Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "driver cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

driver.asm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Disassembly of file :DRIVER.COM ; ; Define common ASCII control codes. ; HT EQU 9 LF EQU 10 FF EQU 12 CR EQU 13 EOF EQU 26 ; ; Define...

2

GLADY CASSIT Y VANDALIA MURPHY CR EEK BU CKHN-CENT URY CLAY  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0, 1997Environment >7,99 Diagram 4.Future:F4:GLADY

3

WH ITNEY CAN YON-CART ER CR K YELLOW CR EEK_WY_D PIN EVIEW AN  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory in Golden, Colorado6 March 21,BOE

4

WH ITNEY CAN YON-CART ER CR K YELLOW CR EEK_WY_D PIN EVIEW AN  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory in Golden, Colorado6 March

5

WH ITNEY CAN YON-CART ER CR K YELLOW CR EEK_WY_D PIN EVIEW AN  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory in Golden, Colorado6 MarchLiquids

6

LOOKOU T U-87 U-70 PEC ONI C COM AN CHE CR EEK U-107 HUGO CLIFF  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0, 1997EnvironmentElectricityrgy81 § ¨ ¦ 81BOELiquidsBOE

7

LOOKOU T U-87 U-70 PEC ONI C COM AN CHE CR EEK U-107 HUGO CLIFF  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0, 1997EnvironmentElectricityrgy81 § ¨ ¦

8

LOOKOU T U-87 U-70 PEC ONI C COM AN CHE CR EEK U-107 HUGO CLIFF  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0, 1997EnvironmentElectricityrgy81 § ¨ ¦Liquids Reserve

9

Spectroscopic Investigation of p-Shell Lambda Hypernuclei by the (e,e'K+) Reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hypernuclear spectroscopy is a powerful tool to investigate Lambda-N interaction. Compared with other Lambda hypernuclei productions, electroproduction via the (e,e'K+) reaction has the advantage of exciting states deeply inside of the hypernucleus and achieving sub-MeV energy resolution. The E05-115 experiment, which was successfully performed in 2009, is the third generation hypernuclear experiment in JLab Hall C. A new splitter magnet and electron spectrometer were installed, and beam energy of 2.344 GeV was selected in this experiment. These new features gave better field uniformity, optics quality and made the ?tilt method? more effective in improving yield-to-background ratio. The magnetic optics of the spectrometers were carefully studied with GEANT simulation, and corrections were applied to compensate for the fringe field cross talk between the compact spectrometer magnets. The non-linear least chi-squared method was used to further calibrate the spectrometer with the events from Lambda, Sigma0 and B12Lambda and uniform magnetic optics as well as precise kinematics were achieved. Several p-shell Lambda hypernuclear spectra, including B12Lambda, Be10Lambda, He7Lambda, were obtained with high energy resolution and good accuracy. For B12Lambda, eight peaks were recognized with the resolution of ~540keV (FWHM), and the ground state binding energy was obtained as 11.529 0.012(stat.) 0.110(syst.) MeV. Be10Lambda, twelve peaks were recognized with the resolution of ~520keV (FWHM), and the binding energy of the ground state was determined as 8.710 0.059(stat.) 0.114(syst.) MeV. For He7Lambda, three peaks were recognized with the resolution of ~730keV, and the ground state binding energy was obtained as 5.510 0.050(stat.) 0.120(syst.) MeV. Compared with the published data of B12Lambda from the JLab Hall A experiment, four extra peaks were fitted and interpreted thanks to the highest ever energy resolution and sufficient statistics. The determined binding energy of Be10Lambda provides new information on charge symmetry breaking effect in the Lambda-N interaction. Compared with the results of He7Lambda from the E01-011 experiment, the ground state position is consistent with 4 times more statistics, and two extra peaks corresponding to excited states were recognized.

Chen, Chunhua [Hampton University

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Driver eye height measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DRIVER EYF HEIGHT MFASHRFMENT A Thesis by ANTHONY DANIEL ABRAHAMSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M Hniversity in partial fulfillment oi the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subje"t: Civil... Engineering DRIVER EYE HEIGHT MEASUREMENT A Thesis by ANTHONY DANIEL ABRAHAMSON Approved as to style and content by: I (C irman of Committee) (Member) (Memb er ) Head of Department) December 1978 ABSTRACT Driver. Eye Height Neasurement. (December...

Abrahamson, Anthony Daniel

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Blanchard Cr JohnsonGulch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dirt yfaceCr Sheep Cr Essex Cr Dic key Cr Paola Cr Cr ystalCr Deerlick Cr Howe Cr M id dle Fork FlatheadRiver Mid dle Fork Bowl C r So u th Fork Scalp Cr West Fork WhistlerCr GraniteCr DodgeCr Flathea d

12

Vehicle Management Driver Safety Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vehicle Management and Driver Safety Program Manual Facilities & Operations / Finance & Administration Version 2 April 2012 #12; 2012 University of Alberta. #12;The Vehicle Management and Driver of employment. Driver Acknowledgement I have received the University of Alberta, Vehicle Management and Driver

Machel, Hans

13

DRIVER RECORD CHECK REQUEST FORM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DRIVER RECORD CHECK REQUEST FORM This form must be submitted to the Sport Clubs Office at least TWO weeks prior to your club's departure and serves as a request for permission to become an approved driver, please email us at sportclb@umn.edu or call 612-625-6017. Driver Information *Enter the following

Amin, S. Massoud

14

Blanchard Cr West Fk Clearwater R  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dirt yfaceCr Sheep Cr Essex Cr Dick ey Cr Paola Cr Cry stalCr Deerlick Cr Howe Cr M id dle Fork FlatheadRiver Mid dle Fork Bowl Cr So u th Fork Scalp Cr West Fork WhistlerCr GraniteCr DodgeCr Flathead

15

Approaches to enhance driver situational assessment aids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Collision warning systems encounter a fundamental trade-off between providing the driver more time in which to respond and alerting the driver unnecessarily. The probability that a driver successfully avoids a hazard ...

Jones, Eric M. (Eric Michael)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Market Drivers for Biofuels  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of EnergyDevelopment Accident Tolerant Fuel: FeCrAlMark Elless,Building

17

MA 125-4 CR PH 105-4 CR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

490-3 CR Mechanical Engineering Design I I Proj Lab Proj Lab MA 125-4 CR Calculus I or Equivalent M MEMA 125-4 CR Calculus I or Equivalent PH 105-4 CR Gen Physics with Calculus MA 126-4 CR Calculus I I or Equivalent M Required Course Elective Course Prerequisite NS M W LAB Proj Lab Natural Science Mathematics

Carver, Jeffrey C.

18

Visualization Drivers for Geant4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This document is on Geant4 visualization tools (drivers), evaluating pros and cons of each option, including recommendations on which tools to support at Fermilab for different applications{\\cite{Daniel}}. Four visualization drivers are evaluated. They are OpenGL, HepRep, DAWN and VRML. They all have good features, OpenGL provides graphic output with out an intermediate file! HepRep provides menus to assist the user. DAWN provides high quality plots and even for large files produces output quickly. VRML uses the smallest disk space for intermediate files. Large experiments at Fermilab will want to write their own display. They should proceed to make this display graphics independent. Medium experiment will probably want to use HepRep because of it's menu support. Smaller scale experiments will want to use OpenGL in the spirit of having immediate response, good quality output and keeping things simple.

Andy Beretvas

2008-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

19

Visualization drivers for Geant4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is on Geant4 visualization tools (drivers), evaluating pros and cons of each option, including recommendations on which tools to support at Fermilab for different applications. Four visualization drivers are evaluated. They are OpenGL, HepRep, DAWN and VRML. They all have good features, OpenGL provides graphic output without an intermediate file. HepRep provides menus to assist the user. DAWN provides high quality plots and even for large files produces output quickly. VRML uses the smallest disk space for intermediate files. Large experiments at Fermilab will want to write their own display. They should proceed to make this display graphics independent. Medium experiment will probably want to use HepRep because of it's menu support. Smaller scale experiments will want to use OpenGL in the spirit of having immediate response, good quality output and keeping things simple.

Beretvas, Andy; /Fermilab

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Oxidation behavior of Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxidation of hypoeutectic Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb alloys containing 6 and 12% Nb at 950 C resulted in formation of a multiproduct scale consisting of a continuous Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} outer layer and an inner region of discrete CrNbO{sub 4} products interspersed with Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Overall oxidation behavior resembled that of Cr as reactions with the Cr-rich phase tended to dominate. Oxidation resistance, in terms of reaction kinetics and scale adherence, increased with increasing volume fraction of the Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb eutectic phase. A model for the oxidation of these alloys based on the growth of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the Cr-rich matrix regions and the formation of a slower growing CrNbO{sub 4} on the Cr{sub 2}Nb-enriched phase can qualitatively explain the development of the multiproduct scale and the observed gravimetric and spallation results. Possible microstructural/compositional modifications to improve oxidation resistance are suggested.

Tortorelli, P.F.; Pint, B.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "driver cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Efficient Driver for Dimmable White LED Lighting.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A high efficiency driver circuit is proposed for Light Emitting Diode (LED) lamps with dimming feature. The current regulation is accomplished by processing partial power (more)

Yang, Wen-ching

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Physics at a Fermilab Proton Driver  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report documents the physics case for building a 2 MW, 8 GeV superconducting linac proton driver at Fermilab.

M. G. Albrow; S. Antusch; K. S. Babu; T. Barnes; A. O. Bazarko; R. H. Bernstein; T. J. Bowles; S. J. Brice; A. Ceccucci; F. Cei; H. W. KCheung; D. C. Christian; J. I. Collar; J. Cooper; P. S. Cooper; A. Curioni; A. deGouvea; F. DeJongh; P. F. Derwent; M. V. Diwan; B. A. Dobrescu; G. J. Feldman; D. A. Finley; B. T. Fleming; S. Geer; G. L. Greene; Y. Grossman; D. A. Harris; C. J. Horowitz; D. W. Hertzog; P. Huber; J. Imazato; A. Jansson; K. P. Jungmann; P. A. Kasper; J. Kersten; S. H. Kettell; Y. Kuno; M. Lindner; M. Mandelkern; W. J. Marciano; W. Melnitchouk; O. Mena; D. G. Michael; J. P. Miller; G. B. Mills; J. G. Morfin; H. Nguyen

2005-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

23

Selected Texas Driver Education Instructors Feelings About A Driver Education Cultural Awareness Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2011 Major Subject: Curriculum and Instruction SELECTED TEXAS DRIVER EDUCATION INSTRUCTORS? FEELINGS ABOUT A DRIVER EDUCATION CULTURAL AWARENESS SURVEY A Thesis by NINA JO.... Davis Maurice E. Dennis Head of Department, Dennie L. Smith May 2011 Major Subject: Curriculum and Instruction iii ABSTRACT Selected Texas Driver Education Instructors? Feelings About A Driver Education Cultural Awareness Survey. (May...

Saint, Nina Jo

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

24

Design consistency and driver error as reflected by driver workload and accident rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESIGN CONSISTENCY AND DRIVER ERROR AS REFLECTED BY DRIVER WORKLOAD AND ACCIDENT RATES A Thesis by MARK DOUGLAS WOOLDRIDGE Approved as to style and content by: Daniel B. Fambro (Chair of Committee) Raymond A. Krammes (Member) Olga J.... Pendleton (Member) James T. P. Yao (Head of Department) May 1992 ABSTRACT Design Consistency and Driver Error as Reflected by Driver Workload and Accident Rates (May 1992) Mark Douglas Wooldridge, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory...

Wooldridge, Mark Douglas

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Construction of a driver-vehicle model and identification of the driver model parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSTRUCTION OF A DRIVER-VEHICLE MODEL AND IDENTIFICATION OF THE DRIVER MODEL PARAMETERS A Thesis by , JEMENG SU Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requiremr nt for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1981 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering CONSTRUCTION OF A DRIVER-VEHICLE MODEL AND IDENTIFICATION OF THE DRIVER MODEL PARAMETERS A Thesis by JEMENG SU Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committe ) / I...

Su, Jemeng

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

E-Print Network 3.0 - active gate driver Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

shadow driver works... Device Drivers Active mode: When drivers fail shadow driver works in active mode. Communication... notification ... Source: Pulfrey, David L. -...

27

Newport Power Meter Drivers CD Installation Software  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Newport Power Meter Drivers CD Installation Software Version 2.3.1 Revision Date: October 16, 2008 IMPORTANT NOTES: The USB drivers on your CD must be installed before the Newport Power Meter is connected to your PC (via USB cable). Manual: The latest manuals for the Newport Power Meters can be found

Kleinfeld, David

28

xDSL line driver design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

xDSL line driver is a very important element in xDSL systems. This thesis proposes a three stage xDSL line driver solution based on a multipath feedforward compensation principle. TSMC 0.8 micro meter high voltage BiCMOS technology is used as a...

Zhang, Xiaoyong

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Physics at an Upgraded Fermilab Proton Driver  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 2004 the Fermilab Long Range Planning Committee identified a new high intensity Proton Driver as an attractive option for the future, primarily motivated by the recent exciting developments in neutrino physics. Over the last few months a physics study has developed the physics case for the Fermilab Proton Driver. The potential physics opportunities are discussed.

S. Geer

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

30

9, 1443714473, 2012 Soil carbon drivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BGD 9, 14437­14473, 2012 Soil carbon drivers and benchmarks in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd if available. Causes of variation in soil carbon predictions from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison #12;BGD 9, 14437­14473, 2012 Soil carbon drivers and benchmarks in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd

Ickert-Bond, Steffi

31

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT MSU DRIVERS SIGNATURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT MSU DRIVERS SIGNATURE Signature 2-9-108, MCA (Statutory Coverage, in lieu-90-(4-20). CERTIFICATE OF INSURANCE X Weather Conditions: ACCIDENT INFORMATION Location: Date: - - 20 Time: : .M. Driver and Risk Management ~ 1160 Research Drive Bozeman, MT 59718 ~ (406) 994-2711 Accident Form #12;OTHER

Dyer, Bill

32

Electronics I 4 cr with Lab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECE 332 Electronics I 4 cr with Lab ECE 370 Signals & Systems 3 cr co ECE 225 Electric Circuits 3 106 - 4 cr General Physics with Calculus CS 116 - 1 cr Intro to Comp. Program. Lab co MATH 227 4 cr cr Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering -- Department of Physics and Astromony

Carver, Jeffrey C.

33

Drivers and Barriers in the Current Concentrated Solar Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Drivers and Barriers in the Current Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) Market (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Drivers and Barriers in the Current...

34

Physics at a New Fermilab Proton Driver  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 2004, motivated by the recent exciting developments in neutrino physics, the Fermilab Long Range Planning Committee identified a new high intensity Proton Driver as an attractive option for the future. At the end of 2004 the APS ``Study on the Physics of Neutrinos'' concluded that the future U.S. neutrino program should have, as one of its components, ``A proton driver in the megawatt class or above and neutrino superbeam with an appropriate very large detector capable of observing CP violation and measuring the neutrino mass-squared differences and mixing parameters with high precision''. The presently proposed Fermilab Proton Driver is designed to accomplish these goals, and is based on, and would help develop, Linear Collider technology. In this paper the Proton Driver parameters are summarized, and the potential physics program is described.

S. Geer

2006-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

35

Physics at a new Fermilab proton driver  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2004, motivated by the recent exciting developments in neutrino physics, the Fermilab Long Range Planning Committee identified a new high intensity Proton Driver as an attractive option for the future. At the end of 2004 the APS ''Study on the Physics of Neutrinos'' concluded that the future US neutrino program should have, as one of its components, ''A proton driver in the megawatt class or above and neutrino superbeam with an appropriate very large detector capable of observing Cp violation and measuring the neutrino mass-squared differences and mixing parameters with high precision''. The presently proposed Fermilab Proton Driver is designed to accomplish these goals, and is based on, and would help develop, Linear Collider technology. In this paper the Proton Driver parameters are summarized, and the potential physics program is described.

Geer, Steve; /Fermilab

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

A Landscape of Driver Mutations in Melanoma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Despite recent insights into melanoma genetics, systematic surveys for driver mutations are challenged by an abundance of passenger mutations caused by carcinogenic UV light exposure. We developed a permutation-based ...

Lander, Eric S.

37

Carbon Price Drivers:Carbon Price Drivers:Carbon Price Drivers:Carbon Price Drivers: AAAAnnnn UpdatedUpdatedUpdatedUpdated Literature ReviewLiterature ReviewLiterature ReviewLiterature Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as unexpected fluctuations in energy demand, energy prices (e.g., oil, gas, coal) and weather conditions1 Carbon Price Drivers:Carbon Price Drivers:Carbon Price Drivers:Carbon Price Drivers: AAAAnnnn the factors that shape the price of carbon, where one European Union Allowance is equal to one ton of CO2

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

38

Nanoscale Phase Separation In Epitaxial Cr-Mo and Cr-V Alloy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Separation In Epitaxial Cr-Mo and Cr-V Alloy Thin Films Studied Using Atom Probe Tomography: Comparison Of Nanoscale Phase Separation In Epitaxial Cr-Mo and Cr-V Alloy Thin Films...

39

Mathematics Required Courses Cr. Semester Gr.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discrete Mathematics 3 Math 321 or Math 421 Applied Stat. Methods Stat. Theory I 3 Elective Course* Cr Student: ID# Catalog: Advisor Upper Division Courses* Required Courses Cr. Semester Gr. *20 cr

Delene, David J.

40

Detection of Driver Fatigue Caused by Sleep Deprivation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper aims to provide reliable indications of driver drowsiness based on the characteristics of driver-vehicle interaction. A test bed was built under a simulated driving environment, and a total of 12 subjects ...

Coughlin, Joseph F.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "driver cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Effects of Single versus Multiple Warnings on Driver Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Objective: To explore how a single master alarm system affects drivers responses when compared to multiple, distinct warnings. Background: Advanced driver warning systems are intended to improve safety, yet inappropriate ...

Cummings, M. L.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Solar Supply Chain and Market Driver Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study aims to explore the evolution of the photovoltaic supply chain in the United States and the drivers which foster growth of the solar market. The study will gather knowledge on the growth of the solar market and roles of different firms...

Martinez, Nicholas 1990-

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

43

MOTOR VEHICLE USE PROGRAM DRIVER SAFETY TIPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MOTOR VEHICLE USE PROGRAM DRIVER SAFETY TIPS Observe Speed Limits and Traffic Laws Allow - Employees who drive Institute or privately owned vehicles on Institute business must possess and carry person. Insurance - Employees who operate their privately owned vehicles on Institute business shall

44

Tank monitor and control system (TMACS) software project Westronics Driver acceptance test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The acceptance test for the Westronics driver. This driver connects the Westronics Smart Multiplexer with the TMACS monitoring system.

Glasscock, J.A.

1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

45

Improvement of SOFC Electrodes through Catalyst Infiltration & Control of Cr Volatilization from FeCr Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation discusses the improvement of SOFC electrodes through catalyst infiltration and control of Cr volatilization from FeCr components.

Visco, S.J.; Jacobson, C.; Kurokawa, H.; Sholklapper, T.; Lu, C.; De Jonghe, L.

2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

46

Underpinning Mathematics/Science: (min 40 cr) Mathematics (16 cr)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials Science and Engineering BS Degree Requirements for students beginning in or after Fall 2011 04 324 Introductory Applied Statistics for Engineers Physics (10 cr) Phys 201 or Phys 207 or Phys 247 Modern Physics for Engineers Phys 235 Introduction to Solid State Electronics Phys 241 Intro to Modern

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

47

Drivers of Commercial Building Operator Skills  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0 Drivers of Commercial Building Operator Skills C&W OVERVIEW C&W SUSTAINABILITY STRATEGIES GROUP WHAT?S DRIVING THE NEED FOR TRAINING? NECESSARY SKILLS & KNOWLEDGE C&W DEVELOPMENT & TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES International Conference... ? Managerial skills ? Market knowledge ? Building certifications ? Energy Star, LEED ? Industry resources 9 C&W TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES ? C&W Training and Support programs ? C&W Green Practice Policies ? LEED Green Associate and AP...

Domanski, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Alternative Fuel Driver Training Companion Manual  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DiggFederalNationalandElectric-driveMobile*Drivers

49

al cd cr: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

junctions with CrFe and CrFeCr barriers. Although the exact... Robinson, J. W. A.; Banerjee, N.; Blamire, M. G. 2014-03-05 134 SEM CR GRADE Intro to Chem Eng 1 Engineering...

50

Improved gauge driver for the generalized harmonic Einstein system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new gauge driver is introduced for the generalized harmonic (GH) representation of Einstein's equation. This new driver allows a rather general class of gauge conditions to be implemented in a way that maintains the hyperbolicity of the combined evolution system. This driver is more stable and effective and, unlike previous drivers, allows stable evolutions using the dual-frame evolution technique. Appropriate boundary conditions for this new gauge driver are constructed, and a new boundary condition for the 'gauge' components of the spacetime metric in the GH Einstein system is introduced. The stability and effectiveness of this new gauge driver are demonstrated through numerical tests, which impose a new damped-wave gauge condition on the evolutions of single black-hole spacetimes.

Lindblom, Lee; Szilagyi, Bela [Theoretical Astrophysics 350-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

An Improved Gauge Driver for the Generalized Harmonic Einstein System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new gauge driver is introduced for the generalized harmonic (GH) representation of Einstein's equation. This new driver allows a rather general class of gauge conditions to be implemented in a way that maintains the hyperbolicity of the combined evolution system. This driver is more stable and effective, and unlike previous drivers, allows stable evolutions using the dual-frame evolution technique. Appropriate boundary conditions for this new gauge driver are constructed, and a new boundary condition for the ``gauge'' components of the spacetime metric in the GH Einstein system is introduced. The stability and effectiveness of this new gauge driver are demonstrated through numerical tests, which impose a new damped-wave gauge condition on the evolutions of single black-hole spacetimes.

Lee Lindblom; Bela Szilagyi

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Fieldbus Device Drivers for Accelerator Control at DESY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to interface the DESY fieldbus adapter, SEDAC (SErial Data Acquisition and Control system), a full duplex device driver was developed for the Windows NT, Linux, VxWorks, and Solaris operating systems. Detailed driver development issues as well as a common user interface will be presented, along with a comparison of the device drivers among the different operating systems. In particular, we shall present benchmark results concerning general performance as well as ease of development.

H. G. Wu

2001-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

53

Market Drivers for Biofuels | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy HealthComments MEMA: CommentsEnergy 13,Combined Heat &Market Drivers

54

Driver Circuit for White LED Lamps with TRIAC Dimming Control.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??An efficient Light Emitting Diode (LED) lamp driver circuit is proposed for retrofitting the conventionally used incandescent lamps with existing TRIAC dimmer. The dimming feature (more)

Weng, Szu-Jung

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

High Temperature, High Voltage Fully Integrated Gate Driver Circuit  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

driver circuit, 5-V on- chip voltage regulator, short-circuit protection, undervoltage lockout, bootstrap capacitor, dead time controller and temperature sensor * 0.8-micron,...

56

Neutrino oscillation physics with a FNAL proton driver  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the need of a proton driver for the Fermilab neutrino oscillation program, as well as its role in the global context.

Walter Winter

2005-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

57

Analyzing Fuel Saving Opportunities through Driver Feedback Mechanisms...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Fuel Saving Opportunities through Driver Feedback Mechanisms 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

58

CLAIMANT AUTO ACCIDENT REPORT For Completion by Driver  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLAIMANT AUTO ACCIDENT REPORT For Completion by Driver D E P A R T M E N T O F A D M I N I S T R Address City State Zip For what purpose was car being used at time of accident? Has damage been repaired signals did you give? Other Driver? Who investigated? Who Cited and Why? Describe Accident CONTINUE

Tullos, Desiree

59

I. NANOSCIENCE COURSE REQUIREMENTS CR A. Communication Skills (8 cr.) CR APSC-101 Applied Science Profession I 1 ENGL-101 Freshman English Composition Required OR 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I. NANOSCIENCE COURSE REQUIREMENTS CR A. Communication Skills (8 cr.) CR APSC-101 Applied Science OF SCIENCE Concentration in Nanoscience University of Wisconsin-Stout 2010-2011 #12;I. MATERIALS SCIENCE

Wu, Mingshen

60

E-Print Network 3.0 - averaging ic drivers Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ic drivers Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: averaging ic drivers Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Simultaneous Driver and Wire Sizing for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "driver cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Thermodynamics of Cr2O3, FeCr2O4, ZnCr2O4 and CoCr2O4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High temperature heat capacity measurements were obtained for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, ZnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} and CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} using a differential scanning calorimeter. These data were combined with previously-available, overlapping heat capacity data at temperatures up to 400 K and fitted to 5-parameter Maier-Kelley C{sub p}(T) equations. Expressions for molar entropy were then derived by suitable integration of the Maier-Kelley equations in combination with recent S{sup o}(298) evaluations. Finally, a database of high temperature equilibrium measurements on the formation of these oxides was constructed and critically evaluated. Gibbs energies of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} and CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} were referenced by averaging the most reliable results at reference temperatures of 1100, 1400 and 1373 K, respectively, while Gibbs energies for ZnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} were referenced to the results of Jacob [Thermochim. Acta 15 (1976) 79-87] at 1100 K. Thermodynamic extrapolations from the high temperature reference points to 298.15 K by application of the heat capacity correlations gave {Delta}{sub f}G{sup o}(298) = -1049.96, -1339.40, -1428.35 and -1326.75 kJ mol{sup -1} for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, ZnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} and CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively.

Ziemniak SE, Anovitz LM, Castelli RA, Porter WD

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

62

Cyclotrons as Drivers for Precision Neutrino Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As we enter the age of precision measurement in neutrino physics, improved flux sources are required. These must have a well-defined flavor content with energies in ranges where backgrounds are low and cross section knowledge is high. Very few sources of neutrinos can meet these requirements. However, pion/muon and isotope decay-at-rest sources qualify. The ideal drivers for decay-at-rest sources are cyclotron accelerators, which are compact and relatively inexpensive. This paper describes a scheme to produce decay-at-rest sources driven by such cyclotrons, developed within the DAEdALUS program. Examples of the value of the high precision beams for pursuing Beyond Standard Model interactions are reviewed. New results on a combined DAEdALUS--Hyper-K search for CP-violation that achieve errors on the mixing matrix parameter of 4 degrees to 12 degrees are presented.

A. Adelmann; J. Alonso; W. A. Barletta; J. M. Conrad; M. H. Shaevitz; J. Spitz; M. Toups; L. A. Winslow

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

63

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis identifies driver Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: analysis identifies driver Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Improving the Reliability of Commodity Operating Summary: 12;Summary I identified properties of drivers...

64

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced driver assistance Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: advanced driver assistance Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Recovering Device Drivers MICHAEL M. SWIFT, MUTHUKARUPPAN ANNAMALAI, BRIAN N. BERSHAD, Summary: Recovering...

65

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced driver information systems Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: advanced driver information systems Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Recovering Device Drivers MICHAEL M. SWIFT, MUTHUKARUPPAN ANNAMALAI, BRIAN N. BERSHAD, Summary: systems,...

66

E-Print Network 3.0 - active-load laser driver Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alternative Alternative Summary: ConceptsOther IFE Driver Concepts 9 HOW INERTIAL FUSION WORKS DIODE-PUMPED SOLID-STATE LASER DRIVER Using... National Laboratory. KRYPTON-FLUORIDE...

67

Threat assessment design for driver assistance system at intersections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper considers the decision-making problem for a human-driven vehicle crossing a road intersection in the presence of other, potentially errant, drivers. Our approach relies on a novel threat assessment module, which ...

Aoude, Georges

68

FlightCrew Browser : a safe browser for drivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drivers have information needs they want to solve while driving, but current mobile browser interfaces can bring forth safety issues when users browse the web even though their attention is required elsewhere, as it is ...

Lpez-Pineda, Andrs Humberto

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

A Survey of Taxi Drivers Aberrant Driving Behavior in Beijing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Taxis are an important component in Beijing's urban integrated transport system. They provide passengers with convenient, comfortable, and efficient service. However, aberrant driving behaviors occur frequently among Beijing taxi drivers, leading...

Shi, Jing; Tao, Li; Li, Xiaoyue; Xiao, Yao; Atchley, Paul

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

70

An affective intelligent driving agent: driver's trajectory and activities prediction.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The traditional relationship between the car, driver, and city can be described as waypoint navigation with additional traffic and maintenance information. The car can receive and store waypoint information, find the ...

Ratti, Carlo

71

Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and magnetization interaction reversal. Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and...

72

AVTA: 2010 Honda CR-Z Hybrid Downloadable Dynamometer Database...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

CR-Z Hybrid Downloadable Dynamometer Database Reports AVTA: 2010 Honda CR-Z Hybrid Downloadable Dynamometer Database Reports The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle...

73

Alternative highway sign alphabet styles for older drivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ALTERNATIVE HIGHWAY SIGN ALPHABET STYLES FOR OLDER DRIVERS A Thesis by Carol Hannah Tan Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... (Member) Jame T. . Yao (Head of partment) May 1991 ABSTRACT Alternative Highway Sign Alphabet Styles for Older Drivers. (May 1991) Carol Hannah Tan, B. S. , Texas A8 M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Daniel B. Farnbro In the United...

Tan, Carol Hannah

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report recaps the "Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance" workshop, held in late 2011. This exploratory workshop's goal was to discuss and address challenges for the next generation of magnetic resonance experimentation. During the workshop, participants from throughout the world outlined the science drivers and instrumentation demands for high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and associated magnetic resonance techniques, discussed barriers to their advancement, and deliberated the path forward for significant and impactful advances in the field.

Mueller, Karl T.; Pruski, Marek; Washton, Nancy M.; Lipton, Andrew S.

2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

75

Holifield!Radioactive!Ion!Beam!Facility! Cyclotron!Driver!White!Paper!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Holifield!Radioactive!Ion!Beam!Facility! Cyclotron!Driver!White!Paper! ! ! ! ! prepared) driver. The quantitative details of both project cost and facility performance have changed as planning as the driver. Consequently performance is often compared to that of the electron driver concept. If we were re

76

Driver Models For Timing And Noise Analysis Bogdan Tutuianu and Ross Baldick  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Driver Models For Timing And Noise Analysis Bogdan Tutuianu and Ross Baldick Abstract errors. This paper presents a new technique to generate accurate non-linear driver models which can driver is holding low or high, the driver is correctly approximated by a linear (RC) model

Baldick, Ross

77

CR-B-02-01.PDF  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

CR-B-02-01 AUDIT REPORT FIXED-PRICE CONTRACTING FOR DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CLEANUP ACTIVITIES OCTOBER 2001 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT...

78

CR-B-02-02.PUB  

Energy Savers [EERE]

CR-B-02-02 AUDIT REPORT U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES PROCUREMENT ADMINISTRATION AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY AUGUST 2002 U....

79

Analyzing Vehicle Fuel Saving Opportunities through Intelligent Driver Feedback  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Driving style changes, e.g., improving driver efficiency and motivating driver behavior changes, could deliver significant petroleum savings. This project examines eliminating stop-and-go driving and unnecessary idling, and also adjusting acceleration rates and cruising speeds to ideal levels to quantify fuel savings. Such extreme adjustments can result in dramatic fuel savings of over 30%, but would in reality only be achievable through automated control of vehicles and traffic flow. In real-world driving, efficient driving behaviors could reduce fuel use by 20% on aggressively driven cycles and by 5-10% on more moderately driven trips. A literature survey was conducted of driver behavior influences, and pertinent factors from on-road experiments with different driving styles were observed. This effort highlighted important driver influences such as surrounding vehicle behavior, anxiety over trying to get somewhere quickly, and the power/torque available from the vehicle. Existing feedback approaches often deliver efficiency information and instruction. Three recommendations for maximizing fuel savings from potential drive cycle improvement are: (1) leveraging applications with enhanced incentives, (2) using an approach that is easy and widely deployable to motivate drivers, and (3) utilizing connected vehicle and automation technologies to achieve large and widespread efficiency improvements.

Gonder, J.; Earleywine, M.; Sparks, W.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Triplet pair correlations and nonmonotonic supercurrent decay with Cr thickness in Nb/Cr/Fe/Nb Josephson devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

roughness and interdiffusion, an antiferromagnetic spin density wave (SDW) state can still form in Cr close to the interface. Here, we show evidence for triplet pair correlations in Josephson junctions with Cr/Fe and Cr/Fe/Cr barriers. Although the exact...

Robinson, J. W. A.; Banerjee, N.; Blamire, M. G.

2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "driver cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

BEAM SIMULATIONS USING VIRTUAL DIAGNOSTICS FOR THE DRIVER LINAC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

End-to-end beam simulations for the driver linac have shown that the design meets the necessary performance requirements including having adequate transverse and longitudinal acceptances. However, to achieve reliable operational performance, the development of appropriate beam diagnostic systems and control room procedures are crucial. With limited R&D funding, beam simulations provide a cost effective tool to evaluate candidate beam diagnostic systems and to provide a critical basis for developing early commissioning and later operational activities. We propose to perform beam dynamic studies and engineering analyses to define the requisite diagnostic systems of the driver linac and through simulation to develop and test commissioning and operational procedures.

R. C. York; X. Wu; Q. Zhao

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

82

-delayed proton emission branches in 43Cr  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The + decay of very neutron-deficient 43Cr was studied by means of an imaging time projection chamber that allowed recording tracks of charged particles. Events of -delayed emission of one, two, and three protons were clearly identified. The absolute branching ratios for these channels were determined to be (81 4)%, (7.1 0.4)%, and (0.08 0.03)%, respectively. 43Cr is thus established as the second case in which the -3p decay occurs. Although the feeding to the proton-bound states in 43V is expected to be negligible, the large branching ratio of (12 4)% for decays without proton emission is found.

Pomorski, M. [University of Warsaw; Miernik, K. [University of Warsaw; Dominik, W. [University of Warsaw; Janas, Z. [University of Warsaw; Pfutzner, M. [University of Warsaw; Bingham, C. R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Czyrkowski, H. [University of Warsaw; Cwiok, Mikolaj [Warsaw University; Darby, Iain [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Dabrowski, Ryszard [Warsaw University; Ginter, T. N. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz [ORNL; Karny, M. [University of Warsaw; Korgul, A. [University of Warsaw; Kusmierz, W. [University of Warsaw; Liddick, Sean [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rajabali, M. M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Stolz, A. [Michigan State University, East Lansing

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Assessment of older driver understanding of certain traffic control devices in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this research was to assess older Texas drivers on their understanding of nine traffic control devices and identify the devices that are misunderstood by people 65 years and older. Additionally, older driver education programs were...

Hulett, Stephanie Renee

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Evaluation of driver braking performance to an unexpected object in the roadway  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

components, specifically whether the equation accurately reflects driver and vehicle behaviors during a braking maneuver. This research evaluated the two components of the SSD equation. Four field studies were conducted that evaluated driver braking...

Picha, Dale Louis

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Comparative Oncogenomic Analysis of Copy Number Alterations in Human and Zebrafish Tumors Enables Cancer Driver Discovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The identification of cancer drivers is a major goal of current cancer research. Finding driver genes within large chromosomal events is especially challenging because such alterations encompass many genes. Previously, we ...

Zhang, GuangJun

86

Final Report on the Fuel Saving Effectiveness of Various Driver Feedback Approaches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report quantifies the fuel-savings opportunities from specific driving behavior changes, identifies factors that influence drivers' receptiveness to adopting fuel-saving behaviors, and assesses various driver feedback approaches.

Gonder, J.; Earleywine, M.; Sparks, W.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Integrating Concurrency Control and Energy Management in Device Drivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrating Concurrency Control and Energy Management in Device Drivers Kevin Klues , Vlado@cs.berkeley.edu dgay@intel-research.net Abstract Energy management is a critical concern in wireless sensornets. De- spite its importance, sensor network operating systems today pro- vide minimal energy management support

Levis, Philip

88

The Drivers of Mergers and Acquisitions in Pharmaceutical Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the determinants and drivers of 112 mergers and acquisitions (M&A) activities exceed 50 million values in the pharmaceutical industry using COMPUSTAT, SDC and FDA data during the period 1980-2010 with random effect logit model. We find...

Ji, Fan

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

89

Termites, elephants and fire are key drivers of tree mortality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mortality: 2 dominated by elephant damage, 2 by termite attack and 1 by fire. Wind and human activity wereTermites, elephants and fire are key drivers of tree mortality 5 plots suffered substantial tree not major causes of tree mortality. Sample sizes are too small to reasonably determine the most significant

90

Next Story > SC DMV lifting drivers' suspensions this week  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The State Next Story > SC DMV lifting drivers' suspensions this week Researcher: Zombie fads peak COLUMBIA, S.C. -- Zombies seem to be everywhere these days. In the popular TV series "The Walking Dead at the University of California at Davis. Lauro said she keeps track of zombie movies, TV shows and video games

Duchowski, Andrew T.

91

Caution, drivers! Children present. Traffic, pollution, and infant health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

air pollution levels on infant health? Our setting is California (with a focus on the Central ValleyCaution, drivers! Children present. Traffic, pollution, and infant health Christopher R. Knittel driving (and especially congestion) on ambient air pollution levels; and (2) what is the impact of modern

Rothman, Daniel

92

Socioeconomic Drivers of Deforestation in the Northern Ecuadorian Amazon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH Socioeconomic Drivers of Deforestation in the Northern Ecuadorian Amazon CARLOS F. MENA the predictions of future deforestation, which is especially important in the Amazon basin, where large tracts to address this lack of understanding. Its objectives are (a) to quantify deforestation in the Northern

McClain, Michael

93

Improved gauge driver for the generalized harmonic Einstein system Lee Lindblom and Bela Szilagyi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improved gauge driver for the generalized harmonic Einstein system Lee Lindblom and Be´la Szila´gyi

Lindblom, Lee

94

Morphology, deformation, and defect structures of TiCr{sub 2} in Ti-Cr alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The morphologies and defect structures of TiCr{sub 2} in several Ti-Cr alloys have been examined by optical metallography, x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), in order to explore the room-temperature deformability of the Laves phase TiCr{sub 2}. The morphology of the Laves phase was found to be dependent upon alloy composition and annealing temperature. Samples deformed by compression have also been studied using TEM. Comparisons of microstructures before and after deformation suggest an increase in twin, stacking fault, and dislocation density within the Laves phase, indicating some but not extensive room-temperature deformability.

Chen, K.C.; Allen, S.M.; Livingston, J.D.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

Testing Closed-Source Binary Device Drivers with DDT Volodymyr Kuznetsov, Vitaly Chipounov, and George Candea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Testing Closed-Source Binary Device Drivers with DDT Volodymyr Kuznetsov, Vitaly Chipounov (EPFL), Switzerland Abstract DDT is a system for testing closed-source binary de- vice drivers against think of it as a pesticide against device driver bugs. DDT combines virtualization with a spe- cialized

Candea, George

96

Journal of Transportation Engineering Modelling Automobile Driver's Toll-Lane Choice Behaviour at a Toll Plaza  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Transportation Engineering Modelling Automobile Driver's Toll-Lane Choice Behaviour at a Toll Plaza --Manuscript Draft-- Manuscript Number: TEENG-1181R3 Full Title: Modelling Automobile Driver to develop a random utility based discrete multinomial choice model for the behaviour of automobile drivers

Kundu, Debasis

97

The physics issues that determine inertial confinement fusion target gain and driver requirements: A tutorial*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The physics issues that determine inertial confinement fusion target gain and driver requirements ``bookkeeping'' of input parametrized by ICF drivers' coupling efficiencies to the target, and subsequent requirements will be discussed for both the direct drive driver impinging directly on the target and indirect

98

Electronic copy available at: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1647901 Improving Empirical Estimation of Demographic Drivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Demographic Drivers: Fertility, Child Mortality & Malaria Ecology Gordon C. McCorda Columbia University Dalton of Demographic Drivers: Fertility, Child Mortality & Malaria Ecology Abstract Much of Africa has yet to go. Results show that child mortality is a powerfully robust driver of fertility behavior. Meeting

99

A method for calibration of bone driver transducers to measure the mastoid impedance Reggie Weecea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bone vibrator transducers for clinical measurements, the transfer of energy from the bone driver by known masses. This absolute calibration is based upon a circuit model of the driver, describing specialized equipment not available in the clinic, and a refined bone driver circuit model is proposed

Allen, Jont

100

Research Paper A method for calibration of bone driver transducers to measure the mastoid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vibrator transducers for clinical measurements, the transfer of energy from the bone driver depends. This absolute calibration is based upon a circuit model of the driver, describing it with three frequency in the clinic, and a refined bone driver circuit model is proposed to better capture the observed behaviors. ?

Allen, Jont

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "driver cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

NUREG/CR-6870 Consideration of Geochemical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Groundwater Restoration at Uranium In-Situ Leach Mining Facilities Manuscript Completed: December 2006 Date associated with uranium mining sites throughout the United States are also included in this report. A tableNUREG/CR-6870 Consideration of Geochemical Issues in Groundwater Restoration at Uranium In

102

E-Print Network 3.0 - aceros al cr-mo-v Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

G. F. Janssens, Dierk Raabe, Ernst Kozeschnik, Mark A. Miodownik, Summary: , ,,Dissimilar 2.25Cr-9Cr and 2Cr-0.5CrMoV steel welds, I. Characterisation of the weld zone and...

103

Gauge Drivers for the Generalized Harmonic Einstein Equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The generalized harmonic representation of Einstein's equation is manifestly hyperbolic for a large class of gauge conditions. Unfortunately most of the useful gauges developed over the past several decades by the numerical relativity community are incompatible with the hyperbolicity of the equations in this form. This paper presents a new method of imposing gauge conditions that preserves hyperbolicity for a much wider class of conditions, including as special cases many of the standard ones used in numerical relativity: e.g., K-freezing, Gamma-freezing, Bona-Masso slicing, conformal Gamma-drivers, etc. Analytical and numerical results are presented which test the stability and the effectiveness of this new gauge driver evolution system.

Lee Lindblom; Keith D. Matthews; Oliver Rinne; Mark A. Scheel

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

104

Simple SPICE model for comparison of CMOS output driver circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to monitor the ground nodes of output driver circuits for noise. Both relative performance and noise levels are generated through the simulations. A test device was built to confirm that the model was effective in speed and noise comparisons. Values were... on CMOS technologies. Journal model is IEEE 'I?ansactions on Automatic Control. A. Literature Survey Research has been done in the past concerning noise generated by digital logic de- vices. In particular, Advanced CMOS Logic (ACL) integrated circuits...

Hermann, John Karl

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

A study of driver behavior on freeway entrance ramps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF SCIENCE August 1961 Major Subject: Civil Engineering A STUDY OF DRIVER BEHAVIOR ON FREEWAY ENTRANCE RAMPS A Thesis By FRED HUNTLEY EDWARDS Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee Head of Department August 1961 TABLE... to the problem would be to provide a design which would encourage proper usage of the freeway ramp. At a 1960 meeting of The American Society of Civil Engineers, Mr. Charles Pinnell presented a paper in which he proposed the freeway entrance design shown...

Edwards, Fred Huntley

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

CW high intensity non-scaling FFAG proton drivers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accelerators are playing increasingly important roles in basic science, technology, and medicine including nuclear power, industrial irradiation, material science, and neutrino production. Proton and light-ion accelerators in particular have many research, energy and medical applications, providing one of the most effective treatments for many types of cancer. Ultra high-intensity and high-energy (GeV) proton drivers are a critical technology for accelerator-driven sub-critical reactors (ADS) and many HEP programs (Muon Collider). These high-intensity GeV-range proton drivers are particularly challenging, encountering duty cycle and space-charge limits in the synchrotron and machine size concerns in the weaker-focusing cyclotrons; a 10-20 MW proton driver is not presently considered technically achievable with conventional re-circulating accelerators. One, as-yet, unexplored re-circulating accelerator, the Fixed-field Alternating Gradient, or FFAG, is an attractive alternative to the cyclotron. Its strong focusing optics are expected to mitigate space charge effects, and a recent innovation in design has coupled stable tunes with isochronous orbits, making the FFAG capable of fixed-frequency, CW acceleration, as in the classical cyclotron. This paper reports on these new advances in FFAG accelerator technology and references advanced modeling tools for fixed-field accelerators developed for and unique to the code COSY INFINITY.

Johnstone, C.; /Fermilab; Berz, M.; Makino, K.; /Michigan State U.; Snopok, P.; /IIT, Chicago

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Ferroelectric plasma sources for NDCX-II and heavy ion drivers E.P. Gilson a,n  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ferroelectric plasma sources for NDCX-II and heavy ion drivers E.P. Gilson a,n , R.C. Davidson for plasma sources for driver applications. Plasma sources for drivers will need to be highly reliable using beams with high perveances that are relevant to heavy ion fusion driver systems, the facility

Gilson, Erik

108

Cr-doped scandium borate laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A broadly wavelength-tunable laser is provided which comprises as the laser medium a single crystal of MBO.sub.3 :Cr.sup.3+, where M is selected from the group of Sc, In and Lu. The laser may be operated over a broad temperature range from cryogenic temperatures to elevated temperatures. Emission is in a spectral range from red to infrared, and the laser is useful in the fields of defense, communications, isotope separation, photochemistry, etc.

Chai, Bruce H. (Bridgewater, NJ); Lai, Shui T. (Florham Park, NJ); Long, Margaret N. (Landing, NJ)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Carbon migration in 5Cr-0.5Mo/21Cr-12Ni dissimilar metal welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The carbon migration between a ferritic steel and an austenitic steel was studied in submerged arc-welded 5Cr-0.5Mo/21Cr-12Ni dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) after aging at 500 C for various times and after long-term service in technical practice. The distribution of carbon, chromium, nickel, and iron in the areas around the weld interface was determined by electron probe microanalysis, and the microstructural aspect in the carbon-depleted/enriched zone was characterized by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, the precipitation sequences and composition characteristics of the carbides were identified by diffraction pattern microanalysis and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis. It was found (1) that there exists a coherent relationship between intracrystalline M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and the austenitic matrix; (2) that the composition of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} in the carbon-enriched zone is independent of the duration of aging and service; (3) that the maximum carbon concentration is determined by the carbide type, the composition characteristic of precipitated carbides, and the concentration of carbide-forming Cr adjacent to the weld interface in the carbon-enriched zone; and (4) that the carbon migration in the 5Cr-0.5Mo/21Cr-12Ni DMWs can be described by a diffusion model.

Huang, M.L.; Wang, L. [Dalian Univ. of Technology (China). Dept. of Materials Engineering

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

The effects of driver gas contamination on shock tube test time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTS OF DRIVER GAS CONTAMINATION ON SHOCK TUBE TEST TIME A Thesis by CARRY OWEN HAWKINS Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Memb e r) (Member) (Member) (Membe r) (Member) December 1970... AB S TRACT The Effects of Driver Gas Contamination on Shock Tube Test Time. (December 1970) Garry 0. Hawkins, B. S. , Texas A&M University; Directed by: Dr. Richard E. Thomas The effects of driver gas contamination are manifested in a change...

Hawkins, Garry Owen

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Time Step Size Limitation Introduced by the BSSN Gamma Driver  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many mesh refinement simulations currently performed in numerical relativity counteract instabilities near the outer boundary of the simulation domain either by changes to the mesh refinement scheme or by changes to the gauge condition. We point out that the BSSN Gamma Driver gauge condition introduces a time step size limitation in a similar manner as a CFL condition, but which is independent of the spatial resolution. We give a didactic explanation of this issue, show why especially mesh refinement simulations suffer from it, and point to a simple remedy.

Erik Schnetter

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

112

ECOdriving - Widespread Implementation for Learner Drivers and Licensed  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified as ASHRAEDuval County, Texas:EECO2 AssetDrivers (ECOWILL)

113

U-226: Linux Kernel SFC Driver TCP MSS Option Handling Denial...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The vulnerability is caused due to an error in the Solarflare network driver (driversnetethernetsfctx.c) when handling TCP segments and can be exploited via a...

114

Detecting motorcycles in road scenes: differences between car drivers and motorcyclists.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Many motorcycle right of way violations are believed to be a result of low conspicuity and a failure to perceive the motorcycle. Drivers with previous (more)

Khashawi, Fadhel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Philips Light Sources & Electronics is Developing an Efficient, Smaller, Cost-Effective Family of LED Drivers  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

With the help of DOE funding, Philips Light Sources & Electronics is developing a new family of LED drivers that are more efficient and cost-effective as well as smaller in size than currently available drivers. The new drivers are switch-mode power supplies that are similar to today's drivers, but with an improved design. In addition, they have a different topologyboost plus LLCfor wattages of 40W and above, but they retain the commonly used flyback topology at lower wattages.

116

The following 24 credits are required. Course Cr Semester Course Cr Semester  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fundamentals of Pest Management 3 Soil and Water Science Minor 15 credits required Course Cr Required SWS Agriculture & Environmental Quality 3 SWS2007 World of Water 3 SWS2008 Humans, Soils, & Environmental Impact 3 SWS3023L Soil Judging 2 SWS4116 Environmental Nutrient Management 3 SWS4223 Environmental

Watson, Craig A.

117

CR mammography: Design and implementation of a quality control program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the recent acquisition of significant quantities of computed radiography CR equipment for mammography, Mexican regulations do not specify the performance requirements for digital systems such as those of CR type. The design of a quality control program QCP specific for CR mammography systems was thus considered relevant. International protocols were taken as reference to define tests, procedures and acceptance criteria. The designed QCP was applied in three CR mammography facilities. Important deficiencies in spatial resolution, noise, image receptor homogeneity, artifacts and breast thickness compensation were detected.

Moreno-Ramirez, A.; Brandan, M. E.; Villasenor-Navarro, Y.; Galvan, H. A.; Ruiz-Trejo, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, DF 04510 (Mexico); Departamento de Radiodiagnostico, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, DF 14080 (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, DF 04510 (Mexico)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

118

UWB multi-burst transmit driver for averaging receivers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multi-burst transmitter for ultra-wideband (UWB) communication systems generates a sequence of precisely spaced RF bursts from a single trigger event. There are two oscillators in the transmitter circuit, a gated burst rate oscillator and a gated RF burst or RF power output oscillator. The burst rate oscillator produces a relatively low frequency, i.e., MHz, square wave output for a selected transmit cycle, and drives the RF burst oscillator, which produces RF bursts of much higher frequency, i.e., GHz, during the transmit cycle. The frequency of the burst rate oscillator sets the spacing of the RF burst packets. The first oscillator output passes through a bias driver to the second oscillator. The bias driver conditions, e.g., level shifts, the signal from the first oscillator for input into the second oscillator, and also controls the length of each RF burst. A trigger pulse actuates a timing circuit, formed of a flip-flop and associated reset time delay circuit, that controls the operation of the first oscillator, i.e., how long it oscillates (which defines the transmit cycle).

Dallum, Gregory E

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

119

Gaz de France ordering high-efficiency drivers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For natural gas transmission, distribution, and storage operations, Gaz de France is installing Creusot-Loire's new line of high-efficiency gas-turbine packages, powered by Allison 501 and 570 generators for compressor speeds exceeding 10,000 rpm. The Type CA.3 driver comprises a 501 generator coupled to a two-stage power turbine; the ISO base rating is 3265 kW on gas fuel with a heat rate of 12,050 Btu/kWhr. The CA.5 driver with the stronger 570 gas-turbine engine is base-rated at 4805 kW with a heat rate of 11,360 Btu/kWhr. Designed for direct-drive, with no intermediary gearing, the high-speed compressor operates on the 13,820-rpm output shaft speed of the CA.3 for baseload requirements or on 11,500 rpm for the more powerful CA.5 set. These compressor packages will serve as boosters for the transmission and storage of regasified LNG from Algeria and natural gas from the North Sea, USSR, and France's own Lacq fields.

de Biasi, V.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Risk-assessment-methodology development for waste isolation in geologic media. Technical review of documents NUREG/CR-0394, NUREG/CR-0424, NUREG/CR-0458  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of five documents that were prepared for the USNRC by Sandia Laboratories is presented in this report. The documents covered in the present review include: NUREG/CR-1262, NUREG/CR-1376, NUREG/CR-1377, NUREG/CR-1397 and NUREG/CR-1608. This constitutes the second phase of the review; the first phase was reported in Volume 1 of NUREG/CR-1672, November 1980. Two of the documents concern simplified computational methods illustrative of the calculations necessary to produce a response surface. Three of the reports pertain to statistical methods, including the application of Latin hypercube Sampling (LHS). The following observations have been made relative to the above reports: (1) the reports are, in general, difficult to read, due, in part, to unnecessarily complicated notation and lack of adequate explanation and examples, (2) the relationship of the work to similar work in the US and abroad is not discussed, and (3) limitations of the LHS method are not discussed in sufficient depth. The Sandia's response to this review is published as NUREG/CR-2428. Volume 1 is scheduled for completion in June 1982.

Stevens, C.A.; Fullwood, R.R.; Basin, S.L.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "driver cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Offshore Wind Turbine Design: Addressing Uncertainty Drivers Sten Frandsen Niels Jacob Tarp-Johansen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Offshore Wind Turbine Design: Addressing Uncertainty Drivers Sten Frandsen Niels Jacob Tarp@civil.auc.dk leje@elsam-eng.com Abstract: Current offshore wind turbine design methods have matured to a 1st identification of the most important uncertainty drivers specific for offshore wind turbine design loads

122

1 Drivers of the projected changes to the Pacific Ocean 2 equatorial circulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Drivers of the projected changes to the Pacific Ocean 2 equatorial circulation 3 A. Sen Gupta,1 A), 29 Drivers of the projected changes to the Pacific Ocean equatorial 30 circulation, Geophys. Res. Lett., 39, LXXXXX, doi:10.1029/ 31 2012GL051447. 32 1. Introduction 33 [2] The equatorial Pacific Ocean

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

123

DRIVER ASSISTED CONTROL STRATEGIES: THEORY AND EXPERIMENT Mark DePoorter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the type of handling behavior required of the vehicle. A strategy based on yaw rate control is presented.e. Driver Assisted Control (DAC). The control system would be used to provide stability and performance while still allowing the driver to dictate the path of the vehicle. Parameters such as yaw angle, yaw

Brennan, Sean

124

AABBSSTTRRAACCTT MA, RUIQI. The Effect of In-Vehicle Automation and Reliability on Driver Situation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AABBSSTTRRAACCTT MA, RUIQI. The Effect of In-Vehicle Automation and Reliability on Driver Situation by automation and in- vehicle device use. Specifically, this study investigated the implications of adaptive; investigate the effect of varying reliability of in-vehicle automation (navigation aids) on driver SA

Kaber, David B.

125

UC SANTA BARBARA POLICY AND PROCEDURE Driving Records for Designated Employees and Drivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

when employees are convicted of motor vehicle violations and when actions are taken against a driver a special certificate (ambulance, private school bus, farm labor vehicle, special construction equipment with this policy. C. There are criminal penalties for employing or continuing to employ as a driver a person who

Bigelow, Stephen

126

Shaping the output pulse of a linear-transformer-driver module W. A. Stygar,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shaping the output pulse of a linear-transformer-driver module W. A. Stygar,1 W. E. Fowler,1 K. R a linear-transformer- driver (LTD) module that drives an internal water-insulated transmission line-insulated radial-transmission-line impedance transformers [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 11, 030401 (2008)]. DOI: 10

127

STATE OF CALIFORNIA -GENERAL SERVICES -RISK AND INSURANCE MANAGEMENT STATE DRIVER ACCIDENT REVIEW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATE OF CALIFORNIA - GENERAL SERVICES - RISK AND INSURANCE MANAGEMENT STATE DRIVER ACCIDENT REVIEW STD. 274 (REV. 1/2003) PLEASE PRINT OR TYPE SUPERVISOR'S REVIEW - FOR DEPARTMENTAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PURPOSE: To have supervisor investigate each driver accident, report facts and circumstances, confirm

Ponce, V. Miguel

128

NUREG/CR-6911 Tests of Uranium (VI) Adsorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUREG/CR-6911 Tests of Uranium (VI) Adsorption Models in a Field Setting U.S. Geological Survey U/CR-6911 Tests of Uranium (VI) Adsorption Models in a Field Setting Manuscript Completed: August 2006 Date Published: August 2006 Prepared by G. P. Curtis, J. A. Davis Water Resources Division U.S. Geological Survey

129

Recirculating induction accelerator as a low-cost driver for heavy ion fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a fusion driver, a heavy ion accelerator offers the advantages of efficient target coupling, high reliability, and long stand-off focusing. While the projected cost of conventional heavy ion fusion (HIF) drivers based on multiple beam induction linacs are quite competitive with other inertial driver options, a driver solution which reduces the cost by a factor of two or more will make the case for HIF truly compelling. The recirculating induction accelerator has the potential of large cost reductions. For this reason, an intensive study of the recirculator concept was performed by a team from LLNL and LBL over the past year. We have constructed a concrete point design example of a 4 MJ driver with a projected efficiency of 35% and projected cost of less than 500 million dollars. A detailed report of our findings during this year of intensive studies has been recently completed. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Barnard, J.J.; Newton, M.A.; Reginato, L.L.; Sharp, W.M.; Shay, H.D.; Yu, S.S.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Analysis of IFR driver fuel hot channel factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal-hydraulic uncertainty factors for Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) driver fuels have been determined based primarily on the database obtained from the predecessor fuels used in the IFR prototype, Experimental Breeder Reactor II. The uncertainty factors were applied to the channel factors (HCFs) analyses to obtain separate overall HCFs for fuel and cladding for steady-state analyses. A ``semistatistical horizontal method`` was used in the HCFs analyses. The uncertainty factor of the fuel thermal conductivity dominates the effects considered in the HCFs analysis; the uncertainty in fuel thermal conductivity will be reduced as more data are obtained to expand the currently limited database for the IFR ternary metal fuel (U-20Pu-10Zr). A set of uncertainty factors to be used for transient analyses has also been derived.

Ku, J.Y.; Chang, L.K.; Mohr, D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Linac-Based Proton Driver for a Neutrino Factory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Neutrino Factory Proton Driver based on a superconducting proton linac has been designed in the CERN context. The 5 GeV/4 MW H- beam from the linac is accumulated using charge exchange injection in a fixed-energy synchrotron and afterwards transferred to a compressor ring, where bunch rotation takes place. The lattices of the accumulator and compressor are described, as well as magnet technology and RF manipulations. Critical issues related to charge-exchange injection, space-charge effects in the compressor and beam stability in the accumulator, are addressed. The analysis is focused on the baseline scenario, which provides 6 bunches on the target. Results of preliminary analysis of options with less bunches (three and one) are also presented.

Garoby, R; Aiba, M; Meddahi, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Study of CSR Effects in the Jefferson Laboratory FEL Driver  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a recent experiment conducted on the Jefferson Laboratory IR FEL driver the effects of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) on beam quality were studied. The primary goal of this work was to explore CSR output and effect on the beam with variation of the bunch compression in the IR chicane. This experiment also provides a valuable opportunity to benchmark existing CSR models in a system that may not be fully represented by a 1-D CSR model. Here we present results from this experiment and compare to initial simulations of CSR in the magnetic compression chicane of the machine. Finally, we touch upon the possibility for CSR induced microbunching gain in the magnetic compression chicane, and show that parameters in the machine are such that it should be thoroughly damped.

Hall, C. C. [Colorado State U.; Biedron, S. [Colorado State U.; Burleson, Theodore A. [Colorado State U.; Milton, Stephen V. [Colorado State U.; Morin, Auralee L. [Colorado State U.; Benson, Stephen V. [JLAB; Douglas, David R. [JLAB; Evtushenko, Pavel E. [JLAB; Hannon, Fay E. [JLAB; Li, Rui [JLAB; Tennant, Christopher D. [JLAB; Zhang, Shukui [JLAB; Carlsten, Bruce E. [LANL; Lewellen, John W. [LANL

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Experience with advanced driver fuels in EBR-II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) is a complete nuclear power plant, incorporating a pool-type liquid-metal reactor (LMR) with a fuel-power thermal output of 62.5 MW and an electrical output of 20 MW. Initial criticality was in 1961, utilizing a metallic driver fuel design called the Mark-I. The fuel design has evolved over the last 30 yr, and significant progress has been made on improving performance. The first major innovations were incorporated into the Mark-II design, and burnup then increased dramatically. This design performed successfully, and fuel element lifetime was limited by subassembly hardware performance rather than the fuel element itself. Transient performance of the fuel was also acceptable and demonstrated the ability of EBR-II to survive severe upsets such as a loss of flow without scram. In the mid 1980s, with renewed interest in metallic fuels and Argonne's integral fast reactor (IFR) concept, the Mark-II design was used as the basis for new designs, the Mark-III and Mark-IV. In 1987, the Mark-III design began qualification testing to become a driver fuel for EBR-II. This was followed in 1989 by the Mark-IIIA and Mark-IV designs. The next fuel design, the Mark-V, is being planned to demonstrate the utilization of recycled fuel. The fuel cycle facility attached to EBR-II is being refurbished to produce pyroprocessed recycled fuel as part of the demonstration of the IFR.

Lahm, C.E.; Koenig, J.F.; Pahl, R.G.; Porter, D.L.; Crawford, D.C. (Argonne National Lab.-West, Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Sliding Mode Pulsed Averaging IC Drivers for High Brightness Light Emitting Diodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project developed new Light Emitting Diode (LED) driver ICs associated with specific (uniquely operated) switching power supplies that optimize performance for High Brightness LEDs (HB-LEDs). The drivers utilize a digital control core with a newly developed nonlinear, hysteretic/sliding mode controller with mixed-signal processing. The drivers are flexible enough to allow both traditional microprocessor interface as well as other options such as on the fly adjustment of color and brightness. Some other unique features of the newly developed drivers include AC Power Factor Correction; High power efficiency; Substantially fewer external components should be required, leading to substantial reduction of Bill of Materials (BOM). Thus, the LED drivers developed in this research : optimize LED performance by increasing power efficiency and power factor. Perhaps more remarkably, the LED drivers provide this improved performance at substantially reduced costs compared to the present LED power electronic driver circuits. Since one of the barriers to market penetration for HB-LEDs (in particular white light LEDs) is cost/lumen, this research makes important contributions in helping the advancement of SSL consumer acceptance and usage.

Dr. Anatoly Shteynberg, PhD

2006-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

135

Usnesen ze 4. zasedn Vdeck rady AV CR konanho dne 10. z 1. Oven a kontrola zpisu z 3. zasedn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reform tercirnho vzdlvn. Vdeck rada AV CR bere se souhlasem na vdom stanovisko AR AV CR k reform

Tebbens, Jurjen Duintjer

136

Physics at an upgraded proton driver at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The accelerator-based particle physics program in the US is entering a period of transition. This is particularly true at Fermilab which for more than two decades has been the home of the Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider, the World's highest energy hadron collider. In a few years time the energy frontier will move to the LHC at CERN. Hence, if an accelerator-based program is to survive at Fermilab, it must evolve. Fermilab is fortunate in that, in addition to hosting the Tevatron Collider, the laboratory also hosts the US accelerator-based neutrino program. The recent discovery that neutrino flavors oscillate has opened a new exciting world for us to explore, and has created an opportunity for the Fermilab accelerator complex to continue to address the cutting-edge questions of particle physics beyond the Tevatron Collider era. The presently foreseen neutrino oscillation experiments at Fermilab (MiniBooNE [1] and MINOS [2]) will enable the laboratory to begin contributing to the Global oscillation physics program in the near future, and will help us better understand the basic parameters describing the oscillations. However, this is only a first step. To be able to pin down all of the oscillation parameters, and hopefully make new discoveries along the way, we will need high statistics experiments, which will require a very intense neutrino beam, and one or more very massive detectors. In particular we will require new MW-scale primary proton beams and perhaps ultimately a Neutrino Factory [3]. Plans to upgrade the Fermilab Proton Driver are presently being developed [4]. The upgrade project would replace the Fermilab Booster with a new 8 GeV accelerator with 0.5-2 MW beam power, a factor of 15-60 more than the current Booster. It would also make the modifications needed to the Fermilab Main Injector (MI) to upgrade it to simultaneously provide 120 GeV beams of 2 MW. This would enable a factor of 5-10 increase in neutrino beam intensities at the MI, while also supporting a vigorous 8 GeV fixed-target program. In addition, a Proton Driver might also serve as a stepping-stone to future accelerators, both as an R&D test bed and as an injector, with connections to the Linear Collider, Neutrino Factories, and a VLHC. Hence, although neutrino physics would provide the main thrust for the science program at an upgraded Fermilab proton source, the new facility would also offer exciting opportunities for other fixed-target particle physics (kaons, muons, neutrons, antiprotons, etc.) and a path towards new accelerators in the future.

Steve Geer

2004-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

137

9 Cr-- 1 Mo steel material for high temperature application  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

One or more embodiments relates to a high-temperature, titanium alloyed, 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibiting improved creep strength and oxidation resistance at service temperatures up to 650.degree. C. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel has a tempered martensite microstructure and is comprised of both large (0.5-3 .mu.m) primary titanium carbides and small (5-50 nm) secondary titanium carbides in a ratio of. from about 1:1.5 to about 1.5:1. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel may be fabricated using exemplary austenizing, rapid cooling, and tempering steps without subsequent hot working requirements. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibits improvements in total mass gain, yield strength, and time-to-rupture over ASTM P91 and ASTM P92 at the temperature and time conditions examined.

Jablonski, Paul D; Alman, David; Dogan, Omer; Holcomb, Gordon; Cowen, Christopher

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

138

TI--CR--AL--O thin film resistors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Thin films of Ti--Cr--Al--O are used as a resistor material. The films are rf sputter deposited from ceramic targets using a reactive working gas mixture of Ar and O.sub.2. Resistivity values from 10.sup.4 to 10.sup.10 Ohm-cm have been measured for Ti--Cr--Al--O film <1 .mu.m thick. The film resistivity can be discretely selected through control of the target composition and the deposition parameters. The application of Ti--Cr--Al--O as a thin film resistor has been found to be thermodynamically stable, unlike other metal-oxide films. The Ti--Cr--Al--O film can be used as a vertical or lateral resistor, for example, as a layer beneath a field emission cathode in a flat panel display; or used to control surface emissivity, for example, as a coating on an insulating material such as vertical wall supports in flat panel displays.

Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA); Schmid, Anthony P. (Solana Beach, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

COURSE OR OR CR. MATH 201f 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P.O.Box: CR. 30 COURSE OR OR CR. MATH 201f 3 MATH 210f 3 MATH 218 MATH 219 3 STAT 233 f 3 STAT 234 f 3 STAT 235 f 3 STAT 236 f 3 STAT 237 f 3 STAT 238 f 3 ELECT .1 3 ELECT .2 3 ELECT .3 3 36 CMPS 200 : NAME: Tel #: ID #: MAY NOT ENROLL IN CVSP 203 OR 204 OR VICE VERSA. 3 ELECTIVES IN HUMANITIES OR SOCIAL

Shihadeh, Alan

140

COURSE OR OR CR. MATH 201f 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P.O.Box: CR. 30 COURSE OR OR CR. MATH 201f 3 MATH 210f 3 MATH 219 3 STAT 233f 3 STAT 234f 3 STAT 235f 3 STAT 236f 3 STAT 237f 3 STAT 238f 3 ELECT. 1 3 ELECT. 2 3 ELECT. 3 3 36 CMPS 200 4 ELECT. 1 3 OR EQUIVALENTa : NAME: Tel #: ID #: E-mail: @aub.edu.lb DIPLOMA TYPE : ENTRY LEVEL: FR SO JR SR COMMENTS Total

Shihadeh, Alan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "driver cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

COURSE OR OR CR. STAT 235f 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P.O.Box: CR. 30 COURSE OR OR CR. MATH 201 f 3 MATH 210 f 3 MATH 219 3 STAT 233 f 3 STAT 234 f 3 STAT 235f 3 STAT 236 f 3 STAT 237f 3 STAT 238f 3 ELECT. 1 3 ELECT. 2 3 ELECT. 3 3 36 CMPS 200 4 ELECT WHO ELECT CVSP 206 FRESHMAN CLASS OR EQUIVALENT a : NAME: Tel #: ID #: E-mail: @aub.edu.lb DIPLOMA

Shihadeh, Alan

142

COURSE or or CR. MATH 218 MATH 219 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P.O.Box: CR. 30 COURSE or or CR. MATH 201 e 3 MATH 210 e 3 MATH 218 MATH 219 3 STAT 233e 3 STAT 234e 3 STAT 235e 3 STAT 236e 3 STAT 237e 3 STAT 238e 3 ELECT .1 3 ELECT .2 3 ELECT .3 3 36 ELECT. 1 3 3 credits requirement for graduation. ID #: E-mail: @aub.edu.lb DIPLOMA TYPE : ENTRY LEVEL: FR SO JR SR

Shihadeh, Alan

143

COURSE OR OR CR. MATH 201f 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P.O.Box: CR. 30 COURSE OR OR CR. MATH 201f 3 MATH 210 f 3 MATH 219 3 STAT 233f 3 STAT 234 f 3 STAT 235 f 3 STAT 236 f 3 STAT 237 f 3 STAT 238 f 3 ELECT. 1 3 ELECT. 2 3 ELECT. 3 3 36 CMPS 200 4 ELECT. 1 CVSP 206 FRESHMAN CLASS OR EQUIVALENTa : NAME: Tel #: ID #: E-mail: @aub.edu.lb DIPLOMA TYPE : ENTRY

Shihadeh, Alan

144

COURSE OR OR CR. MATH 201f 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P.O.Box: CR. 30 COURSE OR OR CR. MATH 201f 3 MATH 210f 3 MATH 218 MATH 219 3 STAT 233f 3 STAT 234f 3 STAT 235f 3 STAT 236f 3 STAT 237f 3 STAT 238f 3 ELECT .1 3 ELECT .2 3 ELECT .3 3 36 CMPS 200 4 REQUIRMENTS FRESHMAN CLASS OR EQUIVALENTa : NAME: Tel #: ID #: MAY NOT ENROLL IN CVSP 203 OR 204 OR VICE VERSA

Shihadeh, Alan

145

COURSE OR OR CR. MATH 201g 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P.O.Box: CR. 30 COURSE OR OR CR. MATH 201g 3 MATH 210g 3 MATH 219 3 STAT 233g 3 STAT 234g 3 STAT 235g 3 STAT 236g 3 STAT 237g 3 STAT 238g 3 ELECT. 1 3 ELECT. 2 3 ELECT. 3 3 36 CMPS 200 4 ELECT. 1 3: Tel #: ID #: Total Credits in Major: E-mail: @aub.edu.lb DIPLOMA TYPE : ENTRY LEVEL: FR SO JR SR

Shihadeh, Alan

146

Dynamic analysis of policy drivers for bioenergy commodity markets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biomass is increasingly being considered as a feedstock to provide a clean and renewable source of energy in the form of both liquid fuels and electric power. In the United States, the biofuels and biopower industries are regulated by different policies and have different drivers which impact the maximum price the industries are willing to pay for biomass. This article describes a dynamic computer simulation model that analyzes future behavior of bioenergy feedstock markets given policy and technical options. The model simulates the long-term dynamics of these markets by treating advanced biomass feedstocks as a commodity and projecting the total demand of each industry as well as the market price over time. The model is used for an analysis of the United States bioenergy feedstock market that projects supply, demand, and market price given three independent buyers: domestic biopower, domestic biofuels, and foreign exports. With base-case assumptions, the biofuels industry is able to dominate the market and meet the federal Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) targets for advanced biofuels. Further analyses suggest that United States bioenergy studies should include estimates of export demand in their projections, and that GHG-limiting policy would partially shield both industries from exporter dominance.

Robert F. Jeffers; Jacob J. Jacobson; Erin M. Searcy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Summary of sessions B and F: High intensity linacs and frontend & proton drivers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the sessions B&F of the 33rd ICFA Advanced Beam Dynamics Workshop on High Intensity & High Brightness Hadron Beams held in Bensheim, Germany. It covers high intensity linacs, front ends and proton driver topics.

Ferdinand, R.; /Saclay; Chou, W.; /Fermilab; Galambos, J.; /Oak Ridge

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

E-Print Network 3.0 - automobile drivers Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: automobile drivers Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report...

149

E-Print Network 3.0 - automobile driver examination Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: automobile driver examination Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 U of L Campus AccidentIncident...

150

Age and cross-cultural comparison of drivers' cognitive workload and performance in simulated urban driving  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Driving demands significant psychomotor attention and requires even more when drivers are engaged in secondary tasks that increase cognitive workload and divert attention. It is well established that age influences driving ...

Son, J.

151

Modification of Driver Behavior Based on Information from Pedestrian Countdown Timers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pedestrian countdown timers (CDTs) are promoted as a means of improving pedestrian safety at intersections. However, there are concerns that drivers view the CDTs when approaching the intersection and use that information to drive more aggressively...

Bundy, Brandon

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

152

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambulance drivers Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

your ears... , but many drivers do it anyways. Driving instructors say unlike the cell phone, the iPod can be a problem Source: Salvucci, Dario D. - Department of Computer...

153

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Look-Ahead Driver Feedback and Powertrain Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Eaton at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about look-ahead driver feedback and...

154

Efficacy, national/international practices and motivational factors of lifelong driver education for the aging population  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a society facing a significant increase in its aging population, older driver education/training is emerging as a potential solution to help seniors drive more safely, thus maintaining their mobility and quality of life. ...

Israels, Richard (Richard Steven)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Temperature as a driver for the expansion of the microalga Gonyostomum semen in Swedish lakes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Temperature as a driver for the expansion of the microalga Gonyostomum semen in Swedish lakes Karin is an example of invasive harmful microalgae (Neilan et al., 2003). Another presumably invasive species

156

Emergency vehicle driver training by Texas municipal police departments: a descriptive study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Because of the increase in the number of monetary civil judgments arising out of police emergency driving situations, law enforcement agencies are taking a critical look at their emergency driver training programs. At the present time...

Westmoreland, Robert Lawrence

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Atom probe: a direct technique for kinetic measurements. [Fe-24Cr; Fe-32Cr; Fe-28. 5Cr-10. 6Co  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The atom probe has been used to study the phase transformations occurring within the low-temperature miscibility gaps in Fe-Cr and Fe-Cr-Co alloys. The morphology of the two-phase microstructure resulting from phase separation deep within the miscibility gaps was found to be highly interconnected and charactristic of an isotropic spinodal reaction. The characteristic dimensions of the microstructure and the changes in composition were measured as a function of aging. The coarsening of the network structures could be fitted with a power law with time exponents that were significantly less than the classical Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner value of one-third.

Miller, M.K.; Brenner, S.S.; Camus, P.P.; Soffa, W.A.

1984-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

158

Roles of Fe2+, Fe3+, and Cr3+ Surface Sites in the Oxidation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fe3+, and Cr3+ Surface Sites in the Oxidation of NO on the (Fe,Cr)3O4(1 1 1) Surface Termination of an -(Fe,Cr Roles of Fe2+, Fe3+, and Cr3+ Surface Sites in the Oxidation of NO...

159

Considerations of driver preferences and performance for selection of electronic automobile instrumentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSIDERATIONS OF DRIVER PREFERENCES AND PERFORMANCE FOR SELECTION OF ELECTRONIC AUTOMOBILE INSTRUMENTATION A Thesis by RAYMOND SCOTT HARWOOD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1988 Major Subject: Industrial Engineering CONSIDERATIONS OF DRIVER PREFERENCES AND PERFORMANCE FOR SELECTION OF ELECTRONIC AUTOMOBILE INSTRUMENTATION A Thesis by RAYMOND SCOTT HARWOOD Approved as to style...

Harwood, Raymond Scott

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

HIGH INTENSITY LINAC DRIVER FOR THE SPIRAL-2 PROJECT : DESIGN OF SUPERCONDUCTING 88 MHZ QUARTER WAVE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HIGH INTENSITY LINAC DRIVER FOR THE SPIRAL-2 PROJECT : DESIGN OF SUPERCONDUCTING 88 MHZ QUARTER to the required energy. · Capability to accelerate ion beams of q/A=1/6 (up to 1 mA) in the future. The initial Abstract A superconducting linac driver, delivering deuterons with an energy up to 40 MeV (5 mA) and heavy

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "driver cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Adaptacin de un driver WLAN Linux a una arquitectura NIOS-Avalon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptación de un driver WLAN Linux a una arquitectura NIOS-Avalon B. Martínez , I. Tarruella, D de un driver Linux se realiza un mapeo sobre una arquitectura basada en un procesador integrado dentro de un SoC. La elección de la partición Hw/Sw y de ciertos parámetros de la arquitectura se

Autònoma de Barcelona, Universitat

162

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN GEOLOGY (UNOFFICIAL) CATALOG 129 Fall (Th-Pr) Cr Spring (Th-Pr) Cr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN GEOLOGY (UNOFFICIAL) CATALOG 129 Fall (Th-Pr) Cr Spring (Th-Pr) Cr Freshman Geology (3-3) 4 GEOL 106 Historical Geology (3-3) 4 MATH 166 Topics in Cont. Math II 1 (3-0) 3 MATH 131-3) 4 GEOP 341 Introduction to Global Geophysics (3-0) 3 GEOL 309 Introduction to Geologic Field Methods

163

Characterization of the CR-39 neutron track etch dosimeter and evaluation of a combination CR-39/thermoluminescent dosimeter badge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . Objectives . THEORY 2 5 9 12 14 Charged Particle Interactions and Damage Track Formation Neutron Converters The Etching Process Background Effects The Quality Factor MATERIALS AND METHODS 14 16 18 21 22 31 CR-39 Supply . CR-39... effectiveness and used for calculating the dose equivalent (H) of exposed personnel, do not offer the same margin of safety for all radiations, including neutrons. The result is a proposed increase in applied Q values to assure comparable safety in all...

Hoover, Paul Steven

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Effect of the magnetic phase transition on the charge transport in layered semiconductor ferromagnets TlCrS{sub 2} and TlCrSe{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TlCrS{sub 2} and TlCrSe{sub 2} crystals were synthesized by solid-state reaction. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that TlCrS{sub 2} and TlCrSe{sub 2} compounds crystallize in the hexagonal crystal system with lattice parameters a = 3.538 A, c = 21.962 A, c/a {approx} 6.207, z = 3; a = 3.6999 A, c = 22.6901 A, c/a {approx} 6.133, z = 3; and X-ray densities {rho}{sub x} = 6.705 and 6.209 g/cm{sup 3}, respectively. Magnetic and electric studies in a temperature range of 77-400 K showed that TlCrS{sub 2} and TlCrSe{sub 2} are semiconductor ferromagnets. Rather large deviations of the experimental effective magnetic moment of TlCrS{sub 2} (3.26 {mu}{sub B}) and TlCrSe{sub 2} (3.05 {mu}{sub B}) from the theoretical one (3.85 {mu}{sub B}) are attributed to two-dimensional magnetic ordering in the paramagnetic region of strongly layered ferromagnets TlCrS{sub 2} and TlCrSe{sub 2}. The effect of the magnetic phase's transition on the charge transport in TlCrS{sub 2} and TlCrSe{sub 2} is detected.

Veliyev, R. G.; Sadikhov, R. Z.; Kerimova, E. M., E-mail: ekerimova@physics.ab.az; Asadov, Yu. G.; Jabbarov, A. I. [Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Large Synoptic Survey Telescope: From Science Drivers to Reference Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the history of astronomy, major advances in our understanding of the Universe have come from dramatic improvements in our ability to accurately measure astronomical quantities. Aided by rapid progress in information technology, current sky surveys are changing the way we view and study the Universe. Next-generation surveys will maintain this revolutionary progress. We focus here on the most ambitious survey currently planned in the visible band, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). LSST will have unique survey capability in the faint time domain. The LSST design is driven by four main science themes: constraining dark energy and dark matter, taking an inventory of the Solar System, exploring the transient optical sky, and mapping the Milky Way. It will be a large, wide-field ground-based system designed to obtain multiple images covering the sky that is visible from Cerro Pachon in Northern Chile. The current baseline design, with an 8.4 m (6.5 m effective) primary mirror, a 9.6 deg{sup 2} field of view, and a 3,200 Megapixel camera, will allow about 10,000 square degrees of sky to be covered using pairs of 15-second exposures in two photometric bands every three nights on average. The system is designed to yield high image quality, as well as superb astrometric and photometric accuracy. The survey area will include 30,000 deg{sup 2} with {delta} < +34.5{sup o}, and will be imaged multiple times in six bands, ugrizy, covering the wavelength range 320-1050 nm. About 90% of the observing time will be devoted to a deep-wide-fast survey mode which will observe a 20,000 deg{sup 2} region about 1000 times in the six bands during the anticipated 10 years of operation. These data will result in databases including 10 billion galaxies and a similar number of stars, and will serve the majority of science programs. The remaining 10% of the observing time will be allocated to special programs such as Very Deep and Very Fast time domain surveys. We describe how the LSST science drivers led to these choices of system parameters.

Ivezic, Z.; Axelrod, T.; Brandt, W.N.; Burke, D.L.; Claver, C.F.; Connolly, A.; Cook, K.H.; Gee, P.; Gilmore, D.K.; Jacoby, S.H.; Jones, R.L.; Kahn, S.M.; Kantor, J.P.; Krabbendam, V.; Lupton, R.H.; Monet, D.G.; Pinto, P.A.; Saha, A.; Schalk, T.L.; Schneider, D.P.; Strauss, Michael A.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /LSST Corp. /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /NOAO, Tucson /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Davis /Princeton U., Astrophys. Sci. Dept. /Naval Observ., Flagstaff /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /UC, Santa Cruz /Harvard U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Illinois U., Urbana

2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

166

Grain boundary depletion and migration during selective oxidation of Cr in a Ni-5Cr binary alloy exposed to high-temperature hydrogenated water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-resolution microscopy of a high-purity Ni-5Cr alloy exposed to 360C hydrogenated water reveals intergranular selective oxidation of Cr accompanied by local Cr depletion and diffusion-induced grain boundary migration (DIGM). The corrosion-product oxide consists of a porous, interconnected network of Cr2O3 platelets with no further O ingress into the metal ahead. Extensive grain boundary depletion of Cr (to <0.05at.%) is observed typically 20100 nm wide as a result of DIGM and reaching depths of many micrometers beyond the oxidation front.

Schreiber, Daniel K.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Supernova 1996cr: SN 1987A's Wild Cousin?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on new VLT optical spectroscopic and multi-wavelength archival observations of SN1996cr, a previously identified ULX known as Circinus Galaxy X-2. Our optical spectrum confirms SN1996cr as a bona fide type IIn SN, while archival imaging isolates its explosion date to between 1995-02-28 and 1996-03-16. SN1996cr is one of the closest SNe (~3.8 Mpc) in the last several decades and in terms of flux ranks among the brightest radio and X-ray SNe ever detected. The wealth of optical, X-ray, and radio observations that exist for this source provide relatively detailed constraints on its post-explosion expansion and progenitor history, including an preliminary angular size constaint from VLBI. The archival X-ray and radio data imply that the progenitor of SN1996cr evacuated a large cavity just prior to exploding: the blast wave likely expanded for ~1-2 yrs before eventually striking the dense circumstellar material which surrounds SN1996cr. The X-ray and radio emission, which trace the progenitor mass-loss rate, have respectively risen by a factor of ~2 and remained roughly constant over the past 7 yr. This behavior is reminiscent of the late rise of SN1987A, but 1000 times more luminous and much more rapid to onset. Complex Oxygen line emission in the optical spectrum further hints at a possible concentric shell or ring-like structure. The discovery of SN1996cr suggests that a substantial fraction of the closest SNe observed in the last several decades have occurred in wind-blown bubbles. An Interplanetary Network position allows us to reject a tentative GRB association with BATSE 4B960202. [Abridged

F. E. Bauer; V. V. Dwarkadas; W. N. Brandt; S. Immler; S. Smartt; N. Bartel; M. F. Bietenholz

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

168

The Geant4 Visualisation System - a multi-driver graphics system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From the beginning the Geant4 Visualisation System was designed to support several simultaneous graphics systems written to common abstract interfaces. Today it has matured into a powerful diagnostic and presentational tool. It comes with a library of models that may be added to the current scene and which include the representation of the Geant4 geometry hierarchy, simulated trajectories and user-written hits and digitisations. The workhorse is the OpenGL suite of drivers for X, Xm, Qt and Win32. There is an Open Inventor driver. Scenes can be exported in special graphics formats for offline viewing in the DAWN, VRML, HepRApp and gMocren browsers. PostScript can be generated through OpenGL, Open Inventor, DAWN and HepRApp. Geant4's own tracking algorithms are used by the Ray Tracer. Not all drivers support all features but all drivers bring added functionality of some sort. This paper describes the interfaces and details the individual drivers.

John Allison; Laurent Garnier; Akinori Kimura; Joseph Perl

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

COURSE or or CR. MATH 201e 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P.O.Box: CR. 30 COURSE or or CR. MATH 201e 3 MATH 210e 3 MATH 218 MATH 219 3 STAT 233e 3 STAT 234e 3 STAT 235e 3 STAT 236e 3 STAT 237e 3 STAT 238e 3 ELECT .1 3 ELECT .2 3 ELECT .3 3 36 ELECT. 1 3 3 or any 207 (A,B,C...) TOTAL CREDITS NEEDED for GRADUATION HUMANITIES LIST I OR IIc ,f ID #: E-mail: @aub

Shihadeh, Alan

170

Nitrate Enhanced Microbial Cr(VI) Reduction-Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major challenge for the bioremediation of radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium) and metals (i.e., Cr(VI), Hg) is the co-occurrence of nitrate as it can inhibit metal transformation. Denitrification (nitrate reduction to dinitrogen gas) is considered the most important ecological process. For many metal and metalloid reducing bacteria, however, ammonia is the end product through respiratory nitrate reduction (RNRA). The focus of this work was to determine how RNRA impacts Cr(VI) transformation. The goal was to elucidate the specific mechanism(s) that limits Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of nitrate and to use this information to develop strategies that enhance Cr(VI) reduction (and thus detoxification). Our central hypothesis is that nitrate impacts the biotransformation of metals and metalloids in three ways 1) as a competitive alternative electron acceptor (inhibiting transformation), 2) as a co-metabolite (i.e., concomitant reduction, stimulating transformation), and 3) as an inducer of specific proteins and pathways involved in oxidation/reduction reactions (stimulating transformation). We have identified three model organisms, Geobacter metallireducens (mechanism 1), Sulfurospirillum barnesii, (mechasism 2), and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (mechanisms 3). Our specific aims were to 1) investigate the role of Cr(VI) concentration on the kinetics of both growth and reduction of nitrate, nitrite, and Cr(VI) in these three organisms; 2) develop a profile of bacterial enzymes involved in nitrate transformation (e.g., oxidoreductases) using a proteomic approach; 3) investigate the function of periplasmic nitrite reductase (Nrf) as a chromate reductase; and 4) develop a strategy to maximize microbial chromium reduction in the presence of nitrate. We found that growth on nitrate by G. metallireducens was inhibited by Cr(VI). Over 240 proteins were identified by LC/MS-MS. Redox active proteins, outer membrane heavy metal efflux proteins, and chemotaxis sensory proteins (Gmet_2478 and Gmet_1641) were up-regulated with exposure to Cr(VI). A nine-heme cytochrome C was purified that could reduce nitrite and could be oxidized by Cr(VI). For D. desulfuricans, we found that confirmed that Cr(VI) induced a prolonged lag period when Cr(VI) was reduced. Over three hundred proteins were unequivocally identified by LC/MS-MS and a significant number of down-regulated proteins for which the levels were changed >2 fold compared to control. Sulfite reductase levels were similar, however, nitrate and nitrite reductase were down-regulated. The supernatant of spent cultures was found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI). In addition, desulfoviridin was purified from nitrate grown cells and shown to have nitrite reductase activity that was inhibited by Cr(VI). For S. barnesii, periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), nitrite reductase (Nrf), and the metalloid reductase (Rar) were purified and characterized. The supernatant of spent cultures was also found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI) but that Rar also reduced Cr(VI). Our results from specific aims 1 through 3 indicate that for G. metallireducens, Cr(VI) inhibits nitrate respiration as it oxidizes cytochromes involved in nitrate respiration. Iron reduction is apparently not affected and the inhibitory affects of Cr(VI) may be attenuated by the addition of sufficient Fe(III) to generate Fe(II) that abiotically reduces the chromium. For S. barnesii, although the enzyme assays indicate that the components of the respiratory pathway for nitrate (e.g. Nap and Nrf) are inhibited by chromate, the organism has a mechanism to prevent this from actually occurring. Our current hypothesis is that the non-specific metalloid reductase (Rar) is providing resistance by reducing the Cr(VI). The strategy here would be to enhance its growth and metabolism in the natural setting. Lactate is a suitable electron donor for S. barnesii but other donors are possible. Although the version of the Phylochip used for monitoring the microb

John F. Stolz

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Grid Parity for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, we analyze PV break-even costs for U.S. residential customers. We evaluate some key drivers of grid parity both regionally and over time. We also examine the impact of moving from flat to time-of-use (TOU) rates, and we evaluate individual components of the break-even cost, including effect of rate structure and various incentives. Finally, we examine how PV markets might evolve on a regional basis considering the sensitivity of the break-even cost to four major drivers: technical performance, financing parameters, electricity prices and rates, and policies. We find that electricity price rather than technical parameters are in general the key drivers of the break-even cost of PV. Additionally, this analysis provides insight about the potential viability of PV markets.

Ong, S.; Denholm, P.; Clark, N.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

A 200 C Universal Gate Driver Integrated Circuit for Extreme Environment Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-temperature power converters (dc-dc, dc-ac, etc.) have enormous potential in extreme environment applications, including automotive, aerospace, geothermal, nuclear, and well logging. For successful realization of such high-temperature power conversion modules, the associated control electronics also need to perform at high temperature. This paper presents a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) based high-temperature gate driver integrated circuit (IC) incorporating an on-chip low-power temperature sensor and demonstrating an improved peak output current drive over our previously reported work. This driver IC has been primarily designed for automotive applications, where the underhood temperature can reach 200 C. This new gate driver prototype has been designed and implemented in a 0.8 {micro}m, 2-poly, and 3-metal bipolar CMOS-DMOS (Double-Diffused Metal-Oxide Semiconductor) on SOI process and has been successfully tested for up to 200 C ambient temperature driving a SiC MOSFET and a SiC normally-ON JFET. The salient feature of the proposed universal gate driver is its ability to drive power switches over a wide range of gate turn-ON voltages such as MOSFET (0 to 20 V), normally-OFF JFET (-7 to 3 V), and normally-ON JFET (-20 to 0 V). The measured peak output current capability of the driver is around 5 A and is thus capable of driving several power switches connected in parallel. An ultralow-power on-chip temperature supervisory circuit has also been integrated into the die to safeguard the driver circuit against excessive die temperature ({ge}220 C). This approach utilizes increased diode leakage current at higher temperature to monitor the die temperature. The power consumption of the proposed temperature sensor circuit is below 10 {micro}W for operating temperature up to 200 C.

Tolbert, Leon M [ORNL; Huque, Mohammad A [ORNL; Islam, Syed K [ORNL; Blalock, Benjamin J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Structural relaxation around substitutional Cr3+ in pyrope garnet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the spinel- garnet transformation -a major phase boundary in the Earth's upper mantle- to pressures as high shells of neighbors (Mg and Si) relax only partially. Site relaxation is accommodated by strain diamonds (Irifune et al. 1982). In the garnet structure (Novak and Gibbs 1971), Cr3+ is small enough

174

Aquatic Chemistry Course Id: CHEM 605 (3 cr.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic Chemistry Fall 2010 Course Id: CHEM 605 (3 cr.) Lecture: TR 3:40-5:20pm, REIC 165 of this course is to introduce students to the concepts and models used in aquatic chemistry while providing-base chemistry, complexation, precipitation-dissolution and reduction-oxidation reactions. Student Learning

Wagner, Diane

175

MAX232, MAX232I DUAL EIA 232 DRIVERS/RECEIVERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

+ C1- C2+ C2- VS- T2OUT R2IN VCC GND T1OUT R1IN R1OUT T1IN T2IN R2OUT MAX232 . . . D, DW, N, OR NSIN T2OUT R2INR2OUT 11 10 12 9 14 7 13 8 #12;MAX232, MAX232I DUAL EIA 232 DRIVERS/RECEIVERS SLLS047LMAX232, MAX232I DUAL EIA 232 DRIVERS/RECEIVERS SLLS047L - FEBRUARY 1989 - REVISED MARCH 2004 1POST

Ravikumar, B.

176

Thermal stability and oxidation resistance of TiCrAlYO coatings...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

stability and oxidation resistance of TiCrAlYO coatings on SS430 for solid oxide fuel cell interconnect applications. Thermal stability and oxidation resistance of TiCrAlYO...

177

Reduction of Health Risks Due to Chromium(VI)Using Mesquite: A Potential Cr Phytoremediator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chromium is a transition metal extensively used in industry. Cr mining and industrial operations account for chromium wastes at Superfund sites in the United States. A study was performed to investigate the possibility of using mesquite (Prosopis spp.), which is an indigenous desert plant species, to remove Cr from contaminated sites. In this study, mesquite plants were grown in an agar-based medium containing 75 mg L-1 and 125 mg L-1 of Cr(VI). The Cr content of leaf tissue (992 mg kg-1 of dry weight, from 125 mg L-1 of Cr(VI)) indicated that mesquite could be classified as a chromium hyperaccumulator. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies performed to experimental samples showed that mesquite roots absorbed some of the supplied Cr(VI). However, the data analyses of plant tissues demonstrated that the absorbed Cr(VI) was fully reduced to Cr(III) in the leaf tissue.

Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L.; Aldrich, Mary V.; Peralta-Videa, Jose R.; Parsons, Jason G.

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

178

Surface structure of ?-Cr2O3(0001) after activated oxygen...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surface structure of ?-Cr2O3(0001) after activated oxygen exposure. Surface structure of ?-Cr2O3(0001) after activated oxygen exposure. Abstract: The surface structure...

179

Growth of Cr-doped TiO Films in the Rutile and Anatase Structures...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Cr-doped TiO Films in the Rutile and Anatase Structures by Oxygen Plasma Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy . Growth of Cr-doped TiO Films in the Rutile and Anatase Structures by...

180

Excited Carrier Dynamics of ?-Cr2O3/?-Fe2O3 Core...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Excited Carrier Dynamics of ?-Cr2O3?-Fe2O3 Core-Shell Nanostructures. Abstract: In this work ?-Cr2O3?-Fe2O3 core-shell polycrystalline...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "driver cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Integrated Ecogenomics Study for Bioremediation of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reducer isolated from the Hanford 100H site capable of Iron(study for bioremediation of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H area RomyVI)contamination at Hanford ?? Cr(VI) highly soluble, toxic

Chakraborty, Romy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Lightest Isotope of Bh Produced Via the 209Bi(52Cr,n)260Bh Reaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

models. For many years, cold fusion reactions utilizingproduced via the new cold fusion reaction 209 Bi( 52 Cr,

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Radiation effects on interface reactions of U/Fe, U/(Fe + Cr), and U/(Fe + Cr + Ni)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the effects of radiation damage on interdiffusion and intermetallic phase formation at the interfaces of U/Fe, U/(Fe + Cr), and U/(Fe + Cr + Ni) diffusion couples. Magnetron sputtering is used to deposit thin films of Fe, Fe + Cr, or Fe + Cr + Ni on U substrates to form the diffusion couples. One set of samples are thermally annealed under high vacuum at 450 C or 550 C for one hour. A second set of samples are annealed identically but with concurrent 3.5 MeV Fe++ ion irradiation. The Fe++ ion penetration depth is sufficient to reach the original interfaces. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analysis with high fidelity spectral simulations is used to obtain interdiffusion profiles, which are used to examine differences in U diffusion and intermetallic phase formation at the buried interfaces. For all three diffusion systems, Fe++ ion irradiations enhance U diffusion. Furthermore, the irradiations accelerate the formation of intermetallic phases. In U/Fe couples, for example, the unirradiated samples show typical interdiffusion governed by Ficks laws, while the irradiated ones show step-like profiles influenced by Gibbs phase rules.

KUn Shao; Di Chen; Chaochen Wei; Michael S. Martin; Xuemei Wang; Youngjoo Park; Ed Dein; Kevin R. Coffey; b , Yongho Sohn; Bulent H. Sencer; J. Rory Kennedy

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Non-classical nuclei and growth kinetics of Cr precipitates in FeCr alloys during ageing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this manuscript, we quantitatively calculated the thermodynamic properties of critical nuclei of Cr precipitates in FeCr alloys. The concentration profiles of the critical nuclei and nucleation energy barriers were predicted by the constrained shrinking dimer dynamics (CSDD) method. It is found that Cr concentration distribution in the critical nuclei strongly depend on the overall Cr concentration as well as temperature. The critical nuclei are non-classical because the concentration in the nuclei is smaller than the thermodynamic equilibrium value. These results are in agreement with atomic probe observation. The growth kinetics of both classical and non-classical nuclei was investigated by the phase field approach. The simulations of critical nucleus evolution showed a number of interesting phenomena: 1) a critical classical nucleus first shrinks toward its non-classical nucleus and then grows; 2) a non-classical nucleus has much slower growth kinetics at its earlier growth stage compared to the diffusion-controlled growth kinetics. 3) a critical classical nucleus grows faster at the earlier growth stage than the non-classical nucleus. All of these results demonstrate that it is critical to introduce the correct critical nuclei in order to correctly capture the kinetics of precipitation.

Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Xin

2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

185

Abstract--There are two types of drivers in production machine systems: constant velocity (CV) motor and servo-motor.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the dynamic model of the five-bar hybrid mechanism including its electric motors. Section 3 presents) motor and servo-motor. If a system contains two drivers or more, among which some are of the CV motor while the other are the servo-motor, the system has the so-called hybrid driver architecture

Zhang, WJ "Chris"

186

Predicting the Effects of Cell-Phone Dialing on Driver Performance Dario D. Salvucci (dario@cbr.com)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting the Effects of Cell-Phone Dialing on Driver Performance Dario D. Salvucci (dario of attention to the effects of cellular telephone ("cell phone") use on driver behavior and performance the impact of cell-phone dialing in a naturalistic driving task. We developed models of four methods of cell-phone

Salvucci, Dario D.

187

Install, both Arduino and AmaSeis software programs: Installing Arduino and drivers: Setting up AmaSeis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Install, both Arduino and AmaSeis software programs: Installing Arduino and drivers: Setting up Ama the Arduino drivers. Take note of the assigned com port number, and set up AmaSeis to that number. 3. Some computers will require the following. Keep in mind, Arduino, does not need to run or be involved. You just

Barrash, Warren

188

austenitnoj cr-mn stali: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cr-mn stali First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Cavitation erosion of laser processed Fe-Cr-Mn and Fe-Cr-Co alloys CiteSeer Summary: Received...

189

High coercivity CoCrPt films achieved by post-deposition rapid thermal annealing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

layer, a CoCrPt mag- netic layer, a capping Mn diffusion layer, and a final CrTi oxidation protection conditions were stud- ied. II. EXPERIMENT All layers were deposited onto glass substrates by rf di- ode, and CrTi oxida- tion protection layer were all 200 ? thick. Post-deposition annealing was performed

Laughlin, David E.

190

Surface half-metallicity of CrS thin films and perfect spin filtering and spin diode effects of CrS/ZnSe heterostructure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, ferromagnetic zinc-blende Mn{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}S thin films (above x?=?0.5) were fabricated experimentally on ZnSe substrate, which confirmed the previous theoretical prediction of half-metallic ferromagnetism in zinc-blende CrS. Here, we theoretically reveal that both Cr- and S-terminated (001) surfaces of the CrS thin films retain the half-metallicity. The CrS/ZnSe(001) heterogeneous junction exhibits excellent spin filtering and spin diode effects, which are explained by the calculated band structure and transmission spectra. The perfect spin transport properties indicate the potential applications of half-metallic CrS in spintronic devices. All computational results are obtained by using the density functional theory combined with nonequilibrium Green's function.

Gao, G. Y., E-mail: guoying-gao@mail.hust.edu.cn; Yao, K. L., E-mail: klyao@mail.hust.edu.cn [School of Physics and Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

191

Stochastic Behaviour of the Electricity Bid Stack: from Fundamental Drivers to Power Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stochastic Behaviour of the Electricity Bid Stack: from Fundamental Drivers to Power Prices Michael) 23 October 2008 Abstract We develop a fundamental model for spot electricity prices, based prices with observed data. Keywords: electricity, bid stack, fundamental, margin, demand, natural gas 1

Howison, Sam

192

Megafauna biomass tradeoff as a driver of Quaternary and future extinctions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Megafauna biomass tradeoff as a driver of Quaternary and future extinctions Anthony D. Barnosky,000 and 3,000 years ago. Estimates of megafauna biomass (including hu- mans as a megafauna species) for before, during, and after the extinction episode suggest that growth of human biomass largely matched

California at Berkeley, University of

193

Perception Drivers for Treated Wood by U.S. South Homebuilders and Remodelers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Perception Drivers for Treated Wood by U.S. South Homebuilders and Remodelers Sanna M. Kallioranta1 for the use of treated wood products in construction is considerable, especially in the U.S. South for termite protection and to mitigate moisture related decay. This research investigates the perception about treated

Wu, Qinglin

194

Refueling Behavior of Flexible Fuel Vehicle Drivers in the Federal Fleet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Federal fleets are a frequent subject of legislative and executive efforts to lead a national transition to alternative fuels and advanced vehicle technologies. Section 701 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires that all dual-fueled alternative fuel vehicles in the federal fleet be operated on alternative fuel 100% of the time when they have access to it. However, in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012, drivers of federal flex fuel vehicles (FFV) leased through the General Services Administration refueled with E85 24% of the time when it was available--falling well short of the mandate. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory completed a 2-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development project to identify the factors that influence the refueling behavior of federal FFV drivers. The project began with two primary hypotheses. First, information scarcity increases the tendency to miss opportunities to purchase E85. Second, even with perfect information, there are limits to how far drivers will go out of their way to purchase E85. This paper discusses the results of the project, which included a June 2012 survey of federal fleet drivers and an empirical analysis of actual refueling behavior from FY 2009 to 2012. This research will aid in the design and implementation of intervention programs aimed at increasing alternative fuel use and reducing petroleum consumption.

Daley, R.; Nangle, J.; Boeckman, G.; Miller, M.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

UA researchers develop develop a device for moving industrial vehicles without drivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in settings with extreme human conditions (cold storage, waste management , etc....) The device is availableUA researchers develop develop a device for moving industrial vehicles without drivers Researchers Localization And Mapping). This technology is applicable to any business or industrial environment where

Escolano, Francisco

196

Department Name: Center for International Education Org. #: 2062 Position Title: Driver  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department Name: Center for International Education Org. #: 2062 Position Title: Driver WLS Level if entering mid-year); and 2. Students of any classification whose work is characterized by highly structured for departmental functions and/or programs. This level is assigned to the following: 1. Student managers

Baltisberger, Jay H.

197

Hydrology as a driver of biodiversity: Controls on carrying capacity, niche formation, and dispersal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrology as a driver of biodiversity: Controls on carrying capacity, niche formation online 3 March 2012 Keywords: Hydrology Biodiversity Dispersal Carrying capacity Niches Climate change and dynamics to biodiversity patterns. The focus of this paper is the key hydrologic controls crucial towards

Konar, Megan

198

A fuel economy optimization system with applications in vehicles with human drivers and autonomous vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A fuel economy optimization system with applications in vehicles with human drivers and autonomous University of New York, Buffalo, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Keywords: Vehicle fuel economy Eco-driving Human developed and validated a new fuel-economy optimization system (FEOS), which receives input from vehicle

Wu, Changxu (Sean)

199

A method for calibration of bone driver transducers to measure the mastoid Reggie Weece a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 Available online xxxx a b s t r a c t When using bone vibrator transducers for clinical a circuit model of the driver, describing it with three frequency-dependent parameters. Once these three circuit model is proposed to better capture the observed behaviors. ? 2010 Published by Elsevier B.V. 1

Allen, Jont

200

Stratospheric ozone depletion: a key driver of recent precipitation trends in South Eastern South America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In this paper we focus on South Eastern South America (SESA), a region that has exhibited one of the largest South America 1 Introduction The depletion of ozone in the polar Antarctic strato- sphere (i.e. `theStratospheric ozone depletion: a key driver of recent precipitation trends in South Eastern South

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "driver cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Resource limitation is a driver of local adaptation in mycorrhizal symbioses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resource limitation is a driver of local adaptation in mycorrhizal symbioses Nancy Collins Johnsona of the most limiting resource is maximized. Grasses grown in home soil and inoculated with home AM fungi biotrophs with vascular plants, and they facilitate plant acquisition of limiting soil resources. Thus

Weiblen, George D

202

Design and characterization of a signal insulation coreless transformer integrated in a CMOS gate driver chip  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design and characterization of a signal insulation coreless transformer integrated in a CMOS gate transformer integrated in a CMOS silicon die together with the gate driver and other required functions frequency through the coreless transformer. The chosen design methodology will be explained and experimental

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

203

Using Vision-Based Driver Assistance to Augment Vehicular Ad-Hoc Network Communication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a Vision-Based Driver Assistance (VBDA) system that monitors the environment surrounding the vehicle using in the surrounding environment. The concept of a CCWS has been introduced, studied and validated by a number adoption of the Wireless Access in Vehicular Environments (WAVE) set of standards in production vehicles

Beauchemin, Steven S.

204

Help us to manage Welsh Assembly Government Woodlands Feedback form for horse riders/carriage drivers to report problems on designated routes,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/carriage drivers to report problems on designated routes, purpose built car parks or facilities in Welsh Assembly

205

Grain boundary migration induced segregation in V-Cr-Ti alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analytical electron microscopy results are reported for a series of vanadium alloys irradiated in the HFIR JP23 experiment at 500{degrees}C. Alloys were V-5Cr-5Ti and pure vanadium which are expected to have transmuted to V-15Cr-5Ti and V-10Cr following irradiation. Analytical microscopy confirmed the expected transmutation occurred and showed redistribution of Cr and Ti resulting from grain boundary migration in V-5Cr-5Ti, but in pure V, segregation was reduced and no clear trends as a function of position near a boundary were identified.

Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ohnuki, S.; Takahashi, H. [Univ. of Hokkaido (Japan)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Partially filled intermediate band of Cr-doped GaN films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the band structure of sputtered Cr-doped GaN (GaCrN) films using optical absorption, photoelectron yield spectroscopy, and charge transport measurements. It was found that an additional energy band is formed in the intrinsic band gap of GaN upon Cr doping, and that charge carriers in the material move in the inserted band. Prototype solar cells showed enhanced short circuit current and open circuit voltage in the n-GaN/GaCrN/p-GaN structure compared to the GaCrN/p-GaN structure, which validates the proposed concept of an intermediate-band solar cell.

Sonoda, S. [Department of Electronics, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

207

Cr{sub 2}Nb-based alloy development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes recent progress in developing Cr{sub 2}Nb/Cr(Nb) alloys for structural use in advanced fossil energy conversion systems. Alloy additions were added to control the microstructure and mechanical properties. Two beneficial elements have been identified among all alloying additions added to the alloys. One element is effective in refining the coarse eutectic structure and thus substantially improves the compressive strength and ductility of the alloys. The other element enhances oxidation resistance without sacrificing the ductility. The tensile properties are sensitive to cast defects, which can not be effectively reduced by HIPping at 1450-1580{degrees}C and/or directionally solidifying via a floating zone remelting method.

Liu, C.T.; Horton, J.A.; Carmichael, C.A.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Gestion d'un cache Loris Marchal CR08 ordonnancement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gestion d'un cache Loris Marchal CR08 ordonnancement 30 novembre 2011 1 Introduction On s'interesse au probl`eme de la gestion d'une memoire temporaire, couramment ap- pelee cache. Plut^ot quetitivite On consid`ere le cas offline, c'est-`a-dire qu'on conna^it `a l'avance toute la sequence des requ

Marchal, Loris

209

Gestion d'un cache Loris Marchal CR07 ordonnancement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gestion d'un cache Loris Marchal CR07 ordonnancement 17 decembre 2012 1 Introduction On s'interesse au probl`eme de la gestion d'une memoire temporaire, couramment ap- pelee cache. Plut^ot quetitivite On consid`ere le cas offline, c'est-`a-dire qu'on conna^it `a l'avance toute la sequence des requ

Marchal, Loris

210

Improving thermostability of CrO{sub 2} thin films by doping with Sn  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chromium dioxide (CrO{sub 2}) is an ideal material for spin electronic devices since it has almost 100% spin polarization near Fermi level. However, it is thermally unstable and easily decomposes to Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} even at room temperature. In this study, we try to improve the thermal stability of CrO{sub 2} thin films by doping with Sn whose oxide has the same structure as CrO{sub 2}. High quality epitaxial CrO{sub 2} and Sn-doped CrO{sub 2} films were grown on single crystalline TiO{sub 2} (100) substrates by chemical vapor deposition. Sn{sup 4+} ions were believed to be doped into CrO{sub 2} lattice and take the lattice positions of Cr{sup 4+}. The magnetic measurements show that Sn-doping leads to a decrease of magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The thermal stabilities of the films were evaluated by annealing the films at different temperatures. Sn-doped films can withstand a temperature up to 510?C, significantly higher than what undoped films can do (lower than 435?C), which suggests that Sn-doping indeed enhances the thermal stability of CrO{sub 2} films. Our study also indicates that Sn-doping may not change the essential half metallic properties of CrO{sub 2}. Therefore, Sn-doped CrO{sub 2} is expected to be very promising for applications in spintronic devices.

Ding, Yi; Wang, Ziyu; Liu, Shuo; Shi, Jing; Yin, Di, E-mail: dyin@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yuan, Cheng; Lu, Zhihong, E-mail: zludavid@live.com [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Xiong, Rui, E-mail: xiongrui@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Wuhan 430062 (China)

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

E-Print Network 3.0 - allikmaa margus eek Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

economics. Estonian ICT industry has gone through a total reorganization with a lot of SMEs born to meet new market requirements. There is a continuous need from Summary: of...

212

Long-term corrosion of Cr-Mo steels in superheated steam at 482 and 538/sup 0/C. [21/4 Cr-1 Mo; 9 Cr-1 Mo; Sumitomo 9 Cr-2 Mo; Sandvik HT-9  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The corrosion of several Cr-Mo ferritic steels was investigated in superheated steam at an operating power plant. Tests were conducted at 482 and 538/sup 0/C (900 and 1000/sup 0/F) in a once-through loop for times up to 28,000 h. Chromium concentrations ranged from 2.0 to 11.3%, and the effect of surface preparation on corrosion was investigated. Only one of many specimens showed evidence of exfoliation at 482/sup 0/C, but at 538/sup 0/C exfoliation occurred on at least some of the specimens of most materials; the exceptions were the alloy with the highest chromium content (Sandvik HT-9), one heat of 9 Cr-1 Mo steel with the highest silicon content, and Sumitomo 9 Cr-2 Mo steel, which was in test for only 19,000 h. Parabolic oxidation kinetics adequately described the corrosion process for about the first year, after which corrosion rates were constant and lower than predicted from extrapolation of the initial part of the penetration versus time curves. With chromium concentrations between 2 and 9%, corrosion behavior was independent of chromium content, and corrosion was only slightly less with Sandvik HT-9. Corrosion was nearly independent of surface preparation, but in two cases the presence of mill scale on the surface prior to steam exposure seemed to retard oxidation in steam. 11 figures, 5 tables.

Griess, J.C.; DeVan, J.H.; Maxwell, W.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Room Temperature, Intrinsic Vacancy Mediated Ferromagnetism in Cr:Ga2Se3/Si E. N. Yitamben,1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Room Temperature, Intrinsic Vacancy Mediated Ferromagnetism in Cr:Ga2Se3/Si E. N. Yitamben,1, T. C of 4 µB/Cr. The intrinsic- vacancy structure of defected-zinc-blende -Ga2Se3 enables Cr incorporation, as well as strong overlap between Cr 3d states and the Se 4p states lining the intrinsic vacancy rows, ob

Olmstead, Marjorie

214

Low-cost, highly efficient, and tunable ultrafast laser technology based on directly diode-pumped Cr:Colquiriites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This doctoral project aims to develop robust, ultra low-cost ($5,000-20,000), highly-efficient, and tunable femtosecond laser technology based on diode-pumped Cr:Colquiriite gain media (Cr:LiCAF, Cr3+:LiSAF and Cr:LiSGaF). ...

Demirbas, Umit

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

MgO seed layers for CoCrPt/Cr longitudinal magnetic recording media Li-Lien Lee, B. K. Cheong,a)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MgO seed layers for CoCrPt/Cr longitudinal magnetic recording media Li-Lien Lee, B. K. Cheong,a) D, the industry is still in the process of search- ing for a better seed layer. MgO is an ionic crystal that has

Laughlin, David E.

216

Vibronic spectroscopy of unsaturated transition metal complexes: CrC2H, CrCH3 , and NiCH3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to characterize diatomic transition metal oxides, nitrides, and carbides.8­22 In addition to these pure metallicVibronic spectroscopy of unsaturated transition metal complexes: CrC2H, CrCH3 , and NiCH3 Dale J investigation of small transition metal clusters and organo- metallic radicals is that these species serve

Morse, Michael D.

217

Soft zone formation in dissimilar welds between two Cr-Mo steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two dissimilar weldments between 9Cr-1Mo and 2.25Cr-1Mo ferritic steels have been characterized for their microstructural stability during various postweld heat treatments (PWHTs). The samples for the investigation were extracted from bead-on-plate weldments made by depositing 2.25Cr-1Mo weld metal on 9Cr-1Mo base plate and vice versa. Subsequent application of PWHT resulted in the formation of a soft zone in the low Cr ferritic steel weld or base plate. A carbide-rich hard zone, adjoining the soft zone, was also detected in the high Cr side of the weldment. Unmixed zones in the weld metal provided additional soft and hard zones in the weld metals. The migration of carbon from low-Cr steel to high-Cr steel, driven by the carbon activity gradient, has been shown to be responsible for the formation of soft and hard zones. A carbon activity diagram for 2.25Cr-1Mo/9Cr-1Mo weldments has been proposed to aid in the selection of welding consumables for reducing or preventing the soft zone formation.

Albert, S.K.; Gill, T.P.S.; Tyagi, A.K.; Mannan, S.L.; Rodriguez, P. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Kulkarni, S.D. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Bombay (India)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Microstructural analyses of Cr(VI) speciation in chromite ore processing Residue (COPR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The speciation and distribution of Cr(VI) in the solid phase was investigated for two types of chromite ore processing residue (COPR) found at two deposition sites in the United States: gray-black (GB) granular and hard brown (HB) cemented COPR. COPR chemistry and mineralogy were investigated using micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy and micro-X-ray diffraction, complemented by laboratory analyses. GB COPR contained 30percent of its total Cr(VI) (6000 mg/kg) as large crystals(>20 ?m diameter) of a previously unreported Na-rich analog of calcium aluminum chromate hydrates. These Cr(VI)-rich phases are thought to be vulnerable to reductive and pH treatments. More than 50percent of the Cr(VI) was located within nodules, not easily accessible to dissolved reductants, and bound to Fe-rich hydrogarnet, hydrotalcite, and possibly brucite. These phases are stable over a large pH range, thus harder to dissolve. Brownmilleritewasalso likely associated with physical entrapment of Cr(VI) in the interior of nodules. HB COPR contained no Cr(VI)-rich phases; all Cr(VI) was diffuse within the nodules and absent from the cementing matrix, with hydrogarnet and hydrotalcite being the main Cr(VI) binding phases. Treatment ofHBCOPRis challenging in terms of dissolving the acidity-resistant, inaccessible Cr(VI) compounds; the same applies to ~;;50percent of Cr(VI) in GB COPR.

CHRYSOCHOOU, MARIA; FAKRA, SIRINE C .; Marcus, Matthew A.; Moon, Deok Hyun; Dermatas, Dimitris

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Accounting for the Variation of Driver Aggression in the Simulation of Conventional and Advanced Vehicles: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and battery electric vehicles offer the potential to reduce both oil imports and greenhouse gases, as well as to offer a financial benefit to the driver. However, assessing these potential benefits is complicated by several factors, including the driving habits of the operator. We focus on driver aggression, i.e., the level of acceleration and velocity characteristic of travel, to (1) assess its variation within large, real-world drive datasets, (2) quantify its effect on both vehicle efficiency and economics for multiple vehicle types, (3) compare these results to those of standard drive cycles commonly used in the industry, and (4) create a representative drive cycle for future analyses where standard drive cycles are lacking.

Neubauer, J.; Wood, E.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Accounting for the Variation of Driver Aggression in the Simulation of Conventional and Advanced Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and battery electric vehicles offer the potential to reduce both oil imports and greenhouse gases, as well as to offer a financial benefit to the driver. However, assessing these potential benefits is complicated by several factors, including the driving habits of the operator. We focus on driver aggression, i.e., the level of acceleration and velocity characteristic of travel, to (1) assess its variation within large, real-world drive datasets, (2) quantify its effect on both vehicle efficiency and economics for multiple vehicle types, (3) compare these results to those of standard drive cycles commonly used in the industry, and (4) create a representative drive cycle for future analyses where standard drive cycles are lacking.

Neubauer, J.; Wood, E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "driver cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single Family Homes (Revised)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document focuses on managing the driving forces which move air and moisture across the building envelope. While other previously published Measure Guidelines focus on elimination of air pathways, the ultimate goal of this Measure Guideline is to manage drivers which cause air flow and water vapor transport across the building envelope (and also within the home), control air infiltration, keep relative humidity (RH) within acceptable limits, avoid combustion safety problems, improve occupant comfort, and reduce house energy use.

Cummings, J.; Withers, C.; Martin, E.; Moyer, N.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Where do Nissan Leaf drivers in The EV Project charge when they have the opportunity to charge at work?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper invesigates where Nissan Leaf drivers in the EV Project charge when they have the opportunity to charge at work. Do they charge at work, home, or some other location?

John Smart; Don Scoffield

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Where do Chevrolet Volt drivers in The EV Project charge when they have the opportunity to charge at work?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates where Chevy Volt drivers in the EV Project charge when they have the opportunity to charge at work. Do they charge at home, work, or some other location.

John Smart; Don Scoffield

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Analytic Framework for Evaluation of State Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Policies with Reference to Stakeholder Drivers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the framework that was developed to analyze energy efficiency and renewable energy policies on the state level based on how well they meet the stakeholder drivers.

Brown, E.; Mosey, G.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Survey of Laser Markets Relevant to Inertial Fusion Energy Drivers, information for National Research Council  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of a new technology for commercial application can be significantly accelerated by leveraging related technologies used in other markets. Synergies across multiple application domains attract research and development (R and D) talent - widening the innovation pipeline - and increases the market demand in common components and subsystems to provide performance improvements and cost reductions. For these reasons, driver development plans for inertial fusion energy (IFE) should consider the non-fusion technology base that can be lveraged for application to IFE. At this time, two laser driver technologies are being proposed for IFE: solid-state lasers (SSLs) and KrF gas (excimer) lasers. This document provides a brief survey of organizations actively engaged in these technologies. This is intended to facilitate comparison of the opportunities for leveraging the larger technical community for IFE laser driver development. They have included tables that summarize the commercial organizations selling solid-state and KrF lasers, and a brief summary of organizations actively engaged in R and D on these technologies.

Bayramian, A J; Deri, R J; Erlandson, A C

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

226

Active inductor shunt peaking in high-speed VCSEL driver design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An all transistor active inductor shunt peaking structure has been used in a prototype of 8-Gbps high-speed VCSEL driver which is designed for the optical link in ATLAS liquid Argon calorimeter upgrade. The VCSEL driver is fabricated in a commercial 0.25-um Silicon-on-Sapphire (SoS) CMOS process for radiation tolerant purpose. The all transistor active inductor shunt peaking is used to overcome the bandwidth limitation from the CMOS process. The peaking structure has the same peaking effect as the passive one, but takes a small area, does not need linear resistors and can overcome the process variation by adjust the peaking strength via an external control. The design has been tapped out, and the prototype has been proofed by the preliminary electrical test results and bit error ratio test results. The driver achieves 8-Gbps data rate as simulated with the peaking. We present the all transistor active inductor shunt peaking structure, simulation and test results in this paper.

Futian Liang; Datao Gong; Suen Hou; Chonghan Liu; Tiankuan Liu; Da-Shung Su; Ping-Kun Teng; Annie Xiang; Jingbo Ye; Ge Jin

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

227

Break-Even Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Grid parity--or break-even cost--for photovoltaic (PV) technology is defined as the point where the cost of PV-generated electricity equals the cost of electricity purchased from the grid. Break-even cost is expressed in $/W of an installed system. Achieving break-even cost is a function of many variables. Consequently, break-even costs vary by location and time for a country, such as the United States, with a diverse set of resources, electricity prices, and other variables. In this report, we analyze PV break-even costs for U.S. residential customers. We evaluate some key drivers of grid parity both regionally and over time. We also examine the impact of moving from flat to time-of-use (TOU) rates, and we evaluate individual components of the break-even cost, including effect of rate structure and various incentives. Finally, we examine how PV markets might evolve on a regional basis considering the sensitivity of the break-even cost to four major drivers: technical performance, financing parameters, electricity prices and rates, and policies. We find that local incentives rather than ?technical? parameters are in general the key drivers of the break-even cost of PV. Additionally, this analysis provides insight about the potential viability of PV markets.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.; Ong, S.; Roberts, B.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Accounting for the Variation of Driver Aggression in the Simulation of Conventional and Advanced Vehicles (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation discusses a method of accounting for realistic levels of driver aggression to higher-level vehicle studies, including the impact of variation in real-world driving characteristics (acceleration and speed) on vehicle energy consumption and different powertrains (e.g., conventionally powered vehicles versus electrified drive vehicles [xEVs]). Aggression variation between drivers can increase fuel consumption by more than 50% or decrease it by more than 20% from average. The normalized fuel consumption deviation from average as a function of population percentile was found to be largely insensitive to powertrain. However, the traits of ideal driving behavior are a function of powertrain. In conventional vehicles, kinetic losses dominate rolling resistance and aerodynamic losses. In xEVs with regenerative braking, rolling resistance and aerodynamic losses dominate. The relation of fuel consumption predicted from real-world drive data to that predicted by the industry-standard HWFET, UDDS, LA92, and US06 drive cycles was not consistent across powertrains, and varied broadly from the mean, median, and mode of real-world driving. A drive cycle synthesized by NREL's DRIVE tool accurately and consistently reproduces average real-world for multiple powertrains within 1%, and can be used to calculate the fuel consumption effects of varying levels of driver aggression.

Neubauer, J.; Wood, E.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Improved oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1 to 8 wt % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500 to 1000/sup 0/C.

Natesan, K.; Baxter, D.J.

1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

230

Oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1-8 wt. % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500.degree.-1000.degree. C.

Natesan, Ken (Naperville, IL); Baxter, David J. (Woodridge, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

SF6432-CR (02-01-13) Cost Reimbursement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStoriesSANDIA REPORT SANDSDNTM (04-95)7/31/137/31/13 PageCR

232

The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector to 19 MeV protons  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector (TasTrak) to protons in the energy range of 0.929.28 MeV has been studied. Previous studies of the CR-39 response to protons have been extended by examining the piece-to-piece variability in addition to the effects of etch time and etchant temperature; it is shown that the shape of the CR-39 response curve to protons can vary from piece-to-piece. Effects due to the age of CR-39 have also been studied using 5.5 MeV alpha particles over a 5-year period. Track diameters were found to degrade with the age of the CR-39 itself rather than the age of the tracks, consistent with previous studies utilizing different CR-39 over shorter time periods.

Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Manuel, M.; McDuffee, S. C.; Casey, D. T.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

233

Bulk and track etch properties of CR-39 SSNTD etched in NaOH/ethanol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bulk and track etch properties of CR-39 SSNTD etched in NaOH/ethanol K.F. Chan, F.M.F. Ng, D. described the use of NaOH/ethanol as an etchant for the CR-39 detector, and have determined the corre and track etch properties of CR- 39 in NaOH/ethanol were derived from direct measurements. The bulk etch

Yu, K.N.

234

CORROSION OF Fe-10Al-Cr ALLOYS BY COAL CHAR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

off-gas from a typical gasifier contains large percentagesIOAl-Cr alloys at coal-gasifier This FeS and CaS0 operating

Gordon, B.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Proton spectroscopy of 48Ni, 46Fe, and 44Cr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results of decay spectroscopy on nuclei in vicinity of the doubly magic 48Ni are presented. The measurements were performed with a Time Projection Chamber with optical readout which records tracks of ions and protons in the gaseous volume. Six decays of 48Ni including four events of two-proton ground-state radioactivity were recorded. An advanced reconstruction procedure yielded the 2p decay energy for 48Ni of Q2p = 1.29(4) MeV. In addition, the energy spectra of \\b{eta}-delayed protons emitted in the decays of 44Cr and 46Fe, as well as half-lives and branching ratios were determined. The results were found to be consistent with the previous measurements made with Si detectors. A new proton line in the decay of 44Cr corresponding to the decay energy of 760 keV is reported. The first evidence for the \\b{eta}2p decay of 46 Fe, based on one clear event, is shown.

M. Pomorski; M. Pftzner; W. Dominik; R. Grzywacz; A. Stolz; T. Baumann; J. S. Berryman; H. Czyrkowski; R. D?browski; A. Fija?kowska; T. Ginter; J. Johnson; G. Kami?ski; N. Larson; S. N. Liddick; M. Madurga; C. Mazzocchi; S. Mianowski; K. Miernik; D. Miller; S. Paulauskas; J. Pereira; K. P. Rykaczewski; S. Suchyta

2014-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

236

Postirradiation deformation of ferritic Fe-Cr binary alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Six binary Fe-Cr alloys ranging from 3 to 18% chromium were irradiated in the form of miniature tensile specimens in the Fast Flux Test Facility and tested at room temperature. The irradiation conditions produced 7 to 30 dpa at 365 to 574{degrees}C. The major purpose of the experiment was to compare the behavior of these simple alloys with that of more complex commercial alloys, The tensile data obtained on these specimens at room temperature are discussed with appropriate fractographic and microstructural support. Previous studies on similar materials had revealed the presence of a feature typically exhibited in channel fractures: elongated voids were evident in shear bands of an irradiated and deformed TEM disk of a binary Fe-6Cr alloy. An additional purpose of the experiment was therefore to provide a better understanding of the potential contribution of channel fracture to deformation in ferritic alloys. No evidence for channel fracture was found, however. 14 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Precipitation in 9Ni-12Cr-2Cu maraging steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two maraging steels with the compositions 9Ni-12Cr-2Cu-4Mo (wt%) and 9Ni-12Cr-2Cu and with small additions of Al and Ti were investigated using atom probe field ion microscopy. Tomographic atom probe investigations were performed to clarify the spatial distribution of elements in and close to the precipitates. Materials heat treated at 475 C for 5, 25 min, 1, 2, 4 and 400 h were analyzed. Precipitates in the Mo-rich material were observed already after 5 min of aging, while in the material without MO, precipitation started later. In both materials precipitation begins with the formation of Cu-rich particles which work as nucleation sites for a Ni-rich phase of type Ni{sub 3}(Ti,Al). A Mo-rich phase was detected in the Mo-rich steel after 2 h of aging. The distribution of alloying elements in the precipitates, their role in the precipitation process, and the mechanism of hardening in the two materials are discussed.

Stiller, K.; Haettestrand, M. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Physics] [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Physics; Danoix, F. [Univ. de Rouen, Mont Saint Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Ionique] [Univ. de Rouen, Mont Saint Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Ionique

1998-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

238

Corrosion resistance evaluation of 22Cr duplex stainless steel weldments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Among the alternatives for the materials to be used for the construction of two flowlines 22Cr duplex stainless steel was taken into consideration. Corrosion resistance of the welds when exposed to the produced sour fluids was considered as the most critical point, so a program of corrosion testing on the 22Cr duplex stainless steel welds was developed. Three different welding procedures were used and tested in two different laboratories; specimens belonging to one of the welding procedures were also tested after a pre-strain to assess the effect of the deformation induced in the pipe by the wrapping in a reel. Tests were performed in an environment simulating the expected flowlines internal service conditions. Several testing procedures were used. Pitting test according to ASTM G48 Standard were carried out in order to rank welds and exposure tests in simulated field conditions were performed to assess stress corrosion and localized corrosion resistance. Test results showed that all the welds passed the tests and were applicable as corrosion resistant in the service environment. A ranking of the weld procedure based on their corrosion resistance has been determined.

Kopliku, A. [AGIP S.p.A., Milan (Italy); Bell, D. [AGIP UK, London (United Kingdom); Barteri, M. [C.S.M., Rome (Italy); Fowler, C. [CAPCIS, Manchester (United Kingdom)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Effect of Cr2O3 on the 18O Tracer Incorporation in SOFC Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Investigations of the impact of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlayers on the oxygen self diffusion in two SOFC materials were conducted to gain insight into the Cr poisoning mechanism at the cathode side of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with stainless steel interconnects. High density Y{sub 0.15}Zr{sub 0.85}O{sub 2} (YSZ) and La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (LSCF) sintered pellets were covered with 3 to 30 nm Cr overlayers that were subsequently oxidized, forming Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Standard {sup 18}O tracer diffusion experiments at 800 C were performed and ToF-SIMS profiling revealed that the oxygen ion diffusion coefficients were unaffected by the thin Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlayers, which is predictable since they are a bulk property, but the extracted effective surface exchange coefficients varied with Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlayer thickness. Solid-state reaction measurements and electronic structure considerations concerning the surface exchange, led to the conclusion that the observed oxygen uptake hindrance for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} capped LSCF and the slight increase of the surface exchange coefficient for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} capped YSZ can be attributed to the electronic properties of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. A critical thickness for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} was determined to be 12 nm where the transition from decreasing cathode-performance to a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-property-governed regime occurs.

Finsterbusch, M.; Lussier, A; Negusse, E; Zhu, Z; Smith, R; Schaefer, J; Idzerda, Y

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Battery Electric Vehicles: Range Optimization and Diversification for the U.S. Drivers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Properly selecting the driving range is critical for accurately predicting the market acceptance and the resulting social benefits of BEVs. Analysis of transportation technology transition could be biased against battery electric vehicles (BEV) and mislead policy making, if BEVs are not represented with optimal ranges. This study proposes a coherent method to optimize the BEV driving range by minimizing the range-related cost, which is formulated as a function of range, battery cost, energy prices, charging frequency, access to backup vehicles, and the cost and refueling hassle of operating the backup vehicle. This method is implemented with a sample of 36,664 drivers, representing U.S. new car drivers, based on the 2009 National Household Travel Survey data. Key findings are: 1) Assuming the near term (2015) battery cost at $405/kWh, about 98% of the sampled drivers are predicted to prefer a range below 200 miles, and about 70% below 100 miles. The most popular 20-mile band of range is 57 to77 miles, unsurprisingly encompassing the Leaf s EPA-certified 73-mile range. With range limited to 4 or 7 discrete options, the majority are predicted to choose a range below 100 miles. 2) Found as a statistically robust rule of thumb, the BEV optimal range is approximately 0.6% of one s annual driving distance. 3) Reducing battery costs could motivate demand for larger range, but improving public charging may cause the opposite. 4) Using a single range to represent BEVs in analysis could significantly underestimate their competitiveness e.g. by $3226/vehicle if BEVs are represented with 73-mile range only or by $7404/BEV if with 150-mile range only. Range optimization and diversification into 4 or 7 range options reduce such analytical bias by 78% or 90%, respectively.

Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "driver cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Corrosion Behavior of Solution-Annealed CoCrMo Medical Implant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

! ! ! Corrosion Behavior of Solution- Annealed CoCrMo Medical Implant Alloys Pooja Panigrahi University June 6, 2011 #12;! ! ""! Corrosion Behavior of Solution-Annealed CoCrMo Medical Implant Alloys and Applied Sciences Northwestern University June 6, 2011 Abstract Corrosion behavior of solution annealed

Shull, Kenneth R.

242

ENDOR study of Cr3 centers substituting for lithium in lithium niobate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENDOR study of Cr3 centers substituting for lithium in lithium niobate G. Malovichko,1, * V centers in lithium niobate crystals were investigated with the help of electron nuclear double resonance and the parameters of hyperfine and quadrupole interactions were determined. It is found that Cr3 substitutes for Li

Malovichko, Galina

243

MAGNESIUM ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION OF CAIs AND CHONDRULES FROM CR CHONDRITES. B. , M. Gounelle1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAGNESIUM ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION OF CAIs AND CHONDRULES FROM CR CHONDRITES. B. Mimoun1 , M. Gounelle1. Introduction: The magnesium isotopic composi- tion of primitive extraterrestrial materials is worth measuring.g. 10]. Figure 1: The magnesium isotopic composition of CAIs in CR chondrites. Error bars are 1

Technische Universiteit Delft

244

EPR, ENDOR, and optical-absorption study of Cr3 centers substituting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTICLES EPR, ENDOR, and optical-absorption study of Cr3¿ centers substituting for niobium in Li of Sciences, Kiev, Ukraine Received 6 January 2000; revised manuscript received 3 May 2000 A triplet of EPR % of Cr. Detailed investigations of the angular dependencies of EPR and electron nuclear double

Malovichko, Galina

245

Field Investigations of Lactate-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this paper is to carry out field investigations to assess the potential for immobilizing and detoxifying chromium-contaminated groundwater using lactate-stimulated bioreduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at the Hanford 100H site.

T. C. Hazen; B. Faybishenko; D. Joyner; S. Borglin; E. Brodie; S.; K. Williams; J. Peterson; J. Wan; T. Tokunaga; M.; P. E. Long; Resch, C.T.; Newcomer, D.; Koenigsberg, S.; Willet, A.

2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

246

Precipitation in a CuCrZrMg alloy during aging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The precipitation processes in a Cu-0.69Cr-0.10Zr-0.02Mg alloy aged at 450 C and 550 C have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The precipitation sequence in this alloy aged at 450 C is: supersaturated solid solution ? GuinierPreston zone (fcc Cr-rich phase) ? ordered fcc Cr-rich phase ? ordered bcc Cr-rich phase. The precipitation sequence in this alloy aged at 550 C is: supersaturated solid solution ? ordered fcc Cr-rich phase ? ordered bcc Cr-rich phase. In the evolution of decomposition, the orientation relationship between the precipitates and the Cu matrix changes from cube-on-cube to NishiyamaWassermann orientation. The ordering of Cr-rich precipitates facilitates the formation of the bcc precipitates and promotes the development of NishiyamaWassermann orientation. - Highlights: Two different precipitation sequences in the CuCrZrMg alloy are proposed. The changes in orientation relationship of the precipitates are presented. The roles of ordering and coherent interface of the precipitates are discussed.

Cheng, J.Y., E-mail: bigchengjianyi@163.com; Shen, B.; Yu, F.X.

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

Postirradiation deformation behavior in ferritic Fe-Cr alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been demonstrated that fast neutron irradiation produces significant hardening in simple Fe(3-18)Cr binary alloys irradiated to about 35 dpa in the temperature range 365 to 420{degrees}C, whereas irradiation at 574{degrees}C produces hardening only for 15% or more chromium. The irradiation-induced changes in tensile properties are discussed in terms of changes in the power law work hardening exponent. The work hardening exponent of the lower chromium alloys decreased significantly after low temperature irradiation ({le}420{degrees}C) but increased after irradiation at 574{degrees}C. The higher chromium alloys failed either in cleavage or in a mixed ductile/brittle fashion. Deformation microstructures are presented to support the tensile behavior.

Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, VA (United States); Gardner, P.L. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

Postirradiation deformation behavior in ferritic Fe-Cr alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been demonstrated that fast-neutron irradiation produces significant hardening in simple Fe-(3-18)Cr binary alloys irradiated to about 35 dpa in the temperature range 365 to 420{degrees}C, whereas irradiation at 574{degrees}C produces hardening only for 15% or more chromium. The irradiation-induced changes in tensile properties are discussed in terms of changes in the power law work-hardening exponent. The work-hardening exponent of the lower chromium alloys decreased significantly after low-temperature irradiation ({le} 420{degrees}C) but increased after irradiation at 574{degrees}C. The higher chromium alloys failed either in cleavage or in a mixed ductile/brittle fashion. Deformation microstructures are presented to support the tensile behavior.

Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Gardner, P.L. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Postirradiation deformation behavior in ferritic Fe-Cr alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been demonstrated that fast-neutron irradiation produces significant hardening in simple Fe-(3-18)Cr binary alloys irradiated to about 35 dpa in the temperature range 365 to 420[degrees]C, whereas irradiation at 574[degrees]C produces hardening only for 15% or more chromium. The irradiation-induced changes in tensile properties are discussed in terms of changes in the power law work-hardening exponent. The work-hardening exponent of the lower chromium alloys decreased significantly after low-temperature irradiation ([le] 420[degrees]C) but increased after irradiation at 574[degrees]C. The higher chromium alloys failed either in cleavage or in a mixed ductile/brittle fashion. Deformation microstructures are presented to support the tensile behavior.

Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Gardner, P.L. (Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

The role of the cant and lateral position of the steering wheel in the orientation of drivers to the location of the automotive pedals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

examined the effects of three steering wheel cants and three steering wheel lateral positions on drivers' preferred automotive foot pedal locations and separation distances. The dependent variables were the preferred vertical and horizontal positions... in orienting the driver to the locations of the pedals and should be part of any design recommendations detailing the relationship between the driver and the foot pedals. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to thank the chairman of my Advisory Committee, Dr...

Sherrod, M. G

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Data acquisition with a VAX 11/780 and MBD branch driver  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have designed and implemented a general purpose data acquisition system, XSYS, for the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory VAX-11/780. The interface is a CAMAC Branch Highway connected to a Microprogrammed Branch Driver (MBD-11). A single general reentrant MBD program handles CAMAC operations and data transfers to and from the VAX using a DMA transfer. Each of the eight MBD channels is controlled by an independent subprocess in the VAX which communicates with the MBD via the UNIBUS. Data are double buffered and are sorted by VAX user written EVAL codes after the MBD wakes a hibernating subprocess image. Scalar operations and control of external devices are also supported.

King, S.E. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC); Lau, Y.C.; Gould, C.R.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

What are the main drivers of the Bitcoin price? Evidence from wavelet coherence analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bitcoin has emerged as a fascinating phenomenon of the financial markets. Without any central authority issuing the currency, it has been associated with controversy ever since its popularity and public interest reached high levels. Here, we contribute to the discussion by examining potential drivers of Bitcoin prices ranging from fundamental to speculative and technical sources as well as a potential influence of the Chinese market. The evolution of the relationships is examined in both time and frequency domains utilizing the continuous wavelets framework so that we comment on development of the interconnections in time but we can also distinguish between short-term and long-term connections.

Kristoufek, Ladislav

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Drivers of U.S. Household Energy Consumption, 1980-2009  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesDataTranslocationDiurnalCommittee Draft Advice9DrillingDriveDrivers

254

Science Drivers of Particle Physics | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial CarbonArticlesHuman ResourcesScience Drivers of Particle Physics High

255

Low-jitter high-power thyristor array pulse driver and generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for generating low-jitter, high-voltage and high-current pulses for driving low impedance loads such as detonator fuses uses a MOSFET driver which, when triggered, discharges a high-voltage pre-charged capacitor into the primary of a toroidal current-multiplying transformer with multiple isolated secondary windings. The secondary outputs are suitable for driving an array of thyristors that discharge a precharged high-voltage capacitor and thus generating the required high-voltage and high-current pulse.

Hanks, Roy L. (Byron, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

STARDUST INVESTIGATION INTO THE CR CHONDRITE GROVE MOUNTAIN 021710  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the presolar grain inventory of the CR chondrite Grove Mountain 021710. A total of 35 C-anomalous grains ({approx}236 ppm) and 112 O-anomalous grains ({approx}189 ppm) were identified in situ using NanoSIMS ion imaging. Of 35 C-anomalous grains, 28 were determined to be SiC grains by Auger spectroscopy. Seven of the SiC grains were subsequently measured for N and Si isotopes, allowing classification as one nova grain, one Y grain, one Z grain, and four mainstream grains. Eighty-nine out of 112 O-anomalous grains belong to Group 1, indicating origins in low-to-intermediate-mass red giant and asymptotic giant branch stars. Twenty-one are Group 4 grains and have origins in supernovae. Auger spectroscopic elemental measurements of 35 O-anomalous grains show that 33 of them are ferromagnesian silicates. They have higher Mg/(Mg+Fe) ratios than those reported in other meteorites, suggesting a lower degree of alteration in the nebula and/or asteroid parent bodies. Only two oxide grains were identified, with stoichiometric compositions of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and SiO{sub 2}, respectively. The presolar silicate/oxide ratio of GRV 021710 is comparable with those of the CR3 chondrites (QUE 99177 and MET 00426) and primitive interplanetary dust particles. In order to search for presolar sulfides, the meteorite was also mapped for S isotopes. However, no presolar sulfides were found, suggesting a maximum abundance of 2 ppm. The scarcity of presolar sulfides may be due to their much faster sputtering rate by cosmic rays compared to silicates.

Zhao Xuchao; Lin Yangting [Key Laboratory of the Earth's Deep Interior, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Beituchengxi Road, Beijing 100029 (China); Floss, Christine [Laboratory for Space Sciences and Physics Department, Washington University, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Bose, Maitrayee, E-mail: linyt@mail.igcas.ac.cn [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 871604, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

257

Solid state phase equilibria and intermetallic compounds of the Al-Cr-Ho system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solid state phase equilibria of the Al-Cr-Ho ternary system at 500 Degree-Sign C were experimentally investigated. The phase relations at 500 Degree-Sign C are governed by 14 three-phase regions, 29 two-phase regions and 15 single-phase regions. The existences of 10 binary compounds and 2 ternary phases have been confirmed. Al{sub 11}Cr{sub 2}, Al{sub 11}Cr{sub 4} and Al{sub 17}Ho{sub 2} were not found at 500 Degree-Sign C. Crystal structures of Al{sub 9}Cr{sub 4} and Al{sub 8}Cr{sub 4}Ho were determined by the Rietveld X-ray powder data refinement. Al{sub 9}Cr{sub 4} was found to exhibit cubic structure with space group I4-bar 3m (no. 217) and lattice parameters a=0.9107(5) nm. Al{sub 8}Cr{sub 4}Ho crystallizes in ThMn{sub 12} structure type with space group I4/mmm (no. 139) and lattice parameters a=0.8909(4) nm, c=0.5120(5) nm. It is concluded that the obtained Al{sub 4}Cr phase in this work should be {mu}-Al{sub 4}Cr by comparing with XRD pattern of the hexagonal {mu}-Al{sub 4}Mn compound. - Graphical abstract: The solid state phase equilibria of the Al-Cr-Ho ternary system at 500 Degree-Sign C. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al-Cr-Ho system has been investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 9}Cr{sub 4} has cubic structure with space group I4-bar 3m. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 8}Cr{sub 4}Ho crystallizes in ThMn{sub 12} type with space group I4/mmm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 4}Cr phase is {mu}-type at 500 Degree-Sign C.

Pang, Mingjun [Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials and New Processing Technology, Ministry of Education, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China) [Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials and New Processing Technology, Ministry of Education, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China); SAIC-GM-Wuling Automobile Co., Ltd., Liuzhou, Guangxi 545007 (China); Zhan, Yongzhong, E-mail: zyzmatres@yahoo.com.cn [Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials and New Processing Technology, Ministry of Education, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China)] [Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials and New Processing Technology, Ministry of Education, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China); Du, Yong [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Mesoporous carbon -Cr2O3 composite as an anode material for lithium ion batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mesoporous carbon-Cr2O3 (M-C-Cr2O3) composite was prepared by co-assembly of in-situ formed phenolic resin, chromium precursor, and Pluronic block copolymer under acidic conditions, followed by carbonization at 750oC under Argon. The TEM results confirmed that the Cr2O3 nanoparticles, ranging from 10 to 20 nm, were well dispersed in the matrix of mesoporous carbon. The composite exhibited an initial reversible capacity of 710 mAh g-1 and good cycling stability, which is mainly due to the synergic effects of carbons within the composites, i.e. confining the crystal growth of Cr2O3 during the high temperature treatment step and buffering the volume change of Cr2O3 during the cycling step. This composite material is a promising anode material for lithium ion batteries.

Guo, Bingkun [ORNL; Chi, Miaofang [ORNL; Sun, Xiao-Guang [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Void swelling resistance in Fe-Cr alloys at 200 dpa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructural examinations have been performed on a serious of binary Fe-cr alloys irradiated to 200 dpa at 425 C in a fast breeder reactor. The alloy compositions ranged from 3% to 18% Cr in 3% Cr increments, and the irradiation temperature corresponded to the peak swelling condition for this alloy class. Density measurements showed swelling levels as high as 7.4%, with the highest swelling found in the Fe-9Cr and Fe-6Cr alloys. Microstructural examinations revealed that the highest swelling conditions contained well-developed voids, often as large as 100 nm, and a dislocation network comprised of both a/2<111> and a<100> Burgers vectors. Swelling was lower in the other alloys, and the swelling reduction could be correlated with increased precipitation. These results are considered in light of the current theories for low swelling in ferritic alloys, but no theory is available to completely explain the results.

Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

The resistance to cavitation erosion of CrMnN stainless steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The resistance to cavitation erosion (CE) was measured using a magnetostrictive device and a rotating disk device for some CrMnN stainless steels (Chinese patent ZL 90 1 02197.0). The microstructural changes in the surface layer before and after CE were analyzed by use of Mossbauer spectra. Results show that the resistance to CE of duplex austenitic-martensitic CrMnN stainless steels is much better than that of ZG0Cr13Ni4-6Mo and ZG0Cr16Ni5Mo steel, which are in common use for hydraulic turbine runners. The metastable austenite and its changes in the process of CE are the key factors why the CrMnN stainless steels have excellent resistance to cavitation erosion.

Fu, W.T. [Yanshan Univ., Qinhuangdao (China). Dept. of Materials Engineering] [Yanshan Univ., Qinhuangdao (China). Dept. of Materials Engineering; [Harbin Inst. of Tech. (China); Jing, T.F.; Zheng, Y.Z. [Yanshan Univ., Qinhuangdao (China). Dept. of Materials Engineering] [Yanshan Univ., Qinhuangdao (China). Dept. of Materials Engineering; Yang, Y.B. [Yanshan Univ., Qinhuangdao (China). Dept. of Materials Engineering] [Yanshan Univ., Qinhuangdao (China). Dept. of Materials Engineering; [Bohai Aluminum Industries Co., Ltd., Qinhuangdao (China); Yao, M. [Harbin Inst. of Tech. (China)] [Harbin Inst. of Tech. (China)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "driver cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Supplement Table 1. Mean environmental drivers at Brasil flux sites. Precipitation (Prec) from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), for site-specific tower measurement years and a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supplement Table 1. Mean environmental drivers at Brasil flux sites. Precipitation (Prec) from #12;Supplement Table 2. Brasil flux sites instrumentation and measuring methods. *: non aspirated

Malhi, Yadvinder

262

Electron concentration and phase stability in NbCr2-based Laves phase alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase stability in NbCr{sub 2}-based transition-metal Laves phases was studied, based on the data reported for binary X-Cr, Nb-X, and ternary Nb-Cr-X phase diagrams. It was shown that when the atomic size ratios are kept identical, the average electron concentration factor, e/a, is the dominating factor in controlling the phase stability of NbCr{sub 2}-based transition-metal Laves phases. The e/a ratios for different Laves polytypes were determined as followed: with e/a < 5.76, the C15 structure is stabilized; at an e/a range of 5.88--7.53, the C14 structure is stabilized; with e/a > 7.65, the C15 structure is stabilized again. A further increase in the electron concentration factor (e/a > 8) leads to the disordering of the alloy. The electron concentration effect on the phase stability of Mg-based Laves phases and transition-metal A{sub 3}B intermetallic compounds is also reviewed and compared with the present observations in transition-metal Laves phases. In order to verify the e/a/phase stability relationship experimentally, additions of Cu (with e/a = 11) were selected to replace Cr in the NbCr{sub 2} Laves phase. Experimental results for the ternary Nb-Cr-Cu system are reported and discussed in terms of the correlation between the e/a ratio and phase stability in NbCr{sub 2}-based Laves phases. A new phase was found, which has an average composition of Nb-47Cr-3Cu. Within the solubility limit, the electron concentration and phase stability relationship is obeyed in the Nb-Cr-Cu system.

Zhu, J.H.; Liaw, P.K. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Liu, C.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

1997-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

263

Integrated Ecogenomics Study for Bioremediation of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hexavalent chromium is a widespread contaminant found in groundwater. In order to stimulate microbially mediated Cr(VI)-reduction, a poly-lactate compound was injected into Cr(VI)-contaminated aquifers at site 100H at Hanford. Investigation of bacterial community composition using high-density DNA microarray analysis of 16S rRNA gene products revealed a stimulation of Pseudomonas, Desulfovibrio and Geobacter species amongst others. Enrichment of these organisms coincided with continued Cr(VI) depletion. Functional gene-array analysis of DNA from monitoring well indicated high abundance of genes involved in nitrate-reduction, sulfate-reduction, iron-reduction, methanogenesis, chromium tolerance/reduction. Clone-library data revealed Psedomonas was the dominant genus in these samples. Based on above results, we conducted lab investigations to study the dominant anaerobic culturable microbial populations present at this site and their role in Cr(VI)-reduction. Enrichments using defined anaerobic media resulted in isolation of an iron-reducing, a sulfate-reducing and a nitrate-reducing isolate among several others. Preliminary 16S rDNA sequence analysis identified the isolates as Geobacter metallireducens, Pseudomonas stutzeri and Desulfovibrio vulgaris species respectively. The Pseudomonas isolate utilized acetate, lactate, glycerol and pyruvate as alternative carbon sources, and reduced Cr(VI). Anaerobic washed cell suspension of strain HLN reduced almost 95?M Cr(VI) within 4 hr. Further, with 100?M Cr(VI) as sole electron-acceptor, cells grew to 4.05 x 107 /ml over 24 h after an initial lag, demonstrating direct enzymatic Cr(VI) reduction coupled to growth. These results demonstrate that Cr(VI)-immobilization at Hanford 100H site could be mediated by direct microbial metabolism in addition to indirect chemical reduction of Cr(VI) by end-products of microbial activity.

Chakraborty, Romy; Chakraborty, Romy

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

264

Simulation of Reduction of Cr(VI) by Fe(II) Produced Electrochemically in a Parallel-Plate Electrochemical Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the cathode, electrocoagulation uses electricity to produce a reducing agent ferrous ions from an iron anode the reduction of Cr VI by permeable reactive barriers. Gheju and Lovi7 reported that the re- duction of Cr VI

265

Implementation of scattering pinhole diagnostic for detection of fusion products on CR-39 at high particle fluence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments use solid-state nuclear track detector CR-39 as a means to detect different types of nuclear products. Until recently, it was difficult to use CR-39 in experiments with ...

Orozco, David, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

A thirty-two clock hour driver education classroom curriculum guide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A THIRTY-TWO CLOCK HOUR DRIVER EDUCATION CLASSROOM CURRICULUM GUIDE A R e c o r d o f St u d y by WILLIAM LEE RICHARDSON S u b m i t t e d t o t h e O f f i c e o f G r a d u a t e S t u d i e s o f Texas A&M U n i v e r s i t y i n p a r t i... a l f u l f i l l m e n t o f t h e r e q u i r e m e n t s f o r t h e de g r e e o f DOCTOR OF EDUCATION December 1990 M a j o r S u b j e c t : I n d u s t r i a l E d u c a t i o n A THIRTY-TWO CLOCK HOUR DRIVER EDUCATION CLASSROOM...

Richardson, William Lee

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

267

Optimizing and Diversifying Electric Vehicle Driving Range for U.S. Drivers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Properly determining the driving range is critical for accurately predicting the sales and social benefits of battery electric vehicles (BEVs). This study proposes a framework for optimizing the driving range by minimizing the sum of battery price, electricity cost, and range limitation cost referred to as the range-related cost as a measurement of range anxiety. The objective function is linked to policy-relevant parameters, including battery cost and price markup, battery utilization, charging infrastructure availability, vehicle efficiency, electricity and gasoline prices, household vehicle ownership, daily driving patterns, discount rate, and perceived vehicle lifetime. Qualitative discussion of the framework and its empirical application to a sample (N=36,664) representing new car drivers in the United States is included. The quantitative results strongly suggest that ranges of less than 100 miles are likely to be more popular in the BEV market for a long period of time. The average optimal range among U.S. drivers is found to be largely inelastic. Still, battery cost reduction significantly drives BEV demand toward longer ranges, whereas improvement in the charging infrastructure is found to significantly drive BEV demand toward shorter ranges. The bias of a single-range assumption and the effects of range optimization and diversification in reducing such biases are both found to be significant.

Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Breakeven Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities (Report Summary) (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

"Break-even cost" for photovoltaic (PV) technology is defined as the point where the cost of PV-generated electricity equals the cost of electricity purchased from the grid. Break-even cost is expressed in $/W of an installed system. Achieving break-even cost is a function of many variables. Consequently, break-even costs vary by location and time for a country, such as the United States, with a diverse set of resources, electricity prices, and other variables. In this presentation, we introduce an analysis of PV break-even costs for residential customers in the United States, including an evaluation of some of the key drivers of PV breakeven both regionally and over time. This presentation includes our methodology and presents results for both near-term residential breakeven costs(2009) and future market sensitivities of break-even costs (2015). See also the the report "Break-Even Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities". Presentation for NREL/TP-6A2-45991.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.; Ong, S.; Roberts, B.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

A new model to account for track overlap in CR-39 data A.B. Zylstra a,n  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in revised form 3 April 2012 Accepted 3 April 2012 Available online 19 April 2012 Keywords: CR-39 Nuclear track detectors Inertial confinement fusion a b s t r a c t The solid-state nuclear track detector CR-39 such as neutron dosimetry and radon detection. The upper limit of detectable charged-particle fluence on CR-39

270

Role of Embedded Clustering in Dilute Magnetic Semiconductors: Cr Doped GaN X. Y. Cui,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, typically 5 (20­30) times smaller for Cr-based (Mn-based) III-V DMS than the value expected, 3 B= Cr4 BRole of Embedded Clustering in Dilute Magnetic Semiconductors: Cr Doped GaN X. Y. Cui,1 J. E configurations coexist and the statistical distribution and associated magnetism will depend sensitively

Medvedeva, Julia E.

271

Differential isotopic fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction by an aquifer-derived bacterium under arobic versus denitrifying conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We studied Cr isotopic fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain RCH2. Despite the fact that strain RCH2 reduces Cr(VI) co-metabolically under both aerobic and denitrifying conditions and at similar specific rates, fractionation was markedly different under these two conditions (ε ~2? aerobically and ~0.4? under denitrifying conditions).

Han, R.; Qin, L.; Brown, S. T.; Christensen, J. N.; Beller, H. R.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Cr-Ga-N materials for negative electrodes in Li rechargeable batteries : structure, synthesis and electrochemical performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrochemical performances of two ternary compounds (Cr2GaN and Cr3GaN) in the Cr-Ga-N system as possible future anode materials for lithium rechargeable batteries were studied. Motivation for this study was dealt in ...

Kim, Miso

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Nanoscale Phase Separation In Epitaxial Cr-Mo and Cr-V Alloy Thin Films Studied Using Atom Probe Tomography: Comparison Of Experiments And Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tailored metal alloy thin film-oxide interfaces generated using molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) deposition of alloy thin films on a single crystalline oxide substrate can be used for detailed studies of irradiation damage response on the interface structure. However presence of nanoscale phase separation in the MBE grown alloy thin films can impact the metal-oxide interface structure. Due to nanoscale domain size of such phase separation it is very challenging to characterize by conventional techniques. Therefor laser assisted atom probe tomography (APT) was utilized to study the phase separation in epitaxial Cr0.61Mo0.39, Cr0.77Mo0.23, and Cr0.32V0.68 alloy thin films grown by MBE on MgO(001) single crystal substrates. Statistical analysis, namely frequency distribution analysis and Pearson coefficient analysis of experimental data was compared with similar analyses conducted on simulated APT datasets with known extent of phase separation. Thus the presence of phase separation in Cr-Mo films, even when phase separation was not clearly observed by x-ray diffraction, and the absence of phase separation in the Cr-V film were thus confirmed.

Devaraj, Arun; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Ramanan, Sathvik; Walvekar, Sarita K.; Bowden, Mark E.; Shutthanandan, V.; Kurtz, Richard J.

2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

274

Ni-Cr-P plating bath time dependent characterization by ion chromatography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis of Cr VII. HPIC gradient eluation program for anions VIII. HPIC eluation program for HsBOs IX. A method comparison of initial Ni-Cr-P plating bath ionic species concentrations as determined by weight measurement and HPIC analysis. X. Ni... the rate constants for compound C. 40 44 79 80 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Amorphous Nickel-Chromium-Phosphorus (Ni-Cr-P) alloys have outstand- ing corrosion resistance, which is even superior to that of Hastelloy C-276 (1). This corrosion resistance...

Faxel, Ralph Edward

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Jade Sky Technologies Partners with CLTC on LED Replacement Lamp Upgrade Project UC Davis' California Lighting Technology Center will utilize Jade Sky Technologies' driver ICs to help spur  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

' California Lighting Technology Center will utilize Jade Sky Technologies' driver ICs to help spur adoption of cost-effective, easy-to-use LED lighting solutions Milpitas, Calif. ­ October 15, 2013 ­ Jade Sky Technologies (JST), a clean-tech start-up manufacturer of driver ICs for LED lighting applications, announces

California at Davis, University of

276

Factors influencing field performance: utilizing the drug evaluation and classificaiton (DEC) program to identify suspected impaired drivers as reported by selected certified police officers in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

impaired drivers. Specifically, this study explored how particular factors observed as part of the DEC Programs decision-making process influence the DREs prediction of a drug category that was impairing a suspected impaired driver in the enforcement...

Walden, Melissa Noggle

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

High temperature oxidation behavior of Fe-Cr-Al foils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metallic catalytic converters for automotive emission control is becoming an important application for heat resistant alloys as more design opportunities are realized. The service conditions and design of metallic catalytic converters require the alloy to be highly oxidation resistant at gauges typically at 50 microns or less. For conventional heat resistant alloy design the goal is to form a well adherent scale on the alloy surface to protect the alloy matrix from being oxidized. However, the thin gauge results in a limited supply of alloying elements that can form the protective scale on the surface. The alloy chemistry has to be optimized to have the minimum oxidation while maintaining processing characteristics. Furthermore, the ratio of scale thickness to foil gauge is significant and the stress state between them introduces measurable permanent distortion of the foil. In this study, the effect of alloying elements on the oxidation behavior of commonly used Fe-Cr-Al alloys was quantified by the oxidation weight gain and length change measurements.

Chang, C.S.; Jha, B. [Texas Instruments, Inc., Attleboro, MA (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Steamside Oxidation Behavior of Experimental 9%Cr Steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reducing emissions and increasing economic competitiveness require more efficient steam power plants that utilize fossil fuels. One of the major challenges in designing these plants is the availability of materials that can stand the supercritical and ultra-supercritical steam conditions at a competitive cost. There are several programs around the world developing new ferritic and austenitic steels for superheater and reheater tubes exposed to the advanced steam conditions. The new steels must possess properties better than current steels in terms of creep strength, steamside oxidation resistance, fireside corrosion resistance, and thermal fatigue resistance. This paper introduces a series of experimental 9%Cr steels containing Cu, Co, and Ti. Stability of the phases in the new steels is discussed and compared to the phases in the commercially available materials. The steels were tested under both the dry and moist conditions at 650C for their cyclical oxidation resistance. Results of oxidation tests are presented. Under the moist conditions, the experimental steels exhibited significantly less mass gain compared to the commercial P91 steel. Microstructural characterization of the scale revealed different oxide compositions.

Dogan, O.N.; Holcomb, G.R.; Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Electrochemical Testing of Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The waste package site recommendation design specified a boron-containing stainless steel, Neutronit 976/978, for fabrication of the internal baskets that will be used as a corrosion-resistant neutron-absorbing material. Recent corrosion test results gave higher-than-expected corrosion rates for this material. The material callout for these components has been changed to a Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy (ASTM-B 932-04, UNS N06464) that is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory. This report discusses the results of initial corrosion testing of this material in simulated in-package environments that could contact the fuel baskets after breach of the waste package outer barrier. The corrosion test matrix was executed using the potentiodynamic and potentiostatic electrochemical test techniques. The alloy performance shows low rates of general corrosion after initial removal of a gadolinium-rich second phase that intersects the surface. The high halide-containing test solutions exhibited greater tendencies toward initiation of crevice corrosion.

T. E. Lister; R. E. Mizia; H. Tian

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Laser-seeded modulation instability in a proton driver plasma wakefield accelerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new method for initiating the modulation instability (MI) of a proton beam in a proton driver plasma wakefield accelerator using a short laser pulse preceding the beam is presented. A diffracting laser pulse is used to produce a plasma wave that provides a seeding modulation of the proton bunch with the period equal to that of the plasma wave. Using the envelope description of the proton beam, this method of seeding the MI is analytically compared with the earlier suggested seeding technique that involves an abrupt truncation of the proton bunch. The full kinetic simulation of a realistic proton bunch is used to validate the analytic results. It is further used to demonstrate that a plasma density ramp placed in the early stages of the laser-seeded MI leads to its stabilization, resulting in sustained accelerating electric fields (of order several hundred MV/m) over long propagation distances (?1001000 m)

Siemon, Carl; Khudik, Vladimir; Austin Yi, S.; Shvets, Gennady [Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Pukhov, Alexander [Institut fr Theoretische Physik I, Universitt Dsseldorf, Dsseldorf 40225 (Germany)] [Institut fr Theoretische Physik I, Universitt Dsseldorf, Dsseldorf 40225 (Germany)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "driver cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Rotating fiber array molecular driver and molecular momentum transfer device constructed therewith  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A rotating fiber array molecular driver is disclosed which includes a magnetically suspended and rotated central hub to which is attached a plurality of elongated fibers extending radially therefrom. The hub is rotated so as to straighten and axially extend the fibers and to provide the fibers with a tip speed which exceeds the average molecular velocity of fluid molecules entering between the fibers. Molecules colliding with the sides of the rotating fibers are accelerated to the tip speed of the fiber and given a momentum having a directional orientation within a relatively narrow distribution angle at a point radially outward of the hub, which is centered and peaks at the normal to the fiber sides in the direction of fiber rotation. The rotating fiber array may be used with other like fiber arrays or with other stationary structures to form molecular momentum transfer devices such as vacuum pumps, molecular separators, molecular coaters, or molecular reactors.

Milleron, Norman (1854 San Juan, Berkeley, CA 94707)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

A Family of L-band SRF Cavities for High Power Proton Driver Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent global interest in high duty factor or CW superconducting linacs with high average beam power highlights the need for robust and reliable SRF structures capable of delivering high average RF power to the beam with moderate HOM damping, low interception of halo and good efficiency. Potential applications include proton or H- drivers for spallation neutron sources, neutrino physics, waste transmutation, subcritical reactors, and high-intensity high-energy physics experiments. We describe a family of SRF cavities with a range of Betas capable of transporting beam currents in excess of 10 mA CW with large irises for minimal interception of halo and HOM and power couplers capable of supporting high average power operation. Goals include an efficient cell shape, high packing factor for efficient real-estate gradient and strong HOM damping to ensure stable beam operation,

Robert Rimmer, Frank Marhauser

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer. Segments of roads with LSFs (right) have better driver visibility and road surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is an equal opportunity educator and employer. Segments of roads with LSFs (right) have better driver improve driver visibility, road surface conditions and have the potential to reduce accidents, snow

Amin, S. Massoud

284

Author's personal copy Regional-and district-level drivers of timber harvesting in European Russia after  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's personal copy Regional- and district-level drivers of timber harvesting in European Russia. Introduction Russia is important globally as a supplier of forest goods and services: it contains 20 percent Russian harvested timber comes from European Russia, even though this area accounts for just 20 percent

Radeloff, Volker C.

285

Understanding the drivers affecting land use change in Ecuador: an application of the Land Change Modeler software  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in forest cover, satellite images (years 1996 and 2001) were used to produce land cover maps which were then used with the software to estimate probabilities of pixels changing from forests to other land use types. Various drivers of deforestation input...

Krishna Rajan, Dhruva

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Brazils Biofuels Scenario: What are the Main Drivers Which will Shape Investments in the Long Term?  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 3CFostering Technology Adoption III: International Market Opportunities in Bioenergy Brazils Biofuels Scenario: What are the Main Drivers Which will Shape Investments in the Long Term? Artur Milanez, Manager of Biofuels Department, Brazilian Development Bank

287

CORROSION OF Fe-10Al-Cr ALLOYS BY COAL CHAR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

owned rights. LBL-6946 Corrosion of Fe-lOAl-Cr Alloys byOctober, 1977 Abstract Corrosion of iron-base alloys at 982high-temperature induced corrosion are probably sulfides and

Gordon, B.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Structure, Magnetism, and Transport of CuCr2Se4 Thin Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structure, Magnetism, and Transport of CuCr 2 Se 4 Thindichroism shows that the magnetism persists to the surfacesuch as the nature of magnetism at surfaces and interfaces.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

E-Print Network 3.0 - austenitic fe-cr-ni alloys Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

than at 650C. Therefore, for these Fe-Cr-Ni model alloys, increasing... Figure 5 shows LM of the samples after 100x1h cycles at 650C for representative ... Source: Pint, Bruce...

290

C/CrC nanocomposite coating deposited by magnetron sputtering at high ion irradiation conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CrC with the fcc NaCl (B1) structure is a metastable phase that can be obtained under the non-equilibrium conditions of high ion irradiation. A nano-composite coating consisting of amorphous carbon embedded in a CrC matrix was prepared via the unbalanced magnetron sputtering of graphite and Cr metal targets in Ar gas with a high ionized flux (ion-to-neutral ratio Ji/Jn = 6). The nanoscale amorphous carbon clusters self-assembled into layers alternated by CrC, giving the composite a multilayer structure. The phase, microstructure, and composition of the coating were characterized using x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled with electron energy loss spectroscopy. The interpretation of the true coating structure, in particular the carbide type, is discussed.

Zhou, Z.; Rainforth, W. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Gass, M. H.; Bleloch, A. [SuperSTEM at Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Ehiassarian, A. P.; Hovsepian, P. Eh. [Materials Engineering Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield, S1 1WB (United Kingdom)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Process for producing Ti-Cr-Al-O thin film resistors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Thin films of Ti-Cr-Al-O are used as a resistor material. The films are rf sputter deposited from ceramic targets using a reactive working gas mixture of Ar and O.sub.2. Resistivity values from 10.sup.4 to 10.sup.10 Ohm-cm have been measured for Ti-Cr-Al-O film <1 .mu.m thick. The film resistivity can be discretely selected through control of the target composition and the deposition parameters. The application of Ti-Cr-Al-O as a thin film resistor has been found to be thermodynamically stable, unlike other metal-oxide films. The Ti-Cr-Al-O film can be used as a vertical or lateral resistor, for example, as a layer beneath a field emission cathode in a flat panel display; or used to control surface emissivity, for example, as a coating on an insulating material such as vertical wall supports in flat panel displays.

Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA); Schmid, Anthony P. (Solana Beach, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Flat panel display using Ti-Cr-Al-O thin film  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Thin films of Ti--Cr--Al--O are used as a resistor material. The films are rf sputter deposited from ceramic targets using a reactive working gas mixture of Ar and O.sub.2. Resistivity values from 10.sup.4 to 10.sup.10 Ohm-cm have been measured for Ti--Cr--Al--O film <1 .mu.m thick. The film resistivity can be discretely selected through control of the target composition and the deposition parameters. The application of Ti--Cr--Al--O as a thin film resistor has been found to be thermodynamically stable, unlike other metal-oxide films. The Ti--Cr--Al--O film can be used as a vertical or lateral resistor, for example, as a layer beneath a field emission cathode in a flat panel display; or used to control surface emissivity, for example, as a coating on an insulating material such as vertical wall supports in flat panel displays.

Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA); Schmid, Anthony P. (Solan Beach, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Cr(VI) reduction in aqueous solutions by using copper smelter slag  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability of Copper Smelter Slag (CSS) to reduce Cr(VI) in aqueous solutions has been investigated. The extent of reduction if dependent on the amounts of acid and reductant, contact time, Cr(VI) concentration, temperature of the solution and particle size of CSS. The amount of acid is the most important variable affecting the reduction process. When twice the amount of acid required with respect to Cr(VI) was used, Cr(VI) in 100 ml solution (100 mg/l) was completely reduced in a contact period less than 5 min by a 10 g/l dosage of CSS. Reduction efficiency increased with increase in temperature of solution, showing that the process is endothermic. Reduced chromium, and iron and other metals dissolved from CSS were effectively precipitated by using NaOH or calcinated carbonation sludge from sugar plant.

Kiyak, B.; Oezer, A.; Altundogan, H.S.; Erdem, M.; Tuemen, F. (Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey))

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Cr(VI) reduction in aqueous solutions by using copper smelter slag  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability of Copper Smelter Slag (CSS) to reduce Cr(VI) in aqueous solutions has been investigated. The extent of reduction if dependent on the amounts of acid and reductant, contact time, Cr(VI) concentration, temperature of the solution and particle size of CSS. The amount of acid is the most important variable affecting the reduction process. When twice the amount of acid required with respect to Cr(VI) was used, Cr(VI) in 100 ml solution (100 mg/l) was completely reduced in a contact period less than 5 min by a 10 g/l dosage of CSS. Reduction efficiency increased with increase in temperature of solution, showing that the process is endothermic. Reduced chromium, and iron and other metals dissolved from CSS were effectively precipitated by using NaOH or calcinated carbonation sludge from sugar plant.

Kiyak, B.; Oezer, A.; Altundogan, H.S.; Erdem, M.; Tuemen, F. [Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey)] [Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Microstructures of Metallic NiCrBSi Coatings Manufactured via Hybrid Plasma Spray  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, nanoindentation, NiCrBSi, plasma-laser hybrid process, scratch testing 1. Introduction Electrodeposited hard, uniform microstructure, high hardness, and highly adhesive bonding to the substrate (Ref 8). Nickel

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

296

Electronic Structure of CrN: from Macro to Nano | Argonne National...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electronic Structure of CrN: from Macro to Nano January 28, 2015 11:00AM to 12:00PM Presenter Antia Sanchez Botana, University of California, Davis Location Building 223, Room S105...

297

A few-cycle Cr??:YAG laser and optical studies of photonic crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A prismless Cr4+:YAG laser was used to generate 20 fs pulses at 1450 nm with a bandwidth of 190 nm FWHM. Intracavity group velocity dispersion was compensated with double-chirped mirrors. Pulse spectrum was observable from ...

Ripin, Daniel Jacob, 1973-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

CORROSION OF Fe-10Al-Cr ALLOYS BY COAL CHAR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potent.ials Encountered in Coal Conversion Systems", NASA TNof Illinois #6 ash and coal char. Figure 1. Cross sectionsof Fe-lOAl-Cr Alloys by Coal Char B. A. Gordon and V.

Gordon, B.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Surface modification to improve fireside corrosion resistance of Fe-Cr ferritic steels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An article of manufacture and a method for providing an Fe--Cr ferritic steel article of manufacture having a surface layer modification for corrosion resistance. Fe--Cr ferritic steels can be modified to enhance their corrosion resistance to liquid coal ash and other chemical environments, which have chlorides or sulfates containing active species. The steel is modified to form an aluminide/silicide passivating layer to reduce such corrosion.

Park, Jong-Hee (Clarendon Hills, IL); Natesan, Krishnamurti (Naperville, IL); Rink, David L. (Mokena, IL)

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

300

Heat treatment of NiCrFe alloy to optimize resistance to intergrannular stress corrosion  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of producing a NiCrFe alloy having a high resistance to stress corrosion cracking comprising heating a NiCrFe alloy to a temperature sufficient to enable the carbon present in the alloy body in the form of carbide deposits to enter into solution, rapidly cool the alloy body, and heat the cooled body to a temperature between 1100.degree. to 1500.degree. F. for about 1 to 30 hours.

Steeves, Arthur F. (Schenectady, NY); Bibb, Albert E. (Clifton Park, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "driver cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Optimizing Cr(VI) and Tc(VII) remediation through nano-scale biomineral engineering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To optimize the production of biomagnetite for the bioremediation of metal oxyanion contaminated waters, the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by two biogenic magnetites and a synthetic magnetite was evaluated under batch and continuous flow conditions. Results indicate that nano-scale biogenic magnetite produced by incubating synthetic schwertmannite powder in cell suspensions of Geobacter sulfurreducens is more efficient at reducing Cr(VI) than either biogenic nano-magnetite produced from a suspension of ferrihydrite 'gel' or synthetic nano-scale Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} powder. Although X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements obtained from post-exposure magnetite samples reveal that both Cr(III) and Cr(VI) are associated with nanoparticle surfaces, X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) studies indicate that some Cr(III) has replaced octahedrally coordinated Fe in the lattice of the magnetite. Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) measurements of total aqueous Cr in the associated solution phase indicated that, although the majority of Cr(III) was incorporated within or adsorbed to the magnetite samples, a proportion ({approx}10-15 %) was released back into solution. Studies of Tc(VII) uptake by magnetites produced via the different synthesis routes also revealed significant differences between them as regards effectiveness for remediation. In addition, column studies using a {gamma}-camera to obtain real time images of a {sup 99m}Tc(VII) radiotracer were performed to visualize directly the relative performances of the magnetite sorbents against ultra-trace concentrations of metal oxyanion contaminants. Again, the magnetite produced from schwertmannite proved capable of retaining more ({approx}20%) {sup 99m}Tc(VII) than the magnetite produced from ferrihydrite, confirming that biomagnetite production for efficient environmental remediation can be fine-tuned through careful selection of the initial Fe(III) mineral substrate supplied to Fe(III)-reducing bacteria.

Cutting, R. S.; Coker, V. S.; Telling, N. D.; Kimber, R. L.; Pearce, C. I.; Ellis, B.; Lawson, R; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R.A.D.; Vaughan, D.J.; Arenholz, E.; Lloyd, J. R.

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

302

Event-by-event study of CR composition with the SPHERE experiment using the 2013 data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an event-by-event study of cosmic ray (CR) composition with the reflected Cherenkov light method. The fraction of CR light component above 5 PeV was reconstructed using the 2013 run data of the SPHERE experiment which observed optical Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation of extensive air showers, reflected from snow surface of Lake Baikal. Additionally, we discuss a possibility to improve the elemental groups separability by means of multidimensional criteria.

Antonov, R A; Bonvech, E A; Chernov, D V; Dzhatdoev, T A; Finger, Mich; Finger, Mir; Galkin, V I; Podgrudkov, D A; Roganova, T M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

PVD synthesis and high-throughput property characterization of Ni?Fe?Cr alloy libraries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three methods of alloy library synthesis, thick-layer deposition followed by interdiffusion, composition-spread codeposition and electron-beam melting of thick deposited layers, have been applied to Ni-Fe-Cr ternary and Ni-Cr binary alloys. Structural XRD mapping and mechanical characterization by means of nanoindentation have been used to characterize the properties of the libraries. The library synthesis methods are compared from the point of view of the structural and mechanical information they can provide.

Rar, A.; Frafjord, J.J.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Specht, E.D.; Rack, P.D.; Santella, M.L.; Bei, H.; George, E.P.; Pharr, G.M. (Tennessee-K); (Tennessee-K); (ORNL)

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

304

High-pressure structure of half-metallic CrO2 B. R. Maddox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transition from rutile -CrO2 phase I P42/mnm to orthorhombic -CrO2 phase II CaCl2-like, Pnnm is presented. The transition to the CaCl2 structure, which appears to be second order, occurs at 12±3 GPa without any typically transforms to another sixfold-coordinated structure, CaCl2, or the -PbO2 structure found in shock

Pickett, Warren

305

Microstructure and Mechanical Property Studies on Neutron-Irradiated Ferritic Fe-Cr Model Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Model Fe, Fe-10Cr and Fe-14Cr alloys were irradiated in Advanced Test Reactor at 300C and 450C to target doses of 0.01, 0.1 and 1 dpa. The microstructure and the mechanical property of irradiated specimens were investigated using TEM, APT and hardness measurements. The irradiation-induced hardening was consistent with the observed microstructures. For lower doses of 0.01 and 0.1 dpa, the formation of dislocation loops was the primarily contributor to the hardening; no a precipitates of resolvable sizes were observed. By 1 dpa, additional increase in hardening were attributed to the formation of a high density of 1-2 nm a' precipitates. In Fe, the hardness increased less as a function of irradiation dose compared to Fe-Cr alloys because of the lack of a' precipitation and differences in loop structures. Three single-parameter effects have been studied: the Cr content, the irradiation temperature and the grain size. The addition of Cr reduced the mobility of both <111> and <100> dislocation loops, leading to a smaller loop size and higher loop density. Also, the Cr contents were positively correlated to the density of a' precipitates, but were less relevant to the precipitate size. Higher irradiation temperature of 450C resulted in a preferential production of the immobile <100> loops over the mobile <111> loops (ex. a ratio of 8:1 in Fe-10Cr irradiated 450C to 0.01 dpa). At lower temperature of 300C, heterogeneous formation of dislocation loops at the vicinity of line dislocations frequently. In Fe, the development of dislocation loops was suppressed (compared to Fe-Cr alloys) due to a combination of smaller grain size, high initial dislocation density and high defect mobility.

Jian Gan; Maria Okuniewski; Wei-Ying Chen; Yinbin Miao; Carolyn A. Tomchik; James F. Stubbins; Y. Q. Wu; Stu A. Maloy

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Oxidation behavior of arc evaporated Al-Cr-Si-N thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of Al and Si on the oxidation behavior of Al-Cr-(Si)-N thin films synthesized by arc evaporation of powder metallurgically prepared Al{sub x}Cr{sub 1-x} targets with x = Al/(Al + Cr) of 0.5, 0.6, and 0.7 and (Al{sub 0.5}Cr{sub 0.5}){sub 1-z}Si{sub z} targets with Si contents of z = 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 in N{sub 2} atmosphere was studied in detail by means of differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), x-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. Dynamical measurements in synthetic air (up to 1440 Degree-Sign C) revealed the highest onset temperature of pronounced oxidation for nitride coatings prepared from the Al{sub 0.4}Cr{sub 0.4}Si{sub 0.2} target. Isothermal TGA at 1100, 1200, 1250, and 1300 Degree-Sign C highlight the pronounced improvement of the oxidation resistance of Al{sub x}Cr{sub 1-x}N coatings by the addition of Si. The results show that Si promotes the formation of a dense coating morphology as well as a dense oxide scale when exposed to air.

Tritremmel, Christian; Daniel, Rostislav; Mitterer, Christian; Mayrhofer, Paul H.; Lechthaler, Markus; Polcik, Peter [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Advanced Hard Coatings, Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Application Oriented Coating Development, Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); OC Oerlikon Balzers AG, Iramali 18, LI-9496 Balzers (Liechtenstein); PLANSEE Composite Materials GmbH, Siebenbuergerstrasse 23, D-86983 Lechbruck am See (Germany)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of n-irradiated Fe-Cr Model Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High chromium ( 9-12 wt %) ferritic/martensitic steels are candidate structural materials for future fusion reactors and other advanced systems such as accelerator driven systems (ADS). Their use for these applications requires a careful assessment of their mechanical stability under high energy neutron irradiation and in aggressive environments. In particular, the Cr concentration has been shown to be a key parameter to be optimized in order to guarantee the best corrosion and swelling resistance, together with the least embrittlement. In this work, the characterization of the neutron irradiated Fe-Cr model alloys with different Cr % with respect to microstructure and mechanical tests will be presented. The behavior of Fe-Cr alloys have been studied using tensile tests at different temperature range ( from -160 deg. C to 300 deg. C). Irradiation-induced microstructure changes have been studied by TEM for two different irradiation doses at 300 deg. C. The density and the size distribution of the defects induced have been determined. The tensile test results indicate that Cr content affects the hardening behavior of Fe-Cr binary alloys. Hardening mechanisms are discussed in terms of Orowan type of approach by correlating TEM data to the measured irradiation hardening. (authors)

Matijasevic, Milena; Al Mazouzi, Abderrahim [Reactor materials research, SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

The Environmental Change Network (ECN) was established in 1992 to provide a framework for monitoring the effects of a range of environmental drivers on freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems. The Alice Holt ECN site represents the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for monitoring the effects of a range of environmental drivers on freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems the functioning of ecosystems. Identifying the cause and effect of individual drivers is a major challenge for environmental monitoring, as it requires that the effects of those drivers are distinguished from background

309

Detection of charge transfer processes in Cr-doped SrTiO{sub 3} single crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An insulator-to-metal transition is observed in Cr-doped SrTiO{sub 3} single crystals upon extended exposure to a high electric field, namely, electroconditioning (EC). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and transport measurements under laser irradiation show anticorrelation between the Cr{sup 3+} EPR signal and the electrical current. This proves that the Cr{sup 3+} ions are responsible for the photocurrent that initiates the EC process. We observe the presence of Cr{sup 3+}/Cr{sup 4+} mixed valencies in the bulk in the conducting state. The EPR characterization of the spectra in the conducting state excludes the possibility of a Cr{sup 3+}-oxygen vacancy complex in the bulk as a result of the EC.

La Mattina, F. [Physik-Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, Winterthurerstr. 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); IBM Research, Zurich Research Laboratory, Saeumerstr. 4, CH-8803 Rueschlikon (Switzerland); Bednorz, J. G.; Alvarado, S. F. [IBM Research, Zurich Research Laboratory, Saeumerstr. 4, CH-8803 Rueschlikon (Switzerland); Shengelaya, A. [Physics Institute of Tbilisi State University, Chavchavadze 3, GE-0128, Tbilisi (Georgia); Keller, H. [Physik-Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, Winterthurerstr. 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)

2008-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

310

Comparative studies of etching mechanisms of CR-39 in NaOH/H2O and NaOH/ethanol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparative studies of etching mechanisms of CR-39 in NaOH/H2O and NaOH/ethanol K.C.C. Tse, D Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong Available online 13 May 2007 Abstract The bulk etch rate for CR-39 in NaOH/ethanol accumulates on the surface of CR-39 detector during etching in NaOH/ethanol, which is absent during etching

Yu, K.N.

311

Void swelling in binary Fe-Cr alloys at 200 dpa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructural examinations have been performed on a series of binary Fe-Cr alloys irradiated in the FFTF/MOTA at 425{degrees}C to 200 dpa. The data represent the highest swelling levels reported in neutron irradiated ferritic alloys. The alloy compositions ranged from 3% to 18% Cr in 3% Cr increments, and the irradiation temperature corresponded to the peak swelling condition for this alloy class. Density measurements showed swelling levels as high as 7.4%, with the highest swelling found in the Fe-9Cr and Fe-6Cr alloys. Microstructural examinations revealed that the highest swelling conditions contained well-developed voids, often as large as 100 nm, and a dislocation network comprised of both a/2<111> and a<100> Burgers vectors. Swelling was lower in the other alloys, and the swelling reduction could be correlated with increased precipitation. These results are considered in light of the current theories for low swelling in ferritic alloys, but no theory is available to completely explain the results.

Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Void swelling in binary Fe-Cr alloys at 200 DPA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructural examinations have been performed on a series of binary Fe-Cr alloys irradiated in the FFTF/MOTA at 425C to 200 dpa. The data represent the highest swelling levels reported in neutron irradiated ferritic alloys. The alloy compositions ranged from 3 to 18% Cr in 3% Cr increments, and the irradiation temperature corresponded to the peak swelling condition for this alloy class. Density measurements showed swelling levels as high as 7.4%, with the highest swelling found in the Fe-9Cr and Fe-6Cr alloys. Microstructural examinations revealed that the highest swelling conditions contained well-developed voids, often as large as 100 nm, and a dislocation network comprised of both {sub 2}{sup a}<111> and a<100> Burgers vectors. Swelling was lower in the other alloys, and the swelling reduction could be correlated with increased precipitation. These results are considered in light of current theories for low swelling in ferritic alloys, but no theory is available to completely explain the results.

Gelles, D.S.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Reduced-activation austenitic stainless steels: The Fe--Mn--Cr--C system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nickel-free manganese-stabilized steels are being developed for fusion-reactor applications. As the first part of this effort, the austenite-stable region in the Fe--Mn--Cr--C system was determined. Results indicated that the Schaeffler diagram developed for Fe--Ni--Cr--C alloys cannot be used to predict the constituents expected for high-manganese steels. This is true because manganese is not as strong an austenite stabilizer relative to delta-ferrite formation as predicted by the diagram, but it is a stronger austenite stabilizer relative to martensite than predicted. Therefore, the austenite-stable region for Ne--Mn--Cr--C alloys occurs at lower chromium and hugher combinations of manganese and carbon than predicted by the Schaeffler diagram. Development of a manganese-stabilized stainless steel should be possible in the composition range of 20 to 25% Mn, 10 to 15% Cr, and 0.01 to 0.25%C. Tensile behavior of an Fe--20%Mn--12%Cr--0.25%C alloy was determined. The strength and ductility of this possible base composition was comparable to type 316 stainless steel in both the solution-annealed and cold-worked condition.

Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Recent developments in Cr{sup 2+}-doped II-VI compound lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transition-metal-doped zinc chalcogenide crystals have recently been investigated as potential mid-IR lasers. Tetrahedrally-coordinated Cr{sup 2+} ions are especially attractive as lasants on account of high luminescence quantum yields for emission in the 2000-3000 nm range. {sup 5}E radiative lifetimes and emission cross sections are respectively {approximately}10 {mu}sec and {approximately}10{sup -18} cm{sup 2}. The associated absorption band peaked at {approximately}1800 nm enables laser-diode pumping of the Cr{sup 2+} systems. Laser demonstrations with ZnS:Cr and ZnSe:Cr (using a MgF{sub 2}:Co{sup 2+} laser pump source) gave slope efficiencies up to 30%. Excited-state-absorption losses appear small, and passive losses dominate. Tuning experiments with a birefringent filter evidence a tuning range covering at least 2280 - 2530 nm. Cr-doped laser samples can be produced by Bridgman growth, seeded physical vapor transport, or diffusion doping.

Page, R.H.; DeLoach, L.D.; Schaffers, K.I., Patel, F.D.; Beach, R.J.; Payne, S.A.; Krupke, W.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Burger, A. [Fisk Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Center for Photonic Materials and Devices

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

A real time status monitor for transistor bank driver power limit resistor in boost injection kicker power supply  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For years suffering of Booster Injection Kicker transistor bank driver regulator troubleshooting, a new real time monitor system has been developed. A simple and floating circuit has been designed and tested. This circuit monitor system can monitor the driver regulator power limit resistor status in real time and warn machine operator if the power limit resistor changes values. This paper will mainly introduce the power supply and the new designed monitoring system. This real time resistor monitor circuit shows a useful method to monitor some critical parts in the booster pulse power supply. After two years accelerator operation, it shows that this monitor works well. Previously, we spent a lot of time in booster machine trouble shooting. We will reinstall all 4 PCB into Euro Card Standard Chassis when the power supply system will be updated.

Mi, J.; Tan, Y.; Zhang, W.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

316

The high current, fast, 100ns, Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) developmental project at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, N.M., USA, in collaboration with the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia, is developing a new paradigm in pulsed power technology: the Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) technology. This technological approach can provide very compact devices that can deliver very fast high current and high voltage pulses straight out of the cavity with out any complicated pulse forming and pulse compression network. Through multistage inductively insulated voltage adders, the output pulse, increased in voltage amplitude, can be applied directly to the load. The load may be a vacuum electron diode, a z-pinch wire array, a gas puff, a liner, an isentropic compression load (ICE) to study material behavior under very high magnetic fields, or a fusion energy (IFE) target. This is because the output pulse rise time and width can be easily tailored to the specific application needs. In this paper we briefly summarize the developmental work done in Sandia and HCEI during the last few years, and describe our new MYKONOS Sandia High Current LTD Laboratory.

Ward, Kevin S.; Long, Finis W.; Sinebryukhov, Vadim A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia); Kim, Alexandre A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, RUSSIA); Wakeland, Peter Eric (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); McKee, G. Randall; Woodworth, Joseph Ray; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Struve, Kenneth William; Stygar, William A.; LeChien, Keith R.; Matzen, Maurice Keith

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Simple Limits on Achieving A Quasi-Linear Magnetic Compression for an FEL Driver  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Free electron lasers (FEL) need a very bright electron beam in three dimensions and a high peak charge density. In order to compress an initially longer electron bunch generated from the photoinjector, magnetic bunch compression systems are widely employed. In this paper, first harmonic RF linearization and its associated requirements are reviewed. Meanwhile it is also briefly discussed what is the relation between a proper initial bunch length and main RF frequency, when a harmonic RF linearization is included. Then given a reasonable bunch compression ratio, a proper initial bunch length as a function of the main RF frequency and RF phase is estimated analytically by several approaches, assuming that no harmonic RF section is needed to linearize the energy modulation introduced during main RF acceleration, and at the same time still linearly compress the bunch length. Next the upper limit of the bunch compression ratio in a single stage is evaluated analytically. The analytical relations derived on choosing a proper initial bunch length as a function of main RF frequency are confirmed by numerical simulation. These simple limit provide rough estimations and may be beneficial for choosing bunch compression ratios in different stages of an FEL driver, especially in a first stage bunch compression where there is usually a harmonic RF linearization applied. It may also be useful in evaluating the possibility of low charge operation mode without any harmonic RF linearization, where a shorter initial bunch length can be achieved from the photoinjector.

Sun, Yipeng; /SLAC

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

318

SPL-based Proton Driver for a nu-Factory at CERN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The conceptual design and feasibility studies for a nu-Factory Proton Driver based on the CERN Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) have been com- pleted. In the proposed scenario, the 4 MW proton beam (H- beam) is acceler- ated with the upgraded High Power (HP)-SPL to 5 GeV, stored in an accumu- lator ring and nally transported to a compressor ring, where bunch rotation takes place, in order to achieve the specic time structure. We here summa- rize the choices in terms of lattice, magnet technology and RF manipulations in the two rings. The possible critical issues, such as heating of the foil for the charge-exchange injection, space-charge problems in the compressor and beam stability in the accumulator ring, have been addressed and are shown not to be show-stoppers. The analysis focuses on the baseline scenario, consider- ing 6 bunches in the accumulator, and preliminary studies are discussed for the option of 3 or a single bunch per burst.

Benedetto, E; Garoby, R; Meddahi, M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Towards the optimal energy of the proton driver for a neutrino factory and muon collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cross section data from the HARP experiment for pion production by protons from a tantalum target have been convoluted with the acceptance of the front-end channel for the proposed neutrino factory or muon collider and integrated over the full phase space measured by HARP, to determine the beam-energy dependence of the muon yield. This permits a determination of the optimal beam energy for the proton driver for these projects. The cross section data are corrected for the beam-energy dependent amplification due to the development of hadronic showers in a thick target. The conclusion is that, for constant beam power, the yield is maximum for a beam energy of about 7 GeV, but it is within 10% of this maximum for 4

J. Strait; N. V. Mokhov; S. I. Striganov

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

320

Quantifying the Drivers of Star Formation on Galactic Scales. I. The Small Magellanic Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use the star formation history of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) to place quantitative limits on the effect of tidal interactions and gas infall on the star formation and chemical enrichment history of the SMC. The coincident timing of two recent (driver of star formation, but is only near the SMC during the most recent burst. The poorly constrained LMC-SMC orbit is our principal uncertainty. To explore the correspondence between bursts and MW pericenter passages further, we model star formation in the SMC using a combination of continuous and tidally-triggered star formation. The behavior of the tidally-triggered mode is a strong inverse function of the SMC-MW separation (preferred behavior ~ r^-5, resulting in a factor of ~100 difference in the rate of tidally-triggered star formation at pericenter and apocenter). Despite the success of these closed-box evolutionary models in reproducing the recent SMC star formation history and current chemical abundance, they have some systematic shortcomings that are remedied by postulating that a sizable infall event (~ 50% of the total gas mass) occured about 4 Gyr ago. Regardless of whether this infall event is included, the fraction of stars in the SMC that formed via a tidally triggered mode is > 10% and could be as large as 70%.

Dennis Zaritsky; Jason Harris

2003-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "driver cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Forming Young Bulges within Existing Disks: Statistical Evidence for External Drivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contrary to traditional models of galaxy formation, recent observations suggest that some bulges form within preexisting disk galaxies. Such late-epoch bulge formation within disks seems to be linked to disk gas inflow and central star formation, caused by either internal secular processes or galaxy mergers and interactions. We identify a population of galaxies likely to be experiencing active bulge growth within disks, using the criterion that the color within the half-light radius is bluer than the outer disk color. Such blue-centered galaxies make up >10% of star-forming disk galaxies within the Nearby Field Galaxy Survey, a broad survey designed to represent the natural diversity of the low-z galaxy population over a wide range of luminosities and environments. Blue-centered galaxies correlate at 99% confidence with morphological peculiarities suggestive of minor mergers and interactions. From this and other evidence, we argue that external drivers rather than internal secular processes probably account for the majority of blue-centered galaxies. We go on to discuss quantitative plausibility arguments indicating that blue-centered evolutionary phases may represent an important mode of bulge growth for most disk galaxies, leading to significant changes in bulge-to-disk ratio without destroying disks. If this view is correct, bulge growth within disks may be a natural consequence of the repeated galaxy mergers and interactions inherent in hierarchical galaxy formation.

Sheila J. Kannappan; Rolf A. Jansen; Elizabeth J. Barton

2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

322

Design of the SRF Driver ERL for the Jefferson Lab UV FEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the design of the SRF Energy-Recovering Linac (ERL) providing the CW electron drive beam at the Jefferson Lab UV FEL. Based on the same 135 MeV linear accelerator as ? and sharing portions of the recirculator with ? the Jefferson Lab 10 kW IR Upgrade FEL, the UV driver ERL uses a novel bypass geometry to provide transverse phase space control, bunch length compression, and nonlinear aberration compensation (including correction of RF curvature effects) without the use of magnetic chicanes or harmonic RF. Stringent phase space requirements at the wiggler, low beam energy, high beam current, and use of a pre-existing facility and legacy hardware subject the design to numerous constraints. These are imposed not only by the need for both transverse and longitudinal phase space management, but also by the potential impact of collective phenomena (space charge, wakefields, beam break-up (BBU), and coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR)), and by interactions between the FEL and the accelerator RF system. This report addresses these issues and presents the accelerator design solution that is now in operation.

David R. Douglas; Stephen Benson; George Biallas; Keith Blackburn; James Boyce; Donald Bullard; James Coleman; Cody Dickover; Forrest Ellingsworth; Pavel Evtushenko; Christopher Gould; Joseph Gubeli; Fay Hannon; David Hardy; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; Kevin Jordan; Michael Klopf; James Kortze; Matthew Marchlik; Steven Moore; George Neil; Thomas Powers; Daniel Sexton; Michelle D. Shinn; Christopher Tennant; Richard Walker; Frederick Wilson; Shukui Zhang

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Use of Multipass Recirculation and Energy Recovery In CW SRF X-FEL Driver Accelerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss the use of multipass recirculation and energy recovery in CW SRF drivers for short wavelength FELs. Benefits include cost management (through reduced system footprint, required RF and SRF hardware, and associated infrastructure - including high power beam dumps and cryogenic systems), ease in radiation control (low drive beam exhaust energy), ability to accelerate and deliver multiple beams of differing energy to multiple FELs, and opportunity for seamless integration of multistage bunch length compression into the longitudinal matching scenario. Issues include all those associated with ERLs compounded by the challenge of generating and preserving the CW electron drive beam brightness required by short wavelength FELs. We thus consider the impact of space charge, BBU and other environmental wakes and impedances, ISR and CSR, potential for microbunching, intra-beam and beam-residual gas scattering, ion effects, RF transients, and halo, as well as the effect of traditional design, fabrication, installation and operational errors (lattice aberrations, alignment, powering, field quality). Context for the discussion is provided by JLAMP, the proposed VUV/X-ray upgrade to the existing Jefferson Lab FEL.

Douglas, David; Akers, Walt; Benson, Stephen V.; Biallas, George; Blackburn, Keith; Boyce, James; Bullard, Donald; Coleman, James; Dickover, Cody; Ellingsworth, Forrest; Evtushenko, Pavel; Fisk, Sally; Gould, Christopher; Gubeli, Joseph; Hannon, Fay; Hardy, David; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Jordan, Kevin; Klopf, John; Kortze, J.; Legg, Robert; Li, Rui; Marchlik, Matthew; Moore, Steven W.; Neil, George; Powers, Thomas; Sexton, Daniel; Shin, Ilkyoung; Shinn, Michelle D.; Tennant, Christopher; Terzic, Balsa; Walker, Richard; Williams, Gwyn P.; Wilson, G.; Zhang, Shukui

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

BEAM DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS OF SARAF ACCELERATOR INCLUDING ERROR PROPAGATION AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE EURISOL DRIVER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AbstractBeam dynamics simulations of SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting RF linear accelerator have been performed in order to establish the accelerator design. The multi-particle simulation includes 3D realistic electromagnetic field distributions, space charge forces and fabrication, misalignment and operation errors. A 4 mA proton or deuteron beam is accelerated up to 40 MeV with a moderated rms emittance growth and a high real-estate gradient of 2 MeV/m. An envelope of 40,000 macro-particles is kept under a radius of 1.1 cm, well below the beam pipe bore radius. The accelerator design of SARAF is proposed as an injector for the EURISOL driver accelerator. The Accel 176 MHZ ?0=0.09 and ?0=0.15 HWR lattice was extended to 90 MeV based on the LNL 352 MHZ ?0=0.31 HWR. The matching between both lattices ensures smooth transition and the possibility to extend the accelerator to the required EURISOL ion energy.

J. Rodnizki, D. Berkovits, K. Lavie, I. Mardor, A. Shor and Y. Yanay (Soreq NRC, Yavne), K. Dunkel, C. Piel (ACCEL, Bergisch Gladbach), A. Facco (INFN/LNL, Legnaro, Padova), V. Zviagintsev (TRIUMF, Vancouver)

325

Visible Light-Driven Water Oxidation by Ir oxide Clusters Coupledto Single Cr Centers in Mesoporous Silica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Visible light-induced water oxidation has been demonstrated at an Ir oxide nanocluster coupled to a single Cr{sup VI} site on the pore surface of MCM-41 mesoporous silica. The photocatalytic unit was assembled by the reaction of surface Cr=O groups with Ir(acac){sub 3} precursor followed by calcination at 300 C and bond formation monitored by FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy. High-resolution Z-contrast electron micrographs of the calcined material combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spot analysis confirmed the occlusion of Ir oxide nanoparticles inside the mesopores. Oxygen evolution of an aqueous suspension of the Ir{sub x}O{sub y}-CrMCM-41 upon visible light irradiation of the Cr{sup VI}-O ligand-to-metal charge-transfer absorption was monitored mass-spectrometrically. Comparison of the product yields for samples with low Cr content (Cr/Si {le} 0.02) and high Cr content (Cr/Si = 0.05) indicates that only isolated Cr centers are capable of extracting electrons from Ir oxide clusters, while di- or polychromate species are not. Water oxidation at a multielectron-transfer catalyst coupled to a single metal center has not been demonstrated before. The ability to drive water oxidation with a single metal center as electron pump offers opportunities for coupling the oxygen-evolving photocatalytic unit to reducing sites in the nanoporous scaffold.

Nakamura, Ryuhei; Frei, Heinz

2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

326

Reduction of Cr(VI) under acidic conditions by the facultative Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Acidiphilium cryptum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential for biological reduction of Cr(VI) under acidic conditions was evaluated with the acidophilic, facultatively metal-reducing bacterium Acidiphilium cryptum strain JF-5 to explore the role of acidophilic microorganisms in the Cr cycle in low-pH environments. An anaerobic suspension of washed A. cryptum cells rapidly reduced 50 M Cr(VI) at pH 3.2; biological reduction was detected from pH 1.7-4.7. The reduction product, confirmed by XANES analysis, was entirely Cr(III) that was associated predominantly with the cell biomass (70-80%) with the residual residing in the aqueous phase. Reduction of Cr(VI) showed a pH optimum similar to that for growth and was inhibited by 5 mM HgCl2, suggesting that the reaction was enzyme-mediated. Introduction of O2 into the reaction medium slowed the reduction rate only slightly, whereas soluble Fe(III) (as ferric sulfate) increased the rate dramatically, presumably by the shuttling of electrons from bioreduced Fe(II) to Cr(VI) in a coupled biotic-abiotic cycle. Starved cells could not reduce Cr(VI) when provided as sole electron acceptor, indicating that Cr(VI) reduction is not an energy-conserving process in A. cryptum. We speculate, rather, that Cr(VI) reduction is used here as a detoxification mechanism.

David E. Cummings; Scott Fendorf; Rajesh K. Sani; Brent M. Peyton; Timothy S. Magnuson

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

A wide bandgap silicon carbide (SiC) gate driver for high-temperature and high-voltage applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Limitations of silicon (Si) based power electronic devices can be overcome with Silicon Carbide (SiC) because of its remarkable material properties. SiC is a wide bandgap semiconductor material with larger bandgap, lower leakage currents, higher breakdown electric field, and higher thermal conductivity, which promotes higher switching frequencies for high power applications, higher temperature operation, and results in higher power density devices relative to Si [1]. The proposed work is focused on design of a SiC gate driver to drive a SiC power MOSFET, on a Cree SiC process, with rise/fall times (less than 100 ns) suitable for 500 kHz to 1 MHz switching frequency applications. A process optimized gate driver topology design which is significantly different from generic Si circuit design is proposed. The ultimate goal of the project is to integrate this gate driver into a Toyota Prius plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) charger module. The application of this high frequency charger will result in lighter, smaller, cheaper, and a more efficient power electronics system.

Lamichhane, Ranjan [University of Arkansas; Ericson, Milton Nance [ORNL; Frank, Steven Shane [ORNL; BRITTONJr., CHARLES L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Marlino, Laura D [ORNL; Mantooth, Alan [University of Arkansas; Francis, Matt [APEI, Inc.; Shepherd, Dr. Paul [University of Arkansas; Glover, Dr. Michael [University of Arkansas; Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Perez, M [University of Arkansas; Mcnutt, Tyler [APEI, Inc.; Whitaker, Mr. Bret [APEI, Inc.; Cole, Mr. Zach [APEI, Inc.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Assessing Energy Impact of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles: Significance of Daily Distance Variation over Time and Among Drivers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate assessment of the impact of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) on petroleum and electricity consumption is a necessary step toward effective policies. Variations in daily vehicle miles traveled (VMT) over time and among drivers affect PHEV energy impact, but the significance is not well understood. This paper uses a graphical illustration, a mathematical derivation, and an empirical study to examine the cause and significance of such an effect. The first two methods reveal that ignoring daily variation in VMT always causes underestimation of petroleum consumption and overestimation of electricity consumption by PHEVs; both biases increase as the assumed PHEV charge-depleting (CD) range moves closer to the average daily VMT. The empirical analysis based on national travel survey data shows that the assumption of uniform daily VMT over time and among drivers causes nearly 68% underestimation of expected petroleum use and nearly 48% overestimation of expected electricity use by PHEVs with a 40-mi CD range (PHEV40s). Also for PHEV40s, consideration of daily variation in VMT over time but not among drivers similar to the way the utility factor curve is derived in SAE Standard SAE J2841 causes underestimation of expected petroleum use by more than 24% and overestimation of expected electricity use by about 17%. Underestimation of petroleum use and overestimation of electricity use increase with larger-battery PHEVs.

Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL; Greene, David L [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Dissimilar-weld failure analysis and development. Comparative behavior of similar and dissimilar welds. Final report. [Welds of 2-1/4Cr-1Mo to 2-1/4Cr-1Mo using 2-1/4Cr-1Mo filler material; and austenitic to ferritic steel welds made by fusion welding alloy-800H to 2-1/4Cr-1Mo using nickel base filler metal ERNiCr-3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 593/sup 0/C (1100/sup 0/F) stress rupture behavior of similar metal welds (SMWs) and dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) was investigated under cyclic load and cyclic temperature conditions to provide insight into the question, ''Why do DMWs fail sooner than SMWs in the fossil fuel boilers.'' The weld joints of interest were an all ferritic steel SMW made by fusion welding 2-1/4Cr-1Mo to 2-1/4Cr-1Mo using 2-1/4Cr-1Mo filler metal and an austenitic to ferritic steel DMW made by fusion welding Alloy-800H to 2-1/4Cr-1Mo using a nickel base filler metal ERNiCr-3. The stress rupture behavior obtained on cross weld specimens was similar for both types of welds with only a 20% reduction in rupture life for the DMW. For rupture times less than 1500 hours, failures occurred in the 2-1/4Cr-1Mo base metal whereas, for rupture times greater than 1500 hours, failures occurred in the 2-1/4Cr-1Mo heat affected zone (HAZ). The HAZ failures exhibited a more brittle appearance than the base metal failures for both types of welds and it appears that the life of both joints was limited by the stress rupture properties of the HAZ. These results support the hypothesis that increased residual stresses due to abrupt changes in hardness (strength) of metals involved are the major contributors to the reduction in life of DMWs as compared to SMWs. 10 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

Busboom, H.; Ring, P.J.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

CrRb: A molecule with large magnetic and electric dipole moments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report calculations of Born-Oppenheimer potential energy curves of the chromium-rubidium heteronuclear molecule ({sup 52}Cr{sup 87}Rb), and the long-range dispersion coefficient for the interaction between ground state Cr and Rb atoms. Our calculated van der Waals coefficient (C{sub 6}=1770 a.u.) has an expected error of 3%. The ground state {sup 6{Sigma}+} molecule at its equilibrium separation has a permanent electric dipole moment of d{sub e}(R{sub e}=3.34Angstrom)=2.90 D. We investigate the hyperfine and dipolar collisions between trapped Cr and Rb atoms, finding elastic to inelastic cross section ratio of 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3}.

Pavlovic, Z. [ITAMP, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269-3046 (United States); Sadeghpour, H. R. [ITAMP, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Cote, R. [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269-3046 (United States); Roos, B. O. [Department of Theoretical Chemistry, University of Lund, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

Testing of welded 13% Cr grades martensitic stainless steels for sour service applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of 13% Cr grade stainless steels is increasing mainly due to the introduction of higher alloyed and weldable grades with carbon content as low as 0.01 %, and the very favorable costs compared to alternative materials as the 22Cr duplex stainless steel. Therefore these steels now have been subject to a major evaluation for transport of oil and gas offshore in the North Sea. This paper discusses aspects of testing required to assess their corrosion properties and their susceptibility to environment assisted cracking (EAC), caused by both H{sub 2}S internally and cathodic protection externally. Testing is discussed with emphasis on test parameters for welded 13% Cr steel using different types of consumables.

Rogne, T.; Bjordal, M. [SINTEF Materials Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

The Effect of Water Vapor on Cr Depletion in Advanced Recuperator Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Durable alloy foils are needed for gas turbine recuperators operating at 650--700 C. It has been established that water vapor in the exhaust gas causes more rapid consumption of Cr in austenitic stainless steels leading to a reduction in operating lifetime of these thin-walled components. Laboratory testing at 650--800 C of commercial and model alloys is being used to develop a better understanding of the long-term rate of Cr consumption in these environments. Results are presented for commercial alloys 709, 120 and 625. After 10,000h exposures at 650 C and 700 C in humid air, grain boundary Cr depletion was observed near the surface of all these materials. In the Fe-base alloys, 709 and 120, this depletion led to localized Fe-rich nodule formation. This information then can be used to develop low-cost alternatives to currently available candidate materials.

Pint, Bruce A [ORNL

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Precipitation behavior of Ni-Cr-22 Fe-18 Mo (Hastelloy-X) and Ni-Cr-22 Co-12 Mo (Inconel-617) after isothermal aging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The precipitation behavior of the nickel-base alloys Ni-Cr-22Fe-18Mo (Hastelloy-X) and Ni-Cr-22Co12Mo (Inconel-617) has been investigated as a function of aging temperature. Hastelloy-X shows that M/sub 6/C and TiN are primary precipitates and M/sub 12/C, A/sub 3/B/sub 2/ (approx. = Fe/sub 3/Mo/sub 2/), and M/sub 23/C/sub 6/ are secondary precipitates, while Inconel-617 also has M/sub 6/C and TiN as primary precipitates and M/sub 23/C/sub 6/, M/sub 12/C, and Ni/sub 3/AlTi as secondary precipitates. The characterization has been carried out by metallographic and transmission electron microscopy investigations and by x-ray examinations of electrochemical isolated precipitates.

Kirchhofer, H.; Nickel, H.; Schubert, F.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

/sup 51/Cr-EDTA: a marker of early intestinal rejection in the rat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intestinal permeability was studied after accessory intestinal transplantation in Lewis rats. Five groups were evaluated: Group 1--isografts (N = 6); Group 2--Lewis X Brown Norway F1 (LBN-F1) allografts (N = 6); Group 3--isografts treated with CsA 2 mg/kg/day X 10 days (N = 6); Group 4--LBN-F1 allografts treated with CsA 2 mg/kg/day X 10 days (N = 6); Group 5--LBN-F1 allografts treated with CsA 4 mg/kg/day X 28 days (N = 6). Chromium-labeled ethylenedimianetetraacetate (/sup 51/Cr-EDTA) was given through the proximal stoma of the graft. Renal clearance of /sup 51/Cr-EDTA and mucosal biopsies were followed post-transplant. The biopsies of the intestinal graft showed no rejection in Groups 1, 3, and 5; fulminant rejection in Group 2; and mild atypical rejection in Group 4. /sup 51/Cr-EDTA clearance was elevated in all groups during the first 7 days post-transplant. Thereafter, /sup 51/Cr-EDTA excretion fell to lower levels in the animals with histologically normal grafts (Groups 1, 3, and 5). /sup 51/Cr-EDTA excretion in Group 4 was increased with the first histological evidence of rejection on Day 14 and remained elevated until sacrifice (P less than 0.02 compared to Groups 3 and 5). A transient permeability defect occurs after intestinal grafting. Once the graft has recovered from this injury, /sup 51/Cr-EDTA is a sensitive marker for intestinal rejection.

Grant, D.; Lamont, D.; Zhong, R.; Garcia, B.; Wang, P.; Stiller, C.; Duff, J.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Magnetic and electrical properties of layered magnets Tl(Cr,Mn,Co)Se{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tl(Cr,Mn,Co)Se{sub 2} crystals were synthesized at T {approx} 1050 K. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that TlCrSe{sub 2}, TlMnSe{sub 2}, and TlCoSe{sub 2} compounds crystallize in the hexagonal crystal system with the lattice parameters: a = 3.6999 A, c = 22.6901 A, c/a {approx} 6.133, z = 3, {rho}{sub x} = 6.209 g/cm{sup 3}; a = 6.53 A, c = 23.96 A, c/a {approx} 3.669, z = 8, {rho}{sub x} = 6.71 g/cm{sup 3}; and a = 3.747 A, c = 22.772 A, c/a {approx} 6.077, z = 3, {rho}{sub x} = 7.577 g/cm{sup 3}, respectively. Magnetic and electrical studies in the temperature range from 80-400 K showed that TlCrSe{sub 2} is a semiconductor ferromagnet, TlMnSe{sub 2} is a semiconductor antiferromagnet, and TlCoSe{sub 2} is a ferrimagnet with a conductivity characteristic of metals. A rather large deviation in the experimental effective magnetic moment for TlCrSe{sub 2} (3.05 {mu}B) from the theoretical value (3.85 {mu}B) is attributed to two-dimensional magnetic ordering in the paramagnetic region of the noticeably layered ferromagnet TlCrSe{sub 2}. In TlCrSe{sub 2}, a correlation between magnetic and electrical properties was detected.

Veliyev, R. G.; Sadikhov, R. Z.; Kerimova, E. M., E-mail: ekerimova@physics.ab.az; Asadov, Yu. G.; Jabbarov, A. I. [National Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Toughness of Cr-Mo-V steels for steam-turbine rotors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cr-Mo-V steels are used extensively as the rotor material in the High Pressure and Intermediate Pressure Sections of modern steam turbines. The toughness of these rotors has a major influence on the reliability and efficiency of the turbine and the overall economy of operation and maintenance of the plant. The metallurgical factors affecting the toughness of the rotors and the methods to improve the toughness are now understood better than ever before. This paper will present a broad overview of the materials and design aspects of the toughness of Cr-Mo-V rotors with emphasis on the salient results of recent research programs aimed at improving their toughness.

Viswanathan, R.; Jaffee, R.I.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Repassivation of 13% Cr steel dependent on brine pH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A joint laboratory project, involving an oil production and oil well service company, investigated repassivation of martensitic 13% Cr steel. The rate at which this alloy is repassivated after losing its protective passive oxide layer to hydrochloric acid (HCI) depended on the pH of the spent acid returns. Test samples of 13% Cr cut from oilfield tubing were subjected to a fluid sequence of (1) initial brine, (2) HCI, (3) spent acid, and (4) final brine. In 9 days, the samples regained their passive oxide layers. When spent acid was taken out of the fluid sequence, the samples regained passive oxide layers in 3 days.

Skogsberg, J.W.; Walker, M.L.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Can one identify the intrinsic structure of the yrast states in $^{48}$Cr after the backbending?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The backbending phenomenon in $^{48}$Cr has been investigated using the recently developed Projected Configuration Interaction (PCI) method, in which the deformed intrinsic states are directly associated with shell model (SM) wavefunctions. Two previous explanations, (i) $K=0$ band crossing, and (ii) $K=2$ band crossing have been reinvestigated using PCI, and it was found that both explanations can successfully reproduce the experimental backbending. The PCI wavefunctions in the pictures of $K=0$ band crossing and $K=2$ band crossing are highly overlapped. We conclude that there are no unique intrinsic states associated with the yrast states after backbending in $^{48}$Cr.

Gao, Zao-Chun; Chen, Y S; Chen, Y J; Tuya,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Can one identify the intrinsic structure of the yrast states in $^{48}$Cr after the backbending?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The backbending phenomenon in $^{48}$Cr has been investigated using the recently developed Projected Configuration Interaction (PCI) method, in which the deformed intrinsic states are directly associated with shell model (SM) wavefunctions. Two previous explanations, (i) $K=0$ band crossing, and (ii) $K=2$ band crossing have been reinvestigated using PCI, and it was found that both explanations can successfully reproduce the experimental backbending. The PCI wavefunctions in the pictures of $K=0$ band crossing and $K=2$ band crossing are highly overlapped. We conclude that there are no unique intrinsic states associated with the yrast states after backbending in $^{48}$Cr.

Zao-Chun Gao; Mihai Horoi; Y. S. Chen; Y. J. Chen; Tuya

2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

340

Microstructure and High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Cr-W Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cr alloys containing 0-30%W by weight were investigated for use in elevated temperature applications. The alloys were melted in a water-cooled, copper-hearth arc furnace. Microstructure of the alloys was characterized using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and light microscopy. A pseudocyclic oxidation test was employed to study scale formation at 1000C in dry air. The scale was predominantly chromia and spalled upon cooling. Alloying with aluminum up to 8 weight percent reduced the spalling drastically. Furthermore, aluminizing the surface of the Cr-W alloys completely stopped the spalling.

Dogan, O.N.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "driver cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Anodonta imbecillis QA Test 4, Clinch River - Environmental restoration program (CR-ERP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Toxicity testing of split whole sediment samples using juvenile freshwater mussels (Anodonta imbecillis) was conducted by TVA to provide a quality assurance mechanism for test organism quality and overall performance of the test being conducted by CR-ERP personnel as part of the CR-ERP biomonitoring study of Clinch River sediments. Testing of sediment samples collected September 8 from Poplar Creek Miles 6.0 and 1.0 was conducted September 13-22, 1994. Results from this test showed no toxicity (survival effects) to fresh-water mussels during a 9-day exposure to the sediments.

Simbeck, D.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Audit Report: CR-B-97-01 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste andAccess to OUO AccessOpportunity | Department7-26CR-B-95-06CR-B-97-01

343

Audit Report: CR-B-99-02 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste andAccess to OUO AccessOpportunity |Report: CR-B-97-04 AuditCR-B-99-02

344

Audit Report: CR-MA-95-02 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3--Logistical5/08 Attendance List from 12/05/08CR-MA-95-02 Audit Report: CR-MA-95-02

345

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

China's rapid economic expansion has propelled it to the rank of the largest energy consuming nation in the world, with energy demand growth continuing at a pace commensurate with its economic growth. The urban population is expected to grow by 20 million every year, accompanied by construction of 2 billion square meters of buildings every year through 2020. Thus residential energy use is very likely to continue its very rapid growth. Understanding the underlying drivers of this growth helps to identify the key areas to analyze energy efficiency potential, appropriate policies to reduce energy use, as well as to understand future energy in the building sector. This paper provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sources and a modelling effort that relies on a very detailed characterization of China's energy demand. It assesses the current energy situation with consideration of end use, intensity, and efficiency etc, and forecast the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020, based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity, availability of energy services, technology improvement and energy intensities. From this analysis, we can conclude that Chinese residential energy consumption will more than double by 2020, from 6.6 EJ in 2000 to 15.9 EJ in 2020. This increase will be driven primarily by urbanization, in combination with increases in living standards. In the urban and higher income Chinese households of the future, most major appliances will be common, and heated and cooled areas will grow on average. These shifts will offset the relatively modest efficiency gains expected according to current government plans and policies already in place. Therefore, levelling and reduction of growth in residential energy demand in China will require a new set of more aggressive efficiency policies.

Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.; Levine, Mark

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Understanding the solidification and microstructure evolution during CSC-MIG welding of FeCrB-based alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present is a study of the solidification and microstructure of Fe28.2%Cr3.8%B1.5%Si1.5%Mn (wt.%) alloy deposited onto a 1020 plain carbon steel substrate using the controlled short-circuit metal inert gas welding process. The as-solidified alloy was a metal matrix composite with a hypereutectic microstructure. Thermodynamic calculation based on the ScheilGulliver model showed that a primary (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B phase formed first during solidification, followed by an eutectic formation of the (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B phase and a body-centered cubic Fe-based solid solution matrix, which contained Cr, Mn and Si. Microstructure analysis confirmed the formation of these phases and showed that the shape of the (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B phase was irregular plate. As the welding heat input increased, the weld dilution increased and thus the volume fraction of the (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B plates decreased while other microstructural characteristics were similar. - Highlights: We deposit FeCrB-based alloy onto plain carbon steel using the CSC-MIG process. We model the solidification behavior using thermodynamic calculation. As deposited alloy consists of (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B plates embedded in Fe-based matrix. We study the effect of the welding heat input on the microstructure.

Sorour, A.A., E-mail: ahmad.sorour@mail.mcgill.ca; Chromik, R.R., E-mail: richard.chromik@mcgill.ca; Gauvin, R., E-mail: raynald.gauvin@mcgill.ca; Jung, I.-H., E-mail: in-ho.jung@mcgill.ca; Brochu, M., E-mail: mathieu.brochu@mcgill.ca

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Spin polarization at Fe/Cr interfaces L. Pizzagalli, M. Freyss, G. Moraitis, D. Stoeffler, C. Demangeat, and H. Dreysse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

configuration with zero net moment of a thin Fe layer on a Cr surface due to a high step density. © 1997.g., a zero net magnetic moment of a Cr layer grown on a stepped Fe surface.6 It will be shown below how some irregularities at the interfaces. The spin-polarized electronic charge distribution was calculated by using

Bayreuther, Günther

348

Changes induced in a ZnS:Cr-based electroluminescent waveguide structure by intrinsic near-infrared laser radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The causes of changes that occur in a thin-film electroluminescent metal-insulator-semiconductor-insulator-metal waveguide structure based on ZnS:Cr (Cr concentration of {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}) upon lasing ({lambda} Almost-Equal-To 2.6 {mu}m) and that induce lasing cessation are studied. It is established that lasing ceases because of light-scattering inhomogeneities formed in the structure and, hence, optical losses enhance. The origin of the inhomogeneities and the causes of their formation are clarified by studying the surface topology and the crystal structure of constituent layers of the samples before and after lasing. The studies are performed by means of atomic force microscopy and X-ray radiography. It is shown that a substantial increase in the sizes of grains on the surface of the structure is the manifestation of changes induced in the ZnS:Cr film by recrystallization. Recrystallization is initiated by local heating by absorbed laser radiation in existing Cr clusters and quickened by a strong electric field (>1 MV cm{sup -1}). The changes observed in the ZnS:Cr film are as follows: the textured growth of ZnS crystallites, an increase in the content of Cr clusters, and the appearance of some CrS and a rather high ZnO content. Some ways for improving the stability of lasing in the ZnS:Cr-based waveguide structures are proposed.

Vlasenko, N. A., E-mail: vlasenko@isp.kiev.ua; Oleksenko, P. F.; Mukhlyo, M. A.; Veligura, L. I. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lashkarev Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine)] [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lashkarev Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

USE OF MICRO X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY AND DIFFRACTION TO DELINEATE Cr(VI) SPECIATION IN COPR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The speciation of Cr(VI) in Cromite Ore Processing Residue was investigated by means of bulk XRD, and a combination of micro-XRF, -XAS and -XRD at the Advanced Light Source (ALS), Berkeley, CA, U.S.A.. Bulk XRD yielded one group of phases that contained explicitly Cr(VI) in their structure, Calcium Aluminum Chromium Oxide Hydrates, accounting for 60% of the total Cr(VI). Micro-analyses at ALS yielded complimentary information, confirming that hydrogarnets and hydrotalcites, two mineral groups that can host Cr(VI) in their structure by substitution, were indeed Cr(VI) sinks. Chromatite (CaCrO4) was also identified by micro-XRD, which was not possible with bulk methods due to its low content. The acquisition of micro-XRF elemental maps enabled not only the identification of Cr(VI)-binding phases, but also the understanding of their location within the matrix. This information is invaluable when designing Cr(VI) treatment, to optimize release and availability for reduction.

CHRYSOCHOOU, M.; MOON, D. H.; FAKRA, S.; MARCUS, M.; DERMATAS, D.; CHRISTODOULATOS, C.

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

350

Chromium(VI) bioremoval by pseudomonas bacteria: role of microbial exudates for natural attenuation and biotreatment of Cr(VI) contamination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the role of microbial exudates, e.g., exopolymeric substance (EPS) and alginic acid, on microbial Cr(VI) reduction by two different Pseudomonas strains (P. putida P18 and P. aeuroginosa P16) as a method for treating subsurface environment contaminated with Cr(VI). Our results indicate that microbial exudates significantly enhanced microbial Cr(VI) reduction rates by forming less toxic and highly soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes despite the fact Cr(III) has a very low solubility under the experimental conditions studied (e.g., pH 7). The formation of soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes led to the protection of the cells and chromate reductases from inactivation. In systems with no organic ligands, soluble organo-Cr(III) end products were formed between Cr(III) and the EPS directly released by bacteria due to cell lysis. Our results also provide evidence that cell lysis played an important role in microbial Cr(VI) reduction by Pseudomonas bacteria due to the release of constitutive reductases that intracellularly and/or extracellularly catalyzed the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The overall results highlight the need for incorporation of the release and formation of organo-Cr(III) complexes into reactive transport models to more accurately design and monitor in situ microbial remediation techniques for the treatment of subsurface systems contaminated with Cr(VI).

Dogan, N.M.; Dodge, C.; Kantar, C.; Gulcan, S.; Yilmaz, B.C.; Mazmanci, M.A.

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

351

Chromium(VI) Bioremoval by Pseudomonas Bacteria: Role of Microbial Exudates for Natural Attenuation and Biotreatment of Cr(VI) Contamination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the role of microbial exudates, e.g., exopolymeric substance (EPS) and alginic acid, on microbial Cr(VI) reduction by two different Pseudomonas strains (P. putida P18 and P. aeuroginosa P16) as a method for treating subsurface environment contaminated with Cr(VI). Our results indicate that microbial exudates significantly enhanced microbial Cr(VI) reduction rates by forming less toxic and highly soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes despite the fact Cr(III) has a very low solubility under the experimental conditions studied (e.g., pH 7). The formation of soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes led to the protection of the cells and chromate reductases from inactivation. In systems with no organic ligands, soluble organo-Cr(III) end products were formed between Cr(III) and the EPS directly released by bacteria due to cell lysis. Our results also provide evidence that cell lysis played an important role in microbial Cr(VI) reduction by Pseudomonas bacteria due to the release of constitutive reductases that intracellularly and/or extracellularly catalyzed the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The overall results highlight the need for incorporation of the release and formation of organo-Cr(III) complexes into reactive transport models to more accurately design and monitor in situ microbial remediation techniques for the treatment of subsurface systems contaminated with Cr(VI).

N Mercan Dogan; C Kantar; S Gulcan; C Dodge; B Coskun Yilmaz; M Ali Mazmanci

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

352

Structural alterations in SiC as a result of Cr/sup +/ and N/sup +/ implantation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion scattering and channeling techniques were used to study production of disorder and randomization of SiC by implantation of Cr/sup +/ and N/sup +/ at doses of up to 3 x 10/sup 16/ /cm/sup 2/ for Cr/sup +/ and 8 x 10/sup 16/ /cm/sup 2/ for N/sup +/. Experiments were designed so that the calculated damage energy profiles would be well matched for the two ion species. The results were compared for the degree of effectiveness of Cr/sup +/ and N/sup +/ in producing disorder. At higher doses, Cr/sup +/ was much more effective than N/sup +/ for a given damage energy using the same calculational method for Cr/sup +/ as for N/sup +/. In correlated studies of swelling, both species had about the same effectiveness in producing swelling.

Williams, J.M.; McHargue, C.J.; Appleton, B.R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Study of hydrogen and carbon monoxide adsorption on modified Zn/Cr catalysts by adsorption calorimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Differential heat of adsorption (q) of hydrogen (a) and carbon monoxide (b) as a function of the adsorbed amount (a) on Zn/Cr catalysts at 463/sup 0/K; 1) unpromoted catalyst, 2) catalyst promoted with 2.5% of K/sub 2/O.

Yoshin, S.V.; Klyacho, A.L.; Kondrat'ev, L.T.; Leonov, V.E.; Skripchenko, G.B.; Sushchaya, L.E.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

AN OBATA-TYPE THEOREM IN CR GEOMETRY SONG-YING LI AND XIAODONG WANG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN OBATA-TYPE THEOREM IN CR GEOMETRY SONG-YING LI AND XIAODONG WANG Abstract. We discuss a sharp. 1 #12;2 SONG-YING LI AND XIAODONG WANG the proof of the Bochner formula in [G]. Due to this error

Wang, Xiaodong

355

G. J. Snyder Page 1 of 6 THERMOELECTRIC PROPERTIES OF CR3S4-TYPE SELENIDES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

devices depends primarily on increasing the figure of merit, ZT, for thermoelectric materials. The figure thermoelectric materials is to search for semiconductors with low lattice thermal conductivity. In this paper we lower than the state-of-the-art thermoelectric material, Bi2Te3 alloys. The structure of Cr3S4 (Figure 1

356

Limitations for the application of 13Cr steel in oil and gas production environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laboratory investigation of application limits of 13Cr steel was carried out for sweet downhole environments in the CO{sub 2} partial pressure regime up to about 10 bar (1 MPa). Two grades of 13Cr steel were studied, one complying with the API 5CT specification and the other a higher carbon version. Polarization curves, taken at various times after immersion of the specimens in simulated brine, revealed an increasing pitting tendency for the higher chloride levels and indicated better performance for the API 5CT grade. This was in agreement with evidence for chromium depleted zones in the higher carbon grade, obtained from polarization curves in sulfuric acid. Weight loss exposure tests, in which the corrosion rate was also monitored by polarization resistance measurements, were performed at temperatures of 100 and 125 C and supplemented with literature data to extend the temperature range. A mathematical formula was derived to describe the corrosion rate as a function of temperature and chloride content. For instance, if 0.1 mm/y is taken as an acceptable corrosion rate, 13Cr steel could be applied up to 125 C in the presence of 150 g/L Cl{sup {minus}}. In the exposure tests, the API 5CT 13Cr steel did not show pitting at the 0.1 mm/y boundary but the higher carbon grade did suffer from this form of attack.

Huizinga, S.; Liek, W.E. [Shell International Oil Products BV, Amsterdam (Netherlands). Shell Research and Technology Centre

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Comparison of SEM and Optical Analysis of DT Neutron Tracks in CR-39 Detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A solid state nuclear track detector, CR-39, was exposed to DT neutrons. After etching, the resultant tracks were analyzed using both an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). In this communication, both methods of analyzing DT neutron tracks are discussed.

P.A. Mosier-Boss, L.P.G. Forsley, P. Carbonnelle, M.S. Morey, J.R. Tinsley, J. P. Hurley, F.E. Gordon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Transmission electron microscopy of oxide development on 9Cr ODS steel in supercritical water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transmission electron microscopy of oxide development on 9Cr ODS steel in supercritical water A strengthened ferritic steel alloys during exposure to 600 C supercritical water for 2- and 4-weeks were cladding include austenitic stainless steels, solid solution and precipitation-hardened alloys, ferritic

Motta, Arthur T.

359

Thermodynamic modelling of Cr-bearing garnets with implications for diamond inclusions and peridotite xenoliths  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Zrich, Switzerland e Geological Survey of Western Australia, Mineral House, 100 Plain Street, East Perth, WA 6004, Australia a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 8 September 2008 using free energy minimization techniques. Here we present calculated phase relations in Cr-rich mantle

360

Magnetic anisotropy in Fe-25Cr-12Co-1Si alloy induced by external magnetic field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic anisotropy in Fe-25Cr-12Co-1Si alloy induced by external magnetic field ZHEN Liang( )1 of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001, China; 2. Department 27599-3255, USA Received 29 June 2006; accepted 15 January 2007 Abstract: Structural and magnetic

Qin, Lu-Chang

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "driver cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Oxidation resistance of 9-12% Cr steels: effect of rare earth surface treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Medium Cr steels have been used in fossil fired power plants for many years because of their excellent high temperature stability and mechanical properties. The environment in a fossil fired power plant is extremely aggressive in terms of corrosion, especially oxidation. This is only accelerated as the operating temperature increases to 650C and beyond. For any new steel to be qualified for power plant use, in addition to adequate strength at the operating temperature, material wastage from all corrosion processes must be kept to a minimum acceptable level. The use of medium Cr steels provides a means to improve overall corrosion resistance. Three medium Cr are under development for use as high temperature power plant steels: 0.08C-(9-12)Cr-1.2Ni-0.7Mo-3.0Cu-3.0Co-0.5Ti. Oxidation tests were performed on the steels for times greater than 1000 hours in order to determine the oxidation kinetics and extent of material wastage. Also, rare earth oxides were incorporated into the outer surface layers of the steels to see if the oxidation resistance could be improved. These results will be compared to current power plant steels.

Dogan, Omer N.; Alman, David A.; Jablonski, Paul D.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Diode-Pumped Gigahertz Repetition Rate Femtosecond Cr:Lisaf Laser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report a low-cost, 1 GHz repetition-rate, diode-pumped, saturable Bragg reflectors mode-locked Cr:LiSAF laser, which generates nearly transform-limited 103-fs long pulses around 866 nm, with a record high peak power of 1.45 kW.

Li, Duo

363

Long-term measurements of equilibrium factor with electrochemically etched CR-39 SSNTD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.60 Keywords: Radon progeny concentration; Equilibrium factor; CR-39 1. Introduction Inhaled radon (222 Rn cancer [3]. Methods for long-term monitoring of the concentrations of radon progeny, or the equilibrium factor (which surro- gates the ratios of concentrations of radon progeny to the concentration of the 222

Yu, K.N.

364

Project EARTH-11-DP1: Exploring early solar system processes using Cr isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project EARTH-11-DP1: Exploring early solar system processes using Cr isotopes Supervisors: Dr D Porcelli & Dr K Amor Various isotope methods have been recently developed to explore the conditions in the early solar system and the processes that have led to the formation of the terrestrial planets. Stable

Henderson, Gideon

365

Clostridium chromiireducens sp. nov., isolated from Cr(VI)-contaminated soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by its ability to reduce Cr(VI) in low concentrations. Mixed acid fermentation during growth on glucose resulted in accumulation of acetate, butyrate, formate and lactate. Morphological studies indicated the presence of peritrichous flagella, pili and an S-layer. The major cellular fatty acids (.5 %) were C16 : 0

Florida, University of

366

Relation between thermal expansion and interstitial formation energy in pure Fe and Cr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relation between thermal expansion and interstitial formation energy in pure Fe and Cr Janne potentials give lower interstitial formation energy, but predict too small thermal expansion. We also show University, Uppsala, Sweden Abstract By fitting a potential of modified Finnis­Sinclair type to the thermal

367

Investigations of HRC-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hypothesis: Lactate (Hydrogen Release Compound-HRC{trademark}) injection into chromium contaminated groundwater through an injection well will cause indirect or direct bioreduction of chromate [Cr(VI)] and precipitation of insoluble species of [Cr(III)] on soil particles, probably catalyzed at oxide surfaces, at the field scale. Objective: Assess the potential for immobilizing and detoxifying chromium-contaminated groundwater using lactate-stimulated bioreduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at the Hanford Site's 100-H Area field site. Types of Research: A three-well system (injection well and upgradient and downgradient monitoring wells) was used for conducting the in situ biostimulation and monitoring. To assess the pre- and post-injection test groundwater conditions, we used an integrated monitoring approach, involving hydraulic, geochemical, microbial, and geophysical techniques and analytical methods, as well as conducted five Br-tracer injection tests and four pumping tests (concurrently with the Br-tracer tests). Groundwater biostimulation was conducted by injection of 40 lbs of {sup 13}C-labeled HRC into the injection well (over the depth interval from 44-50 ft) on 8/3/2004, followed by low-flow pumping (1.2 to 2.5 l/min) through the downgradient well (to ensure capture of groundwater flow lines passing through the injection well) for 27 days. Main Results: Although the total microbial population in sediments is relatively low (<10{sup 5} cells g-1) under background conditions, which is likely insufficient for direct enzymatic Cr(VI) reduction, several types of bacteria, e.g., Bacillus/Arthrobacter and Geobacter, are present in the Hanford sediments, which are known to reduce or sorb hexavalent chromium. The HRC injection stimulated microbial cell counts to reach the maximum of 2 x 10{sup 7} cells g{sup -1} 13-17 days after the injection, and generated highly reducing conditions. Geochemical and isotopic observations confirmed microbial metabolism of HRC. The Cr(VI) concentration in the monitoring and pumping wells decreased below drinking water minimum contaminant limits and remained below background concentrations even after 1.5 years, when redox conditions and microbial densities had returned to background levels. Fe(II) levels have remained high and may account for the continued reduction of Cr(VI).

T.C. Hazen; B. Faybishenko; D. Joyner; S. Borglin; E.Brodie; S. Hubbard; K. Williams; J. Peterson; J. Wan; T. Tokunaga; Long, P.E.; Newcomer, D.; Koenigsberg, S.; Willet, A.

2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

368

Investigations of HRC-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hypothesis: Lactate (Hydrogen Release Compound-HRC{trademark}) injection into chromium contaminated groundwater through an injection well will cause indirect or direct bioreduction of chromate [Cr(VI)] and precipitation of insoluble species of [Cr(III)] on soil particles, probably catalyzed at oxide surfaces, at the field scale. Objective: Assess the potential for immobilizing and detoxifying chromium-contaminated groundwater using lactate-stimulated bioreduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at the Hanford Site's 100-H Area field site. Types of Research: A three-well system (injection well and upgradient and downgradient monitoring wells) was used for conducting the in situ biostimulation and monitoring. To assess the pre- and post-injection test groundwater conditions, we used an integrated monitoring approach, involving hydraulic, geochemical, microbial, and geophysical techniques and analytical methods, as well as conducted five Br-tracer injection tests and four pumping tests (concurrently with the Br-tracer tests). Groundwater biostimulation was conducted by injection of 40 lbs of {sup 13}C-labeled HRC into the injection well (over the depth interval from 44-50 ft) on 8/3/2004, followed by low-flow pumping (1.2 to 2.5 l/min) through the downgradient well (to ensure capture of groundwater flow lines passing through the injection well) for 27 days. Main Results: Although the total microbial population in sediments is relatively low (<10{sup 5} cells g{sup -1}) under background conditions, which is likely insufficient for direct enzymatic Cr(VI) reduction, several types of bacteria, e.g., Bacillus/Arthrobacter and Geobacter, are present in the Hanford sediments, which are known to reduce or sorb hexavalent chromium. The HRC injection stimulated microbial cell counts to reach the maximum of 2 x 10{sup 7} cells g{sup -1} 13-17 days after the injection, and generated highly reducing conditions. Geochemical and isotopic observations confirmed microbial metabolism of HRC. The CR(VI) concentration in the monitoring and pumping wells decreased below drinking water minimum contaminant limits and remained below background concentrations even after 1.5 years, when redox conditions and microbial densities had returned to background levels. Fe(II) levels have remained high and may account for the continued reduction of Cr(VI).

Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Joyner, D.; Borglin, S.; Brodie, E.; Hubbard, S.; Williams, K.; Peterson, J.; Wan, J.; Tokunaga, T.; Firestone, M.; Long, P.E.; Resch, C.T.; Cantrell, K.; Newcomer, D.; Koenigsberg, S.; Willet, A.

2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

369

Originally presented at Photomask Japan '94, Kanagawa Science Park, April, 1994 Attenuated phase-shifting photomasks fabricated from Cr-based embedded shifter blanks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the cathode powers and gas mixture. Cr-based films' flexible properties are suitable for several applications

Rollins, Andrew M.

370

Key regulatory drivers affecting shipments of mixed transuranic waste from Los Alamos National Laboratory to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of key regulatory drivers affect the nature, scope, and timing of Los Alamos National Laboratory`s (LANL`s) plans for mixed transuranic (MTRU) waste shipments to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which are planned to commence as soon as possible following WIPP`s currently anticipated November, 1997 opening date. This paper provides an overview of some of the key drivers at LANL, particularly emphasizing those associated with the hazardous waste component of LANL`s MTRU waste (MTRU, like any mixed waste, contains both a radioactive and a hazardous waste component). The key drivers discussed here derive from the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and its amendments, including the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAU), and from the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act (NMHWA). These statutory provisions are enforced through three major mechanisms: facility RCRA permits; the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Management Regulations, set forth in the New Mexico Administrative Code, Title 20, Chapter 4, Part 1: and compliance orders issued to enforce these requirements. General requirements in all three categories will apply to MTRU waste management and characterization activities at both WIPP and LANL. In addition, LANL is subject to facility-specific requirements in its RCRA hazardous waste facility permit, permit conditions as currently proposed in RCRA Part B permit applications presently being reviewed by the New Mexico Environment Department (NNED), and facility-specific compliance orders related to MTRU waste management. Likewise, permitting and compliance-related requirements specific to WIPP indirectly affect LANL`s characterization, packaging, record-keeping, and transportation requirements for MTRU waste. LANL must comply with this evolving set of regulatory requirements to begin shipments of MTRU waste to WIPP in a timely fashion.

Schumann, P.B.; Bacigalupa, G.A.; Kosiewicz, S.T.; Sinkule, B.J. [and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Diode-pumped solid-state laser driver experiments for inertial fusion energy applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although solid-state lasers have been the primary means by which the physics of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) have been investigated, it was previously thought that solid-state laser technology could not offer adequate efficiencies for an inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant. Orth and co-workers have recently designed a conceptual IFE power plant, however, with a high efficiency diode-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL) driver that utilized several recent innovations in laser technology. It was concluded that DPSSLs could offer adequate performance for IFE with reasonable assumptions. This system was based on a novel diode pumped Yb-doped Sr{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F (Yb:S-FAP) amplifier. Because this is a relatively new gain medium, a project was established to experimentally validate the diode-pumping and extraction dynamics of this system at the smallest reasonable scale. This paper reports on the initial experimental results of this study. We found the pumping dynamics and extraction cross-sections of Yb:S-FAP crystals to be similar to those previously inferred by purely spectroscopic techniques. The saturation fluence for pumping was measured to be 2.2 J/cm{sup 2} using three different methods based on either the spatial, temporal, or energy transmission properties of a Yb:S-FAP rod. The small signal gain implies an emission cross section of 6.0{times}10{sup {minus}20} cm{sup 2}. Up to 1.7 J/cm{sup 3} of stored energy density was achieved in a 6{times}6{times}44 mm{sup 3} Yb:S-FAP amplifier rod. In a free running configuration diode-pumped slope efficiencies up to 43% were observed with output energies up to {approximately}0.5 J per 1 ms pulse from a 3{times}3{times}30 mm{sup 3} rod. When the rod was mounted in a copper block for cooling, 13 W of average power was produced with power supply limited operation at 70 Hz with 500 {mu}s pulses.

Marshall, C.D.; Payne, S.A.; Emanuel, M.E.; Smith, L.K.; Powell, H.T.; Krupke, W.F.

1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

372

Agricultural green revolution as a driver of increasing atmospheric CO2 seasonal amplitude  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) record displays a prominent seasonal cycle that arises mainly from changes in vegetation growth and the corresponding CO2 uptake during the boreal spring and summer growing seasons and CO2 release during the autumn and winter seasons. The CO2 seasonal amplitude has increased over the past five decades, suggesting an increase in Northern Hemisphere biospheric activity. It has been proposed that vegetation growth may have been stimulated by higher concentrations of CO2 as well as by warming in recent decades, but such mechanisms have been unable to explain the full range and magnitude of the observed increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude. Here we suggest that the intensification of agriculture (the Green Revolution, in which much greater crop yield per unit area was achieved by hybridization, irrigation and fertilization) during the past five decades is a driver of changes in the seasonal characteristics of the global carbon cycle. Our analysis of CO2 data and atmospheric inversions shows a robust 15 per cent long-term increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude from 1961 to 2010, punctuated by large decadal and interannual variations. Using a terrestrial carbon cycle model that takes into account high-yield cultivars, fertilizer use and irrigation, we find that the long-term increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude arises from two major regions: the mid-latitude cropland between 256N and 606N and the high-latitude natural vegetation between 506N and 706 N. The long-term trend of seasonal amplitude increase is 0.311 0.027 percent per year, of which sensitivity experiments attribute 45, 29 and 26 per cent to land-use change, climate variability and change, and increased productivity due to CO2 fertilization, respectively. Vegetation growth was earlier by one to two weeks, as measured by the mid-point of vegetation carbon uptake, and took up 0.5 petagrams more carbon in July, the height of the growing season, during 20012010 than in 19611970, suggesting that human land use and management contribute to seasonal changes in the CO2 exchange between the biosphere and the atmosphere.

Zeng, Ning; Zhao, Fang; Collatz, George; Kalnay, Eugenia; Salawitch, Ross J.; West, Tristram O.; Guanter, Luis

2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

373

Rapid embedded wire heating via resistive guiding of laser-generated fast electrons as a hydrodynamic driver  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Resistively guiding laser-generated fast electron beams in targets consisting of a resistive wire embedded in lower Z material should allow one to rapidly heat the wire to over 100 eV over a substantial distance without strongly heating the surrounding material. On the multi-ps timescale, this can drive hydrodynamic motion in the surrounding material. Thus, ultra-intense laser solid interactions have the potential as a controlled driver of radiation hydrodynamics in solid density material. In this paper, we assess the laser and target parameters needed to achieve such rapid and controlled heating of the embedded wire.

Robinson, A. P. L.; Schmitz, H. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)] [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Pasley, J. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom) [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); York Plasma Institute, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Enabling pulse compression and proton acceleration in a modular ICF driver for nuclear and particle physics applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The existence of efficient ion acceleration regimes in collective laser-plasma interactions opens up the possibility to develop high-energy physics facilities in conjunction with projects for inertial confinement nuclear fusion (ICF) and neutron spallation sources. In this paper, we show that the pulse compression requests to make operative these acceleration mechanisms do not fall in contradiction with current technologies for high repetition rate ICF drivers. In particular, we discuss explicitly a solution that exploits optical parametric chirped pulse amplification and the intrinsic modularity of the lasers aimed at ICF.

F. Terranova; S. V. Bulanov; J. L. Collier; H. Kiriyama; F. Pegoraro

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

375

Structural Properties of the Cr(III)-Fe(III) (Oxy)Hydroxide Compositional Series: Insights for a Nanomaterial Solid Solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chromium(III) (oxy)hydroxide and mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides are environmentally important compounds for controlling chromium speciation and bioaccessibility in soils and aquatic systems and are also industrially important as precursors for materials and catalyst synthesis. However, direct characterization of the atomic arrangements of these materials is complicated because of their amorphous X-ray properties. This study involves synthesis of the complete Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide compositional series, and the use of complementary thermal, microscopic, spectroscopic, and scattering techniques for the evaluation of their structural properties. Thermal analysis results show that the Cr end member has a higher hydration state than the Fe end member, likely associated with the difference in water exchange rates in the first hydration spheres of Cr(III) and Fe(III). Three stages of weight loss are observed and are likely related to the loss of surface/structural water and hydroxyl groups. As compared to the Cr end member, the intermediate composition sample shows lower dehydration temperatures and a higher exothermic transition temperature. XANES analysis shows Cr(III) and Fe(III) to be the dominant oxidation states. XANES spectra also show progressive changes in the local structure around Cr and Fe atoms over the series. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray total scattering data shows that the Fe end member is nanocrystalline ferrihydrite with an intermediate-range order and average coherent domain size of {approx}27 {angstrom}. The Cr end member, with a coherent domain size of {approx}10 {angstrom}, has only short-range order. The PDFs show progressive structural changes across the compositional series. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results also show the loss of structural order with increasing Cr content. These observations provide strong structural evidence of chemical substitution and progressive structural changes along the compositional series.

Tang, Y.; Zhang, L.; Michel, F.M.; Harrington, R.; Parise, J.B.; Reeder, R.J.

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

376

Structural Properties of the Cr(III)-Fe(III) (Oxy)hydroxide Compositional Series: Insights for a Nanomaterial "Solid Solution"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chromium(III) (oxy)hydroxide and mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides are environmentally important compounds for controlling chromium speciation and bioaccessibility in soils and aquatic systems and are also industrially important as precursors for materials and catalyst synthesis. However, direct characterization of the atomic arrangements of these materials is complicated because of their amorphous X-ray properties. This study involves synthesis of the complete Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide compositional series, and the use of complementary thermal, microscopic, spectroscopic, and scattering techniques for the evaluation of their structural properties. Thermal analysis results show that the Cr end member has a higher hydration state than the Fe end member, likely associated with the difference in water exchange rates in the first hydration spheres of Cr(III) and Fe(III). Three stages of weight loss are observed and are likely related to the loss of surface/structural water and hydroxyl groups. As compared to the Cr end member, the intermediate composition sample shows lower dehydration temperatures and a higher exothermic transition temperature. XANES analysis shows Cr(III) and Fe(III) to be the dominant oxidation states. XANES spectra also show progressive changes in the local structure around Cr and Fe atoms over the series. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray total scattering data shows that the Fe end member is nanocrystalline ferrihydrite with an intermediate-range order and average coherent domain size of 27 {angstrom}. The Cr end member, with a coherent domain size of 10 {angstrom}, has only short-range order. The PDFs show progressive structural changes across the compositional series. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results also show the loss of structural order with increasing Cr content. These observations provide strong structural evidence of chemical substitution and progressive structural changes along the compositional series.

Michel, Y.; Michel, F; Zhang, L; Harrington, R; Parise, J; Reeder, R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Break-Even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the break-even cost for residential rooftop solar water heating (SWH) technology, defined as the point where the cost of the energy saved with a SWH system equals the cost of a conventional heating fuel purchased from the grid (either electricity or natural gas). We examine the break-even cost for the largest 1,000 electric and natural gas utilities serving residential customers in the United States as of 2008. Currently, the break-even cost of SWH in the United States varies by more than a factor of five for both electricity and natural gas, despite a much smaller variation in the amount of energy saved by the systems (a factor of approximately one and a half). The break-even price for natural gas is lower than that for electricity due to a lower fuel cost. We also consider the relationship between SWH price and solar fraction and examine the key drivers behind break-even costs. Overall, the key drivers of the break-even cost of SWH are a combination of fuel price, local incentives, and technical factors including the solar resource location, system size, and hot water draw.

Cassard, H.; Denholm, P.; Ong, S.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Doubly resonant Raman electron paramagnetic transitions of Cr{sup 3+} in ruby (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Cr{sup 3+}).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the Raman electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of Cr{sup 3+} in ruby (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Cr{sup 3+}) in the {sup 4}A{sub 2} (ground) and E{sup -} (excited) states of its well-known R{sub 1} emission line. Using tunable dye laser excitation within the range of the Zeeman components of R{sub 1}, we observe highly selective doubly resonant enhancements of the Raman EPR lines. The double resonances confirm the assignments of the Raman EPR lines, and they underscore the simultaneous occurrence of both 'in resonance' and 'out resonance' as visualized in the Kramers-Heisenberg quantum-mechanical picture of inelastic light scattering. The g factors of the {sup 4}A{sub 2} and E{sup -} states are consistent with the observed magnetic field dependence of the Raman EPR shifts. Through the interplay of Raman effect and the sharp Zeeman components of R{sub 1}, the results provide clear insights into the underlying microscopic mechanism of these resonant Raman EPR spectra of ruby.

Lu, X.; Venugopalan, S.; Kim, H.; Grimsditch, M.; Rodriguez, S.; Ramdas, A. K.; Materials Science Division; Purdue Univ.; State Univ. of New York at Binghamton; Sogang Univ.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Magnetization switching of rare earth orthochromite CeCrO{sub 3}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the synthesis of single phase rare earth orthochromite CeCrO{sub 3} and its magnetic properties. A canted antiferromagnetic transition with thermal hysteresis at T?=?260?K is observed, and a magnetic compensation (zero magnetization) near 133?K is attributed to the antiparallel coupling between Ce{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+} moments. At low temperature, field induced magnetization reversal starting from 43?K for H?=?1.2 kOe reveals the spin flip driven by Zeeman energy between the net moments and the applied field. These findings may find potential uses in magnetic switching devices such as nonvolatile magnetic memory which facilitates two distinct states of magnetization.

Cao, Yiming; Cao, Shixun, E-mail: sxcao@shu.edu.cn; Ren, Wei; Feng, Zhenjie; Yuan, Shujuan; Kang, Baojuan; Zhang, Jincang [Department of Physics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Lu, Bo [Laboratory for Microstructures, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

380

Irradiation effects on base metal and welds of 9Cr-1Mo (EM10) martensitic steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

9Cr martensitic steels are being developed for core components (wrapper tubes) of fast breeder reactors as well as for fusion reactor structures. Here, the effects of fast neutron irradiation on the mechanical behavior of base metal and welds of 9Cr-1Mo (EM10) martensitic steel have been studied. Two types of weldments have been produced by TIG and electron beam techniques. Half of samples have been post-weld heat treated to produce a stress-relieved structure. The irradiation has been conducted in the Phenix reactor to doses of 63--65 dpa in the temperature range 450--459 C. The characterization of the welds, before and after irradiation, includes metallographic observations, hardness measurements, tensile and Charpy tests. It is shown that the mechanical properties of the welds after irradiation are in general similar to the characteristics obtained on the base metal, which is little affected by neutron irradiation.

Alamo, A.; Seran, J.L.; Rabouille, O.; Brachet, J.C.; Maillard, A.; Touron, H.; Royer, J. [CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "driver cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

High-reflectivity Cr/Sc multilayer condenser for compact soft x-ray microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The condenser is a critical component in compact water-window x-ray microscopes as it influences the exposure time via its efficiency and the resolution via its numerical aperture. Normal-incidence multilayer mirrors can reach large geometrical collection efficiencies and match the numerical aperture of the zone plate but require advanced processing for high total reflectivity. In the present article we demonstrate large-diameter normal-incidence spherical Cr/Sc multilayer condensers with high and uniform reflectivity. Dc-magnetron sputtering was used to deposit 300 bilayers of Cr/Sc with a predetermined d-spacing matching the {lambda}=3.374 nm operating wavelength on spherical substrates. The mirrors show a uniform reflectivity of {approx}3% over the full 58 mm diameter condenser area. With these mirrors an improvement in exposure time by a factor of 10 was achieved, thereby improving the performance of the compact x-ray microscope significantly.

Stollberg, H.; Yulin, S.; Takman, P. A. C.; Hertz, H. M. [Biomedical and X-Ray Physics, Department of Applied Physics, KTH-AlbaNova, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Fraunhofer-Institut fur Angewandte Optik und Feinmechanik, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 7, 07745 Jena (Germany); Biomedical and X-Ray Physics, Department of Applied Physics, KTH-AlbaNova, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Development and characterization of PdCr temperature-compensaated wire resistance strain gage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A temperature-compensated resistance static strain gage with potential to be used to 600 C was recently developed. Gages were fabricated from specially developed palladium-13 w/o chromium (Pd-13Cr) wire and platinum (Pt) compensator. When bonded to high temperature Hastelloy X, the apparent strain from room temperature to 600 C was within 400 microstrain for gages with no preheat treatment and within 3500 microstrain for gages with 16 hours prestabilization at 640 C. The apparent strain versus temperature relationship of stabilized PdCr gages were repeatable with the reproducibility within 100 microstrain during three thermal cycles to 600 C and an 11 hours soak at 600 C. The gage fabrication, construction and installation is described. Also, the coating system used for this compensated resistance strain gage is explained. The electrical properties of the strain sensing element and main characteristics of the compensated gage including apparent strain, drift and reproducibility are discussed.

Lei, J.F.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Absence of long-range chemical ordering in equimolar FeCoCrNi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Equimolar FeCoCrNi alloys have been the topic of recent research as 'high-entropy alloys,' where the name is derived from the high configurational entropy of mixing for a random solid solution. Despite their name, no systematic study of ordering in this alloy system has been performed to date. Here, we present results from anomalous x-ray scattering and neutron scattering on quenched and annealed samples. An alloy of FeNi{sub 3} was prepared in the same manner to act as a control. Evidence of long-range chemical ordering is clearly observed in the annealed FeNi{sub 3} sample from both experimental techniques. The FeCoCrNi sample given the same heat treatment lacks long-range chemical order.

Lucas, M. S. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); UTC Inc., 1270 North Fairfield Road, Dayton, Ohio 45432 (United States); Wilks, G. B.; Senkov, O. N. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); UES, Inc., 4401 Dayton-Xenia Rd., Dayton, Ohio 45432 (United States); Mauger, L.; Munoz, J. A. [California Institute of Technology, W. M. Keck Laboratory 138-78, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Michel, E. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio 45435 (United States); Horwath, J.; Semiatin, S. L. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); Stone, M. B.; Abernathy, D. L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1, Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Karapetrova, E. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

384

Absence of long-range chemical ordering in equimolar FeCoCrNi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Equimolar FeCoCrNi alloys have been the topic of recent research as high-entropy alloys, where the name is derived from the high configurational entropy of mixing for a random solid solution. Despite their name, no systematic study of ordering in this alloy system has been performed to date. Here we present results from anomalous x-ray scattering and neutron scattering on quenched and annealed samples. An alloy of FeNi3 was prepared in the same manner to act as a control. Evidence of longrange chemical ordering is clearly observed in the annealed FeNi3 sample from both experimental techniques. The FeCoCrNi sample given the same heat treatment lacks long-range chemical order.

Lucas, Matthew [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Wilks, G B [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Mauger, L [W. M. Keck Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Munoz, Jorge A. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Senkov, Oleg [ORNL; Michel, E [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Horwath, J [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Semiatin, S L [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Stone, Matthew B [ORNL; Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL; Karapetrova, Evgenia [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Silicon-on-insulator-based high-voltage, high-temperature integrated circuit gate driver for silicon carbide-based power field effect transistors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicon carbide (SiC)-based field effect transistors (FETs) are gaining popularity as switching elements in power electronic circuits designed for high-temperature environments like hybrid electric vehicle, aircraft, well logging, geothermal power generation etc. Like any other power switches, SiC-based power devices also need gate driver circuits to interface them with the logic units. The placement of the gate driver circuit next to the power switch is optimal for minimising system complexity. Successful operation of the gate driver circuit in a harsh environment, especially with minimal or no heat sink and without liquid cooling, can increase the power-to-volume ratio as well as the power-to-weight ratio for power conversion modules such as a DC-DC converter, inverter etc. A silicon-on-insulator (SOI)-based high-voltage, high-temperature integrated circuit (IC) gate driver for SiC power FETs has been designed and fabricated using a commercially available 0.8--m, 2-poly and 3-metal bipolar-complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-double diffused metal oxide semiconductor (DMOS) process. The prototype circuit-s maximum gate drive supply can be 40-V with peak 2.3-A sourcing/sinking current driving capability. Owing to the wide driving range, this gate driver IC can be used to drive a wide variety of SiC FET switches (both normally OFF metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) and normally ON junction field effect transistor (JFET)). The switching frequency is 20-kHz and the duty cycle can be varied from 0 to 100-. The circuit has been successfully tested with SiC power MOSFETs and JFETs without any heat sink and cooling mechanism. During these tests, SiC switches were kept at room temperature and ambient temperature of the driver circuit was increased to 200-C. The circuit underwent numerous temperature cycles with negligible performance degradation.

Tolbert, Leon M [ORNL; Huque, Mohammad A [ORNL; Blalock, Benjamin J [ORNL; Islam, Syed K [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

MICROSTRUCTURAL EXAMINATION OF V-4CR-4TI PRESSURIZED THERMAL CREEP TUBES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two further failed thermal creep pressurized tubes of V-4Cr-4Ti tested at 700 and 800 degrees C have been examined using optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy in order to understand failure and creep mechanisms. These conditions represent lower stress states than were previously examined. Creep deformation at lower stress is shown to be controlled by sub-boundary formation and mis-orientation between sub-grains arising from climb of dislocations within the boundary.

Gelles, David S.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

High pressure synthesis of a new chromite, ScCrO{sub 3}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new compound, ScCrO{sub 3} has been synthesized at 45 kbar and 1,200 C using the cylindrical type press (USCA-1000). It has Pbnm symmetry with a = 5.0329(2) {angstrom}, b = 5.3602(3) {angstrom}, and c = 7.3790(4) {angstrom}, and its structure has been refined using the Rietveld technique and the synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data.

Park, J.H.; Parise, J.B. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)] [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

The energy distribution of beta CrB for the specific stellar abundances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The comparison of the observed and computed energy distributions of beta CrB has shown that a model with the specific chemical composition of the star can account for the visual enery distribution, while it is still unable to reproduce ultraviolet observations shortward of 1700 A. Furthermore, the predicted absorption of strong Fe II and Mg II UV lines is much larger than the observed one.

F. Castelli

1998-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

389

The MSFR as a flexible CR reactor: the viewpoint of safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the possibility has first been discussed of using the liquid-fuelled Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR) as a flexible conversion ratio (CR) reactor without design modification. By tuning the reprocessing rate it is possible to determine the content of fission products in the core, which in turn can significantly affect the neutron economy without incurring in solubility problems. The MSFR can thus be operated as U-233 breeder (CR>1), iso-breeder (CR=1) and burner reactor (CR<1). In particular a 40 year doubling time can be achieved, as well as a considerable Transuranics and MA (minor actinide) burning rate equal to about 150 kg{sub HN}/GWE-yr. The safety parameters of the MSFR have then been evaluated for different fuel cycle strategies. Th use and a softer spectrum combine to give a strong Doppler coefficient, one order of magnitude higher compared to traditional fast reactors (FRs). The fuel expansion coefficient is comparable to the Doppler coefficient and is only mildly affected by core compositions, thus assisting the fuel cycle flexibility of the MSFR. ?eff and generation time are comparable to the case of traditional FRs, if a static fuel is assumed. A notable reduction of ?eff is caused by salt circulation, but a low value of this parameter is a limited concern in the MSFR thanks to the lack of a burnup reactivity swing and of positive feedbacks. A simple approach has also been developed to evaluate the MSFR capabilities to withstand all typical double-fault accidents, for different fuel cycle options.

Fiorina, C.; Cammi, A. [Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20136 Milan (Italy); Franceschini, F. [Westinghouse Electric Company LL, 1000 Westinghouse Dr., Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States); Krepel, J. [Paul Scherrer Institut, PSI WEST, 5234 Villigen (Switzerland)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Ferromagnetic ordering of Cr and Fe doped p-type diamond: An ab initio study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ferromagnetic ordering of transition metal dopants in semiconductors holds the prospect of combining the capabilities of semiconductors and magnetic systems in single hybrid devices for spintronic applications. Various semiconductors have so far been considered for spintronic applications, but low Curie temperatures have hindered room temperature applications. We report ab initio DFT calculations on the stability and magnetic properties of Fe and Cr impurities in diamond, and show that their ground state magnetic ordering and stabilization energies depend strongly on the charge state and type of co-doping. We predict that divacancy Cr{sup +2} and substitutional Fe{sup +1} order ferromagnetically in p-type diamond, with magnetic stabilization energies (and magnetic moment per impurity ion) of 16.9 meV (2.5 ?{sub B}) and 33.3 meV (1.0 ?{sub B}), respectively. These magnetic stabilization energies are much larger than what has been achieved in other semiconductors at comparable impurity concentrations, including the archetypal dilute magnetic semiconductor GaAs:Mn. In addition, substitutional Fe{sup +1} exhibits a strong half-metallic character, with the Fermi level crossing bands in only the spin down channel. These results, combined with diamonds extreme properties, demonstrate that Cr or Fe dopedp-type diamond may successfully be considered in the search for room temperature spintronic materials.

Benecha, E. M. [Department of Physics, University of South Africa, P.O Box 392, UNISA 0003, Pretoria (South Africa); Lombardi, E. B. [College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, P.O Box 392, UNISA 0003, Pretoria (South Africa)

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

391

Attribute Cr. Course Name Prereq 4 BIOL 220 (204) Principles of Biology: Organisms, Ecology, Evolution Plus Lab and discussion (Fall)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Attribute Cr. Course Name Prereqs Prereq 4 BIOL 220 (204) Principles of Biology: Organisms, Ecology Foundations of Learning and Memory (Fall, Spr) Beh. Elec. 3 PSYC 317 Sensation and Perception (Fall) Beh

Lewis, Robert Michael

392

Raman Spectroscopic and Visible Absorption Investigation of LiCrSi2O6 Pyroxene Under Pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

symmetry.6,7 Spodumene (LiAlSi2O6) and LiCrSi2O6 behave similarly at the phase transition; both go from 6

Downs, Robert T.

393

Auger Nanoprobe analysis of presolar ferromagnesian silicate grains from primitive CR chondrites QUE 99177 and MET 00426  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Auger Nanoprobe analysis of presolar ferromagnesian silicate grains from primitive CR chondrites inventories are dominated by ferromagnesian silicates with group 1 oxygen isotopic compositions, indicative interstellar silicates have stoichiometries between olivine and pyroxene type silicates. Although structural

394

Microbial community changes during sustained Cr(VI) reduction at the 100H site in Hanford, WA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the 100H site in Hanford, WA Romy Chakraborty 1 , Eoin Lcontaminated aquifer at the Hanford (WA) 100H site in 2004.Cr(VI) reduction at Hanford, and a comparison of the

Chakraborty, Romy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

In situ long-term reductive bioimmobilization of Cr(VI) in groundwater using hydrogen release compound  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

100 H Area of the DOE Hanford Facility, Quantum EngineeringCr-immobilization research site at Hanford 100-H area. Wellexperiment was conducted at the Hanford Site (Washington), a

Faybishenko, B.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Structure of multilayered Cr(Al)N/SiO{sub x} nanocomposite coatings fabricated by differential pumping co-sputtering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Cr(Al)N/38 vol. % SiO{sub x} hard coating was prepared on a (001) Si substrate at 250 C in a differential pumping co-sputtering system, which has two chambers for radio frequency (RF) sputtering and a substrate holder rotating on the chambers. The composite coating was grown by alternate sputter-depositions from CrAl and SiO{sub 2} targets with flows of N{sub 2}+Ar and Ar at RF powers of 200 and 75 W, respectively, on transition layers grown on the substrate. Analytical electron microscopy reveled that the Cr(Al)N/SiO{sub x} coating had a multilayered structure of Cr(Al)N crystal layers ?1.6 nm thick and two-dimensionally dispersed amorphous silicon oxide (a-SiO{sub x}) particles with sizes of ?1 nm or less. The a-SiO{sub x} particles were enclosed with the Cr(Al)N layers. The coating had a low indentation hardness of ?25 GPa at room temperature, due to a high oxide fraction of 38 vol. % and a low substrate rotational speed of 1 rpm. Faster rotation and lower oxide fraction would make a-SiO{sub x} particles smaller, resulting in the formation of Cr(Al)N crystal including the very fine a-SiO{sub x} particles with small number density. They would work as obstacles for the lattice deformation of the Cr(Al)N crystals. We have fabricated a superhard coating of Cr(Al)N/17 vol. % SiO{sub x} with a hardness of 46 GPa prepared at 12 rpm.

Kawasaki, Masahiro [JEOL USA Inc., 11 Dearborn Road, Peabody, Massachusetts 01960 (United States)] [JEOL USA Inc., 11 Dearborn Road, Peabody, Massachusetts 01960 (United States); Nose, Masateru [Faculty of Art and Design, University of Toyama, 180 Futagami-machi, Takaoka 933-8588 (Japan)] [Faculty of Art and Design, University of Toyama, 180 Futagami-machi, Takaoka 933-8588 (Japan); Onishi, Ichiro [JEOL Ltd. 3-1-2 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan)] [JEOL Ltd. 3-1-2 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Shiojiri, Makoto [Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)] [Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

397

Cr-W-V bainitic/ferritic steel with improved strength and toughness and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high strength, high toughness Cr-W-V ferritic steel composition suitable for fast induced-radioactivity (FIRD) decay after irradiation in a fusion reactor comprises 2.5-3.5 wt % Cr, 2. This invention was made with Government support under contract DE-AC05-840R21400 awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy to Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. and the Government has certain rights in this invention.

Klueh, Ronald L. (Knoxville, TN); Maziasz, Philip J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Currently, in countries where automobiles are moving on the right, drivers are required to drive in the rightmost lane. To overtake another vehicle, they move one lane to the left, pass, and return to their  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary Currently, in countries where automobiles are moving on the right, drivers are required automobiles travel on the left. Finally, in "Further Thinking", we try to integrate more factors to improve February 11, 2014 Abstract Currently, in countries where automobiles are moving on the right, drivers

Morrow, James A.

399

Transmission electron microscopy of RSP Fe/Cr/Mn/Mo/C alloy. [Fe-3 wt % Cr-2 wt % Mn-0. 5 wt % Mo, -0. 3 wt % C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rapid solidification processing (RSP) has been carried out on an Fe/Cr/Mn/Mo/C alloy using both electron-beam melting and piston-and-anvil techniques. Preliminary TEM results show RSP produces a refined duplex microstructure of ferrite and martensite, with a typical ferrite grain size of 0.50 - 3.0 microns. This RSP microstructure is significantly different from that observed in the conventionally austenitized and quenched alloys - a lath martensitic microstructure with thin films of retained interlath austenite. The morphological change produced by RSP is accompanied by an increase in hardness from 48R/sub c/ to 61R/sub c/ (approx. 480 to 720 VHN). It is intended to use electron-beam specimens to examine the potential beneficial effect of RSP upon sliding wear resistance and, by careful TEM studies, it will be possible to characterize the microstructure and its role in the hardness and wear behavior of the RSP alloy.

Rayment, J.J.; Thomas, G.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

THORAX pretest prediction of a sodium-boiling transient in a 19-pin simulated LMFBR driver bundle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments will be conducted in the Thermal-Hydraulic Out-of-Reactor Safety-Shutdown Heat Removal System (THORS-SHRS) Assembly 1 loop at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to model the behavior of a reactor during degraded decay heat removal conditions. The test section is to consist of two parallel 19-pin electrically-heated driver bundles, typical of U.S. Large Developmental Plant (LDP) Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) design. Analysis of these experiments will include using THORAX, a two-dimensional boiling model which assumes an equilibrium mixture two-phase flow (with slip). A THORAX prediction is presented for a single-bundle forced convection boiling-to-dryout transient at 15.8 kW/pin.

Rose, S.D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "driver cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Critical Drivers for Safety Culture: Examining Department of Energy and U.S. Army Operational Experiences - 12382  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluating operational incidents can provide a window into the drivers most critical to establishing and maintaining a strong safety culture, thereby minimizing the potential project risk associated with safety incidents. By examining U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) versus U.S. Army drivers in terms of regulatory and contract requirements, programs implemented to address the requirements, and example case studies of operational events, a view of the elements most critical to making a positive influence on safety culture is presented. Four case studies are used in this evaluation; two from DOE and two from U.S. Army experiences. Although the standards guiding operations at these facilities are different, there are many similarities in the level of hazards, as well as the causes and the potential consequences of the events presented. Two of the incidents examined, one from a DOE operation and the other from a U.S. Army facility, resulted in workers receiving chemical burns. The remaining two incidents are similar in that significant conduct of operations failures occurred resulting in high-level radioactive waste (in the case of the DOE facility) or chemical agent (in the case of the Army facility) being transferred outside of engineering controls. A review of the investigation reports for all four events indicates the primary causes to be failures in work planning leading to ineffective hazard evaluation and control, lack of procedure adherence, and most importantly, lack of management oversight to effectively reinforce expectations for safe work planning and execution. DOE and Army safety programs are similar, and although there are some differences in contractual requirements, the expectations for safe performance are essentially the same. This analysis concludes that instilling a positive safety culture comes down to management leadership and engagement to (1) cultivate an environment that values a questioning attitude and (2) continually reinforce expectations for the appropriate level of rigor in work planning and procedure adherence. A review of the root causes and key contributing causes to the events indicate: - Three of the four root cause analyses cite lack of management engagement (oversight, involvement, ability to recognize issues, etc.) as a root cause to the events. - Two of the four root cause analyses cite work planning failures as a root cause to the events and all cause analyses reflect work planning failures as contributing factors to the events. - All events with the exception of the Tuba City plant shutdown indicate procedure noncompliance as a key contributor; in the case of Tuba City the procedure issues were primarily related to a lack of procedures, or a lack of sufficiently detailed procedures. - All events included discussion or suggestion of a lack of a questioning attitude, either on the part of management/supervision, work planners, or workers. This analysis suggests that the most critical drivers to safety culture are: - Management engagement, - Effective work planning and procedures, and - Procedure adherence with a questioning attitude to ensure procedural problems are identified and fixed. In high-hazard operational environments the importance of robust work planning processes and procedure adherence cannot be overstated. However, having the processes by themselves is not enough. Management must actively engage in expectation setting and ensure work planning that meets expectations for hazard analysis and control, develop a culture that encourages incident reporting and a questioning attitude, and routinely observe work performance to reinforce expectations for adherence to procedures/work control documents. In conclusion, the most critical driver to achieving a workforce culture that supports safe and effective project performance can be summarized as follows: 'Management engagement to continually reinforce expectations for work planning processes and procedure adherence in an environment that cultivates a questioning attitude'. (authors)

Lowes, Elizabeth A. [The S.M. Stoller Corporation, Broomfield, Colorado (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Migration: An engine for social change The movement of people into societies that offer a better way of life is a more powerful driver of cultural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Migration: An engine for social change The movement of people into societies that offer a better way of life is a more powerful driver of cultural evolution than conflict and conquest, say Peter effect on how societies evolve cul- turally because it is selective. People move to societies

Richerson, Peter J.

403

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. , NO. , 2012 1 Dynamic Driver Supply Voltage Scaling for Organic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic Driver Supply Voltage Scaling for Organic Light Emitting Diode Displays Donghwa Shin, Student, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--Organic light emitting diode (OLED) display is a self-illuminating device]. On the other hand, an organic light emitting diode (OLED) is self-illuminating using organic light emission

Pedram, Massoud

404

DRIVER LICENSE NUMBER MUST BE INCLUDED ON RESUME All qualified applicants must submit a cover letter and resume detailing education and work  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DRIVER LICENSE NUMBER MUST BE INCLUDED ON RESUME All qualified applicants must submit a cover letter and resume detailing education and work experience to the City of Waterloo Human Resources Department, 715 Mulberry Street, Waterloo, Iowa 50703 or email employment@waterloo-ia.org. The resume must

Isaacs, Rufus

405

ith our country facing unprecedented economic challenges, the need to invest in drivers of long-term growth has never been greater. The Obama Administra-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

W ith our country facing unprecedented economic challenges, the need to invest in drivers of long--from healthcare and edu- cation to energy independence and climate change. Information technology (IT to work together to create new economic opportunities and address our country's most pressing challenges

Narasayya, Vivek

406

Reactive oxygen species mediate Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis through PI3K/AKT-dependent activation of GSK-3?/?-catenin signaling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cr(VI) compounds are known human carcinogens that primarily target the lungs. Cr(VI) produces reactive oxygen species (ROS), but the exact effects of ROS on the signaling molecules involved in Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis have not been extensively studied. Chronic exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells to Cr(VI) at nanomolar concentrations (10100 nM) for 3 months not only induced cell transformation, but also increased the potential of these cells to invade and migrate. Injection of Cr(VI)-stimulated cells into nude mice resulted in the formation of tumors. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) increased levels of intracellular ROS and antiapoptotic proteins. Transfection with catalase or superoxide dismutase (SOD) prevented Cr(VI)-mediated increases in colony formation, cell invasion, migration, and xenograft tumors. While chronic Cr(VI) exposure led to activation of signaling cascades involving PI3K/AKT/GSK-3?/?-catenin and PI3K/AKT/mTOR, transfection with catalase or SOD markedly inhibited Cr(VI)-mediated activation of these signaling proteins. Inhibitors specific for AKT or ?-catenin almost completely suppressed the Cr(VI)-mediated increase in total and active ?-catenin proteins and colony formation. In particular, Cr(VI) suppressed autophagy of epithelial cells under nutrition deprivation. Furthermore, there was a marked induction of AKT, GSK-3?, ?-catenin, mTOR, and carcinogenic markers in tumor tissues formed in mice after injection with Cr(VI)-stimulated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that ROS is a key mediator of Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis through the activation of PI3K/AKT-dependent GSK-3?/?-catenin signaling and the promotion of cell survival mechanisms via the inhibition of apoptosis and autophagy. - Highlights: Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) induces carcinogenic properties in BEAS-2B cells. ROS play an important role in Cr(VI)-induced tumorigenicity of BEAS-2B cells. PI3K/AKT/GSK-3?/?-catenin signaling involved in Cr(VI) carcinogenesis. The inhibition of apoptosis and autophagy contributes to Cr(VI) carcinogenesis.

Son, Young-Ok; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Wang, Lei; Wang, Xin; Fan, Jia; Kim, Dong-Hern; Lee, Ju-Yeon; Zhang, Zhuo [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); Lee, Jeong-Chae [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Biosciences, Research Center of Bioactive Materials, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Shi, Xianglin, E-mail: xshi5@email.uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Letter Report Documenting Progress of Second Generation ATF FeCrAl Alloy Fabrication  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of the 2nd generation ATF FeCrAl alloy has been initiated, and a candidate alloy was selected for trial tube fabrication through hot-extrusion and gun-drilling processes. Four alloys based on Fe-13Cr-4.5Al-0.15Y in weight percent were newly cast with minor alloying additions of Mo, Si, Nb, and C to promote solid-solution and second-phase precipitate strengthening. The alloy compositions were selected with guidance from computational thermodynamic tools. The lab-scale heats of ~ 600g were arc-melted and drop-cast, homogenized, hot-forged and -rolled, and then annealed producing plate shape samples. An alloy with Mo and Nb additions (C35MN) processed at 800C exhibits very fine sub-grain structure with the sub-grain size of 1-3?m which exhibited more than 25% better yield and tensile strengths together with decent ductility compared to the other FeCrAl alloys at room temperature. It was found that the Nb addition was key to improving thermal stability of the fine sub-grain structure. Optimally, grains of less than 30 microns are desired, with grains up to and order of magnitude in desired produced through Nb addition. Scale-up effort of the C35MN alloy was made in collaboration with a commercial cast company who has a capability of vacuum induction melting. A 39lb columnar ingot with ~81mm diameter and ~305mm height (with hot-top) was commercially cast, homogenized, hot-extruded, and annealed providing 10mm-diameter bar-shape samples with the fine sub-grain structure. This commercial heat proved consistent with materials produced at ORNL at the lab-scale. Tubes and end caps were machined from the bar sample and provided to another work package for the ATF-1 irradiation campaign in the milestone M3FT-14OR0202251.

Yamamoto,, Y. [ORNL] [ORNL; Yang, Y. [ORNL] [ORNL; Field, K. G. [ORNL] [ORNL; Terrani, K. [ORNL] [ORNL; Pint, B. A. [ORNL] [ORNL; Snead, L. L. [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

408

CHARACTERIZATION OF PRESOLAR MATERIAL IN THE CR CHONDRITE NORTHWEST AFRICA 852  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the inventory of presolar silicate, oxide, and silicon carbide (SiC) grains in the CR2 chondrite Northwest Africa (NWA) 852. Thirty-one O-anomalous grains were detected: 24 were identified as silicates ({approx}78 ppm); the remaining 7 are Al-rich oxides ({approx}38 ppm). NWA 852 is the first C2 chondrite containing O-anomalous presolar dust in concentrations comparable to other more primitive meteorites. Eight presolar SiC grains have been found, representing the highest abundance ({approx}160 ppm) observed so far in primitive meteorites. {sup 15}N-enriched matter is also present, although very heterogeneously distributed. Twenty-six of the O-anomalous grains are enriched in {sup 17}O, originating from the outflows of low-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. We calculate a silicate/oxide abundance ratio of {approx}2, which indicates a higher degree of aqueous alteration than observed for other presolar-grain-rich meteorites. NWA 852 thus stands between the presolar-grain-rich CR3 chondrites (MET 00426, QUE 99177) and CR2 chondrites with low presolar grain abundances (Renazzo, NWA 530). We calculate an initial presolar silicate abundance of {approx}800 ppm for NWA 852, if silicate destruction by aqueous alteration is taken into account. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) investigation of one presolar Al-rich grain of an AGB star origin revealed that the grain mainly consists of a single crystal of hibonite with slightly varying orientations. A distinct subgrain (d < 100 nm) with a Ca/Ti ratio of {approx}1 is located in the central region, most likely indicating a perovskite-like phase. Our data suggest this phase to be a primary condensate and not an alteration product.

Leitner, J.; Hoppe, P. [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Particle Chemistry Department, P.O. Box 3060, 55020 Mainz (Germany); Vollmer, C. [Institut fuer Mineralogie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Zipfel, J., E-mail: jan.leitner@mpic.de [Forschungsinstitut und Naturmuseum Senckenberg, Sektion Meteoritenforschung, Senckenberganlage 25, 60325 Frankfurt (Germany)

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

409

Microstructural examination of V-(4-5%) Cr-(4-5%)Ti irradiated in X530  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructural examination results are reported for two heats of V-(4-5%)Cr-(4-5%)Ti irradiated in the X530 experiment to {approximately}400{degrees}C to provide an understanding of the microstructural evolution that may be associated with degradation of mechanical properties. Fine precipitates were observed in high density intermixed with small defect clusters for all conditions examined following the irradiation. The irradiation-induced precipitation does not appear to be affected by preirradiation heat treatment at 950-1125{degrees}C. There was no evidence for a significant density of large (diameter >10 nm) dislocation loops or network dislocations.

Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Chung, H.M. [Argonne Natinonal Lab., IL (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Determination of mechanical properties of Ni-Cr-P amorphous alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DETERMINATION OF MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF Ni-Cr-P AMORPHOUS ALLOYS A Thesis by SWAROOP KUMAR R. KONDLAPUDI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree.... Kondlapudi, B. E. , Qsmania University Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee : Dr. A. wolfenden Dr. R. Griffin A study of the mechanical properties of Ni80 xCrxPgp amorphous alloys (x = 0 to 40 at% in steps of 5. 0) has been undertaken at Texas A&M University...

Kondlapudi, Swaroop Kumar R

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

411

Oxidation Characteristics of Fe-18Cr-18Mn-stainless alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air oxidation studies of Fe-18Cr-18Mn stainless steels were conducted at 525C, 625C, and 725C. Alloys were evaluated with respect to changes in oxidation properties as a result of interstitial additions of nitrogen and carbon and of minor solute additions of silicon, molybdenum, and nickel. Interstitial concentrations possibly had a small, positive effect on oxidation resistance. Minor solute additions significantly improved oxidation resistance but could also reduce interstitial solubility resulting in formation of chromium carbides. Loss of solute chromium resulted in a slight reduction in oxidation protection. Oxidation lasting over 500 hours produced a manganese rich, duplex oxide structure: an outer sesquioxide and an inner spinel oxide.

James Rawers

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Audit Report: CR-B-95-06 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste andAccess to OUO AccessOpportunity | Department7-26CR-B-95-06 Audit

413

Audit Report: CR-B-96-01 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste andAccess to OUO AccessOpportunity | Department7-26CR-B-95-06

414

Audit Report: CR-B-97-04 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste andAccess to OUO AccessOpportunity |Report: CR-B-97-04 Audit Report:

415

Audit Report: CR-B-98-01 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste andAccess to OUO AccessOpportunity |Report: CR-B-97-04 Audit Report:8-01

416

Audit Report: CR-B-98-02 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste andAccess to OUO AccessOpportunity |Report: CR-B-97-04 Audit

417

Audit Report: CR-FS-96-03 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste andAccess to OUO AccessOpportunity |Report: CR-B-97-04

418

NUREG/CR-0413 ANLlES-67 Distribution Code: RE ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCT 28 1% - :NEW YORICNUREG/CR-0413

419

Grain boundary depletion and migration during selective oxidation of Cr in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky LearningGet AssistanceCatalytic SitesEmployee, Retireea Ni-5Cr

420

Audit Report: CR-B-01-01 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3--Logistical5/08 Attendance List from 12/05/08 Attendance5Operations TheCR-B-01-01

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "driver cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Permeable Reactive Biobarriers for In Situ Cr(VI) Reduction: Bench Scale Tests Using Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chromate (Cr(VI)) reduction studies were performed in bench scale flow columns using the fermentative subsurface isolate Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6. In these tests, columns packed with either quartz sand or hydrous ferric oxide (HFO)-coated quartz sand, were inoculated with strain ES6 and fed nutrients to stimulate growth before nutrient-free Cr(VI) solutions were injected. Results show that in columns containing quartz sand, a continuous inflow of 2 mg/L Cr(VI) was reduced to below detection limits in the effluent for durations of up to 5.7 residence times after nutrient injection was discontinued proving the ability of strain ES6 to reduce chromate in the absence of an external electron donor. In the HFO-containing columns, Cr(VI) reduction was significantly prolonged and effluent Cr(VI) concentrations remained below detectable levels for periods of up to 66 residence times after nutrient injection was discontinued. Fe was detected in the effluent of the HFO-containing columns throughout the period of Cr(VI) removal indicating that the insoluble Fe(III) bearing solids were being continuously reduced to form soluble Fe(II) resulting in prolonged abiotic Cr(VI) reduction. Thus, growth of Cellulomonas within the soil columns resulted in formation of permeable reactive barriers that could reduce Cr(VI) and Fe(III) for extended periods even in the absence of external electron donors. Other bioremediation systems employing Fe(II)-mediated reactions require a continuous presence of external nutrients to regenerate Fe(II). After depletion of nutrients, contaminant removal within these systems occurs by reaction with surface-associated Fe(II) that can rapidly become inaccessible due to formation of crystalline Fe-minerals or other precipitates. The ability of fermentative organisms like Cellulomonas to reduce metals without continuous nutrient supply in the subsurface offers a viable and economical alternative technology for in situ remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated groundwater through formation of permeable reactive biobarriers (PRBB).

Sridhar Viamajala; Brent M. Peyton; Robin Gerlach; Vaideeswaran; William A. Apel; James N. Petersen

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Effect of V and Ta on the precipitation behavior of 12%Cr reduced activation ferrite/martensite steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

12%Cr reduced activation ferrite/martensite steels are promising candidate materials for good corrosion and irradiation resistance used for supercritical water-cooled reactor cladding and in-core components. V and Ta are considered to have improved the creep strength of high Cr steels by precipitating as MX phase. In this paper, a series of trial products microalloyed with V and VTa are produced, and the microstructure is characterized after quenching at 1050 C and tempering at 780 C by using TEM method to investigate the effect of these elements on the precipitation behavior of 12%Cr reduced activation ferrite/martensite steel. The results from both the experimental observations and thermodynamic and kinetic calculations reveal that V and VTa can promote the stable MX precipitation instead of M{sub 2}X, thus increasing the volume fraction of M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. Two-phase separation behavior of the (Ta, V)(C, N) carbonitride into a Ta(V)C(N) phase and a V(Ta)N(C) phase in 12Cr3WVTa steel is observed and further discussed. - Highlights: Microalloyed with V and V-Ta can promote the precipitation of MX instead of M{sub 2}X. The presence of delta-ferrite in microstructure affects the morphology of MX. Two-phase separation of MX carbonitride was observed in 12Cr3WVTa steel.

Xiao, Xiang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Guoquan, E-mail: g.liu@ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Hu, Benfu; Wang, Jinsan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Ullah, Asad [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Department of Mathematics, Karakoram International University, Gilgit-Baltistan (Pakistan)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

Corrosion property of 9Cr-ODS steel in nitric acid solution for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrosion tests of oxide dispersion strengthened with 9% Cr (9Cr-ODS) steel, which is one of the desirable materials for cladding tube of sodium-cooled fast reactors, in pure nitric acid solution, spent FBR fuel solution, and its simulated solution were performed to understand the corrosion behavior in a spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. In this study, the 9Cr-ODS steel with lower effective chromium content was evaluated to understand the corrosion behavior conservatively. As results, the tube-type specimens of the 9Cr-ODS steels suffered severe weight loss owing to active dissolution at the beginning of the immersion test in pure nitric acid solution in the range from 1 to 3.5 M. In contrast, the weight loss was decreased and they showed a stable corrosion in the higher nitric acid concentration, the dissolved FBR fuel solution, and its simulated solution by passivation. The corrosion rates of the 9Cr-ODS steel in the dissolved FBR fuel solution and its simulated solution were 1-2 mm/y and showed good agreement with each other. The passivation was caused by the shift of corrosion potential to noble side owing to increase in nitric acid concentration or oxidative ions in the dissolved FBR fuel solution and the simulated spent fuel solution. (authors)

Takeuchi, M.; Koizumi, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Inoue, M.; Koyama, S.I. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai-machi, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, Ambient water toxicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of January 25-February 1, 1994, as described in the Statement of Work (SOW) document. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Clinch River Mile 9.0, Poplar Creek Mile 1.0, and Poplar Creek Mile 2.9 on January 24, 26, and 28. Samples were partitioned (split) and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival or growth) to fathead minnows; however, toxicity to daphnids (significantly reduced reproduction) was demonstrated in undiluted samples from Poplar Creek Mile 1.0 in testing conducted by TVA based on hypothesis testing of data. Point estimation (IC{sub 25}) analysis of the data, however, showed no toxicity in PCM 1.0 samples.

Simbeck, D.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Solidification characterization of a new rapidly solidified Ni-Cr-Co based superalloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solidification characterization of a new rapidly solidified Ni-Cr-Co based superalloy prepared by plasma rotating electrode process was investigated by means of optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscope. The results show that the solidification microstructure changes from dendrites to cellular and microcrystal structures with decreasing powder size. The elements of Co, Cr, W and Ni are enriched in the dendrites, while Mo, Nb and Ti are higher in the interdendritic regions. The relationships between powder size with the average solid-liquid interface moving rate, the average interface temperature gradient and the average cooling rate are established. Microsegregation is increased with larger powder size. The geometric integrity of MC Prime type carbides in the powders changes from regular to diverse with decreasing powder size. The morphology and quantity of carbides depend on the thermal parameters and non-equilibrium solute partition coefficients during rapid solidification. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The relations of solidification thermal parameters with powder size are established. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The relation of non-equilibrium solute partition with powder size is investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The solidification microstructure is related to thermal parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The segregation behavior is linked to non-equilibrium partition coefficients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The morphology and quantity of carbides depend on the above combined factors.

Wu, Kai, E-mail: wk-ustb@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Guoquan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China) [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Hu, Benfu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Li, Feng [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)] [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Zhang, Yiwen [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China) [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); High Temperature Materials Research Institution, CISRI, Beijing 100081 (China); Tao, Yu; Liu, Jiantao [High Temperature Materials Research Institution, CISRI, Beijing 100081 (China)] [High Temperature Materials Research Institution, CISRI, Beijing 100081 (China)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

Localized Corrosion of a Neutron Absorbing Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd Alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program, located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), has developed a new nickel-chromium-molybdenum-gadolinium structural alloy for storage and long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The new alloy will be used for SNF storage container inserts for nuclear criticality control. Gadolinium has been chosen as the neutron absorption alloying element due to its high thermal neutron absorption cross section. This alloy must be resistant to localized corrosion when exposed to postulated Yucca Mountain in-package chemistries. The corrosion resistance properties of three experimental heats of this alloy are presented. The alloys performance are be compared to Alloy 22 and borated stainless steel. The results show that initially the new Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy is less resistant to corrosion as compared to another Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy (Alloy 22); but when the secondary phase that contains gadolinium (gadolinide) is dissolved, the alloy surface becomes passive. The focus of this work is to qualify these gadolinium containing materials for ASME code qualification and acceptance in the Yucca Mountain Repository.

R.E. Mizia; T. E. Lister; P. J. Pinhero; T. L. Trowbridge

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Discovery of Optical Bursts from MS1603.6+2600 = UW CrB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the discovery of several optical burst-like events from the low-mass X-ray binary MS1603.6+2600 (UW CrB). The events last for a few tens of seconds, exhibit a very fast rise and slow decay, and involve optical brightening of a factor of 2-3. The flares appear distinct from the lower level flickering and instead strongly resemble reprocessed type-I X-ray bursts as seen in a number of other neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries. In conjunction with the previously reported candidate X-ray burst, these confirm that the compact object in UW CrB is a neutron star. We examine the optical burst brightness and recurrence times and discuss how the nature of the system can be constrained. We conclude that the source is most likely an accretion disk corona source at an intermediate distance, rather than a nearby quiescent system or very distant dipper.

R. I. Hynes; E. L. Robinson; E. Jeffery

2004-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

428

Demonstrations of diode-pumped and grating-tuned ZnSe:Cr{sup 2+} lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within the last few years, divalent-transition-metal-doped II-VI material class has been proposed as source of new tunable mid-IR lasers. Cr{sup 2+} is a prime laser candidate on account of its high luminescence quantum yield and the expectation that ESA would be absent. The first ZnSe:Cr{sup 2+} laser demonstrations were conducted in an end-pumped geometry with a tightly focused (0.2 mm spot) MgF{sub 2}-Co{sup 2+} laser beam, for a peak pump intensity well over 100 kW/cm{sup 2}, so laser threshold was easily reached. Grating tuning experiments were done by replacing the cavity high-reflector with a diffraction grating. The diode array was removed and pump beam from a MgF{sub 2}:Co{sup 2+} laser was focused onto the crystal using the same cylindrical lens. Output wavelengths were checked with a monochromator. The long-wavelength limit of operation was 2799 nm. Short-wavelength cutoff was 2134 nm; even though the emission cross section remains substantial, self-absorption inhibits laser operation.

Page, R.H.; Skidmore, J.A.; Schaffers, K.I.; Beach, R.J.; Payne, S.A.; Krupke, W.F.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Effect of prior cold work on age hardening of Cu-3Ti-1Cr alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of 50%, 75% and 90% cold work on the age hardening behavior of Cu-3Ti-1Cr alloy has been investigated by hardness and tensile tests, and light optical and transmission electron microscopy. Hardness increased from 118 Hv in the solution-treated condition to 373 Hv after 90% cold work and peak aging. Cold deformation reduced the peak aging time and temperature of the alloy. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength reached a maximum of 1090 and 1110 MPa, respectively, following 90% deformation and peak aging. The microstructure of the deformed alloy exhibited elongated grains and deformation twins. The maximum strength on peak aging was obtained due to precipitation of the ordered, metastable and coherent {beta}'-Cu{sub 4}Ti phase, in addition to high dislocation density and deformation twins. Over-aging resulted in decreases in hardness and strength due to the formation of incoherent and equilibrium {beta}-Cu{sub 3}Ti phase in the form of a cellular structure. However, the morphology of the discontinuous precipitation changed to a globular form on high deformation. The mechanical properties of Cu-3Ti-1Cr alloy are superior to those of Cu-2.7Ti, Cu-3Ti-1Cd and the commercial Cu-0.5Be-2.5Co alloys in the cold-worked and peak-aged condition.

Markandeya, R. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, College of Engineering, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kukatpally, Hyderabad-500 072 (India); Nagarjuna, S. [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad-500 058 (India)]. E-mail: snagarjuna1@rediffmail.com; Sarma, D.S. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221 005 (India)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

Ab initio study on noncompensated CrO codoping of GaN for enhanced solar energy conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe a novel photocatalyst obtained by codoping GaN with CrO, according to a new "noncompensated" codoping concept based on first-principles calculations. The approach enables controllable narrowing of the GaN band gap with significantly enhanced carrier mobility and photocatalytic activity in the visible light region and thus offers immense potential for application in solar energy conversion, water splitting, and a variety of solar-assisted photocatalysis. Our calculations indicate that the formation energy for the cation doping is greatly reduced by noncompensated codoping with an anion. Although Cr doping alone can split the band gap with the formation of an intermediate band, the mobility is low due to carrier trapping by the localized states. The first-principles calculations also demonstrate that CrO codoping of GaN shifts the Fermi level into the conduction band resulting in high carrier density and mobility.

Pan, Hui [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Eres, Gyula [ORNL; Zhang, Zhenyu [ORNL

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Projecting Fatalities in Crashes Involving Older Drivers, 20002025, CRADA No. ORNL98-0500 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the turn of the century the 20th century that is the median age in the United States was under 30 years; America was 60% rural in nature; and there were only 36 highway fatalities all year. As we leave the 20th century behind, the route into the 21st century is very different. Intelligent cars speed down multi-lane smart highways in a nation that is 75% urban. According to the Federal Highway Administrations Highway Statistics, there are 28,000 times more vehicles on the road in 2000 than there were in 1900, and these vehicles travel about 2.6 trillion miles each year. Annual fatalities resulting from highway crashes have also increased by over 1100%. We see other changes as well. The face of America is changing. It is growing older. In 2025, persons 65 and over will make up 18.5% of the total population. The number of persons aged 85 and over is increasing more rapidly than any other age group. More importantly, the elderly are taking more trips, driving further, and continuing to drive much later in life. These conditions lead to concerns about traffic safety. Although the elderly are healthier and drive safer cars than they did just two decades ago, their frailty makes them more susceptible to injury than younger persons involved in traffic crashes of the same severity. In addition, visual, physical, and cognitive skills, all of which contribute to driving abilities, decrease with advancing age. The familiar U-shaped curve depicting the rate of fatalities per vehicle miles traveled, shows that the elderly experience a higher highway fatality rate than any other age group except teenagers. While the overall number of highway fatalities has decreased regularly since 1972, the number of fatalities of elderly travelers has continued to increase steadily. This increase is cause for concern for both the elderly driver and for other persons on the roads who migh tbe placed in danger through crashes involving elderly drivers.

Hu, Patricia S. [ORNL] [ORNL; Jones, Donald W. [ORNL] [ORNL; Reuscher, Timothy [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education] [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education; Schmoyer, Richard S. [ORNL] [ORNL; Truett, Lorena F. [ORNL] [ORNL

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Microbial community changes during sustained Cr(VI) reduction at the 100H site in Hanford, WA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hexavalent Chromium is a widespread contaminant found in soil, sediment, and groundwater. In order to stimulate microbially-mediated reduction of Cr(VI), a poly-lactate compound (HRC) was injected into the Chromium-contaminated aquifer at the Hanford (WA) 100H site in 2004. Cr(VI) concentrations rapidly declined to below the detection limit and remained so for more than three years after injection. Based on the results of the bacterial community composition using high-density DNA 16S rRNA gene microarrays, we observed the community to transition through denitrifying, ironreducing and sulfate-reducing populations. As a result, we specifically focused isolation efforts on three bacterial species that were significant components of the community. Positive enrichments in defined anaerobic media resulted in the isolation of an iron-reducing Geobacter metallireducens-like isolate, a sulfate-reducing Desulfovibrio vukgaris-like strain and a nitrate-reducing Pseudomonas stutzeri-like isolate among several others. All of these isolates were capable of reducing Cr(VI) anoxically and have been submitted for genome sequencing to JGI. To further characterize the microbial, and geochemical mechanisms associated with in situ Cr(VI) reduction at the site, additional HRC was injected in 2008. The goal was to restimulate the indigenous microbial community and to regenerate the reducing conditions necessary for continued Cr(VI) bio-immobilization in the groundwater. Analysis of the microbial populations post-injection revealed that they recovered to a similar density as after the first injection in 2004. In this study, we present the results from our investigation into microbially-mediated Cr(VI) reduction at Hanford, and a comparison of the microbial community development following two HRC injections four years apart.

Chakraborty, Romy; Brodie, Eoin L; Faybishenko, Boris; Piceno, Yvette M; Tom, Lauren; Choudhuri, Swati; Beller, Harry R; Liu, Jenny; Torok, Tamas; Joyner, Dominique C; Joachimiak, Marcin P; Zhou, Aifen; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Zhou, Joe; Long, Phil E; Newcomer, Darrell R; Andersen, Gary L; Hazen, Terry C.

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

433

Temperature dependence of dynamic Young's modulus and internal friction in three plasma sprayed NiCrAlY coating alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF DYNAM'IIC YOUNG'S MODULUS AND INTERNAL FRICTION IN THREE PLASMA SPRAYED NiCrAlY COATING -ALLOYS A Thesis LLOYD STEVEN COOK Submitted to the 08ice of Graduate Studies of Texas AE M University in part. al full...'illment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1989 Itiajor Subject: l'dechanical Engineering TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF DYNAMIC YOUNG'S MODULUS AND INTERNAL FRICTION IN THREE PLASMA SPRAYED NiCrAIY COATING ALLOYS A Thesis by LLOYD STEVEN COOK...

Cook, Lloyd Steven

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Can one identify the intrinsic structure of the yrast states in {sup 48}Cr after the backbending?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The backbending phenomenon in {sup 48}Cr has been investigated using the recently developed projected configuration interaction (PCI) method, in which the deformed intrinsic states are directly associated with shell model wave functions. Two previous explanations, (i) K=0 band crossing and (ii) K=2 band crossing, have been reinvestigated using PCI, and it was found that both explanations can successfully reproduce the experimental backbending. The PCI wave functions in the pictures of K=0 band crossing and K=2 band crossing are highly overlapped. We conclude that there are no unique intrinsic states associated with the yrast states after backbending in {sup 48}Cr.

Gao Zaochun; Chen, Y. S.; Chen, Y. J. [China Institute of Atomic Energy P.O. Box 275-10, Beijing 102413 (China); Horoi, Mihai [Department of Physics, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, Michigan 48859 (United States); Tuya [College of Physics Science and Technology, Shenyang Normal University, ShenYang 110034 (China)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Design of a 7-MV Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) for down-hole flash x-ray radiography.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pulsed power driven flash x-ray radiography is a valuable diagnostic for subcritical experiments at the Nevada Test Site. The existing dual-axis Cygnus system produces images using a 2.25 MV electron beam diode to produce intense x-rays from a small source. Future hydrodynamic experiments will likely use objects with higher areal mass, requiring increased x-ray dose and higher voltages while maintaining small source spot size. A linear transformer driver (LTD) is a compact pulsed power technology with applications ranging from pulsed power flash x-ray radiography to high current Z-pinch accelerators. This report describes the design of a 7-MV dual-axis system that occupies the same lab space as the Cygnus accelerators. The work builds on a design proposed in a previous report [1]. This new design provides increased diode voltage from a lower impedance accelerator to improve coupling to low impedance diodes such as the self magnetic pinch (SMP) diode. The design also improves the predicted reliability by operating at a lower charge voltage and removing components that have proven vulnerable to failure. Simulations of the new design and experimental results of the 1-MV prototype are presented.

Cordova, Steve Ray; Welch, Dale Robert (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Oliver, Bryan Velten; Rose, David Vincent (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Johnson, David Lee (L-3 Communications - Pulse Sciences, San Leandro, CA); Bruner, Nichelle Lee (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Leckbee, Joshua J.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Wire number dependence of the implosion dynamics, stagnation, and radiation output of tungsten wire arrays at Z driver  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report results of the experimental campaign, which studied the initiation, implosion dynamics, and radiation yield of tungsten wire arrays as a function of the wire number. The wire array dimensions and mass were those of interest for the Z-pinch driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program. An optimization study of the x-ray emitted peak power, rise time, and full width at half maximum was effectuated by varying the wire number while keeping the total array mass constant and equal to {approx}5.8 mg. The driver utilized was the {approx}20-MA Z accelerator before refurbishment in its usual short pulse mode of 100 ns. We studied single arrays of 20-mm diameter and 1-cm height. The smaller wire number studied was 30 and the largest 600. It appears that 600 is the highest achievable wire number with present day's technology. Radial and axial diagnostics were utilized including crystal monochromatic x-ray backlighter. An optimum wire number of {approx}375 was observed which was very close to the routinely utilized 300 for the ICF program in Sandia.

Mazarakis, Michael G.; Stygar, William A.; Sinars, Daniel B.; Cuneo, Michael E.; Nash, Thomas J.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Keith Matzen, M.; Porter, John L.; Struve, Kenneth W.; McDaniel, Dillon H. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Deeney, Christopher E. [National Nuclear Security Administration, Washington, D.C. 20585 (United States); Douglas, Melissa R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Chittenden, Jerry [Imperial College, London, SW and 2BW (United Kingdom)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Quantitative measurement of Cr segregation in Co0.8xCrxPt0.1B0.1 recording media by scatter diagram analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- trometry or electron energy-loss spectrometry EELS data at each point. In most cases this technique diagram analysis of chemically resolved energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy EFTEM images the Cr enrichment is suf- ficiently high as to render the local Co­Cr composition non- magnetic

Krishnan, Kannan M.

438

Thermally Nitrided Stainless Steels for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Bipolar Plates: Part 1 Model Ni-50Cr and Austenitic 349TM alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal nitridation of a model Ni-50Cr alloy at 1100 C for 2 h in pure nitrogen resulted in the formation of a continuous, protective CrN/Cr{sub 2}N surface layer with a low interfacial contact resistance. Application of similar nitridation parameters to an austenitic stainless steel, 349{sup TM}, however, resulted in a discontinuous mixture of discrete CrN, Cr{sub 2}N and (Cr,Fe){sub 2}N{sub 1-x} (x = 0--0.5) phase surface particles overlying an exposed {gamma} austenite-based matrix, rather than a continuous nitride surface layer. The interfacial contact resistance of the 349{sup TM} was reduced significantly by the nitridation treatment. However, in the simulated PEMFC environments (1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 2 ppm F{sup -} solutions at 70 C sparged with either hydrogen or air), very high corrosion currents were observed under both anodic and cathodic conditions. This poor behavior was linked to the lack of continuity of the Cr-rich nitride surface formed on 349{sup TM} Issues regarding achieving continuous, protective Cr-nitride surface layers on stainless steel alloys are discussed.

Wang, Heli [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Turner, John [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Microstructural examination of irradiated V-(4-5%)Cr-(4-5%)Ti.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructural examination results are reported for two heats of V-(4-5%) Cr-(4-5%)Ti irradiated in the EBR-II X530 experiment to 4.5 dpa at {approximately}400 C to provide an understanding of the microstructural evolution that may be associated with degradation of mechanical properties. Fine precipitates were observed in high density intermixed with small defect clusters for all conditions examined following the irradiation. The irradiation-induced precipitation does not appear to be affected by preirradiation heat treatment at 950-1125 C. There was no evidence for a significant density of large (diameter >10 nm) dislocation loops or network dislocations. Analytical investigations successfully demonstrated that the precipitates were enriched in titanium, depleted in vanadium and contained no nitrogen. These results are discussed in terms of future alloy development options.

Gelles, D. S.

1998-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

440

FURTHER OBSERVATIONS ON V-4Cr-4Ti PRESSURIZED CREEP TUBES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Further observations are provided for pressurized thermal creep tubes of V-4Cr-4Ti examined following testing in the range 650 to 800C for tests lasting up to ~104 h. Precipitate particles have been analyzed by EELS to define interstitial contents, and are shown to be either C or O rich with only minor N contents. Grain shape aspect ratios as a function of strain have been measured and these data shows shape change as a result of effective mid-wall strains as high as 12.7%. Deformation mechanisms are considered to explain Newtonian viscous flow response at 800C below effective midwall stresses of 70 MPa, and it is concluded that grain boundary sliding probably is the predominant mechanism based on the microstructural information presented here, but there is evidence that Harper-Dorn creep may also be a contributing creep mechanism under these conditions.

Gelles, David S.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Thomas, Larry E.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "driver cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Microstructural examination of irradiated V-(4-5%)Cr-(4-5%)Ti  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructural examination results are reported for two heats of V-(4-5%)Cr-(4-5%)Ti irradiated in the EBR-II X530 experiment to {approximately}4 dpa at {approximately}400 C to provide an understanding of the microstructural evolution that may be associated with degradation of mechanical properties. Fine precipitates were observed in high density intermixed with small defect clusters for all conditions examined following the irradiation. The irradiation-induced precipitation does not appear to b affected by preirradiation heat treatment at 950--1125 C. There was no evidence for a significant density of large (diameter >10 nm) dislocation loops or network dislocations. Analytical investigators successfully demonstrated that the precipitates were enriched in titanium, depleted in vanadium and contained no nitrogen.

Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rice, P.M.; Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chung, H.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

On the origin of the low temperatures resistivity minimum in Cr thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present measurements of the electrical resistivity and Hall coefficient, ? and R{sub H}, in Cr films of different thicknesses grown on MgO (100) substrates, as a function of temperature T and applied magnetic field H. The results show a low temperature minimum in ?(T), which is thickness dependent. From 40?K to 2?K, the Hall coefficient is a monotonous increasing function as T is reduced with no particular signature at the temperature T{sub min} where the minimum develops. We explain the resistivity minimum assuming an imperfect nesting of the Fermi surface leading to small electron and hole pockets. We introduce a phenomenological model which supports this simple physical picture.

Osquiguil, E.; Tosi, L.; Kaul, E. E.; Balseiro, C. A. [Centro Atmico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Comisin Nacional de Energa Atmica, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina)

2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

443

2011 HONDA CR-Z 2982 - HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE BATTERY TEST RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energys Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing traction batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Honda CR-Z (VIN JHMZF1C64BS002982). Battery testing was performed by Intertek Testing Services NA. The Idaho National Laboratory and Intertek collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Gray, Tyler [Interek; Shirk, Matthew [Idaho National Laboratory; Wishart, Jeffrey [Interek

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

2011 Honda CR-Z 4466 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energys Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing traction batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Honda CR-Z (VIN JHMZF1C67BS004466). Battery testing was performed by Intertek Testing Services NA. The Idaho National Laboratory and Intertek collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Heat treated 9 Cr-1 Mo steel material for high temperature application  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to a composition and heat treatment for a high-temperature, titanium alloyed, 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibiting improved creep strength and oxidation resistance at service temperatures up to 650.degree. C. The novel combination of composition and heat treatment produces a heat treated material containing both large primary titanium carbides and small secondary titanium carbides. The primary titanium carbides contribute to creep strength while the secondary titanium carbides act to maintain a higher level of chromium in the finished steel for increased oxidation resistance, and strengthen the steel by impeding the movement of dislocations through the crystal structure. The heat treated material provides improved performance at comparable cost to commonly used high-temperature steels such as ASTM P91 and ASTM P92, and requires heat treatment consisting solely of austenization, rapid cooling, tempering, and final cooling, avoiding the need for any hot-working in the austenite temperature range.

Jablonski, Paul D.; Alman, David; Dogan, Omer; Holcomb, Gordon; Cowen, Christopher

2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

446

Mn-Fe base and Mn-Cr-Fe base austenitic alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Manganese-iron base and manganese-chromium-iron base austenitic alloys designed to have resistance to neutron irradiation induced swelling and low activation have the following compositions (in weight percent): 20 to 40 Mn; up to about 15 Cr; about 0.4 to about 3.0 Si; an austenite stabilizing element selected from C and N, alone or in combination with each other, and in an amount effective to substantially stabilize the austenite phase, but less than about 0.7 C, and less than about 0.3 N; up to about 2.5 V; up to about 0.1 P; up to about 0.01 B; up to about 3.0 Al; up to about 0.5 Ni; up to about 2.0 W; up to about 1.0 Ti; up to about 1.0 Ta; and with the remainder of the alloy being essentially iron.

Brager, Howard R. (Richland, WA); Garner, Francis A. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Thermodynamic modeling and experimental validation of the Fe-Al-Ni-Cr-Mo alloy system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NiAl-type precipitate-strengthened ferritic steels have been known as potential materials for the steam turbine applications. In this study, thermodynamic descriptions of the B2-NiAl type nano-scaled precipitates and body-centered-cubic (BCC) Fe matrix phase for four alloys based on the Fe-Al-Ni-Cr-Mo system were developed as a function of the alloy composition at the aging temperature. The calculated phase structure, composition, and volume fraction were validated by the experimental investigations using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and atom probe tomography. With the ability to accurately predict the key microstructural features related to the mechanical properties in a given alloy system, the established thermodynamic model in the current study may significantly accelerate the alloy design process of the NiAl-strengthened ferritic steels.

Teng, Zhenke [ORNL; Zhang, F [CompuTherm LLC, Madison, WI; Miller, Michael K [ORNL; Liu, Chain T [Hong Kong Polytechnic University; Huang, Shenyan [ORNL; Chou, Y.T. [Multi-Phase Services Inc., Knoxville; Tien, R [Multi-Phase Services Inc., Knoxville; Chang, Y A [ORNL; Liaw, Peter K [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Microstructural characterization of as-cast biocompatible Co-Cr-Mo alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microstructure of a cobalt-base alloy (Co-Cr-Mo) obtained by the investment casting process was studied. This alloy complies with the ASTM F75 standard and is widely used in the manufacturing of orthopedic implants because of its high strength, good corrosion resistance and excellent biocompatibility properties. This work focuses on the resulting microstructures arising from samples poured under industrial environment conditions, of three different Co-Cr-Mo alloys. For this purpose, we used: 1) an alloy built up from commercial purity constituents, 2) a remelted alloy and 3) a certified alloy for comparison. The characterization of the samples was achieved by using optical microscopy (OM) with a colorant etchant to identify the present phases and scanning electron microscopy (SE-SEM) and energy dispersion spectrometry (EDS) techniques for a better identification. In general the as-cast microstructure is a Co-fcc dendritic matrix with the presence of a secondary phase, such as the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides precipitated at grain boundaries and interdendritic zones. These precipitates are the main strengthening mechanism in this type of alloys. Other minority phases were also reported and their presence could be linked to the cooling rate and the manufacturing process variables and environment. - Research Highlights: {yields}The solidification microstructure of an ASTM-F75 type alloy were studied. {yields}The alloys were poured under an industrial environment. {yields}Carbides and sigma phase identified by color metallography and scanning microscopy (SEM and EDS). {yields}Two carbide morphologies were detected 'blocky type' and 'pearlite type'. {yields}Minority phases were also detected.

Giacchi, J.V., E-mail: jgiacchi@exa.unicen.edu.ar [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil (IFIMAT-FCE-CICPBA) Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399 B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Morando, C.N.; Fornaro, O. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil (IFIMAT-FCE-CICPBA) Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399 B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Palacio, H.A. [Comision de Investigaciones Cientificas de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (CICPBA), Calle 526 e/10 y 11 B1096APP La Plata (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil (IFIMAT-FCE-CICPBA) Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399 B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

Transmission infrared spectra (225 lm) of carbonaceous chondrites (CI, CM, CVCK, CR, C2 ungrouped): Mineralogy, water, and asteroidal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transmission infrared spectra (2­25 lm) of carbonaceous chondrites (CI, CM, CV­CK, CR, C2 ungrouped t In this work, infrared transmission spectra (2­25 lm range, 5000­400 cm?1 ) of 40 carbonaceous chon- drites. The variability in the silicate features is correlated with the intensity of an ­OH related absorption at 3-lm

Montes-Hernandez, German

450

Characterization of Gas Metal Arc Welding welds obtained with new high Cr-Mo ferritic stainless steel filler wires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Characterization of Gas Metal Arc Welding welds obtained with new high Cr-Mo ferritic stainless Several compositions of metal cored filler wire were manufactured to define the best welding conditions for homogeneous welding, by Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) process, of a modified AISI 444 ferritic stainless steel

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

451

Directed-energy electron-beam processing of a hypoeutectic Cr/sub 90/Ta/sub 10/ alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A hypoeutectic Cr/sub 90/Ta/sub 10/ alloy was processed using a directed-energy electron-beam surface melting and resolidification technique to study its microstructure evolution during rapid solidification. The power of the electron beam was 2500 W and the scan speed ranged from 0.13 to 2.0 m/sec. Microstructure characteristics such as transitions from planar front to dendritic growth, and from cellular to dendritic growth were observed. At low solidification rate, the interdendritic regions are characterized by the Cr/Cr/sub 2/Ta eutectic, and at high solidification rate the intercellular regions are characterized by a Cr/sub 2/Ta phase. For the latter, the distribution of Ta-solute across the interior of a cell is very uniform. In a given sample, the primary cell spacing increases as the solidification front moves from the substrate/regrowth interface toward the surface. The solidification parameters, i.e., temperature gradient and growth velocity, were determined with finite-element heat flow analyses. The observed microstructure characteristics were correlated to these parameters using available theoretical models. 9 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

Huang, J.S.; Kaufmann, E.N.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Re-Evaluation of Results in NUREG/CR-6674 for Carbon and Low-Alloy Steel Components (MRP-76)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates the conservatisms and uncertainties reported in NUREG/CR-6674 that lead to high probabilities of cracking in carbon and low-alloy steel for reactor piping. The report uses additional data generated since the completion of the report to eliminate uncertainties and show lower probabilities of cracking.

A. Deardorff; D. Harris; D. Dedhia

2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

453

Combined filtered cathodic arc etching pretreatment-magnetron sputter deposition of highly adherent CrN films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CrN films were prepared on steel substrates by a hybrid method utilizing filtered cathodic arc for Cr ion pretreatment and magnetron sputtering for coating deposition. During pretreatment the substrates were biased to -1200 V and exposed to filtered chromium plasma. The substrate-coating interface formed during the pretreatment contained a Cr-enriched modified layer with composition that was strongly influenced by the temperature of the substrate as observed by scanning transmission electron microscopy--energy dispersive spectroscopy. The modified layer had a nanocrystalline morphology and thickness of 15 nm. The path of formation of the layer is linked to the combined action of implantation, diffusion, and resputtering. The resulting adhesion of 3 {mu}m thick CrN films was very high with scratch test critical load values of 83 N. The morphology of the films was smooth without large scale defects and the microstructure was columnar. The coatings behaved well in dry sliding tests with very low wear coefficients of 2.3x10{sup -16} m{sup 3} N{sup -1} m{sup -1}, which can be linked to the high adhesion and defect-free microstructure. The smooth coatings also had a high resistance to corrosion as demonstrated by potentiodynamic tests with particularly high pitting potentials of +800 mV.

Ehiasarian, A. P.; Anders, A.; Petrov, I. [Materials and Engineering Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Howard St., Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

454

Sputter-Deposited Pt/CrN Nanoparticle PEM Fuel Cell Cathodes: Limited Proton Conductivity Through Electrode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sputter-Deposited Pt/CrN Nanoparticle PEM Fuel Cell Cathodes: Limited Proton Conductivity Through for proton exchange membrane PEM fuel cells. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy show manuscript received September 17, 2009. Published November 13, 2009. Proton exchange membrane PEM fuel cells

Gall, Daniel

455

The CR 2.0mm (.079") insulation displacement connector features a mounting height as low as  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7 The CR 2.0mm (.079") insulation displacement connector features a mounting height as low as 6.9mm") pitch insulation displacement connector allows automatic harness production for connection of UL1007 of misinsertion without being permanently distorted. Twin U-slot insulation displacement section The insulation

Wedeward, Kevin

456

Modulation of physical and photocatalytic properties of (Cr, N) codoped TiO{sub 2} nanorods using soft solution processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Facile polymerized complex reactions together with a hydrothermal reaction were implemented to make single crystalline TiO{sub 2} nanorods for the first time. Chromium (Cr) and nitrogen (N{sub 2}) co-doping was performed to tailor the physical properties. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction study illustrated that highly reactive facets of (101), (111), and (001) dominated rutile TiO{sub 2} nanorods. A growth model, based on formation of complex species, was proposed to elucidate effectiveness of the soft solution processing in making TiO{sub 2} nanorods. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and consideration of fundamentals of charge neutrality showed N{sub 2} doping could inhibit formation of Cr{sup 6+} and oxygen vacancies (V{sub O}{sup 2+}). An investigation of the photocatalytic properties exhibited high efficiency of photodegradation of methylene blue in 15?min under pH?=?10, using a nanocomposite of (7% Cr, 0.0021% N) codoped and 3% Cr doped TiO{sub 2} nanorods.

Lu, Wen-Chung [Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Nguyen, Hoang-Diem; Wu, Chun-Yi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Chang, Kao-Shuo, E-mail: kschang@mail.ncku.edu.tw; Yoshimura, Masahiro [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Promotion Center for Global Materials Research (PCGMR), National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China)

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

457

Tunable blue light source by intracavity frequency doubling of a Cr-LiSrAIF6 laser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tunable blue light source by intracavity frequency doubling of a Cr- LiSrAIF6 laser Franqois-switched operation at 10 kHz was intracavity frequency doubled by using a LiIOl crystal. The 230 ns tunable blue lasers emitting in the blue-green wavelength range are expected to be the key components for optical

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

458

Targeting Cancer More Effectively CR@B brings together researchers from across the University and the Royal United Hospital, Bath.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Targeting Cancer More Effectively CR@B brings together researchers from across the University to find a cure for various types of cancer. 40 academic groups from nearly every department to bedside and back again. Drug Discovery The discovery of a new family of anti-cancer drugs called steroid

Burton, Geoffrey R.

459

Kinetics of oxidation of an organic amine with a Cr(V) salen complex in homogeneous aqueous solution and on the surface of mesoporous silica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comparative study of catalytic activity under homogeneous and heterogeneous conditions was carried out using the (salen)Cr{sup III}-catalyzed oxidation of tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) with iodosobenzene as a model reaction. Amine-functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) were synthesized in a co-condensation reaction and functionalized with salen via a covalent Si-C bond. A Cr(III) complex of this supported ligand, MSN-(salen)Cr{sup III}, was prepared and characterized. Data from powder XRD, BET isotherms and BJH pore size distribution all showed that MSN-(salen)Cr{sup III} still had the typical MSN high surface area, narrow pore size distribution, and ordered hexagonal pore structure, which were further confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si solid-state NMR data provided structural information about the catalyst and verified successful functionalization of the salen ligand and coordination to Cr(III). No unreacted salen or Cr(III) were observed. The loadings of salen and salen-Cr{sup III} complex were determined via TGA and EDX, respectively. Both measurements indicated that approximately 0.5 mmol/g of catalyst was loaded on the surface of MSN. The oxidation of TMB with iodosobenzene using MSN-(salen)Cr{sup III} as a heterogeneous catalyst exhibited both similarities and differences with the analogous homogeneous reaction using (salen)Cr{sup III}(H{sub 2}O){sup +} as a catalyst in aqueous acetonitrile. In the presence of 0.10 M HClO{sub 4}, the two catalytic reactions proceeded at similar rates and generated the doubly oxidized product TMB{sup 2+}. In the absence of acid, the radical cation TMB{sup +} was produced. The kinetics of the heterogeneous reaction in the absence of added acid responded to concentrations of all three reagents, i.e. (salen)Cr{sup III}, TMB, and PhIO.

Szajna-Fuller, Ewa; Huang, Yulin; Rapp, Jennifer L.; Chaka, Gezhegn; Lin, Victor S.Y.; Pruski, Marek; Bakac, Andreja

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

460

Suggestions for Weed Control in Corn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F r ontier ? for additional w eed contr ol. Consult (R efer to label for specific w eeds BASF U se rate determined b y inches of soil) or sur face applied the pr oduct label. R o tational cr o p r estrictions will contr olled.) C.E.C. (cationex...) or sur face contr olled.) BASF applied within 2 w eeks of U se rate is determined b y C.E.C. (cation ex change planting. Early postemergence capacity) or soil textur e and organic matter befor e corn is12 inches tall, but content. Can make split...

Baumann, Paul A.

2002-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "driver cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Impact of x-ray dose on the response of CR-39 to 1-5.5 MeV alphas  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

The CR-39 nuclear track detector is used in many nuclear diagnostics #12;fielded at inertial con#12;nement fusion (ICF) facilities. Large x-ray uences generated by ICF experiments may impact the CR-39 response to incident charged particles. To determine the impact of x-ray exposure on the CR-39 response to alpha particles, a thick-target bremsstrahlung x-ray generator was used to expose CR-39 to various doses of 8 keV Cu-K?#11; and K#12;? x-rays. The CR-39 detectors were then exposed to 1-5.5 MeV alphas from an Am-241 source. The regions of the CR-39 exposed to x-rays showed a smaller track diameter than those not exposed to x-rays: for example, a dose of 3.0#6; 0.1 Gy causes a decrease of (19 #6;2)% in the track diameter of a 5.5 MeV alpha particle, while a dose of 60.0 #6;1.3 Gy results in a decrease of (45 #6;5)% in the track diameter. The reduced track diameters were found to be predominantly caused by a comparable reduction in the bulk etch rate of the CR-39 with x-ray dose. A residual eff#11;ect depending on alpha particle energy is characterized using an empirical formula.

Rojas-Herrera, J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Orozco, D.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sio, H.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Microstructural evolution during solution treatment of Co-Cr-Mo-C biocompatible alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three different Co-Cr-Mo-C alloys conforming to ASTM F75 standard were poured in an industrial environment and subjected to a conventional solution treatment at 1225 Degree-Sign C for several time intervals. The microstructural changes and transformations were studied in each case in order to evaluate the way in which treatment time influences the secondary phase fraction and clarify the microstructural changes that could occur. To assess how treatment time affects microstructure, optical microscopy and image analyzer software, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion spectrometry analysis were employed. The main phases detected in the as-cast state were: {sigma}-phase, M{sub 6}C, and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides. The latter presented two different morphologies, blocky type and lamellar type. Despite being considered the most detrimental feature to mechanical properties, {sigma}-phase and lamellar carbides dissolution took place in the early stages of solution treatment. M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides featured two different behaviors. In the alloy obtained by melting an appropriate quantity of alloyed commercial materials, a decrease in size, spheroidization and transformation into M{sub 6}C carbides were simultaneously observed. In the commercial ASTM F75 alloy, in turn, despite being the same phase, only a marked decrease in precipitates size was noticed. These different behaviors could be ascribed to the initial presence of other phases in the alloy obtained from alloyed materials, such as {sigma}-phase and 'pearlitic' carbides, or to the initial precipitate size which was much larger in the first than in the commercial ASTM F75 alloy studied. M{sub 6}C carbides dissolved directly in the matrix as they could not be detected in samples solution-treated for 15 min. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three different Co-Cr-Mo alloys were poured under an industrial environment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformation of existing phases followed during conventional solution treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In as-cast/treated samples, phases were identified by color metallography, SEM and EDS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer M{sub 23}C{sub 6} {yields} M{sub 6}C transformation was corroborated by SEM and EDS analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbide spheroidization was also detected prior a noticeably carbide size decreasing.

Giacchi, J.V., E-mail: jgiacchi@exa.unicen.edu.ar [IFIMAT, Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Fornaro, O. [IFIMAT, Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Palacio, H. [IFIMAT, Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Comision de Investigaciones Cientificas de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (CICPBA), Calle 526 e/10 y 11, B1096APP, La Plata (Argentina)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking of High Cr Ferritic-Martensitic Steels in Supercritical Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrosion behavior of the F-M (ferritic-martensitic) steels (T91, T92, T122) and Fe-base ODS (oxide dispersion strengthened) alloy (MA956{sup TM}) were evaluated in an aerated (8 ppm D.O.) SCW (supercritical water) at the temperature range between 300 and 627 deg C under 25 MPa. In aerated SCW the weight change of the F-M steel specimens became greater as the test temperature increased. However, the extent of the weight change at 350 deg C, just below the critical temperature appeared not to be less than those at 550 deg C. And the weight changes of all the F-M steel specimens in the deaerated SCW (for 347 hrs in 100 ppb D.O. for 347 hrs, and in 10 ppb D.O. for 432 hrs) tended to converge to about 1 mgcm{sup -2}. In aerated or deaerated conditions 20Cr Fe-base ODS alloy appeared to be very resistant to a SCW corrosion at all the test temperatures up to 500 hrs. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of 9Cr F-M steels (T91 and T92) was investigated by CERT (Constant Extension Rate Test) in SCW at various temperatures and D.O. levels with different strain rates. T91 did not show any evidence of a SCC in a fully deaerated (below 10 ppb D.O.) SCW at 500, 550, and 600 deg C at the test conditions. T92 specimens were tested at 500 deg C in SCW with different D.O. levels. The strain rate did not seem to affect the SCC behavior of the T92 steel, but D.O. in SCW seems to affect the SCC behavior to some extent. The total elongation of T92 in SCW of 100 ppb or of 500 ppb D.O. was significantly smaller than that at a fully deaerated (below 10 ppb D.O.) SCW (about 15 vs. 20%), and it appears to provide a clue to a SCC on the fracture surface after the CERT test. (authors)

Jinsung, Jang; Seong Sik, Hwang; Chang Hee, Han; Byung Hak, Lee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 150 Deokjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

JLAB Electron Driver Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several schemes have been proposed for adding a positron beam option at the Continuous Electron Beam Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Laboratory (JLAB). They involve using a primary beam of electrons or gamma rays striking a target to produce a positron beam. At JLAB electron beams are produced and used in two different accelerators, CEBAF and the JLAB FEL (Free Electron Laser). Both have low emittance and energy spread. The CEBAF beam is polarized. The FEL beam is unpolarized but the injector can produce a higher current electron beam. In this paper we describe the characteristics of these beams and the parameters relevant for positron production.

Kazimi, Reza [Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

465

Drivers of melanoma susceptibility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an overview of these publications, see the Nature ENCODE explorer at http://www.nature.com/encode/). By using different approaches such as chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq), RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and mass spectrometry in more than 140 human cell... ), radiation sources (e.g. X or gamma radiation), biological agents (e.g. hepatitis B or C or HIV viruses), personal habits (e.g. consuming areca nuts or Chinese-style salted fish), or drugs (e.g. cyclosporine or tamoxifen) [57]. The value of identifying...

Robles Espinoza, Carla Daniela

2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

466

Optimizing and Diversifying the Electric Range of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles for U.S. Drivers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To provide useful information for automakers to design successful plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) products and for energy and environmental analysts to understand the social impact of PHEVs, this paper addresses the question of how many of the U.S. consumers, if buying a PHEV, would prefer what electric ranges. The Market-oriented Optimal Range for PHEV (MOR-PHEV) model is developed to optimize the PHEV electric range for each of 36,664 sampled individuals representing U.S. new vehicle drivers. The optimization objective is the minimization of the sum of costs on battery, gasoline, electricity and refueling hassle. Assuming no battery subsidy, the empirical results suggest that: 1) the optimal PHEV electric range approximates two thirds of one s typical daily driving distance in the near term, defined as $450/kWh battery delivered price and $4/gallon gasoline price. 2) PHEVs are not ready to directly compete with HEVs at today s situation, defined by the $600/kWh battery delivered price and the $3-$4/gallon gasoline price, but can do so in the near term. 3) PHEV10s will be favored by the market over longer-range PHEVs in the near term, but longer-range PHEVs can dominate the PHEV market if gasoline prices reach as high as $5-$6 per gallon and/or battery delivered prices reach as low as $150-$300/kWh. 4) PHEVs can become much more attractive against HEVs in the near term if the electric range can be extended by only 10% with multiple charges per day, possible with improved charging infrastructure or adapted charging behavior. 5) the impact of a $100/kWh decrease in battery delivered prices on the competiveness of PHEVs against HEVs can be offset by about $1.25/gallon decrease in gasoline prices, or about 7/kWh increase in electricity prices. This also means that the impact of a $1/gallon decrease in gasoline prices can be offset by about 5/kWh decrease in electricity prices.

Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

ROOM TEMPERATURE COMPRESSION PROPERTIES OF TWO HEATS OF UNIRRADIATED V-4Cr-4Ti  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vanadium alloys are of interest to the Fusion program as potential first wall structural materials. The expected irradiation conditions for the first wall structural material include a range of temperatures where very high hardening caused by a high density of small, but shearable defect clusters results in a type of deformation called "localized deformation". At the onset of yield in a tensile test, a dislocation may move through a grain shearing the obstacles and clearing out a channel. Subsequent dislocations may easily pass through this channel. As the test progresses, more channels form. In the early stages of deformation, it is thought that the plastic deformation is confined to these channels. One important macroscopic result of this deformation behavior is rapid onset of necking in a tensile test and very low uniform elongation. As a means to help understand the range of stress states where localized deformation may adversely affect macroscopic ductility in vanadium alloys, compression test specimens fabricated from two heats of V-4Cr-4Ti are currently under irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The results of room temperature compression tests on the unirradiated control materials are presented here and compared with uniaxial tensile values from the literature.

Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Kurtz, Richard J.

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

468

Effect of heat treatment on precipitation on V-5Cr-5Ti heat BL63  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microstructures of V-5Cr-5Ti heat BL63 are compared following heat treatments at 1125{degrees}C for 1 h and 1125{degrees}C for 1 h followed by 890{degrees}C for 24 h. Following the 890{degrees}C treatment, precipitate density was increased due to the presence of a moderate density of highly elongated particles. Microchemical analysis showed that these particles often contained both Ti and V, some particles showed minor amounts of Si, S, and P, but it was also possible to show that these precipitates were enriched in O rather than C or N. Following the 1125{degrees}C heat treatment, only Si was found as a minor impurity in large particles, but S could be identified at grain boundaries, which were coated with a fine distribution of precipitates. The embrittlement observed is ascribed to a combination of interstitial solid solution hardening and grain boundary embrittlement, with interstitial hardening likely the dominant factor.

Gelles, D.S.; Li, H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

FURTHER MICROSTRUCTURAL EXAMINATIONS OF V-4Cr-4Ti PRESSURIZED CREEP TUBES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pressurized thermal creep tubes of V-4Cr-4Ti have been examined following testing in the range 650 to 800C for tests lasting ~104 h. Creep deformation was found to be controlled by climb-controlled dislocation glide at all temperatures below 800C whereas at 800C, sub-grain boundary structure predominated and represented the main obstacle for dislocation motion. At 650 and 700C after ~104 h an increased density of (Ti,V) oxy-carbo-nitride precipitates near the outer surface extending inwards a distance of 30 and 70 m, respectively, was found. At 800C, enhanced (Ti,V) oxy-carbo-nitride precipitation was observed across the entire tube wall thickness and may have affected creep response. Also, evidence for internal precipitation associated with the dislocation structure could be identified. The discussion section addresses differences in the controlling creep mechanisms between grain boundary sliding, sub-grain boundary controlled dislocation climb and individual dislocation climb processes.

Gelles, David S.; Kurtz, Richard J.

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

470

Spatial fractal characteristic of spinodal decomposition in Fe-Cr-Ni duplex stainless steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Owing to the extensive use of duplex stainless steels in areas like chemical and petrochemical industries, considerable interest has arisen concerning the thermal degradation of these materials during service, and the consequent changes on the mechanical properties. The embrittlement of these steels is basically due to the decomposition of the ferrite phase at elevated temperatures, and duplex steels are seldom used at temperatures above 300 C. Although the microstructure of spinodal decomposition has been studied extensively using atom probe, it is interesting to investigate the development of fractal characteristics in the microstructure during spinodal decomposition. In this paper the authors present part of their recent results in this aspect on a duplex stainless steel. The {alpha} and {alpha}{prime} domains evolved from the primary ferrite phase during spinodal decomposition have different morphologies. The {alpha} (Fe-rich) forms the matrix while the {alpha}{prime} (Cr-rich) domains are developed in the form of discrete regions embedded within the {alpha} matrix. The distribution of these domains follows the fractal-growth characteristics with fractal dimensions ranging from 0.1 to 0.2. In addition, there exists a lower critical dimension beyond which the self-similarity of the domains breaks down.

Shek, C.H.; Wong, K.W.; Lai, J.K.L. [City Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong). Dept. of Physics and Materials Science] [City Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong). Dept. of Physics and Materials Science; Shao, Y.Z. [Zhongshan Univ., Guangzhou (China). Dept. of Physics] [Zhongshan Univ., Guangzhou (China). Dept. of Physics

1997-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

471

Application of NUREG/CR-5999 interim fatigue curves to selected nuclear power plant components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent test data indicate that the effects of the light water reactor (LWR) environment could significantly reduce the fatigue resistance of materials used in the reactor coolant pressure boundary components of operating nuclear power plants. Argonne National Laboratory has developed interim fatigue curves based on test data simulating LWR conditions, and published them in NUREG/CR-5999. In order to assess the significance of these interim fatigue curves, fatigue evaluations of a sample of the components in the reactor coolant pressure boundary of LWRs were performed. The sample consists of components from facilities designed by each of the four U.S. nuclear steam supply system vendors. For each facility, six locations were studied, including two locations on the reactor pressure vessel. In addition, there are older vintage plants where components of the reactor coolant pressure boundary were designed to codes that did not require an explicit fatigue analysis of the components. In order to assess the fatigue resistance of the older vintage plants, an evaluation was also conducted on selected components of three of these plants. This report discusses the insights gained from the application of the interim fatigue curves to components of seven operating nuclear power plants.

Ware, A.G.; Morton, D.K.; Nitzel, M.E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Magnetic interactions in CoCrPt-oxide based perpendicular magnetic recording media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

First order reversal curves (FORC) method has been reported to be an efficient tool to study interaction between grains and layers of magnetic materials. Although a few studies have been carried out on perpendicular recording media in the past, a study on the effect of systematic variation of exchange interaction in granular perpendicular magnetic recording media on FORC contours has not been carried out in detail. Such a study will help to understand the use of FORC better. In this paper, we have made a systematic set of samples in order to study the variation in exchange coupling and its effect on FORC contours. The pressure during the deposition of the second ruthenium layer and the magnetic layer was varied to alter the separation between the grains and hence the exchange interaction between the grains in the CoCrPt-oxide recording layer. In addition, the thickness of Co-alloy cap layer was used as an additional tool to control the exchange interaction between the magnetic grains. The results indicated that the interaction field obtained from the FORC does not vary in a significant manner when the changes in exchange interaction are small. In comparison, the peak intensity of the FORC shows a clear trend as the exchange coupling is varied, making it a more suitable parameter to study the exchange and magnetostatic interactions in systems such as magnetic recording media.

Tan, H. K.; Varghese, B.; Piramanayagam, S. N., E-mail: prem-SN@dsi.a-star.edu.sg [Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A-STAR), Singapore 117608 (Singapore)

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

473

High-temperature phase transformation in Cr added TiAl base alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have investigated a microstructure evolution of a Ti-48Al-3.5Cr (in at.%) alloy at high-temperatures ({gt} 1,473K). In the alloy annealed at 1673K for 1.8ks, followed by air-cooling, a characteristic microstructure with a feathery fashion was uniformly formed. From a cooling-rate-controlling study, it was found that formation of the feathery structure is accomplished during continuous cooling from 1673K to 1573K, within the {alpha} + {gamma} two-phase region. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the feathery structure is composed of lamellar colonies (5--10{micro}m) which are crystallographically tilted slightly (a few degree) with their neighbors. A surprising fact is that lamellae in each colony are mostly the {gamma} phase with few {alpha}{sub 2} phase less than 5% in volume. This suggests that the feathery structure is a metastable product and has not resulted from the {alpha} {r{underscore}arrow} {alpha} + {gamma} transformation above 1,573 K. Instead, the feathery structure formation should be attributed to the non-equilibrium {alpha} {r{underscore}arrow} {gamma} transformation which occurs at high-temperatures with a small degree of supercooling. The authors discuss this interesting phase transformation in terms of the {alpha} {r{underscore}arrow} {gamma} massive transformation, based on the continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagram constructed for the present alloy.

Abe, E.; Niinobe, K.; Nobuki, M.; Nakamura, M.; Tsujimoto, T.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Star formation in z>1 3CR host galaxies as seen by Herschel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present Herschel (PACS and SPIRE) far-infrared (FIR) photometry of a complete sample of z>1 3CR sources, from the Herschel GT project The Herschel Legacy of distant radio-loud AGN (PI: Barthel). Combining these with existing Spitzer photometric data, we perform an infrared (IR) spectral energy distribution (SED) analysis of these landmark objects in extragalactic research to study the star formation in the hosts of some of the brightest active galactic nuclei (AGN) known at any epoch. Accounting for the contribution from an AGN-powered warm dust component to the IR SED, about 40% of our objects undergo episodes of prodigious, ULIRG-strength star formation, with rates of hundreds of solar masses per year, coeval with the growth of the central supermassive black hole. Median SEDs imply that the quasar and radio galaxy hosts have similar FIR properties, in agreement with the orientation-based unification for radio-loud AGN. The star-forming properties of the AGN hosts are similar to those of the general popul...

Podigachoski, P; Haas, M; Leipski, C; Wilkes, B; Kuraszkiewicz, J; Westhues, C; Willner, S P; Ashby, M L N; Chini, R; Clements, D L; Fazio, G G; Labiano, A; Lawrence, C; Meisenheimer, K; Peletier, R F; Siebenmorgen, R; Kleijn, G Verdoes

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Phase diagram and magnetocaloric effects in Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}(In{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}){sub 15} and (Mn{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x})NiGe{sub 1.05} alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The magnetocaloric and thermomagnetic properties of Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}(In{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}){sub 15} and (Mn{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}) NiGe{sub 1.05} systems for 0???x???0.105 and 0???x???0.1, respectively, have been studied by x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and magnetization measurements. Partial substitution of Cr for Mn in (Mn{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x})NiGe{sub 1.05} results in a first order magnetostructural transition from a hexagonal paramagnetic to an orthorhombic paramagnetic phase near T{sub M}???380?K (for x?=?0.07). Partial substitution of Cr for In in Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}(In{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}){sub 15} shifts the magnetostructural transition to a higher temperature (T?=?T{sub M}???450?K) for x?=?0.1. Large magnetic entropy changes of ?S?=??12 (J/(kgK)) and ?S?=??11 (J/(kgK)), both for a magnetic field change of 5?T, were observed in the vicinity of T{sub M} for (Mn{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x})NiGe{sub 1.05} and Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}(In{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}){sub 15}, respectively.

Quetz, Abdiel, E-mail: anorve2002@yahoo.com; Muchharla, Baleeswaraiah; Dubenko, Igor; Talapatra, Saikat; Ali, Naushad [Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois 62901 (United States); Samanta, Tapas; Stadler, Shane [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

476

Using CrAIN Multilayer Coatings to Improve Oxidation Resistance of Steel Interconnects for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stacks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The requirements of low cost and high-tempurature corrosion resistance for bipolar interconnect plates in solid oxide fuel cell stacks has directed attention to the use of metal plates with oxidation resistant coatings. We have investigatedt he performance of steel plates with multilayer coatings consisting of CrN for electrical conductivity and CrAIN for oxidation resistance. The coatings were deposited usin large area filterd arc deposition technolgy, and subsequently annealed in air for up to 25 hours at 800 degrees celsius. The composition, structer and morphology of the coated plates were characterized using RBS, nuclear reaction analysis, AFM and TEM techniques. By altering the architecture of the layers within the coatings, the rate of oxidation was reduced by more than an order of magnitute. Electrical resistance was measured at room temperature.

Smith, Richard J.; Tripp, C.; Knospe, Anders; Ramana, C. V.; Gorokhovsky, Vladimir I.; Shutthanandan, V.; Gelles, David S.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Surface structure and electrochemical characteristics of Ti-V-Cr bcc-type solid solution alloys sintered with Ni  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ti-V-Cr bcc-type solid solution alloys can absorb a large amount of hydrogen and be applied to active materials of the negative electrode in Ni-MH batteries. However, because of the insolubility of Ni into these alloys, the electrochemical characteristics like discharge capacity and cycle life were poor. In order to increase the discharge capacity of hydrogen absorbing alloy electrodes, Ti-V-Cr bcc-type alloy powders were sintered with Ni in order to form Ni contained surface layer on the alloy surface. As sintering temperature rose up, the surface composition changed from TiNi to Ti{sub 2}Ni. TiNi surface layer showed better electrochemical characteristics. For the Ni adding method, Ni electroless plating was preferred because of good adhesion. As a result of optimized conditions, a discharge capacity of 570 mAh/g and an improvement of cycle life were achieved.

Tsuji, Yoichiro; Yamamoto, Osamu; Matsuda, Hiromu; Toyoguchi, Yoshinori

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Demonstrations of diode-pumped and grating-tuned ZnSe:Cr{sup 2+} lasers. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A diode-side-pumped ZnSe:Cr{sup 2+} laser was operated with a 75 - Watt peak power 1.65 {micro}m InGaAsP/InP pump array. The laser was configured with a ``single-bounce`` architecture to maximize its round-trip gain. Peak output powers of {approx}0.3 Watt were obtained with a 10% - transmitting output coupler and a lightly-doped crystal. The estimated ``mode fill`` of {approx}0.06 will increase with Cr{sup 2+} concentration, raising the output power and extraction efficiency. With a grating tuner and MgF{sub 2}:Co{sup 2+} laser pumping, the laser tuned throughout the 2134 - 2799 nm range.

Page, R.H.; Skidmore, J.A.; Schaffers, K.I.; Beach, R.J.; Payne, S.A.; Krupke, W.F.

1997-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

479

Cr, N-Codoped TiO2 Mesoporous Microspheres for Li-ion Rechargeable Batteries with Enhanced Electrochemical Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cr,N-codoped TiO2 mesoporous microspheres synthesized using hydrothermal and subsequent nitridation treatment, exhibited higher solubility of nitrogen, and improved electrical conductivity than N-doped TiO2, as anode for Lithium-ion rechargeable batteries, which led to improving charge-discharge capacity at 0.1 C and twice higher rate capability compared to that of nitrogen-doped TiO2 mesoporous microsphere at 10 C

Bi, Zhonghe [ORNL] [ORNL; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL] [ORNL; Guo, Bingkun [ORNL] [ORNL; Unocic, Raymond R [ORNL] [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL] [ORNL; Bridges, Craig A [ORNL] [ORNL; Sun, Xiao-Guang [ORNL] [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Last update: 3/13/12 SYN COURSE SEC TITLE FAC ROOM TY DAY START END CR PREREQ NOTES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

END CR PREREQ NOTES 9524 ENGL 190A 1W Afro-Caribbean Studies Wilkerson HOLL 217 CLS MWF 03:00PM 04 0 Independent Study Staff 1-4 Permission Required 7186 ENGL 290A 1W American Literary Traditions Askeland HOLL 217 CLS MWF 12:40PM 01:40PM 4 ENGL 170, ENGL 180A or ENGL 190A/C 9599 ENGL 380A 1W The Beat

Bogaerts, Steven

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "driver cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

AN UNBIASED SPECTRAL LINE SURVEY TOWARD R CrA IRS7B IN THE 345 GHz WINDOW WITH ASTE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have conducted a spectral line survey in the 332-364 GHz region with the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment 10 m telescope toward R CrA IRS7B, a low-mass protostar in the Class 0 or Class 0/I transitional stage. We have also performed some supplementary observations in the 450 GHz band. In total, 16 molecular species are identified in the 332-364 GHz region. Strong emission lines of CN and CCH are observed, whereas complex organic molecules and long carbon-chain molecules, which are characteristics of hot corino and warm carbon-chain chemistry (WCCC) source, respectively, are not detected. The rotation temperature of CH{sub 3}OH is evaluated to be 31 K, which is significantly lower than that reported for the prototypical hot corino IRAS 16293-2422 ({approx}85 K). The deuterium fractionation ratios for CCH and H{sub 2}CO are obtained to be 0.038 and 0.050, respectively, which are much lower than those in the hot corino. These results suggest a weak hot corino activity in R CrA IRS7B. On the other hand, the carbon-chain related molecules, CCH and c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2}, are found to be abundant. However, this source cannot be classified as a WCCC source, since long carbon-chain molecules are not detected. If WCCC and hot corino chemistry represent the two extremes in chemical compositions of low-mass Class 0 sources, R CrA IRS7B would be a source with a mixture of these two chemical characteristics. The UV radiation from the nearby Herbig Ae star R CrA may also affect the chemical composition. The present line survey demonstrates further chemical diversity in low-mass star-forming regions.

Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Sakai, Nami; Yamamoto, Satoshi [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan); Lindberg, Johan E.; Bisschop, Suzanne E. [Centre for Star and Planet Formation, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Oster Voldgade 5-7, DK-1350 Copenhagen K. (Denmark); Jorgensen, Jes K. [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O. (Denmark)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Deformation Behavior of Laser Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant Fe-Cr-Al Alloys for Fuel Cladding Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ferritic-structured Fe-Cr-Al alloys are being developed and show promise as oxidation resistant accident tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding. This study focuses on investigating the weldability of three model alloys in a range of Fe-(13-17.5)Cr-(3-4.4)Al in weight percent with a minor addition of yttrium using laser-welding techniques. A detailed study on the mechanical performance of bead-on-plate welds has been carried out to determine the performance of welds as a function of alloy composition. Laser welding resulted in a defect free weld devoid of cracking or inclusions for all alloys studied. Results indicated a reduction in the yield strength within the fusion zone compared to the base metal. Yield strength reduction was found to be primarily constrained to the fusion zone due to grain coarsening with a less severe reduction in the heat affected zone. No significant correlation was found between the deformation behavior/mechanical performance of welds and the level of Cr or Al in the alloy ranges studied.

Field, Kevin G [ORNL; Gussev, Maxim N [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

High Temperature Thermal Stability and Oxidation Resistance of Magnetron-sputtered Homogeneous CrAlON Coatings on 430 Steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The requirements of low cost and high-temperature corrosion resistance for bipolar interconnect plates in solid oxide fuel cell stacks has directed attention to the use of metal plates with oxidation resistant coatings. We have investigated the performance of steel plates with homogenous coatings of CrAlON (oxynitrides). The coatings were deposited using RF magnetron sputtering, with Ar as a sputtering gas. Oxygen in these coatings was not intentionally added. Oxygen might have come through contaminated nitrogen gas bottle, leak in the chamber or from the partial pressure of water vapors. Nitrogen was added during the growth process to get oxynitride coating. The Cr/Al composition ratio in the coatings was varied in a combinatorial approach. The coatings were subsequently annealed in air for up to 25 hours at 800 deg. C. The composition of the coated plates and the rate of oxidation were characterized using Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). From our results, we conclude that Al rich coatings are more susceptible to oxidation than Cr rich coatings.

Kayani, A.; Wickey, K. J.; Nandasiri, M. I.; Moore, A.; Garratt, E.; AlFaify, S.; Gao, X. [Western Michigan University-Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States); Smith, R. J.; Buchanan, T. L.; Priyantha, W.; Kopczyk, M.; Gannon, P. E. [Montana State University-Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Gorokhovsky, V. I. [Arcomac Surface Engineering, LLC-Bozeman, MT 59715 (United States)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

484

Formation of Delta Ferrite in 9WtPct Cr Steel Investigated by In-Situ X-Ray Diffraction Using Synchrotron Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formation of Delta Ferrite in 9 Wt Pct Cr Steel Investigatedthe formation of delta ferrite in a martensitic 9 wt pctaustenite, and delta ferrite were measured as a function of

Mayr, P.; Palmer, T.A.; Elmer, J.W.; Specht, E.D.; Allen, S.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

QUEST: QUantum Electron Simulation Toolbox C.-R. Lee1,10 S. Chiesa2, C. N. Varney3,4, E. Khatami3, Z. Bai5,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QUEST: QUantum Electron Simulation Toolbox C.-R. Lee1,10 S. Chiesa2, C. N. Varney3,4, E. Khatami3 use of standing electromagnetic waves causes the atoms to e

Bai, Zhaojun

486

A Conceptual model of coupled biogeochemical and hydrogeological processes affected by in situ Cr(VI) bioreduction in groundwater at Hanford 100H Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Groundwater at Hanford 100H Site B.Faybishenko, P.E.Long,Cr(VI) contaminated groundwater at Hanford 100H site. A slowHRC TM ), was injected in Hanford sediments to stimulate

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Search for pentaquark partners [Theta]??, [Sigma]? and N? in H (e,e'K [pi])) X reactions at Jefferson Lab Hall A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 1997, D. Diakonov et al. using a soliton model predicted a SU(3)F flavor antide-cuplet of pentaquarks. The most striking prediction using this symmetry group is a narrow exotic state, E+(1540), which has quark component ...

Qiang, Yi, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

tEEK TRANSACJ'JONS ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL. VOL. 36, NO. 7. JULY 1991890 J. C. Jtsangand E. A. Jonckheere, "On compudng the spxtrsd nw.fiua  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

! Equations. ErtglewnodCliffs. NJ: Prentice-Hall. 1964. C. Kenney and G. Hewer, "The senslrivity of the afgebraic and differential Riccati equations," Slit&f J. Corer. Oprimiz., vol. 28, Pp. 50-69., 1990. G. WBM Corporation under the SUR Contract SL 88086, D.S.T.O. of Australia, and by Boeing (WAC). R. Horowitz and W

Moore, John Barratt

489

Role of microbial exopolymeric substances (EPS) on chromium sorption and transport in heterogeneous subsurface soils: I. Cr(III) complexation with EPS in aqueous solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chromium (III) binding by exopolymeric substances (EPS) isolated from Pseudomonas putida P18, Pseudomonas aeruginosa P16 and Pseudomonas stutzeri P40 strains were investigated by the determination of conditional stability constants and the concentration of functional groups using the ion-exchange experiments and potentiometric titrations. Spectroscopic (EXAFS) analysis was also used to obtain information on the nature of Cr(III) binding with EPS functional groups. The data from ion-exchange experiments and potentiometric titrations were evaluated using a non-electrostatic discrete ligand approach. The modeling results show that the acid/base properties of EPSs can be best characterized by invoking four different types of acid functional groups with arbitrarily assigned pK{sub a} values of 4, 6, 8 and 10. The analysis of ion-exchange data using the discrete ligand approach suggests that while the Cr binding by EPS from P. aeruginosa can be successfully described based on a reaction stoichiometry of 1:2 between Cr(III) and HL{sub 2} monoprotic ligands, the accurate description of Cr binding by EPSs extracted from P. putida and P. stutzeri requires postulation of 1:1 Cr(III)-ligand complexes with HL{sub 2} and HL{sub 3} monoprotic ligands, respectively. These results indicate that the carboxyl and/or phosphoric acid sites contribute to Cr(III) binding by microbial EPS, as also confirmed by EXAFS analysis performed in the current study. Overall, this study highlights the need for incorporation of Cr-EPS interactions into transport and speciation models to more accurately assess microbial Cr(VI) reduction and chromium transport in subsurface systems, including microbial reactive treatment barriers.

Kantar, C.; Dodge, C.; Demiray, H.; Dogan, N.M.

2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

490

Role of Microbial Exopolymeric Substances (EPS) on Chromium Sorption and Transport in Heterogeneous Subsurface Soils: I. Cr(III) Complexation with EPS in Aqueous Solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chromium (III) binding by exopolymeric substances (EPS) isolated from Pseudomonas putida P18, Pseudomonas aeruginosa P16 and Pseudomonas stutzeri P40 strains were investigated by the determination of conditional stability constants and the concentration of functional groups using the ion-exchange experiments and potentiometric titrations. Spectroscopic (EXAFS) analysis was also used to obtain information on the nature of Cr(III) binding with EPS functional groups. The data from ion-exchange experiments and potentiometric titrations were evaluated using a non-electrostatic discrete ligand approach. The modeling results show that the acid/base properties of EPSs can be best characterized by invoking four different types of acid functional groups with arbitrarily assigned pK{sub a} values of 4, 6, 8 and 10. The analysis of ion-exchange data using the discrete ligand approach suggests that while the Cr binding by EPS from P. aeruginosa can be successfully described based on a reaction stoichiometry of 1:2 between Cr(III) and HL{sub 2} monoprotic ligands, the accurate description of Cr binding by EPSs extracted from P. putida and P. stutzeri requires postulation of 1:1 Cr(III)-ligand complexes with HL{sub 2} and HL{sub 3} monoprotic ligands, respectively. These results indicate that the carboxyl and/or phosphoric acid sites contribute to Cr(III) binding by microbial EPS, as also confirmed by EXAFS analysis performed in the current study. Overall, this study highlights the need for incorporation of Cr-EPS interactions into transport and speciation models to more accurately assess microbial Cr(VI) reduction and chromium transport in subsurface systems, including microbial reactive treatment barriers.

C Kantar; H Demiray; N Dogan; C Dodge

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

491

X-ray spectroscopic application of Cr/Sc periodic multilayers K. Le Guen, H. Maury, J.-M. Andr, P. Jonnard, A. Hardouin et al.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray spectroscopic application of Cr/Sc periodic multilayers K. Le Guen, H. Maury, J.-M. André, P://apl.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;X-ray spectroscopic application of Cr/Sc periodic multilayers K. Le Guen,a H. Maury, J.-M. André-Paris 6, UMR-CNRS 7614, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05, France A. Hardouin, F

492

Giant magnetoresistive structures based on CrO{sub 2} with epitaxial RuO{sub 2} as the spacer layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Epitaxial ruthenium dioxide (RuO{sub 2})/chromium dioxide(CrO{sub 2}) thin film heterostructures have been grown on (100)-TiO{sub 2} substrates by chemical vapor deposition. Both current-in-plane (CIP) and current-perpendicular-to-plane (CPP) giant magnetoresistive stacks were fabricated with either Co or another epitaxial CrO{sub 2} layer as the top electrode. The Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} barrier, which forms naturally on CrO{sub 2} surfaces, is no longer present after the RuO{sub 2} deposition, resulting in a highly conductive interface that has a resistance at least four orders of magnitude lower. However, only very limited magnetoresistance (MR) was observed. Such low MR is due to the appearance of a chemically and magnetically disordered layer at the CrO{sub 2} and RuO{sub 2} interfaces when Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} is transformed into rutile structures during its intermixing with RuO{sub 2}.

Miao, G.X.; Gupta, A.; Sims, H.; Butler, W.H.; Ghosh, S.; Xiao Gang [Physics Department, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States); Center for Materials for Information Technology, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Physics Department, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

493

Investigations of the electronic and magnetic structures of Co{sub 2}YGa (Y=Cr, Mn) Heusler alloys and their (100) surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of bulk structures of Co{sub 2}YGa (Y?=?Cr, Mn) Heusler alloys and the surfaces along the (100) orientation. The bulk structures of both alloys show a ferromagnetic behavior with total magnetic moments of 3.03?{sub B} and 4.09?{sub B} and high spin polarizations of 99% and 67% for Co{sub 2}CrGa and Co{sub 2}MnGa, respectively. The surfaces are found to exhibit corrugations due to different relaxations of the surface atoms. For the case of Co{sub 2}CrGa, two surfaces preserve the half metallicity, namely those with Cr-Ga and Ga terminations with high spin polarizations above 90%, whereas it dropped to about 50% for the other surfaces. However, the spin polarizations of Co-Co and Mn-Ga terminated surfaces remain close to that of bulk Co{sub 2}MnGa alloy, whereas it is suppressed down to 17% for Co termination. The highest local magnetic moments are found to be 3.26??{sub B} and 4.11??{sub B} for Cr and Mn surface atoms in Cr-Ga and Mn terminated surfaces, respectively.

Hamad, Bothina, E-mail: b.hamad@ju.edu.jo [Physics Department, The University of Jordan, Amman-11942 (Jordan)

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

494

Strain-Induced Bond Buckling and Its Role in Insulating Properties of Cr-Doped V{sub 2}O{sub 3}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural transformations around both V and Cr atoms in (V{sub 1-x}Cr{sub x}){sub 2}O{sub 3} across its metal-insulator transition (MIT) at x{approx}0.01 are studied by extended x-ray absorption fine-structure technique. Our new results for Cr made possible by the use of a novel x-ray analyzer that we developed reveal the substitutional mechanism of Cr doping. We find that this system has a buckled structure with short Cr-V and long V-V bonds. This system of bonds is disordered around the average trigonal lattice ascertained by x-ray diffraction. Such local distortions can result in a long range strain field that sets in around dilute Cr atoms in microscopic regions. We suggest that such locally strained regions should be insulating even at small x. The possibility of local insulating regions within a metallic phase, first suggested by Rice and Brinkman in 1972, remains unaccounted for in modern MIT theories.

Frenkel, A. I. [Department of Physics, Yeshiva University, New York, New York 10016 (United States); Pease, D. M.; Budnick, J. I.; Shanthakumar, P.; Huang, T. [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States); Metcalf, P. [Department of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Stern, E. A. [Department of Physics, Box 351560, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

2006-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

495

Laser welding and post weld treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steel.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser welding and post weld laser treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steels (Grade P91) were performed in this preliminary study to investigate the feasibility of using laser welding process as a potential alternative to arc welding methods for solving the Type IV cracking problem in P91 steel welds. The mechanical and metallurgical testing of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser-welded samples shows the following conclusions: (1) both bead-on-plate and circumferential butt welds made by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser show good welds that are free of microcracks and porosity. The narrow heat affected zone has a homogeneous grain structure without conventional soft hardness zone where the Type IV cracking occurs in conventional arc welds. (2) The laser weld tests also show that the same laser welder has the potential to b