National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for driver cr eek

  1. GLADY CASSIT Y VANDALIA MURPHY CR EEK BU CKHN-CENT URY CLAY

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets 9,WhyConsumption6Fuel Oil andF2:3)GLADY

  2. WH ITNEY CAN YON-CART ER CR K YELLOW CR EEK_WY_D PIN EVIEW AN

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers inYear JanSalesa.E. GreatCSVLiquids

  3. WH ITNEY CAN YON-CART ER CR K YELLOW CR EEK_WY_D PIN EVIEW AN

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers inYear JanSalesa.E. GreatCSVLiquidsGas

  4. WH ITNEY CAN YON-CART ER CR K YELLOW CR EEK_WY_D PIN EVIEW AN

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers inYear JanSalesa.E.

  5. COMMUNICATIONS OF THE ACM October 2004/Vol. 47, No. 10 69 eeking to bolster the security, accessi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivest, Ronald L.

    COMMUNICATIONS OF THE ACM October 2004/Vol. 47, No. 10 69 S eeking to bolster the security, accessi- bility, and public confidence in the voting process, ACM's elected leader- ship has approved a public elections. ACM's statement recognizes that while computer-based e- voting systems have the potential

  6. LOOKOU T U-87 U-70 PEC ONI C COM AN CHE CR EEK U-107 HUGO CLIFF

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See full2% of34,929.0 36,104.5

  7. LOOKOU T U-87 U-70 PEC ONI C COM AN CHE CR EEK U-107 HUGO CLIFF

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See full2% of34,929.0 36,104.5Gas Reserve

  8. LOOKOU T U-87 U-70 PEC ONI C COM AN CHE CR EEK U-107 HUGO CLIFF

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See full2% of34,929.0 36,104.5Gas

  9. Spectroscopic Investigation of p-Shell Lambda Hypernuclei by the (e,e'K+) Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Chunhua

    2014-08-01

    Hypernuclear spectroscopy is a powerful tool to investigate Lambda-N interaction. Compared with other Lambda hypernuclei productions, electroproduction via the (e,e'K+) reaction has the advantage of exciting states deeply inside of the hypernucleus and achieving sub-MeV energy resolution. The E05-115 experiment, which was successfully performed in 2009, is the third generation hypernuclear experiment in JLab Hall C. A new splitter magnet and electron spectrometer were installed, and beam energy of 2.344 GeV was selected in this experiment. These new features gave better field uniformity, optics quality and made the ?tilt method? more effective in improving yield-to-background ratio. The magnetic optics of the spectrometers were carefully studied with GEANT simulation, and corrections were applied to compensate for the fringe field cross talk between the compact spectrometer magnets. The non-linear least chi-squared method was used to further calibrate the spectrometer with the events from Lambda, Sigma0 and B12Lambda and uniform magnetic optics as well as precise kinematics were achieved. Several p-shell Lambda hypernuclear spectra, including B12Lambda, Be10Lambda, He7Lambda, were obtained with high energy resolution and good accuracy. For B12Lambda, eight peaks were recognized with the resolution of ~540keV (FWHM), and the ground state binding energy was obtained as 11.529 ± 0.012(stat.) ± 0.110(syst.) MeV. Be10Lambda, twelve peaks were recognized with the resolution of ~520keV (FWHM), and the binding energy of the ground state was determined as 8.710 ± 0.059(stat.) ± 0.114(syst.) MeV. For He7Lambda, three peaks were recognized with the resolution of ~730keV, and the ground state binding energy was obtained as 5.510 ± 0.050(stat.) ± 0.120(syst.) MeV. Compared with the published data of B12Lambda from the JLab Hall A experiment, four extra peaks were fitted and interpreted thanks to the highest ever energy resolution and sufficient statistics. The determined binding energy of Be10Lambda provides new information on charge symmetry breaking effect in the Lambda-N interaction. Compared with the results of He7Lambda from the E01-011 experiment, the ground state position is consistent with 4 times more statistics, and two extra peaks corresponding to excited states were recognized.

  10. 9. Driver's Age 13. Driver's Date of Birth 14. Driver's Social Security Number 19. Driver's Telephone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    of Accident (city, state; if on a highway, give number and nearest community) DRIVER INFORMATION OTHER VEHICLE OR PROPERTY Occupied Unoccupied 17. Driver's Age VEHICLE OPERATED BY UNIVERSITY EMPLOYEE Occupied Unoccupied 8. Driver's Name 16. Driver's Name TRUMAN STATE UNIVERSITY VEHICLE ACCIDENT REPORT NAME AND ADDRESS AREA

  11. Market Drivers for Biofuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Market Drivers for Biofuels Market Drivers for Biofuels This presentation, entitled "Market Drivers for Biofuels," was given at the Third Annual MSW to Biofuels Summit in February,...

  12. Drivers, Trends and Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanco, Arthur S.; Gerlagh, Reyer; Suh, Sangwon; Barrett, John A.; de Coninck, Heleen; Diaz Morejon, Cristobal Felix; Mathur, Ritu; Nakicenovic, Nebojsa; Ahenkorah, Alfred Ofosu; Pan, Jiahua; Pathak, Himanshu; Rice, Jake; Richels, Richard G.; Smith, Steven J.; Stern, David; Toth, Ferenc L.; Zhou, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Chapter 5 analyzes the anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emission trends until the present and the main drivers that explain those trends. The chapter uses different perspectives to analyze past GHG-emissions trends, including aggregate emissions flows and per capita emissions, cumulative emissions, sectoral emissions, and territory-based vs. consumption-based emissions. In all cases, global and regional trends are analyzed. Where appropriate, the emission trends are contextualized with long-term historic developments in GHG emissions extending back to 1750.

  13. Approaches to enhance driver situational assessment aids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Eric M. (Eric Michael)

    2007-01-01

    Collision warning systems encounter a fundamental trade-off between providing the driver more time in which to respond and alerting the driver unnecessarily. The probability that a driver successfully avoids a hazard ...

  14. The Static Driver Verifier Research Platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajamani, Sriram K.

    of Bebop! #12;Device Driver Interface KeAcquire SpinLock KeRelease SpinLock Driver Entry Point I/O Manager Device Driver Interface Model KeAcquire SpinLock KeRelease SpinLock Driver Entry Point I/O Manager Model(s==locked) { abort "The driver has returned from an entry point without releasing the lock.";}} #12;Sample Driver

  15. UWB dual burst transmit driver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dallum, Gregory E. (Livermore, CA); Pratt, Garth C. (Discovery Bay, CA); Haugen, Peter C. (Livermore, CA); Zumstein, James M. (Livermore, CA); Vigars, Mark L. (Livermore, CA); Romero, Carlos E. (Livermore, CA)

    2012-04-17

    A dual burst transmitter for ultra-wideband (UWB) communication systems generates a pair of precisely spaced RF bursts from a single trigger event. An input trigger pulse produces two oscillator trigger pulses, an initial pulse and a delayed pulse, in a dual trigger generator. The two oscillator trigger pulses drive a gated RF burst (power output) oscillator. A bias driver circuit gates the RF output oscillator on and off and sets the RF burst packet width. The bias driver also level shifts the drive signal to the level that is required for the RF output device.

  16. Fourth Year -34 Credits Cr FA SP Fifth Year 29 Credits Cr FA SP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fourth Year - 34 Credits Cr FA SP Fifth Year ­ 29 Credits Cr FA SP Students: Please note Credits First Year - 28 Credits ­ Courses (prereqs) Cr FA SP Third Year ­ 35 Credits Cr FA SP Second Year

  17. Drivers of Future Energy Demand

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table272/S The National Interim7141. Total3.9Drivers

  18. Design consistency and driver error as reflected by driver workload and accident rates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wooldridge, Mark Douglas

    1992-01-01

    DESIGN CONSISTENCY AND DRIVER ERROR AS REFLECTED BY DRIVER WORKLOAD AND ACCIDENT RATES A Thesis by MARK DOUGLAS WOOLDRIDGE Approved as to style and content by: Daniel B. Fambro (Chair of Committee) Raymond A. Krammes (Member) Olga J.... Pendleton (Member) James T. P. Yao (Head of Department) May 1992 ABSTRACT Design Consistency and Driver Error as Reflected by Driver Workload and Accident Rates (May 1992) Mark Douglas Wooldridge, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory...

  19. Construction of a driver-vehicle model and identification of the driver model parameters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Jemeng

    1981-01-01

    CONSTRUCTION OF A DRIVER-VEHICLE MODEL AND IDENTIFICATION OF THE DRIVER MODEL PARAMETERS A Thesis by , JEMENG SU Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requiremr nt for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1981 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering CONSTRUCTION OF A DRIVER-VEHICLE MODEL AND IDENTIFICATION OF THE DRIVER MODEL PARAMETERS A Thesis by JEMENG SU Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committe ) / I...

  20. Older Emergency Department Drivers: Patterns, Behaviors, and Willingness to Enroll in a Safe Driver Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stiffler, Kirk A; Wilber, Scott T

    2011-01-01

    of Address for Correspondence: Kirk A. Stiffler, MD, Summain a Safe Driver Program Kirk A. Stiffler, MD Scott T.

  1. Fifth Year -29 Credits Cr FA SP Fourth Year 32 Credits Cr FA SP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fifth Year - 29 Credits Cr FA SP Fourth Year ­ 32 Credits Cr FA SP Students: Please note Engineering First Year - 31 Credits ­ (prereqs) CR FA SP Third Year - 32 Credits Cr FA SP 3B Arts _____________ _______________ 6 Second Year - 34 Credits Cr FA SP Rev 5/18/2012 Courses are planned to be first be offered: BIOM

  2. 9, 1443714473, 2012 Soil carbon drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    BGD 9, 14437­14473, 2012 Soil carbon drivers and benchmarks in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd if available. Causes of variation in soil carbon predictions from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison #12;BGD 9, 14437­14473, 2012 Soil carbon drivers and benchmarks in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd

  3. In-car Airway Options for NASCAR Drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyreyes, Jonathan Q; Grange, Jeff; Smith, Dustin; Jin, Peter; Guldner, Greg

    2008-01-01

    Medicine Background: “Stock car” drivers may require anpresentation pregnancy. In-car Airway Options for NASCARhelmeted, and apneic stock car driver simulation model.

  4. Brazil's Biofuels Scenario: What are the Main Drivers Which will...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Brazil's Biofuels Scenario: What are the Main Drivers Which will Shape Investments in the Long Term? Brazil's Biofuels Scenario: What are the Main Drivers Which will Shape...

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Gate Driver Optimizatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gate Driver Optimization for WBG Applications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Gate Driver Optimization for WBG Applications Presentation given by Oak Ridge National...

  6. Analyzing Fuel Saving Opportunities through Driver Feedback Mechanisms...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Analyzing Fuel Saving Opportunities through Driver Feedback Mechanisms Analyzing Fuel Saving Opportunities through Driver Feedback Mechanisms 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  7. NASA CR-187041 DESIGN PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    NASA CR- 187041 ADVANCED DESIGN PROGRAM Proceedings of the 6 t h Annual Summer Conference University Advanced Design Program Hosted by NASA Lewis Research Center June I 1-15,1990 NATIONAL AERONAUTICS & SPACE ADMINISTRATION UNIVERSITIES SPACE RESEARCH ASSOCIATION #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;NASA

  8. Solar Supply Chain and Market Driver Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Nicholas 1990-

    2012-05-09

    This study aims to explore the evolution of the photovoltaic supply chain in the United States and the drivers which foster growth of the solar market. The study will gather knowledge on the growth of the solar market and ...

  9. Drawing driver's attention to potentially dangerous objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurugöl, Orc?un

    2008-01-01

    Drivers often have difficulties noticing potentially dangerous objects due to weather or lighting conditions or when their field of view is restricted. This thesis presents a display method for potentially dangerous objects ...

  10. Workshop on transport for a common ion driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, C.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lee, E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Langdon, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    This report contains research in the following areas related to beam transport for a common ion driver: multi-gap acceleration; neutralization with electrons; gas neutralization; self-pinched transport; HIF and LIF transport, and relevance to common ion driver; LIF and HIF reactor concepts and relevance to common ion driver; atomic physics for common ion driver; code capabilities and needed improvement.

  11. Driver expectancy in locating automotive controls 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis, Dawn Suzette

    1990-01-01

    DRIVER EXPECTANCY IN LOCATING AUTOMOTIVE CONTROLS A Thesis by DAWN SUZETTE FRANCIS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1990... Major Subject: Industrial Engineering DRIVER EXPECTANCY IN LOCATING AUTOMOTIVE CONTROLS A Thesis by DAWN SUZETTE FRANCIS Approved as to style and content by: R. Dale Huchi son (Chair of Committee) Rodger . . ppa (Member) Waymon L ohnston (M er...

  12. Local Danger Warnings for Drivers: The Effect of Modality and Level of Assistance on Driver Reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theune, Mariët

    Local Danger Warnings for Drivers: The Effect of Modality and Level of Assistance on Driver¨ucken, Germany christian.mueller@dfki.de ABSTRACT Local danger warning is an important function of Advanced presentation) is particularly crucial to a successful danger avoidance. We present a user study investigating

  13. BES_ESnet_Cover_CR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections Audits &driversNetworkBES User FacilitiesNetwork

  14. Selected Texas Driver Education Instructors’ Feelings About A Driver Education Cultural Awareness Survey 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saint, Nina Jo

    2012-07-16

    in equitable roles,? and ?images of teenager drivers;? and (2) Instructors did not agree on how a survey instrument should be administered. iv DEDICATION This work is dedicated to the young drivers who drive me to continue to work towards ensuring... that high quality and equitable driver and traffic safety education will be offered that will provide them the knowledge and skills that they can use to avoid traffic crashes and stay alive on our roadways. In addition, this work is dedicated to traffic...

  15. Process for depositing Cr-bearing layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellis, T.W.; Lograsso, T.A.; Eshelman, M.A.

    1995-05-09

    A method of applying a Cr-bearing layer to a substrate, comprises introducing an organometallic compound, in vapor or solid powder form entrained in a carrier gas to a plasma of an inductively coupled plasma torch or device to thermally decompose the organometallic compound and contacting the plasma and the substrate to be coated so as to deposit the Cr-bearing layer on the substrate. A metallic Cr, Cr alloy or Cr compound such as chromium oxide, nitride and carbide can be provided on the substrate. Typically, the organometallic compound is introduced to an inductively coupled plasma torch that is disposed in ambient air so to thermally decompose the organometallic compound in the plasma. The plasma is directed at the substrate to deposit the Cr-bearing layer or coating on the substrate. 7 figs.

  16. Fact #574: June 8, 2009 Vehicles per Licensed Driver Rising

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The number of vehicles in operation per licensed driver has risen steadily since 1950. In 1985, for the first time, there was one vehicle for every licensed driver. Since 1985, the number of...

  17. Long run changes in driver behavior due to variable tolls 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konduru, Karun K.

    2004-09-30

    As many variable pricing projects are still in the implementation stage, long-run driver responses to the variable tolls are largely unknown. This research examined the long-run changes in driver behavior in an existing ...

  18. California Water and Fish: Drivers of Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Yoram

    California Water and Fish: Drivers of Change Stephanie Carlson Assistant Professor Environmental Matters to Californians Water Supply Recreation Ecosystem Housing Agriculture Infrastructure Slide;Ecological Impacts of Delta Water Diversion/Use #12;Key Issues in the Delta 1. Water infrastructure

  19. Intercept: Profiling Windows Network Device Drivers* Manuel Mendona Nuno Neves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neves, Nuno

    testing, or reverse engineering. Experi- ments using Ethernet, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth device drivers show the device driver under test is subject to a heavy workload. Keywords. Device drivers; profiling not release openly the code, or even the hardware specifications. Therefore, the de- velopment, testing

  20. Page 1 of 3 Georgia Drivers License and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Page 1 of 3 Georgia Drivers License and U.S. Social Security Card Information for International Students Do I need a Georgia driver's license or Social Security card? What are the benefits? Generally speaking, a U.S. driver's license is the most common form of day-to-day identification in the U.S. because

  1. SEM CR GRADE Intro to Chem Eng 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Elective Option Elective 2 SEM CR GRADE 4 CHE 705 or CHE 712 Fossil Fuels or Nuclear Engineering SEM CR GRADE 4 CHE 712 or CHE 705 Nuclear Engineering or Fossil Fuels STUDENT NAME ADVISOR NAME #12;Chemical Chemistry SEM CR GRADE 3 CHE 601 Fluid Mechanics SEM CR GRADE 3 CHE 604 ChE Thermodynamics SEM CR GRADE 4

  2. SEM CR GRADE Intro to Chem Eng 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    or Nuclear Engineering SEM CR GRADE 4 CHE 712 or CHE 705 Nuclear Engineering or Fossil Fuels Sem: 16 Cum: 132 students see "Advising Notes" on back page SEM CR GRADE 3 CHE 601 Fluid Mechanics SEM CR GRADE 3 CHE 604 Ch of 3 SEM CR GRADE 4 CHE 761 Biochemical Engineering SEM CR GRADE 4 CHE 705 or CHE 712 Fossil Fuels

  3. SEM CR GRADE Intro to Chem Eng 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    E Majors Energy Option Page 1 of 3 SEM CR GRADE 4 CHE 705 or CHE 712 Fossil Fuels or Nuclear Engineering Chemistry SEM CR GRADE 3 CHE 601 Fluid Mechanics SEM CR GRADE 3 CHE 604 ChE Thermodynamics SEM CR GRADE 3 Energy Option Elective Option Elective 2 SEM CR GRADE 4 CHE 712 or CHE 705 Nuclear Engineering or Fossil

  4. SEM CR GRADE Intro to Chem Eng 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    SEM CR GRADE 3 ENE 612* Unit Operations Lab 1 SEM CR GRADE 4 Tech Elective Tech Elective 1 SEM CR GRADE 4 Tech Elective Tech Elective 2 SEM CR GRADE 4 Tech Elective Tech Elective 3 SEM CR GRADE 4 ENE-IP; Red ­ General Education; Black - Other Environmental Engineering Program University of New Hampshire

  5. Structural analysis of Cr aggregation in ferromagnetic semiconductor (Zn,Cr)Te

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, H.; Yamawaki, K.; Nishio, Y.; Kanazawa, K.; Kuroda, S.; Mitome, M.; Bando, Y.

    2013-12-04

    The Cr aggregation in a ferromagnetic semiconductor (Zn,Cr)Te was studied by performing precise analyses using TEM and XRD of microscopic structure of the Cr-aggregated regions formed in iodine-doped Zn{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}Te films with a relatively high Cr composition x ? 0.2. It was found that the Cr-aggregated regions are composed of Cr{sub 1??}Te nanocrystals of the hexagonal structure and these hexagonal precipitates are stacked preferentially on the (111)A plane of the zinc-blende (ZB) structure of the host ZnTe crystal with its c-axis nearly parallel to the (111){sub ZB} plane.

  6. Market Drivers for Biofuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecial Report ManagementMarine & Hydrokinetic »Market Drivers for

  7. Midea: ENERGY STAR Referral (MWF-08CR)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE referred the matter of Westpointe-brand room air conditioner model MWF-08CR to the EPA for appropriate action after DOE testing showed that the model does not meet the ENERGY STAR specification.

  8. Gash-Mm APP21¢¢¢§Q$ Cr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gash-Mm APP21¢¢¢§Q$ Cr. Partial Transfers by. Daniel Henry Gottliebl. The transfer for compact fibrations has been studied for some time now, [l,2,3,4,6,7,8,

  9. Properties of Electricity Prices and the Drivers of Interconnector Revenue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parail, Vladimir

    Properties of Electricity Prices and the Drivers of Interconnector Revenue Vladimir Parail November 2010 CWPE 1059 & EPRG 1033 www.eprg.group.cam.ac.uk E P R G W O R K IN G P A P E R Abstract... Properties of Electricity Prices and the Drivers of Interconnector Revenue EPRG Working Paper 1033 Cambridge Working Paper in Economics 1059 Vladimir Parail This paper examines the drivers behind revenues of merchant electricity...

  10. ION ACCELERATORS AS DRIVERS FOR INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faltens, A.

    2010-01-01

    AS DRIVERS FOR INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION Andris Faltens,ENERGY PRODUCTION VIA INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSIONFor inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to lead to net energy

  11. Microsoft Word - ContractManagementPlanningDRIVERS.doc | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ContractManagementPlanningDRIVERS.doc More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - ARRAAttachment2.doc Microsoft Word - ARRAModelWAS.doc Microsoft Word - ARRAMOModelMod.doc...

  12. Investigation of microstructure and mechanical properties of multi-layer Cr/Cr2O3 coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    ) coated tool cutting performance and resistance to abrasive and erosive wear [15]. Graded systems haveInvestigation of microstructure and mechanical properties of multi-layer Cr/Cr2O3 coatings Xiaolu-layer Microstructure Fracture toughness Adhesion Single and multi-layer Cr/Cr2O3 coatings were deposited by reactive

  13. SEM CR GRADE Intro to Chem Eng 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    Discovery 5 Social Science SEM CR GRADE 3 ENE 612* Unit Operations Lab 1 SEM CR GRADE 4 Tech Elective Tech Elective 1 SEM CR GRADE 4 Tech Elective Tech Elective 2 SEM CR GRADE 4 Tech Elective Tech Elective 3 SEM CR of New Hampshire Advising Worksheet for ENE-IP Majors Page 1 of 3 Green ­ ENE-IP; Red ­ General Education

  14. Inertially confined fusion using heavy ion drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Bangerter, R.O.; Bock, R.; Hogan, W.J.; Lindl, J.D.

    1991-10-01

    The various technical issues of HIF will be briefly reviewed in this paper. It will be seen that there are numerous areas in common in all the approaches to HIF. In the recent International Symposium on Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion, the attendees met in specialized workshop sessions to consider the needs for research in each area. Each of the workshop groups considered the key questions of this report: (1) Is this an appropriate time for international collaboration in HIF? (2) Which problems are most appropriate for such collaboration? (3) Can the sharing of target design information be set aside until other driver and systems issues are better resolved, by which time it might be supposed that there could be a relaxation of classification of target issues? (4) What form(s) of collaboration are most appropriate, e.g., bilateral or multilateral? (5) Can international collaboration be sensibly attempted without significant increases in funding for HIF? The authors of this report share the conviction that collaboration on a broad scale is mandatory for HIF to have the resources, both financial and personnel, to progress to a demonstration experiment. Ultimately it may be possible for a single driver with the energy, power, focusibility, and pulse shape to satisfy the needs of the international community for target physics research. Such a facility could service multiple experimental chambers with a variety of beam geometries and target concepts.

  15. Inertially confined fusion using heavy ion drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B. ); Bangerter, R.O. ); Bock, R. ); Hogan, W.J.; Lindl, J.D. )

    1991-10-01

    The various technical issues of HIF will be briefly reviewed in this paper. It will be seen that there are numerous areas in common in all the approaches to HIF. In the recent International Symposium on Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion, the attendees met in specialized workshop sessions to consider the needs for research in each area. Each of the workshop groups considered the key questions of this report: (1) Is this an appropriate time for international collaboration in HIF (2) Which problems are most appropriate for such collaboration (3) Can the sharing of target design information be set aside until other driver and systems issues are better resolved, by which time it might be supposed that there could be a relaxation of classification of target issues (4) What form(s) of collaboration are most appropriate, e.g., bilateral or multilateral (5) Can international collaboration be sensibly attempted without significant increases in funding for HIF The authors of this report share the conviction that collaboration on a broad scale is mandatory for HIF to have the resources, both financial and personnel, to progress to a demonstration experiment. Ultimately it may be possible for a single driver with the energy, power, focusibility, and pulse shape to satisfy the needs of the international community for target physics research. Such a facility could service multiple experimental chambers with a variety of beam geometries and target concepts.

  16. A general probabilistic framework for volumetric articulated body pose estimation and driver gesture, activity and intent analysis for human-centric driver assistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Shinko Yuanhsien

    2007-01-01

    Driver body-pose analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Body Pose Estimation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mixture Model . . 4. Learning Pose using EM . . . . . .

  17. Updated 6/9/2015 Louisiana Driver's License

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Updated 6/9/2015 Louisiana Driver's License http://omv.dps.state.la.us/ or www on your status to be issued a driver's license, as indicated by the end date on your I-20, DS-2019 will NOT be issued a license with validity that includes the 60 or 30 grace period permitted at the end

  18. I. NANOSCIENCE COURSE REQUIREMENTS CR A. Communication Skills (8 cr.) CR APSC-101 Applied Science Profession I 1 ENGL-101 Freshman English Composition Required OR 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Mingshen

    Profession I 1 ENGL-101 Freshman English Composition Required OR 3 APSC-311 Issues for Scientific-8 ENGL-102 Freshman English Reading, P: ENGL-101 or ENGL-111 3 APSC-401 Applied Science Profession II 1 COURSE REQUIREMENTS CR A. Communication Skills (8 cr.) CR APSC-101 Applied Science Profession I 1 ENGL

  19. Nonlinear transmission line based electron beam driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, David M.; Hoff, Brad W.; Tang Wilkin; Heidger, Susan; Shiffler, Don [Directed Energy Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, New Mexico 87117 (United States); Allen-Flowers, Jordan [Program in Applied Mathematics, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Gated field emission cathodes can provide short electron pulses without the requirement of laser systems or cathode heating required by photoemission or thermionic cathodes. The large electric field requirement for field emission to take place can be achieved by using a high aspect ratio cathode with a large field enhancement factor which reduces the voltage requirement for emission. In this paper, a cathode gate driver based on the output pulse train from a nonlinear transmission line is experimentally demonstrated. The application of the pulse train to a tufted carbon fiber field emission cathode generates short electron pulses. The pulses are approximately 2 ns in duration with emission currents of several mA, and the train contains up to 6 pulses at a frequency of 100 MHz. Particle-in-cell simulation is used to predict the characteristic of the current pulse train generated from a single carbon fiber field emission cathode using the same technique.

  20. Ris Energy Report 5 Global drivers for transformation of energy systems 3 Global drivers for transformation of energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of greenhouse gases has brought a new political rationale for the development of more climate-friendly energy in the global energy market of rapidly-expanding national economies, notably China and India. TogetherRisø Energy Report 5 Global drivers for transformation of energy systems 3 Global drivers

  1. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Hydrogenation of CpCr(CO)3•/[CpCr(CO)3]2 Equilibrium to CpCr(CO)3H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norton, Jack R.; Spataru, Tudor; Camaioni, Donald M.; Lee, Suh-Jane; Li, Gang; Choi, Jongwook; Franz, James A.

    2014-05-26

    The kinetics of the hydrogenation of 2 CpCr(CO)3•/[CpCr(CO)3]2 to CpCr(CO)3H has been investigated. The reaction is second-order in Cr and first-order in H2, with a rate constant of 45 M 2s 1 at 25 °C in benzene. DFT calculations rule out an H2 complex as an intermediate, and suggest (a) end-on approach of H2 to one Cr of [CpCr(CO)3]2 as the Cr-Cr bond undergoes heterolytic cleavage, (b) heterolytic cleavage of the coordinated H2 between O and Cr, and (c) isomerization of the resulting O-protonated CpCr(CO)2(COH) to CpCr(CO)3H. The work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences; Battelle operates PNNL for DOE.

  2. Morphology, deformation, and defect structures of TiCr{sub 2} in Ti-Cr alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, K.C.; Allen, S.M.; Livingston, J.D.

    1992-12-31

    The morphologies and defect structures of TiCr{sub 2} in several Ti-Cr alloys have been examined by optical metallography, x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), in order to explore the room-temperature deformability of the Laves phase TiCr{sub 2}. The morphology of the Laves phase was found to be dependent upon alloy composition and annealing temperature. Samples deformed by compression have also been studied using TEM. Comparisons of microstructures before and after deformation suggest an increase in twin, stacking fault, and dislocation density within the Laves phase, indicating some but not extensive room-temperature deformability.

  3. Driver performance data acquisition system for ergonomics research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, R.J.; Goodman, M.J.

    1994-12-31

    A portable ergonomics data acquisition system consisting of state-of-the-art hardware being designed is described here. It will be employed to record driver, vehicle, and environment parameter data from a wide range of vehicles and trucks. The system will be unobtrusive to the driver and inconspicuous to the outside world. It will have three modes of data gathering and provide for extended periods of data collection. Modularity, flexibility, and cost will be key drivers in the development effort. The ergonomics data acquisition system project is being conducted in two phases--a feasibility study and a development, construction, and validation phase.

  4. Dual-phase Cr-Ta alloys for structural applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chain T. (Oak Ridge, TN); Brady, Michael P. (Oak Ridge, TN); Zhu, Jiahong (Knoxville, TN); Tortorelli, Peter F. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01

    Dual phase alloys of chromium containing 2 to 11 atomic percent tantalum with minor amounts of Mo, Cr, Ti, Y, La, Cr, Si and Ge are disclosed. These alloys contain two phases including Laves phase and Cr-rich solid solution in either eutectic structures or dispersed Laves phase particles in the Cr-rich solid solution matrix. The alloys have superior mechanical properties at high temperature and good oxidation resistance when heated to above 1000.degree. C. in air.

  5. High-temperature instability of a Cr{sub 2}Nb-Nb(Cr) microlaminate composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, M.; Rowe, R.G.; Skelly, D.W. [General Electric Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Microlaminate composites consisting of alternating layers of a high temperature intermetallic compound for elevated temperature strength and a ductile refractory metal for toughening may have uses in aircraft engine turbines. Microstructural stability at elevated temperatures is a crucial requirement for these composites. A microlaminate composite consisting of alternating layers of Cr{sub 2}Nb and Nb(Cr) was produced by vapor phase deposition. The stability of the layers at elevated temperatures was investigated by cross-sectional TEM.

  6. FFAG ACCELERATOR PROTON DRIVER FOR NEUTRINO FACTORY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RUGGIERO, A.

    2005-06-21

    This paper is the summary of a conceptual study of a Proton Driver for Neutrino Factory based on the use of a Fixed-Field Alternating-Gradient (FFAG) Accelerator. The required proton energy range for an optimum neutrino production is 5 to 12 GeV. This can be accomplished with a group of three concentric rings each with 807 m circumference [1]. FFAG Accelerators [2] have the capability to accelerate charged particles over a large momentum range ({+-}30-50%) and the feature of constant bending and focusing fields. Particles can be accelerated very fast at the rate given by the accelerating field of RF cavities placed in proper locations between magnets. The performance of FFAG accelerators is to be placed between that of Super-Conducting Linear Accelerators (SCL), with which they share the fast acceleration rate, and Rapid-Cycling Synchrotrons (RCS), as they allow the beam to re-circulate over fewer revolutions. Brookhaven National Laboratory is involved in the study of feasibility of FFAG Accelerators to accelerate intense beams of protons in the GeV energy range for a variety of applications the most important of which is the Upgrade of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) with a new FFAG injector [3] accelerating from 400 MeV to 1.5 GeV. The ring would be housed in the AGS tunnel and has henceforth a circumference of 807 m.

  7. Drivers of the US CO2 emissions 1997-2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    drivers of regional carbon dioxide emissions for China. J.D. & Rose, A. Carbon dioxide emissions in the U.S. economy.Analysis of Carbon Dioxide Emission Changes in Germany -

  8. A novel active heads-up display for driver assistance.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doshi, Anup; Cheng, Shinko Yuanhsien; Trivedi, Mohan Manubhai

    2009-01-01

    and P. Green, “The effect of HUD warning location on driverComparison of head-up display (HUD) vs. head-down display (also use heads-up displays (HUDs) to convey information to

  9. An affective intelligent driving agent: driver's trajectory and activities prediction.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratti, Carlo

    The traditional relationship between the car, driver, and city can be described as waypoint navigation with additional traffic and maintenance information. The car can receive and store waypoint information, find the ...

  10. Visual Attention and Driver Performance at Horizontal Curves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brimley, Bradford K.

    2014-12-02

    at any location and on any facility. Traffic control devices (TCDs) can be installed at curves to provide drivers the information necessary for safe navigation. The research in this dissertation examines the theory that TCDs at curves are not only...

  11. FlightCrew Browser : a safe browser for drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    López-Pineda, Andrés Humberto

    2013-01-01

    Drivers have information needs they want to solve while driving, but current mobile browser interfaces can bring forth safety issues when users browse the web even though their attention is required elsewhere, as it is ...

  12. University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Employment & Training Institute Driver's License Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Employment & Training Institute Driver's License Issues-Milwaukee Employment & Training Institute Driver's license obstacles 1. Lack of driver's education in the high schools of unlicensed driving 4. Court-ordered 2-year driver's license suspensions as a tool to collect municipal fines

  13. Two-band model of -prime phase formation in Fe-Cr. Par Olsson1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordlund, Kai

    of ferritic-martensitic stainless steel. Fe-Cr forms a perfect ferro-magnetic alloy for Cr concentrations up

  14. Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Karl T.; Pruski, Marek; Washton, Nancy M.; Lipton, Andrew S.

    2013-03-07

    This report recaps the "Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance" workshop, held in late 2011. This exploratory workshop's goal was to discuss and address challenges for the next generation of magnetic resonance experimentation. During the workshop, participants from throughout the world outlined the science drivers and instrumentation demands for high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and associated magnetic resonance techniques, discussed barriers to their advancement, and deliberated the path forward for significant and impactful advances in the field.

  15. Look-ahead driver feedback and powertrain management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verma, Rajeev

    2014-12-31

    Commercial medium and heavy vehicles, though only a small portion of total vehicle population, play a significant role in energy consumption. In 2012, these vehicles accounted for about 5775.5 trillion btu of energy consumption and 408.8 million tons of CO2 emissions annually, which is a quarter of the total energy burden of highway transportation in the United States [1]. This number is expected to surpass passenger car fuel use within the next few decades. In the meantime, most commercial vehicle fleets are running at a very low profit margin. It is a well known fact that fuel economy can vary significantly between drivers, even when they operate the same vehicle on the same route. According to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Natural Resource Canada (NRCan), there is up to 35% fuel economy difference between drivers within the same commercial fleet [2] [3], [4]. Similar results were obtained from a Field Operation Test conducted by Eaton Corporation [5]. During this test as much as 30% fuel economy difference was observed among pick-up-and-delivery drivers and 11% difference was observed among line-haul drivers. The driver variability can be attributed to the fact that different drivers react differently to driving conditions such as road grade, traffic, speed limits, etc. For instance, analysis of over 600k miles of naturalistic heavy duty truck driving data [5] indicates that an experienced driver anticipates a downhill and eases up on the throttle to save fuel while an inexperienced driver lacks this judgment.

  16. Cr-doped scandium borate laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chai, Bruce H. (Bridgewater, NJ); Lai, Shui T. (Florham Park, NJ); Long, Margaret N. (Landing, NJ)

    1989-01-01

    A broadly wavelength-tunable laser is provided which comprises as the laser medium a single crystal of MBO.sub.3 :Cr.sup.3+, where M is selected from the group of Sc, In and Lu. The laser may be operated over a broad temperature range from cryogenic temperatures to elevated temperatures. Emission is in a spectral range from red to infrared, and the laser is useful in the fields of defense, communications, isotope separation, photochemistry, etc.

  17. Game Theoretic Modelling of a Human Driver’s Steering Interaction with Vehicle Active Steering Collision Avoidance System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Na, Xiaoxiang; Cole, David J.

    2014-11-10

    deeper insights into physiological and cognitive behaviours of human drivers so that optimization of present or future driver-automation interfaces, e.g. continuous sharing control [8] becomes a possibility. However, little attention has yet been paid... Model Predictive Control (MPC) and the Linear Quadratic (LQ) dynamic optimization approaches. A. Distributed MPC The idea of distributed MPC was presented in [26] as a practical approach to industrial process control of large-scale systems...

  18. Magnetic coupling in neutral and charged Cr{sub 2}, Mn{sub 2}, and CrMn dimers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desmarais, N. [Institut de Physique Experimentale, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, PHB-Ecublens, CH-1015 Lausanne, (Switzerland)] [Institut de Physique Experimentale, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, PHB-Ecublens, CH-1015 Lausanne, (Switzerland); Reuse, F. A. [Institut de Physique Experimentale, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, PHB-Ecublens, CH-1015 Lausanne, (Switzerland)] [Institut de Physique Experimentale, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, PHB-Ecublens, CH-1015 Lausanne, (Switzerland); Khanna, S. N. [Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284-2000 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284-2000 (United States)

    2000-04-01

    Theoretical ab initio studies of neutral, cationic and anionic Cr{sub 2}, Mn{sub 2}, and CrMn dimers have been carried out to explore the progression of magnetic coupling with the number of electrons. It is shown that while Cr{sub 2} and Cr{sub 2}{sup -} have antiferromagnetically coupled atomic spins, Cr{sub 2}{sup +} has a ferromagnetic ground state closely followed by an antiferromagnetic state. On the other hand, all Mn{sub 2} dimers are ferromagnetic, irrespective of the charge. The neutral CrMn is ferrimagnetic while the charged CrMn are antiferromagnetic. In all cases, the charged dimers are found to be more stable than the neutral ones. The results are compared with available calculations and experiments and the difficulties associated with theoretical description and the experimental interpretations are discussed. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Analyzing Vehicle Fuel Saving Opportunities through Intelligent Driver Feedback

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonder, J.; Earleywine, M.; Sparks, W.

    2012-06-01

    Driving style changes, e.g., improving driver efficiency and motivating driver behavior changes, could deliver significant petroleum savings. This project examines eliminating stop-and-go driving and unnecessary idling, and also adjusting acceleration rates and cruising speeds to ideal levels to quantify fuel savings. Such extreme adjustments can result in dramatic fuel savings of over 30%, but would in reality only be achievable through automated control of vehicles and traffic flow. In real-world driving, efficient driving behaviors could reduce fuel use by 20% on aggressively driven cycles and by 5-10% on more moderately driven trips. A literature survey was conducted of driver behavior influences, and pertinent factors from on-road experiments with different driving styles were observed. This effort highlighted important driver influences such as surrounding vehicle behavior, anxiety over trying to get somewhere quickly, and the power/torque available from the vehicle. Existing feedback approaches often deliver efficiency information and instruction. Three recommendations for maximizing fuel savings from potential drive cycle improvement are: (1) leveraging applications with enhanced incentives, (2) using an approach that is easy and widely deployable to motivate drivers, and (3) utilizing connected vehicle and automation technologies to achieve large and widespread efficiency improvements.

  20. Accepted Manuscript Comment on "Ccl2, Cx3cr1 and Ccl2/Cx3cr1 chemokine deficiencies are not sufficient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Accepted Manuscript Comment on "Ccl2, Cx3cr1 and Ccl2/Cx3cr1 chemokine deficiencies on "Ccl2, Cx3cr1 and Ccl2/Cx3cr1 chemokine deficiencies are not sufficient to cause age- related retinal on "Ccl2, Cx3cr1 and Ccl2/Cx3cr1 chemokine deficiencies are not sufficient to cause age- related retinal

  1. Cr segregation at the FeCr surface and the origin of corrosion resistance in ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Caro, M S; Morse, B; Egiebor, N; Farmer, J; Caro, A

    2008-11-22

    Structural materials in Gen-IV nuclear reactors will face severe conditions of high operating temperatures, high neutron flux exposure, and corrosive environment. Radiation effects and corrosion and chemical compatibility issues are factors that will limit the materials lifetime. Low-chromium (9-12 Cr wt.%) ferritic martensitic (F/M) steels are being considered as possible candidates because they offer good swelling resistance and good mechanical properties under extreme conditions of radiation dose and irradiation temperature. The surface chemistry of FeCr alloys, responsible for the corrosion properties, is complex. It exists today a controversy between equilibrium thermodynamic calculations, which suggest Cr depletion at the surface driven by the higher surface energy of Cr, and experimental data which suggest the oxidation process occurs in two stages, first forming a Fe-rich oxide, followed by a duplex oxide layer, and ending with a Cr-rich oxide. Moreover, it has been shown experimentally that corrosion resistance of F/M steels depends significantly on Cr content, increasing with increasing Cr content and with a threshold around 10% Cr, below which, the alloy behaves as pure Fe. In an attempt to rationalize these two contradicting observations and to understand the physical mechanism behind corrosion resistance in these materials we perform atomistic simulations using our FeCr empirical potential and analyze Cr equilibrium distributions at different compositions and temperatures in single and polycrystalline samples. We analyze the controversy in terms of thermodynamic and kinetic considerations.

  2. Analytics For Distracted Driver Behavior Modeling in Dilemma Zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jan-Mou [ORNL] [ORNL; Malikopoulos, Andreas [ORNL] [ORNL; Thakur, Gautam [ORNL] [ORNL; Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results obtained and insights gained through the analysis of TRB contest data. We used exploratory analysis, regression, and clustering models for gaining insights into the driver behavior in a dilemma zone while driving under distraction. While simple exploratory analysis showed the distinguishing driver behavior patterns among different popu- lation groups in the dilemma zone, regression analysis showed statically signification relationships between groups of variables. In addition to analyzing the contest data, we have also looked into the possible impact of distracted driving on the fuel economy.

  3. Effects of Cr and Ni on Interdiffusion and Reaction between U and Fe-Cr-Ni Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Huang; Y. Park; L. Zhou; K.R. Coffey; Y.H. Sohn; B.H. Sencer; J. R. Kennedy

    2014-08-01

    Metallic U-alloy fuel cladded in steel has been examined for high temperature fast reactor technology wherein the fuel cladding chemical interaction is a challenge that requires a fundamental and quantitative understanding. In order to study the fundamental diffusional interactions between U with Fe and the alloying effect of Cr and Ni, solid-to-solid diffusion couples were assembled between pure U and Fe, Fe–15 wt.%Cr or Fe–15 wt.%Cr–15 wt.%Ni alloy, and annealed at high temperature ranging from 580 to 700 °C. The microstructures and concentration profiles that developed from the diffusion anneal were examined by scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS), respectively. Thick U6Fe and thin UFe2 phases were observed to develop with solubilities: up to 2.5 at.% Ni in U6(Fe,Ni), up to 20 at.%Cr in U(Fe, Cr)2, and up to 7 at.%Cr and 14 at.% Ni in U(Fe, Cr, Ni)2. The interdiffusion and reactions in the U vs. Fe and U vs. Fe–Cr–Ni exhibited a similar temperature dependence, while the U vs. Fe–Cr diffusion couples, without the presence of Ni, yielded greater activation energy for the growth of intermetallic phases – lower growth rate at lower temperature but higher growth rate at higher temperature.

  4. Cars and Drivers in the New Suburbs: Linking Access to Travel in Neotraditional Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crane, Randall

    1994-01-01

    Neotradltlonal TownPlanmng. Cars, Pedestmans, and Transit,Cars and Drivers in the NewSuburbs: Linking Access to Travelspccxfica~on, or mguIahon Cars and Drivers in the New

  5. Driver mental workload requirements on horizontal curves based on occluded vision test measurements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shafer, Mark Anthony

    1994-01-01

    This thesis documents an evaluation of driver mental workload requirements on horizontal curves based on occluded vision test measurements. Driver workload is an important concept in the design of highway systems. A ...

  6. Final Report on the Fuel Saving Effectiveness of Various Driver Feedback Approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonder, J.; Earleywine, M.; Sparks, W.

    2011-03-01

    This final report quantifies the fuel-savings opportunities from specific driving behavior changes, identifies factors that influence drivers' receptiveness to adopting fuel-saving behaviors, and assesses various driver feedback approaches.

  7. Projecting Fatalities in Crashes Involving Older Drivers, 20002025

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORNL-6963 Projecting Fatalities in Crashes Involving Older Drivers, 2000­2025 Patricia S. Hu 2000 This research was funded by GM pursuant to an agreement between GM and the U.S. Department #12;#12;GM Project G.6 October 2000iii TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES

  8. Drivers and Barriers for Implementing Sustainable Development in Higher Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svenningsson, Josef

    #12;Drivers and Barriers for Implementing Sustainable Development in Higher Education Göteborg for Sustainable Development through Higher Education. The authors are responsible for the choice and presentation.unesco.org/education/desd Education for Sustainable Development in Action Technical Paper N° 3 - 2006 Cover design: Helmut Langer (ED

  9. Stochastic and deterministic drivers of spatial and temporal turnover in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Nathan

    and Sustainability, and Department of Zoology, Miami University, Oxford, USA, 5 New Zealand Institute for Advanced filtering). While numerous studies have examined the relation- ship between turnover and individual drivers effects were removed, but relation- ships with primary productivity and habitat heterogeneity remained

  10. DYNAMIC DATABASE INTEGRATION IN A JDBC DRIVER Terrence Mason

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Ramon

    -lawrence@uiowa.edu Keywords: integration, database, schema, metadata, annotation, evolution, dynamic, JDBC, conceptualDYNAMIC DATABASE INTEGRATION IN A JDBC DRIVER Terrence Mason Iowa Database and Emerging Iowa Database and Emerging Applications Laboratory, Computer Science University of Iowa Email: ramon

  11. Fluctuations in Alertness and Sustained Attention: Predicting Driver Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvucci, Dario D.

    Fluctuations in Alertness and Sustained Attention: Predicting Driver Performance Glenn Gunzelmann an existing account of the effect of sleep loss and circadian rhythms on sustained attention performance to predict performance impairments in complex task domains like driving is limited by a gap in our

  12. Energy for 500 million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sourcesLBNL-2417E Energy for 500 million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou*, Michael A. McNeil, Mark Levine Keywords

  13. SECTION 9-DRIVER SAFETY PROGRAM AND VEHICLE OPERATION/ AND MAINTENANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selmic, Sandra

    SECTION 9- DRIVER SAFETY PROGRAM AND VEHICLE OPERATION/ AND MAINTENANCE INTRODUCTION Driving, driving statistically exposes you to the single greatest degree of risk in your everyday life. The driving in a vehicular accident while conducting State business. · Make recommendations on how to operate a vehicle

  14. Integrating Concurrency Control and Energy Management in Device Drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maróti, Miklós

    Integrating Concurrency Control and Energy Management in Device Drivers Kevin Klues , Vlado@cs.berkeley.edu dgay@intel-research.net Abstract Energy management is a critical concern in wireless sensornets. De- spite its importance, sensor network operating systems today pro- vide minimal energy management support

  15. Project: Driver and controller for a thermoelectric cooler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Project: Driver and controller for a thermoelectric cooler Supervisor: Prof. Sam Ben-Yaakov Year solutions. Based on one of the three thermoelectric phenomena ­ the Peltier effect ­ bi-directional control is achieved. The TEC (which is a Thermoelectric Cooler) uses this effect. The direction of the current through

  16. A REVIEW AND EVALUATION OF EMERGING DRIVER FATIGUE DETECTION MEASURES AND TECHNOLOGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -to-perform and fitness-for-duty screeners; mathematical models/algorithms; vehicle-based driver performance measurements

  17. Driver/Pedestrian Understanding and Behavior at Marked and Unmarked Crosswalks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitman, Meghan F.; Ragland, David R

    2008-01-01

    45 PEDESTRIAN CRASH PATTERNS IN45 PEDESTRIAN AND DRIVER KNOWLEDGE OF CROSSWALK47 COUNTERMEASURES TO INCREASE PEDESTRIAN SAFETY IN

  18. Common CX3CR1 alleles are associated with a reduced risk of headaches Short title: CX3CR1 gene polymorphisms and headaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Common CX3CR1 alleles are associated with a reduced risk of headaches Short title: CX3CR1 gene Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the chemokine receptor CX3CR1 in headaches and migraine. Methods: Distribution of two polymorphisms of the chemokine receptor CX3CR1 (V249I and T280M

  19. Two-Stage Power Conversion Architecture for an LED Driver Circuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perreault, Dave

    Two-Stage Power Conversion Architecture for an LED Driver Circuit Seungbum Lim, John Ranson, David with 0.93 power factor at 8.4 W average power. I. INTRODUCTION LED lighting promises unprecedented efficiency, and high-power-factor LED drivers [1]. A survey of commercial LED drivers illustrates this

  20. University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Employment & Training Institute 1 Drivers License

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Employment & Training Institute 1 Drivers License Status Report for the Center on Driver's License Recovery & Employability June 13, 2012 by Lois Quinn and John Pawasarat residents in the state DOT files, including: · drivers with a current license as of January 2012 · plus

  1. MICROSTRUCTURE AND MAGNETIC PROPERTIES OF SPINODAL Fe-Cr-Co ALLOYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okada, Masuo

    2011-01-01

    28 Isothermal wt% Co, Fe-31 wtS Cr-23 wt% Co, Cr-26 wt% Fe-system. An Fe-31 wt% Cr-23 wtS Co a l l o y was found to be

  2. Failure Mode, Effects, and Cr-iticality Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    in view of test data received from RCA frdm two·separate tests. The major effect that this change has upon · · : · -. Loss of 3 !L!aia I!-~pI" iSla Use quad output 1 i j ·Pia!Z~ month/output, ! ; i !· , , relay drivers Ioutput, and l j J· . : relay drivers with I j 1 1 , . , 18 hour output : : I ! 1 four 1 sec to 3 mont j

  3. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN GEOLOGY (UNOFFICIAL) CATALOG 129 Fall (Th-Pr) Cr Spring (Th-Pr) Cr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN GEOLOGY (UNOFFICIAL) CATALOG 129 Fall (Th-Pr) Cr Spring (Th-Pr) Cr Freshman Geology (3-3) 4 GEOL 106 Historical Geology (3-3) 4 MATH 151 Engineering Math. I (3-2) 4 MATH 152 341 Introduction to Global Geophysics (3-0) 3 GEOL 309 Introduction to Geologic Field Methods (1-6) 3

  4. 244-CR Vault Interim Stabilization Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PARKMAN, D.B.

    2000-04-25

    The 244-CR Vault is a two-level, multi-cell structure of reinforced concrete constructed below grade. The lower cell contains four individual compartments, each containing a steel process storage tank and equipped with a concrete sump. The upper cell contains the piping and support equipment, and has two compartments for each of the tanks. The ''pump pit'' is accessed by the removal of concrete cover blocks, while the smaller ''riser pit'' is accessed by steel cover plates. The facility most recently was used as a double-contained receiver tank (DCRT). A DCRT is a type of waste transfer tank that together with its related equipment constitutes a short-term storage area for liquid waste and has a pump pit for waste transfer operations. This vault most recently was used for short-term storage and waste routing for saltwell liquid pumped from the 241-C Tank Farm in the 200 East Area. Waste transfer lines are connected inside the pump pit by a jumper installed between connecting nozzles. An active ventilation system is in operation at the 244-CR vault. Ventilation supply air enters the upper vault section through an inlet header with some leakage through the spaces between the cell cover blocks. The upper and lower vaults are connected by exhauster ports, which allow airflow between the two sections. Normal flow moves air from the upper cell to the lower cell where it is removed and routed into a filter plenum; there the air is treated by a bank of four prefilters and two banks of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters (each containing four HEPAs). The air is exhausted to the atmosphere through the 296-C-05 Stack. The stack is equipped with a record sampler and continuous air monitor. Two fans (each rated at 4,200 cubic feet per minute) installed downstream of the filtration system provide the motive force for exhausting the vaults and the tanks. As an active system, it is operated continuously with only one of the two fans required to operate at a time. A continuous beta-gamma air monitor is interlocked to the operating fan. Loss of power to the fans will activate an alarm at the 244-AR facility.

  5. 59136 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 186 / Monday, September 27, 2010 / Rules and Regulations (c) Certain farm vehicle drivers. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Certain farm vehicle drivers. The rules in this part except for § 391.15(e) do not apply to a farm vehicle driver except a farm vehicle driver who drives an articulated (combination) commercial motor vehicle, as defined in § 390.5. For limited exemptions for farm vehicle drivers of articulated commercial motor

  6. 9 Cr-- 1 Mo steel material for high temperature application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jablonski, Paul D; Alman, David; Dogan, Omer; Holcomb, Gordon; Cowen, Christopher

    2012-11-27

    One or more embodiments relates to a high-temperature, titanium alloyed, 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibiting improved creep strength and oxidation resistance at service temperatures up to 650.degree. C. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel has a tempered martensite microstructure and is comprised of both large (0.5-3 .mu.m) primary titanium carbides and small (5-50 nm) secondary titanium carbides in a ratio of. from about 1:1.5 to about 1.5:1. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel may be fabricated using exemplary austenizing, rapid cooling, and tempering steps without subsequent hot working requirements. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibits improvements in total mass gain, yield strength, and time-to-rupture over ASTM P91 and ASTM P92 at the temperature and time conditions examined.

  7. TI--CR--AL--O thin film resistors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA); Schmid, Anthony P. (Solana Beach, CA)

    2000-01-01

    Thin films of Ti--Cr--Al--O are used as a resistor material. The films are rf sputter deposited from ceramic targets using a reactive working gas mixture of Ar and O.sub.2. Resistivity values from 10.sup.4 to 10.sup.10 Ohm-cm have been measured for Ti--Cr--Al--O film <1 .mu.m thick. The film resistivity can be discretely selected through control of the target composition and the deposition parameters. The application of Ti--Cr--Al--O as a thin film resistor has been found to be thermodynamically stable, unlike other metal-oxide films. The Ti--Cr--Al--O film can be used as a vertical or lateral resistor, for example, as a layer beneath a field emission cathode in a flat panel display; or used to control surface emissivity, for example, as a coating on an insulating material such as vertical wall supports in flat panel displays.

  8. Phase stability and elastic properties of Cr-V alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, M. C.; Suzuki, Y.; Schweiger, H.; Do?an, Ö.N.; Hawk, J.; Widom M.

    2013-02-20

    V is the only element in the periodic table that forms a complete solid solution with Cr and thus is particularly important in alloying strategy to ductilize Cr. This study combines first-principles density functional theory calculations and experiments to investigate the phase stability and elastic properties of Cr–V binary alloys. The cluster expansion study reveals the formation of various ordered compounds at low temperatures that were not previously known. These compounds become unstable due to the configurational entropy of bcc solid solution as the temperature is increased. The elastic constants of ordered and disordered compounds are calculated at both T = 0 K and finite temperatures. The overall trends in elastic properties are in agreement with measurements using the resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method. The calculations predict that addition of V to Cr decreases both the bulk modulus and the shear modulus, and enhances the Poisson’s ratio, in agreement with experiments. Decrease in the bulk modulus is correlated to decrease in the valence electron density and increase in the lattice constant. An enhanced Poisson’s ratio for bcc Cr–V alloys (compared to pure Cr) is associated with an increased density of states at the Fermi level. Furthermore, the difference charge density in the bonding region in the (110) slip plane is highest for pure Cr and decreases gradually as V is added. The present calculation also predicts a negative Cauchy pressure for pure Cr, and it becomes positive upon alloying with V. The intrinsic ductilizing effect from V may contribute, at least partially, to the experimentally observed ductilizing phenomenon in the literature.

  9. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN GEOLOGY (UNOFFICIAL) CATALOG 129 Fall (Th-Pr) Cr Spring (Th-Pr) Cr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BACHELOR OF ARTS IN GEOLOGY (UNOFFICIAL) CATALOG 129 Fall (Th-Pr) Cr Spring (Th-Pr) Cr Freshman Geology (3-3) 4 GEOL 106 Historical Geology (3-3) 4 MATH 166 Topics in Cont. Math II 1 (3-0) 3 MATH 131-3) 4 GEOP 341 Introduction to Global Geophysics (3-0) 3 GEOL 309 Introduction to Geologic Field Methods

  10. Characterization of the CR-39 neutron track etch dosimeter and evaluation of a combination CR-39/thermoluminescent dosimeter badge 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoover, Paul Steven

    1989-01-01

    . . . . . . . Objectives . THEORY 2 5 9 12 14 Charged Particle Interactions and Damage Track Formation Neutron Converters The Etching Process Background Effects The Quality Factor MATERIALS AND METHODS 14 16 18 21 22 31 CR-39 Supply . CR-39... to the total neutron exposure is the nuclear power industry. Neutrons from the reactor core produced by induced fission penetrate the shielding and escape through coolant ducts and safety vents. Spontaneous fission in the fuel itself contributes significant...

  11. http://www-cr.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp/gakubu/P6.html http://www-cr.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp/gakubu/P6.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011 P6 http://www-cr.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp/gakubu/P6.html web #12;http://www-cr.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp/gakubu/P6.html () ( #12;http://www-cr.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp/gakubu/P6.html X MeV X Astro-H 2013 TeV10m) #12;http://www-cr.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp/gakubu/P6.html 2010 ASTRO-H CCD X (2) () (2) (2

  12. Chromium Isotope Fractionation During Reduction of Cr(VI) Under Saturated Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamieson-Hanes, Julia H.; Gibson, Blair D.; Lindsay, Matthew B.J.; Kim, Yeongkyoo; Ptacek, Carol J.; Blowes, David W.

    2012-10-25

    Chromium isotopes are potentially useful indicators of Cr(VI) reduction reactions in groundwater flow systems; however, the influence of transport on Cr isotope fractionation has not been fully examined. Laboratory batch and column experiments were conducted to evaluate isotopic fractionation of Cr during Cr(VI) reduction under both static and controlled flow conditions. Organic carbon was used to reduce Cr(VI) in simulated groundwater containing 20 mg L{sup -1} Cr(VI) in both batch and column experiments. Isotope measurements were performed on dissolved Cr on samples from the batch experiments, and on effluent and profile samples from the column experiment. Analysis of the residual solid-phase materials by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy confirmed association of Cr(III) with organic carbon in the column solids. Decreases in dissolved Cr(VI) concentrations were coupled with increases in {delta}{sup 53}Cr, indicating that Cr isotope enrichment occurred during reduction of Cr(VI). The {delta}{sup 53}Cr data from the column experiment was fit by linear regression yielding a fractionation factor ({alpha}) of 0.9979, whereas the batch experiments exhibited Rayleigh-type isotope fractionation ({alpha} = 0.9965). The linear characteristic of the column {delta}{sup 53}Cr data may reflect the contribution of transport on Cr isotope fractionation.

  13. Surface structure of ?-Cr2O3(0001) after activated oxygen exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Chamberlin, Sara E.; Chambers, Scott A.

    2013-09-13

    The surface structure of a-Cr2O3(0001) before and after exposure to activated oxygen from an ECR plasma source was investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD). Epitaxial Cr2O3(0001) thin films were deposited on Al2O3(0001) substrates by oxygen-plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (OPA-MBE). When cooled or annealed in vacuum, strong evidence for a Cr-Cr-O3- termination was obtained by comparing the Cr3+ XPD azimuthal scan to single scattering simulations. However, after plasma exposure, a high binding energy feature was observed in the Cr 2p XPS spectrum that possesses an ordered structure distinct from the underlying Cr3+ of Cr2O3, which remains Cr-Cr-O3-like. Investigation of this new surface structure with simulations of various candidate structures tentatively rules out CrO2-like configurations. The high binding energy feature likely arises from a higher oxidation state of Cr. One possibility is the oxidation of the surface layer of Cr to Cr6- with a double chromyl structure (O=Cr=O).

  14. Utility Integrated Resource Planning: An Emerging Driver of New Renewable Generation in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-01-01

    greater role in future utility planning efforts. Bolinger,Utility Integrated Resource Planning: An Emerging Driver ofyears: utility integrated resource planning (IRP). Common in

  15. Philips Light Sources & Electronics is Developing an Efficient, Smaller, Cost-Effective Family of LED Drivers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the help of DOE funding, Philips Light Sources & Electronics is developing a new family of LED drivers that are more efficient and cost-effective as well as smaller in size than currently available drivers. The new drivers are switch-mode power supplies that are similar to today's drivers, but with an improved design. In addition, they have a different topology—boost plus LLC—for wattages of 40W and above, but they retain the commonly used flyback topology at lower wattages.

  16. Driver/Pedestrian Understanding and Behavior at Marked and Unmarked Crosswalks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragland, David R; Mitman, Meghan Fehlig

    2007-01-01

    July 1, 2007 DRIVER/PEDESTRIAN UNDERSTANDING AND BEHAVIOR AT9922 BERKELEY MANIFESTO ON PEDESTRIAN CROSSINGS MAY 11, 2007for safe and convenient pedestrian travel and to embrace

  17. Gamma-ray decay of levels in /sup 53/Cr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickens, J.K.; Larson, D.C.

    1987-11-01

    Gamma-ray decay of levels in the stable isotope /sup 53/Cr has been studied using /sup 53/Cr(n,n'..gamma..) reactions for incident neutron energies between threshold and 10 MeV. Of the 65 gamma rays or gamma-ray groups observed for neutron interactions with /sup 53/Cr, 50 have been placed or tentatively placed among 34 levels in /sup 53/Cr up to an excitation energy of 4.36 MeV. Deduced branching ratios are in reasonable agreement with previous measurements except for decay of the E/sub x/ = 1537-keV level. For the decay of the E/sub x/ = 1537-keV level we are unable to explain variations in the branching ratios of the transition gamma rays as a function of incident neutron energy within the framework of the presently known level structure of /sup 53/Cr and suggest the possibility of a second energy level at E/sub x/ = 1537 keV. 59 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. UWB multi-burst transmit driver for averaging receivers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dallum, Gregory E

    2012-11-20

    A multi-burst transmitter for ultra-wideband (UWB) communication systems generates a sequence of precisely spaced RF bursts from a single trigger event. There are two oscillators in the transmitter circuit, a gated burst rate oscillator and a gated RF burst or RF power output oscillator. The burst rate oscillator produces a relatively low frequency, i.e., MHz, square wave output for a selected transmit cycle, and drives the RF burst oscillator, which produces RF bursts of much higher frequency, i.e., GHz, during the transmit cycle. The frequency of the burst rate oscillator sets the spacing of the RF burst packets. The first oscillator output passes through a bias driver to the second oscillator. The bias driver conditions, e.g., level shifts, the signal from the first oscillator for input into the second oscillator, and also controls the length of each RF burst. A trigger pulse actuates a timing circuit, formed of a flip-flop and associated reset time delay circuit, that controls the operation of the first oscillator, i.e., how long it oscillates (which defines the transmit cycle).

  19. Enhanced Electrochemical Lithium Storage Activity of LiCrO2 by Size Effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, G.; Li, L; Liu, J; Liu, N; Li, H; Yang, X; Huang, X; Chen, L; Nam, K; Yoon, W

    2009-01-01

    Cr8O21 was chemically lithiated using a lithium-biphenyl-dimethoxyethane solution. Lithiated Cr8O21 shows a structure in which as-formed LiCrO2 units are sandwiched between Cr2O3 superlattice layers. Chemically lithiated Cr8O21 shows a delithiation capacity of 200 mAh g-1. It means that LiCrO2 units in lithiated Cr8O21 are electrochemically active. This finding is opposite to previous reports that LiCrO2 materials have very poor Li-storage capacities. Our new result implies that LiCrO2 with extremely small domain size could show enhanced reactivity. This proposal is proved unambiguously by the fact that LiCrO2 powder materials with smaller grain size (<20 nm) show much higher capacities than LiCrO2 materials with larger grain size (>50 nm). In addition, it is found that the cation mixing is more significantly in LiCrO2 materials with smaller grain size, which seems a key factor for the storage and transport of lithium in layered Cr-based materials. The cation mixing may also explain the result that the lattice parameters of LiCrO2 do not change significantly upon lithium extraction and insertion, investigated by in situ and ex situ XRD techniques.

  20. Importance of Doping and Frustration in Itinerant Fe-doped Cr2Al

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susner, Michael A; Parker, David S; Safa-Sefat, Athena

    2015-01-01

    We have performed an experimental and theoretical study comparing the effects of Fe-doping of Cr2Al, an antiferromagnet with a N el temperature of 670 K, with known results on Fe-doping of antiferromagnetic bcc Cr. (Cr1-xFex)2Al materials are found to exhibit a rapid suppression of antiferromagnetic order with the presence of Fe, decreasing TN to 170 K for x=0.10. Antiferromagnetic behavior disappears entirely at x 0.125 after which point increasing paramagnetic behavior is exhibited. This is unlike the effects of Fe doping of bcc antiferromagnetic Cr, in which TN gradually decreases followed by the appearance of a ferromagnetic state. Theoretical calculations explain that the Cr2Al-Fe suppression of magnetic order originates from two effects: the first is band narrowing caused by doping of additional electrons from Fe substitution that weakens itinerant magnetism; the second is magnetic frustration of the Cr itinerant moments in Fe-substituted Cr2Al. In pure-phase Cr2Al, the Cr moments have an antiparallel alignment; however, these are destroyed through Fe substitution and the preference of Fe for parallel alignment with Cr. This is unlike bulk Fe-doped Cr alloys in which the Fe anti-aligns with the Cr atoms, and speaks to the importance of the Al atoms in the magnetic structure of Cr2Al and Fe-doped Cr2Al.

  1. Grain boundary depletion and migration during selective oxidation of Cr in a Ni-5Cr binary alloy exposed to high-temperature hydrogenated water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreiber, Daniel K.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2014-10-01

    High-resolution microscopy of a high-purity Ni-5Cr alloy exposed to 360°C hydrogenated water reveals intergranular selective oxidation of Cr accompanied by local Cr depletion and diffusion-induced grain boundary migration (DIGM). The corrosion-product oxide consists of a porous, interconnected network of Cr2O3 platelets with no further O ingress into the metal ahead. Extensive grain boundary depletion of Cr (to <0.05at.%) is observed typically 20–100 nm wide as a result of DIGM and reaching depths of many micrometers beyond the oxidation front.

  2. Exchange bias in Fe/Cr double superlattices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, J. S.; Felcher, G. P.; Inomata, A.; Goyette, R.; Nelson, C.; Bader, S. D.

    1999-11-30

    Utilizing the oscillatory interlayer exchange coupling in Fe/Cr superlattices, we have constructed ''double superlattice'' structures where a ferromagnetic (F) and an antiferromagnetic (AF) Fe/Cr superlattice are coupled through a Cr spacer. The minor hysteresis loops in the magnetization are shifted from zero field, i.e., the F superlattice is exchange biased by the AF one. The double superlattices are sputter-deposited with (211) epitaxy and possess uniaxial in-plane magnetic anisotropy. The magnitude of the bias field is satisfactorily described by the classic formula for collinear spin structures. The coherent structure and insensitivity to atomic-scale roughness makes it possible to determine the spin distribution by polarized neutron reflectivity, which confirms that the spin structure is collinear. The magnetic reversal behavior of the double superlattices suggests that a realistic model of exchange bias needs to address the process of nucleating local reverse domains.

  3. Metastable bcc phase formation in the Nb-Cr system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoma, D.J.; Schwarz, R.B.; Perepezko, J.H.; Plantz, D.H.

    1993-08-01

    Extended metastable bcc solid solutions of Nb-Xat.%Cr (X = 35, 50, 57, 77, 82, and 94) were synthesized by two-anvil splat-quenching. In addition, bcc (Nb-67at.%Cr) was prepared by mechanically alloying mixtures of niobium and chromium powders. The lattice parameters were measured by X-ray diffraction and the Young`s moduli were measured by low-load microindentation. The composition dependence of the lattice parameters and elastic moduli show a positive deviation with respect to a rule of mixtures. During continuous heating at 15C/min., the metastable precursor bcc phases decomposed at temperatures above 750C to uniformly refined microstructures.

  4. Nash Equilibria for a Model of Traffic Flow with Several Groups of Drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nash Equilibria for a Model of Traffic Flow with Several Groups of Drivers Alberto Bressan and Ke population sizes 1, . . . , n, we prove the existence of a Nash equilibrium solution, where no driver can, and a characterization of this Nash equilibrium solution, are also discussed. 1 Introduction Consider a model of traffic

  5. Nash Equilibria for a Model of Traffic Flow with Several Groups of Drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bressan, Alberto

    Nash Equilibria for a Model of Traffic Flow with Several Groups of Drivers Alberto Bressan and Ke population sizes 1, . . . , n, we prove the existence of a Nash equilibrium solution, where no driver can, and a characterization of this Nash equilibrium solution, are also discussed. Key words: Scalar conservation law

  6. 1 Drivers of the projected changes to the Pacific Ocean 2 equatorial circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Drivers of the projected changes to the Pacific Ocean 2 equatorial circulation 3 A. Sen Gupta,1 A), 29 Drivers of the projected changes to the Pacific Ocean equatorial 30 circulation, Geophys. Res. Lett., 39, LXXXXX, doi:10.1029/ 31 2012GL051447. 32 1. Introduction 33 [2] The equatorial Pacific Ocean

  7. AABBSSTTRRAACCTT MA, RUIQI. The Effect of In-Vehicle Automation and Reliability on Driver Situation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaber, David B.

    AABBSSTTRRAACCTT MA, RUIQI. The Effect of In-Vehicle Automation and Reliability on Driver Situation by automation and in- vehicle device use. Specifically, this study investigated the implications of adaptive; investigate the effect of varying reliability of in-vehicle automation (navigation aids) on driver SA

  8. ESPM 131 Using microbes to understand effects S06 and drivers of species diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruns, Tom

    ESPM 131 Using microbes to understand effects S06 and drivers of species diversity Microbial. Perceived disadvantages and counterpoints: too simple, too artificial microbes are fundamentally different;ESPM 131 Using microbes to understand effects S06 and drivers of species diversity Species richness

  9. Predicting the Effects of In-Car Interfaces on Driver Behavior using a Cognitive Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvucci, Dario D.

    Predicting the Effects of In-Car Interfaces on Driver Behavior using a Cognitive Architecture Dario 9669 dario@cbr.com ABSTRACT When designing and evaluating "in-car" user interfaces for drivers describes a novel approach to predicting effects of in-car interfaces by modeling behavior in a cognitive

  10. Driver Attitudes and Choices: Speed Limits, Seat Belt Use, and Drinking-and-Driving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    Driver attitudes; Driver behavior; Speeding; Motor Vehicle Occupant Safety Surveys (MVOSS) #12;- 2 Board, January 2004 Abstract A better understanding of attitudes and behavioral principles underlying driving behavior and traffic safety issues can contribute to design and policy solutions, such as, speed

  11. Integrated Circuit Implementation for a GaN HFETs Driver Circuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakos, Jason D.

    @engr.sc.edu Abstract- The paper presents the design of an integrated circuit (IC) for a 10MHz low power-loss driver exploit the advantages of GaN devices, such as superior switching speed and operation in high-power the authors focus on the design of the IC and present preliminary results and considerations. The driver

  12. An Electrolytic-Free Offline LED Driver with a Ceramic-Capacitor-Based Compact SSC Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perreault, Dave

    An Electrolytic-Free Offline LED Driver with a Ceramic-Capacitor-Based Compact SSC Energy Buffer of a compact ceramic-capacitor-based stacked switched capacitor (SSC) energy buffer for a single-stage offline precharge circuit. The prototype LED driver presented here uses a ceramic-capacitor-based SSC energy buffer

  13. Laddie: The Language for Automated Device Drivers (Ver 1) Bucknell Computer Science Technical Report #08-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wittie, Lea

    Report #08-2 Lea Wittie March 12, 2008 Abstract Device drivers, which make up a large portion. Rebooting can mean data loss; a CD-RW writing a CD, network card sending packets. The driver could also read

  14. Study of CSR Effects in the Jefferson Laboratory FEL Driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, C. C.; Biedron, S.; Burleson, Theodore A.; Milton, Stephen V.; Morin, Auralee L.; Benson, Stephen V.; Douglas, David R.; Evtushenko, Pavel E.; Hannon, Fay E.; Li, Rui; Tennant, Christopher D.; Zhang, Shukui; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Lewellen, John W.

    2013-08-01

    In a recent experiment conducted on the Jefferson Laboratory IR FEL driver the effects of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) on beam quality were studied. The primary goal of this work was to explore CSR output and effect on the beam with variation of the bunch compression in the IR chicane. This experiment also provides a valuable opportunity to benchmark existing CSR models in a system that may not be fully represented by a 1-D CSR model. Here we present results from this experiment and compare to initial simulations of CSR in the magnetic compression chicane of the machine. Finally, we touch upon the possibility for CSR induced microbunching gain in the magnetic compression chicane, and show that parameters in the machine are such that it should be thoroughly damped.

  15. October 2010 NASA/CR2010-216861

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    October 2010 NASA/CR­2010-216861 Optimizing Air Transportation Service to Metroplex Airports Part Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia #12;NASA STI Program . . . in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been dedicated to the advancement of aeronautics and space science. The NASA scientific and technical

  16. October 2010 NASA/CR2010-216860

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    October 2010 NASA/CR­2010-216860 Optimizing Air Transportation Service to Metroplex Airports Part 1;NASA STI Program . . . in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been dedicated to the advancement of aeronautics and space science. The NASA scientific and technical information (STI) program plays a key part

  17. October 2006 NASA/CR-2006-214298

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, César A.

    October 2006 NASA/CR-2006-214298 NIA Report No. 2006-01 A High-Level Formalization of Floating of Aerospace, Hampton, Virginia #12;The NASA STI Program Office . . . in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been dedicated to the advancement of aeronautics and space science. The NASA Scientific and Technical

  18. NASA/CR2004208938 Lunar Receiving Laboratory Project History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    NASA/CR­2004­208938 Lunar Receiving Laboratory Project History Susan Mangus Muskingum College New Concord, Ohio William Larsen Johnson Space Center Houston, Texas June 2004 #12;THE NASA STI PROGRAM OFFICE . . . IN PROFILE Since its founding, NASA has been dedicated to the advancement of aeronautics and space science

  19. Math 5654 4cr Spring 2010 Prediction and Filtering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krylov, Nicolai

    Math 5654 4cr Spring 2010 Syllabus Prediction and Filtering Lectures: 10:10am-12:05pm TTh, VinH 364: Saturday, May 15, 4 pm-6 pm. A few homeworks wil be assigned and the grades for them will enter as 2-dimensional case 133 2:2. Multidimensional case 137 3. Linear filtering 147 Chapter 6. Wiener process

  20. ADHERENCE OF A12O3 TO CoCrAl COATINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whittle, D.P.

    2010-01-01

    Conference on Metallurgical Coatings, San Diego, CA, Aprilfr ADHERENCE OF AlgOg TO CoCrAl COATINGS D. P. Whittle, D. HADHERENCE OF Al 0 TO CoCrAl COATINGS D. P. Whittle, D. H.

  1. Technology Implimentation Plan - ATF FeCrAl Cladding for LWR Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snead, Mary A.; Snead, Lance; Terrani, Kurt A.; Field, Kevin G.; Worrall, Andrew; Robb, Kevin R.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Powers, Jeffrey J.; Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Pint, Bruce A.; Hu, Xunxiang

    2015-06-01

    Technology implimentation plan for FeCrAl development under the FCRD Advanced Fuel program. The document describes the activities required to get FeCrAl clad ready for LTR testing

  2. Lightest Isotope of Bh Produced Via the 209Bi(52Cr,n)260Bh Reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    models. For many years, “cold fusion” reactions utilizingproduced via the new “cold fusion” reaction 209 Bi( 52 Cr,

  3. CSC444-2001-CR-01A Page 1 14 November, 2001 Change Request #001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Easterbrook, Steve

    CSC444-2001-CR-01A Page 1 14 November, 2001 Change Request #001 for the CSC444 Graph Editor Document # CSC444-2001-CR-01A Revision A 14th November 2001 #12;CSC444-2001-CR-01A Page 2 14 November, 2001 ...................................................................................................... 5 #12;CSC444-2001-CR-01A Page 3 14 November, 2001 1 Scope This change request refers to the Graph

  4. Non-classical nuclei and growth kinetics of Cr precipitates in FeCr alloys during ageing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Xin

    2014-01-10

    In this manuscript, we quantitatively calculated the thermodynamic properties of critical nuclei of Cr precipitates in FeCr alloys. The concentration profiles of the critical nuclei and nucleation energy barriers were predicted by the constrained shrinking dimer dynamics (CSDD) method. It is found that Cr concentration distribution in the critical nuclei strongly depend on the overall Cr concentration as well as temperature. The critical nuclei are non-classical because the concentration in the nuclei is smaller than the thermodynamic equilibrium value. These results are in agreement with atomic probe observation. The growth kinetics of both classical and non-classical nuclei was investigated by the phase field approach. The simulations of critical nucleus evolution showed a number of interesting phenomena: 1) a critical classical nucleus first shrinks toward its non-classical nucleus and then grows; 2) a non-classical nucleus has much slower growth kinetics at its earlier growth stage compared to the diffusion-controlled growth kinetics. 3) a critical classical nucleus grows faster at the earlier growth stage than the non-classical nucleus. All of these results demonstrate that it is critical to introduce the correct critical nuclei in order to correctly capture the kinetics of precipitation.

  5. Radiation effects on interface reactions of U/Fe, U/(Fe+Cr), and U/(Fe+Cr+Ni)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shao, Lin; Chen, Di; Wei, Chaochen; Martin, Michael S.; Wang, Xuemei; Park, Youngjoo; Dein, Ed; Coffey, Kevin R.; Sohn, Yongho; Sencer, Bulent H.; et al

    2014-10-01

    We study the effects of radiation damage on interdiffusion and intermetallic phase formation at the interfaces of U/Fe, U/(Fe + Cr), and U/(Fe + Cr + Ni) diffusion couples. Magnetron sputtering is used to deposit thin films of Fe, Fe + Cr, or Fe + Cr + Ni on U substrates to form the diffusion couples. One set of samples are thermally annealed under high vacuum at 450 C or 550 C for one hour. A second set of samples are annealed identically but with concurrent 3.5 MeV Fe++ ion irradiation. The Fe++ ion penetration depth is sufficient to reachmore »the original interfaces. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analysis with high fidelity spectral simulations is used to obtain interdiffusion profiles, which are used to examine differences in U diffusion and intermetallic phase formation at the buried interfaces. For all three diffusion systems, Fe++ ion irradiations enhance U diffusion. Furthermore, the irradiations accelerate the formation of intermetallic phases. In U/Fe couples, for example, the unirradiated samples show typical interdiffusion governed by Fick’s laws, while the irradiated ones show step-like profiles influenced by Gibbs phase rules.« less

  6. Radiation effects on interface reactions of U/Fe, U/(Fe+Cr), and U/(Fe+Cr+Ni)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Lin; Chen, Di; Wei, Chaochen; Martin, Michael S.; Wang, Xuemei; Park, Youngjoo; Dein, Ed; Coffey, Kevin R.; Sohn, Yongho; Sencer, Bulent H.; Rory Kennedy, J.

    2014-10-01

    We study the effects of radiation damage on interdiffusion and intermetallic phase formation at the interfaces of U/Fe, U/(Fe + Cr), and U/(Fe + Cr + Ni) diffusion couples. Magnetron sputtering is used to deposit thin films of Fe, Fe + Cr, or Fe + Cr + Ni on U substrates to form the diffusion couples. One set of samples are thermally annealed under high vacuum at 450 C or 550 C for one hour. A second set of samples are annealed identically but with concurrent 3.5 MeV Fe++ ion irradiation. The Fe++ ion penetration depth is sufficient to reach the original interfaces. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analysis with high fidelity spectral simulations is used to obtain interdiffusion profiles, which are used to examine differences in U diffusion and intermetallic phase formation at the buried interfaces. For all three diffusion systems, Fe++ ion irradiations enhance U diffusion. Furthermore, the irradiations accelerate the formation of intermetallic phases. In U/Fe couples, for example, the unirradiated samples show typical interdiffusion governed by Fick’s laws, while the irradiated ones show step-like profiles influenced by Gibbs phase rules.

  7. Expression of CX3CR1 chemokine receptors on neurons and their role in neuronal survival

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meucci, Olimpia

    Expression of CX3CR1 chemokine receptors on neurons and their role in neuronal survival Olimpia expression of CX3CR1, the only known receptor for fractalkine, has been demonstrated exclusively on microglia, that hippocampal neurons also express CX3CR1. Receptor activation by soluble fractalkine induces activation

  8. Surface half-metallicity of CrS thin films and perfect spin filtering and spin diode effects of CrS/ZnSe heterostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, G. Y. Yao, K. L.

    2014-11-03

    Recently, ferromagnetic zinc-blende Mn{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}S thin films (above x?=?0.5) were fabricated experimentally on ZnSe substrate, which confirmed the previous theoretical prediction of half-metallic ferromagnetism in zinc-blende CrS. Here, we theoretically reveal that both Cr- and S-terminated (001) surfaces of the CrS thin films retain the half-metallicity. The CrS/ZnSe(001) heterogeneous junction exhibits excellent spin filtering and spin diode effects, which are explained by the calculated band structure and transmission spectra. The perfect spin transport properties indicate the potential applications of half-metallic CrS in spintronic devices. All computational results are obtained by using the density functional theory combined with nonequilibrium Green's function.

  9. Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and magnetization interaction reversal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaur, Maninder; Dai, Qilin; Bowden, Mark E.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Wu, Yaqiao; Tang, Jinke; Qiang, You

    2013-06-26

    Chromium (Cr) forms a solid solution with iron (Fe) lattice when doped in core-shell iron -iron oxide nanocluster (NC) and shows a mixed phase of sigma (?) FeCr and bcc Fe. The Cr dopant affects heavily the magnetization and magnetic reversal process, and causes the hysteresis loop to shrink near the zero field axis. Dramatic transformation happens from dipolar interaction (0 at. % Cr) to strong exchange interaction (8 at. % of Cr) is confirmed from the Henkel plot and delta M plot, and is explained by a water-melon model of core-shell NC system.

  10. Transport signatures of quantum critically in Cr at high pressure.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaramillo, R.; Feng, Y.; Wang, J.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2010-08-03

    The elemental antiferromagnet Cr at high pressure presents a new type of naked quantum critical point that is free of disorder and symmetry-breaking fields. Here we measure magnetotransport in fine detail around the critical pressure, P{sub c} {approx} 10 GPa, in a diamond anvil cell and reveal the role of quantum critical fluctuations at the phase transition. As the magnetism disappears and T {yields} 0, the magntotransport scaling converges to a non-mean-field form that illustrates the reconstruction of the magnetic Fermi surface, and is distinct from the critical scaling measured in chemically disordered Cr:V under pressure. The breakdown of itinerant antiferromagnetism only comes clearly into view in the clean limit, establishing disorder as a relevant variable at a quantum phase transition.

  11. Cr/sup 3 +/-doped colquiriite solid state laser material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, S.A.; Chase, L.L.; Newkirk, H.W.; Krupke, W.F.

    1988-03-31

    Chromium doped colquiriite, LiCaAlF/sub 6/:Cr/sup 3 +/, is useful as a tunable laser crystal that has a high intrinsic slope efficiency, comparable to or exceeding that of alexandrite, the current leading performer of vibronic sideband Cr/sup 3 +/ lasers. The laser output is tunable from at least 720 nm to 840 nm with a measured slope efficiency of about 60% in a Kr laser pumped laser configuration. The intrinsic slope efficiency (in the limit of large output coupling) may approach the quantum defect limited value of 83%. The high slope efficiency implies that excited state absorption (ESA) is negligible. The potential for efficiency and the tuning range of this material satisfy the requirements for a pump laser for a high density storage medium incorporating Nd/sup 3 +/ or Tm/sup 3 +/ for use in a multimegajoule single shot fusion research facility. 4 figs.

  12. Cr{sub 2}Nb-based alloy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, C.T.; Horton, J.A.; Carmichael, C.A.

    1996-05-01

    This paper summarizes recent progress in developing Cr{sub 2}Nb/Cr(Nb) alloys for structural use in advanced fossil energy conversion systems. Alloy additions were added to control the microstructure and mechanical properties. Two beneficial elements have been identified among all alloying additions added to the alloys. One element is effective in refining the coarse eutectic structure and thus substantially improves the compressive strength and ductility of the alloys. The other element enhances oxidation resistance without sacrificing the ductility. The tensile properties are sensitive to cast defects, which can not be effectively reduced by HIPping at 1450-1580{degrees}C and/or directionally solidifying via a floating zone remelting method.

  13. Improving thermostability of CrO{sub 2} thin films by doping with Sn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Yi; Wang, Ziyu; Liu, Shuo; Shi, Jing; Yin, Di; Yuan, Cheng; Lu, Zhihong; Xiong, Rui

    2014-09-01

    Chromium dioxide (CrO{sub 2}) is an ideal material for spin electronic devices since it has almost 100% spin polarization near Fermi level. However, it is thermally unstable and easily decomposes to Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} even at room temperature. In this study, we try to improve the thermal stability of CrO{sub 2} thin films by doping with Sn whose oxide has the same structure as CrO{sub 2}. High quality epitaxial CrO{sub 2} and Sn-doped CrO{sub 2} films were grown on single crystalline TiO{sub 2} (100) substrates by chemical vapor deposition. Sn{sup 4+} ions were believed to be doped into CrO{sub 2} lattice and take the lattice positions of Cr{sup 4+}. The magnetic measurements show that Sn-doping leads to a decrease of magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The thermal stabilities of the films were evaluated by annealing the films at different temperatures. Sn-doped films can withstand a temperature up to 510?°C, significantly higher than what undoped films can do (lower than 435?°C), which suggests that Sn-doping indeed enhances the thermal stability of CrO{sub 2} films. Our study also indicates that Sn-doping may not change the essential half metallic properties of CrO{sub 2}. Therefore, Sn-doped CrO{sub 2} is expected to be very promising for applications in spintronic devices.

  14. Dynamic analysis of policy drivers for bioenergy commodity markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert F. Jeffers; Jacob J. Jacobson; Erin M. Searcy

    2001-01-01

    Biomass is increasingly being considered as a feedstock to provide a clean and renewable source of energy in the form of both liquid fuels and electric power. In the United States, the biofuels and biopower industries are regulated by different policies and have different drivers which impact the maximum price the industries are willing to pay for biomass. This article describes a dynamic computer simulation model that analyzes future behavior of bioenergy feedstock markets given policy and technical options. The model simulates the long-term dynamics of these markets by treating advanced biomass feedstocks as a commodity and projecting the total demand of each industry as well as the market price over time. The model is used for an analysis of the United States bioenergy feedstock market that projects supply, demand, and market price given three independent buyers: domestic biopower, domestic biofuels, and foreign exports. With base-case assumptions, the biofuels industry is able to dominate the market and meet the federal Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) targets for advanced biofuels. Further analyses suggest that United States bioenergy studies should include estimates of export demand in their projections, and that GHG-limiting policy would partially shield both industries from exporter dominance.

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Look-Ahead Driver Feedback and Powertrain Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Eaton at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about look-ahead driver feedback and...

  16. Emergency vehicle driver training by Texas municipal police departments: a descriptive study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westmoreland, Robert Lawrence

    1994-01-01

    police departments with 26 or more sworn police officers were mailed questionnaires that were to be completed and returned to the researcher. The questionnaire requested information on the current emergency driver training program of each agency. Results...

  17. Two-stage power conversion architecture for an LED driver circuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Seungbum

    This paper presents a merged-two-stage circuit topology suitable for efficient LED drivers operating from either wide-range dc input voltage or ac line voltage. This two-stage topology is based on a soft-charged ...

  18. State of Wisconsin Fleet Driver and Management Policies and Procedures Manual 1 State of Wisconsin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Stephen R.

    .30. Lease and Rental Rates 30 2.31. Citizen Driver Complaints 30 Appendix Directory 30 #12;State confusion between previous versions, (3) increase employee and public understanding of the overall state

  19. Using NASA-Task Load Index to Assess Drivers' Workload on Freeway Guide Sign Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using NASA-Task Load Index to Assess Drivers' Workload on Freeway Guide Sign Structures Fengxiang are carefully analyzed using the NASA-Task Load Index. With the statistical analyses of questionnaires

  20. FALLOW MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN GUATEMALA'S WESTERN HIGHLANDS: SOCIAL DRIVERS AND BIOPHYSICAL IMPACTSy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FALLOW MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN GUATEMALA'S WESTERN HIGHLANDS: SOCIAL DRIVERS AND BIOPHYSICAL practices in the Western Highlands of Guatemala based on interdisciplinary data collected using fertility; Buddleia skutchii; Baccharis vaccinioides; Andisol; Guatemala INTRODUCTION At any given time

  1. Efficacy, national/international practices and motivational factors of lifelong driver education for the aging population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Israels, Richard (Richard Steven)

    2006-01-01

    In a society facing a significant increase in its aging population, older driver education/training is emerging as a potential solution to help seniors drive more safely, thus maintaining their mobility and quality of life. ...

  2. Temperature as a driver for the expansion of the microalga Gonyostomum semen in Swedish lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temperature as a driver for the expansion of the microalga Gonyostomum semen in Swedish lakes Karin is an example of invasive harmful microalgae (Neilan et al., 2003). Another presumably invasive species

  3. Personality fit in nascar: does driver-sponsor congruence influence sponsorship effectiveness outcomes? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dees, Windy Lynn

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine if personality fit between NASCAR drivers and their major sponsors affects the sponsorship outcomes of consumer attitudes toward the sponsor, attitudes toward the brand, and ...

  4. Fourth Annual Ethical Leadership Conference Panel Drivers, Challenges, and Strategies for Future of Corporate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    Fourth Annual Ethical Leadership Conference Panel Drivers, Challenges, and Strategies for Future, Academy of Management Review, Academy of Management Perspectives, Business & Society, Long Range Planning Social Responsibility for Hess Corporation, a global integrated energy company based in New York City

  5. Marine metagenomic infrastructure services as driver for research and industrial innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bongo, Lars Ailo

    Marine metagenomic infrastructure services as driver for research and industrial innovation Lars-EBI) · Participants: ­ Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation (Portugal) ­ CCMAR ­ Center for Marine Sciences (Portugal;Marine Metagenomics · Marine genomics and metagenomics are rapidly expanding · Need customized data

  6. Assessment of older driver understanding of certain traffic control devices in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulett, Stephanie Renee

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to assess older Texas drivers on their understanding of nine traffic control devices and identify the devices that are misunderstood by people 65 years and older. Additionally, older ...

  7. Low temperature spin dynamics in Cr{sub 7}Ni-Cu-Cr{sub 7}Ni coupled molecular rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bordonali, L.; Furukawa, Y.; Mariani, M.; Sabareesh, K. P. V.; Garlatti, E.; Borsa, F.

    2014-05-07

    Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation measurements have been performed down to very low temperature (50?mK) to determine the effect of coupling two Cr{sub 7}Ni molecular rings via a Cu{sup 2+} ion. No difference in the spin dynamics was found from nuclear spin lattice relaxation down to 1.5?K. At lower temperature, the {sup 1}H-NMR line broadens dramatically indicating spin freezing. From the plot of the line width vs. magnetization, it is found that the freezing temperature is higher (260?mK) in the coupled ring with respect to the single Cr{sub 7}Ni ring (140?mK)

  8. Low-cost, highly efficient, and tunable ultrafast laser technology based on directly diode-pumped Cr:Colquiriites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirbas, Umit

    2010-01-01

    This doctoral project aims to develop robust, ultra low-cost ($5,000-20,000), highly-efficient, and tunable femtosecond laser technology based on diode-pumped Cr:Colquiriite gain media (Cr:LiCAF, Cr3+:LiSAF and Cr:LiSGaF). ...

  9. Characterization of the natural barriers of intergranular tunnel junctions: Cr2O3 surface layers on CrO2 nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diebold, Ulrike

    thin native oxide layer with a thickness of 1­3 nm on the surface of CrO2 powders has been observed direct observation by TEM of a 1­3 nm thick native oxide layer on the surface of the CrO2 single crystal

  10. Cr(OH)?(s) Oxidation Induced by Surface Catalyzed Mn(II) Oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Namgung, Seonyi; Kwon, M.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Lee, Gie Hyeon

    2014-09-16

    This study examined the feasibility of Cr(OH)?(s) oxidation mediated by surface catalyzed Mn(II) oxidation under common groundwater pH conditions as a potential pathway of natural Cr(VI) contaminations. Dissolved Mn(II) (50 ?M) was reacted with or without synthesized Cr(OH)?(s) (1.0 g/L) at pH 7 – 9 under oxic or anoxic conditions. In the absence of Cr(OH)?(s), homogeneous Mn(II) oxidation by dissolved O? was not observed at pH ? 8.0 for 50 d. At pH 9.0, by contrast, dissolved Mn(II) was completely removed within 8 d and precipitated as hausmannite. When Cr(OH)?(s) was present, this solid was oxidized and released substantial amounts of Cr(VI) as dissolved Mn(II) was added into the suspension at pH ? 8.0 under oxic conditions. Our results suggest that Cr(OH)?(s) was readily oxidized by a newly formed Mn oxide as a result of Mn(II) oxidation catalyzed on Cr(OH)?(s) surface. XANES analysis of the residual solids after the reaction between 1.0 g/L Cr(OH)?(s) and 204 ?M Mn(II) at pH 9.0 for 22 d revealed that the product of surface catalyzed Mn(II) oxidation resembled birnessite. The rate and extent of Cr(OH)?(s) oxidation was likely controlled by those of surface catalyzed Mn(II) oxidation as the production of Cr(VI) increased with increasing pH and initial Mn(II) concentrations. This study evokes the potential environmental hazard of sparingly soluble Cr(OH)?(s) that can be a source of Cr(VI) in the presence of dissolved Mn(II).

  11. The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector to 1–9 MeV protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinenian, N. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Rosenberg, M. J. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Manuel, M. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); McDuffee, S. C. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Casey, D. T. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Zylstra, A. B. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Rinderknecht, H. G. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Gatu Johnson, M. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Se?guin, F. H. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Frenje, J. A. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Li, C. K. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Petrasso, R. D. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector (TasTrak®) to protons in the energy range of 0.92–9.28 MeV has been studied. Previous studies of the CR-39 response to protons have been extended by examining the piece-to-piece variability in addition to the effects of etch time and etchant temperature; it is shown that the shape of the CR-39 response curve to protons can vary from piece-to-piece. Effects due to the age of CR-39 have also been studied using 5.5 MeV alpha particles over a 5-year period. Track diameters were found to degrade with the age of the CR-39 itself rather than the age of the tracks, consistent with previous studies utilizing different CR-39 over shorter time periods.

  12. Ferromagnetism at room temperature in Cr-doped anodic titanium dioxide nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, Yulong E-mail: hwzhang@uestc.edu.cn; Zhang, Huaiwu E-mail: hwzhang@uestc.edu.cn; Li, Jie; Yu, Guoliang; Zhong, Zhiyong; Bai, Feiming; Jia, Lijun; Zhang, Shihong; Zhong, Peng

    2014-05-07

    This study reports the room-temperature ferromagnetism in Cr-doped TiO{sub 2} nanotubes (NTs) synthesized via the electrochemical method followed by a novel Cr-doping process. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed that the TiO{sub 2} NTs were highly ordered with length up to 26 ?m, outer diameter about 110 nm, and inner diameter about 100 nm. X-ray diffraction results indicated there were no magnetic contaminations of metallic Cr clusters or any other phases except anatase TiO{sub 2}. The Cr-doped TiO{sub 2} NTs were further annealed in oxygen, air and argon, and room-temperature ferromagnetism was observed in all Cr-doped samples. Moreover, saturation magnetizations and coercivities of the Cr-doped under various annealing atmosphere were further analyzed, and results indicate that oxygen content played a critical role in the room-temperature ferromagnetism.

  13. Effects of Cr doping on the magnetic properties of multiferroic YMnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Tai-Chun Wu, I-Chu; Hsu, Hsin-Kai

    2014-05-07

    We have synthesized a series of YMn{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}O{sub 3} (0???x???0.1) samples and study the effect of Cr-doping on their magnetic properties. The magnetic characterization indicates that with increasing Cr-content up to 0.1, the antiferromagnetic (AFM) transition temperature increases from 73 to 89?K. Our experiment results also indicate that the Cr-doped samples exhibit the characteristics of spin-glass state at low temperature. Moreover, the magnetic hysteresis curves of the doped samples show a weak ferromagnetic (FM) behavior. It is found that the spin-glass state of the Cr-doped samples is due to the competition between AFM superexchange and FM double-exchange interaction, induced by the Cr doping.

  14. The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector to 1–9 MeV protons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Manuel, M.; McDuffee, S. C.; Casey, D. T.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2011-10-28

    The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector (TasTrak®) to protons in the energy range of 0.92–9.28 MeV has been studied. Previous studies of the CR-39 response to protons have been extended by examining the piece-to-piece variability in addition to the effects of etch time and etchant temperature; it is shown that the shape of the CR-39 response curve to protons can vary from piece-to-piece. Effects due to the age of CR-39 have also been studied using 5.5 MeV alpha particles over a 5-year period. Track diameters were found to degrade with the age of the CR-39 itself rather than the age of the tracks, consistent with previous studies utilizing different CR-39 over shorter time periods.

  15. The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector to 1–9 MeV protons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Manuel, M.; McDuffee, S. C.; Casey, D. T.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Se?guin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; et al

    2011-10-28

    The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector (TasTrak®) to protons in the energy range of 0.92–9.28 MeV has been studied. Previous studies of the CR-39 response to protons have been extended by examining the piece-to-piece variability in addition to the effects of etch time and etchant temperature; it is shown that the shape of the CR-39 response curve to protons can vary from piece-to-piece. The effects due to the age of CR-39 have also been studied using 5.5 MeV alpha particles over a 5-year period. Track diameters were found to degrade with the age of the CR-39 itself rather thanmore »the age of the tracks, consistent with previous studies utilizing different CR-39 over shorter time periods.« less

  16. Improved oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Natesan, K.; Baxter, D.J.

    1983-07-26

    High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1 to 8 wt % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500 to 1000/sup 0/C.

  17. Oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Natesan, Ken (Naperville, IL); Baxter, David J. (Woodridge, IL)

    1984-01-01

    High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1-8 wt. % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500.degree.-1000.degree. C.

  18. SF6432-CR (02-01-13) Cost Reimbursement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The2/01/12 Page 1 of 24 Printed copies of thisCR

  19. Hot-pressed ceramic Cr2+ :ZnSe gain-switched

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirov, Sergey B.

    Hot-pressed ceramic Cr2+ :ZnSe gain-switched laser A. Gallian, V. V. Fedorov, and S. B. Mirov: The technology of hot-pressed Cr2+ :ZnSe ceramic preparation is reported. Comparative gain-switched lasing of hot­pressed ceramic and CVD grown Cr2+ :ZnSe samples with slope efficiencies up to 10 % and output energies up to 2 m

  20. Bulk and track etch properties of CR-39 SSNTD etched in NaOH/ethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    Bulk and track etch properties of CR-39 SSNTD etched in NaOH/ethanol K.F. Chan, F.M.F. Ng, D. described the use of NaOH/ethanol as an etchant for the CR-39 detector, and have determined the corre and track etch properties of CR- 39 in NaOH/ethanol were derived from direct measurements. The bulk etch

  1. Structural studies and band gap tuning of Cr doped ZnO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srinet, Gunjan Kumar, Ravindra Sajal, Vivek

    2014-04-24

    Structural and optical properties of Cr doped ZnO nanoparticles prepared by the thermal decomposition method are presented. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the substitution of Cr on Zn sites without changing the wurtzite structure of ZnO. Modified form of W-H equations was used to calculate various physical parameters and their variation with Cr doping is discussed. Significant red shift was observed in band gap, i.e., a band gap tuning is achieved by Cr doping which could eventually be useful for optoelectronic applications.

  2. Pressure dependence of the magnetic order in CrAs: A neutron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Pressure dependence of the magnetic order in CrAs: A neutron diffraction investigation Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on January...

  3. Stress Evolution Behavior in CoCrPt Alloy Thin Films with varying Pt Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Im, M.-Y.

    2009-01-01

    Stress Evolution Behavior in CoCrPt Alloy Thin Films withmagnetic recording media is to investigate growth stress,since stress inevitably generated during thin film

  4. CORROSION OF Fe-10Al-Cr ALLOYS BY COAL CHAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, B.A.

    2011-01-01

    off-gas from a typical gasifier contains large percentagesIOAl-Cr alloys at coal-gasifier This FeS and CaS0 operating

  5. Effect of driver impedance on dense plasma focus Z-pinch neutron yield

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sears, Jason E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Link, Anthony E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Schmidt, Andrea E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Welch, Dale

    2014-12-15

    The Z-pinch phase of a dense plasma focus (DPF) heats the plasma by rapid compression and accelerates ions across its intense electric fields, producing neutrons through both thermonuclear and beam-target fusion. Driver characteristics have empirically been shown to affect performance, as measured by neutron yield per unit of stored energy. We are exploring the effect of driver characteristics on DPF performance using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of a kJ scale DPF. In this work, our PIC simulations are fluid for the run-down phase and transition to fully kinetic for the pinch phase, capturing kinetic instabilities, anomalous resistivity, and beam formation during the pinch. The anode-cathode boundary is driven by a circuit model of the capacitive driver, including system inductance, the load of the railgap switches, the guard resistors, and the coaxial transmission line parameters. It is known that the driver impedance plays an important role in the neutron yield: first, it sets the peak current achieved at pinch time; and second, it affects how much current continues to flow through the pinch when the pinch inductance and resistance suddenly increase. Here we show from fully kinetic simulations how total neutron yield depends on the impedance of the driver and the distributed parameters of the transmission circuit. Direct comparisons between the experiment and simulations enhance our understanding of these plasmas and provide predictive design capability for neutron source applications.

  6. Grid Parity for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; Denholm, P.; Clark, N.

    2012-08-01

    In this report, we analyze PV break-even costs for U.S. residential customers. We evaluate some key drivers of grid parity both regionally and over time. We also examine the impact of moving from flat to time-of-use (TOU) rates, and we evaluate individual components of the break-even cost, including effect of rate structure and various incentives. Finally, we examine how PV markets might evolve on a regional basis considering the sensitivity of the break-even cost to four major drivers: technical performance, financing parameters, electricity prices and rates, and policies. We find that electricity price rather than technical parameters are in general the key drivers of the break-even cost of PV. Additionally, this analysis provides insight about the potential viability of PV markets.

  7. Magnetic Interaction Reversal In Watermelon Nanostructured Cr-doped Fe Nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaur, Maninder; Dai, Qilin; Bowden, Mark E.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Wu, Yaqiao; Tang, Jinke; Qiang, You

    2013-11-11

    Cr-doped core-shell Fe/Fe-oxide nanoclusters (NCs) were synthesized at varied atomic percentages of Cr from 0 at. % to 8 at. %. The low concentrations of Cr (<10 at. %) were selected in order to inhibit the complete conversion of the Fe-oxide shell to Cr2O3 and the Fe core to FeCr alloy. The magnetic interaction in Fe/Fe-oxide NCs (rv25 nm) can be controlled by antiferromagnetic Cr-dopant. We report the origin of r-FeCr phase at very low Cr concentration (2 at. %) unlike in previous studies, and the interaction reversal from dipolar to exchange interaction in watermelon-like Cr-doped core-shell NCs. The giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect,1,2 where an antiferromagnetic (AFM) exchange coupling exists between two ferromagnetic (FM) layers separated by a certain type of magnetic or non-magnetic spacer,3 has significant potential for application in the magnetic recording industry. Soon after the discovery of the GMR, the magnetic properties of multilayer systems (FeCr) became a subject of intensive study. The application of bulk iron-chromium (Fe-Cr) alloys has been of great interest, as these alloys exhibit favorable prop- erties including corrosion resistance, high strength, hardness, low oxidation rate, and strength retention at elevated temper- ature. However, the structural and magnetic properties of Cr-doped Fe nanoclusters (NCs) have not been investigated in-depth. Of all NCs, Fe-based clusters have unique magnetic properties as well as favorable catalytic characteristics in reactivity, selectivity, and durability.4 The incorporation of dopant of varied type and concentration in Fe can modify its chemical ordering, thereby optimizing its electrical, optical, and magnetic properties and opening up many new applications. The substitution of an Fe atom (1.24 A? ) by a Cr atom (1.25 A? ) can easily modify the magnetic properties, since (i) the curie temperature (Tc ) of Fe is 1043 K, while Cr is an itinerant AFM with a bulk Neel temperature TN =311 K, and (ii) Fe and Cr share the same crystal structure (bcc) with only 0.5% difference between their lattice constants.

  8. Transmission electron microscopy of oxide development on 9Cr ODS steel in supercritical water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    cladding include austenitic stainless steels, solid solution and precipitation-hardened alloys, ferritic­martensitic is on the ferritic­martensitic 9Cr ODS steel, which was originally developed by JAEA for use in sodium-cooled fastTransmission electron microscopy of oxide development on 9Cr ODS steel in supercritical water A

  9. Towards the use of Cr-rules and Semantic Contents in ASP for planning in GIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Christian

    Towards the use of Cr-rules and Semantic Contents in ASP for planning in GIS Claudia Zepeda Cort, using cr-rules. Keywords: Answer sets, GIS, Planning. 1 Introduction Government is responsible as part of a Geographical In- formation System (GIS) in order to give decision support. Besides, our work

  10. Precipitation in a Cu–Cr–Zr–Mg alloy during aging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, J.Y. Shen, B.; Yu, F.X.

    2013-07-15

    The precipitation processes in a Cu-0.69Cr-0.10Zr-0.02Mg alloy aged at 450 °C and 550 °C have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The precipitation sequence in this alloy aged at 450 °C is: supersaturated solid solution ? Guinier–Preston zone (fcc Cr-rich phase) ? ordered fcc Cr-rich phase ? ordered bcc Cr-rich phase. The precipitation sequence in this alloy aged at 550 °C is: supersaturated solid solution ? ordered fcc Cr-rich phase ? ordered bcc Cr-rich phase. In the evolution of decomposition, the orientation relationship between the precipitates and the Cu matrix changes from cube-on-cube to Nishiyama–Wassermann orientation. The ordering of Cr-rich precipitates facilitates the formation of the bcc precipitates and promotes the development of Nishiyama–Wassermann orientation. - Highlights: • Two different precipitation sequences in the Cu–Cr–Zr–Mg alloy are proposed. • The changes in orientation relationship of the precipitates are presented. • The roles of ordering and coherent interface of the precipitates are discussed.

  11. Metastable bcc phase formation in the Nb-Cr-Ti system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoma, D.J.; Perepezko, J.H.

    1994-08-01

    Metastable disordered bcc phases have been formed from the melt in the Nb-Cr-Ti system where primary Laves phases would develop under equilibrium solidification conditions. Three vertical temperature-composition sections in the ternary system incorporating NbCr, were evaluated: the Nb-Cr binary, the TiCr{sub 2}-NbCr{sub 2} isoplethal section, and the NbCr{sub 2}-Ti plethal section. In the rapid solidification of NbCr{sub 2}, metastable bcc phase formation was not observed, but deviations from NbCr{sub 2} stoichiometry or alloying with Ti was found to promote bcc phase formation by decreasing the required liquid undercooling to reach the metastable bcc liquidus and solidus. The metastable phases were characterized through x-ray diffraction (XRD), and systematic deviations from Vegard`s Rule have been defined in the three plethal sections. The metastable bcc phases decompose at temperatures >800{degrees}C to uniformly refined microstructures. As a result, novel microstructural tailoring schemes are possible through the metastable precursor microstructures.

  12. Characterization of Fe–Cr alloy metallic interconnects coated with LSMO using the aerosol deposition process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Jian-Jia [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Fu, Yen-Pei, E-mail: ypfu@mail.ndhu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Dong Hwa University, Shoufeng, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Wang, Jian-Yih [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Dong Hwa University, Shoufeng, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Yung-Neng [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Longtan, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lee, Shyong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Jin-Cherng [Department of Physics, Fu Jen Catholic University, Xinzhuang, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Lanthanum strontium manganite (LSMO) as the protective layer for metallic interconnects was successfully prepared by aerosol deposition method (AD). • The microstructure, electrical resistance and composition for LSMO-coated Fe–Cr alloys undergoing high temperature, long-hour oxidation were investigated. • The denser protective layer prepared by AD might effectively prohibit the growth of oxidized scale after long time running at 800 °C in air. - Abstract: A Fe–Cr alloy, used for metallic interconnects, was coated with a protective layer of lanthanum strontium manganite (LSMO) using the aerosol deposition method (AD). The effects of the LSMO protective layer, which was coated on the Fe–Cr interconnects using AD, on the area specific resistance (ASR) during high temperature oxidation and the Cr evaporation behaviors were systematically investigated in this paper. The microstructures, morphologies, and compositions of the oxidized scales that appeared on the LSMO-coated Fe–Cr alloy after annealing at 800 °C for 750 h in air were examined using SEM equipped with EDS. The EPMA mapping of the LSMO-coated Fe–Cr interconnects undergoing long term, high-temperature oxidation was used to explain the formation layers of the oxidized scale, which consists of (Mn,Cr){sub 3}O{sub 4} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers. Moreover, the experimental results revealed that the AD process is a potential method for preparing denser protective layers with highly desirable electrical properties for metallic interconnects.

  13. Compressive deformation and failure of CrAlN/Si3N4 nanocomposite coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, S.; Raghavan, R.; Zeng, X. T.; Michler, J.; Clegg, W. J.

    2014-02-28

    The deformation and failure mechanisms of CrAlN/Si3N4 coatings containing grains a few nanometres in size have been compared with those of conventional CrN-based coatings. It is shown that the addition of amorphous Si3N4 phase increased the yield...

  14. Precipitation in the Equiatomic High-Entropy Alloy CrMnFeCoNi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickering, E. J.; Muñoz-Moreno, R.; Stone, H. J.; Jones, N. G.

    2015-11-02

    CrMnFeCoNi is widely considered to be an exemplar high-entropy alloy, which is stable as a single solid-solution phase at all temperatures below its melting point. Here, for the first time, the formation of two distinct types of Cr-rich precipitate...

  15. A > 89% Efficient LED Driver with 0.5V Supply Voltage for Applications Requiring Low Average Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perrott, Michael

    and that it lowers power consumption of the primarily digital architecture of the sensor [3]. However, red LEDs monitoring system [3] Since the LED driver is the dominant source of power consumption in this system [4A > 89% Efficient LED Driver with 0.5V Supply Voltage for Applications Requiring Low Average

  16. Install, both Arduino and AmaSeis software programs: Installing Arduino and drivers: Setting up AmaSeis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Install, both Arduino and AmaSeis software programs: Installing Arduino and drivers: Setting up Ama the Arduino drivers. Take note of the assigned com port number, and set up AmaSeis to that number. 3. Some computers will require the following. Keep in mind, Arduino, does not need to run or be involved. You just

  17. Implementation of scattering pinhole diagnostic for detection of fusion products on CR-39 at high particle fluence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orozco, David, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    Many Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments use solid-state nuclear track detector CR-39 as a means to detect different types of nuclear products. Until recently, it was difficult to use CR-39 in experiments with ...

  18. Issues Related to Wisconsin "Failure to Pay Forfeitures" Driver's License Suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    their employment options and placing them at risk in the criminal justice system when found "driving while suspended" to and from work. Lack of a driver's license is a particularly serious barrier to employment further place themselves at high risk within the criminal justice system ­ for illegal driving, increased

  19. Offshore Wind Turbine Design: Addressing Uncertainty Drivers Sten Frandsen Niels Jacob Tarp-Johansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the next generation of offshore wind farms are designed. The aim of this paper is to discuss existingOffshore Wind Turbine Design: Addressing Uncertainty Drivers Sten Frandsen Niels Jacob Tarp@civil.auc.dk leje@elsam-eng.com Abstract: Current offshore wind turbine design methods have matured to a 1st

  20. 2002-21-0041 Performance Driver Information Systems, Enhancing the Fun-to-Drive Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with the vehicle chassis in the form of autocross racing. Whatever the form, people like to drive their cars Copyright © 2002 Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc. ABSTRACT Most driver information systems offered hopefully do not have to fight construction delays and congested traffic. People just don't use their cars

  1. TEM Driver's Test 2014 July 23 Berkeley Lab Materials Sciences Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : _____________________________ 1. Safety: Understand emergency shut down procedure Know emergency contact numbers Know where Liquid image #12; TEM Driver's Test 2014 July 23 11. Shut down Stop live camera image (if shutting down instrument) 12. Record session in log-book Record filament time, adviser, and any

  2. Multimodal Presentation of Local Danger Warnings for Drivers: A Situation-Dependent Assessment of Usability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theune, Mariët

    Multimodal Presentation of Local Danger Warnings for Drivers: A Situation-Dependent Assessment danger warning function. To achieve high-quality assistance, the communication mode needs to be adaptive. Moreover, regardless of communication mode, the local danger warning function was considered as the most

  3. Evolution on a Restless Planet: Were Environmental Variability and Environmental Change Major Drivers of Human Evolution?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richerson, Peter J.

    223 7 Evolution on a Restless Planet: Were Environmental Variability and Environmental Change Major Drivers of Human Evolution? Peter J. Richerson, Robert L. Bettinger, and Robert Boyd 7.1 Introduction Two kinds of factors set the tempo and direction of organic and cultural evolution, those external to biotic

  4. Evolution styles: using architectural knowledge as an evolution driver Carlos E. Cuesta1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Dewayne E.

    Evolution styles: using architectural knowledge as an evolution driver Carlos E. Cuesta1 , Elena+D, 02006, Albacete, Spain ABSTRACT Software evolution is an increasingly challenging and compelling concern software evolution is carried out, software architecture emerges as one of the cornerstones that should

  5. Evolution in plant populations as a driver of ecological changes in arthropod communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vellend, Mark

    Evolution in plant populations as a driver of ecological changes in arthropod communities Marc T. J of Ecology and Evolution, Centre for the Analysis of Genome Evolution and Function, University of Toronto, 25-ranging impacts on species interactions, but the effects that ongoing evolution has on the temporal ecological

  6. Driver Selection Integration with Utility System Design Li Sun, Robin Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahrendt, Wolfgang

    Driver options · Electric motor · Helper motor and generator · Steam turbine · Gas turbine · Combustion and energy efficiency · Flexibility and reliability · Others VHP HP MP LP Steam turbines HRSG Gas turbine, M13 9PL, UK Utility system design analysis Main components: - Fuel - Steam mains - Steam generation

  7. Revisiting the parameterization of potential evaporation as a driver of long-term water balance trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Aiguo

    /or Runoff. Most regions in the world lie in the continuum between the water and energy limits, reachingRevisiting the parameterization of potential evaporation as a driver of long-term water balance, evaporative flux and runoff simulated by the water balance model underlying the Palmer Drought Severity Index

  8. PachyRand: SQL Randomization for the PostgreSQL JDBC Driver Extended Abstract

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PachyRand: SQL Randomization for the PostgreSQL JDBC Driver Extended Abstract Michael E. Locasto content stored in SQL databases. Such systems take input directly from the client via HTML forms. Without proper input validation, these systems are vulnerable to SQL injection at- tacks. The predominant defense

  9. A Flexible Active-Matrix Electronic Paper With Integrated Display Driver Using The -Czochralski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Flexible Active-Matrix Electronic Paper With Integrated Display Driver Using The µ on the display itself. The display is flexible, including the driving electronics. Technology used offers great possibilities for future applications e.g. flexible electronics, three dimensional IC, System-on-Panel, ultra

  10. THE PRIMARY DRIVER of today's com-mercial electronics market is time. Portable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandborn, Peter

    shorter market windows. The very existence of these products depends on finding quick design solutions to market is combining manufacturing information with application- specific design information as earlyTHE PRIMARY DRIVER of today's com- mercial electronics market is time. Portable computers, cellular

  11. Extending parental mentoring using an event-triggered video intervention in rural teen drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, John D.

    . During the initial phase of learning, adult or parental supervision often provides such guidance. However, once teens obtain their license, adult supervision is no longer mandated, and teens are left to teach their teens even after they begin driving independently. Twenty-six 16- to 17-year-old drivers

  12. HIGH INTENSITY LINAC DRIVER FOR THE SPIRAL-2 PROJECT : DESIGN OF SUPERCONDUCTING 88 MHZ QUARTER WAVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . For the high-energy section of the linac, a superconducting 88 MHz Quarter Wave Resonator (beta 0.12) has been WAVE RESONATORS (BETA 0.12), POWER COUPLERS AND CRYOMODULES T. Junquera, G. Olry, H. Saugnac, J Abstract A superconducting linac driver, delivering deuterons with an energy up to 40 MeV (5 mA) and heavy

  13. Driver Models For Timing And Noise Analysis Bogdan Tutuianu and Ross Baldick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldick, Ross

    Driver Models For Timing And Noise Analysis Bogdan Tutuianu and Ross Baldick Abstract and ways to model and analyze it is given in [23]. Other tools and methodologies for functional noise analysis are proposed in [19], [10] and [1]. Special circuit modeling techniques to asses global noise

  14. The Peril of Fragmentation: Security Hazards in Android Device Driver Customizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Peril of Fragmentation: Security Hazards in Android Device Driver Customizations Xiaoyong Zhou of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Email: naveed2@illinois.edu Abstract--Android phone manufacturers are under the per- petual pressure to move quickly on their new models, continu- ously customizing Android to fit

  15. FEPMA: Fine-Grained Event-Driven Power Meter for Android Smartphones Based on Device Driver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    FEPMA: Fine-Grained Event-Driven Power Meter for Android Smartphones Based on Device Driver Layer for providing highly accurate and nearly instantaneous estimates of power dis- sipation in an Android smartphone the Android operating system to provide information about power/performance state changes of various

  16. A fuel economy optimization system with applications in vehicles with human drivers and autonomous vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Changxu (Sean)

    A fuel economy optimization system with applications in vehicles with human drivers and autonomous University of New York, Buffalo, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Keywords: Vehicle fuel economy Eco-driving Human developed and validated a new fuel-economy optimization system (FEOS), which receives input from vehicle

  17. Tree mortality in the eastern and central United States: patterns and drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorcroft, Paul R.

    Tree mortality in the eastern and central United States: patterns and drivers M I C H A E L C . D I rate due to the small sample size of deaths within individual studies. Still, life cycle analyses have, such as the loss of >1.2 mil- lion ha of pinyon pine forest in the southwestern United States following the 2002

  18. Your Smartphone Can Watch the Road and You: Mobile Assistant for Inattentive Drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelakuditi, Srihari

    -reported motor vehicle crashes occurred in the United States in 2007 [1]. Around 41000 people lost their lives of the leading causes of death. While lane departure warning, blind spot warning, and driver attention monitoring which results in increased latency and decreased frame rate. Fig. 1 shows the frame rate achieved

  19. An unsteady wave driver for narrowbanded waves: modeling nearshore circulation driven by wave groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    An unsteady wave driver for narrowbanded waves: modeling nearshore circulation driven by wave Abstract In this paper, we derive an unsteady refraction­diffraction model for narrowbanded water waves for use in computing coupled wave­current motion in the nearshore. The end result is a variable

  20. Stochastic Behaviour of the Electricity Bid Stack: from Fundamental Drivers to Power Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howison, Sam

    Stochastic Behaviour of the Electricity Bid Stack: from Fundamental Drivers to Power Prices Michael) 23 October 2008 Abstract We develop a fundamental model for spot electricity prices, based on stochastic processes for underlying factors (fuel prices, power demand and generation capacity availability

  1. ORIGINAL PAPER Species diversity and drivers of spread of alien fungi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORIGINAL PAPER Species diversity and drivers of spread of alien fungi (sensu lato) in Europe February 2009 Ó Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009 Abstract A first comprehensive inventory of alien at the two spatial scales. Some taxonomic/phylogenetic orders were shown to be over-represented in alien

  2. The ITRS Design Technology and System Drivers Roadmap: Process and Status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahng, Andrew B.

    The ITRS Design Technology and System Drivers Roadmap: Process and Status Andrew B. Kahng CSE (TWG) is one of 16 working groups in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconduc- tors (ITRS) effort. It is responsible for the ITRS' Design Chap- ter, which roadmaps design technology requirements

  3. IMPACT OF BEAM TRANSPORT METHOD ON CHAMBER AND DRIVER DESIGN FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    IMPACT OF BEAM TRANSPORT METHOD ON CHAMBER AND DRIVER DESIGN FOR HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY D National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 W. M. SHARP Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 ARIES-IFE TEAM Received June 1, 2003 Accepted for Publication February 3, 2004

  4. What kind of charging infrastructure do Chevrolet Volts Drivers in The EV Project use?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Smart

    2013-09-01

    This report summarizes key conclusions from analysis of data collected from Chevrolet Volts participating in The EV Project. Topics include how much Volt drivers charge at level 1 vs. level 2 rates and how much they charge at home vs. away from home.

  5. Refueling Behavior of Flexible Fuel Vehicle Drivers in the Federal Fleet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daley, R.; Nangle, J.; Boeckman, G.; Miller, M.

    2014-05-01

    Federal fleets are a frequent subject of legislative and executive efforts to lead a national transition to alternative fuels and advanced vehicle technologies. Section 701 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires that all dual-fueled alternative fuel vehicles in the federal fleet be operated on alternative fuel 100% of the time when they have access to it. However, in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012, drivers of federal flex fuel vehicles (FFV) leased through the General Services Administration refueled with E85 24% of the time when it was available--falling well short of the mandate. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory completed a 2-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development project to identify the factors that influence the refueling behavior of federal FFV drivers. The project began with two primary hypotheses. First, information scarcity increases the tendency to miss opportunities to purchase E85. Second, even with perfect information, there are limits to how far drivers will go out of their way to purchase E85. This paper discusses the results of the project, which included a June 2012 survey of federal fleet drivers and an empirical analysis of actual refueling behavior from FY 2009 to 2012. This research will aid in the design and implementation of intervention programs aimed at increasing alternative fuel use and reducing petroleum consumption.

  6. Megafauna biomass tradeoff as a driver of Quaternary and future extinctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnosky, Anthony D.

    Megafauna biomass tradeoff as a driver of Quaternary and future extinctions Anthony D. Barnosky,000 and 3,000 years ago. Estimates of megafauna biomass (including hu- mans as a megafauna species) for before, during, and after the extinction episode suggest that growth of human biomass largely matched

  7. On the Relation Between Oxide Ridge Evolution and Alloy Surface Grain Boundary Disorientation in Fe22 wt % Cr Alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, David E.

    design requires the use of interconnectors in the SOFC stack that provide mechanical support to the cell and on relatively expensive high Cr superalloys have been used as interconnector materials.2 However, lowering for interconnector applications, alumina or silica formers are not suitable. Fe­Cr-based alloys less than 24 wt % Cr

  8. Progress in the material development of LiCaAlF sub 6 :Cr sup 3+ laser crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michelle D. Shinn.; Chase, L.L.; Caird, J.A.; Payne, S.A.; Atherton, L.J.; Kway, W.L.

    1990-03-01

    High Cr{sup 3+} doping levels, up to 8 mole percent, and low losses have been obtained with the tunable solid-state laser material LiCaAlF{sub 6}:Cr{sup 3+} (Cr:LiCAF). Measurements and calculations show that high pumping and extraction efficiencies are possible with the improved material. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Lipid bloated subretinal microglial cells are at the origin of Drusen appearance in CX3CR1 deficient mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Lipid bloated subretinal microglial cells are at the origin of Drusen appearance in CX3CR1 of sizeable dome-shaped material below the RPE. We show that aged CX3CR1-/- mice present with drusen,version1-1Sep2008 #12;shaped sub-RPE debris of an equivalent size (7). We recently demonstrated that CX3CR

  10. Cr-Ga-N materials for negative electrodes in Li rechargeable batteries : structure, synthesis and electrochemical performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Miso

    2007-01-01

    Electrochemical performances of two ternary compounds (Cr2GaN and Cr3GaN) in the Cr-Ga-N system as possible future anode materials for lithium rechargeable batteries were studied. Motivation for this study was dealt in ...

  11. Temperature activated self-lubrication in CrN/Mo2N nanolayer coatings Robin Abraham Koshy 1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marks, Laurence D.

    . Introduction Hard coatings for cutting tools have been in use for many decades , [1­6], and have evolved from coatings Tool coatings Self lubrication Multi-layers Magnetron Sputtering Reactive sputtering CrN Mo2N CrTemperature activated self-lubrication in CrN/Mo2N nanolayer coatings Robin Abraham Koshy 1

  12. Effects of competing magnetic interactions on the electronic transport properties of CuCrSe{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, Girish C.; Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 ; Karppinen, Maarit; Rastogi, Ashok K.

    2013-02-15

    We have synthesized single-phase samples of the CuCrSe{sub 2} phase that exhibits hexagonal-rhombohedral layered crystal structure with space group R3m. Here we present a detailed study of electronic transport and magnetic properties of CuCrSe{sub 2}. We moreover investigate the heat capacity of CuCrSe{sub 2} in comparison to that of CuCrS{sub 2}. The electrical resistivity of CuCrSe{sub 2} shows metallic-like behavior down to 2 K, while the thermoelectric power is large around 100 {mu}V K{sup -1} at 300 K. A weak anomaly in resistivity and a rounded maximum in magnetic susceptibility are observed around 55 K. No sharp transition at 55 K is observed in the heat capacity of CuCrSe{sub 2}, rather a visible maximum is seen. At low temperatures from 2 to 14 K, the magnetic heat capacity follows T{sup 2}-dependence. We tentatively believe this behavior of CuCrSe{sub 2} to be due to competing magnetic interactions between intralayer Cr atoms. The ferromagnetic Cr-Se-Cr indirect exchange among intralayer Cr atoms is enhanced in the selenide compound (that is more metallic than the sulfide compound), and competes with the antiferromagnetic Cr-Cr direct interactions. The interlayer antiferromagnetic exchange through Cu atoms leads to magnetic ordering at low temperature at T{sub N}=55 K. - Graphical abstract: Comparison of magnetic properties of CuCrSe{sub 2} and CuCrS{sub 2} indicates a sharp cusp-like anomaly in magnetic susceptibility at the antiferromagnetic transition of CuCrS{sub 2} while the maximum of CuCrSe{sub 2} is well rounded. Magnetization is reversible after field-cooling (FC) and zero-field-cooling (ZFC) for both compounds. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Layered CuCrSe{sub 2} can be synthesized in both fully and partially cation-ordered forms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Contrary to previously believed insulating nature the cation-ordered phase is metallic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic property of CuCrSe{sub 2} is somewhat different from that of CuCrS{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetization and heat capacity data suggest complex short-range ordering for CuCrSe{sub 2}.

  13. Probe Mössbauer spectroscopy of mechanical alloying in binary Cr?{sup 57}Fe(1 at%) system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elsukov, Evgeny P. Kolodkin, Denis A. Ul'yanov, Alexander L. Porsev, Vitaly E.

    2014-10-27

    Solid state reactions during mechanical alloying (MA) in a binary mixture of powdered Cr and {sup 57}Fe in atomic ratio of 99:1 have been studied using {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Auger spectrometry. The proposed model of MA includes formation of Cr(Fe){sub x}O{sub y} oxides at the contact places of Cr and Fe particles, formation of nanostructure with simultaneous dissolution of the oxides, penetration of Fe atoms along grain boundaries in close-to-boundary distorted zones of interfaces in a substitutional position, formation of the substitutional solid solution of Fe in Cr in the body of grains. It was shown that the increase in the BCC lattice parameter on increasing the milling time is due to the dissolution of oxides and formation of interstitial solid solution of O in Cr. There were established substantial differences in consumption of BCC Fe in a Mg ? Al ? Si ? Cr sequence due to the major role of chemical interaction of Mg(Al,Si,Cr) with Fe.

  14. Ferromagnetic superexchange in insulating Cr2MoO6 by controlling orbital hybridization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, M.; Do, D.; Dela Cruz, Clarina R.; Dun, Zhiling; Cheng, J. -G.; Goto, H.; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Zou, T.; Zhou, Haidon D.; Mahanti, Subhendra D.; et al

    2015-09-11

    We report the magnetic and electronic structures of the newly synthesized inverse-trirutile compound Cr2MoO6. Despite the same crystal symmetry and similar bond-lengths and bond-angles to Cr2TeO6, Cr2MoO6 possesses a magnetic structure of the Cr2MoO6 type, different from that seen in Cr2TeO6. Ab-initio electronic structure calculations show that the sign and strength of the Cr-O-Cr exchange coupling is strongly influenced by the hybridization between Mo 4d and O 2p orbitals. This result further substantiates our recently proposed mechanism for tuning the exchange interaction between two magnetic atoms by modifying the electronic states of the non-magnetic atoms in the exchange path throughmore »orbital hybridization. This approach is fundamentally different from the conventional methods of controlling the exchange interaction by either carrier injection or through structural distortions.« less

  15. Magnetic properties and hyperfine interactions in Cr{sub 8}, Cr{sub 7}Cd, and Cr{sub 7}Ni molecular rings from {sup 19}F-NMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bordonali, L.; Borsa, F.; Consorzio INSTM, Via Giusti 9, I-50121 Firenze; Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 ; Garlatti, E.; Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Parma, Viale G. P. Usberti 7 Casadei, C. M.; Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 ; Furukawa, Y.; Lascialfari, A.; Consorzio INSTM, Via Giusti 9, I-50121 Firenze; Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano ; Carretta, S.; Timco, G.; Winpenny, R. E. P.

    2014-04-14

    A detailed experimental investigation of the {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance is made on single crystals of the homometallic Cr{sub 8} antiferromagnetic molecular ring and heterometallic Cr{sub 7}Cd and Cr{sub 7}Ni rings in the low temperature ground state. Since the F{sup ?} ion is located midway between neighboring magnetic metal ions in the ring, the {sup 19}F-NMR spectra yield information about the local electronic spin density and {sup 19}F hyperfine interactions. In Cr{sub 8}, where the ground state is a singlet with total spin S{sub T} = 0, the {sup 19}F-NMR spectra at 1.7 K and low external magnetic field display a single narrow line, while when the magnetic field is increased towards the first level crossing field, satellite lines appear in the {sup 19}F-NMR spectrum, indicating a progressive increase in the Boltzmann population of the first excited state S{sub T} = 1. In the heterometallic rings, Cr{sub 7}Cd and Cr{sub 7}Ni, whose ground state is magnetic with S{sub T} = 3/2 and S{sub T} = 1/2, respectively, the {sup 19}F-NMR spectrum has a complicated structure which depends on the strength and orientation of the magnetic field, due to both isotropic and anisotropic transferred hyperfine interactions and classical dipolar interactions. From the {sup 19}F-NMR spectra in single crystals we estimated the transferred hyperfine constants for both the F{sup ?}-Ni{sup 2+} and the F{sup ?}-Cd{sup 2+} bonds. The values of the hyperfine constants compare well to the ones known for F{sup ?}-Ni{sup 2+} in KNiF{sub 3} and NiF{sub 2} and for F{sup ?}-Cr{sup 3+} in K{sub 2}NaCrF{sub 6}. The results are discussed in terms of hybridization of the 2s, 2p orbitals of the F{sup ?} ion and the d orbitals of the magnetic ion. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for the electron-spin decoherence.

  16. Thermodynamic Modeling and Experimental Study of the Fe-Cr-Zr System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Ying; Tan, Lizhen; Bei, Hongbin; Busby, Jeremy T

    2013-01-01

    Wide applications of zircaloys, stainless steels and their interactions in nuclear reactors require the knowledge on phase stability and thermodynamic property of the Fe-Cr-Zr system. This knowledge is also important to develop new Zr-contained Fe-Cr ferritic steels. This work aims at developing thermodynamic models for describing phase stability and thermodynamic property of the Fe-Cr-Zr system using the Calphad approach coupled with experimental study. Thermodynamic descriptions of the Fe-Cr and Cr-Zr systems were either directly adopted or slightly modified from literature. The Fe-Zr system has been remodeled to accommodate recent ab-initio calculation of formation enthalpies of various Fe-Zr compounds. Reliable ternary experimental data and thermodynamic models were mainly available in the Zr-rich region. Therefore, selected ternary alloys located in the vicinity of the eutectic valley of (Fe,Cr,Zr) and (Fe,Cr)2Zr laves phase in the Fe-rich region have been experimentally investigated in this study. Microstructure has been examined by using scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive Xray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. These experimental results, along with the literature data were then used to develop thermodynamic models for phases in the Fe-Cr-Zr system. Calculated phase equilibria and thermodynamic properties of the ternary system yield satisfactory agreements with available experimental data, which gives the confidence to use these models as building blocks for developing a Zr, Fe and Cr contained multicomponent thermodynamic database for broader applications in nuclear reactors.

  17. Nanoscale Phase Separation In Epitaxial Cr-Mo and Cr-V Alloy Thin Films Studied Using Atom Probe Tomography: Comparison Of Experiments And Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devaraj, Arun; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Ramanan, Sathvik; Walvekar, Sarita K.; Bowden, Mark E.; Shutthanandan, V.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2014-11-21

    Tailored metal alloy thin film-oxide interfaces generated using molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) deposition of alloy thin films on a single crystalline oxide substrate can be used for detailed studies of irradiation damage response on the interface structure. However presence of nanoscale phase separation in the MBE grown alloy thin films can impact the metal-oxide interface structure. Due to nanoscale domain size of such phase separation it is very challenging to characterize by conventional techniques. Therefor laser assisted atom probe tomography (APT) was utilized to study the phase separation in epitaxial Cr0.61Mo0.39, Cr0.77Mo0.23, and Cr0.32V0.68 alloy thin films grown by MBE on MgO(001) single crystal substrates. Statistical analysis, namely frequency distribution analysis and Pearson coefficient analysis of experimental data was compared with similar analyses conducted on simulated APT datasets with known extent of phase separation. Thus the presence of phase separation in Cr-Mo films, even when phase separation was not clearly observed by x-ray diffraction, and the absence of phase separation in the Cr-V film were thus confirmed.

  18. Nanoscale phase separation in epitaxial Cr-Mo and Cr-V alloy thin films studied using atom probe tomography: Comparison of experiments and simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devaraj, A.; Ramanan, S.; Walvekar, S.; Bowden, M. E.; Shutthanandan, V.; Kaspar, T. C.; Kurtz, R. J.

    2014-11-21

    Tailored metal alloy thin film-oxide interfaces generated using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) deposition of alloy thin films on a single crystalline oxide substrate can be used for detailed studies of irradiation damage response on the interface structure. However, the presence of nanoscale phase separation in the MBE grown alloy thin films can impact the metal-oxide interface structure. Due to nanoscale domain size of such phase separation, it is very challenging to characterize by conventional techniques. Therefore, laser assisted atom probe tomography (APT) was utilized to study the phase separation in epitaxial Cr{sub 0.61}Mo{sub 0.39}, Cr{sub 0.77}Mo{sub 0.23}, and Cr{sub 0.32}V{sub 0.68} alloy thin films grown by MBE on MgO(001) single crystal substrates. Statistical analysis, namely frequency distribution analysis and Pearson coefficient analysis of experimental data was compared with similar analyses conducted on simulated APT datasets with known extent of phase separation. Thus, the presence of phase separation in Cr-Mo films, even when phase separation was not clearly observed by x-ray diffraction, and the absence of phase separation in the Cr-V film were confirmed.

  19. Steamside Oxidation Behavior of Experimental 9%Cr Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dogan, O.N.; Holcomb, G.R.; Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.

    2007-10-01

    Reducing emissions and increasing economic competitiveness require more efficient steam power plants that utilize fossil fuels. One of the major challenges in designing these plants is the availability of materials that can stand the supercritical and ultra-supercritical steam conditions at a competitive cost. There are several programs around the world developing new ferritic and austenitic steels for superheater and reheater tubes exposed to the advanced steam conditions. The new steels must possess properties better than current steels in terms of creep strength, steamside oxidation resistance, fireside corrosion resistance, and thermal fatigue resistance. This paper introduces a series of experimental 9%Cr steels containing Cu, Co, and Ti. Stability of the phases in the new steels is discussed and compared to the phases in the commercially available materials. The steels were tested under both the dry and moist conditions at 650ºC for their cyclical oxidation resistance. Results of oxidation tests are presented. Under the moist conditions, the experimental steels exhibited significantly less mass gain compared to the commercial P91 steel. Microstructural characterization of the scale revealed different oxide compositions.

  20. Electrochemical Testing of Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. E. Lister; R. E. Mizia; H. Tian

    2005-10-01

    The waste package site recommendation design specified a boron-containing stainless steel, Neutronit 976/978, for fabrication of the internal baskets that will be used as a corrosion-resistant neutron-absorbing material. Recent corrosion test results gave higher-than-expected corrosion rates for this material. The material callout for these components has been changed to a Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy (ASTM-B 932-04, UNS N06464) that is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory. This report discusses the results of initial corrosion testing of this material in simulated in-package environments that could contact the fuel baskets after breach of the waste package outer barrier. The corrosion test matrix was executed using the potentiodynamic and potentiostatic electrochemical test techniques. The alloy performance shows low rates of general corrosion after initial removal of a gadolinium-rich second phase that intersects the surface. The high halide-containing test solutions exhibited greater tendencies toward initiation of crevice corrosion.

  1. NOAA Technical Report NESDIS TBD Cross Track Infrared Sounder (CrIS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Report NESDIS TBD Cross Track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) Sensor Data Record (SDR) User. NESDIS 114 Satellite Rainfall Estimation Over South America: Evaluation of Two Major Events. Daniel A

  2. CORROSION OF Fe-10Al-Cr ALLOYS BY COAL CHAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, B.A.

    2011-01-01

    Potent.ials Encountered in Coal Conversion Systems", NASA TNof Illinois #6 ash and coal char. Figure 1. Cross sectionsof Fe-lOAl-Cr Alloys by Coal Char B. A. Gordon and V.

  3. Microstructural Stability of 9-12 Cr Steels at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dogan, Omer N.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2005-09-01

    The objective of this report is to explore new substitutional solute solution (Cu, Co) and precipitate (TiC) hardening mechanisms for improved strength of 9-12 Cr martensitic steels.

  4. Rolling contact fatigue in martensitic 100Cr6: Subsurface hardening and crack formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Jee-Hyun; Vegter, R. H.; Rivera-Díaz-del-Castillo, Pedro E. J.

    2014-04-13

    Rolling contact fatigue tests on 100Cr6 steel were carried out with a ball-on-rod tester. Microstructural damage was manifested by gradual hardness changes under the subsurface, and microcracks formed adjacent to inclusions; both being evidence...

  5. NASA-CR-203364 0045-7949(94)E0223-0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Pascal

    dds =and bo for _ Pergamon NASA-CR-203364 0045-7949(94)E0223-0 REDUCED BASIS TECHNIQUE Technology, University of Virginia, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681, U.S.A. (Received 28

  6. Half-metallic ferromagnetism in Cr-doped semiconducting Ge-chalcogenide: Density functional approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saini, Hardev S.; Singh, Mukhtiyar; Thakur, Jyoti; Kashyap, Manish K.

    2014-04-24

    A supercell approach has been used to calculate the electronic and magnetic properties of Cr-doped Ge chalcogenide, Ge{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}Te (x = 0.25 and 0.125). The calculations have been performed using full potential Linear Augmented Plane Wave (FPLAPW) method within generalized gradient approximation (GGA) as exchange-correlation (XC) potential. The calculated results show that the doping of Cr induces the 100% spin polarization at Fermi level (EF) and showed the robust half metallic ferromagnetism in this compound. Thus, the compound at both dopant concentrations behave as dilute magnetic semiconductor (DMS) showing metallic property in majority and semiconducting for minority spin channels which is best suited for spintronic applications. The total magnetic moments of this compound are mainly due to Cr-d states present at E{sup F} with negligible contribution from electronic states of other atoms.

  7. Flat panel display using Ti-Cr-Al-O thin film

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA); Schmid, Anthony P. (Solan Beach, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Thin films of Ti--Cr--Al--O are used as a resistor material. The films are rf sputter deposited from ceramic targets using a reactive working gas mixture of Ar and O.sub.2. Resistivity values from 10.sup.4 to 10.sup.10 Ohm-cm have been measured for Ti--Cr--Al--O film <1 .mu.m thick. The film resistivity can be discretely selected through control of the target composition and the deposition parameters. The application of Ti--Cr--Al--O as a thin film resistor has been found to be thermodynamically stable, unlike other metal-oxide films. The Ti--Cr--Al--O film can be used as a vertical or lateral resistor, for example, as a layer beneath a field emission cathode in a flat panel display; or used to control surface emissivity, for example, as a coating on an insulating material such as vertical wall supports in flat panel displays.

  8. Process for producing Ti-Cr-Al-O thin film resistors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA); Schmid, Anthony P. (Solana Beach, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Thin films of Ti-Cr-Al-O are used as a resistor material. The films are rf sputter deposited from ceramic targets using a reactive working gas mixture of Ar and O.sub.2. Resistivity values from 10.sup.4 to 10.sup.10 Ohm-cm have been measured for Ti-Cr-Al-O film <1 .mu.m thick. The film resistivity can be discretely selected through control of the target composition and the deposition parameters. The application of Ti-Cr-Al-O as a thin film resistor has been found to be thermodynamically stable, unlike other metal-oxide films. The Ti-Cr-Al-O film can be used as a vertical or lateral resistor, for example, as a layer beneath a field emission cathode in a flat panel display; or used to control surface emissivity, for example, as a coating on an insulating material such as vertical wall supports in flat panel displays.

  9. In Situ Long-Term Reductive Bioimmobilization of Cr(VI) in Groundwater...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    injection into Cr(VI)-contaminated groundwater stimulates an average increase in biomass by up to 50 times, from-5105 to 2.5107 cellsmL. The results also show a...

  10. while ll 6= ERROR do tcl tuple of ctcl corresponding to ll.tid cr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samet, Hanan

    corresponding to cdb.tid cr lca #12;rst tuple t of li cl such that t.class >= ca.name caf while lca 6= ERROR and lca.class = ca.name do lia tuple of logical images corresponding to lca.tid cr lcb #12;rst tuple next tuple of li cl in alphabetic order can lca next tuple of li cl in alphabetic order can Plan P4P

  11. Optimizing Cr(VI) and Tc(VII) remediation through nano-scale biomineral engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cutting, R. S.; Coker, V. S.; Telling, N. D.; Kimber, R. L.; Pearce, C. I.; Ellis, B.; Lawson, R; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R.A.D.; Vaughan, D.J.; Arenholz, E.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2009-09-09

    To optimize the production of biomagnetite for the bioremediation of metal oxyanion contaminated waters, the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by two biogenic magnetites and a synthetic magnetite was evaluated under batch and continuous flow conditions. Results indicate that nano-scale biogenic magnetite produced by incubating synthetic schwertmannite powder in cell suspensions of Geobacter sulfurreducens is more efficient at reducing Cr(VI) than either biogenic nano-magnetite produced from a suspension of ferrihydrite 'gel' or synthetic nano-scale Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} powder. Although X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements obtained from post-exposure magnetite samples reveal that both Cr(III) and Cr(VI) are associated with nanoparticle surfaces, X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) studies indicate that some Cr(III) has replaced octahedrally coordinated Fe in the lattice of the magnetite. Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) measurements of total aqueous Cr in the associated solution phase indicated that, although the majority of Cr(III) was incorporated within or adsorbed to the magnetite samples, a proportion ({approx}10-15 %) was released back into solution. Studies of Tc(VII) uptake by magnetites produced via the different synthesis routes also revealed significant differences between them as regards effectiveness for remediation. In addition, column studies using a {gamma}-camera to obtain real time images of a {sup 99m}Tc(VII) radiotracer were performed to visualize directly the relative performances of the magnetite sorbents against ultra-trace concentrations of metal oxyanion contaminants. Again, the magnetite produced from schwertmannite proved capable of retaining more ({approx}20%) {sup 99m}Tc(VII) than the magnetite produced from ferrihydrite, confirming that biomagnetite production for efficient environmental remediation can be fine-tuned through careful selection of the initial Fe(III) mineral substrate supplied to Fe(III)-reducing bacteria.

  12. Surface modification to improve fireside corrosion resistance of Fe-Cr ferritic steels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Park, Jong-Hee (Clarendon Hills, IL); Natesan, Krishnamurti (Naperville, IL); Rink, David L. (Mokena, IL)

    2010-03-16

    An article of manufacture and a method for providing an Fe--Cr ferritic steel article of manufacture having a surface layer modification for corrosion resistance. Fe--Cr ferritic steels can be modified to enhance their corrosion resistance to liquid coal ash and other chemical environments, which have chlorides or sulfates containing active species. The steel is modified to form an aluminide/silicide passivating layer to reduce such corrosion.

  13. Heat treatment of NiCrFe alloy to optimize resistance to intergrannular stress corrosion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steeves, Arthur F. (Schenectady, NY); Bibb, Albert E. (Clifton Park, NY)

    1984-01-01

    A process of producing a NiCrFe alloy having a high resistance to stress corrosion cracking comprising heating a NiCrFe alloy to a temperature sufficient to enable the carbon present in the alloy body in the form of carbide deposits to enter into solution, rapidly cool the alloy body, and heat the cooled body to a temperature between 1100.degree. to 1500.degree. F. for about 1 to 30 hours.

  14. Determination of mechanical properties of Ni-Cr-P amorphous alloys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kondlapudi, Swaroop Kumar R

    1991-01-01

    DETERMINATION OF MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF Ni-Cr-P AMORPHOUS ALLOYS A Thesis by SWAROOP KUMAR R. KONDLAPUDI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1991 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DETERMINATION OF MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF Ni-Cr-P AMORPHOUS ALLOYS A Thesis by SWAROOP KUMAR R. KONDLAPUDI Approved as to style and content by I-t (, :()o . e, ~&am A. Wolfenden...

  15. Accounting for the Variation of Driver Aggression in the Simulation of Conventional and Advanced Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer, J.; Wood, E.

    2013-01-01

    Hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and battery electric vehicles offer the potential to reduce both oil imports and greenhouse gases, as well as to offer a financial benefit to the driver. However, assessing these potential benefits is complicated by several factors, including the driving habits of the operator. We focus on driver aggression, i.e., the level of acceleration and velocity characteristic of travel, to (1) assess its variation within large, real-world drive datasets, (2) quantify its effect on both vehicle efficiency and economics for multiple vehicle types, (3) compare these results to those of standard drive cycles commonly used in the industry, and (4) create a representative drive cycle for future analyses where standard drive cycles are lacking.

  16. Accounting for the Variation of Driver Aggression in the Simulation of Conventional and Advanced Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer, J.; Wood, E.

    2013-03-01

    Hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and battery electric vehicles offer the potential to reduce both oil imports and greenhouse gases, as well as to offer a financial benefit to the driver. However, assessing these potential benefits is complicated by several factors, including the driving habits of the operator. We focus on driver aggression, i.e., the level of acceleration and velocity characteristic of travel, to (1) assess its variation within large, real-world drive datasets, (2) quantify its effect on both vehicle efficiency and economics for multiple vehicle types, (3) compare these results to those of standard drive cycles commonly used in the industry, and (4) create a representative drive cycle for future analyses where standard drive cycles are lacking.

  17. Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single Family Homes (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, J.; Withers, C.; Martin, E.; Moyer, N.

    2012-10-01

    This document focuses on managing the driving forces which move air and moisture across the building envelope. While other previously published Measure Guidelines focus on elimination of air pathways, the ultimate goal of this Measure Guideline is to manage drivers which cause air flow and water vapor transport across the building envelope (and also within the home), control air infiltration, keep relative humidity (RH) within acceptable limits, avoid combustion safety problems, improve occupant comfort, and reduce house energy use.

  18. Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single-Family Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, James; Withers, Charles; Martin, Eric; Moyer, Neil

    2012-10-01

    This report is a revision of an earlier report titled: Measure Guideline: Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single-Family Homes. Revisions include: Information in the text box on page 1 was revised to reflect the most accurate information regarding classifications as referenced in the 2012 International Residential Code. “Measure Guideline” was dropped from the title of the report. An addition was made to the reference list.

  19. DRIVER ACCELERATOR DESIGN FOR THE 10 KW UPGRADE OF THE JEFFERSON LAB IR FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DRIVER ACCELERATOR DESIGN FOR THE 10 KW UPGRADE OF THE JEFFERSON LAB IR FEL D. Douglas, S. V, Newport News, VA23606, USA Abstract An upgrade of the Jefferson Lab IR FEL [1] is now un- der construction. It will provide 10 kW output light power in a wavelength range of 2­10 µm. The FEL will be driven by a modest

  20. Design of a new main injector cavity for the Fermilab Proton Driver era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, V.; Chen, A.; Qian, Z.; Wildman, D.W.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    In the design report of the Fermilab Proton Driver [1], the Main Injector (MI) needs to be upgraded to a 2 MW machine. For the Main Injector radiofrequency (rf) upgrade, R&D efforts are launched to design and build a new rf system. This paper presents the new cavity design study for the rf system. The cavity is simulated with the design code Mafia [2].

  1. Processing of LaCrO{sub 3} for solid oxide fuel cell applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huebner, W.; Anderson, H.U.

    1994-09-01

    The University of Missouri-Rolla is performing a 5 year research program dedicated towards the development of LaCrO{sub 3}-based interconnect powders which densify when in contact with anode and cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). During the course of this program the authors investigated compositions within the pseudo-ternary LaCrO{sub 3}-LaMnO{sub 3}-LaCoO{sub 3} system. Their expanded studies on the processing and sintering of LaCrO{sub 3} to make dense interconnects using LaCrO{sub 3}-based oxides at temperatures less than 1,500 C in an air atmosphere and in contact with both anode and cathode oxides. The specific objectives of this research program are to: Develop a novel technique which reproducibly yields LaCrO{sub 3}-based powders with the desired particle characteristics; Fully understand the liquid phase sintering mechanism; Clearly identify the reason why LaCrO{sub 3} does not densify in the presence of electrolyte and cathode materials; Systematically solve this problem through judicious control over the liquid phase; and Incorporate materials developed in this program into planar cells and measure their performance. Results are discussed on porosity and skrinkage, and sintering and melting behaviors.

  2. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of n-irradiated Fe-Cr Model Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matijasevic, Milena; Al Mazouzi, Abderrahim

    2008-07-01

    High chromium ( 9-12 wt %) ferritic/martensitic steels are candidate structural materials for future fusion reactors and other advanced systems such as accelerator driven systems (ADS). Their use for these applications requires a careful assessment of their mechanical stability under high energy neutron irradiation and in aggressive environments. In particular, the Cr concentration has been shown to be a key parameter to be optimized in order to guarantee the best corrosion and swelling resistance, together with the least embrittlement. In this work, the characterization of the neutron irradiated Fe-Cr model alloys with different Cr % with respect to microstructure and mechanical tests will be presented. The behavior of Fe-Cr alloys have been studied using tensile tests at different temperature range ( from -160 deg. C to 300 deg. C). Irradiation-induced microstructure changes have been studied by TEM for two different irradiation doses at 300 deg. C. The density and the size distribution of the defects induced have been determined. The tensile test results indicate that Cr content affects the hardening behavior of Fe-Cr binary alloys. Hardening mechanisms are discussed in terms of Orowan type of approach by correlating TEM data to the measured irradiation hardening. (authors)

  3. Radiation Tolerance of Neutron-Irradiated Model Fe-Cr-Al Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, Kevin G; Hu, Xunxiang; Littrell, Ken; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-01-01

    The Fe Cr Al alloy system has the potential to form an important class of enhanced accident-tolerant cladding materials in the nuclear power industry owing to the alloy system's higher oxidation resistance in high-temperature steam environments compared with traditional zirconium-based alloys. However, radiation tolerance of Fe Cr Al alloys has not been fully established. In this study, a series of Fe Cr Al alloys with 10 18 wt % Cr and 2.9 4.9 wt % Al were neutron irradiated at 382 C to 1.8 dpa to investigate the irradiation-induced microstructural and mechanical property evolution as a function of alloy composition. Dislocation loops with Burgers vector of a/2 111 and a 100 were detected and quantified. Results indicate precipitation of Cr-rich is primarily dependent on the bulk chromium composition. Mechanical testing of sub-size-irradiated tensile specimens indicates the hardening response seen after irradiation is dependent on the bulk chromium composition. A structure property relationship was developed; it indicated that the change in yield strength after irradiation is caused by the formation of these radiation-induced defects and is dominated by the large number density of Cr-rich precipitates at sufficiently high chromium contents after irradiation.

  4. Networks of ultrasmall Pd/Cr bilayer nanowires as high performance hydrogen sensors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng, X.-Q.; Wang, Y.-L.; Deng, H.; Latimer, M. L.; Xiao, Z.-L.; Pearson, J.; Xu, T.; Wang, H.-H.; Welp, U.; Crabtree, G. W.; Kwok, W.-K.

    2011-01-01

    The newly developed hydrogen sensor, based on a network of ultrasmall pure palladium nanowires sputter-deposited on a filtration membrane, takes advantage of single palladium nanowires' characteristics of high speed and sensitivity while eliminating their nanofabrication obstacles. However, this new type of sensor, like the single palladium nanowires, cannot distinguish hydrogen concentrations above 3%, thus limiting the potential applications of the sensor. This study reports hydrogen sensors based on a network of ultrasmall Cr-buffered Pd (Pd/Cr) nanowires on a filtration membrane. These sensors not only are able to outperform their pure Pd counterparts in speed and durability but also allow hydrogen detection at concentrations up to 100%. The new networks consist of a thin layer of palladium deposited on top of a Cr adhesion layer 1-3 nm thick. Although the Cr layer is insensitive to hydrogen, it enables the formation of a network of continuous Pd/Cr nanowires with thicknesses of the Pd layer as thin as 2 nm. The improved performance of the Pd/Cr sensors can be attributed to the increased surface area to volume ratio and to the confinement-induced suppression of the phase transition from Pd/H solid solution ({alpha}-phase) to Pd hydride ({beta}-phase).

  5. Where do Nissan Leaf drivers in The EV Project charge when they have the opportunity to charge at work?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Smart; Don Scoffield

    2014-03-01

    This paper invesigates where Nissan Leaf drivers in the EV Project charge when they have the opportunity to charge at work. Do they charge at work, home, or some other location?

  6. Where do Chevrolet Volt drivers in The EV Project charge when they have the opportunity to charge at work?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Smart; Don Scoffield

    2014-03-01

    This paper investigates where Chevy Volt drivers in the EV Project charge when they have the opportunity to charge at work. Do they charge at home, work, or some other location.

  7. How to Apply for a NYS License If after reading through the Drivers From Other Nations section on the following page, you decide that you need to apply for a NYS license,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandrova, Ivana

    11/19/14 How to Apply for a NYS License If after reading through the Drivers From Other Nations section on the following page, you decide that you need to apply for a NYS license, these are some basic for your test. http://dmv.ny.gov/driver-license/nys-dmv-drivers-manual-online-drivers- manual

  8. Break-Even Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.; Ong, S.; Roberts, B.

    2009-12-01

    Grid parity--or break-even cost--for photovoltaic (PV) technology is defined as the point where the cost of PV-generated electricity equals the cost of electricity purchased from the grid. Break-even cost is expressed in $/W of an installed system. Achieving break-even cost is a function of many variables. Consequently, break-even costs vary by location and time for a country, such as the United States, with a diverse set of resources, electricity prices, and other variables. In this report, we analyze PV break-even costs for U.S. residential customers. We evaluate some key drivers of grid parity both regionally and over time. We also examine the impact of moving from flat to time-of-use (TOU) rates, and we evaluate individual components of the break-even cost, including effect of rate structure and various incentives. Finally, we examine how PV markets might evolve on a regional basis considering the sensitivity of the break-even cost to four major drivers: technical performance, financing parameters, electricity prices and rates, and policies. We find that local incentives rather than ?technical? parameters are in general the key drivers of the break-even cost of PV. Additionally, this analysis provides insight about the potential viability of PV markets.

  9. Analysis of the Ultra-fast Switching Dynamics in a Hybrid MOSFET/Driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, T.; Burkhart, C.; /SLAC

    2011-08-17

    The turn-on dynamics of a power MOSFET during ultra-fast, {approx} ns, switching are discussed in this paper. The testing was performed using a custom hybrid MOSFET/Driver module, which was fabricated by directly assembling die-form components, power MOSFET and drivers, on a printed circuit board. By using die-form components, the hybrid approach substantially reduces parasitic inductance, which facilitates ultra-fast switching. The measured turn on time of the hybrid module with a resistive load is 1.2 ns with an applied voltage of 1000 V and drain current of 33 A. Detailed analysis of the switching waveforms reveals that switching behavior must be interpreted differently in the ultra-fast regime. For example, the gate threshold voltage to turn on the device is observed to increase as the switching time decreases. Further analysis and simulation of MOSFET switching behavior shows that the minimum turn on time scales with the product of the drain-source on resistance and drain-source capacitance, R{sub DS(on)}C{sub OSS}. This information will be useful in power MOSFET selection and gate driver design for ultra-fast switching applications.

  10. Accounting for the Variation of Driver Aggression in the Simulation of Conventional and Advanced Vehicles (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer, J.; Wood, E.

    2013-05-01

    This presentation discusses a method of accounting for realistic levels of driver aggression to higher-level vehicle studies, including the impact of variation in real-world driving characteristics (acceleration and speed) on vehicle energy consumption and different powertrains (e.g., conventionally powered vehicles versus electrified drive vehicles [xEVs]). Aggression variation between drivers can increase fuel consumption by more than 50% or decrease it by more than 20% from average. The normalized fuel consumption deviation from average as a function of population percentile was found to be largely insensitive to powertrain. However, the traits of ideal driving behavior are a function of powertrain. In conventional vehicles, kinetic losses dominate rolling resistance and aerodynamic losses. In xEVs with regenerative braking, rolling resistance and aerodynamic losses dominate. The relation of fuel consumption predicted from real-world drive data to that predicted by the industry-standard HWFET, UDDS, LA92, and US06 drive cycles was not consistent across powertrains, and varied broadly from the mean, median, and mode of real-world driving. A drive cycle synthesized by NREL's DRIVE tool accurately and consistently reproduces average real-world for multiple powertrains within 1%, and can be used to calculate the fuel consumption effects of varying levels of driver aggression.

  11. Survey of Laser Markets Relevant to Inertial Fusion Energy Drivers, information for National Research Council

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayramian, A J; Deri, R J; Erlandson, A C

    2011-02-24

    Development of a new technology for commercial application can be significantly accelerated by leveraging related technologies used in other markets. Synergies across multiple application domains attract research and development (R and D) talent - widening the innovation pipeline - and increases the market demand in common components and subsystems to provide performance improvements and cost reductions. For these reasons, driver development plans for inertial fusion energy (IFE) should consider the non-fusion technology base that can be lveraged for application to IFE. At this time, two laser driver technologies are being proposed for IFE: solid-state lasers (SSLs) and KrF gas (excimer) lasers. This document provides a brief survey of organizations actively engaged in these technologies. This is intended to facilitate comparison of the opportunities for leveraging the larger technical community for IFE laser driver development. They have included tables that summarize the commercial organizations selling solid-state and KrF lasers, and a brief summary of organizations actively engaged in R and D on these technologies.

  12. HESFIRE: a global fire model to explore the role of anthropogenic and weather drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Page, Yannick LB; Morton, Douglas; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Pereira, Jose M.; Hurtt, George C.

    2015-01-01

    Vegetation fires are a major driver of ecosystem dynamics and greenhouse gas emissions. Anticipating potential changes in fire activity and their impacts relies first on a realistic model of fire activity (e.g., fire incidence and interannual variability) and second on a model accounting for fire impacts (e.g., mortality and emissions). In this paper, we focus on our understanding of fire activity and describe a new fire model, HESFIRE (Human–Earth System FIRE), which integrates the influence of weather, vegetation characteristics, and human activities on fires in a stand-alone framework. It was developed with a particular emphasis on allowing fires to spread over consecutive days given their major contribution to burned areas in many ecosystems. A subset of the model parameters was calibrated through an optimization procedure using observation data to enhance our knowledge of regional drivers of fire activity and improve the performance of the model on a global scale. Modeled fire activity showed reasonable agreement with observations of burned area, fire seasonality, and interannual variability in many regions, including for spatial and temporal domains not included in the optimization procedure. Significant discrepancies are investigated, most notably regarding fires in boreal regions and in xeric ecosystems and also fire size distribution. The sensitivity of fire activity to model parameters is analyzed to explore the dominance of specific drivers across regions and ecosystems. The characteristics of HESFIRE and the outcome of its evaluation provide insights into the influence of anthropogenic activities and weather, and their interactions, on fire activity.

  13. Reliable, high repetition rate thyratron grid driver used with a magnetic modulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, J.V.; Ball, D.G.; Garrett, D.N.

    1991-06-14

    The Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory uses a magnetic modulator switched by a high voltage thyratron to drive a gas discharge laser. The thyratron trigger source must provide an extremely reliable, low jitter, high- rep-rate grid pulse. This paper describes a thyratron grid driver which delivers a 1.2 kV, 80 ns rise time grid pulse into a 50 ohm load at up to 4.5 kHz repetition rate and has demonstrated approximately 10,000 hours MTBF. Since the thyratron is used with a magnetic compression circuit having a delay time of 1.4 ms this grid driver incorporates a jitter compensation circuit to adjust the trigger timing of the thyratron to provide overall modulator/laser jitter of less than {plus minus} 2 ns. The specific grid driver requirements will be discussed followed by a description of the circuit design and theory of operation. Construction comments will be followed by performance data (for a specific thyratron and magnetic compression circuit), including pulse shape, jitter, and lifetime. 1 ref., 10 figs.

  14. ROTATIONAL REST FREQUENCIES FOR CrO (X 5Pr) AND CrN (X 4) P. M. Sheridan, M. A. Brewster, and L. M. Ziurys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziurys, Lucy M.

    were created by the reac- tion of chromium vapor, produced in a Broida-type oven, with N2O or NH3 under 10À8, while the Cr/H ratio is 4:8 Â 10À7 (Savage & Sembach 1996). The solar abundance of chromium

  15. Influence of the hydration by the environmental humidity on the metallic speciation and the photocatalytic activity of Cr/MCM-41

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elías, Verónica R.; Sabre, Ema V.; Winkler, Elin L.; Andrini, Leandro; Requejo, Félix G.; Casuscelli, Sandra G.; Eimer, Griselda A.

    2014-05-01

    The influence of the environmental humidity on the Cr species deposited on inorganic supports like MCM-41 silicates was analyzed by UV–vis Diffuse Reflectance (UV–vis RD), Electronic Spin Resonance (ESR) and X-ray near-edge (XANES) spectroscopy. Metal speciation could be inferred, finding that prolonged exposure periods under environmental humidity provoked the reduction of the active Cr{sup 6+} species and thus, the decrease of the Cr/MCM-41 photoactivity. After the Ti loading over the Cr modified samples, Cr species and the photoactivity were not notably influenced by the humidity exposure. Thus, it could be concluded that the presence of Ti is important because the TiO{sub 2} cover protects the oxidized Cr species, stabilizing them. - Graphical abstract: The load of Ti on the Cr modified MCM-41 produces a TiO{sub 2} cover that protects the active Cr species from their reduction by the environmental humidity. - Highlights: • Spectroscopic analysis shows presence of Cr{sup 6+}/Cr{sup 5+} in calcined/re-calcined samples. • Cr{sup 3+} species increase for hydrated samples causing their photoactivity decrease. • Samples with high Cr loadings are more sensitive to environmental humidity presence. • TiO{sub 2} cover protects oxidized Cr species from their reduction by the water. • Ti is important to allow a synergistic effect and to stabilize active Cr{sup 6+}/Cr{sup 5+}.

  16. Stephan Klemme Hugh St.C. O'Neill The reaction MgCr2O4 + SiO2 = Cr2O3 + MgSiO3 and the free energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    bar and 298 K (J molA1 ) DG Gibbs free energy change for a reaction among pure end membersStephan Klemme á Hugh St.C. O'Neill The reaction MgCr2O4 + SiO2 = Cr2O3 + MgSiO3 and the free energy of formation of magnesiochromite (MgCr2O4) Received: 9 May 1997 / Accepted: 28 July 1997 Abstract

  17. Comparative studies of etching mechanisms of CR-39 in NaOH/H2O and NaOH/ethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    Comparative studies of etching mechanisms of CR-39 in NaOH/H2O and NaOH/ethanol K.C.C. Tse, D Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong Available online 13 May 2007 Abstract The bulk etch rate for CR-39 in NaOH/ethanol accumulates on the surface of CR-39 detector during etching in NaOH/ethanol, which is absent during etching

  18. Production of Ni-Cr-Ti-natural fibres composite and investigation of mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesmen, G.; Erol, A.

    2015-03-30

    Intermetallic materials such as Ni{sub 2}Ti, Cr{sub 2}Ti are among advanced technology materials that have outstanding mechanical and physical properties for high temperature applications. Especially creep resistance, low density and high hardness properties stand out in such intermetallics. The microstructure, mechanical properties of (%50Ni-%48Cr-%2Ti)-%10Naturel Fibres and (%64Ni-%32Cr-%4Ti)-%10Naturel Fibres powders were investigated using specimens produced by tube furnace sintering at 1000-1200-1400°C temperature. A composite consisting of ternary additions, a metallic phase, Ti,Cr and Ni have been prepared under Ar shroud and then tube furnace sintered. XRD, SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope), were investigated to characterize the properties of the specimens. Experimental results carried out for composition (%64Ni-%32Cr-%4Ti)-%10Naturel at 1400°C suggest that the best properties as 112.09HV and 5,422g/cm{sup 3} density were obtained at 1400°C.

  19. Ablation and cone formation mechanism on CR-39 by ArF laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shakeri Jooybari, B. E-mail: hafarideh@aut.ac.ir; Afarideh, H. E-mail: hafarideh@aut.ac.ir; Lamehi-Rachti, M.; Ghergherehchi, M.

    2015-03-07

    In this work, chemical properties, surface modification, and micro structures formation on ablated polyallyl di-glycol carbonate (CR-39) polymer by ArF laser irradiation (??=?193?nm) at various fluences and pulse number were investigated. CR-39 samples have been irradiated with an ArF laser (193?nm) at a repetition rate of 1?Hz. Threshold fluence of ablation and effective absorption coefficient of CR-39 were determined. Conical microstructures (Taylor cone) formed on laser-ablated CR-39 exhibit: smooth, Taylor cone shape walls and sharp tips together with interference and well defined fringe-structure with a period of 230?nm, around cone base. Mechanism of cone formation and cone evolution of CR-39 ablated surface were investigated by change of fluences (at a given pulse number) and pulse number (at a given fluence). Cone height, cone base, and region of interface were increased in micrometer steps by increasing the total fluence. Depression on the base of the cone and the circular fringe were simulated. FTIR spectra were measured and energy dispersive x-ray analysis of irradiated and un-irradiated samples was performed.

  20. ROLE OF QUARTERNARY ADDITIONS ON DISLOCATED MARTENSITE, RETAIN AUSTENITE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF Fe/Cr/C STRUCTURAL STEELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, Bangaru Venkata Narasimha

    2011-01-01

    ductile fracture (dimpled rupture) above DBTT. While the Fe/4Cr/0.35C base steels exhibited excellent plane strain fracture toughness

  1. HESFIRE: a global fire model to explore the role of anthropogenic and weather drivers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Le Page, Yannick LB; Morton, Douglas; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Pereira, Jose M.; Hurtt, George C.

    2015-02-13

    Vegetation fires are a major driver of ecosystem dynamics and greenhouse gas emissions. Anticipating potential changes in fire activity and their impacts relies first on a realistic model of fire activity (e.g., fire incidence and interannual variability) and second on a model accounting for fire impacts (e.g., mortality and emissions). In this paper, we focus on our understanding of fire activity and describe a new fire model, HESFIRE (Human–Earth System FIRE), which integrates the influence of weather, vegetation characteristics, and human activities on fires in a stand-alone framework. It was developed with a particular emphasis on allowing fires to spreadmore »over consecutive days given their major contribution to burned areas in many ecosystems. A subset of the model parameters was calibrated through an optimization procedure using observation data to enhance our knowledge of regional drivers of fire activity and improve the performance of the model on a global scale. Modeled fire activity showed reasonable agreement with observations of burned area, fire seasonality, and interannual variability in many regions, including for spatial and temporal domains not included in the optimization procedure. Significant discrepancies are investigated, most notably regarding fires in boreal regions and in xeric ecosystems and also fire size distribution. The sensitivity of fire activity to model parameters is analyzed to explore the dominance of specific drivers across regions and ecosystems. The characteristics of HESFIRE and the outcome of its evaluation provide insights into the influence of anthropogenic activities and weather, and their interactions, on fire activity.« less

  2. Overview of proton drivers for neutrino super beams and neutrino factories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, W.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    There has been a world-wide interest in Proton Drivers in the past decade. Numerous design proposals have been presented in Asia, Europe and North America, ranging from low energy rapid cycling synchrotrons, normal or superconducting linacs to high energy slow cycling synchrotrons and FFAGs. One thing in common is that all these machines provide MW beam power and are used primarily for neutrino experiments. This paper gives an overview of these activities. In the last section the author expresses his personal opinion on the future of this field.

  3. Low-jitter high-power thyristor array pulse driver and generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanks, Roy L. (Byron, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for generating low-jitter, high-voltage and high-current pulses for driving low impedance loads such as detonator fuses uses a MOSFET driver which, when triggered, discharges a high-voltage pre-charged capacitor into the primary of a toroidal current-multiplying transformer with multiple isolated secondary windings. The secondary outputs are suitable for driving an array of thyristors that discharge a precharged high-voltage capacitor and thus generating the required high-voltage and high-current pulse.

  4. Linear beam raster magnet driver based on H-bridge technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinkine, Nikolai I.; Yan, Chen; Apeldoorn, Cornelis; Dail, Jeffrey Glenn; Wojcik, Randolph Frank; Gunning, William

    2006-06-06

    An improved raster magnet driver for a linear particle beam is based on an H-bridge technique. Four branches of power HEXFETs form a two-by-two switch. Switching the HEXFETs in a predetermined order and at the right frequency produces a triangular current waveform. An H-bridge controller controls switching sequence and timing. The magnetic field of the coil follows the shape of the waveform and thus steers the beam using a triangular rather than a sinusoidal waveform. The system produces a raster pattern having a highly uniform raster density distribution, eliminates target heating from non-uniform raster density distributions, and produces higher levels of beam current.

  5. Response of 9Cr-ODS Steel to Proton Irradiation at 400 °C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jianchao He; Farong Wan; Kumar Sridharan; Todd R. Allen; A. Certain; Y. Q. Wu

    2014-09-01

    The stability of Y–Ti–O nanoclusters, dislocation structure, and grain boundary segregation in 9Cr-ODS steels has been investigated following proton irradiation at 400 °C with damage levels up to 3.7 dpa. A slight coarsening and a decrease in number density of nanoclusters were observed as a result of irradiation. The composition of nanoclusters was also observed to change with a slight increase of Y and Cr concentration in the nanoclusters following irradiation. Size, density, and composition of the nanoclusters were investigated as a function of nanocluster size, specifically classified to three groups. In addition to the changes in nanoclusters, dislocation loops were observed after irradiation. Finally, radiation-induced enrichment of Cr and depletion of W were observed at grain boundaries after irradiation.

  6. HIV/AIDS Prevention among The Male Population: Results of a Peer-Education Program For Taxicab and Tricycle Drivers in the Philippines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morisky, Donald E

    2008-01-01

    and truck drivers in the Philippines. Occupational SafetyLabour and Employment, Philippines. United Nations EconomicRisk Reduction Program in the Philippines: A Comprehensive

  7. Supplement Table 1. Mean environmental drivers at Brasil flux sites. Precipitation (Prec) from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), for site-specific tower measurement years and a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    Supplement Table 1. Mean environmental drivers at Brasil flux sites. Precipitation (Prec) from #12;Supplement Table 2. Brasil flux sites instrumentation and measuring methods. *: non aspirated

  8. Development and quality assessments of commercial heat production of ATF FeCrAl tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2015-09-01

    Development and quality assessment of the 2nd generation ATF FeCrAl tube production with commercial manufacturers were conducted. The manufacturing partners include Sophisticated Alloys, Inc. (SAI), Butler, PA for FeCrAl alloy casting via vacuum induction melting, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for extrusion process to prepare the master bars/tubes to be tube-drawn, and Rhenium Alloys, Inc. (RAI), North Ridgeville, OH, for tube-drawing process. The masters bars have also been provided to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) who works with Century Tubes, Inc., (CTI), San Diego, CA, as parallel tube production effort under the current program.

  9. Review: Balancing Limiting Factors and Economic Drivers to Achieve Sustainable Midwestern US Agricultural Residue Feedstock Supplies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wally W. Wilhelm; J. Richard Hess; Douglas L. Karlen; David J. Muth; Jane M. F. Johnson; John M. Baker; Hero T. Gollany; Jeff M. Novak; Diane E. Stott; Gary E. Varvel

    2010-10-01

    Advanced biofuels will be developed using cellulosic feedstock rather than grain or oilseed crops that can also be used for food and feed. To be sustainable, these new agronomic production systems must be economically viable without degrading soil resources. This review examines six agronomic factors that collectively define many of the limits and opportunities for harvesting crop residue for biofuel feedstock. These six “limiting factors” are discussed in relationship to economic drivers associated with harvesting corn (Zea mays L.) stover as a potential cellulosic feedstock. The limiting factors include soil organic carbon, wind and water erosion, plant nutrient balance, soil water and temperature dynamics, soil compaction, and off-site environmental impacts. Initial evaluations using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation 2.0 (RUSLE2) show that a single factor analysis based on simply meeting tolerable soil loss might indicate stover could be harvested sustainably, but the same analysis based on maintaining soil organic carbon shows the practice to be non-sustainable. Modifying agricultural management to include either annual or perennial cover crops is shown to meet both soil erosion and soil carbon requirements. The importance of achieving high yields and planning in a holistic manner at the landscape scale are also shown to be crucial for balancing limitations and drivers associated with renewable bioenergy production.

  10. Optimizing and Diversifying Electric Vehicle Driving Range for U.S. Drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Properly determining the driving range is critical for accurately predicting the sales and social benefits of battery electric vehicles (BEVs). This study proposes a framework for optimizing the driving range by minimizing the sum of battery price, electricity cost, and range limitation cost referred to as the range-related cost as a measurement of range anxiety. The objective function is linked to policy-relevant parameters, including battery cost and price markup, battery utilization, charging infrastructure availability, vehicle efficiency, electricity and gasoline prices, household vehicle ownership, daily driving patterns, discount rate, and perceived vehicle lifetime. Qualitative discussion of the framework and its empirical application to a sample (N=36,664) representing new car drivers in the United States is included. The quantitative results strongly suggest that ranges of less than 100 miles are likely to be more popular in the BEV market for a long period of time. The average optimal range among U.S. drivers is found to be largely inelastic. Still, battery cost reduction significantly drives BEV demand toward longer ranges, whereas improvement in the charging infrastructure is found to significantly drive BEV demand toward shorter ranges. The bias of a single-range assumption and the effects of range optimization and diversification in reducing such biases are both found to be significant.

  11. Breakeven Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities (Report Summary) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.; Ong, S.; Roberts, B.

    2009-12-01

    "Break-even cost" for photovoltaic (PV) technology is defined as the point where the cost of PV-generated electricity equals the cost of electricity purchased from the grid. Break-even cost is expressed in $/W of an installed system. Achieving break-even cost is a function of many variables. Consequently, break-even costs vary by location and time for a country, such as the United States, with a diverse set of resources, electricity prices, and other variables. In this presentation, we introduce an analysis of PV break-even costs for residential customers in the United States, including an evaluation of some of the key drivers of PV breakeven both regionally and over time. This presentation includes our methodology and presents results for both near-term residential breakeven costs(2009) and future market sensitivities of break-even costs (2015). See also the the report "Break-Even Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities". Presentation for NREL/TP-6A2-45991.

  12. La neutrino factory del CERN e i problemi radiologici dell'annesso proton driver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bressan, Beatrice Alessandra

    2001-01-01

    The thesis, La Neutrino Factory del CERN e i problemi radiologici dell’annesso proton driver (CERN Neutrino Factory and the radiological problems of the annex proton driver), deals with the new particle accelerators for the post LHC (Large Hadron Collider) era. The first part of the work describes these innovative accelerators with particular emphasis on the muon collider which, producing ?+/?? collisions in the 100 GeV energy range, should explore deeply the Higgs Boson physics. The second part of the thesis describes the three-step scenario proposed for the muon accelerators: Neutrino Factory, Higgs Factory and a collider with TeV C.M. energy. The third chapter explains how a Neutrino Factory works. In a Neutrino Factory the neutrino beam is generated by high-energy muons decaying in a storage ring. The muons are produced by pions generated in a target bombarded by an intense proton beam. In the CERN project, the proton beam is produced by a super conducting LINAC (with 75 Hz frequency and 2.2 GeV ene...

  13. Reliability and Failure Modes of Solid-State Lighting Electrical Drivers Subjected to Accelerated Aging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lall, Pradeep; Sakalaukus, Peter; Davis, Lynn

    2015-02-19

    An investigation of an off-the-shelf solid-state lighting device with the primary focus on the accompanied light-emitting diode (LED) electrical driver (ED) has been conducted. A set of 10 EDs were exposed to temperature humidity life testing of 85% RH and 85 #14;C (85/85) without an electrical bias per the JEDEC standard JESD22-A101C in order to accelerate the ingress of moisture into the aluminum electrolytic capacitor (AEC) and the EDs in order to assess the reliability of the LED drivers for harsh environment applications. The capacitance and equivalent series resistance for each AEC inside the ED were measured using a handheldmore »LCR meter as possible leading indications of failure. The photometric quantities of a single pristine light engine were monitored in order to investigate the interaction between the light engine and the EDs. These parameters were used in assessing the overall reliability of the EDs. In addition, a comparative analysis has been conducted between the 85/85 accelerated test data and a previously published high-temperature storage life accelerated test of 135°C. The results of the 85/85 acceleration test and the comparative analysis are presented in this paper.« less

  14. A thirty-two clock hour driver education classroom curriculum guide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, William Lee

    1990-01-01

    A THIRTY-TWO CLOCK HOUR DRIVER EDUCATION CLASSROOM CURRICULUM GUIDE A R e c o r d o f St u d y by WILLIAM LEE RICHARDSON S u b m i t t e d t o t h e O f f i c e o f G r a d u a t e S t u d i e s o f Texas A&M U n i v e r s i t y i n p a r t i... a l f u l f i l l m e n t o f t h e r e q u i r e m e n t s f o r t h e de g r e e o f DOCTOR OF EDUCATION December 1990 M a j o r S u b j e c t : I n d u s t r i a l E d u c a t i o n A THIRTY-TWO CLOCK HOUR DRIVER EDUCATION CLASSROOM...

  15. Dual and Triple Ion-Beam Irradiations of Fe, Fe(Cr) and Fe(Cr)-ODS Final Report: IAEA SMoRE CRP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fluss, M J; Hsiung, L L; Marian, J

    2011-11-20

    Structures of nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr-4.5Al-0.3Ti-2W-0.37Y2O3 (K3) and Fe-20Cr-4.5Al-0.34Ti-0.5Y2O3 (MA956) oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels produced by mechanical alloying (MA) and followed by hot extrusion have been studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques to gain insight about the formation mechanism of nanoparticles in MA/ODS steels. The observations of Y-Al-O complex-oxide nanoparticles in both ODS steels imply that decomposition of Y2O3 in association with internal oxidation of Al occurred during mechanical alloying. While the majority of oxide nanoparticles formed in both steels is Y4Al2O9, a few oxide particles of YAlO3 are also occasionally observed. These results reveal that Ti (0.3 wt %) plays an insignificant role in forming oxide nanoparticles in the presence of Al (4.5 wt %). HRTEM observations of crystalline nanoparticles larger than {approx}2 nm and amorphous or disordered cluster domains smaller than {approx}2 nm provide an insight into the formation mechanism of oxide nanoparticle in MA/ODS steels, which we believe from our observations involves a solid-state amorphous precursor followed by recrystallization. Dual ion-beam irradiations using He{sup +} + Fe{sup +8} ions were employed to gain more detailed insight about the role of nanoparticles in suppressing radiation-induced swelling. This is elaborated through TEM examinations of cavity distributions in ion-irradiated Fe-14Cr and K3-ODS ferritic steels. HRTEM observations of helium-filled cavities (helium bubbles) preferably trapped at nanoscale oxide particles and clusters in ion-irradiated K3-ODS are presented. Finally, we describe the results from triple ion-beam irradiations using H{sup +} + He{sup +} + Fe{sup +8} ions to emulate fusion first wall radiation effects. Preliminary work is reported that confirms the existence of significant hydrogen synergistic effects described earlier by Tanaka et al., for Fe(Cr) and by Wakai et al., for F82H reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAF/M) steel. These previous results combined with our data suggest a complex new 'catalytic' mechanism whereby H interacts with the steady state population of defects and the embryonic cavities so as to accelerated cavity (void) growth in both Fe(Cr) and under special conditions in ODS steels.

  16. An Electron Microscopy Investigation of the Transient Stage Oxidation Products in an Fe-22Cr Alloy with Ce and La

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, David E.

    as interconnector materials.[1] However, lowering of the operational temperature of SOFCs from approximately 1273 K; these properties make Fe-Cr alloys favorable candidates for interconnector materials.[1,3] Research has been. A major problem with metallic interconnectors based on Fe-Cr alloys, is their reactivity

  17. Changes induced in a ZnS:Cr-based electroluminescent waveguide structure by intrinsic near-infrared laser radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vlasenko, N. A. Oleksenko, P. F.; Mukhlyo, M. A.; Veligura, L. I.

    2013-08-15

    The causes of changes that occur in a thin-film electroluminescent metal-insulator-semiconductor-insulator-metal waveguide structure based on ZnS:Cr (Cr concentration of {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}) upon lasing ({lambda} Almost-Equal-To 2.6 {mu}m) and that induce lasing cessation are studied. It is established that lasing ceases because of light-scattering inhomogeneities formed in the structure and, hence, optical losses enhance. The origin of the inhomogeneities and the causes of their formation are clarified by studying the surface topology and the crystal structure of constituent layers of the samples before and after lasing. The studies are performed by means of atomic force microscopy and X-ray radiography. It is shown that a substantial increase in the sizes of grains on the surface of the structure is the manifestation of changes induced in the ZnS:Cr film by recrystallization. Recrystallization is initiated by local heating by absorbed laser radiation in existing Cr clusters and quickened by a strong electric field (>1 MV cm{sup -1}). The changes observed in the ZnS:Cr film are as follows: the textured growth of ZnS crystallites, an increase in the content of Cr clusters, and the appearance of some CrS and a rather high ZnO content. Some ways for improving the stability of lasing in the ZnS:Cr-based waveguide structures are proposed.

  18. Strain induced ferromagnetism in epitaxial Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films integrated on Si(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Punugupati, Sandhyarani Narayan, Jagdish; Hunte, Frank

    2014-09-29

    We report on the epitaxial growth and magnetic properties of antiferromagnetic and magnetoelectric (ME) Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films deposited on cubic yttria stabilized zirconia (c-YSZ)/Si(001) using pulsed laser deposition. The X-ray diffraction (2? and ?) and TEM characterizations confirm that the films were grown epitaxially. The Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) growth on YSZ(001) occurs with twin domains. There are four domains of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} with in-plane rotation of 30° or 150° from each other about the [0001] growth direction. The epitaxial relation between the layers is given as [001]Si???[001]YSZ???[0001]Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and [100]Si???[100]YSZ???[101{sup ¯}0] Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} or [112{sup ¯}0] Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Though the bulk Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} is an antiferromagnetic with T{sub N}?=?307?K, we found that the films exhibit ferromagnetic like hysteresis loops with high saturation and finite coercive field up to 400?K. The thickness dependent magnetizations together with oxygen annealing results suggest that the ferromagnetism (FM) is due to oxygen related defects whose concentration is controlled by strain present in the films. This FM, in addition to the intrinsic magneto-electric properties of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, opens the door to relevant spintronics applications.

  19. Crystalline ZnMgSe:Cr2+: a new material for active elements of tunable IR-lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. A. Zagoruiko; N. O. Kovalenko; O. A. Fedorenko; V. A. Khristyan

    2008-07-01

    Obtained is a new thermostable material for active elements of tunable IR-lasers - Zn1-xMgxSe:Cr2+ single crystals. The position of the absorption band of Cr2+ ions in wurtzite-type Zn0.8Mg0.2Se matrix is established.

  20. Understanding the solidification and microstructure evolution during CSC-MIG welding of Fe–Cr–B-based alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorour, A.A. Chromik, R.R. Gauvin, R. Jung, I.-H. Brochu, M.

    2013-12-15

    The present is a study of the solidification and microstructure of Fe–28.2%Cr–3.8%B–1.5%Si–1.5%Mn (wt.%) alloy deposited onto a 1020 plain carbon steel substrate using the controlled short-circuit metal inert gas welding process. The as-solidified alloy was a metal matrix composite with a hypereutectic microstructure. Thermodynamic calculation based on the Scheil–Gulliver model showed that a primary (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B phase formed first during solidification, followed by an eutectic formation of the (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B phase and a body-centered cubic Fe-based solid solution matrix, which contained Cr, Mn and Si. Microstructure analysis confirmed the formation of these phases and showed that the shape of the (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B phase was irregular plate. As the welding heat input increased, the weld dilution increased and thus the volume fraction of the (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B plates decreased while other microstructural characteristics were similar. - Highlights: • We deposit Fe–Cr–B-based alloy onto plain carbon steel using the CSC-MIG process. • We model the solidification behavior using thermodynamic calculation. • As deposited alloy consists of (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B plates embedded in Fe-based matrix. • We study the effect of the welding heat input on the microstructure.

  1. Annealing effects on microstructure and mechanical properties of sputtered multilayer Cr(1 -x)AlxN films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    Annealing effects on microstructure and mechanical properties of sputtered multilayer Cr(1 - x)AlxN films Microstructure Annealing X-ray diffraction Mechanical properties Multilayer Cr(1 - x)AlxN films with a total thickness of 2 m were deposited on high-speed steel by medium frequency magnetron sputtering from

  2. Aging behavior and precipitates analysis of the CuCrZrCe alloy Yi Zhang a,b,d,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    Aging behavior and precipitates analysis of the Cu­Cr­Zr­Ce alloy Yi Zhang a,b,d,n , Alex A October 2015 Keywords: Cu­Cr­Zr­Ce alloy Cold rolling Aging treatment Microstructure Physical properties rolling and aging for 16 h at 300 °C. Under the same aging conditions, without cold rolling, the hardness

  3. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Compositionally Complex Co-free FeNiMnCr18 FCC Solid Solution Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Zhenggang [The University of Tennessee; Bei, Hongbin [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Recently,a structurally-simplebutcompositionally-complex FeNiCoMnCr highentropyalloywasfoundto haveexcellentmechanicalproperties(e.g.,highstrengthandductility).Tounderstandthepotentialof using highentropyalloysasstructuralmaterialsforadvancednuclearreactorandpowerplants,itis necessary tohaveathoroughunderstandingoftheirstructuralstabilityandmechanicalpropertiesde- gradation underneutronirradiation.ThisrequiresustodevelopasimilarmodelalloywithoutCobe- cause materialwithCowillmakepost-neutron-irradiationtestingdifficult duetotheproductionofthe 60Co radioisotope.Toachievethisgoal,aFCC-structuredsingle-phasealloywithacompositionof FeNiMnCr18 wassuccessfullydeveloped.Thisnear-equiatomicFeNiMnCr18 alloy hasgoodmalleability and itsmicrostructurecanbecontrolledbythermomechanicalprocessing.Byrollingandannealing,the as-cast elongated-grained-microstructureisreplacedbyhomogeneousequiaxedgrains.Themechanical properties (e.g.,strengthandductility)oftheFeNiMnCr18 alloy arecomparabletothoseoftheequiatomic FeNiCoMnCr highentropyalloy.Bothstrengthandductilityincreasewithdecreasingdeformation temperature,withthelargestdifferenceoccurringbetween293and77K.Extensivetwin-bandswhich are bundlesofnumerousindividualtwinsareobservedwhenitistensile-fracturedat77K.Notwin bands aredetectedbyEBSDformaterialsdeformedat293Kandhigher.Theunusualtemperature-de- pendencies ofUTSanduniformelongationcouldbecausedbythedevelopmentofthedensetwin substructure, twin-dislocationinteractionsandtheinteractionsbetweenprimaryandsecondarytwin- ning systemswhichresultinamicrostructurerefinement andhencecauseenhancedstrainhardening and postponednecking.

  4. Zinc protects human peripheral blood lymphocytes from Cr(III)(phenanthroline){sub 3}-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sankaramanivel, Sundararaj; Rajaram, Anantanarayanan; Rajaram, Rama

    2010-03-15

    We have studied the effect of Cr(III)(phen){sub 3} [(tris(1,10-phenanthroline) chromium(III) chloride)] on lymphocytes in order to find out if metallothioneins (MTs) are produced in the process. We also investigated whether zinc pretreatment is able to protect cells from apoptosis reported to occur for this compound. Our results indicate that MT synthesis is induced by Cr(III)(phen){sub 3}, and it has been identified as the MT-3 isoform through RT-PCR which has not been reported earlier. By zinc pretreatment, this apoptosis is reversed as inferred from cytotoxicity studies, Annexin-V/PI staining, ethidium bromide/acridine orange staining and DNA fragmentation pattern and ultrastructural investigations using TEM and SEM. The zinc pretreatment reduces the amount of ROS produced by Cr(III)(phen){sub 3} . The MT-1a and 1b synthesized by zinc (also evidenced through RT-PCR experiments) is possibly able to scavenge ROS which is one of the early signaling molecules that lead to apoptosis. Zinc pretreatment also reverses the changes in downstream signaling events such as mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP levels and the activation of caspase-3. This is the first report on the induction of MT-3 in lymphocytes due to a metal stress or any other stimuli. Even though MT-3 is synthesized here, apoptosis still occurs due to ROS production on Cr(III)(phen){sub 3} exposure when the cells have not been primed with zinc.

  5. NASA/CR-2009-215703 NIA Report No. 2008-09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, César A.

    April 2009 NASA/CR-2009-215703 NIA Report No. 2008-09 Design and Verification of a Distributed #12;NASA STI Program . . . in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been dedicated to the advancement of aeronautics and space science. The NASA scientific and technical information (STI) program plays a key part

  6. NASA/CR-2002-211759 ICASE Report No. 2002-26

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lüttgen, Gerald

    NASA/CR-2002-211759 ICASE Report No. 2002-26 A Logical Process Calculus Rance Cleaveland State, Sheffield, United Kingdom August 2002 #12;The NASA STI Program Office . . . in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been dedicated to the advancement of aeronautics and space science. The NASA Scientific

  7. NASA/CR-2002-211637 ICASE Report No. 2002-12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, César A.

    NASA/CR-2002-211637 ICASE Report No. 2002-12 Air Traffic Conflict Resolution and Recovery Aljons Kirchner ENA C, Toulouse, France May 2002 #12;The NASA STI Program Office... in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been dedicated to the advancement of aeronautics and space science. The NASA Scientific

  8. NASA/CR-2007-214546 NIA Report No. 2007-03

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, César A.

    NASA/CR-2007-214546 NIA Report No. 2007-03 Batch Proving and Proof Scripting in PVS Cesar A. Munoz National Institute of Aerospace (NIA), Hampton, Virginia February 2007 #12;The NASA STI Program Office . . . in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been dedicated to the advancement of aeronautics and space science

  9. NASA/CR-2000-210097 ICASE Report No. 2000-16

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, César A.

    NASA/CR-2000-210097 ICASE Report No. 2000-16 Aircraft Trajectory Modeling and Alerting Algorithm Verification Cdsar Muhoz ICASE, Hampton, Virginia Victor Carreho NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia April 2000 #12;The NASA STI Program Office... in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been

  10. NASA/CR-2001-211271 ICASE Interim Report No. 39

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, César A.

    NASA/CR-2001-211271 ICASE Interim Report No. 39 Real Automation in the Field C6sar Mu_oz ICASE, Hampton, Virginia Micaela Mayero INRIA, Le Chesnay Cedex, France December 2001 #12;The NASA STI Program Office... in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been dedicated to the advancement of aeronautics

  11. NASA/CR-97-206268 ICASE Report No. 97-68

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jameson, Antony

    NASA/CR-97-206268 ICASE Report No. 97-68 _th ,NNIVERSARY Essential Elements of Computational Algorithms for Aerodynamic Analysis and Design Antony Jameson December 1997 #12;The NASA STI Program Off'we... in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been dedicated to the advancement of aeronautics and space science

  12. NASA/CR-2001-210853 ICASE Report No. 2001-7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, César A.

    NASA/CR-2001-210853 ICASE Report No. 2001-7 Tactical Conflict Detection and Resolution in a 3-D April 2001 #12;The NASA STI Program Office... in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been dedicated to the advancement of aeronautics and space science. The NASA Scientific and Technical Information (STI) Program

  13. NASA/CR-2000-209851 ICASE Report No. 2000-4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, César A.

    NASA/CR-2000-209851 ICASE Report No. 2000-4 Towards a Customizable PVS Gerald Liittgen and C_sar Mu_oz ICASE, Hampton, Virginia Ricky Butler, Ben Di Vito, and Paul Miner NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia January2000 #12;The NASA STI Program Office... in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been

  14. NASA/CR-2007-214863 NIA Report No. 2007-06

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, César A.

    NASA/CR-2007-214863 NIA Report No. 2007-06 In-Trail Procedure (ITP) Algorithm Design Cesar A. Munoz and Radu I. Siminiceanu National Institute of Aerospace (NIA), Hampton, Virginia August 2007 #12;The NASA STI Program Office . . . in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been dedicated to the advancement

  15. NASA/CR-2003-212418 NIA Report No. 2003-03

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, César A.

    NASA/CR-2003-212418 NIA Report No. 2003-03 Rapid Prototyping in PVS César A. Muñoz National Institute of Aerospace, Hampton, Virginia November 2003 #12;The NASA STI Program Office . . . in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been dedicated to the advancement of aeronautics and space science

  16. Nondestructive evaluation of the oxidation stresses through thermal barrier coatings using Cr3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, David R.

    Nondestructive evaluation of the oxidation stresses through thermal barrier coatings using Cr3 The stresses in the aluminum oxide formed during high-temperature oxidation of a bond-coated superalloy are shown to be measurable through zirconia thermal barrier coatings. The basis for the measurements

  17. Diode-Pumped Gigahertz Repetition Rate Femtosecond Cr:Lisaf Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Duo

    We report a low-cost, 1 GHz repetition-rate, diode-pumped, saturable Bragg reflectors mode-locked Cr:LiSAF laser, which generates nearly transform-limited 103-fs long pulses around 866 nm, with a record high peak power of 1.45 kW.

  18. Ion irradiation testing and characterization of FeCrAl candidate alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderoglu, Osman; Aydogan, Eda; Maloy, Stuart Andrew; Wang, Yongqiang

    2014-10-29

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program’s Advanced Fuels Campaign has initiated a multifold effort aimed at facilitating development of accident tolerant fuels. This effort involves development of fuel cladding materials that will be resistant to oxidizing environments for extended period of time such as loss of coolant accident. Ferritic FeCrAl alloys are among the promising candidates due to formation of a stable Al?O? oxide scale. In addition to being oxidation resistant, these promising alloys need to be radiation tolerant under LWR conditions (maximum dose of 10-15 dpa at 250 – 350°C). Thus, in addition to a number of commercially available alloys, nuclear grade FeCrAl alloys developed at ORNL were tested using high energy proton irradiations and subsequent characterization of irradiation hardening and damage microstructure. This report summarizes ion irradiation testing and characterization of three nuclear grade FeCrAl cladding materials developed at ORNL and four commercially available Kanthal series FeCrAl alloys in FY14 toward satisfying FCRD campaign goals.

  19. CREEP STRENGTH OF HIGH CR FERRITIC STEELS DESIGNED USING NEURAL NETWORKS AND PHASE STABILITY CALCULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    in the creep resistance of 9- 12%Cr steels used for boiler header/piping and steam turbine rotor applications,000 h. While the 630°C goal may be realized, much more work is needed to achieve steam temperatures up Development of heat-resistant steel for power boilers and turbines has been ongoing for about five decades

  20. 55CR 9/23/2007 1 5.5. Optimal advertising

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Peter

    55CR 9/23/2007 1 5.5. Optimal advertising The graph at the right tells us how expected ticket sales T depend on the number x of advertising minutes purchased. For example, with 20 minutes of advertising, some 350 tickets will be sold. (a) Suppose tickets to the concert sell for $5 apiece, and advertising

  1. Relation between thermal expansion and interstitial formation energy in pure Fe and Cr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    term, i.e. the contribution to the total energy from the valence electron density. Consequently we needRelation between thermal expansion and interstitial formation energy in pure Fe and Cr Janne Wallenius a,b,*, Pa¨r Olsson b , Christina Lagerstedt a a Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics, KTH

  2. Nanostaircases: An atomic shadowing instability during epitaxial CrN,,001... layer growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gall, Daniel

    Nanostaircases: An atomic shadowing instability during epitaxial CrN,,001... layer growth J. R the effect of atomic shadowing on surface morphological and microstructural evolution. The layers are single deposition flux than the surrounding layer. This leads to both vertical and lateral growth and the formation

  3. Synthesis and characterization of CrN/Mo2N multilayers and phases of Molybdenum nitride

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marks, Laurence D.

    ; Nanolayers; Tool coatings 1. Introduction Hard coatings for cutting tools have been in use now for thirty for dry machining [7­10]. If tools (coatings) can effectively tolerate high temperatures or can helpOx and CrN/Mo2N multilayer films were deposited by reactive sputtering. Characterization of the coatings

  4. Cu, Cr and As distribution in soils adjacent to pressure-treated decks, fences and poles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    Cu, Cr and As distribution in soils adjacent to pressure-treated decks, fences and poles Tait with depth in areas close to CCA-treated poles. Abstract Chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood has), and copper (Cu), in soils surrounding CCA-treated wood structures such as decks, fences and poles; and (2

  5. Rare-earth chromium gallides RE{sub 4}CrGa{sub 12} (RE=Tb-Tm)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slater, Brianna R.; Bie, Haiying; Stoyko, Stanislav S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G2 (Canada)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G2 (Canada); Bauer, Eric D.; Thompson, Joe D. [Materials Physics and Applications Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)] [Materials Physics and Applications Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Mar, Arthur, E-mail: arthur.mar@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G2 (Canada)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G2 (Canada)

    2012-12-15

    The ternary rare-earth-metal chromium gallides RE{sub 4}CrGa{sub 12} (RE=Tb-Tm) have been prepared by reactions of the elements at 1000 Degree-Sign C in the presence of excess gallium used as a self-flux. Their structures are derived by inserting Cr atoms into a quarter of the empty Ga{sub 6} octahedral clusters found in the parent binary gallides REGa{sub 3} (AuCu{sub 3}-type), although single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies suggest that complex superstructures may be adopted. An ideal ordered Y{sub 4}PdGa{sub 12}-type structure was successfully refined for a crystal of Dy{sub 4}CrGa{sub 12} (Pearson symbol cI34, space group Im3{sup Macron }m, Z=2, a=8.572(1) A). Magnetic measurements on single-crystal samples reveal ferromagnetic or possibly ferrimagnetic ordering for the Tb, Dy, and Er members (T{sub C}=22, 15, and 2.8 K, respectively) and antiferromagnetic ordering for the Ho member (T{sub N}=7.5 K). Band structure calculations on a hypothetical 'Y{sub 4}CrGa{sub 12}' model suggest that the Cr atoms carry no local magnetic moment. - Graphical abstract: RE{sub 4}CrGa{sub 12} is derived by inserting Cr atoms into empty Ga{sub 6} octahedral clusters present in the parent binary gallides REGa{sub 3}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RE{sub 4}MGa{sub 12} (previously known for M=Fe, Ni, Pd, Pt, Ag) has been extended to M=Cr. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RE{sub 4}CrGa{sub 12} compounds show predominantly ferromagnetic ordering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Band structure calculations suggest that Cr atoms carry no local magnetic moment.

  6. Authorization and Driving History Form The following information will be retained on file by all agencies on their drivers authorized to operate a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    agencies on their drivers authorized to operate a State vehicle, or a private vehicle for state purposes ___________________________________________ Position: Staff_____ Faculty_____ Student_____ Is employee's primary purpose to drive vehicles? Yes_____ No/her private vehicle in the course and scope of employment? Yes_____ No_____ Date of last Driver Training

  7. Combined image and genomic analysis of high-grade serous ovarian cancer reveals PTEN loss as a common driver event and prognostic classifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martins, Filipe C.; de Santiago, Ines; Trinh, Anne; Xian, Jian; Guo, Anne; Sayal, Karen; Jimenez-Linan, Mercedes; Deen, Suha; Driver, Kristy; Mack, Marie; Aslop, Jennifer; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Markowetz, Florian; Brenton, James D.

    2014-12-17

    TP53 and BRCA1/2 mutations are the main drivers in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSOC). We hypothesise that combining tissue phenotypes from image analysis of tumour sections with genomic profiles could reveal other significant driver events...

  8. Two-band modeling of -prime phase formation in Fe-Cr Pr Olsson,1 Janne Wallenius,1,2 Christophe Domain,3 Kai Nordlund,4 and Lorenzo Malerba5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordlund, Kai

    of application to the Fe-Cr system, the basic component of ferritic-martensitic stainless steel. Fe-Cr forms

  9. Laser-seeded modulation instability in a proton driver plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siemon, Carl; Khudik, Vladimir; Austin Yi, S.; Shvets, Gennady; Pukhov, Alexander

    2013-10-15

    A new method for initiating the modulation instability (MI) of a proton beam in a proton driver plasma wakefield accelerator using a short laser pulse preceding the beam is presented. A diffracting laser pulse is used to produce a plasma wave that provides a seeding modulation of the proton bunch with the period equal to that of the plasma wave. Using the envelope description of the proton beam, this method of seeding the MI is analytically compared with the earlier suggested seeding technique that involves an abrupt truncation of the proton bunch. The full kinetic simulation of a realistic proton bunch is used to validate the analytic results. It is further used to demonstrate that a plasma density ramp placed in the early stages of the laser-seeded MI leads to its stabilization, resulting in sustained accelerating electric fields (of order several hundred MV/m) over long propagation distances (?100–1000 m)

  10. HIGH-POWER FFAG-BASED HEAVY-ION AND PROTON DRIVERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RUGGIERO,A.

    2007-10-01

    Fixed-Field Alternating-Gradient (FFAG) accelerators are being proposed as an alternative to Super-conducting Linacs (SCL), Rapid-Cycling Synchrotrons (RCS) and Cyclotrons for the acceleration of very intense Heavy-Ion and Proton beams in the medium energy range. One application is the acceleration of ions of Uranium-238 to an energy of 400 MeV/u, and the average power of 400 kWatt, and the other a 1-GeV Proton Driver with an average beam power of 10 MWatt. One or two FFAG rings are needed for acceleration of both beams. They adopt a Non-Scaling Lattice (NSL) to reduce the size and the cost of the accelerator. The continuous wave (CW) mode of operation is achieved with the method of Harmonic Number Jump (HNJ).

  11. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MULTIMEDIA, VOL. X, NO. X, APRIL 2012 1 Modeling of Driver Behavior in Real World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Busso, Carlos

    (NHTSA) indicated that over 25% of police- reported crashes involved inattentive drivers [1]. The 100-car are in a moving vehicle, they are This work was done when the authors were with Department of Electrical of Electrical Engineering, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX, 75080 USA E-mail: busso

  12. Data-Driven Probabilistic Modeling and Verification of Human Driver Behavior D. Sadigh, K. Driggs-Campbell, A. Puggelli,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seshia, Sanjit A.

    Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences University of California, Berkeley. Berkeley, CA Introduction The problem of modeling driver behavior in cars has long been studied, due to its relevance to reduce the number of car fatalities (Cacciabue 2007). In particular, one of the major focuses

  13. TrafficView: A Driver Assistant Device for Traffic Monitoring based on Car-to-Car Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iftode, Liviu

    TrafficView: A Driver Assistant Device for Traffic Monitoring based on Car-to-Car Communication an intelligent transportation system, a common platform for inter-vehicle communication is needed. This platform, Directions, etc. Slide bar for areas infront or behind you Your car Other cars Fig. 1. Example of Traffic

  14. CarSafe: A Driver Safety App that Detects Dangerous Driving Behavior using Dual-Cameras on Smartphones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Andrew T.

    , Lorenzo Torresani1 , and Andrew T. Campbell1 Dartmouth College1 , Autonomous National University of Mexico the safety extras? Several research projects have designed vision-based algorithms to detect drowsiness (us classification pipelines at the right time. The front camera pipeline tracks the driver's head pose and direction

  15. Brazil’s Biofuels Scenario: What are the Main Drivers Which will Shape Investments in the Long Term?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3C—Fostering Technology Adoption III: International Market Opportunities in Bioenergy Brazil’s Biofuels Scenario: What are the Main Drivers Which will Shape Investments in the Long Term? Artur Milanez, Manager of Biofuels Department, Brazilian Development Bank

  16. Analysis of the FeCrAl Accident Tolerant Fuel Concept Benefits during BWR Station Blackout Accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robb, Kevin R

    2015-01-01

    Iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys are being considered for fuel concepts with enhanced accident tolerance. FeCrAl alloys have very slow oxidation kinetics and good strength at high temperatures. FeCrAl could be used for fuel cladding in light water reactors and/or as channel box material in boiling water reactors (BWRs). To estimate the potential safety gains afforded by the FeCrAl concept, the MELCOR code was used to analyze a range of postulated station blackout severe accident scenarios in a BWR/4 reactor employing FeCrAl. The simulations utilize the most recently known thermophysical properties and oxidation kinetics for FeCrAl. Overall, when compared to the traditional Zircaloy-based cladding and channel box, the FeCrAl concept provides a few extra hours of time for operators to take mitigating actions and/or for evacuations to take place. A coolable core geometry is retained longer, enhancing the ability to stabilize an accident. Finally, due to the slower oxidation kinetics, substantially less hydrogen is generated, and the generation is delayed in time. This decreases the amount of non-condensable gases in containment and the potential for deflagrations to inhibit the accident response.

  17. First-principles study of the structural and elastic properties of Cr{sub 2}AlX (X=N, C) compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui Shouxin; Wei Dongqing; Hu Haiquan; Feng Wenxia; Gong Zizheng

    2012-07-15

    The structural, electronic and elastic properties of Cr{sub 2}AlX, with X=N, C, have been investigated at the density functional theory level by applying a plane-wave pseudopotential approach. The band structure and density of states reveal the metallic features of Cr{sub 2}AlX. The total and projected density of states indicate that the bonding is achieved through a hybridization of Cr 3d states with Al and X-atom p states. The Cr 3d-X2p bonds are lower in energy and are stiffer than Cr 3d-Al 3p bonds. The charge density distributions indicate that there exist soft Cr-Al and relatively strong Cr-X covalent bonds, which might be responsible for their hardness. The elastic constants were obtained in the pressure range 0-100 GPa, and satisfy the stability conditions for hexagonal crystal, which indicates that these two compounds are stable in the pressure regime studied. By analyzing bulk modulus to shear modulus ratio and Cauchy pressure, Cr{sub 2}AlC is predicted to be brittleness and Cr{sub 2}AlN is ductile. The Debye temperature was obtained from the average sound velocity. - Graphical abstract: The heterogeneity of chemical bonds in Cr{sub 2}AlX (X=N, C) is observed: soft Cr-Al and relatively strong Cr-X covalent bonds might be contributed to their hardness. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cr 3d-X2p (X=N, C) bonds are lower in energy and stiffer than Cr 3d-Al 3p bonds for Cr{sub 2}AlX. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hardness of Cr{sub 2}AlX might be ascribed to soft Cr-Al and relatively strong Cr-X covalent bonds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The predicted brittleness of Cr{sub 2}AlC and ductility of Cr{sub 2}AlN originated from their novel structure.

  18. Anharmonicity, mechanical instability, and thermodynamic properties of the Cr-Re ?-phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palumbo, Mauro, E-mail: mauro.palumbo@rub.de; Fries, Suzana G. [ICAMS, Ruhr University Bochum, Universität Str. 150, D-44801 Bochum (Germany)] [ICAMS, Ruhr University Bochum, Universität Str. 150, D-44801 Bochum (Germany); Pasturel, Alain [SIMAP, UMR CNRS-INPG-UJF 5266, BP 75, F-38402 Saint Martin d’Hères (France)] [SIMAP, UMR CNRS-INPG-UJF 5266, BP 75, F-38402 Saint Martin d’Hères (France); Alfè, Dario [Department of Earth Sciences, Department of Physics and Astronomy, London Centre for Nanotechnology and Thomas Young Centre-UCL, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)] [Department of Earth Sciences, Department of Physics and Astronomy, London Centre for Nanotechnology and Thomas Young Centre-UCL, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-14

    Using density-functional theory in combination with the direct force method and molecular dynamics we investigate the vibrational properties of a binary Cr-Re ?-phase. In the harmonic approximation, we have computed phonon dispersion curves and density of states, evidencing structural and chemical effects. We found that the ?-phase is mechanically unstable in some configurations, for example, when all crystallographic sites are occupied by Re atoms. By using a molecular-dynamics-based method, we have analysed the anharmonicity in the system and found negligible effects (?0.5 kJ/mol) on the Helmholtz energy of the binary Cr-Re ?-phase up to 2000 K (?0.8T{sub m}). Finally, we show that the vibrational contribution has significant consequences on the disordering of the ?-phase at high temperature.

  19. A High-resolution Spectrum of the R CrB Star V2552 Ophiuchi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Kameswara Rao; David L. Lambert

    2003-08-25

    Photometry and low-resolution spectroscopy have added V2552 Oph to the rare class of R Coronae Borealis variables. We confirm this classification of V2552 Oph through a comparison of our high-resolution optical spectrum of this star and that of R CrB and other F-type members of the class. We show that V2552 Oph most closely resembles Y Mus and FH Sct, stars in which Sr, Y, and Zr are enhanced.

  20. Ferromagnetic ordering of Cr and Fe doped p-type diamond: An ab initio study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benecha, E. M.; Lombardi, E. B.

    2014-02-21

    Ferromagnetic ordering of transition metal dopants in semiconductors holds the prospect of combining the capabilities of semiconductors and magnetic systems in single hybrid devices for spintronic applications. Various semiconductors have so far been considered for spintronic applications, but low Curie temperatures have hindered room temperature applications. We report ab initio DFT calculations on the stability and magnetic properties of Fe and Cr impurities in diamond, and show that their ground state magnetic ordering and stabilization energies depend strongly on the charge state and type of co-doping. We predict that divacancy Cr{sup +2} and substitutional Fe{sup +1} order ferromagnetically in p-type diamond, with magnetic stabilization energies (and magnetic moment per impurity ion) of 16.9 meV (2.5 ?{sub B}) and 33.3 meV (1.0 ?{sub B}), respectively. These magnetic stabilization energies are much larger than what has been achieved in other semiconductors at comparable impurity concentrations, including the archetypal dilute magnetic semiconductor GaAs:Mn. In addition, substitutional Fe{sup +1} exhibits a strong half-metallic character, with the Fermi level crossing bands in only the spin down channel. These results, combined with diamond’s extreme properties, demonstrate that Cr or Fe dopedp-type diamond may successfully be considered in the search for room temperature spintronic materials.

  1. Stability of precipitate phases in Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Ying; Tan, Lizhen; Busby, Jeremy T

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the stability of precipitate phases in the Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys is critical to the alloy design and application of Mo-containing Austenitic steels. Coupled with thermodynamic modeling, stability of the and phases in two Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys were investigated at 1000, 850 and 700 C for different annealing time. The morphologies, compositions and crystal structures of the matrix and precipitate phases were carefully examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Electron Probe Microanalysis, X-ray diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. Two key findings resulted from this work. One is that the phase is stable at high temperature and transformed into the phase at lowmore »temperature. The other is that both the and phases have large solubilites of Cr, Mo and Ni, among which the Mo solubility has a major role on the relative stability of the precipitate phases. The developed thermodynamic models were then applied to evaluating the Mo effect on the stability of precipitate phases in AISI 316 and NF709 alloys.« less

  2. Field fabrication of heavy wall hydrocracking reactors made from advanced Cr-Mo steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flores, E.D. [Pemex, Huasteca (Mexico); Kao, T.; Tasker, K. [HRI, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States); Festa, F.; Pietrantonio, V. [Snamprogetti, S. Donato Milanese (Italy); Inoue, S.; Iga, H.; Tahara, T. [Japan Steel Works, Ltd., Muroran (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    The manufacture of first commercial hydrocracking reactors made from 3Cr-Mo-1/4V-Ti-B steel was completed in August 1990. Since then, almost 30 units of heavy wall hydrocracking reactors made of the same material have been fabricated. These vessels have been applied to high temperature and high pressure operation of hydrocracking and hydrodesulfurization units. The characteristics of advanced Cr-Mo steel, such as higher resistance to hydrogen atmosphere, higher creep rupture strength and lower susceptibility to long term degradation were verified through enough experiences based on the latest technology of manufacturing and operation of the vessels. Based on these experiences the first field fabrication of the vessels made from 3Cr-1Mo-1/4V-Ti-b steel was started in April, 1995 and successfully completed in October, 1995, at job site in Pemex Tula Refinery, Mexico. This paper is prepared to present the highlights of manufacturing technology for field fabrication based on the actual experience.

  3. Blending Cr2O3 into a NiO-Ni electrocatalyst for sustained water splitting

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gong, Ming; Zhou, Wu; Kenney, Michael James; Kapusta, Rich; Cowley, Sam; Wu, Yingpeng; Lu, Bingan; Lin, Meng -Chang; Wang, Di -Yan; Yang, Jiang; et al

    2015-08-24

    The rising H2 economy demands active and durable electrocatalysts based on low-cost, earth-abundant materials for water electrolysis/photolysis. Here we report nanoscale Ni metal cores over-coated by a Cr2O3-blended NiO layer synthesized on metallic foam substrates. The Ni@NiO/Cr2O3 triphase material exhibits superior activity and stability similar to Pt for the hydrogen-evolution reaction in basic solutions. The chemically stable Cr2O3 is crucial for preventing oxidation of the Ni core, maintaining abundant NiO/Ni interfaces as catalytically active sites in the heterostructure and thus imparting high stability to the hydrogen-evolution catalyst. The highly active and stable electrocatalyst enables an alkaline electrolyzer operating at 20more »mA cm–2 at a voltage lower than 1.5 V, lasting longer than 3 weeks without decay. Thus, the non-precious metal catalysts afford a high efficiency of about 15 % for light-driven water splitting using GaAs solar cells.« less

  4. Thermal stability of intermetallic phases in Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Ying; Tan, Lizhen; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-06-12

    Understanding the stability of precipitate phases in the Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys is critical to the alloy design and application of Mo-containing Austenitic steels. Coupled with thermodynamic modeling, stability of the chi and Laves phases in two Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys were investigated at 1000, 850 and 700 °C for different annealing time. The morphologies, compositions and crystal structures of the matrix and precipitate phases were carefully examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Electron Probe Microanalysis, X-ray diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The two key findings resulted from this work. One is that the chi phase is stable at high temperature and transformed intomore »the Laves phase at low temperature. The other is that both the chi and Laves phases have large solubilites of Cr, Mo and Ni, among which the Mo solubility has a major role on the relative stability of the precipitate phases. The developed thermodynamic models were then applied to evaluating the Mo effect on the stability of precipitate phases in AISI 316 and NF709 alloys.« less

  5. Effect of lattice deformation on exchange coupling constants in Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kota, Yohei; Imamura, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Munetaka

    2014-05-07

    We studied lattice deformation effect on exchange interaction in the corundum-type Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} theoretically. First-principles electronic structure calculations were performed to evaluate the total energy and exchange coupling constants of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} under lattice deformation. We found that a few percent elastic deformation is expected via misfit strain and that the first- and second-nearest neighbor exchange coupling constants of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} strongly depend on the lattice deformation. These results imply a possibility for improving the thermal stability of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} based magnetoelectric devices by lattice deformation.

  6. A study of CR-39 track response to charged particles from NOVA T. W. Phillips and M. D. Cable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the CR- 39. The manipulators permit the positioning of the package at various distances from the target enhanced image, and c tracks identified. Tracks labeled 6, 31, 35, and 48 are double and can

  7. Development of Cr-Mo-V-Cb-Ca steel for high pressure and high temperature hydrogenation reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamada, Masato; Sakai, Tadamiti; Nose, Shiro [Kobe Steel, Ltd., Takasago, Hyogo (Japan). Energy and Chemical Plant Group

    1995-12-31

    Cr-Mo-V-Cb-Ca steels have been developed as materials for high temperature and high pressure hydrogenation reactors. Cr-Mo-V-Cb-Ca steels have high strength at elevated temperature. The addition of vanadium and columbium also improve the resistance against hydrogen attack and hydrogen embrittlement. Calcium addition, which is a unique feature of this material, effectively reduces the possibility of stress relief cracking in the heat affected zone of the weldment of which susceptibility is otherwise impaired by the addition of vanadium. In 1993, 3Cr-1Mo-V-Cb-Ca steel was approved by ASME as ASME Code Case 2151 and the first hydrocracking reactors made of 3Cr-1Mo-V-Cb-Ca steel were manufactured in 1994 at Kobe Steel, Takasago Works.

  8. Coordination and Haptotropic Rearrangement of Cr(CO)3 on (n,0) Nanotube Sidewalls: A Dynamical Density Functional Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giannozzi, Paolo

    them ideal candidates for use in fuel cells (batteries), electron devices (semiconductors), catalysts optimizations have been performed on the Cr(CO)3-(C72H12) complex, pointing out the preferred coordination sites

  9. Course Course Title and Semester Offered Cr PhD in Public Health, CBHP Concentration, Curriculum (p 1 of 4)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Course Course Title and Semester Offered Cr PhD in Public Health, CBHP) until the Biostatistics offerings are expanded to include 710 3 COMMUNITY of Community Interventions ­ Fall, Offered as PH 740 Topics in Fall 2013 3 #12;Ph

  10. CR108, a novel vitamin K3 derivative induces apoptosis and breast tumor inhibition by reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial dysfunction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Chun-Ru; Liao, Wei-Siang; Wu, Ya-Hui; Murugan, Kaliyappan; Chen, Chinpiao; Chao, Jui-I

    2013-12-15

    Vitamin K3 derivatives have been shown to exert anticancer activities. Here we show a novel vitamin K3 derivative (S)-2-(2-hydroxy-3-methylbutylthio)naphthalene-1,4-dione, which is named as CR108 that induces apoptosis and tumor inhibition through reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial dysfunction in human breast cancer. CR108 is more effective on the breast cancer cell death than other vitamin K3 derivatives. Moreover, CR108 induced apoptosis in both the non-HER-2-overexpressed MCF-7 and HER-2-overexpressed BT-474 breast cancer cells. CR108 caused the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c released from mitochondria to cytosol, and cleaved PARP proteins for apoptosis induction. CR108 markedly increased ROS levels in breast cancer cells. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a general ROS scavenger, completely blocked the CR108-induced ROS levels, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. Interestingly, CR108 increased the phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase but conversely inhibited the survivin protein expression. NAC treatment prevented the activation of p38 MAP kinase and rescued the survivin protein levels. SB202190, a specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, recovered the survivin protein levels and attenuated the cytotoxicity of CR108-treated cells. Furthermore, CR108 inhibited the xenografted human breast tumor growth in nude mice. Together, we demonstrate that CR108 is a novel vitamin K3 derivative that induces apoptosis and tumor inhibition by ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction and associates with the phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase and the inhibition of survivin in the human breast cancer. - Highlights: • CR108 is more effective on the cell death than other vitamin K3 derivatives. • CR108 induces apoptosis and tumor inhibition by ROS and mitochondrial dysfunction. • CR108 induces apoptosis by p38 kinase activation and survivin inhibition. • CR108 is a potent vitamin K3 analog that can develop for breast cancer therapy.

  11. Cr-W-V bainitic/ferritic steel with improved strength and toughness and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klueh, Ronald L. (Knoxville, TN); Maziasz, Philip J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A high strength, high toughness Cr-W-V ferritic steel composition suitable for fast induced-radioactivity (FIRD) decay after irradiation in a fusion reactor comprises 2.5-3.5 wt % Cr, 2. This invention was made with Government support under contract DE-AC05-840R21400 awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy to Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. and the Government has certain rights in this invention.

  12. On the Utility of Antiprotons as Drivers for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, L J; Orth, C D; Tabak, M

    2003-10-20

    By contrast to the large mass, complexity and recirculating power of conventional drivers for inertial confinement fusion (ICF), antiproton annihilation offers a specific energy of 90MJ/{micro}g and thus a unique form of energy packaging and delivery. In principle, antiproton drivers could provide a profound reduction in system mass for advanced space propulsion by ICF. We examine the physics underlying the use of antiprotons ({bar p}) to drive various classes of high-yield ICF targets by the methods of volumetric ignition, hotspot ignition and fast ignition. The useable fraction of annihilation deposition energy is determined for both {bar p}-driven ablative compression and {bar p}-driven fast ignition, in association with 0-D and 1-D target burn models. Thereby, we deduce scaling laws for the number of injected antiprotons required per capsule, together with timing and focal spot requirements. The kinetic energy of the injected antiproton beam required to penetrate to the desired annihilation point is always small relative to the deposited annihilation energy. We show that heavy metal seeding of the fuel and/or ablator is required to optimize local deposition of annihilation energy and determine that a minimum of {approx}3x10{sup 15} injected antiprotons will be required to achieve high yield (several hundred megajoules) in any target configuration. Target gains - i.e., fusion yields divided by the available p - {bar p} annihilation energy from the injected antiprotons (1.88GeV/{bar p}) - range from {approx}3 for volumetric ignition targets to {approx}600 for fast ignition targets. Antiproton-driven ICF is a speculative concept, and the handling of antiprotons and their required injection precision - temporally and spatially - will present significant technical challenges. The storage and manipulation of low-energy antiprotons, particularly in the form of antihydrogen, is a science in its infancy and a large scale-up of antiproton production over present supply methods would be required to embark on a serious R&D program for this application.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of Cr-doped ZnO nanorod-array photocatalysts with improved activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Chi-Jung Yang, Tsung-Lin; Weng, Yu-Ching

    2014-06-01

    Immobilized photocatalysts with high catalytic activity under UV light were prepared by growing Cr-doped ZnO nanorods on glass substrates by a hydrothermal method. The effects of Cr dopant on the surface texture, crystallinity, surface chemistry, and photoinduced charge separation and their relation with the photocatalytic degradation of Cr-doped ZnO were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, diffuse reflectance spectra, photoelectrochemical scanning electrochemical microscopy, and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Adding the appropriate amount of Cr dopant is a powerful way to enhance the separation of charge carriers in ZnO photocatalyst. The photocatalytic activity was improved due to the increase in surface oxygen vacancies, the separation of charge carriers, modification of the band gap, and the large surface area of the doped ZnO nanorod photocatalyst. - Graphical abstract: Photoinduced charge separation and its relation with the photocatalytic degradation activity of Cr-doped ZnO were investigated by photoelectrochemical scanning electrochemical microscopy. - Highlights: • Cr dopant enhances separation of charge carries in ZnO nanorod photocatalyst. • Photoinduced charge carries separation monitored by PEC-SECM. • The higher the photocurrent is, the higher the photocatalytic activity is. • Degradation of DB86 dye solutions under visible light finished within 50 min. • Higher activity due to more oxygen vacancy, tuned band gap and more surface area.

  14. Characterization of Cr poisoning in a solid oxide fuel cell cathode using a high-energy x-ray microbeam.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, D. J.; Almer, J.; Cruse, T.

    2010-01-01

    A key feature of planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) is the feasibility of using metallic interconnects made of high temperature ferritic stainless steels, which reduce system cost while providing excellent electric conductivity. Such interconnects, however, contain high levels of chromium, which has been found to be associated with SOFC cathode performance degradation at SOFC operating temperatures; a phenomenon known as Cr poisoning. Here, we demonstrate an accurate measurement of the phase and concentration distributions of Cr species in a degraded SOFC, as well as related properties including deviatoric strain, integrated porosity, and lattice parameter variation, using high energy microbeam X-ray diffraction and radiography. We unambiguously identify (MnCr){sub 3}O{sub 4} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} as the two main contaminant phases and find that their concentrations correlate strongly with the cathode layer composition. Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} deposition within the active cathode region reduces porosity and produces compressive residual strains, which hinders the reactant gas percolation and can cause structural breakdown of the SOFC cathode. The information obtained through this study can be used to better understand the Cr-poisoning mechanism and improve SOFC design.

  15. Studies Of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation And Longitudinal Space Charge In The Jefferson Lab FEL Driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennant, Christopher D.; Douglas, David R.; Li, Rui; Tsai, C.-Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Jefferson Laboratory IR FEL Driver provides an ideal test bed for studying a variety of beam dynamical effects. Recent studies focused on characterizing the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) with the goal of benchmarking measurements with simulation. Following measurements to characterize the beam, we quantitatively characterized energy extraction via CSR by measuring beam position at a dispersed location as a function of bunch compression. In addition to operating with the beam on the rising part of the linac RF waveform, measurements were also made while accelerating on the falling part. For each, the full compression point was moved along the backleg of the machine and the response of the beam (distribution, extracted energy) measured. Initial results of start-to-end simulations using a 1D CSR algorithm show remarkably good agreement with measurements. A subsequent experiment established lasing with the beam accelerated on the falling side of the RF waveform in conjunction with positive momentum compaction (R56) to compress the bunch. The success of this experiment motivated the design of a modified CEBAF-style arc with control of CSR and microbunching effects.

  16. Performance of the accelerator driver of Jefferson Laboratory's free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohn, C.L.; Benson, S.; Biallas, G.

    1999-04-01

    The driver of Jefferson Lab's kW-level infrared free-electron laser (FEL) is a superconducting, recirculating accelerator that recovers about 75% of the electron-beam power and converts it to radiofrequency power. In achieving first lasing, the accelerator operated straight-ahead to deliver 38 MeV, 1.1 mA cw current through the wiggler for lasing at wavelengths in the vicinity of 5 {mu}m. Just prior to first lasing, measured rms beam properties at the wiggler were 7.5{+-}1.5 mm-mr normalized transverse emittance, 26{+-}7 keV-deg longitudinal emittance, and 0.4{+-}0.1 ps bunch length which yielded a peak current of 60{+-}15A. The waste beam was then sent directly to a dump, bypassing the recirculation loop. Stable operation at up to 311 W cw was achieved in this mode. Commissioning the recirculation loop then proceeded. As of this Conference, the machine has recirculated cw average current up to 4 mA, and has lased cw with energy recover up to 710 W.

  17. Evaluation of EBR-II driver-fuel elements following an unprotected station blackout accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, L.K.; Bottcher, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    One of the current design objectives for a liquid metal reactor (LMR) is the inherent shutdown-cooling capability of the reactor, such that the reactor itself can safely reduce power following a total loss of pump power without activating the reactor shutdown system (RSS). Following a loss-of-flow (LOF) accident and a failure of RSS, in EBR-II, reactor core damage and plant restartability is of considerable interest. In the LOF event, high temperature in the reactor causes negative reactivity feedback that reduces reactor power. After an accident, reactor fuel performance is one of the factors used to assess the restartability of the plant. A thermal-hydraulic-neutronic analysis was performed to determine the response of the plant and the temperature of individual subassemblies. These temperatures were then used to assess the damage to driver fuel elements caused by the station blackout accident. The maximum depth of cladding wastage from molten eutectic at temperatures >715/sup 0/C was found to be 0.0053 mm for the hottest subassembly; this value is considerably less than the 0.28 mm cladding thickness. 12 refs.

  18. Low impedance z-pinch drivers without post-hole convolute current adders.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savage, Mark Edward; Seidel, David Bruce; Mendel, Clifford Will, Jr.

    2009-09-01

    Present-day pulsed-power systems operating in the terawatt regime typically use post-hole convolute current adders to operate at sufficiently low impedance. These adders necessarily involve magnetic nulls that connect the positive and negative electrodes. The resultant loss of magnetic insulation results in electron losses in the vicinity of the nulls that can severely limit the efficiency of the delivery of the system's energy to a load. In this report, we describe an alternate transformer-based approach to obtaining low impedance. The transformer consists of coils whose windings are in parallel rather than in series, and does not suffer from the presence of magnetic nulls. By varying the pitch of the coils windings, the current multiplication ratio can be varied, leading to a more versatile driver. The coupling efficiency of the transformer, its behavior in the presence of electron flow, and its mechanical strength are issues that need to be addressed to evaluate the potential of transformer-based current multiplication as a viable alternative to conventional current adder technology.

  19. The high current, fast, 100ns, Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) developmental project at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Kevin S.; Long, Finis W.; Sinebryukhov, Vadim A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia); Kim, Alexandre A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, RUSSIA); Wakeland, Peter Eric (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); McKee, G. Randall; Woodworth, Joseph Ray; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Struve, Kenneth William; Stygar, William A.; LeChien, Keith R.; Matzen, Maurice Keith

    2010-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, N.M., USA, in collaboration with the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia, is developing a new paradigm in pulsed power technology: the Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) technology. This technological approach can provide very compact devices that can deliver very fast high current and high voltage pulses straight out of the cavity with out any complicated pulse forming and pulse compression network. Through multistage inductively insulated voltage adders, the output pulse, increased in voltage amplitude, can be applied directly to the load. The load may be a vacuum electron diode, a z-pinch wire array, a gas puff, a liner, an isentropic compression load (ICE) to study material behavior under very high magnetic fields, or a fusion energy (IFE) target. This is because the output pulse rise time and width can be easily tailored to the specific application needs. In this paper we briefly summarize the developmental work done in Sandia and HCEI during the last few years, and describe our new MYKONOS Sandia High Current LTD Laboratory.

  20. Biennial Workshop on DSP for In-Vehicle Systems, Kiel, Germany, 2011 Assessment of driver's distraction using perceptual evaluations, self assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Busso, Carlos

    platform ­ a car equipped with multiple nonintrusive sensors [1, 9]. Following the de- finition provided causes of car accidents is drivers that become distracted by secondary tasks. There is a growing concern-in car ra

  1. Correlation between morphology, chemical environment, and ferromagnetism in the intrinsic-vacancy dilute magnetic semiconductor Cr-doped Ga2Se3/Si(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yitamben, E.N.; Arena, D.; Lovejoy, T.C.; Pakhomov, A.B.; Heald, S.M.; Negusse, E.; Ohuchi, F.S.; Olmstead, M.A.

    2011-01-28

    Chromium-doped gallium sesquiselenide, Cr:Ga{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, is a member of a new class of dilute magnetic semiconductors exploiting intrinsic vacancies in the host material. The correlation among room-temperature ferromagnetism, surface morphology, electronic structure, chromium concentration, and local chemical and structural environments in Cr:Ga{sub 2}Se{sub 3} films grown epitaxially on silicon is investigated with magnetometry, scanning tunneling microscopy, photoemission spectroscopy, and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Inclusion of a few percent chromium in Ga{sub 2}Se{sub 3} results in laminar, semiconducting films that are ferromagnetic at room temperature with a magnetic moment 4{micro}{sub B}/Cr. The intrinsic-vacancy structure of defected-zinc-blende {beta}-Ga{sub 2}Se{sub 3} enables Cr incorporation in a locally octahedral site without disrupting long-range order, determined by x-ray absorption spectroscopy, as well as strong overlap between Cr 3d states and the Se 4p states lining the intrinsic-vacancy rows, observed with photoemission. The highest magnetic moment per Cr is observed near the solubility limit of roughly one Cr per three vacancies. At higher Cr concentrations, islanded, metallic films result, with a magnetic moment that depends strongly on surface morphology. The effective valence is Cr{sup 3+} in laminar films, with introduction of Cr{sup 0} upon islanding. A mechanism is proposed for laminar films whereby ordered intrinsic vacancies mediate ferromagnetism.

  2. Effect of annealing treatment on the electrical characteristics of Pt/Cr-embedded ZnO/Pt resistance random access memory devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Li-Chun; Kao, Hsuan-Ling; Liu, Keng-Hao

    2014-03-15

    ZnO/Cr/ZnO trilayer films sandwiched with Pt electrodes were prepared for nonvolatile resistive memory applications. The threshold voltage of a ZnO device embedded with a 3-nm Cr interlayer was approximately 50% lower than that of a ZnO monolayer device. This study investigated threshold voltage as a function of Cr thickness. Both the ZnO monolayer device and the Cr-embedded ZnO device structures exhibited resistance switching under electrical bias both before and after rapid thermal annealing (RTA) treatment, but resistive switching effects in the two cases exhibited distinct characteristics. Compared with the as-fabricated device, the memory cell after RTA demonstrated remarkable device parameter improvements, including a lower threshold voltage, a lower write current, and a higher R{sub off}/R{sub on} ratio. Both transmission electron microscope observations and Auger electron spectroscopy revealed that the Cr charge trapping layer in Cr-embedded ZnO dispersed uniformly into the storage medium after RTA, and x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses demonstrated that the Cr atoms lost electrons to become Cr{sup 3+} ions after dispersion. These results indicated that the altered status of Cr in ZnO/Cr/ZnO trilayer films during RTA treatment was responsible for the switching mechanism transition.

  3. Feasibility of developing a portable driver performance data acquisition system for human factors research: Design specifications. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, R.J.; Barickman, F.S.

    1998-01-01

    A two-phase, multi-year research program entitled ``development of a portable driver performance data acquisition system for human factors research was recently completed. The primary objective of the project was to develop a portable data acquisition system for crash avoidance research (DASCAR) that will allow driver performance data to be collected using a large variety of vehicle types and that would be capable of being installed on a given vehicle type within a relatively short-time frame. During Phase 1 a feasibility study for designing and fabricating DASCAR was conducted. In phase 2 of the research DASCAR was actually developed and validated. This technical memorandum documents the results from the feasibility study. It is subdivided into three volumes. Volume one addresses the last five items in the phase 1 research and the first issue in the second phase of the project. Volume 2 presents the related appendices. Volume three (this report) displays the design specifications developed for DASCAR during the ``develop design requirements and specifications for a portable driver performance data acquisition system`` task. Design specifications were assembled for each DASCAR element. The specifications were prepared in sufficient detail to allow a third party to use them to design, develop, procure, and subsequently construct the data acquisition system. This report also covers the background to the program.

  4. Assessing Energy Impact of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles: Significance of Daily Distance Variation over Time and Among Drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL; Greene, David L [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Accurate assessment of the impact of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) on petroleum and electricity consumption is a necessary step toward effective policies. Variations in daily vehicle miles traveled (VMT) over time and among drivers affect PHEV energy impact, but the significance is not well understood. This paper uses a graphical illustration, a mathematical derivation, and an empirical study to examine the cause and significance of such an effect. The first two methods reveal that ignoring daily variation in VMT always causes underestimation of petroleum consumption and overestimation of electricity consumption by PHEVs; both biases increase as the assumed PHEV charge-depleting (CD) range moves closer to the average daily VMT. The empirical analysis based on national travel survey data shows that the assumption of uniform daily VMT over time and among drivers causes nearly 68% underestimation of expected petroleum use and nearly 48% overestimation of expected electricity use by PHEVs with a 40-mi CD range (PHEV40s). Also for PHEV40s, consideration of daily variation in VMT over time but not among drivers similar to the way the utility factor curve is derived in SAE Standard SAE J2841 causes underestimation of expected petroleum use by more than 24% and overestimation of expected electricity use by about 17%. Underestimation of petroleum use and overestimation of electricity use increase with larger-battery PHEVs.

  5. A wide bandgap silicon carbide (SiC) gate driver for high-temperature and high-voltage applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamichhane, Ranjan [University of Arkansas; Ericson, Milton Nance [ORNL; Frank, Steven Shane [ORNL; BRITTONJr., CHARLES L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Marlino, Laura D [ORNL; Mantooth, Alan [University of Arkansas; Francis, Matt [APEI, Inc.; Shepherd, Dr. Paul [University of Arkansas; Glover, Dr. Michael [University of Arkansas; Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Perez, M [University of Arkansas; Mcnutt, Tyler [APEI, Inc.; Whitaker, Mr. Bret [APEI, Inc.; Cole, Mr. Zach [APEI, Inc.

    2014-01-01

    Limitations of silicon (Si) based power electronic devices can be overcome with Silicon Carbide (SiC) because of its remarkable material properties. SiC is a wide bandgap semiconductor material with larger bandgap, lower leakage currents, higher breakdown electric field, and higher thermal conductivity, which promotes higher switching frequencies for high power applications, higher temperature operation, and results in higher power density devices relative to Si [1]. The proposed work is focused on design of a SiC gate driver to drive a SiC power MOSFET, on a Cree SiC process, with rise/fall times (less than 100 ns) suitable for 500 kHz to 1 MHz switching frequency applications. A process optimized gate driver topology design which is significantly different from generic Si circuit design is proposed. The ultimate goal of the project is to integrate this gate driver into a Toyota Prius plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) charger module. The application of this high frequency charger will result in lighter, smaller, cheaper, and a more efficient power electronics system.

  6. Reactive oxygen species mediate Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis through PI3K/AKT-dependent activation of GSK-3?/?-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Son, Young-Ok; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Wang, Lei; Wang, Xin; Fan, Jia; Kim, Dong-Hern; Lee, Ju-Yeon; Zhang, Zhuo; Lee, Jeong-Chae; Shi, Xianglin

    2013-09-01

    Cr(VI) compounds are known human carcinogens that primarily target the lungs. Cr(VI) produces reactive oxygen species (ROS), but the exact effects of ROS on the signaling molecules involved in Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis have not been extensively studied. Chronic exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells to Cr(VI) at nanomolar concentrations (10–100 nM) for 3 months not only induced cell transformation, but also increased the potential of these cells to invade and migrate. Injection of Cr(VI)-stimulated cells into nude mice resulted in the formation of tumors. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) increased levels of intracellular ROS and antiapoptotic proteins. Transfection with catalase or superoxide dismutase (SOD) prevented Cr(VI)-mediated increases in colony formation, cell invasion, migration, and xenograft tumors. While chronic Cr(VI) exposure led to activation of signaling cascades involving PI3K/AKT/GSK-3?/?-catenin and PI3K/AKT/mTOR, transfection with catalase or SOD markedly inhibited Cr(VI)-mediated activation of these signaling proteins. Inhibitors specific for AKT or ?-catenin almost completely suppressed the Cr(VI)-mediated increase in total and active ?-catenin proteins and colony formation. In particular, Cr(VI) suppressed autophagy of epithelial cells under nutrition deprivation. Furthermore, there was a marked induction of AKT, GSK-3?, ?-catenin, mTOR, and carcinogenic markers in tumor tissues formed in mice after injection with Cr(VI)-stimulated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that ROS is a key mediator of Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis through the activation of PI3K/AKT-dependent GSK-3?/?-catenin signaling and the promotion of cell survival mechanisms via the inhibition of apoptosis and autophagy. - Highlights: • Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) induces carcinogenic properties in BEAS-2B cells. • ROS play an important role in Cr(VI)-induced tumorigenicity of BEAS-2B cells. • PI3K/AKT/GSK-3?/?-catenin signaling involved in Cr(VI) carcinogenesis. • The inhibition of apoptosis and autophagy contributes to Cr(VI) carcinogenesis.

  7. Letter Report Documenting Progress of Second Generation ATF FeCrAl Alloy Fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamamoto,, Y.; Yang, Y.; Field, K. G.; Terrani, K.; Pint, B. A.; Snead, L. L.

    2014-06-10

    Development of the 2nd generation ATF FeCrAl alloy has been initiated, and a candidate alloy was selected for trial tube fabrication through hot-extrusion and gun-drilling processes. Four alloys based on Fe-13Cr-4.5Al-0.15Y in weight percent were newly cast with minor alloying additions of Mo, Si, Nb, and C to promote solid-solution and second-phase precipitate strengthening. The alloy compositions were selected with guidance from computational thermodynamic tools. The lab-scale heats of ~ 600g were arc-melted and drop-cast, homogenized, hot-forged and -rolled, and then annealed producing plate shape samples. An alloy with Mo and Nb additions (C35MN) processed at 800°C exhibits very fine sub-grain structure with the sub-grain size of 1-3?m which exhibited more than 25% better yield and tensile strengths together with decent ductility compared to the other FeCrAl alloys at room temperature. It was found that the Nb addition was key to improving thermal stability of the fine sub-grain structure. Optimally, grains of less than 30 microns are desired, with grains up to and order of magnitude in desired produced through Nb addition. Scale-up effort of the C35MN alloy was made in collaboration with a commercial cast company who has a capability of vacuum induction melting. A 39lb columnar ingot with ~81mm diameter and ~305mm height (with hot-top) was commercially cast, homogenized, hot-extruded, and annealed providing 10mm-diameter bar-shape samples with the fine sub-grain structure. This commercial heat proved consistent with materials produced at ORNL at the lab-scale. Tubes and end caps were machined from the bar sample and provided to another work package for the ATF-1 irradiation campaign in the milestone M3FT-14OR0202251.

  8. Thermal aging modeling and validation on the Mo containing Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Ying; Tan, Lizhen; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-04-01

    Thermodynamics of intermetallic phases in Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys is critical knowledge to understand thermal aging effect on the phase stability of Mo-containing austenitic steels, which subsequently facilitates alloy design/improvement and degradation mitigation of these materials for reactor applications. Among the intermetallic phases, Chi (?), Laves, and Sigma (?) are often of concern because of their tendency to cause embrittlement of the materials. The focus of this study is thermal stability of the Chi and Laves phases as they were less studied compared to the Sigma phase. Coupled with thermodynamic modeling, thermal stability of intermetallic phases in Mo containing Fe-Cr-Ni alloys was investigated at 1000, 850 and 700 C for different annealing times. The morphologies, compositions and crystal structures of the precipitates of the intermetallic phases were carefully examined by scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Three key findings resulted from this study. First, the Chi phase is stable at high temperature, and with decreasing temperature it transforms into the Laves phase that is stable at low temperature. Secondly, Cr, Mo, Ni are soluble in both the Chi and Laves phases, with the solubility of Mo playing a major role in the relative stability of the intermetallic phases. Thirdly, in situ transformation from Chi phase to Laves phase was directly observed, which increased the local strain field, generated dislocations in the intermetallic phases, and altered the precipitate phase orientation relationship with the austenitic matrix. The thermodynamic models that were developed and validated were then applied to evaluating the effect of Mo on the thermal stability of intermetallic phases in type 316 and NF709 stainless steels.

  9. Quantum spin coherence in halogen-modified Cr$_7$Ni molecular nanomagnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danielle Kaminski; Amy L. Webber; Christopher J. Wedge; Junjie Liu; Grigore A. Timco; Inigo J. Vitorica-Yrezabal; Eric J. L. McInnes; Richard E. P. Winpenny; Arzhang Ardavan

    2014-10-30

    Among the factors determining the quantum coherence of the spin in molecular magnets is the presence and the nature of nuclear spins in the molecule. We have explored modifying the nuclear spin environment in Cr$_7$Ni-based molecular nanomagnets by replacing hydrogen atoms with deuterium or the halogen atoms, fluorine or chlorine. We find that the spin coherence, studied at low temperatures by pulsed electron spin resonance, is modified by a range of factors, including nuclear spin and magnetic moment, changes in dynamics owing to nuclear mass, and molecular morphology changes.

  10. Testing Novel CR-39 Detector Deployment System For Identification of Subsurface Fractures, Soda Springs, ID

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLing, Travis; Carpenter, Michael; Brandon, William; Zavala, Bernie

    2015-06-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has teamed with Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to facilitate further testing of geologic-fracture-identification methodology at a field site near the Monsanto Superfund Site located in Soda Springs, Idaho. INL has the necessary testing and technological expertise to perform this work. Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI) has engaged INL to perform this work through a Work for Others (WFO) Agreement. This study continues a multi-year collaborative effort between INL and EPA to test the efficacy of using field deployed Cr-39 radon in soil portals. This research enables identification of active fractures capable of transporting contaminants at sites where fractures are suspected pathways into the subsurface. Current state of the art methods for mapping fracture networks are exceedingly expensive and notoriously inaccurate. The proposed WFO will evaluate the applicability of using cheap, readily available, passive radon detectors to identify conductive geologic structures (i.e. fractures, and fracture networks) in the subsurface that control the transport of contaminants at fracture-dominated sites. The proposed WFO utilizes proven off-the-shelf technology in the form of CR-39 radon detectors, which have been widely deployed to detect radon levels in homes and businesses. In an existing collaborative EPA/INL study outside of this workscope,. CR-39 detectors are being utilized to determine the location of active transport fractures in a fractured granitic upland adjacent to a landfill site at the Fort Devens, MA that EPA-designated as National Priorities List (NPL) site. The innovative concept of using an easily deployed port that allows the CR-39 to measure the Rn-222 in the soil or alluvium above the fractured rock, while restricting atmospheric Rn-222 and soil sourced Ra from contaminating the detector is unique to INL and EPA approach previously developed. By deploying a series of these inexpensive detector-casing combinations statistical samples of the Rn-222 flux can be measured, elucidating the most communicative fractures (i.e. fractures that are actively transporting water and gasses). The Rn-222 measurements can then be used as an input to create a more accurate conceptual model to be used for transport modeling and related cleanup activities. If the team’s approach is demonstrated to be applicable to a wide variety of rock types and soil conditions it might potentially offer significant cost saving without a reduction in data quality at Monsanto Superfund and other sites underlain by fracture-dominated bedrock.

  11. Corrosion and degradation of a polyurethane/Co-Ni-Cr-Mo pacemaker lead

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sung, P.; Fraker, A.C.

    1987-12-01

    An investigation to study changes in the metal surfaces and the polyurethane insulation of heart pacemaker leads under controlled in vitro conditions was conducted. A polyurethane (Pellethane 2363-80A)/Co-Ni-Cr-Mo (MP35N) wire lead was exposed in Hanks' physiological saline solution for 14 months and then analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray energy dispersive analysis, and small angle x-ray scattering. Results showed that some leakage of solution into the lead had occurred and changes were present on both the metal and the polyurethane surfaces.

  12. Model independent interpretation of recent CR lepton data after AMS-02

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaggero, Daniele; Maccione, Luca E-mail: luca.maccione@lmu.de

    2013-12-01

    We model the CR leptonic fluxes above 20 GeV in terms of a superposition of a standard and a charge symmetric extra component, which we generically describe as power-laws in momentum. We investigate under these hypotheses the compatibility between AMS-02, Fermi-LAT and PAMELA datasets on positron fraction, electron+positron spectrum and electron spectrum respectively. We find that it is possible to reconcile AMS and Fermi-LAT data within uncertainties, if energy-dependent effects are present in Fermi-LAT systematics. We also study possible deviations from charge symmetry in the extra component and find no compelling evidence for them.

  13. Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.; Levine, Mark

    2009-06-01

    China's rapid economic expansion has propelled it to the rank of the largest energy consuming nation in the world, with energy demand growth continuing at a pace commensurate with its economic growth. The urban population is expected to grow by 20 million every year, accompanied by construction of 2 billion square meters of buildings every year through 2020. Thus residential energy use is very likely to continue its very rapid growth. Understanding the underlying drivers of this growth helps to identify the key areas to analyze energy efficiency potential, appropriate policies to reduce energy use, as well as to understand future energy in the building sector. This paper provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sources and a modelling effort that relies on a very detailed characterization of China's energy demand. It assesses the current energy situation with consideration of end use, intensity, and efficiency etc, and forecast the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020, based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity, availability of energy services, technology improvement and energy intensities. From this analysis, we can conclude that Chinese residential energy consumption will more than double by 2020, from 6.6 EJ in 2000 to 15.9 EJ in 2020. This increase will be driven primarily by urbanization, in combination with increases in living standards. In the urban and higher income Chinese households of the future, most major appliances will be common, and heated and cooled areas will grow on average. These shifts will offset the relatively modest efficiency gains expected according to current government plans and policies already in place. Therefore, levelling and reduction of growth in residential energy demand in China will require a new set of more aggressive efficiency policies.

  14. Pulse shaping and energy storage capabilities of angularly multiplexed KrF laser fusion drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehmberg, R. H. [Research Support Instruments, Inc., Lanham, Maryland 20706 (United States); Giuliani, J. L.; Schmitt, A. J. [Plasma Physics Division, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    This paper describes a rep-rated multibeam KrF laser driver design for the 500 kJ Inertial Fusion test Facility (FTF) recently proposed by NRL, then models its optical pulse shaping capabilities using the ORESTES laser kinetics code. It describes a stable and reliable iteration technique for calculating the required precompensated input pulse shape that will achieve the desired output shape, even when the amplifiers are heavily saturated. It also describes how this precompensation technique could be experimentally implemented in real time on a reprated laser system. The simulations show that this multibeam system can achieve a high fidelity pulse shaping capability, even for a high gain shock ignition pulse whose final spike requires output intensities much higher than the approx4 MW/cm{sup 2} saturation levels associated with quasi-cw operation; i.e., they show that KrF can act as a storage medium even for pulsewidths of approx1 ns. For the chosen pulse, which gives a predicted fusion energy gain of approx120, the simulations predict the FTF can deliver a total on-target energy of 428 kJ, a peak spike power of 385 TW, and amplified spontaneous emission prepulse contrast ratios I{sub ASE}/I<3x10{sup -7} in intensity and F{sub ASE}/F<1.5x10{sup -5} in fluence. Finally, the paper proposes a front-end pulse shaping technique that combines an optical Kerr gate with cw 248 nm light and a 1 mum control beam shaped by advanced fiber optic technology, such as the one used in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser.

  15. On the peculiar properties of triangular-chain EuCr{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4} antiferromagnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gondek, ?.; Szytu?a, A.; Przewo?nik, J.; ?ukrowski, J.; Prokhorov, A.; Chernush, L.; Zubov, E.; Dyakonov, V.; Tyvanchuk, Yu.

    2014-02-15

    In this paper we report studies on EuCr{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4} compound, that is a member of newly discovered family of huntite-related specimens for non-linear optics. For the first time, the uncommon temperature dependence of the EuCr{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4} lattice parameters is reported. Additionally, the magnetism of this compound is extremely interesting. Namely, a possible interplay in between potentially magnetic rare-earth ions and 3d metal stacked within quasi-1D chain that can lead to a great variety of magnetic behaviour. Indeed, in our studies we have found 3D-long range ordering with metamagnetic behaviour, while at higher temperature the magnetic chains become uncoupled. - Graphical abstract: Torsion-like vibrations are the key to understand negative thermal expansion along the a-axis. Display Omitted - Highlights: • EuCr{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4} is a peculiar triangular-chain antiferromagnet. • Rare earth sublattice is non-magnetic with Eu{sup 3+} configuration. • Cr{sup 3+} magnetic moments show 1-D behaviour along with spin fluctuations. • Torsion vibrations of Cr triangular tubes lead to anomalous expansion of unit cell.

  16. Optical properties of undoped and Mg doped CuCrO{sub 2} powders synthesized by sol-gel route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srinivasan, Radhakrishnan; Bolloju, Satish [Department of Chemistry, BITS Pilani Hyderabad Campus, Jawahar Nagar Village, Shamirpet Mandal, R.R.District, Hyderabad - 500 078 (India)

    2014-01-28

    In this work, CuCrO{sub 2} was synthesized by sol-gel method using citric acid as a gelling agent. The different parameters like ratio of citric acid to metal ions, calcination temperature, and duration were studied. A green colored powder with particle size around 300 nm was formed at the calcination temperature of 800 °C for four hours duration. The increase in temperature has a profound impact on crystallite size and in turn effected the optical properties. Band gap of the obtained CuCrO{sub 2} has varied from 2.3 to 1.7 eV by increasing the temperature from 800 °C to 900 °C. Doping studies were performed by introducing Mg{sup 2+} ion to substitute Cr{sup 3+} in CuCrO{sub 2}. X-ray powder diffraction and SEM studies on 2% Mg doped samples indicated a clear formation of side phases. According to the X-ray powder patterns, the reflections from side phases were increasing with the increase in doping concentrations of Mg from 2 to 5%. The side phases were found to be MgCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel and CuO. The band gap has decreased for doped samples in comparison to undoped one. In this paper, sol-gel synthesis and characterization by Xray powder diffraction, SEM studies and UV-Vis-Diffuse Reflectance spectra are presented.

  17. Stud. Geophys. Geod., 56 (2012), 677-704, DOI: 10.1007/s11200-011-9005-9 677 2012 Inst. Geophys. AS CR, Prague

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    2012-01-01

    . AS CR, Prague Magnetic susceptibility and its relationship with paleoenvironments, diagenesis, diagenesis 1. INTRODUCTION The use of initial magnetic susceptibility (in) records for high

  18. Magnetic Correlations in the Quasi-Two-Dimensional Semiconducting Ferromagnet CrSiTe3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Williams, Travis J.; Aczel, Adam A.; Lumsden, Mark D.; Nagler, Stephen E.; Stone, Matthew B.; Yan, Jiaqiang -Q.; Mandrus, D.

    2015-10-02

    Intrinsic, 2D ferromagnetic semiconductors are an important class of materials for overcoming dilute magnetic semiconductors’ limitations for spintronics. CrSiTe3 is a particularly interesting material of this class, since it can likely be exfoliated to single layers, for which Tc is predicted to increase dramatically. Establishing the nature of the bulk material’s magnetism is necessary for understanding the thin-film magnetic behavior and the material’s possible applications. In this work, we use elastic and inelastic neutron scattering to measure the magnetic properties of single crystalline CrSiTe3. We find a very small single ion anisotropy that favors magnetic ordering along the c-axis andmore »that the measured spin waves fit well to a model in which the moments are only weakly coupled along that direction. Then, we find that both static and dynamic correlations persist within the ab-plane up to at least 300 K, which is strong evidence of the material's 2D characteristics that are relevant for future studies on thin film and monolayer samples.« less

  19. Origin of spin gapless semiconductor behavior in CoFeCrGa. Theory and Experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bainsla, Lakhan; Mallick, A. I.; Raja, M. Manivel; Coelho, A. A.; Nigam, A. K.; Johnson, D. D.; Alam, Aftab; Suresh, K. G.

    2015-07-08

    Despite a plethora of materials suggested for spintronic applications, a new class of materials has emerged, namely spin gapless semiconductors (SGS), which offers potentially more advantageous properties than existing ones. These magnetic semiconductors exhibit a finite band gap for one spin channel and a closed gap for the other. Supported by electronic-structure calculations, we report evidence of SGS behavior in equiatomic quaternary CoFeCrGa, having a cubic Heusler (prototype LiMgPdSn) structure but exhibiting chemical disorder (DO3 structure). CoFeCrGa is found to transform from SGS to half-metallic phase under pressure, which is attributed to unique electronic-structure features. The saturation magnetization (MS) wasmore »obtained at 8K agrees with the Slater-Pauling rule and the Curie temperature (TC) is found to exceed 400K. Carrier concentration (up to 250K) and electrical conductivity are observed to be nearly temperature independent, prerequisites for SGS. The anomalous Hall coefficient is estimated to be 185S/cm at 5K. Considering the SGS properties and high TC, this material appears to be promising for spintronic applications.« less

  20. Origin of spin gapless semiconductor behavior in CoFeCrGa. Theory and Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bainsla, Lakhan; Mallick, A. I.; Raja, M. Manivel; Coelho, A. A.; Nigam, A. K.; Johnson, D. D.; Alam, Aftab; Suresh, K. G.

    2015-07-08

    Despite a plethora of materials suggested for spintronic applications, a new class of materials has emerged, namely spin gapless semiconductors (SGS), which offers potentially more advantageous properties than existing ones. These magnetic semiconductors exhibit a finite band gap for one spin channel and a closed gap for the other. Supported by electronic-structure calculations, we report evidence of SGS behavior in equiatomic quaternary CoFeCrGa, having a cubic Heusler (prototype LiMgPdSn) structure but exhibiting chemical disorder (DO3 structure). CoFeCrGa is found to transform from SGS to half-metallic phase under pressure, which is attributed to unique electronic-structure features. The saturation magnetization (MS) was obtained at 8K agrees with the Slater-Pauling rule and the Curie temperature (TC) is found to exceed 400K. Carrier concentration (up to 250K) and electrical conductivity are observed to be nearly temperature independent, prerequisites for SGS. The anomalous Hall coefficient is estimated to be 185S/cm at 5K. Considering the SGS properties and high TC, this material appears to be promising for spintronic applications.

  1. Magnetic Correlations in the Quasi-2D Semiconducting Ferromagnet CrSiTe3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Williams, Travis J.; Aczel, Adam A.; Lumsden, Mark D.; Nagler, Stephen E.; Stone, Matthew B.; Yan, Jiaqiang; Mandrus, D.

    2015-10-02

    Intrinsic, two-dimensional ferromagnetic semiconductors are an important class of materials for overcoming the limitations of dilute magnetic semiconductors for spintronics applications. CrSiTe3 is a particularly interesting member of this class, since it can likely be exfoliated down to single layers, where Tc is predicted to increase dramatically. Establishing the nature of the magnetism in the bulk is a necessary precursor to understanding the magnetic behavior in thin film samples and the possible applications of this material. In this work, we use elastic and inelastic neutron scattering to measure the magnetic properties of single crystalline CrSiTe3. We find that there ismore »a very small single ion anisotropy favoring magnetic ordering along the c-axis and that the measured spin waves fit well to a model where the moments are only weakly coupled along that direction. Finally, we find that both static and dynamic correlations persist within the ab-plane up to at least 300 K, strong evidence of this material's two-dimensional characteristics that are relevant for future studies on thin film and monolayer samples.« less

  2. Oxidation Resistant, Cr Retaining, Electrically Conductive Coatings on Metallic Alloys for SOFC Interconnects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vladimir Gorokhovsky

    2008-03-31

    This report describes significant results from an on-going, collaborative effort to enable the use of inexpensive metallic alloys as interconnects in planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) through the use of advanced coating technologies. Arcomac Surface Engineering, LLC, under the leadership of Dr. Vladimir Gorokhovsky, is investigating filtered-arc and filtered-arc plasma-assisted hybrid coating deposition technologies to promote oxidation resistance, eliminate Cr volatility, and stabilize the electrical conductivity of both standard and specialty steel alloys of interest for SOFC metallic interconnect (IC) applications. Arcomac has successfully developed technologies and processes to deposit coatings with excellent adhesion, which have demonstrated a substantial increase in high temperature oxidation resistance, stabilization of low Area Specific Resistance values and significantly decrease Cr volatility. An extensive matrix of deposition processes, coating compositions and architectures was evaluated. Technical performance of coated and uncoated sample coupons during exposures to SOFC interconnect-relevant conditions is discussed, and promising future directions are considered. Cost analyses have been prepared based on assessment of plasma processing parameters, which demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed surface engineering process for SOFC metallic IC applications.

  3. Low voltage tunneling magnetoresistance in CuCrO{sub 2}-based semiconductor heterojunctions at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, X. R.; Han, M. J.; Shan, C.; Hu, Z. G. Zhu, Z. Q.; Chu, J. H.; Wu, J. D.

    2014-12-14

    CuCrO{sub 2}-based heterojunction diodes with rectifying characteristics have been fabricated by combining p-type Mg-doped CuCrO{sub 2} and n-type Al-doped ZnO. It was found that the current for the heterojunction in low bias voltage region is dominated by the trap-assisted tunneling mechanism. Positive magnetoresistance (MR) effect for the heterojunction can be observed at room temperature due to the tunneling-induced antiparallel spin polarization near the heterostructure interface. The MR effect becomes enhanced with the magnetic field, and shows the maximum at a bias voltage around 0.5?V. The phenomena indicate that the CuCrO{sub 2}-based heterojunction is a promising candidate for low-power semiconductor spintronic devices.

  4. Key regulatory drivers affecting shipments of mixed transuranic waste from Los Alamos National Laboratory to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumann, P.B.; Bacigalupa, G.A.; Kosiewicz, S.T.; Sinkule, B.J.

    1997-02-01

    A number of key regulatory drivers affect the nature, scope, and timing of Los Alamos National Laboratory`s (LANL`s) plans for mixed transuranic (MTRU) waste shipments to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which are planned to commence as soon as possible following WIPP`s currently anticipated November, 1997 opening date. This paper provides an overview of some of the key drivers at LANL, particularly emphasizing those associated with the hazardous waste component of LANL`s MTRU waste (MTRU, like any mixed waste, contains both a radioactive and a hazardous waste component). The key drivers discussed here derive from the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and its amendments, including the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAU), and from the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act (NMHWA). These statutory provisions are enforced through three major mechanisms: facility RCRA permits; the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Management Regulations, set forth in the New Mexico Administrative Code, Title 20, Chapter 4, Part 1: and compliance orders issued to enforce these requirements. General requirements in all three categories will apply to MTRU waste management and characterization activities at both WIPP and LANL. In addition, LANL is subject to facility-specific requirements in its RCRA hazardous waste facility permit, permit conditions as currently proposed in RCRA Part B permit applications presently being reviewed by the New Mexico Environment Department (NNED), and facility-specific compliance orders related to MTRU waste management. Likewise, permitting and compliance-related requirements specific to WIPP indirectly affect LANL`s characterization, packaging, record-keeping, and transportation requirements for MTRU waste. LANL must comply with this evolving set of regulatory requirements to begin shipments of MTRU waste to WIPP in a timely fashion.

  5. Development of a New Class of Fe-3Cr-W(V) Ferritic Steels for Industrial Process Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jawad, Mann; Sikka, Vinod K.

    2005-04-06

    The project described in this report dealt with improving the materials performance and fabrication for hydrotreating reactor vessels, heat recovery systems, and other components for the petroleum and chemical industries. These reactor vessels can approach ship weights of about 300 tons with vessel wall thicknesses of 3 to 8 inches. They are typically fabricated from Fe-Cr-Mo alloy steels, containing 1.25 to 12% chromium and 1 to 2% molybdenum. The goal of this project was to develop Fe-Cr-W(V) steels that can perform similar duties, in terms of strength at high temperatures, but will weigh less and thereby save energy.

  6. Oxidation of H2S by coadsorbed oxygen on the ?-Cr2O3(0001) surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Michael A.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2011-03-01

    The interactions of H2S and oxygen have been explored on the a-Cr2O3(0001) surface using temperature programmed desorption (TPD), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and sticking coefficient measurements. H2S adsorbs with near unity sticking on the clean a-Cr2O3(0001) surface at 125 K up to a coverage of ~1.6 ML (where 1 ML is defined as the surface areal density of Cr3+ sites). Reversible adsorption is evidenced in TPD by three desorption states evolving between 150 and 315 K. Although no S-containing decomposition products were observed in TPD, AES detected S on the surface after TPD indicating that some degree of irreversible decomposition occurred. The level of H2S decomposition on the clean surface was estimated to be between 0.2-0.5 ML using water TPD as an indicator of S site blocking. In contrast, preadsorbed O2 at three temperatures (125, 400 and 800 K) exerted drastic changes on the surface chemistry of H2S seen on the clean surface. At 400 and 800 K, O2 adsorption on clean ?-Cr2O3(0001) is dissociative, populating the surface with chromyl groups (Cr=O) in the former case (corresponding to roughly 1 O per Cr3+ surface site) and resulting in a nearly complete O-termination sheet (~3 O per Cr3+) in the latter case. Little or no H2S chemistry is observed on the O-terminated surface based on TPD and AES. However, availability of Cr-coordination sites on the chromyl-terminated surface facilitated H2S adsorption and oxidation during TPD to SO2 (445-470 K) and H2O (320 K). Isotopic-labeling studies suggest that the oxygen atom in the water product originates from dosed oxygen whereas that in the SO2 product comes from the lattice. Similar results were obtained from H2S dosed on the surface pretreated with O2 at 125 K, where O2 adsorption is predominately molecular, except that S2 was also detected in TPD at 525 K and the amount of SO2 produced at 445 K decreased. These results suggest that atomically adsorbed oxygen effectively oxidizes H2S, but that molecularly adsorbed O2 is key to the partial oxidation of H2S to elemental sulfur.

  7. MASS MEASUREMENT OF {sup 45}Cr AND ITS IMPACT ON THE Ca-Sc CYCLE IN X-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, X. L.; Xu, H. S.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Zhang, Y. H.; Tu, X. L.; Zhou, X. H.; He, J. J.; Sun, Y.; Wang, M.; Yuan, Y. J.; Xia, J. W.; Yang, J. C.; Jia, G. B.; Hu, Z. G.; Ma, X. W.; Mao, R. S.; Schatz, H.; Blaum, K.; Sun, B. H.; Audi, G.; and others

    2013-03-20

    Masses of neutron-deficient {sup 58}Ni projectile fragments have been measured at the HIRFL-CSR facility in Lanzhou, China employing the isochronous mass spectrometry technique. Masses of a series of short-lived T{sub z} = -3/2 nuclides including the {sup 45}Cr nucleus have been measured with a relative uncertainty of about 10{sup -6}-10{sup -7}. The new {sup 45}Cr mass turned out to be essential for modeling the astrophysical rp-process. In particular, we find that the formation of the predicted Ca-Sc cycle in X-ray bursts can be excluded.

  8. Agricultural green revolution as a driver of increasing atmospheric CO2 seasonal amplitude

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng, Ning; Zhao, Fang; Collatz, George; Kalnay, Eugenia; Salawitch, Ross J.; West, Tristram O.; Guanter, Luis

    2014-11-20

    The atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) record displays a prominent seasonal cycle that arises mainly from changes in vegetation growth and the corresponding CO2 uptake during the boreal spring and summer growing seasons and CO2 release during the autumn and winter seasons. The CO2 seasonal amplitude has increased over the past five decades, suggesting an increase in Northern Hemisphere biospheric activity. It has been proposed that vegetation growth may have been stimulated by higher concentrations of CO2 as well as by warming in recent decades, but such mechanisms have been unable to explain the full range and magnitude of the observed increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude. Here we suggest that the intensification of agriculture (the Green Revolution, in which much greater crop yield per unit area was achieved by hybridization, irrigation and fertilization) during the past five decades is a driver of changes in the seasonal characteristics of the global carbon cycle. Our analysis of CO2 data and atmospheric inversions shows a robust 15 per cent long-term increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude from 1961 to 2010, punctuated by large decadal and interannual variations. Using a terrestrial carbon cycle model that takes into account high-yield cultivars, fertilizer use and irrigation, we find that the long-term increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude arises from two major regions: the mid-latitude cropland between 256N and 606N and the high-latitude natural vegetation between 506N and 706 N. The long-term trend of seasonal amplitude increase is 0.311 ± 0.027 percent per year, of which sensitivity experiments attribute 45, 29 and 26 per cent to land-use change, climate variability and change, and increased productivity due to CO2 fertilization, respectively. Vegetation growth was earlier by one to two weeks, as measured by the mid-point of vegetation carbon uptake, and took up 0.5 petagrams more carbon in July, the height of the growing season, during 2001–2010 than in 1961–1970, suggesting that human land use and management contribute to seasonal changes in the CO2 exchange between the biosphere and the atmosphere.

  9. Rapid embedded wire heating via resistive guiding of laser-generated fast electrons as a hydrodynamic driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, A. P. L.; Schmitz, H. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)] [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Pasley, J. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom) [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); York Plasma Institute, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-15

    Resistively guiding laser-generated fast electron beams in targets consisting of a resistive wire embedded in lower Z material should allow one to rapidly heat the wire to over 100 eV over a substantial distance without strongly heating the surrounding material. On the multi-ps timescale, this can drive hydrodynamic motion in the surrounding material. Thus, ultra-intense laser solid interactions have the potential as a controlled driver of radiation hydrodynamics in solid density material. In this paper, we assess the laser and target parameters needed to achieve such rapid and controlled heating of the embedded wire.

  10. CX3CR1 Is Expressed by Prostate Epithelial Cells and Androgens Regulate the Levels of CX3CL1/Fractalkine in the Bone Marrow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatatis, Alessandro

    CX3CR1 Is Expressed by Prostate Epithelial Cells and Androgens Regulate the Levels of CX3CL1 human osteoblasts in vitro. Thus, the interaction of fractalkine with its receptor CX3CR1 could play a crucial role in vivo by directing circulating prostate cancer cells to the bone. We found that although CX

  11. Impact of a Mixed Oxide’s Surface Composition and Structure on Its Adsorptive Properties: Case of the (Fe,Cr)3O4(111) Termination of the ?-(Fe,Cr)2O3(0001) Surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Michael A.; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2014-12-18

    Characterization of an ?-(Fe0.75,Cr0.25)2O3(0001) mixed oxide single crystal surface was conducted using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). After sputter/anneal cleaning in ultra-high vacuum (UHV), the mixed oxide surface became terminated with a magnetite-(111) structure based on the presence of (2x2) spots in LEED and Fe2+ in XPS. The composition of the surface was close to that of M3O4 based on XPS, with the metal (M) content of Fe2+/3+ and Cr3+ being close to 1.4:1, despite the fact that the film’s bulk was 3:1 with respect to the metal cations. The enrichment of the surface with Cr was not altered by high temperature oxidation in UHV, but could be returned to that of the bulk film composition by exposure to the ambient. Adsorption of various probe molecules (NO, O2, CO2 and H2O) was used to identify the active cation sites present in the (Fe,Cr)3O4(111) terminated surface. Although XPS and SIMS both indicated that the near-surface region was enriched in Cr3+, no adsorption states typically associated with Cr3+ sites on ?-Cr2O3 single crystal surfaces were detected. Instead, the TPD behaviors of O2 and CO2 pointed toward the main active sites being Fe2+ and Fe3+, with O2 preferentially adsorbing at the former and CO2 at the latter. NO was observed to bind at both Fe2+ and Fe3+ sites, and H2O TPD looked nearly identical to that for H2O on the Fe3O4(111) surface. Competition for adsorption sites between coadsorbed combinations of CO2, O2, H2O and NO corroborated these assignments. These results indicate that the surface composition of a mixed oxide can vary significantly from its bulk composition depending on the treatment conditions. Even then, the surface composition does not necessarily provide direct insight into the active adsorption sites. In the case of the (Fe,Cr)3O4(111) termination of the ?-(Fe0.75,Cr0.25)2O3(0001) surface, Cr3+ cations in the near-surface region appear to be fully coordinated and unavailable for adsorbing molecules. The authors thank Drs. Sara Chamberlin and Scott Chambers for supplying the film used in this work. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. The research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  12. Super-High Temperature Alloys and Composites from NbW-Cr Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shailendra Varma

    2008-12-31

    Nickel base superalloys must be replaced if the demand for the materials continues to rise for applications beyond 1000{sup o}C which is the upper limit for such alloys at this time. There are non-metallic materials available for such high temperature applications but they all present processing difficulties because of the lack of ductility. Metallic systems can present a chance to find materials with adequate room temperature ductility. Obviously the system must contain elements with high melting points. Nb has been chosen by many investigators which has a potential of being considered as a candidate if alloyed properly. This research is exploring the Nb-W-Cr system for the possible choice of alloys to be used as a high temperature material.

  13. 2011 Honda CR-Z 4466 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

    2014-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing traction batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Honda CR-Z (VIN JHMZF1C67BS004466). Battery testing was performed by Intertek Testing Services NA. The Idaho National Laboratory and Intertek collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  14. 2011 HONDA CR-Z 2982 - HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE BATTERY TEST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Tyler; Shirk, Matthew; Wishart, Jeffrey

    2014-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing traction batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Honda CR-Z (VIN JHMZF1C64BS002982). Battery testing was performed by Intertek Testing Services NA. The Idaho National Laboratory and Intertek collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  15. Heat treated 9 Cr-1 Mo steel material for high temperature application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Alman, David; Dogan, Omer; Holcomb, Gordon; Cowen, Christopher

    2012-08-21

    The invention relates to a composition and heat treatment for a high-temperature, titanium alloyed, 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibiting improved creep strength and oxidation resistance at service temperatures up to 650.degree. C. The novel combination of composition and heat treatment produces a heat treated material containing both large primary titanium carbides and small secondary titanium carbides. The primary titanium carbides contribute to creep strength while the secondary titanium carbides act to maintain a higher level of chromium in the finished steel for increased oxidation resistance, and strengthen the steel by impeding the movement of dislocations through the crystal structure. The heat treated material provides improved performance at comparable cost to commonly used high-temperature steels such as ASTM P91 and ASTM P92, and requires heat treatment consisting solely of austenization, rapid cooling, tempering, and final cooling, avoiding the need for any hot-working in the austenite temperature range.

  16. Ion polished Cr/Sc attosecond multilayer mirrors for high water window reflectivity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guggenmos, Alexander; Radünz, Stefan; Rauhut, Roman; Hofstetter, Michael; Venkatesan, Sriram; Wochnik, Angela; Gullikson, Eric M.; Fischer, Stefan; Nickel, Bert; Scheu, Christina; et al

    2014-01-20

    Recent advances in the development of attosecond soft X-ray sources ranging into the water window spectral range, between the 1s states of carbon and oxygen (284 eV–543 eV), are also driving the development of suited broadband multilayer optics for steering and shaping attosecond pulses. The relatively low intensity of current High Harmonic Generation (HHG) soft X-ray sources calls for an efficient use of photons, thus the development of low-loss multilayer optics is of uttermost importance. Here, we report about the realization of broadband Cr/Sc attosecond multilayer mirrors with nearly atomically smooth interfaces by an optimized ion beam deposition and assistedmore »interface polishing process. This yields to our knowledge highest multilayer mirror reflectivity at 300 eV near normal incidence. The results are verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and soft/hard X-ray reflectometry.« less

  17. Thermodynamic modeling and experimental validation of the Fe-Al-Ni-Cr-Mo alloy system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teng, Zhenke; Zhang, F; Miller, Michael K; Liu, Chain T; Huang, Shenyan; Chou, Y.T.; Tien, R; Chang, Y A; Liaw, Peter K

    2012-01-01

    NiAl-type precipitate-strengthened ferritic steels have been known as potential materials for the steam turbine applications. In this study, thermodynamic descriptions of the B2-NiAl type nano-scaled precipitates and body-centered-cubic (BCC) Fe matrix phase for four alloys based on the Fe-Al-Ni-Cr-Mo system were developed as a function of the alloy composition at the aging temperature. The calculated phase structure, composition, and volume fraction were validated by the experimental investigations using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and atom probe tomography. With the ability to accurately predict the key microstructural features related to the mechanical properties in a given alloy system, the established thermodynamic model in the current study may significantly accelerate the alloy design process of the NiAl-strengthened ferritic steels.

  18. Photo-transport properties of Pb{sub 2}CrO{sub 5} single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mondal, P. S.; Okazaki, R. Taniguchi, H.; Terasaki, I.

    2014-11-21

    We report photo-thermoelectric transport phenomena in Pb{sub 2}CrO{sub 5} single crystals. Without illumination, this material exhibits an insulating behavior characterized by an activation-type temperature variation of the electrical conductivity. The Seebeck coefficient contrastingly shows a crossover from high-temperature insulating to low-temperature metallic behavior, which is attributed to degenerate carriers in a donor level. We have found that under illumination, both the conductivity and the Seebeck coefficient increase in magnitude with increasing photon flux density in the degenerate-conduction regime. This result is difficult to understand within a simple photo-doping effect, which usually leads to a decrease in the Seebeck coefficient under illumination. The observed phenomenon is discussed in terms of a two-carrier contribution to the transport properties.

  19. Ion polished Cr/Sc attosecond multilayer mirrors for high water window reflectivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guggenmos, Alexander; Radünz, Stefan; Rauhut, Roman; Hofstetter, Michael; Venkatesan, Sriram; Wochnik, Angela; Gullikson, Eric M.; Fischer, Stefan; Nickel, Bert; Scheu, Christina; Kleineberg, Ulf

    2014-01-20

    Recent advances in the development of attosecond soft X-ray sources ranging into the water window spectral range, between the 1s states of carbon and oxygen (284 eV–543 eV), are also driving the development of suited broadband multilayer optics for steering and shaping attosecond pulses. The relatively low intensity of current High Harmonic Generation (HHG) soft X-ray sources calls for an efficient use of photons, thus the development of low-loss multilayer optics is of uttermost importance. Here, we report about the realization of broadband Cr/Sc attosecond multilayer mirrors with nearly atomically smooth interfaces by an optimized ion beam deposition and assisted interface polishing process. This yields to our knowledge highest multilayer mirror reflectivity at 300 eV near normal incidence. The results are verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and soft/hard X-ray reflectometry.

  20. Energy levels and radiative rates for transitions in Cr-like Co IV and Ni V

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, K M; Karpuškien?, R; Keenan, F P; Kisielius, R; Stancalie, V

    2015-01-01

    We report calculations of energy levels and radiative rates ($A$-values) for transitions in Cr-like Co IV and Ni V. The quasi-relativistic Hartree-Fock (QRHF) code is adopted for calculating the data although GRASP (general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package) and flexible atomic code (FAC) have also been employed for comparison purposes. No radiative rates are available in the literature to compare with our results, but our calculated energies are in close agreement with those compiled by NIST for a majority of the levels. However, there are discrepancies for a few levels of up to 3\\%. The $A$-values are listed for all significantly contributing E1, E2 and M1 transitions, and the corresponding lifetimes reported, although unfortunately no previous theoretical or experimental results exist to compare with our data.

  1. Tensile and fracture properties of EBR-II-irradiated V-15Cr-5Ti containing helium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Horak, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The alloy V-15Cr-5Ti was cyclotron-implanted with 80 appM He and subsequently irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) to 30 dpa. The same alloy was also irradiated in the 10, 20, and 30% cold-worked conditions. Irradiation temperatures ranged from 400 to 700/sup 0/C. No significant effects of helium on mechanical properties were found in this temperature range although the neutron irradiation shifted the temperature of transition from cleavage to ductile fracture to about 625/sup 0/C. Ten percent cold work was found to have a beneficial effect in reducing the tendency for cleavage fracture following irradiation, but high levels (20%) were observed to reduce ductility. Still higher levels (30%) improved ductility by inducing recovery during the elevated-temperature irradiation. Swelling was found to be negligible, but precipitates - titanium oxides or carbonitrides - contained substantial cavities.

  2. Mn-Fe base and Mn-Cr-Fe base austenitic alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brager, Howard R. (Richland, WA); Garner, Francis A. (Richland, WA)

    1987-01-01

    Manganese-iron base and manganese-chromium-iron base austenitic alloys designed to have resistance to neutron irradiation induced swelling and low activation have the following compositions (in weight percent): 20 to 40 Mn; up to about 15 Cr; about 0.4 to about 3.0 Si; an austenite stabilizing element selected from C and N, alone or in combination with each other, and in an amount effective to substantially stabilize the austenite phase, but less than about 0.7 C, and less than about 0.3 N; up to about 2.5 V; up to about 0.1 P; up to about 0.01 B; up to about 3.0 Al; up to about 0.5 Ni; up to about 2.0 W; up to about 1.0 Ti; up to about 1.0 Ta; and with the remainder of the alloy being essentially iron.

  3. Structure of Oxide Nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr MA/ODS Ferritic Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsiung, L; Fluss, M; Kimura, A

    2010-04-06

    Oxide nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr ODS ferritic steel fabricated by mechanical alloying (MA) method have been examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. A partial crystallization of oxide nanoparticles was frequently observed in as-fabricated ODS steel. The crystal structure of crystalline oxide particles is identified to be mainly Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} (YAM) with a monoclinic structure. Large nanoparticles with a diameter larger than 20 nm tend to be incoherent and have a nearly spherical shape, whereas small nanoparticles with a diameter smaller than 10 nm tend to be coherent or semi-coherent and have faceted boundaries. The oxide nanoparticles become fully crystallized after prolonged annealing at 900 C. These results lead us to propose a three-stage formation mechanism of oxide nanoparticles in MA/ODS steels.

  4. Thermo-mechanical processing (TMP) of Ti-48Al-2Nb-2Cr based alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuchs, G.E.

    1995-02-01

    The effects of heat treatment and deformation processing on the microstructures and properties of {gamma}-TiAl based alloys produced by ingot metallurgy (I/M) and powder metallurgy (P/M) techniques were examined. The alloy selected for this work is the second generation {gamma}-TiAl based alloy -- Ti-48Al-2Nb-2Cr (at %). Homogenization of I/M samples was performed at a variety of temperatures, followed by hot working by isothermal forging. P/M samples were prepared from gas atomized powders, consolidated by both HIP and extrusion and some of the HIPed material was then hot worked by isothermal forging. The effects of processing, heat treatment and hot working on the microstructures and properties will be discussed.

  5. Bose-Einstein condensation of triplons in Ba3Cr2O8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaime, Marcelo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kohama, Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aczel, A [MCMASTER UNIV; Ninios, K [UNIV OF FL; Chan, H [UNIV OF FL; Balicas, L [NHMFL; Dabkowska, H [MCMASTER UNIV; Like, G [MCMASTER UNIV

    2009-01-01

    By performing heat capacity, magnetocaloric effect, torque magnetometry and force magnetometry measurements up to 33 T, we have mapped out the T-H phase diagram of the S = 1/2 spin dimer compound Ba{sub 3}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 8}. We found evidence for field-induced magnetic order between H{sub cl} = 12.52(2) T and H{sub c2} = 23.65(5) T, with the maximum transition temperature T{sub c} {approx} 2.7 K at H {approx} 18 T. The lower transition can likely be described by Bose-Einstein condensation of triplons theory, and this is consistent with the absence of any magnetization plateaus in our magnetic torque and force measurements. In contrast, the nature of the upper phase transition appears to be quite different as our measurements suggest that this transition is actually first order.

  6. Microstructural characterization of as-cast biocompatible Co-Cr-Mo alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giacchi, J.V.; Morando, C.N.; Fornaro, O.; Palacio, H.A.

    2011-01-15

    The microstructure of a cobalt-base alloy (Co-Cr-Mo) obtained by the investment casting process was studied. This alloy complies with the ASTM F75 standard and is widely used in the manufacturing of orthopedic implants because of its high strength, good corrosion resistance and excellent biocompatibility properties. This work focuses on the resulting microstructures arising from samples poured under industrial environment conditions, of three different Co-Cr-Mo alloys. For this purpose, we used: 1) an alloy built up from commercial purity constituents, 2) a remelted alloy and 3) a certified alloy for comparison. The characterization of the samples was achieved by using optical microscopy (OM) with a colorant etchant to identify the present phases and scanning electron microscopy (SE-SEM) and energy dispersion spectrometry (EDS) techniques for a better identification. In general the as-cast microstructure is a Co-fcc dendritic matrix with the presence of a secondary phase, such as the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides precipitated at grain boundaries and interdendritic zones. These precipitates are the main strengthening mechanism in this type of alloys. Other minority phases were also reported and their presence could be linked to the cooling rate and the manufacturing process variables and environment. - Research Highlights: {yields}The solidification microstructure of an ASTM-F75 type alloy were studied. {yields}The alloys were poured under an industrial environment. {yields}Carbides and sigma phase identified by color metallography and scanning microscopy (SEM and EDS). {yields}Two carbide morphologies were detected 'blocky type' and 'pearlite type'. {yields}Minority phases were also detected.

  7. Break-Even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassard, H.; Denholm, P.; Ong, S.

    2011-02-01

    This paper examines the break-even cost for residential rooftop solar water heating (SWH) technology, defined as the point where the cost of the energy saved with a SWH system equals the cost of a conventional heating fuel purchased from the grid (either electricity or natural gas). We examine the break-even cost for the largest 1,000 electric and natural gas utilities serving residential customers in the United States as of 2008. Currently, the break-even cost of SWH in the United States varies by more than a factor of five for both electricity and natural gas, despite a much smaller variation in the amount of energy saved by the systems (a factor of approximately one and a half). The break-even price for natural gas is lower than that for electricity due to a lower fuel cost. We also consider the relationship between SWH price and solar fraction and examine the key drivers behind break-even costs. Overall, the key drivers of the break-even cost of SWH are a combination of fuel price, local incentives, and technical factors including the solar resource location, system size, and hot water draw.

  8. High-Temperature SiC Power Module with Integrated SiC Gate Drivers for Future High-Density Power Electronics Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitaker, Mr. Bret [APEI, Inc.; Cole, Mr. Zach [APEI, Inc.; Passmore, Mr. Brandon [APEI, Inc.; Mcnutt, Tyler [APEI, Inc.; Lostetter, Dr. Alex [APEI, Inc.; Ericson, Milton Nance [ORNL; Frank, Steven [ORNL; Britton Jr, Charles L [ORNL; Marlino, Laura D [ORNL; Mantooth, Alan [University of Arkansas; Francis, Matt [APEI, Inc.; Lamichhane, Ranjan [APEI, Inc.; Shepherd, Paul [APEI, Inc.; Glover, Michael [APEI, Inc.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a high-temperature capable intelligent power module that contains SiC power devices and SiC gate driver integrated circuits (ICs). The high-temperature capability of the SiC gate driver ICs allows for them to be packaged into the power module and be located physically close to the power devices. This provides a distinct advantage by reducing the gate driver loop inductance, which promotes high frequency operation, while also reducing the overall volume of the system through higher levels of integration. The power module was tested in a bridgeless-boost converter (Fig. 1) to determine the performance of the module in a system level application. The converter was operated with a switching frequency of 200 kHz with a peak output power of approximately 5 kW. The peak efficiency was found to be 97.5% at 2.9 kW.

  9. Effect of Austenization Temperature on the Microstructure and Strength of 9% and 12% Cr Ferritic-Martensitic Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry C. Totemeier

    2004-10-01

    The effect of reduced-temperature austenization on the microstructure and strength of two ferritic-martensitic steels was studied. Prototypic 9% and 12% Cr steels, grade 91 (9Cr-1MoVNb) and type 422 stainless (12Cr-1MoVW), respectively, were austenized at 925°C and 1050°C and tempered at 760°C. The reduced austenization temperature was intended to simulate potential inadequate austenization during field construction of large structures and also the thermal cycle experienced in the Type IV region of weld heat affected zones (HAZ). The microstructure, tensile behavior, and creep strength were characterized for both steels treated at each condition. The reduced austenization temperature resulted in general coarsening of carbides in both steels and polygonization of the tempered martensite structure in type 422. For this steel, a marked reduction in microhardness was observed, while there was little change in microhardness for grade 91. Slight reductions in tensile strength were observed for both steels at room temperature and elevated temperatures of 450 and 550°C. The strength reduction was greater for type 422 than for grade 91. At 650°C the tensile strength reduction was minimal for both steels. Marked reductions in creep rupture lives were observed for both steels at 650°C; the reductions were less at 600°C and minimal at 550°C. Overall, the higher Cr content steel was observed to be more sensitive to variations in heat treatment conditions.

  10. ccsd00003882, Structural relaxations around Ti, Cr and Fe impurities in -Al 2 O 3 probed by x-ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    improve the voltage holdo#11; capability of insulating materials 1 , they are critical for the optical of solids. In the case of dilute elements in single crystals, especially at the K edge of 3d transitionccsd­00003882, version 1 ­ 12 Jan 2005 Structural relaxations around Ti, Cr and Fe impurities

  11. Magnetic behavior in Cr{sub 2}@Ge{sub n} (1?n?12) clusters: A density functional investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhaka, Kapil Trivedi, Ravi Bandyopadhyay, Debashis

    2014-04-24

    With a goal to produce magnetic moment in Cr{sub 2} Doped Ge{sub n} clusters which will be useful for practical applications, we have considered the structure and magnetic properties of Pure Germanium clusters and substitutionally doped it with Cr dimer to produce Cr{sub 2}@Ge{sub n} clusters. As the first step of calculation, geometrical optimizations of the nanoclusters have been done. These optimized geometries have been used in calculate the average binding energy per atom (BE), HOMO-LUMO gap and hence the relative stability of the clusters. These parameters have been demonstrated as structural and electronic properties of the clusters. Gap between highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital indicate cluster to be a potential motif for generating magnetic cluster assembled materials. Based on these values a comparative study on different sized clusters has been done in order to understand the origin of structures, electronic and magnetic properties of Cr{sub 2}@Ge{sub n} nanoclusters.

  12. Re-Evaluation of Results in NUREG/CR-6674 for Carbon and Low-Alloy Steel Components (MRP-76)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Deardorff; D. Harris; D. Dedhia

    2002-11-30

    This report evaluates the conservatisms and uncertainties reported in NUREG/CR-6674 that lead to high probabilities of cracking in carbon and low-alloy steel for reactor piping. The report uses additional data generated since the completion of the report to eliminate uncertainties and show lower probabilities of cracking.

  13. Sputter-Deposited Pt/CrN Nanoparticle PEM Fuel Cell Cathodes: Limited Proton Conductivity Through Electrode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gall, Daniel

    Sputter-Deposited Pt/CrN Nanoparticle PEM Fuel Cell Cathodes: Limited Proton Conductivity Through for proton exchange membrane PEM fuel cells. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy show manuscript received September 17, 2009. Published November 13, 2009. Proton exchange membrane PEM fuel cells

  14. Tunable blue light source by intracavity frequency doubling of a Cr-LiSrAIF6 laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Tunable blue light source by intracavity frequency doubling of a Cr- LiSrAIF6 laser Franqois-switched operation at 10 kHz was intracavity frequency doubled by using a LiIOl crystal. The 230 ns tunable blue lasers emitting in the blue-green wavelength range are expected to be the key components for optical

  15. Half-Metallicity and Efficient Spin Injection in AlN=GaN:Cr (0001) Heterostructure J. E. Medvedeva,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medvedeva, Julia E.

    V, so that the conduction electrons can tunnel into the semiconductor material with 100% spin, Australia 3 Chemical and Materials Engineering Department, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 of the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of Cr-doped AlN=GaN (0001) heterostructures reveal

  16. Modulation of physical and photocatalytic properties of (Cr, N) codoped TiO{sub 2} nanorods using soft solution processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Wen-Chung [Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Nguyen, Hoang-Diem; Wu, Chun-Yi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Chang, Kao-Shuo, E-mail: kschang@mail.ncku.edu.tw; Yoshimura, Masahiro [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Promotion Center for Global Materials Research (PCGMR), National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2014-04-14

    Facile polymerized complex reactions together with a hydrothermal reaction were implemented to make single crystalline TiO{sub 2} nanorods for the first time. Chromium (Cr) and nitrogen (N{sub 2}) co-doping was performed to tailor the physical properties. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction study illustrated that highly reactive facets of (101), (111), and (001) dominated rutile TiO{sub 2} nanorods. A growth model, based on formation of complex species, was proposed to elucidate effectiveness of the soft solution processing in making TiO{sub 2} nanorods. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and consideration of fundamentals of charge neutrality showed N{sub 2} doping could inhibit formation of Cr{sup 6+} and oxygen vacancies (V{sub O}{sup 2+}). An investigation of the photocatalytic properties exhibited high efficiency of photodegradation of methylene blue in 15?min under pH?=?10, using a nanocomposite of (7% Cr, 0.0021% N) codoped and 3% Cr doped TiO{sub 2} nanorods.

  17. Creep-fatigue criteria and inelastic behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel at elevated temperatures. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruggles, M.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ogata, T. [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab.

    1994-02-01

    The ever increasing demand for safety requires that stringent and conservative methodology be developed for design and analysis of reactor components. At present modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is a candidate material for construction of steam generators in fast breeder reactors. Therefore high-temperature material properties and extensive insight into deformation behavior and creep-fatigue life are required to develop design guidelines for use of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel in actual plant components. However, existing information on creep-fatigue and deformation response of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is insufficient, and further experimental and modeling efforts are needed. A joint effort between the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in the United States and the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) in Japan was started in 1991 to investigate the inelastic behavior of and to develop creep-fatigue criteria for modified 9Cr-1Mo steel at elevated temperatures. The current program focuses on uniaxial and biaxial fatigue, creep, and creep-fatigue tests. Results of this effort are presented in this report. Section 2 introduces the test material and experimental arrangement. Uniaxial exploratory deformation tests and unified constitutive equations for inelastic analysis of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel are presented in Sections 3 and 4, respectively. Axial fatigue and creep-fatigue test results are discussed in Section 5. Section 6 is devoted to constant stress creep tests. Biaxial fatigue and creep-fatigue tests are described in Section 7. Progress in creep-fatigue life evaluation is reported in Section 8.

  18. See the yellow handout, "Driver's License and State ID Information for NonUS Citizens" or visit the PennDOT website: www.dmv.state.pa.us/ for more details.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    See the yellow handout, "Driver's License and State ID Information for NonUS Citizens" or visit Administration (SSA) to A. If you are a student, confirm that id ti l A. Obtain a PA Driver's License Manual at OIE Submit all required documents and proofs Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 (For License Only) Step 4 Step 5

  19. Impact of x-ray dose on the response of CR-39 to 1–5.5 MeV alphas

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rojas-Herrera, J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Orozco, D.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sio, H.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; et al

    2015-03-01

    The CR-39 nuclear track detector is used in many nuclear diagnostics #12;fielded at inertial con#12;nement fusion (ICF) facilities. Large x-ray uences generated by ICF experiments may impact the CR-39 response to incident charged particles. To determine the impact of x-ray exposure on the CR-39 response to alpha particles, a thick-target bremsstrahlung x-ray generator was used to expose CR-39 to various doses of 8 keV Cu-K?#11; and K#12;? x-rays. The CR-39 detectors were then exposed to 1-5.5 MeV alphas from an Am-241 source. The regions of the CR-39 exposed to x-rays showed a smaller track diameter than those not exposed tomore »x-rays: for example, a dose of 3.0#6; ± 0.1 Gy causes a decrease of (19 ± #6;2)% in the track diameter of a 5.5 MeV alpha particle, while a dose of 60.0 ± #6;1.3 Gy results in a decrease of (45 ± #6;5)% in the track diameter. The reduced track diameters were found to be predominantly caused by a comparable reduction in the bulk etch rate of the CR-39 with x-ray dose. A residual eff#11;ect depending on alpha particle energy is characterized using an empirical formula.« less

  20. Synthesis and mechanical properties of CrMoC{sub x}N{sub 1-x} coatings deposited by a hybrid coating system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yun, Ji Hwan; Heo, Su Jeong; Kim, Kwang Ryul; Kim, Kwang Ho

    2008-01-15

    Quaternary CrMoC{sub x}N{sub 1-x} coatings were deposited on steel substrates (AISI D2) and Si wafers by a hybrid coating system combining an arc-ion plating technique and a dc reactive magnetron sputtering technique using Cr and Mo targets in an Ar/N{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} gaseous mixture. The carbon content of CrMoC{sub x}N{sub 1-x} coatings was linearly increased with increasing CH{sub 4}/(CH{sub 4}+N{sub 2}) gas flow rate ratio. The maximum hardness of 44 GPa was obtained from the CrMoC{sub x}N{sub 1-x} coatings containing a carbon content of x=0.33 with a residual stress of -4.4 GPa. The average friction coefficient of Cr-Mo-N coatings was 0.42, and it is decreased to 0.31 after applying CrMoC{sub x}N{sub 1-x} coatings. This result was caused by the formation of a carbon-rich transfer layer that acted as a solid lubricant to reduce contact between the coating surface and steel ball. The microstructure of the coatings was investigated by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In this work, the microstructure and mechanical properties of the CrMoC{sub x}N{sub 1-x} coatings were systematically investigated with the instrumental analyses.

  1. Impact of x-ray dose on the response of CR-39 to 1-5.5 MeV alphas

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rojas-Herrera, J. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Rinderknecht, H. G. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Zylstra, A. B. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Gatu Johnson, M. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Orozco, D. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Rosenberg, M. J. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Sio, H. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Seguin, F. H. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Frenje, J. A. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Li, C. K. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Petrasso, R. D. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    2015-03-01

    The CR-39 nuclear track detector is used in many nuclear diagnostics #12;fielded at inertial con#12;nement fusion (ICF) facilities. Large x-ray uences generated by ICF experiments may impact the CR-39 response to incident charged particles. To determine the impact of x-ray exposure on the CR-39 response to alpha particles, a thick-target bremsstrahlung x-ray generator was used to expose CR-39 to various doses of 8 keV Cu-K?#11; and K#12;? x-rays. The CR-39 detectors were then exposed to 1-5.5 MeV alphas from an Am-241 source. The regions of the CR-39 exposed to x-rays showed a smaller track diameter than those not exposed to x-rays: for example, a dose of 3.0#6; ± 0.1 Gy causes a decrease of (19 ± #6;2)% in the track diameter of a 5.5 MeV alpha particle, while a dose of 60.0 ± #6;1.3 Gy results in a decrease of (45 ± #6;5)% in the track diameter. The reduced track diameters were found to be predominantly caused by a comparable reduction in the bulk etch rate of the CR-39 with x-ray dose. A residual eff#11;ect depending on alpha particle energy is characterized using an empirical formula.

  2. Formation of less-known structurally complex ?{sub b} and orthorhombic quasicrystalline approximant ?{sub n} on solidification of selected Al–Pd–Cr alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamech, M.; ?erni?ková, I.; ?uriška, L.; Kolesár, V.; Drienovský, M.; Bednar?ík, J.; Svoboda, M.; Janovec, J.

    2014-11-15

    The evolution of phases was investigated on cooling of Al{sub 71}Pd{sub 24}Cr{sub 5}, Al{sub 73}Pd{sub 20}Cr{sub 7}, and Al{sub 73}Pd{sub 23}Cr{sub 4} alloys from 1350 °C down to ambient temperature with the rate of 10 °C·min{sup ?1}. To perform the investigation, differential thermal analysis, synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used. In all the investigated alloys structurally complex phases ?{sub n} (?{sub 6} + ?{sub 28}) and ?{sub b}, as well as the ?-phase were identified. Based on the results of differential thermal analysis, sequences of phase transformations were determined. The Al{sub 71}Pd{sub 24}Cr{sub 5} alloy started to solidify at 1031.4 °C through ?. Primary dendrites of ?{sub b} were observed in Al{sub 73}Pd{sub 20}Cr{sub 7} and Al{sub 73}Pd{sub 23}Cr{sub 4} alloys. In the second step of solidification ? and/or ?{sub b} were formed. The peritectic reaction, liquid + ?{sub b} + ? ? ?{sub n} + ?{sub b} + ?, leading to the formation of the quasicrystalline approximant ?{sub n} (?{sub 6} + ?{sub 28}) took place in the final step of solidification at approximately 792 °C. - Highlights: • Structurally complex ?{sub n} (?{sub 6} + ?{sub 28}), ?{sub b} and ?-phases were identified. • The Al{sub 71}Pd{sub 24}Cr{sub 5} alloy started to solidify at 1031.4 °C through the primary ? phase. • The Al{sub 73}Pd{sub 20}Cr{sub 7} and Al{sub 73}Pd{sub 23}Cr{sub 4} alloys solidified in the same way. • The quasicrystalline approximant ?{sub n} (?{sub 6} + ?{sub 28}) was formed at approximately 792 °C.

  3. Microstructural evolution during solution treatment of Co-Cr-Mo-C biocompatible alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giacchi, J.V.; Fornaro, O.; Palacio, H.

    2012-06-15

    Three different Co-Cr-Mo-C alloys conforming to ASTM F75 standard were poured in an industrial environment and subjected to a conventional solution treatment at 1225 Degree-Sign C for several time intervals. The microstructural changes and transformations were studied in each case in order to evaluate the way in which treatment time influences the secondary phase fraction and clarify the microstructural changes that could occur. To assess how treatment time affects microstructure, optical microscopy and image analyzer software, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion spectrometry analysis were employed. The main phases detected in the as-cast state were: {sigma}-phase, M{sub 6}C, and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides. The latter presented two different morphologies, blocky type and lamellar type. Despite being considered the most detrimental feature to mechanical properties, {sigma}-phase and lamellar carbides dissolution took place in the early stages of solution treatment. M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides featured two different behaviors. In the alloy obtained by melting an appropriate quantity of alloyed commercial materials, a decrease in size, spheroidization and transformation into M{sub 6}C carbides were simultaneously observed. In the commercial ASTM F75 alloy, in turn, despite being the same phase, only a marked decrease in precipitates size was noticed. These different behaviors could be ascribed to the initial presence of other phases in the alloy obtained from alloyed materials, such as {sigma}-phase and 'pearlitic' carbides, or to the initial precipitate size which was much larger in the first than in the commercial ASTM F75 alloy studied. M{sub 6}C carbides dissolved directly in the matrix as they could not be detected in samples solution-treated for 15 min. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three different Co-Cr-Mo alloys were poured under an industrial environment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformation of existing phases followed during conventional solution treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In as-cast/treated samples, phases were identified by color metallography, SEM and EDS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer M{sub 23}C{sub 6} {yields} M{sub 6}C transformation was corroborated by SEM and EDS analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbide spheroidization was also detected prior a noticeably carbide size decreasing.

  4. Aluminum and tungsten X-pinch experiments on 100 kA, 100 ns linear transformer driver stage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Jian [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 10086 (China); Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Sun Tieping; Wu Gang; Wang Liangping; Han Juanjuan; Li Mo; Cong Peitian; Qiu Aici [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Lv Min [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 10086 (China)

    2011-05-15

    X-pinch experiments have been carried out on a 100 kA, 100 ns linear transformer driver stage recently built up. The X-pinches exhibited a source size of about 10 {mu}m, a pulse duration of 3 ns, 3-5 keV radiation energy of 3.9 mJ, and a burst time jitter of tens of nanosecond with the 2-wire 8 {mu}m W X-pinch load. The generator output current and the X-pinch characteristics depended on the X-pinch wire materials in the tests. X-ray backlighting images from the insects showed the significant phase-contrast effect.

  5. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. , NO. , 2012 1 Dynamic Driver Supply Voltage Scaling for Organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    Dynamic Driver Supply Voltage Scaling for Organic Light Emitting Diode Displays Donghwa Shin, Student, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--Organic light emitting diode (OLED) display is a self-illuminating device]. On the other hand, an organic light emitting diode (OLED) is self-illuminating using organic light emission

  6. High field magnetotransport and point contact Andreev reflection measurements on CuCr{sub 2}Se{sub 4} and CuCr{sub 2}Se{sub 3}Br—Degenerate magnetic semiconductor single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borisov, K. Coey, J. M. D.; Stamenov, P.; Alaria, J.

    2014-05-07

    Single crystals of the metallically degenerate fully magnetic semiconductors CuCr{sub 2}Se{sub 4} and CuCr{sub 2}Se{sub 3}Br have been prepared by the Chemical Vapour Transport method, using either Se or Br as transport agents. The high-quality, millimetre-sized, octahedrally faceted, needle- and platelet-shaped crystals are characterised by means of high field magnetotransport (?{sub 0}H? 14?T) and Point Contact Andreev Reflection. The relatively high spin polarisation observed |P|>0.56, together with the relatively low minority carrier effective mass of 0.25 m{sub e}, and long scattering time  10{sup ?13}?s, could poise these materials for integration in low- and close-to-room temperature minority injection bipolar heterojunction transistor demonstrations.

  7. Nature of =~SiOCrO(2)CI And (=~SiO)(2)CrO(2) Sites Prepared By Grafting CrO(2)CI(2) Onto Silica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demmelmaier, C.A.; White, R.E.; Bokhoven, J.A.van; Scott, S.L.

    2009-05-14

    The room-temperature reaction between chromyl chloride and Sylopol 952 silicas pretreated at 200, 450, and 800 C was investigated using IR, XANES, and EXAFS spectroscopy, as well as by DFT modeling. On the silicas pretreated at 200 and 450 C, the structurally uniform sites formed by the reaction with one surface hydroxyl group are described as {triple_bond}SiOCrO{sub 2}Cl. Unreacted silanols persist on these silicas even in the presence of excess CrO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, and on the silica pretreated at 200 C some participate in hydrogen bonding with the grafted monochlorochromate sites. On the silica pretreated at 800 C, both {triple_bond}SiOCrO{sub 2}Cl and ({triple_bond}SiO){sub 2}CrO{sub 2} sites are formed. The latter are produced despite the absence of hydrogen-bonded hydroxyl pairs on the support. The origin of the chromate sites is proposed to be the reaction between CrO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and hydroxyl-substituted siloxane 2-rings. These rings are likely formed at 800 C by condensation between a pair of vicinal silanols in which one of the silanols is also a member of a geminal pair.

  8. Phase diagram and magnetocaloric effects in Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}(In{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}){sub 15} and (Mn{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x})NiGe{sub 1.05} alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quetz, Abdiel Muchharla, Baleeswaraiah; Dubenko, Igor; Talapatra, Saikat; Ali, Naushad; Samanta, Tapas; Stadler, Shane

    2014-05-07

    The magnetocaloric and thermomagnetic properties of Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}(In{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}){sub 15} and (Mn{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}) NiGe{sub 1.05} systems for 0???x???0.105 and 0???x???0.1, respectively, have been studied by x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and magnetization measurements. Partial substitution of Cr for Mn in (Mn{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x})NiGe{sub 1.05} results in a first order magnetostructural transition from a hexagonal paramagnetic to an orthorhombic paramagnetic phase near T{sub M}???380?K (for x?=?0.07). Partial substitution of Cr for In in Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}(In{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}){sub 15} shifts the magnetostructural transition to a higher temperature (T?=?T{sub M}???450?K) for x?=?0.1. Large magnetic entropy changes of ?S?=??12 (J/(kgK)) and ?S?=??11 (J/(kgK)), both for a magnetic field change of 5?T, were observed in the vicinity of T{sub M} for (Mn{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x})NiGe{sub 1.05} and Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}(In{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}){sub 15}, respectively.

  9. Star formation in z>1 3CR host galaxies as seen by Herschel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podigachoski, P; Haas, M; Leipski, C; Wilkes, B; Kuraszkiewicz, J; Westhues, C; Willner, S P; Ashby, M L N; Chini, R; Clements, D L; Fazio, G G; Labiano, A; Lawrence, C; Meisenheimer, K; Peletier, R F; Siebenmorgen, R; Kleijn, G Verdoes

    2015-01-01

    We present Herschel (PACS and SPIRE) far-infrared (FIR) photometry of a complete sample of z>1 3CR sources, from the Herschel GT project The Herschel Legacy of distant radio-loud AGN (PI: Barthel). Combining these with existing Spitzer photometric data, we perform an infrared (IR) spectral energy distribution (SED) analysis of these landmark objects in extragalactic research to study the star formation in the hosts of some of the brightest active galactic nuclei (AGN) known at any epoch. Accounting for the contribution from an AGN-powered warm dust component to the IR SED, about 40% of our objects undergo episodes of prodigious, ULIRG-strength star formation, with rates of hundreds of solar masses per year, coeval with the growth of the central supermassive black hole. Median SEDs imply that the quasar and radio galaxy hosts have similar FIR properties, in agreement with the orientation-based unification for radio-loud AGN. The star-forming properties of the AGN hosts are similar to those of the general popul...

  10. Study on the influence of CR-39 detector size on radon progeny detection in indoor environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereira, L. A.; Hadler, J. C.; Lixandrão F, A. L.; Guedes, S.; Takizawa, R. H.

    2014-11-11

    It is well known that radon daughters up to {sup 214}Po are the real contaminants to be considered in case of indoor radon contamination. Assemblies consisting of 6 circular bare sheets of CR-39, a nuclear track detector, with radius varying from 0.15 to 1.2 cm were exposed far from any material surface for periods of approximately 6 months in 13 different indoor rooms (7 workplaces and 6 dwellings), where ventilation was moderate or poor. It was observed that track density was as greater as smaller was the detector radius. Track density data were fitted using an equation deduced based on the assumption that the behavior of radon and its progeny in the air was described by Fick's Law, i.e., when the main mechanism of transport of radon progeny in the air is diffusion. As many people spend great part of their time in closed or poorly ventilated environments, the confirmation they present equilibrium between radon and its progeny is an interesting start for dosimetric calculations concerning this contamination.

  11. High-temperature phase transformation in Cr added TiAl base alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abe, E.; Niinobe, K.; Nobuki, M.; Nakamura, M.; Tsujimoto, T.

    1999-07-01

    The authors have investigated a microstructure evolution of a Ti-48Al-3.5Cr (in at.%) alloy at high-temperatures ({gt} 1,473K). In the alloy annealed at 1673K for 1.8ks, followed by air-cooling, a characteristic microstructure with a feathery fashion was uniformly formed. From a cooling-rate-controlling study, it was found that formation of the feathery structure is accomplished during continuous cooling from 1673K to 1573K, within the {alpha} + {gamma} two-phase region. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the feathery structure is composed of lamellar colonies (5--10{micro}m) which are crystallographically tilted slightly (a few degree) with their neighbors. A surprising fact is that lamellae in each colony are mostly the {gamma} phase with few {alpha}{sub 2} phase less than 5% in volume. This suggests that the feathery structure is a metastable product and has not resulted from the {alpha} {r{underscore}arrow} {alpha} + {gamma} transformation above 1,573 K. Instead, the feathery structure formation should be attributed to the non-equilibrium {alpha} {r{underscore}arrow} {gamma} transformation which occurs at high-temperatures with a small degree of supercooling. The authors discuss this interesting phase transformation in terms of the {alpha} {r{underscore}arrow} {gamma} massive transformation, based on the continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagram constructed for the present alloy.

  12. Measurement of the {sup 208}Pb({sup 52}Cr,n){sup 259}Sg excitation function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folden III, C. M.; Dragojevic, I.; Garcia, M. A.; Gates, J. M.; Nelson, S. L.; Hoffman, D. C.; Nitsche, H.; Duellmann, Ch. E.; Sudowe, R.; Gregorich, K. E.; Eichler, R.

    2009-02-15

    The excitation function for the {sup 208}Pb({sup 52}Cr,n){sup 259}Sg reaction has been measured using the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron. The maximum cross section of 320{sub -100}{sup +110} pb is observed at a center-of-target laboratory-frame energy of 253.0 MeV. In total, 25 decay chains originating from {sup 259}Sg were observed and the measured decay properties are in good agreement with previous reports. In addition, a partial excitation function for the {sup 208}Pb({sup 52}Cr,2n){sup 258}Sg reaction was obtained, and an improved {sup 258}Sg half-life of 2.6{sub -0.4}{sup +0.6} ms was calculated by combining all available experimental data.

  13. Development of A New Class of Fe-3Cr-W(V)Ferritic Steels for Industrial Process Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sikka, V.J.; Jawad, M.H. (Nooter Corp.)

    2005-06-15

    The project, 'Development of a New Class of Fe-Cr-W(V) Ferritic Steels for Industrial Process Applications', was a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Nooter Corporation. This project dealt with improving the materials performance and fabrication for the hydrotreating reactor vessels, heat recovery systems, and other components for the petroleum and chemical industries. The petroleum and chemical industries use reactor vessels that can approach the ship weights of approximately 300 tons with vessel wall thicknesses of 3 to 8 in. These vessels are typically fabricated from Fe-Cr-Mo steels with chromium ranging from 1.25 to 12% and molybdenum from 1 to 2%. Steels in this composition have great advantages of high thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion, low cost, and properties obtainable by heat treatment. With all of the advantages of Fe-Cr-Mo steels, several issues are faced in design and fabrication of vessels and related components. These issues include the following: (1) low strength properties of current alloys require thicker sections; (2) increased thickness causes heat-treatment issues related to nonuniformity across the thickness and thus not achieving the optimum properties; (3) fracture toughness (ductile-to-brittle transition ) is a critical safety issue for these vessels, and it is affected in thick sections due to nonuniformity of microstructure; (4) PWHT needed after welding and makes fabrication more time-consuming with increased cost; and (5) PWHT needed after welding also limits any modifications of the large vessels in service. The goal of this project was to reduce the weight of large-pressure vessel components (ranging from 100 to 300 tons) by approximately 25% and reduce fabrication cost and improve in-service modification feasibility through development of Fe-3Cr-W(V) steels with combination of nearly a 50% higher strength, a lower DBTT and a higher upper-shelf energy, ease of heat treating, and a strong potential for not requiring PWHT.

  14. Temperature dependence of dynamic Young's modulus and internal friction in three plasma sprayed NiCrAlY coating alloys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Lloyd Steven

    1989-01-01

    for internal friction 6. 3 The corstant C TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) CONCLUSIONS Page 17 REFERENCES VITA 00 LIST OF TABLES Table l. Alloy Compositions . 2. Measured Densities of Specimens 3. Polynomials for CTE Data 4. Dynamic Young's Modulus... in failure, the mechanical properties of coatings have not been a subject of much concern. Recently, however, plasma sprayed NiCrA1Y coatings have been used as "bond coats", intermediate between an insulating top coat and the protected structural member...

  15. Structural and optical characterization of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures: Evaluation of its dielectric properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdullah, M. M., E-mail: abdullahphyzia@gmail.com [Promising Centre for Sensors and Electronic Devices (PCSED), Najran University, P.O. Box 1988, Najran, 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Physics, College of Science and Arts, Najran University, P.O. Box 1988, Najran, 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Rajab, Fahd M. [Promising Centre for Sensors and Electronic Devices (PCSED), Najran University, P.O. Box 1988, Najran, 11001 (Saudi Arabia) [Promising Centre for Sensors and Electronic Devices (PCSED), Najran University, P.O. Box 1988, Najran, 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Najran University, P.O. Box 1988, Najran, 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Abbas, Saleh M. [Promising Centre for Sensors and Electronic Devices (PCSED), Najran University, P.O. Box 1988, Najran, 11001 (Saudi Arabia)] [Promising Centre for Sensors and Electronic Devices (PCSED), Najran University, P.O. Box 1988, Najran, 11001 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-02-15

    The structural, optical and dielectric properties of as-grown Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures are demonstrated in this paper. Powder X-ray diffractometry analysis confirmed the rhombohedral structure of the material with lattice parameter, a = b = 4.953 Å; c = 13.578 Å, and average crystallize size (62.40 ± 21.3) nm. FE-SEM image illustrated the mixture of different shapes (disk, particle and rod) of as-grown nanostructures whereas; EDS spectrum confirmed the elemental purity of the material. FTIR spectroscopy, revealed the characteristic peaks of Cr–O bond stretching vibrations. Energy band gap (3.2 eV) of the nanostructures has been determined using the results of UV-VIS-NIR spectrophotometer. The dielectric properties of the material were checked in the wide frequency region (100Hz-30 MHz). In the low frequency region, the matrix of the dielectric behaves like source as well as sink of electrical energy within the relaxation time. Low value of dielectric loss exhibits that the materials posses good optical quality with lesser defects. The ac conductivity of the material in the high frequency region was found according to frequency power law. The physical-mechanism and the theoretical-interpretation of dielectric-properties of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures attest the potential candidature of the material as an efficient dielectric medium.

  16. Deformation Behavior of Laser Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant Fe-Cr-Al Alloys for Fuel Cladding Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, Kevin G; Gussev, Maxim N; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2014-11-01

    Ferritic-structured Fe-Cr-Al alloys are being developed and show promise as oxidation resistant accident tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding. This study focuses on investigating the weldability of three model alloys in a range of Fe-(13-17.5)Cr-(3-4.4)Al in weight percent with a minor addition of yttrium using laser-welding techniques. A detailed study on the mechanical performance of bead-on-plate welds has been carried out to determine the performance of welds as a function of alloy composition. Laser welding resulted in a defect free weld devoid of cracking or inclusions for all alloys studied. Results indicated a reduction in the yield strength within the fusion zone compared to the base metal. Yield strength reduction was found to be primarily constrained to the fusion zone due to grain coarsening with a less severe reduction in the heat affected zone. No significant correlation was found between the deformation behavior/mechanical performance of welds and the level of Cr or Al in the alloy ranges studied.

  17. Comparison of Crevice Corrosion of Fe-Based Amorphous Metal and Crystalline Ni-Cr-Mo Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shan, X; Ha, H; Payer, J H

    2008-07-24

    The crevice corrosion behaviors of an Fe-based bulk metallic glass alloy (SAM1651) and a Ni-Cr-Mo crystalline alloy (C-22) were studied in 4M NaCl at 100 C with cyclic potentiodynamic polarization and constant potential tests. The corrosion damage morphologies, corrosion products and the compositions of corroded surfaces of these two alloys were studied with optical 3D reconstruction, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). It was found that the Fe-based bulk metallic glass (amorphous alloy) SAM1651 had a more positive breakdown potential and repassivation potential than crystalline alloy C-22 in cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests and required a more positive oxidizing potential to initiate crevice corrosion in constant potential test. Once crevice corrosion initiated, the corrosion propagation of C-22 was more localized near the crevice border compared to SAM1651, and SAM1651 repassivated more readily than C-22. The EDS results indicated that the corrosion products of both alloys contained high amount of O and were enriched in Mo and Cr. The AES results indicated that a Cr-rich oxide passive film was formed on the surfaces of both alloys, and both alloys were corroded congruently.

  18. REGISTRATION INFORMATION: Registration and payment should be received in our office by the third class meeting. CRN# Subject Course# Section# VR/CR Hrs Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    class meeting. CRN# Subject Course# Section# VR/CR Hrs Title I affirm that the information I have and should be received in our office by the third class meeting. Forms received without payment can

  19. Properties of molecular beam epitaxy grown Eu{sub x}(transition metal){sub y} films (transition metals: Mn, Cr)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balin, K.; Nowak, A.; Gibaud, A.; Szade, J.; Celinski, Z.

    2011-04-01

    The electronic and crystallographic structures, as well as the magnetic properties, of Eu{sub x}(transition metal){sub y} (transition metals: Mn, Cr) thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy were studied. Relative changes of the Eu/Mn and Eu/Cr ratios derived from the XPS lines, as well as x-ray reflectivity, indicate mixing of the Eu/Mn and Eu/Cr layers. Valency transitions from Eu{sup 2+} to Eu{sup 3+} were observed in both systems for most studied stoichiometries. A transition to a magnetically ordered phase was observed at 15 K, 40 K, and 62 K for selected films in the Eu-Mn system, and at 50 K for the film with a Eu/Cr ratio of 0.5.

  20. High temperature oxidation and NaCl-induced accelerated corrosion of hot-dip aluminized 9Cr-1Mo and 310 stainless steel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsaur, Charng-Cheng

    2005-02-17

    The behaviors of high temperature corrosion on hot-dip aluminized on 9Cr-1Mo and 310 stainless steels when catalyzed by NaCl and cyclic heating environment were studied experimentally. The corrosion behavior and morphological development were...

  1. Generation of 15-nJ pulses from a highly efficient, low-cost multipass-cavity Cr[superscript 3+]:LiCAF laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirbas, Umit

    We describe the generation of enhanced pulse energies using a multipass-cavity (MPC) Cr[superscript3] +:LiCAF laser, pumped by inexpensive, single spatial mode laser diodes. A semiconductor saturable absorber was used for ...

  2. Sol-Gel Synthesis of KVII[CrIII(CN)6],2H2O: A Crystalline Molecule-Based Magnet with a Magnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girolami, Gregory S.

    of VII(OTf)2 9 with [NEt4]3- [CrIII (CN)6]10 under anaerobic conditions affords a dark blue gel after(ethyl)ammonium, NEt4 + .6-8 These counterions were initially chosen because they are too large to be incorporated to afford VII[CrIII(CN)6]0.66,3.5H2O,0.1[NEt4][OTf] (1).11 Addition of alkali metal cations to the reaction

  3. High-frequency electromagnetic properties of epitaxial Bi2FeCrO6 thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High-frequency electromagnetic properties of epitaxial Bi2FeCrO6 thin films grown by pulsed laser on the electromagnetic (EM) properties in high-frequency domain (HF) of multiferroic Bi2FeCrO6 (BFCO) thin films. The films were epitaxially grown on SrTiO3 substrates by pulsed laser ablation. Typical 50 nm-thick BFCO

  4. Laser welding and post weld treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Z.

    2012-04-03

    Laser welding and post weld laser treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steels (Grade P91) were performed in this preliminary study to investigate the feasibility of using laser welding process as a potential alternative to arc welding methods for solving the Type IV cracking problem in P91 steel welds. The mechanical and metallurgical testing of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser-welded samples shows the following conclusions: (1) both bead-on-plate and circumferential butt welds made by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser show good welds that are free of microcracks and porosity. The narrow heat affected zone has a homogeneous grain structure without conventional soft hardness zone where the Type IV cracking occurs in conventional arc welds. (2) The laser weld tests also show that the same laser welder has the potential to be used as a multi-function tool for weld surface remelting, glazing or post weld tempering to reduce the weld surface defects and to increase the cracking resistance and toughness of the welds. (3) The Vicker hardness of laser welds in the weld and heat affected zone was 420-500 HV with peak hardness in the HAZ compared to 240 HV of base metal. Post weld laser treatment was able to slightly reduce the peak hardness and smooth the hardness profile, but failed to bring the hardness down to below 300 HV due to insufficient time at temperature and too fast cooling rate after the time. Though optimal hardness of weld made by laser is to be determined for best weld strength, methods to achieve the post weld laser treatment temperature, time at the temperature and slow cooling rate need to be developed. (4) Mechanical testing of the laser weld and post weld laser treated samples need to be performed to evaluate the effects of laser post treatments such as surface remelting, glazing, re-hardening, or tempering on the strength of the welds.

  5. Projecting Fatalities in Crashes Involving Older Drivers, 2000–2025, CRADA No. ORNL98-0500 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Patricia S. [ORNL] [ORNL; Jones, Donald W. [ORNL] [ORNL; Reuscher, Timothy [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education] [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education; Schmoyer, Richard S. [ORNL] [ORNL; Truett, Lorena F. [ORNL] [ORNL

    2000-04-01

    At the turn of the century – the 20th century that is – the median age in the United States was under 30 years; America was 60% rural in nature; and there were only 36 highway fatalities all year. As we leave the 20th century behind, the route into the 21st century is very different. “Intelligent” cars speed down multi-lane “smart” highways in a nation that is 75% urban. According to the Federal Highway Administration’s Highway Statistics, there are 28,000 times more vehicles on the road in 2000 than there were in 1900, and these vehicles travel about 2.6 trillion miles each year. Annual fatalities resulting from highway crashes have also increased – by over 1100%. We see other changes as well. The face of America is changing. It is growing older. In 2025, persons 65 and over will make up 18.5% of the total population. The number of persons aged 85 and over is increasing more rapidly than any other age group. More importantly, the elderly are taking more trips, driving further, and continuing to drive much later in life. These conditions lead to concerns about traffic safety. Although the elderly are healthier and drive safer cars than they did just two decades ago, their frailty makes them more susceptible to injury than younger persons involved in traffic crashes of the same severity. In addition, visual, physical, and cognitive skills, all of which contribute to driving abilities, decrease with advancing age. The familiar “U”-shaped curve depicting the rate of fatalities per vehicle miles traveled, shows that the elderly experience a higher highway fatality rate than any other age group except teenagers. While the overall number of highway fatalities has decreased regularly since 1972, the number of fatalities of elderly travelers has continued to increase steadily. This increase is cause for concern for both the elderly driver and for other persons on the roads who migh tbe placed in danger through crashes involving elderly drivers.

  6. Wire number dependence of the implosion dynamics, stagnation, and radiation output of tungsten wire arrays at Z driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazarakis, Michael G.; Stygar, William A.; Sinars, Daniel B.; Cuneo, Michael E.; Nash, Thomas J.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Keith Matzen, M.; Porter, John L.; Struve, Kenneth W.; McDaniel, Dillon H. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Deeney, Christopher E. [National Nuclear Security Administration, Washington, D.C. 20585 (United States); Douglas, Melissa R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Chittenden, Jerry [Imperial College, London, SW and 2BW (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    We report results of the experimental campaign, which studied the initiation, implosion dynamics, and radiation yield of tungsten wire arrays as a function of the wire number. The wire array dimensions and mass were those of interest for the Z-pinch driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program. An optimization study of the x-ray emitted peak power, rise time, and full width at half maximum was effectuated by varying the wire number while keeping the total array mass constant and equal to {approx}5.8 mg. The driver utilized was the {approx}20-MA Z accelerator before refurbishment in its usual short pulse mode of 100 ns. We studied single arrays of 20-mm diameter and 1-cm height. The smaller wire number studied was 30 and the largest 600. It appears that 600 is the highest achievable wire number with present day's technology. Radial and axial diagnostics were utilized including crystal monochromatic x-ray backlighter. An optimum wire number of {approx}375 was observed which was very close to the routinely utilized 300 for the ICF program in Sandia.

  7. Comparison of electric and magnetic quadrupole focusing for the low energy end of an induction-linac-ICF (Inertial-Confinement-Fusion) driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, C.H.

    1987-04-01

    This report compares two physics designs of the low energy end of an induction linac-ICF driver: one using electric quadrupole focusing of many parallel beams followed by transverse combining; the other using magnetic quadrupole focusing of fewer beams without beam combining. Because of larger head-to-tail velocity spread and a consequent rapid current amplification in a magnetic focusing channel, the overall accelerator size of the design using magnetic focusing is comparable to that using electric focusing.

  8. High-Temperature SiC Power Module with Integrated SiC Gate Drivers for Future High-Density Power Electronics Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitaker, Mr. Bret [APEI, Inc.; Cole, Mr. Zach [APEI, Inc.; Passmore, Mr. Brandon [APEI, Inc.; Martin, Daniel [APEI, Inc.; Mcnutt, Tyler [APEI, Inc.; Lostetter, Dr. Alex [APEI, Inc.; Ericson, Milton Nance [ORNL; Frank, Steven Shane [ORNL; Britton Jr, Charles L [ORNL; Marlino, Laura D [ORNL; Mantooth, Alan [University of Arkansas; Francis, Dr. Matt [University of Arkansas; Lamichhane, Ranjan [University of Arkansas; Shepherd, Dr. Paul [University of Arkansas; Glover, Dr. Michael [University of Arkansas

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the testing results of an all-silicon carbide (SiC) intelligent power module (IPM) for use in future high-density power electronics applications. The IPM has high-temperature capability and contains both SiC power devices and SiC gate driver integrated circuits (ICs). The high-temperature capability of the SiC gate driver ICs allows for them to be packaged into the power module and be located physically close to the power devices. This provides a distinct advantage by reducing the gate driver loop inductance, which promotes high frequency operation, while also reducing the overall volume of the system through higher levels of integration. The power module was tested in a bridgeless-boost converter to showcase the performance of the module in a system level application. The converter was initially operated with a switching frequency of 200 kHz with a peak output power of approximately 5 kW. The efficiency of the converter was then evaluated experimentally and optimized by increasing the overdrive voltage on the SiC gate driver ICs. Overall a peak efficiency of 97.7% was measured at 3.0 kW output. The converter s switching frequency was then increased to 500 kHz to prove the high frequency capability of the power module was then pushed to its limits and operated at a switching frequency of 500 kHz. With no further optimization of components, the converter was able to operate under these conditions and showed a peak efficiency of 95.0% at an output power of 2.1 kW.

  9. Simple bond-order-type interatomic potential for an intermixed Fe-Cr-C system of metallic and covalent bondings in heat-resistant ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumagai, Tomohisa Nakamura, Kaoru; Yamada, Susumu; Ohnuma, Toshiharu

    2014-12-28

    It is known that M{sub 23}C{sub 6}(M?=?Cr/Fe) behavior in heat-resistant ferritic steels affects the strength of the material at high temperature. The ability to garner direct information regarding the atomic motion using classical molecular dynamics simulations is useful for investigating the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} behavior in heat-resistant ferritic steels. For such classical molecular dynamics calculations, a suitable interatomic potential is needed. To satisfy this requirement, an empirical bond-order-type interatomic potential for Fe-Cr-C systems was developed because the three main elements to simulate the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} behavior in heat-resistant ferritic steels are Fe, Cr, and C. The angular-dependent term, which applies only in non-metallic systems, was determined based on the similarity between a Finnis-Sinclair-type embedded-atom-method interatomic potential and a Tersoff-type bond-order potential. The potential parameters were determined such that the material properties of Fe-Cr-C systems were reproduced. These properties include the energy and lattice constants of 89 crystal structures; the elastic constants of four realistic precipitates; the bulk moduli of B1, B2, and B3 crystals; the surface energies of B1 and B2 crystals; and the defect-formation energies and atomic configurations of 66 Fe-Cr-C complexes. Most of these material properties were found to be reproduced by our proposed empirical bond-order potentials. The formation energies and lattice constants of randomly mixed Fe-Cr alloys calculated using the interatomic potentials were comparable to those obtained through experiments and first-principles calculations. Furthermore, the energies and structures of interfaces between Cr carbide and ?-Fe as predicted through first-principles calculations were well reproduced using these interatomic potentials.

  10. Fission decay of Cr-48 at E*{sub CN} approximate to 60 MeV.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrar, K. A.; Sanders, S. J.; Dummer, A. K.; Hasan, A. T.; Prosser, F. W.; Back, B. B.; Bearden, I. G.; Betts, R. R.; Carpenter, M. P.; Crowell, B.; Freer, M.; Henderson, D. J.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Khoo, T. L.; Lauritsen, T.; Liang, Y.; Nisius, D.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Beck, C.; Freeman, R. M.; Cavallaro, S.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Physics; Univ. of Kansas; Univ. Louis Pasteur; Univ. di Catania; Univ. de Sao Paulo

    1996-09-01

    The fully energy-damped yields for the {sup 36}Ar + {sup 12}C and {sup 20}Ne + {sup 28}Si reactions at E{sub c.m.}=47.0 MeV and 45.5 MeV, respectively, are explored using particle-particle-{gamma} coincidence data. These reactions reach a similar excitation energy of E{sub CN}*=59.5 MeV in the {sup 48}Cr compound nucleus as was obtained in an earlier particle-particle coincidence study of the {sup 24}Mg + {sup 24}Mg reaction. The overall mass and total kinetic energy distributions of the fission fragments are found to be well reproduced by statistical-model calculations. These calculations are also found to reproduce structure seen in the excitation-energy spectra for the {sup 20}Ne + {sup 28}Si and {sup 24}Mg + {sup 24}Mg exit channels for all three reactions. In previous excitation-function measurements, strong heavy-ion resonance behavior has been observed in elastic and inelastic cross sections for the {sup 24}Mg + {sup 24}Mg system. There has been speculation that peaks observed in the corresponding excitation-energy spectra at more negative Q values may also be a consequence of this resonance phenomenon. The observation of very similar behavior with the asymmetric-mass entrance channels makes it less likely, though, that the peaks arise from any special configuration of the compound system. Instead, an analysis of the {gamma}-ray data and the results of statistical-model calculations support the conclusion that most of the observed high-lying structure can be accounted for in terms of statistical fission from a fully energy- and shape-equilibrated compound nucleus. For the {sup 24}Mg + {sup 24}Mg entrance channel, however, comparisons with the statistical model indicate a reduction of high-angular-momentum partial cross sections, leading to the {sup 24}Mg + {sup 24}Mg fission channel. For the first time, we are able to deduce the nature of the competition between the resonance and statistical-fission mechanisms in this mass region.

  11. AREVA NP Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped fuel development for BWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delafoy, C.; Dewes, P.; Miles, T.

    2007-07-01

    The search for improvements in nuclear fuel cycle economics results in increasing demands for fuel discharged burnup and reliability, plant maneuverability and power up-rating. To achieve these objectives without any reduction of safety margins, fuel design and materials that enable enhanced performance capabilities have been developed or are under investigations. Research on fuel pellets focuses on the modification of the microstructure to increase fission product retention and pellet mechanical compliance. Currently, production of the desired large grain viscoplastic UO{sub 2} fuel microstructures has been extensively investigated by AREVA NP through the use of doping elements. This track is nowadays a worldwide working field. In this area, AREVA NP has launched the development of a new UO{sub 2} fuel pellet obtained by optimum chromium oxide doping. The purpose of this paper is first to present the current results with the AREVA NP optimized chromia doped fuel and to discuss the key advantages in terms of fuel performance for BWR applications. In particular, the development relies on ramp testing results, fuel temperature and fission gas release values acquired at high burnup and high power levels. Second, the paper focuses on the qualification process implemented by AREVA NP to assess the margins of the optimized Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped UO{sub 2} fuel towards safety criteria at high burnup and the risk of PCI failure, as well as to develop calculation tools to support design. The driving force in this qualification plan is to gain the accurate knowledge of the optimized doped fuel behavior under normal, transient and anticipated accident conditions. To support this effort, irradiation campaigns are under progress in PWR and BWR plants to cover a wide range of existing operating conditions and to anticipate future demands. Considering only the BWR part, the program has successfully run since 2005 and is designed to obtain data up to high burnup, at least 70 GWd/tU. The aim is to define the range of operational conditions for application of chromia-doped fuel in combination with LTP2 non-liner cladding as an alternative to the present standard Fe-enhanced Zr liner cladding. (authors)

  12. 10 Gb/s Radiation-Hard VCSEL Array Driver K.K. Gan, P. Buchholz, S. Heidbrink, H. Kagan, R. Kass, J. Moore, D.S. Smith, M. Vogt, M. Ziolkowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gan, K. K.

    to enhance the radiation-hardness. Each ASIC contains eight low voltage differential signal (LVDS) receivers10 Gb/s Radiation-Hard VCSEL Array Driver K.K. Gan, P. Buchholz, S. Heidbrink, H. Kagan, R. Kass, JV protons to a dose of 0.92x1015 1-MeV neq/cm2 and remain operational. For the 10 Gb/s VCSEL array driver

  13. Development of a New Class of Fe-3Cr-W(V)Ferritic STeels for Industrial Process Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jawad, M.

    2005-03-31

    The project described in this report dealt with improving the materials performance and fabrication for hydrotreating reactor vessels, heat recovery systems, and other components for the petroleum and chemical industries. The petroleum and chemical industries use reactor vessels that can approach ship weights of approximately 300 tons with vessel wall thicknesses of 3-8 in. These vessels are typically fabricated from Fe-Cr-Mo steels with chromium ranging from 1.25 to 12% and molybdenum from 1 to 2%. Steels in this composition range have great advantages of high thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion, low cost, and good properties obtainable by heat treatment. With all of the advantages of Fe-Cr-Mo steels, several issues are faced in design and fabrication of vessels and related components. These issues include the following: 1. The low strengths of current alloys require thicker sections. 2. Increased thickness causes heat-treatment issues related to nonuniformity across the thickness and thus a failure to achieve optimum properties. 3. Fracture toughness (ductile-to-brittle transition) is a critical safety issue for these vessels, especially in thick sections because of the nonuniformity of the microstructure. 4. The postweld heat treatment (PWHT) needed after welding makes fabrication more timeconsuming with increased cost. 5. PWHT needed after welding also limits any modifications of the large vessels in service. The goal of this project was to reduce the weight of large-pressure-vessel components (ranging from 100 to 300 tons) by approximately 25%, reduce fabrication cost, and improve in-service modification feasibility through development of Fe-3Cr-W(V) steels with a combination of nearly a 50% higher strength, a lower ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), a higher upper-shelf energy, ease of heat treating, and a strong potential for not requiring PWHT.

  14. Prediction and Monitoring Systems of Creep-Fracture Behavior of 9Cr-1Mo Steels for Teactor Pressure Vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potirniche, Gabriel; Barlow, Fred D.; Charit, Indrajit; Rink, Karl

    2013-11-26

    A recent workshop on next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) topics underscored the need for research studies on the creep fracture behavior of two materials under consideration for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) applications: 9Cr-1Mo and SA-5XX steels. This research project will provide a fundamental understanding of creep fracture behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel welds for through modeling and experimentation and will recommend a design for an RPV structural health monitoring system. Following are the specific objectives of this research project: • Characterize metallurgical degradation in welded modified 9Cr-1Mo steel resulting from aging processes and creep service conditions. • Perform creep tests and characterize the mechanisms of creep fracture process. • Quantify how the microstructure degradation controls the creep strength of welded steel specimens. • Perform finite element (FE) simulations using polycrystal plasticity to understand how grain texture affects the creep fracture properties of welds. • Develop a microstructure-based creep fracture model to estimate RPVs service life . • Manufacture small, prototypic, cylindrical pressure vessels, subject them to degradation by aging, and measure their leak rates. • Simulate damage evolution in creep specimens by FE analyses. • Develop a model that correlates gas leak rates from welded pressure vessels with the amount of microstructural damage. • Perform large-scale FE simulations with a realistic microstructure to evaluate RPV performance at elevated temperatures and creep strength. • Develop a fracture model for the structural integrity of RPVs subjected to creep loads. • Develop a plan for a non-destructive structural health monitoring technique and damage detection device for RPVs.

  15. Electrical spin injection using GaCrN in a GaN based spin light emitting diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, D.; Ganguly, S.; Saha, D.; Adari, R.; Sankaranarayan, S.; Kumar, A.; Aldhaheri, R. W.; Hussain, M. A.; Balamesh, A. S.

    2013-12-09

    We have demonstrated electrical spin-injection from GaCrN dilute magnetic semiconductor (DMS) in a GaN-based spin light emitting diode (spin-LED). The remanent in-plane magnetization of the thin-film semiconducting ferromagnet has been used for introducing the spin polarized electrons into the non-magnetic InGaN quantum well. The output circular polarization obtained from the spin-LED closely follows the normalized in-plane magnetization curve of the DMS. A saturation circular polarization of ?2.5% is obtained at 200?K.

  16. Investigations of protons passing through the CR-39/PM-355 type of solid state nuclear track detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malinowska, A.; Szyd?owski, A.; Jaskó?a, M.; Korman, A.; Kuk, M.; Sartowska, B.; Kuehn, T.

    2013-07-15

    Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors of the CR-39/PM-355 type were irradiated with protons with energies in the range from 0.2 to 8.5 MeV. Their intensities and energies were controlled by a Si surface barrier detector located in an accelerator scattering chamber. The ranges of protons with energies of 6–7 MeV were comparable to the thickness of the PM-355 track detectors. Latent tracks in the polymeric detectors were chemically etched under standard conditions to develop the tracks. Standard optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used for surface morphology characterization.

  17. Solid-solution CrCoCuFeNi high-entropy alloy thin films synthesized by sputter deposition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    An, Zhinan; Jia, Haoling; Wu, Yueying; Rack, Philip D.; Patchen, Allan D.; Liu, Yuzi; Ren, Yang; Li, Nan; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-05-04

    The concept of high configurational entropy requires that the high-entropy alloys (HEAs) yield single-phase solid solutions. However, phase separations are quite common in bulk HEAs. A five-element alloy, CrCoCuFeNi, was deposited via radio frequency magnetron sputtering and confirmed to be a single-phase solid solution through the high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The formation of the solid-solution phase is presumed to be due to the high cooling rate of the sputter-deposition process.

  18. Application of USNRC NUREG/CR-6661 and draft DG-1108 to evolutionary and advanced reactor designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang 'Apollo', Chen

    2006-07-01

    For the seismic design of evolutionary and advanced nuclear reactor power plants, there are definite financial advantages in the application of USNRC NUREG/CR-6661 and draft Regulatory Guide DG-1108. NUREG/CR-6661, 'Benchmark Program for the Evaluation of Methods to Analyze Non-Classically Damped Coupled Systems', was by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the USNRC, and Draft Regulatory Guide DG-1108 is the proposed revision to the current Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.92, Revision 1, 'Combining Modal Responses and Spatial Components in Seismic Response Analysis'. The draft Regulatory Guide DG-1108 is available at http://members.cox.net/apolloconsulting, which also provides a link to the USNRC ADAMS site to search for NUREG/CR-6661 in text file or image file. The draft Regulatory Guide DG-1108 removes unnecessary conservatism in the modal combinations for closely spaced modes in seismic response spectrum analysis. Its application will be very helpful in coupled seismic analysis for structures and heavy equipment to reduce seismic responses and in piping system seismic design. In the NUREG/CR-6661 benchmark program, which investigated coupled seismic analysis of structures and equipment or piping systems with different damping values, three of the four participants applied the complex mode solution method to handle different damping values for structures, equipment, and piping systems. The fourth participant applied the classical normal mode method with equivalent weighted damping values to handle differences in structural, equipment, and piping system damping values. Coupled analysis will reduce the equipment responses when equipment, or piping system and structure are in or close to resonance. However, this reduction in responses occurs only if the realistic DG-1108 modal response combination method is applied, because closely spaced modes will be produced when structure and equipment or piping systems are in or close to resonance. Otherwise, the conservatism in the current Regulatory Guide 1.92, Revision 1, will overshadow the advantage of coupled analysis. All four participants applied the realistic modal combination method of DG-1108. Consequently, more realistic and reduced responses were obtained. (authors)

  19. Phase equilibria of an Al0.5CrFeCoNiCu High Entropy Alloy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, N. G.; Frezza, A.; Stone, H. J.

    2014-07-27

    evidence of shrinkage porosity. Bulk compositional assess- ment showed that each of the constituent elements were within 1 at% of the nominal composition. The distribution of each element in the as-cast state is shown in Fig. 2. Cr, Fe and Co were observed... ,2]. Traditional metallurgical wisdom would expect the microstructure of these materials to contain a number of intermetallic phases, yet surprisingly, this has not been the case. Experimental studies have reported single or dual phase as-cast microstructures [2...

  20. Roles of Fe2+, Fe3+, and Cr3+ Surface Sites in the Oxidation of NO on the (Fe,Cr)3O4(1 1 1) Surface Termination of an ?-(Fe,Cr)2O3(0 0 0 1) Mixed Oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Michael A.

    2014-10-01

    The oxidation and photooxidation reactions of nitric oxide were explored on a mixed Fe and Cr mixed oxide surface using temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The mixed oxide surface examined initially had a corundum (0001) structure with a nominal cation composition of 75% Fe and 25% Cr, but after sputter/anneal cleaning was transformed into a magnetite-like (111) surface structure enriched with Cr (~40%). TPD studies of nitric oxide on the (Fe,Cr)3O4(111) surface revealed two main desorption states at 220 and 370 K, along with a third minor desorption state at ~310 K. Similarly, O2 TPD occurred in two main TPD states (100 and 230 K) and a minor state (155 K). The more strongly and weakly bound NO and O2 molecules were assigned to adsorption at Fe2+ and Fe3+ sites, respectively, with the minor desorption states assigned to Cr3+ sites. No thermal decomposition or surface chemistry was detected in TPD for adsorbed NO (e.g., no N2 or N2O formation), whereas ~10% of the adsorbed O2 irreversibly dissociated at Fe2+ sites. These dissociated oxygen species did not react with coadsorbed NO, but instead blocked NO adsorption at the Fe2+ sites, but had no effect on NO adsorption at Fe3+ sites. In contrast, NO reacted with preadsorbed O2 molecules to generate an adsorbed nitrate/nitrite species that decomposed in TPD to liberate NO at 425 K, leaving an O atom on the surface. Coadsorption of 15N18O with 16O2 suggests the oxidized species was a nitrate based on the detected level of oxygen scrambling. Preadsorption of O2 was required for nitrate formation as preadsorbed NO blocked both O2 adsorption and the oxidation reaction. Irradiation of adsorbed NO with 460 nm light at 40 K resulted in rapid photodesorption of NO without generation of any new surface species. Irradiation of the coadsorbed NO+O2 system did not promote additional NO oxidation, but limited the extent of thermal NO oxidation (in subsequent TPD) by photodepleting the surface of adsorbed NO. Preheating the NO+O2 adlayer to 250 K prior to 460 nm light irradiation restored the level of thermal NO oxidation, revealing both that thermal activation is required for NO oxidation on the (Fe,Cr)3O4(111) surface and that the nitrate product was insensitive to 460 nm light. The author thanks Drs. Sara Chamberlin and Scott Chambers for supplying the film used in this work. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. The research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  1. Effect of Cr substitution on the magnetic and magnetic-transport properties of Fe{sub 2}Mn{sub 1-x}Cr{sub x}Si alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pal, Lakhan; Gupta, Sachin; Suresh, K. G.; Nigam, A. K.

    2014-05-07

    Fe{sub 2}Mn{sub 1-x}Cr{sub x}Si (x?=?0, 0.1, and 0.2) alloys were investigated for their magnetic and transport properties in view of the expected half metallicity. It is found that Cr substitution suppresses the antiferromagnetic phase present in parent Fe{sub 2}MnSi, which completely disappears for x?=?0.2. Curie temperature of the alloys increases from 230?K to 299?K as x is increased from 0 to 0.2. The value of the Rhodes-Wohlfarth ratio indicates that the system shows iterant magnetism. Resistivity measurements also show absence of antiferromagnetic phase for x?=?0.2. Resistivity data have been fitted by considering the electron-phonon and electron-magnon scattering contributions, which indicates the presence of half metallicity in these compounds. Temperature dependence of resistivity data shows magnetoresistance of ?3% and ?2.5% at Curie temperature with applied field of 50 kOe for x?=?0.1 and 0.2, respectively.

  2. Ferromagnetism of magnetically doped topological insulators in Cr{sub x}Bi{sub 2?x}Te{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni, Y.; Zhang, Z. Hadimani, R. L.; Tuttle, G.; Jiles, D. C.; Nlebedim, I. C.

    2015-05-07

    We investigated the effect of magnetic doping on magnetic and transport properties of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films. Cr{sub x}Bi{sub 2?x}Te{sub 3} thin films with x?=?0.03, 0.14, and 0.29 were grown epitaxially on mica substrate with low surface roughness (?0.4?nm). It is found that Cr is an electron acceptor in Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and increases the magnetization of Cr{sub x}Bi{sub 2?x}Te{sub 3}. When x?=?0.14 and 0.29, ferromagnetism appears in Cr{sub x}Bi{sub 2?x}Te{sub 3} thin films, where anomalous Hall effect and weak localization of magnetoconductance were observed. The Curie temperature, coercivity, and remnant Hall resistance of thin films increase with increasing Cr concentration. The Arrott-Noakes plot demonstrates that the critical mechanism of the ferromagnetism can be described better with 3D-Heisenberg model than with mean field model. Our work may benefit for the practical applications of magnetic topological insulators in spintronics and magnetoelectric devices.

  3. Study the effect of mechanical alloying parameters on synthesis of Cr{sub 2}Nb–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shayesteh, Payam Mirdamadi, Shamseddin; Razavi, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Cr{sub 2}Nb–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite synthesized through MA. • Effect of BPR, rotating speed, milling time and PCA concentration investigated. • After annealing at 1100 °C crystalline phase were appeared. • Williamson–Hall analysis was used in order to study the grain size of nano composite. - Abstract: In this study, Cr{sub 2}Nb–20 vol.% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite was prepared successfully by mechanochemical reaction between Al, Nb and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders. Amorphization of powder occurred during mechanical alloying because of high energy collisions between powders and steel balls in milling container which transfer high degree of energy to powders. Therefore, annealing was needed to form crystalline phases. The influence of different mechanical alloying parameters such as BPR, rotating speed, milling time and PCA concentration on synthesis of composite material were investigated. After mechanical alloying, the powder was encapsulated in quartz and then annealed at 1100 °C for 3 h. After annealing, 3 different phases were appeared (Cr{sub 2}Nb (cubic), Cr{sub 2}Nb (hexagonal) and ?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The structural changes of powder particles during mechanical alloying were studied by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

  4. Influence of Cr and W alloying on the fiber-matrix interfacial shear strength in cast and directionally solidified sapphire NiAl composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asthana, R.; Tiwari, R.; Tewari, S.N.

    1995-08-01

    Sapphire-reinforced NiAl matrix composites with chromium or tungsten as alloying additions were synthesized using casting and zone directional solidification (DS) techniques and characterized by a fiber pushout test as well as by microhardness measurements. The sapphire-NiAl(Cr) specimens exhibited an interlayer of Cr rich eutectic at the fiber-matrix interface and a higher interfacial shear strength compared to unalloyed sapphire-NiAl specimens processed under identical conditions. In contrast, the sapphire-NiAl(W) specimens did not show interfacial excess of tungsten rich phases, although the interfacial shear strength was high and comparable to that of sapphire-NiAl(Cr). The postdebond sliding stress was higher in sapphire-NiAl(Cr) than in sapphire-NiAl(W) due to interface enrichment with chromium particles. The matrix microhardness progressively decreased with increasing distance from the interface in both DS NiAl and NiAl(Cr) specimens. The study highlights the potential of casting and DS techniques to improve the toughness and strength of NiAl by designing dual-phase microstructures in NiAl alloys reinforced with sapphire fibers.

  5. Tribological properties of CrN coatings deposited by nitro-chromizing treatment on AISI D2 steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durmaz, M. Abakay, E.; Sen, U.; Sen, S.; Kilinc, B.

    2015-03-30

    In this work, the wear test of uncoated and chromium nitride coated AISI D2 cold work tool steel against alumina ball realized at 0.1?m/s sliding speeds and under the loads of 2.5N, 5N and 10N. Steel samples were nitrided at 575°C for 8?h in the first step of the coating process, and then chromium nitride coating was performed thermo-reactive deposition technique (TRD) in a powder mixture consisting of ferro-chromium, ammonium chloride and alumina at 1000°C for 2?h. Nitro-chromized samples were characterized by X-Ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-hardness and ball on disk wear tests. The coating layer formed on the AISI D2 steel was compact and homogeneous. X-ray studies showed that the phase formed in the coated layer is Cr{sub 2}N. The depth of the layer was 8.15?µm. The average hardness of the layer was 2160±15 HV{sub 0.025}. For uncoated and chromium nitride materials, wear rate increased with increasing load. The results of friction coefficient and wear rate of the tested materials showed that the CrN coating presents the lowest results.

  6. Multiferroic CuCrO? under high pressure: In situ X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garg, Alka B. Mishra, A. K.; Pandey, K. K.; Sharma, Surinder M.

    2014-10-07

    The compression behavior of delafossite compound CuCrO? has been investigated by in situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopic measurements up to 23.2 and 34 GPa, respectively. X-ray diffraction data show the stability of ambient rhombohedral structure up to ~23 GPa. Material shows large anisotropy in axial compression with c-axis compressibility, ?{sub c} = 1.26 × 10?³(1) GPa?¹ and a-axis compressibility, ?{sub a} = 8.90 × 10?³(6) GPa?¹. Our XRD data show an irreversible broadening of diffraction peaks. Pressure volume data when fitted to 3rd order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state give the value of bulk modulus, B? = 156.7(2.8) GPa with its pressure derivative, B?{sup ’} as 5.3(0.5). All the observed vibrational modes in Raman measurements show hardening with pressure. Appearance of a new mode at ~24 GPa indicates the structural phase transition in the compound. Our XRD and Raman results indicate that CuCrO{sub 2} may be transforming to an ordered rocksalt type structure under compression.

  7. Magnetic Correlations in the Quasi-Two-Dimensional Semiconducting Ferromagnet CrSiTe3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Travis J.; Aczel, Adam A.; Lumsden, Mark D.; Nagler, Stephen E.; Stone, Matthew B.; Yan, Jiaqiang -Q.; Mandrus, D.

    2015-10-02

    Intrinsic, 2D ferromagnetic semiconductors are an important class of materials for overcoming dilute magnetic semiconductors’ limitations for spintronics. CrSiTe3 is a particularly interesting material of this class, since it can likely be exfoliated to single layers, for which Tc is predicted to increase dramatically. Establishing the nature of the bulk material’s magnetism is necessary for understanding the thin-film magnetic behavior and the material’s possible applications. In this work, we use elastic and inelastic neutron scattering to measure the magnetic properties of single crystalline CrSiTe3. We find a very small single ion anisotropy that favors magnetic ordering along the c-axis and that the measured spin waves fit well to a model in which the moments are only weakly coupled along that direction. Then, we find that both static and dynamic correlations persist within the ab-plane up to at least 300 K, which is strong evidence of the material's 2D characteristics that are relevant for future studies on thin film and monolayer samples.

  8. Feasibility of developing a portable driver performance data acquisition system for human factors research: Technical tasks. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, R.J.; Barickman, F.S.; Spelt, P.F.; Schmoyer, R.L.; Kirkpatrick, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    A two-phase, multi-year research program entitled ``development of a portable driver performance data acquisition system for human factors research`` was recently completed. The primary objective of the project was to develop a portable data acquisition system for crash avoidance research (DASCAR) that will allow drive performance data to be collected using a large variety of vehicle types and that would be capable of being installed on a given vehicle type within a relatively short-time frame. During phase 1 a feasibility study for designing and fabricating DASCAR was conducted. In phase 2 of the research DASCAR was actually developed and validated. This technical memorandum documents the results from the feasibility study. It is subdivided into three volumes. Volume one (this report) addresses the last five items in the phase 1 research and the first issue in the second phase of the project. Volumes two and three present the related appendices, and the design specifications developed for DASCAR respectively. The six tasks were oriented toward: identifying parameters and measures; identifying analysis tools and methods; identifying measurement techniques and state-of-the-art hardware and software; developing design requirements and specifications; determining the cost of one or more copies of the proposed data acquisition system; and designing a development plan and constructing DASCAR. This report also covers: the background to the program; the requirements for the project; micro camera testing; heat load calculations for the DASCAR instrumentation package in automobile trunks; phase 2 of the research; the DASCAR hardware and software delivered to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration; and crash avoidance problems that can be addressed by DASCAR.

  9. Reactions of methyl groups on a non-reducible metal oxide: The reaction of iodomethane on stoichiometric ?-Cr2O3(0001)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dong, Yujung; Brooks, John D.; Chen, Tsung-Liang; Mullins, David R.; Cox, David F.

    2015-06-10

    The reaction of iodomethane on the nearly stoichiometric ?-Cr2O3(0001) surface produces gas phase ethylene, methane, and surface iodine adatoms. The reaction is first initiated by the dissociation of iodomethane into surface methyl fragments, -CH3, and iodine adatoms. Methyl fragments bound at surface Cr cation sites undergo a rate-limiting dehydrogenation reaction to methylene, =CH2. The methylene intermediates formed from methyl dehydrogenation can then undergo coupling reactions to produce ethylene via two principle reaction pathways: (1) direct coupling of methylene and (2) methylene insertion into the methyl surface bond to form surface ethyl groups which undergo ?-H elimination to produce ethylene. Themore »liberated hydrogen also combines with methyl groups to form methane. Iodine adatoms from the dissociation of iodomethane deactivate the surface by simple site blocking of the surface Cr3+ cations.« less

  10. Performance of LiAlloy/Ag(2)CrO(4) Couples in Molten CsBr-LiBr-KBr Eutectic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GUIDOTTI,RONALD A.; REINHARDT,FREDERICK W.

    1999-10-18

    The performance of Li-alloy/CsBr-LiBr-KBr/Ag{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} systems was studied over a temperature range of 250 C to 300 C, for possible use as a power source for geothermal borehole applications. Single cells were discharged at current densities of 15.8 and 32.6 mA/cm{sup 2} using Li-Si and Li-Al anodes. When tested in 5-cell batteries, the Li-Si/CsBr-LiBr-KBr/Ag{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} system exhibited thermal runaway. Thermal analytical tests showed that the Ag{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} cathode reacted exothermically with the electrolyte on activation. Consequently, this system would not be practical for the envisioned geothermal borehole applications.

  11. Structure and magnetic interactions in the solid solution Ba{sub 3?x}Sr{sub x}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 8}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grundmann, Henrik; Schilling, Andreas; Marjerrison, Casey A.; Dabkowska, Hanna A.; Gaulin, Bruce D.

    2013-09-01

    Highlights: • We describe for the first time the preparation of single- and polycrystalline members of the solid solution Ba{sub 3?x}Sr{sub x}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 8}. • We report on the structural changes in the solid solution at room temperature depending on the stoichiometry. • We describe the peculiar change of the magnetic behavior in the solid solution with the stoichiometry. - Abstract: Solid solutions of the magnetic insulators Ba{sub 3}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 8} and Sr{sub 3}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 8} (Ba{sub 3?x}Sr{sub x}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 8}) have been prepared in polycrystalline form for the first time. Single crystalline material was obtained using a mirror image floating zone technique. X-ray diffraction data taken at room temperature indicate that the space group of Ba{sub 3?x}Sr{sub x}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 8} remains unchanged for all values of x, while the cell parameters depend on the chemical composition, as expected. Magnetization data, measured from 300 K down to 2 K, suggest that the interaction constant J{sub d} within the Cr{sup 5+} dimers varies in a peculiar way as a function of x, starting at J{sub d} = 25 K for x = 0, then first slightly dropping to J{sub d} = 18 K for x ? 0.75, before reaching J{sub d} = 62 K for x = 3.

  12. The Cr-substitution concentration dependence of the structural, electric and magnetic behaviors for Aurivillius Bi{sub 5}Ti{sub 3}FeO{sub 15} multiferroic ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jia; Bai, Wei E-mail: xdtang@sist.ecnu.edu.cn; Yang, Jing; Xu, Wenfei; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Tang, Xiaodong E-mail: xdtang@sist.ecnu.edu.cn; Lin, Tie; Meng, Xiangjian; Duan, Chun-Gang; Chu, Junhao

    2013-12-21

    Aurivillius Bi{sub 5}Ti{sub 3}FeO{sub 15} (BTFO) multiferroic ceramics with different Cr-doped concentrations have been synthesized by the conventional solid state reaction method. The influences of Cr-doping concentrations on the structural, magnetic, dielectric, and ferroelectric properties of BTFO ceramics are investigated in detail. All these sintered Cr-substituted BTFO ceramics are determined to be layered perovskite Aurivillius structure by X-ray diffraction, as well as the lattice parameters a, b, and c are in good accordance with Vegard's law along with the Cr-doping concentration. The lattice distortion a/b for Aurivillius family decreases with increasing Cr-doping concentration. Moreover, Cr-doping can promote greatly the grain growth of BTFO samples confirmed from field emission scanning electron microscopy characterization. However, no obvious signs of the improvement in ferroelectric properties are found in Cr-doped BTFO ceramics, and abnormal ferroelectric polarization versus electric field (P-E) loops are observed as Cr-doping content is beyond 0.1. Similar ? (tan?) versus frequency plots to those of the BTFO sample are exhibited when Cr-doping concentration is less than 0.1. Nevertheless, obvious dielectric dispersion phenomena are shown as the Cr-doping concentration is beyond 0.1, and this dispersion behavior becomes strong with further increasing Cr-doping concentration, which are clearly indicated by the appearance of dielectric loss relaxation peaks in the measurement frequency from 10{sup 2} Hz to 10{sup 6} Hz. In addition, the corresponding frequency to relaxation peak shifts towards high frequencies with the Cr-doping concentration. Finally, the same magnetic orderings for all these Cr-doped BTFO ceramics as those of the BTFO one, i.e., superparamagnetic state dominated with antiferromagnetic interaction, are unambiguously found, signifying that the predicted Fe{sup 3+}-O-Cr{sup 3+} 180° ferromagnetic superexchange interaction based on the Goodenough-Kanamori (G-K) rule might not be achieved in BTFO ceramics through Cr substitution by the conventional solid state reaction.

  13. MODELING THE EFFECT OF WATER VAPOR ON THE INTERFACIAL BEHAVIOR OF HIGH-TEMPERATURE AIR IN CONTACT WITH Fe20Cr SURFACES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chialvo, Ariel A [ORNL; Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Keiser, James R [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this communication is to provide an atomistic view, via molecular dynamic simulation, of the contrasting interfacial behavior between high temperature dry- and (10-40 vol%) wet-air in contact with stainless steels as represented by Fe20Cr. It was found that H2O preferentially adsorbs and displaces oxygen at the metal/fluid interface. Comparison of these findings with experimental studies reported in the literature is discussed. Keywords: Fe-Cr alloys, metal-fluid interfacial behavior, wet-air, molecular simulation

  14. Fragmentation cross sections of Fe^{26+}, Si^{14+} and C^{6+} ions of 0.3-10 A GeV on polyethylene, CR39 and aluminum targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Cecchini; T. Chiarusi; G. Giacomelli; M. Giorgini; A. Kumar; G. Mandrioli; S. Manzoor; A. R. Margiotta; E. Medinaceli; L. Patrizii; V. Popa; I. E. Qureshi; G. Sirri; M. Spurio; V. Togo

    2008-01-21

    We present new measurements of the total and partial fragmentation cross sections in the energy range 0.3-10 A GeV of 56Fe, 28Si and 12C beams on polyethylene, CR39 and aluminum targets. The exposures were made at BNL, USA and HIMAC, Japan. The CR39 nuclear track detectors were used to identify the incident and survived beams and their fragments. The total fragmentation cross sections for all targets are almost energy independent while they depend on the target mass. The measured partial fragmentation cross sections are also discussed.

  15. Fragmentation cross sections of Fe^{26+}, Si^{14+} and C^{6+} ions of 0.3-10 A GeV on CR39, polyethylene and aluminum targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miriam Giorgini

    2008-12-01

    New measurements of the total and partial fragmentation cross sections in the energy range 0.3-10 A GeV of Fe^{26+}, Si^{14+} and C^{6+} beams on polyethylene, CR39 and aluminum targets are presented. The exposures were made at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), USA, and Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC), Japan. The CR39 nuclear track detectors were used to identify the incident and survived beams and their fragments. The total fragmentation cross sections for all targets are almost energy independent while they depend on the target mass. The measured partial fragmentation cross sections are also discussed.

  16. Ga, Ca, and 3d transition element (Cr through Zn) partitioning among spinel-lherzolite phases from the Lanzo massif, Italy: Analytical results and crystal chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wogelius, R.A.; Fraser, D.G.

    1994-06-01

    Ultramafic rocks exposed in Lanzo massif, Italy is a record of mantle geochemistry, melting, sub-solidus re-equilibration. Plagioclase(+ spinel)-lherzolite samples were analyzed by Scanning Proton Microscopy, other techniques. Previous work postulated partial melting events and a two-stage sub-solidus cooling history; this paper notes Ga enrichment on spinel-clinopyroxene grain boundaries, high Ga and transition element content of spinel, and pyroxene zonation in Ca and Al. Trace element levels in olivine and orthopyroxene are also presented. Zoning trends are interpreted as due to diffusion during cooling. Olivine-clinopyroxene Cr and Ca exchange as well as clinopyroxene and spinel zonation trends indicate that the massif experienced at least two sub-solidus cooling episodes, one at 20 kbar to 1000 C and one at 8 kbar <750C. Ga levels in cores of Lanzo high-Cr spinels are high (82-66 ppM) relative to other mantle spinels (66-40 ppM), indicating enrichment. Ga content of ultramafic spinels apparently increases with Cr content; this may be due to: increased Ga solubility stemming from crystal chemical effects and/or higher Ga activities in associated silicate melts. Thus, during melting, high-Cr residual spinel may tend to buffer solid-phase Ga level. These spinels are not only rich in Ga and Cr (max 26.37 el. wt %), but also in Fe (max 21.07 el. wt %), Mn (max 3400 ppM), and Zn (max 2430 ppM). These enrichments are again due to melt extraction and partitioning into spinel structure. Low Ni (min 1050 ppM) levels are due to unsuccessful competition of Ni with Cr for octahedral structural sites caused by crystal field. Comparisons of change in partitioning vs Cr content among several 3d transition elements for spinels from Lanzo, other localities allow us to separate crystal field effects from bulk chemical effects and to show that in typical assemblages, inversion of olivine-spinel partition coefficient for Ni from <1 to >1 should occur at 11% el. wt. Cr in spinel.

  17. Microstructure and oxidation behavior of NiCoCrAl/YSZ microlaminates produced by EB-PVD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi Guodong, E-mail: gdshi@dlut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang Zhi; Liu Mincong [State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Liang Jun [Center for Composite Materials, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China); Wu Zhanjun [State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Two NiCoCrAl/ZrO{sub 2}-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} microlaminates (A and B) were fabricated by electron beam physical vapor deposition, which were different in layer number and metal-layer thickness. The layer number was 20 and 26, respectively. And the metal-layer thickness was 35 and 14 {mu}m, respectively. The microstructure and isothermal oxidation behavior were investigated. During the exposure in air at 1000 deg. C for 100 h, the t to m phase transformation occurred in the ceramic layers, and oxide scales formed at the surfaces of not only the outer metal-layers but also the internal metal-layers for the microlaminates. The oxidation rate of microlaminate B was greater than that of microlaminate A. Their overall mass gains were significantly dependent on the number and thickness of the metal-layers. The oxidation products were also influenced by metal-layer thickness. Oxide scales of the 35 {mu}m thick metal-layer microlaminate (A) consisted mainly of {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {theta}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, while the oxidation products of the 14 {mu}m thick metal-layer microlaminate (B) were the mixture of {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {theta}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. It was also found that the growth of the oxide scale adjacent to the top YSZ layer was controlled by the oxygen diffusion, and that the growth of the oxide scale adjacent to the internal YSZ layer was controlled by the metal ionic diffusion. - Highlights: {yields} Effect of laminate structure on oxidation behavior of microlaminates was studied. {yields} Oxygen diffusion through YSZ layers led to the oxidation of internal metal-layers. {yields} The thinner NiCoCrAl layer was more difficult to form the stable Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale. {yields} Control of oxide scale growth by the oxygen diffusion in the outer metal-layers. {yields} Control of oxide scale growth by the metal ionic diffusion in internal metal-layers.

  18. Drivers of melanoma susceptibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robles Espinoza, Carla Daniela

    2015-03-03

    (Winterstein A. Festschrift. Basel: Emil Barell; 1936; quoted by [83]), and subsequent experiments showed that BP applied on mouse skin, even at low doses, was highly carcinogenic and generally produced squamous cell carcinomas [84]. Other researchers were... caused by UV radiation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 1.2 Paul Broca’s pedigree evidences familial predisposition to cancer . . . . . 26 1.3 Known melanoma susceptibility genes and their functions . . . . . . . . . 35 1.4 Polygenic model...

  19. Market Drivers for Biofuels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    or natural gas, for process energy 6 Ethanol Grain Sorghum Dry mill process, using only biogas from landfills, waste treatment plants, andor waste digesters for process energy...

  20. The high current, fast, 100ns, Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) developmental project at Sandia Laboratories and HCEI.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Kevin S.; Long, Finis W.; Sinebryukhov, Vadim A. , Tomsk, Russia); Kim, Alexandre A. , Tomsk, Russia); Wakeland, Peter Eric; McKee, G. Randall; Woodworth, Joseph Ray; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Struve, Kenneth William; Savage, Mark Edward; Stygar, William A.; LeChien, Keith R.; Matzen, Maurice Keith

    2010-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, N.M., USA, in collaboration with the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia, is developing a new paradigm in pulsed power technology: the Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) technology. This technological approach can provide very compact devices that can deliver very fast high current and high voltage pulses straight out of the cavity with out any complicated pulse forming and pulse compression network. Through multistage inductively insulated voltage adders, the output pulse, increased in voltage amplitude, can be applied directly to the load. The load may be a vacuum electron diode, a z-pinch wire array, a gas puff, a liner, an isentropic compression load (ICE) to study material behavior under very high magnetic fields, or a fusion energy (IFE) target. This is because the output pulse rise time and width can be easily tailored to the specific application needs. In this paper we briefly summarize the developmental work done in Sandia and HCEI during the last few years, and describe our new MYKONOS Sandia High Current LTD Laboratory. An extensive evaluation of the LTD technology is being performed at SNL and the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI) in Tomsk Russia. Two types of High Current LTD cavities (LTD I-II, and 1-MA LTD) were constructed and tested individually and in a voltage adder configuration (1-MA cavity only). All cavities performed remarkably well and the experimental results are in full agreement with analytical and numerical calculation predictions. A two-cavity voltage adder is been assembled and currently undergoes evaluation. This is the first step towards the completion of the 10-cavity, 1-TW module. This MYKONOS voltage adder will be the first ever IVA built with a transmission line insulated with deionized water. The LTD II cavity renamed LTD III will serve as a test bed for evaluating a number of different types of switches, resistors, alternative capacitor configurations, cores and other cavity components. Experimental results will be presented at the Conference and in future publications.

  1. Optimizing and Diversifying the Electric Range of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles for U.S. Drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    To provide useful information for automakers to design successful plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) products and for energy and environmental analysts to understand the social impact of PHEVs, this paper addresses the question of how many of the U.S. consumers, if buying a PHEV, would prefer what electric ranges. The Market-oriented Optimal Range for PHEV (MOR-PHEV) model is developed to optimize the PHEV electric range for each of 36,664 sampled individuals representing U.S. new vehicle drivers. The optimization objective is the minimization of the sum of costs on battery, gasoline, electricity and refueling hassle. Assuming no battery subsidy, the empirical results suggest that: 1) the optimal PHEV electric range approximates two thirds of one s typical daily driving distance in the near term, defined as $450/kWh battery delivered price and $4/gallon gasoline price. 2) PHEVs are not ready to directly compete with HEVs at today s situation, defined by the $600/kWh battery delivered price and the $3-$4/gallon gasoline price, but can do so in the near term. 3) PHEV10s will be favored by the market over longer-range PHEVs in the near term, but longer-range PHEVs can dominate the PHEV market if gasoline prices reach as high as $5-$6 per gallon and/or battery delivered prices reach as low as $150-$300/kWh. 4) PHEVs can become much more attractive against HEVs in the near term if the electric range can be extended by only 10% with multiple charges per day, possible with improved charging infrastructure or adapted charging behavior. 5) the impact of a $100/kWh decrease in battery delivered prices on the competiveness of PHEVs against HEVs can be offset by about $1.25/gallon decrease in gasoline prices, or about 7/kWh increase in electricity prices. This also means that the impact of a $1/gallon decrease in gasoline prices can be offset by about 5/kWh decrease in electricity prices.

  2. Steam Oxidation of FeCrAl and SiC in the Severe Accident Test Station (SATS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pint, Bruce A.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Terrani, Kurt A.

    2015-08-01

    Numerous research projects are directed towards developing accident tolerant fuel (ATF) concepts that will enhance safety margins in light water reactors (LWR) during severe accident scenarios. In the U.S. program, the high temperature steam oxidation performance of ATF solutions has been evaluated in the Severe Accident Test Station (SATS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 2012 [1-3] and this facility continues to support those efforts in the ATF community. Compared to the current UO2/Zr-based alloy fuel system, alternative cladding materials can offer slower oxidation kinetics and a smaller enthalpy of oxidation that can significantly reduce the rate of heat and hydrogen generation in the core during a coolant-limited severe accident [4-5]. Thus, steam oxidation behavior is a key aspect of the evaluation of ATF concepts. This report summarizes recent work to measure steam oxidation kinetics of FeCrAl and SiC specimens in the SATS.

  3. Effects of varying CoCrV seed layer deposition pressure on Ru crystallinity in perpendicular magnetic recording media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joost, W. [Heraeus Materials Technology, Chandler, Arizona 85226 (United States); School of Materials, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Das, A. [Heraeus Materials Technology, Chandler, Arizona 85226 (United States); Alford, T. L. [School of Materials, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2009-10-01

    The effects of varying deposition parameters of a CoCrV seed layer under Ru on the structural and interfacial properties of both layers were studied. While sputtering power showed little effect on film structure, sputtering pressure during deposition of the seed layer had a significant effect on the structural properties of the seed layer. In particular, the grain morphology and crystallinity of the seed layer varied considerably with deposition pressure. Deposition of Ru using a constant recipe for all samples demonstrated the effect of varying seed layer deposition pressure on the Ru layer. The strain energy of the Ru film, a measurement of contraction due to the registry with the seed layer, was greatest at moderate seed layer sputtering pressures, while the Ru(0002) peak area was greatest at low sputtering pressures. The competing contributions of interfacial energy and strain energy describe this effect, with interfacial energy dominating at low sputtering pressures.

  4. Shell model description of Gamow-Teller strengths for $^{42}$Ti, $^{46}$Cr, $^{50}$Fe and $^{54}$Ni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vikas; Hirsch, Jorge G

    2015-01-01

    A systematic shell model description of the experimental Gamow-Teller transition strength distributions in $^{42}$Ti, $^{46}$Cr, $^{50}$Fe and $^{54}$Ni is presented. These transitions have been recently measured via $\\beta$ decay of these $T_z$=-1 nuclei, produced in fragmentation reactions at GSI and also with ($^3${He},$t$) charge-exchange (CE) reactions corresponding to $T_z = + 1$ to $T_z = 0$ carried out at RCNP-Osaka. The calculations are performed in the $pf$ model space, using the GXPF1a and KB3G effective interactions. Qualitative agreement is obtained for the individual transitions, while the calculated summed transition strengths closely reproduce the observed ones.

  5. Experimental and Numerical Analysis on the Distortion of Parts Made of 20MnCr5 by Hot Metal Forming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rentsch, Ruediger; Brinksmeier, Ekkard [Stiftung Institut fuer Werkstofftechnik, Badgasteiner Strasse 3, 28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2011-05-04

    For high performance applications, shafts and gears made of 20MnCr5 (AISI 5120) are manufactured in large numbers every year. Inhomogeneities in the material properties, process perturbations and asymmetries in shape and operation setups provide a potential for the distortion of parts, often released by heat treatment. In this contribution experimental results on the distortion of shafts and the dishing of disk-like gear wheel blanks are presented. The numerical analysis of the hot-rolling process allowed to trace a peculiar segregation distribution at the cross-section of the bars back to the casting process, and to identify an asymmetric strain distribution which may be the main cause for shaft distortion. For the dishing of the disks a correlation to the resulting distribution of the material flow was found and, a process perturbation parameter identified which is assumed to be responsible for the observed material flow variation.

  6. Hubble Space Telescope Near-Infrared Snapshot Survey of 3CR radio source counterparts at low redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juan P. Madrid; Marco Chiaberge; David Floyd; William B. Sparks; Duccio Macchetto; George K. Miley; David Axon; Alessandro Capetti; Christopher P. O'Dea; Stefi Baum; Eric Perlman; Alice Quillen

    2006-03-09

    We present newly acquired images of the near-infrared counterpart of 3CR radio sources. All the sources were selected to have a redshift of less than 0.3 to allow us to obtain the highest spatial resolution. The observations were carried out as a snapshot program using the Near-Infrared Camera and Multiobject Spectrograph (NICMOS) on-board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). In this paper we describe 69 radio galaxies observed for the first time with NICMOS during HST cycle 13. All the objects presented here are elliptical galaxies. However, each of them has unique characteristics such as close companions, dust lanes, unresolved nuclei, arc-like features, globular clusters and jets clearly visible from the images or with basic galaxy subtraction.

  7. Cr-free Fe-based metal oxide catalysts for high temperature water gas shift reaction of fuel processor using LPG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    lee, Joon Y.; Lee, Dae-Won; Lee, Kwan Young; Wang, Yong

    2009-08-15

    The goal of this study was to identify the most suitable chromium-free iron-based catalysts for the HTS (high temperature shift) reaction of a fuel processor using LPG. Hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) in the commercial HTS catalyst has been regarded as hazardous material. We selected Ni and Co as the substitution for chromium in the Fe-based HTS catalyst and investigated the HTS activities of these Crfree catalysts at LPG reformate condition. Cr-free Fe-based catalysts which contain Ni, Zn, or Co instead of Cr were prepared by coprecipitation method and the performance of the catalysts in HTS was evaluated under gas mixture conditions (42% H2, 10% CO, 37% H2O, 8% CO2, and 3% CH4; R (reduction factor): about 1.2) similar to the gases from steam reforming of LPG (100% conversion at steam/carbon ratio = 3), which is higher than R (under 1) of typically studied LNG reformate condition. Among the prepared Cr-free Febased catalysts, the 5 wt%-Co/Fe/20 wt%-Ni and 5 wt%-Zn/Fe/20 wt%-Ni catalysts showed good catalytic activity under this reaction condition simulating LPG reformate gas.

  8. Methane Activation by Transition-Metal Oxides, MOx (M ) Cr, Mo, W; x ) 1, 2, 3) Xin Xu,# Francesco Faglioni, and William A. Goddard, III*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Methane Activation by Transition-Metal Oxides, MOx (M ) Cr, Mo, W; x ) 1, 2, 3) Xin Xu,# Francesco, 2002 Recent experiments on the dehydrogenation-aromatization of methane (DHAM) to form benzene using a MoO3/HZSM-5 catalyst stimulated us to examine methane activation by the transition-metal oxide

  9. Comparison of Pb, Zn, Cd, As, Cr, Mo and Sb Adsorption onto Natural Surface Coatings in a Stream Draining Natural As

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comparison of Pb, Zn, Cd, As, Cr, Mo and Sb Adsorption onto Natural Surface Coatings in a Stream Science+Business Media New York 2014 Abstract Natural surface coatings (biofilms) were col- lected elements Á Distribution coefficient Á Biogenic Mn oxide Natural surface coatings are ubiquitous

  10. Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, M. J., E-mail: mrosenbe@mit.edu; Séguin, F. H.; Waugh, C. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Orozco, D.; Frenje, J. A.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Hohenberger, M.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-04-15

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ?0.5–8 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5 h etch in 6N NaOH at 80?°C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.7–4.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant for detection of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ?3?×?10{sup 6} cm{sup ?2}. A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ?50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount.

  11. A ferromagnetic quantum critical point in heavy-fermion iron oxypnictide CeFe{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}PO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okano, T.; Matoba, M.; Kamihara, Y.; Kitao, S.; Seto, M.; Atou, T.; Itoh, M.

    2015-05-07

    We report crystallographic and magnetic properties of layered iron oxypnictide CeFe{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}PO (x?=?0.000–0.692). Interlayer distances between Ce{sub 2}O{sub 2} and (Fe{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}){sub 2}P{sub 2} layers increase as a function of x, suggesting suppression of Kondo coupling among hybridized conducting orbitals and localized Ce 4f orbitals. CeFe{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}PO (x?=?0.100–0.384) exhibits finite ferromagnetic transition temperatures (T{sub curie}) obtained by Arrott plots, although {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectra reveal paramagnetic Fe sublattice at T???4.2?K. These results indicate that the ferromagnetic phase transitions of samples are mainly due to Ce sublattice. For the samples with x???0.500, no ferromagnetic order is observed down to 2?K. These results verify that ferromagnetic quantum critical points of CeFe{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}PO appear at 0.045???x???0.100 and 0.384???x???0.500.

  12. Anisotropy reversal of the upper critical field at low temperatures and spin-locked superconductivity in K2Cr3As3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Balakirev, F. F.; Kong, T.; Jaime, M.; McDonald, R. D.; Mielke, C. H.; Gurevich, A.; Canfield, P. C.; Bud'ko, S. L.

    2015-06-23

    We report measurements of the anisotropic upper critical field Hc2(T) for K2Cr3As3 single crystals up to 60 T and T>0.6K. Our results show that the upper critical field parallel to the Cr chains, H?c2(T), exhibits a paramagnetically limited behavior, whereas the shape of the H?c2(T) curve (perpendicular to the Cr chains) has no evidence of paramagnetic effects. As a result, the curves H?c2(T) and H?c2(T) cross at T?4K, so that the anisotropy parameter ?H(T)=H?c2/H?c2(T)increases from ?H(Tc)?0.35 near Tc to ?H(0)?1.7 at 0.6 K. The paramagnetically limited behavior of H?c2(T) is inconsistent with triplet superconductivity but suggests a form of singletmore »superconductivity with the electron spins locked onto the direction of Cr chains.« less

  13. A neutron diffraction study of the magnetic structure for the perovskite-type mixed oxides La(Mn, Cr)03 and (La, Sr)Fe03 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bents, Ulrich H.

    1956-01-01

    that these oligomers are > 99.96 % phase selectively soluble in nonpolar solvents. This has allowed us to prepare PIB-supported salen Cr(III) complexes that can be used in a latent biphasic liquid/liquid solvent system. The synthesis of these complexes is quite...

  14. Band-Gap Reduction and Dopant Interaction in Epitaxial La,Cr Co-doped SrTiO3 Thin Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comes, Ryan B.; Sushko, Petr; Heald, Steve M.; Colby, Robert J.; Bowden, Mark E.; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-12-03

    We show that by co-doping SrTiO3 (STO) epitaxial thin films with equal amounts of La and Cr it is possible to produce films with an optical band gap ~0.9 eV lower than that of undoped STO. Sr1-xLaxTi1-xCrxO3 thin films were deposited by molecular beam epitaxy and characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy to show that the Cr dopants are almost exclusively in the Cr3+ oxidation state. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements and theoretical modeling suggest that it is thermodynamically preferred for La and Cr dopants to occupy nearest neighbor A- and B-sites in the lattice. Transport measurements show that the material exhibits variable-range hopping conductivity with high resistivity. These results create new opportunities for the use of doped STO films in photovoltaic and photocatalytic applications.

  15. Nature, Density, and Catalytic Role of Exposed Species on Dispersed VOx/CrOx/Al2O3 Shuwu Yang, Enrique Iglesia,* and Alexis T. Bell*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    6+ favored the primary combustion of propane, which led to low propene selectivity. Thus (ODH) of propane were examined and compared with those for CrOx and VOx dispersed on alumina. VOx for the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of propane to propene,1-25 but reaction rates and selectivities remain too

  16. The influence of Cr on the garnetspinel transition in the Earth's mantle: experiments in the system MgOCr2O3SiO2 and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the garnet-in reaction to much higher pressures than previously anticipated. Moreover, in Cr-bearing systems main minerals such as olivine, clinopyroxene, orthopyrox- ene and spinel. At higher pressures, however, the spinel bearing assemblage converts into a garnet bearing mineral assemblage. Among others, the tran

  17. J. Phys. Chem. 1988, 92, 1731-1738 1731 Energies of cr* Orbitals from Extended Huckel Calculations in Combination wlth HAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    J. Phys. Chem. 1988, 92, 1731-1738 1731 Energies of cr* Orbitals from Extended Huckel Calculations an approximatededuction from first principles. The use of experimentalionization energies for the atoms in the molecule implies that the correlation energy is taken care of. Koopmans' theorem therefore cannot be used. Instead

  18. Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Seguin, F. H.; Waugh, C. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Orozco, D.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Hohenberger, M.; Sangster, T. C.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Landen, O. L.; Zacharias, R. A.; Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2014-04-01

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ~0.5–8 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5 h etch in 6N NaOH at 80 °C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.7–4.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant for detection of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ?3 × 106 cm-2. A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ~50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount.

  19. LONG-TERM OPTICAL OBSERVATIONS OF TWO LMXBs: UW CrB (=MS 1603+260) AND V1408 Aql (=4U 1957+115)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, Paul A. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Robinson, Edward L.; Bayless, Amanda J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Hakala, Pasi J. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO, Vaeisaelaentie 20, FIN-21500 Piikkioe, University of Turku (Finland)

    2012-10-01

    We present new optical photometry of two low-mass X-ray binary stars, UW CrB (MS 1603+260) and V1408 Aql (4U 1957+115). UW CrB is an eclipsing binary and we refine its eclipse ephemeris and measure an upper limit to the rate of change of its orbital period, | P-dot | < 4.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} (unitless). The light curve of UW CrB shows optical counterparts of type I X-ray bursts. We tabulate the times, orbital phases, and fluences of 33 bursts and show that the optical flux in the bursts comes primarily from the accretion disk, not from the secondary star. The new observations are consistent with a model in which the accretion disk in UW CrB is asymmetric and precesses in the prograde direction with a period of {approx}5.5 days. The light curve of V1408 Aql has a low-amplitude modulation at its 9.33 hr orbital period. The modulation remained a nearly pure sine curve in the new data as it was in 1984 and 2008, but its mean amplitude was lower, 18% against 23% in the earlier data. A model in which the orbital modulation is caused by the varying aspect of the heated face of the secondary star continues to give an excellent fit to the light curve. We derive a much improved orbital ephemeris for the system.

  20. Generation of sub-150-fs, 100 nJ pulses from a low-cost cavity-dumped Cr:LiSAF laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirbas, Umit

    We report a low-cost, cavity dumped Cr:LiSAF laser, generating 135-fs pulses at 825 nm, with 105 nJ pulse energies and ?0.78 MW of peak power at 10 kHz, using only 600 mW of pump power.