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1

,"Natural Gas Salt Caverns Storage Capacity "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Caverns Storage Capacity " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Natural Gas...

2

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Salt Cavern Storage Reservoir...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Cavern Underground Natural Gas Storage Reservoir Configuration Salt Cavern Underground Natural Gas Storage Reservoir Configuration Source: PB Energy Storage Services Inc....

3

Multiphase Flow and Cavern Abandonment in Salt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report will explore the hypothesis that an underground cavity in gassy salt will eventually be gas filled as is observed on a small scale in some naturally occurring salt inclusions. First, a summary is presented on what is known about gas occurrences, flow mechanisms, and cavern behavior after abandonment. Then, background information is synthesized into theory on how gas can fill a cavern and simultaneously displace cavern fluids into the surrounding salt. Lastly, two-phase (gas and brine) flow visualization experiments are presented that demonstrate some of the associated flow mechanisms and support the theory and hypothesis that a cavity in salt can become gas filled after plugging and abandonment

Ehgartner, Brian; Tidwell, Vince

2001-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

4

Disposal of NORM waste in salt caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some types of oil and gas production and processing wastes contain naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). If NORM is present at concentrations above regulatory levels in oil field waste, the waste requires special disposal practices. The existing disposal options for wastes containing NORM are limited and costly. This paper evaluates the legality, technical feasibility, economics, and human health risk of disposing of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns. Cavern disposal of NORM waste is technically feasible and poses a very low human health risk. From a legal perspective, there are no fatal flaws that would prevent a state regulatory agency from approving cavern disposal of NORM. On the basis of the costs charged by caverns currently used for disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW), NORM waste disposal caverns could be cost competitive with existing NORM waste disposal methods when regulatory agencies approve the practice.

Veil, J.A.; Smith, K.P.; Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Blunt, D.; Williams, G.P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Disposal in Salt Caverns  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Salt Caverns Salt Caverns Fact Sheet - Disposal in Salt Caverns Introduction to Salt Caverns Underground salt deposits are found in the continental United States and worldwide. Salt domes are large, fingerlike projections of nearly pure salt that have risen to near the surface. Bedded salt formations typically contain multiple layers of salt separated by layers of other rocks. Salt beds occur at depths of 500 to more than 6,000 feet below the surface. Schematic Drawing click to view larger image Schematic Drawing of a Cavern in Domal Salt Schematic Drawing click to view larger image Schematic Drawing of a Cavern in Bedded Salt Salt caverns used for oil field waste disposal are created by a process called solution mining. Well drilling equipment is used to drill a hole

6

Fracture and Healing of Rock Salt Related to Salt Caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, serious investigations of potential extension of the useful life of older caverns or of the use of abandoned caverns for waste disposal have been of interest to the technical community. All of the potential applications depend upon understanding the reamer in which older caverns and sealing systems can fail. Such an understanding will require a more detailed knowledge of the fracture of salt than has been necessary to date. Fortunately, the knowledge of the fracture and healing of salt has made significant advances in the last decade, and is in a position to yield meaningful insights to older cavern behavior. In particular, micromechanical mechanisms of fracture and the concept of a fracture mechanism map have been essential guides, as has the utilization of continuum damage mechanics. The Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, which is summarized extensively in this work was developed specifically to treat both the creep and fracture of salt, and was later extended to incorporate the fracture healing process known to occur in rock salt. Fracture in salt is based on the formation and evolution of microfractures, which may take the form of wing tip cracks, either in the body or the boundary of the grain. This type of crack deforms under shear to produce a strain, and furthermore, the opening of the wing cracks produce volume strain or dilatancy. In the presence of a confining pressure, microcrack formation may be suppressed, as is often the case for triaxial compression tests or natural underground stress situations. However, if the confining pressure is insufficient to suppress fracture, then the fractures will evolve with time to give the characteristic tertiary creep response. Two first order kinetics processes, closure of cracks and healing of cracks, control the healing process. Significantly, volume strain produced by microfractures may lead to changes in the permeability of the salt, which can become a major concern in cavern sealing and operation. The MDCF model is used in three simulations of field experiments in which indirect measures were obtained of the generation of damage. The results of the simulations help to verify the model and suggest that the model captures the correct fracture behavior of rock salt. The model is used in this work to estimate the generation and location of damage around a cylindrical storage cavern. The results are interesting because stress conditions around the cylindrical cavern do not lead to large amounts of damage. Moreover, the damage is such that general failure can not readily occur, nor does the extent of the damage suggest possible increased permeation when the surrounding salt is impermeable.

Chan, K.S.; Fossum, A.F.; Munson, D.E.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1990's:

8

Disposal of oil field wastes into salt caverns: Feasibility, legality, risk, and costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Salt caverns can be formed through solution mining in the bedded or domal salt formations that are found in many states. Salt caverns have traditionally been used for hydrocarbon storage, but caverns have also been used to dispose of some types of wastes. This paper provides an overview of several years of research by Argonne National Laboratory on the feasibility and legality of using salt caverns for disposing of oil field wastes, the risks to human populations from this disposal method, and the cost of cavern disposal. Costs are compared between the four operating US disposal caverns and other commercial disposal options located in the same geographic area as the caverns. Argonne`s research indicates that disposal of oil field wastes into salt caverns is feasible and legal. The risk from cavern disposal of oil field wastes appears to be below accepted safe risk thresholds. Disposal caverns are economically competitive with other disposal options.

Veil, J.A. [Argonne National Lab., Washington, DC (United States). Water Policy Program

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Sensitivity of storage field performance to geologic and cavern design parameters in salt domes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sensitivity study was performed utilizing a three dimensional finite element model to assess allowable cavern field sizes in strategic petroleum reserve salt domes. A potential exists for tensile fracturing and dilatancy damage to salt that can compromise the integrity of a cavern field in situations where high extraction ratios exist. The effects of salt creep rate, depth of salt dome top, dome size, caprock thickness, elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, lateral stress ratio of surrounding rock, cavern size, depth of cavern, and number of caverns are examined numerically. As a result, a correlation table between the parameters and the impact on the performance of a storage field was established. In general, slower salt creep rates, deeper depth of salt dome top, larger elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, and a smaller radius of cavern are better for structural performance of the salt dome.

Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon; Herrick, Courtney Grant

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Sensitivity of storage field performance to geologic and cavern design parameters in salt domes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sensitivity study was performed utilizing a three dimensional finite element model to assess allowable cavern field sizes for strategic petroleum reserve salt domes. A potential exists for tensile fracturing and dilatancy damage to salt that can compromise the integrity of a cavern field in situations where high extraction ratios exist. The effects of salt creep rate, depth of salt dome top, dome size, caprock thickness, elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, lateral stress ratio of surrounding rock, cavern size, depth of cavern, and number of caverns are examined numerically. As a result, a correlation table between the parameters and the impact on the performance of storage field was established. In general, slower salt creep rates, deeper depth of salt dome top, larger elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, and a smaller radius of cavern are better for structural performance of the salt dome.

Ehgartner, Brian L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Park, Byoung Yoon

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Salt caverns account for 23% of U.S. underground natural gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The U.S. has three primary types of underground natural gas storage facilities: depleted fields, aquifers, and salt caverns. Depleted natural gas fields provide by ...

12

Disposal of oil field wastes and NORM wastes into salt caverns.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Salt caverns can be formed through solution mining in the bedded or domal salt formations that are found in many states. Salt caverns have traditionally been used for hydrocarbon storage, but caverns have also been used to dispose of some types of wastes. This paper provides an overview of several years of research by Argonne National Laboratory on the feasibility and legality of using salt caverns for disposing of nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) and naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), the risk to human populations from this disposal method, and the cost of cavern disposal. Costs are compared between the four operating US disposal caverns and other commercial disposal options located in the same geographic area as the caverns. Argonne's research indicates that disposal of NOW into salt caverns is feasible and, in most cases, would not be prohibited by state agencies (although those agencies may need to revise their wastes management regulations). A risk analysis of several cavern leakage scenarios suggests that the risk from cavern disposal of NOW and NORM wastes is below accepted safe risk thresholds. Disposal caverns are economically competitive with other disposal options.

Veil, J. A.

1999-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

13

Preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste into salt caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Caverns can be readily formed in salt formations through solution mining. The caverns may be formed incidentally, as a result of salt recovery, or intentionally to create an underground chamber that can be used for storing hydrocarbon products or compressed air or disposing of wastes. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the feasibility, suitability, and legality of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration, development, and production wastes (hereafter referred to as oil field wastes, unless otherwise noted) in salt caverns. Chapter 2 provides background information on: types and locations of US subsurface salt deposits; basic solution mining techniques used to create caverns; and ways in which salt caverns are used. Later chapters provide discussion of: federal and state regulatory requirements concerning disposal of oil field waste, including which wastes are considered eligible for cavern disposal; waste streams that are considered to be oil field waste; and an evaluation of technical issues concerning the suitability of using salt caverns for disposing of oil field waste. Separate chapters present: types of oil field wastes suitable for cavern disposal; cavern design and location; disposal operations; and closure and remediation. This report does not suggest specific numerical limits for such factors or variables as distance to neighboring activities, depths for casings, pressure testing, or size and shape of cavern. The intent is to raise issues and general approaches that will contribute to the growing body of information on this subject.

Veil, J.; Elcock, D.; Raivel, M.; Caudle, D.; Ayers, R.C. Jr.; Grunewald, B.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Geomechanical Analysis and Design Considerations for Thin-Bedded Salt Caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bedded salt formations located throughout the United States are layered and interspersed with non-salt materials such as anhydrite, shale, dolomite and limestone. The salt layers often contain significant impurities. GRI and DOE have initialized this research proposal in order to increase the gas storage capabilities by providing operators with improved geotechnical design and operating guidelines for thin bedded salt caverns. Terralog has summarized the geologic conditions, pressure conditions, and critical design factors that may lead to: (1) Fracture in heterogeneous materials; (2) Differential deformation and bedding plane slip; (3) Propagation of damage around single and multiple cavern; and (4) Improved design recommendations for single and multiple cavern configurations in various bedded salt environments. The existing caverns within both the Permian Basin Complex and the Michigan and Appalachian Basins are normally found between 300 m to 1,000 m (1,000 ft to 3,300 ft) depth depending on local geology and salt dissolution depth. Currently, active cavern operations are found in the Midland and Anadarko Basins within the Permian Basin Complex and in the Appalachian and Michigan Basins. The Palo Duro and Delaware Basins within the Permian Basin Complex also offer salt cavern development potential. Terralog developed a number of numerical models for caverns located in thin bedded salt. A modified creep viscoplastic model has been developed and implemented in Flac3D to simulate the response of salt at the Permian, Michigan and Appalachian Basins. The formulation of the viscoplastic salt model, which is based on an empirical creep law developed for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Program, is combined with the Drucker-Prager model to include the formation of damage and failure. The Permian salt lab test data provided by Pfeifle et al. 1983, are used to validate the assumptions made in the material model development. For the actual cavern simulations two baseline models are developed for single and multiple caverns, respectively. Different parameters that affect damage propagation and deformation of salt cavern, such as cavern pressure, operating conditions, cavern height/diameter ratio, overburden stiffness and roof thickness are analyzed and the respective results summarized. For multiple horizontal caverns numerical models are developed to determine the cavern interaction and the minimum safe center to center distance. A step by step methodology for operators to assess critical cavern design parameters for thin bedded salt formations is also presented.

Michael S. Bruno

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

15

Features of Bayou Choctaw SPR caverns and internal structure of the salt dome.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intent of this study is to examine the internal structure of the Bayou Choctaw salt dome utilizing the information obtained from graphical representations of sonar survey data of the internal cavern surfaces. Many of the Bayou Choctaw caverns have been abandoned. Some existing caverns were purchased by the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program and have rather convoluted histories and complex cavern geometries. In fact, these caverns are typically poorly documented and are not particularly constructive to this study. Only two Bayou Choctaw caverns, 101 and 102, which were constructed using well-controlled solutioning methods, are well documented. One of these was constructed by the SPR for their use while the other was constructed and traded for another existing cavern. Consequently, compared to the SPR caverns of the West Hackberry and Big Hill domes, it is more difficult to obtain a general impression of the stratigraphy of the dome. Indeed, caverns of Bayou Choctaw show features significantly different than those encountered in the other two SPR facilities. In the number of abandoned caverns, and some of those existing caverns purchased by the SPR, extremely irregular solutioning has occurred. The two SPR constructed caverns suggest that some sections of the caverns may have undergone very regular solutioning to form uniform cylindrical shapes. Although it is not usually productive to speculate, some suggestions that point to the behavior of the Bayou Choctaw dome are examined. Also the primary differences in the Bayou Choctaw dome and the other SPR domes are noted.

Munson, Darrell E.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Underground hydrogen storage. Final report. [Salt caverns, excavated caverns, aquifers and depleted fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical and economic feasibility of storing hydrogen in underground storage reservoirs is evaluated. The past and present technology of storing gases, primarily natural gas is reviewed. Four types of reservoirs are examined: salt caverns, excavated caverns, aquifers, and depleted fields. A technical investigation of hydrogen properties reveals that only hydrogen embrittlement places a limit on the underground storage by hydrogen. This constraint will limit reservoir pressures to 1200 psi or less. A model was developed to determine economic feasibility. After making reasonable assumptions that a utility might make in determining whether to proceed with a new storage operation, the model was tested and verified on natural gas storage. A parameteric analysis was made on some of the input parameters of the model to determine the sensitivity of the cost of service to them. Once the model was verified it was used to compute the cost of service of storing hydrogen in the four reservoir types. The costs of service for hydrogen storage ranged from 26 to 150% of the cost of the gas stored. The study concludes that it is now both safe and economic to store hydrogen in underground reservoirs.

Foh, S.; Novil, M.; Rockar, E.; Randolph, P.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Threat of a sinkhole: A reevaluation of Cavern 4, Bayou Choctaw salt dome, Louisiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cavern Lake at Bayou Choctaw salt dome resulted from the failure of Cavern 7 in 1954. Uncontrolled solutioning of this cavern through the thin caprock had set the stage for overburden to collapse into the cavern below. A similar situation developed with nearby Cavern 4, but with less dissolutioning of the caprock. Because pressure loss was already a problem and because another 800 ft diameter lake would have endangered surface operations, solutioning of Cavern 4 was stopped and the cavern abandoned in 1957 in order to protect the already-small site. In 1978 the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) acquired a number of caverns at Bayou Choctaw, including Cavern 4, and the possible repeat of the Cavern 7 failure and formation of another lake thus became an issue. The cavern dimensions were re-sonared in 1980 for comparison with 1963 and 1977 surveys. Annual surface leveling between 1982--1992 showed less subsidence occurring than the site average, and a cavern monitoring system, installed in 1984, has revealed no anomalous motion. Repeat sonar surveys in 1992 showed very little, if any, change occurred since 1980 although a small amount of uncertainty exists as a result of changing sonar techniques. We conclude that significant additional solutioning or erosion of the caprock has not occurred and that there is no increased threat to SPR operations.

Neal, J.T.; Todd, J.L.; Linn, J.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Magorian, T.R. [Magorian (Thomas R.), Amherst, NY (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

A NOVEL PROCESS TO USE SALT CAVERNS TO RECEIVE SHIP BORNE LNG  

SciTech Connect

This cooperative research project validates use of man made salt caverns to receive and store the cargoes of LNG ships in lieu of large liquid LNG tanks. Salt caverns will not tolerate direct injection of LNG because it is a cryogenic liquid, too cold for contact with salt. This research confirmed the technical processes and the economic benefits of pressuring the LNG up to dense phase, warming it to salt compatible temperatures and then directly injecting the dense phase gas into salt caverns for storage. The use of salt caverns to store natural gas sourced from LNG imports, particularly when located offshore, provides a highly secure, large scale and lower cost import facility as an alternative to tank based LNG import terminals. This design can unload a ship in the same time as unloading at a tank based terminal. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve uses man made salt caverns to securely store large quantities of crude oil. Similarly, this project describes a novel application of salt cavern gas storage technologies used for the first time in conjunction with LNG receiving. The energy industry uses man made salt caverns to store an array of gases and liquids but has never used man made salt caverns directly in the importation of LNG. This project has adapted and expanded the field of salt cavern storage technology and combined it with novel equipment and processes to accommodate LNG importation. The salt cavern based LNG receiving terminal described in the project can be located onshore or offshore, but the focus of the design and cost estimates has been on an offshore location, away from congested channels and ports. The salt cavern based terminal can provide large volumes of gas storage, high deliverability from storage, and is simplified in operation compared to tank based LNG terminals. Phase I of this project included mathematical modeling that proved a salt cavern based receiving terminal could be built at lower capital cost, and would have significantly higher delivery capacity, shorter construction time, and be much more secure than a conventional liquid tank based terminal. Operating costs of a salt cavern terminal are lower than tank based terminals because ''boil off'' is eliminated and maintenance costs of caverns are lower than LNG tanks. Phase II included the development of offshore mooring designs, wave tank tests, high pressure LNG pump field tests, heat exchanger field tests, and development of a model offshore LNG facility and cavern design. Engineers designed a model facility, prepared equipment lists, and confirmed capital and operating costs. In addition, vendors quoted fabrication and installation costs, confirming that an offshore salt cavern based LNG terminal would have lower capital and operating costs than a similarly sized offshore tank based terminal. Salt cavern storage is infinitely more secure than surface storage tanks, far less susceptible to accidents or purposeful damage, and much more acceptable to the community. More than thirty industry participants provided cost sharing, technical expertise, and guidance in the conduct and evaluation of the field tests, facility design and operating and cost estimates. Their close participation has accelerated the industry's acceptance of the conclusions of this research. The industry participants also developed and submitted several alternative designs for offshore mooring and for high pressure LNG heat exchangers in addition to those that were field tested in this project. HNG Storage, a developer, owner, and operator of natural gas storage facilities, and a participant in the DOE research has announced they will lead the development of the first offshore salt cavern based LNG import facility. Which will be called the Freedom LNG Terminal. It will be located offshore Louisiana, and is expected to be jointly developed with other members of the research group yet to be named. An offshore port license application is scheduled to be filed by fourth quarter 2005 and the terminal could be operational by 2009. This terminal allows the large volume importa

Michael M. McCall; William M. Bishop; Marcus Krekel; James F. Davis; D. Braxton Scherz

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Salt caverns can be formed in underground salt formations incidentally as a result of mining or intentionally to create underground chambers for product storage or waste disposal. For more than 50 years, salt caverns have been used to store hydrocarbon products. Recently, concerns over the costs and environmental effects of land disposal and incineration have sparked interest in using salt caverns for waste disposal. Countries using or considering using salt caverns for waste disposal include Canada (oil-production wastes), Mexico (purged sulfates from salt evaporators), Germany (contaminated soils and ashes), the United Kingdom (organic residues), and the Netherlands (brine purification wastes). In the US, industry and the regulatory community are pursuing the use of salt caverns for disposal of oil-field wastes. In 1988, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a regulatory determination exempting wastes generated during oil and gas exploration and production (oil-field wastes) from federal hazardous waste regulations--even though such wastes may contain hazardous constituents. At the same time, EPA urged states to tighten their oil-field waste management regulations. The resulting restrictions have generated industry interest in the use of salt caverns for potentially economical and environmentally safe oil-field waste disposal. Before the practice can be implemented commercially, however, regulators need assurance that disposing of oil-field wastes in salt caverns is technically and legally feasible and that potential health effects associated with the practice are acceptable. In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. It investigated regulatory issues; the types of oil-field wastes suitable for cavern disposal; cavern design and location considerations; and disposal operations, closure and remediation issues. It determined that if caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they could, from technical and legal perspectives, be suitable for disposing of oil-field wastes. On the basis of these findings, ANL subsequently conducted a preliminary risk assessment on the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from the NOW disposed of in salt caverns. The methodology for the risk assessment included the following steps: identifying potential contaminants of concern; determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants; assessing contaminant toxicities; estimating contaminant intakes; and estimating human cancer and noncancer risks. To estimate exposure routes and pathways, four postclosure cavern release scenarios were assessed. These were inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks, failure of the cavern through leaky interbeds, and partial collapse of the cavern roof. Assuming a single, generic, salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, potential human health effects associated with constituent hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) were assessed under each of these scenarios. Preliminary results provided excess cancer risk and hazard index (for noncancer health effects) estimates that were well within the EPA target range for acceptable exposure risk levels. These results lead to the preliminary conclusion that from a human health perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for nonhazardous oil-field wastes.

Elcock, D.

1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

20

New information on disposal of oil field wastes in salt caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solution-mined salt caverns have been used for many years for storing hydrocarbon products. This paper summarizes an Argonne National Laboratory report that reviews the legality, technical suitability, and feasibility of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration and production wastes in salt caverns. An analysis of regulations indicated that there are no outright regulatory prohibitions on cavern disposal of oil field wastes at either the federal level or in the 11 oil-producing states that were studied. There is no actual field experience on the long-term impacts that might arise following closure of waste disposal caverns. Although research has found that pressures will build-up in a closed cavern, none has specifically addressed caverns filled with oil field wastes. More field research on pressure build-up in closed caverns is needed. On the basis of preliminary investigations, we believe that disposal of oil field wastes in salt caverns is legal and feasible. The technical suitability of the practice depends on whether the caverns are well-sited and well-designed, carefully operated, properly closed, and routinely monitored.

Veil, J.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drive salt caverns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Can nonhazardous oil field wastes be disposed of in salt caverns?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solution-mined salt caverns have been used for many years for storing hydrocarbon products. This paper summarizes an Argonne National Laboratory report that reviews the legality, technical suitability, and feasibility of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration and production wastes in salt caverns. An analysis of regulations indicated that there are no outright regulatory prohibitions on cavern disposal -of oil field wastes at either the federal level or in the 11 oil-producing states that were studied. There is no actual field experience on the long-term impacts that might arise following closure of waste disposal caverns. Although research has found that pressures will build up in a closed cavern, none has specifically addressed caverns filled with oil field wastes. More field research on pressure build up in closed caverns is needed. On the basis of preliminary investigations, we believe that disposal of oil field wastes in salt caverns is legal and feasible. The technical suitability of the practice depends on whether the caverns are well-sited and well-designed, carefully operated, properly closed, and routinely monitored.

Veil, J.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Preliminary long-term stability criteria for compressed air energy storage caverns in salt domes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air storage caverns, which are an essential and integral component of a CAES plant, should be designed and operated so as to perform satisfactorily over the intended life of the overall facility. It follows that the long-term ''stability'' of air storage caverns must be considered as a primary concern in projecting the satisfactory operation of CAES facilities. As used in the report, ''stability'' of a storage cavern implies the extent to which an acceptable amount of cavern storage volume can be utilized with routine maintenance for a specified time interval, e.g., 35 years. In this context, cavern stability is relative to both planned utilization and time interval of operation. The objective of the study was to review the existing literature and consult knowledgeable workers in the storage industry, and then report state-of-the-art findings relative to long-term stability of compressed air energy storage caverns in salt domes. Further, preliminary cavern stability criteria were to be presented in a form consistent with the amount of information available on cavern performance in salt domes. Another objective of the study was to outline a methodology for determining the long-term stability of site-specific CAES cavern systems in salt domes.

Thoms, R.L.; Martinez, J.D.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

,"U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)" Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","nga_epg0_sacws_nus_mmcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/nga_epg0_sacws_nus_mmcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

24

,"Underground Natural Gas Storage - Salt Cavern Storage Fields"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Cavern Storage Fields" Salt Cavern Storage Fields" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Underground Natural Gas Storage - Salt Cavern Storage Fields",8,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm10vmall.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/oil_gas/natural_gas/data_publications/natural_gas_monthly/ngm.html" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

25

Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. Argonne determined that if caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they could be suitable for disposing of oil-field wastes. On the basis of these findings, Argonne subsequently conducted a preliminary evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from the NOW disposed of in domal salt caverns. Steps used in this evaluation included the following: identifying potential contaminants of concern, determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing contaminant toxicities, estimating contaminant intakes, and calculating human cancer and noncancer risk estimates. Five postclosure cavern release scenarios were assessed. These were inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks, failure of the cavern through leaky interbeds, and a partial collapse of the cavern roof. Assuming a single, generic, salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, potential human health effects associated with constituent hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) were assessed under each of these scenarios. Preliminary results provided excess cancer risk and hazard index (referring to noncancer health effects) estimates that were well within the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) target range for acceptable exposure risk levels. These results led to the preliminary conclusion that from a human health perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for nonhazardous oil-field wastes.

Elcock, D.

1998-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

26

EXAMINE AND EVALUATE A PROCESS TO USE SALT CAVERNS TO RECEIVE SHIP BORNE LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy cooperative research project is to define, describe, and validate, a process to utilize salt caverns to receive and store the cargoes of LNG ships. The project defines the process as receiving LNG from a ship, pumping the LNG up to cavern injection pressures, warming it to cavern compatible temperatures, injecting the warmed vapor directly into salt caverns for storage, and distribution to the pipeline network. The performance of work under this agreement is based on U.S. Patent 5,511,905, and other U.S. and Foreign pending patent applications. The cost sharing participants in the research are The National Energy Technology Laboratory (U.S. Department of Energy), BP America Production Company, Bluewater Offshore Production Systems (U.S.A.), Inc., and HNG Storage, L.P. Initial results indicate that a salt cavern based receiving terminal could be built at about half the capital cost, less than half the operating costs and would have significantly higher delivery capacity, shorter construction time, and be much more secure than a conventional liquid tank based terminal. There is a significant body of knowledge and practice concerning natural gas storage in salt caverns, and there is a considerable body of knowledge and practice in handling LNG, but there has never been any attempt to develop a process whereby the two technologies can be combined. Salt cavern storage is infinitely more secure than surface storage tanks, far less susceptible to accidents or terrorist acts, and much more acceptable to the community. The project team developed conceptual designs of two salt cavern based LNG terminals, one with caverns located in Calcasieu Parish Louisiana, and the second in Vermilion block 179 about 50 miles offshore Louisiana. These conceptual designs were compared to conventional tank based LNG terminals and demonstrate superior security, economy and capacity. The potential for the development of LNG receiving terminals, utilizing salt caverns for storage and the existing comprehensive pipeline system has profound implications for the next generation of LNG terminals. LNG imports are expected to become an increasingly more important part of the U.S. energy supply and the capacities to receive LNG securely, safely, and economically must be expanded. Salt cavern LNG receiving terminals both in onshore and offshore locations can be quickly built and provide additional import capacity into the U.S. exceeding 6-10 Bcf/day in the aggregate.

Michael M. McCall; William M. Bishop; D. Braxton Scherz

2003-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

27

Disposal of NORM-Contaminated Oil Field Wastes in Salt Caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1995, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, asked Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to conduct a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW) into salt caverns. That study concluded that disposal of NOW into salt caverns is feasible and legal. If caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they can be a suitable means of disposing of NOW (Veil et al. 1996). Considering these findings and the increased U.S. interest in using salt caverns for NOW disposal, the Office of Fossil Energy asked Argonne to conduct further research on the cost of cavern disposal compared with the cost of more traditional NOW disposal methods and on preliminary identification and investigation of the risks associated with such disposal. The cost study (Veil 1997) found that disposal costs at the four permitted disposal caverns in the United States were comparable to or lower than the costs of other disposal facilities in the same geographic area. The risk study (Tomasko et al. 1997) estimated that both cancer and noncancer human health risks from drinking water that had been contaminated by releases of cavern contents were significantly lower than the accepted risk thresholds. Since 1992, DOE has funded Argonne to conduct a series of studies evaluating issues related to management and disposal of oil field wastes contaminated with naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). Included among these studies were radiological dose assessments of several different NORM disposal options (Smith et al. 1996). In 1997, DOE asked Argonne to conduct additional analyses on waste disposal in salt caverns, except that this time the wastes to be evaluated would be those types of oil field wastes that are contaminated by NORM. This report describes these analyses. Throughout the remainder of this report, the term ''NORM waste'' is used to mean ''oil field waste contaminated by NORM''.

Blunt, D.L.; Elcock, D.; Smith, K.P.; Tomasko, D.; Viel, J.A.; and Williams, G.P.

1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

28

Risk analyses for disposing nonhazardous oil field wastes in salt caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Salt caverns have been used for several decades to store various hydrocarbon products. In the past few years, four facilities in the US have been permitted to dispose nonhazardous oil field wastes in salt caverns. Several other disposal caverns have been permitted in Canada and Europe. This report evaluates the possibility that adverse human health effects could result from exposure to contaminants released from the caverns in domal salt formations used for nonhazardous oil field waste disposal. The evaluation assumes normal operations but considers the possibility of leaks in cavern seals and cavern walls during the post-closure phase of operation. In this assessment, several steps were followed to identify possible human health risks. At the broadest level, these steps include identifying a reasonable set of contaminants of possible concern, identifying how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing the toxicities of these contaminants, estimating their intakes, and characterizing their associated human health risks. The contaminants of concern for the assessment are benzene, cadmium, arsenic, and chromium. These were selected as being components of oil field waste and having a likelihood to remain in solution for a long enough time to reach a human receptor.

Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.; Caudle, D.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

,"U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)" Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1393_nus_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1393_nus_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:34 PM"

30

,"U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (Count)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Caverns Capacity (Count)" Salt Caverns Capacity (Count)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (Count)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1393_nus_8a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1393_nus_8a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:34 PM"

31

Disposal of NORM-Contaminated Oil Field Wastes in Salt Caverns  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy Office of Fossil Energy National Petroleum Technology Office National Petroleum Technology Office under Contract W -31-109- under Contract W -31-109- Eng Eng -38 -38 Prepared by: Prepared by: John A. Veil, Karen P. Smith, David John A. Veil, Karen P. Smith, David Tomasko Tomasko , , Deborah Deborah Elcock Elcock , Deborah L. Blunt, and , Deborah L. Blunt, and Gustavious Gustavious P. W illiams P. W illiams Argonne National Laboratory August 1998 August 1998 Disposal of NORM - Disposal of NORM - Contam inated O il Contam inated O il Field Wastes in Salt Field Wastes in Salt Caverns Caverns Disposal of NORM in Salt Caverns Page i Table of Contents Acronyms and Abbreviations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

32

Analysis of SPR salt cavern remedial leach program 2013.  

SciTech Connect

The storage caverns of the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) exhibit creep behavior resulting in reduction of storage capacity over time. Maintenance of oil storage capacity requires periodic controlled leaching named remedial leach. The 30 MMB sale in summer 2011 provided space available to facilitate leaching operations. The objective of this report is to present the results and analyses of remedial leach activity at the SPR following the 2011 sale until mid-January 2013. This report focuses on caverns BH101, BH104, WH105 and WH106. Three of the four hanging strings were damaged resulting in deviations from normal leach patterns; however, the deviations did not affect the immediate geomechanical stability of the caverns. Significant leaching occurred in the toes of the caverns likely decreasing the number of available drawdowns until P/D ratio criteria are met. SANSMIC shows good agreement with sonar data and reasonably predicted the location and size of the enhanced leaching region resulting from string breakage.

Weber, Paula D.; Gutierrez, Karen A.; Lord, David L.; Rudeen, David Keith [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Preliminary Technical and Legal Evaluation of Disposing of Nonhazardous Oil Field Waste into Salt Caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an initial evaluation of the suitability, feasibility, and legality of using salt caverns for disposal of nonhazardous oil field wastes. Given the preliminary and general nature of this report, we recognize that some of our findings and conclusions maybe speculative and subject to change upon further research on this topic.

Ayers, Robert C.; Caudle, Dan; Elcock, Deborah; Raivel, Mary; Veil, John; and Grunewald, Ben

1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

34

Characterization of bedded salt for storage caverns -- A case study from the Midland Basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The geometry of Permian bedding salt in the Midland Basin is a product of interaction between depositional facies and postdepositional modification by salt dissolution. Mapping high-frequency cycle patterns in cross section and map view using wireline logs documents the salt geometry. Geologically based interpretation of depositional and dissolution processes provides a powerful tool for mapping and geometry of salt to assess the suitability of sites for development of solution-mined storage caverns. In addition, this process-based description of salt geometry complements existing data about the evolution of one of the best-known sedimentary basins in the world, and can serve as a genetic model to assist in interpreting other salts.

Hovorka, Susan D.; Nava, Robin

2000-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

35

Disposal of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns -- Legality, technical feasibility, economics, and risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some types of oil and gas production and processing wastes contain naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). If NORM is present at concentrations above regulatory levels in oil field waste, the waste requires special disposal practices. The existing disposal options for wastes containing NORM are limited and costly. This paper evaluates the legality, technical feasibility, economics, and human health risk of disposing of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns. Cavern disposal of NORM waste is technically feasible and poses a very low human health risk. From a legal perspective, there are no fatal flaws that would prevent a state regulatory agency from approaching cavern disposal of NORM. On the basis of the costs charged by caverns currently used for disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW), NORM waste disposal caverns could be cost competitive with existing NORM waste disposal methods when regulatory agencies approve the practice.

Veil, J.A.; Smith, K.P.; Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Blunt, D.; Williams, G.P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

An Investigation of the Integrity of Cemented Casing Seals with Application to Salt Cavern Sealing and Abandonment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research project was pursued in three key areas. (1) Salt permeability testing under complex stress states; (2) Hydraulic and mechanical integrity investigations of the well casing shoe through benchscale testing; and (3) Geomechanical modeling of the fluid/salt hydraulic and mechanical interaction of a sealed cavern.

Pfeifle, T.W.; Mellegard, K.D.; Skaug, N.T.; Bruno, M.S.

2001-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

37

Gas intrusion into SPR caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conditions and occurrence of gas in crude oil stored in Strategic Petroleum Reserve, SPR, caverns is characterized in this report. Many caverns in the SPR show that gas has intruded into the oil from the surrounding salt dome. Historical evidence and the analyses presented here suggest that gas will continue to intrude into many SPR caverns in the future. In considering why only some caverns contain gas, it is concluded that the naturally occurring spatial variability in salt permeability can explain the range of gas content measured in SPR caverns. Further, it is not possible to make a one-to-one correlation between specific geologic phenomena and the occurrence of gas in salt caverns. However, gas is concluded to be petrogenic in origin. Consequently, attempts have been made to associate the occurrence of gas with salt inhomogeneities including anomalies and other structural features. Two scenarios for actual gas intrusion into caverns were investigated for consistency with existing information. These scenarios are gas release during leaching and gas permeation through salt. Of these mechanisms, the greater consistency comes from the belief that gas permeates to caverns through the salt. A review of historical operating data for five Bryan Mound caverns loosely supports the hypothesis that higher operating pressures reduce gas intrusion into caverns. This conclusion supports a permeability intrusion mechanism. Further, it provides justification for operating the caverns near maximum operating pressure to minimize gas intrusion. Historical gas intrusion rates and estimates of future gas intrusion are given for all caverns.

Hinkebein, T.E.; Bauer, S.J.; Ehgartner, B.L.; Linn, J.K.; Neal, J.T.; Todd, J.L.; Kuhlman, P.S.; Gniady, C.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Underground Storage Technology Dept.; Giles, H.N. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Strategic Petroleum Reserve

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Mechanisms Driving the Time-Dependent Salt Flux in a Partially Stratified Estuary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subtidal salt balance and the mechanisms driving the downgradient salt flux in the Hudson River estuary are investigated using measurements from a cross-channel mooring array of current meters, temperature and conductivity sensors, and cross-...

James A. Lerczak; W. Rockwell Geyer; Robert J. Chant

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Tensile Effective Stresses in Hydrocarbon Storage Caverns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cycling in compressed air and natural gas storage in salt: Tracking stress states and cavern closure using.L., 2006.Geomechanical evaluation of two gulf coast natural gas storage caverns: Proceedings of the. (2011). More recently, Lux and Dresen (2012) analyzed high-frequency, cycled storage gas and noted

40

Analysis of cavern stability at the West Hackberry SPR site.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents computational analyses that simulate the structural response of caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) West Hackberry site. The cavern field comprises 22 caverns. Five caverns (6, 7, 8, 9, 11) were acquired from industry and have unusual shapes and a history dating back to 1946. The other 17 caverns (101-117) were leached according to SPR standards in the mid-1980s and have tall cylindrical shapes. The history of the caverns and their shapes are simulated in a three-dimensional geomechanics model of the site that predicts deformations, strains, and stresses. Future leaching scenarios corresponding to oil drawdowns using fresh water are also simulated by increasing the volume of the caverns. Cavern pressures are varied in the model to capture operational practices in the field. The results of the finite element model are interpreted to provide information on the current and future status of subsidence, well integrity, and cavern stability. The most significant results in this report are relevant to Cavern 6. The cavern is shaped like a bowl with a large ceiling span and is in close proximity to Cavern 9. The analyses predict tensile stresses at the edge of the ceiling during repressuization of Cavern 6 following workover conditions. During a workover the cavern is at low pressure to service a well. The wellhead pressures are atmospheric. When the workover is complete, the cavern is repressurized. The resulting elastic stresses are sufficient to cause tension around the edge of the large ceiling span. With time, these stresses relax to a compressive state because of salt creep. However, the potential for salt fracture and propagation exists, particularly towards Cavern 9. With only 200 ft of salt between the caverns, the operational consequences must be examined if the two caverns become connected. A critical time may be during a workover of Cavern 9 in part because of the operational vulnerabilities, but also because dilatant damage is predicted under the ledge that forms the lower lobe in the cavern. The remaining caverns have no significant issues regarding cavern stability and may be safely enlarged during subsequent oil drawdowns. Predicted well strains and subsidence are significant and consequently future remedial actions may be necessary. These predicted well strains certainly suggest appropriate monitoring through a well-logging program. Subsidence is currently being monitored.

Ehgartner, Brian L.; Sobolik, Steven Ronald

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drive salt caverns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Strategic petroleum reserve caverns casing damage update 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hanging casing strings are used for oil and brine transfer in the domal salt storage caverns of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Damage to these casings is of concern because hanging string replacement is costly and because of implications on cavern stability. Although the causes of casing damage are not always well defined, many events leading to damage are assumed to be the result of salt falls impacting the hanging strings. However, in some cases, operational aspects may be suspected. The history of damage to hanging strings is updated in this study to include the most recent events. Potential general domal and local operational and material factors that could influence the tendency for caverns to have salt falls are examined in detail. As a result of this examination, general factors, such as salt dome anomalies and crude type, and most of the operational factors, such as geometry, location and depressurizations, are not believed to be primary causes of casing damage. Further analysis is presented of the accumulation of insolubles during cavern solutioning and accumulation of salt fall material on the cavern floor. Inaccuracies in sump geometry probably make relative cavern insolubles contents uncertain. However, determination of the salt fall accumulations, which are more accurate, suggest that the caverns with the largest salt fall accumulations show the greatest number of hanging string events. There is good correlation between the accumulation rate and the number of events when the event numbers are corrected to an equivalent number for a single hanging string in a quiescent, operating cavern. The principal factor that determines the propensity for a cavern to exhibit this behavior is thought to be the effect of impurity content on the fracture behavior of salt.

Munson, D.E.; Molecke, M.A.; Neal, J.T. [and others

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Converting LPG caverns to natural-gas storage permits fast response to market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deregulation of Canada`s natural-gas industry in the late 1980s led to a very competitive North American natural-gas storage market. TransGas Ltd., Regina, Sask., began looking for method for developing cost-effective storage while at the same time responding to new market-development opportunities and incentives. Conversion of existing LPG-storage salt caverns to natural-gas storage is one method of providing new storage. To supply SaskEnergy Inc., the province`s local distribution company, and Saskatchewan customers, TransGas previously had developed solution-mined salt storage caverns from start to finish. Two Regina North case histories illustrate TransGas` experiences with conversion of LPG salt caverns to gas storage. This paper provides the testing procedures for the various caverns, cross-sectional diagrams of each cavern, and outlines for cavern conversion. It also lists storage capacities of these caverns.

Crossley, N.G. [TransGas Ltd., Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada)

1996-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

43

Horizontal natural gas storage caverns and methods for producing same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides caverns and methods for producing caverns in bedded salt deposits for the storage of materials that are not solvents for salt. The contemplated salt deposits are of the bedded, non-domed variety, more particularly salt found in layered formations that are sufficiently thick to enable the production of commercially usefully sized caverns completely encompassed by walls of salt of the formation. In a preferred method, a first bore hole is drilled into the salt formation and a cavity for receiving insolubles is leached from the salt formation. Thereafter, at a predetermined distance away from the first bore hole, a second bore hole is drilled towards the salt formation. As this drill approaches the salt, the drill assumes a slant approach and enters the salt and drills through it in a horizontal direction until it intersects the cavity for receiving insolubles. This produces a substantially horizontal conduit from which solvent is controlledly supplied to the surrounding salt formation, leaching the salt and producing a concentrated brine which is removed through the first bore hole. Insolubles are collected in the cavity for receiving insolubles. By controlledly supplying solvent, a horizontal cavern is produced with two bore holes extending therefrom.

Russo, Anthony (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Allowable pillar to diameter ratio for strategic petroleum reserve caverns.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compiles 3-D finite element analyses performed to evaluate the stability of Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) caverns over multiple leach cycles. When oil is withdrawn from a cavern in salt using freshwater, the cavern enlarges. As a result, the pillar separating caverns in the SPR fields is reduced over time due to usage of the reserve. The enlarged cavern diameters and smaller pillars reduce underground stability. Advances in geomechanics modeling enable the allowable pillar to diameter ratio (P/D) to be defined. Prior to such modeling capabilities, the allowable P/D was established as 1.78 based on some very limited experience in other cavern fields. While appropriate for 1980, the ratio conservatively limits the allowable number of oil drawdowns and hence limits the overall utility and life of the SPR cavern field. Analyses from all four cavern fields are evaluated along with operating experience gained over the past 30 years to define a new P/D for the reserve. A new ratio of 1.0 is recommended. This ratio is applicable only to existing SPR caverns.

Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Overfilling of cavern blamed for LPG blasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three explosions and a fire Apr. 7 at an LPG salt dome storage cavern near Brenham, Tex., were triggered when the cavern was overfilled, the Texas Railroad Commission (TRC) has reported. This paper reports that a TRC investigation found that LPG escaped to the surface at the Brenham site through brine injection tubing after excessive fill from an LPG line forced the cavern's water level below the brine tubing's bottom. At the surface, LPG was released into a brine storage pit where it turned into a dense, explosive vapor. At 7:08 a.m., the vapor was ignited by an unknown source. The resulting blast killed three persons and injured 19 and brought operations at the site to a halt.

Not Available

1992-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

46

Long-term sealing analyses for US Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is inevitable that sealing and abandonment will someday occur in a SPR cavern or caverns. To gain insight into the long-term behavior of a typical SPR cavern following sealing and abandonment, a suite of mechanical finite-element calculations was performed. The initial analyses predict how quickly and to what extent a cavern pressurizes after it is plugged. The analyses also examine the stability of the cavern as it changes shape due to the excessive pressures generated as the salt creeps and the brine in the cavern thermally expands. These large-scale analyses do not include the details of the plug but assume a good seal is established in the cavern wells. In another series of analyses, the potential for forming a leak at the plug is evaluated. A cement plug, emplaced in the casing seat of a cavern well, is loaded using the predicted brine pressures from the cavern analyses. The plugged casing analyses examine the potential for forming a leak path in and along the interfaces of salt, casing, and cement plug. In the last set of analysis, the dimensional scale of the problem is further reduced to examine a preexisting crack along a casing/salt interface. The cracked interface is assumed to be fluid filled and fully pressurized by the cavern fluids. The analyses address the potential for the fluid path to extend upwards along a plugged casing should an open microannulus surround the casing after it is plugged.

Ehgartner, B.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Update on cavern disposal of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some types of oil and gas production and processing wastes contain naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). If NORM is present at concentrations above regulatory levels in oil field waste, the waste requires special disposal practices. The existing disposal options for wastes containing NORM are limited and costly. Argonne National Laboratory has previously evaluated the feasibility, legality, risk and economics of disposing of nonhazardous oil field wastes, other than NORM waste, in salt caverns. Cavern disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste, other than NORM waste, is occurring at four Texas facilities, in several Canadian facilities, and reportedly in Europe. This paper evaluates the legality, technical feasibility, economics, and human health risk of disposing of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns as well. Cavern disposal of NORM waste is technically feasible and poses a very low human health risk. From a legal perspective, a review of federal regulations and regulations from several states indicated that there are no outright prohibitions against NORM disposal in salt caverns or other Class II wells, except for Louisiana which prohibits disposal of radioactive wastes or other radioactive materials in salt domes. Currently, however, only Texas and New Mexico are working on disposal cavern regulations, and no states have issued permits to allow cavern disposal of NORM waste. On the basis of the costs currently charged for cavern disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW), NORM waste disposal in caverns is likely to be cost competitive with existing NORM waste disposal methods when regulatory agencies approve the practice.

Veil, J. A.

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

48

The depth of the oil/brine interface and crude oil leaks in SPR caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitoring wellhead pressure evolution is the best method of detecting crude oil leaks in SPR caverns while oil/brine interface depth measurements provide additional insight. However, to fully utilize the information provided by these interface depth measurements, a thorough understanding of how the interface movement corresponds to cavern phenomena, such as salt creep, crude oil leakage, and temperature equilibration, as well as to wellhead pressure, is required. The time evolution of the oil/brine interface depth is a function of several opposing factors. Cavern closure due to salt creep and crude oil leakage, if present, move the interface upward. Brine removal and temperature equilibration of the oil/brine system move the interface downward. Therefore, the relative magnitudes of these factors determine the net direction of interface movement. Using a mass balance on the cavern fluids, coupled with a simplified salt creep model for closure in SPR caverns, the movement of the oil/brine interface has been predicted for varying cavern configurations, including both right-cylindrical and carrot-shaped caverns. Three different cavern depths and operating pressures have been investigated. In addition, the caverns were investigated at four different points in time, allowing for varying extents of temperature equilibration. Time dependent interface depth changes of a few inches to a few feet were found to be characteristic of the range of cases studied. 5 refs, 19 figs., 1 tab.

Heffelfinger, G.S.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Cavern Protection (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Savings Cavern Protection (Texas) Cavern Protection (Texas) Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial...

50

Salt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Salt Salt Nature Bulletin No. 340-A April 12, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation SALT It is fortunate that Salt -- common salt, known to chemists as sodium chloride and to mineralogists as Halite -- is one of the most abundant substances on earth, because most of us crave it and must have it. Eskimos get along without salt because they live mostly on the uncooked flesh of fish and mammals. A few nomad tribes never eat it and do not need it because their diet contains so much milk cheese, and meat eaten raw or roasted. We people who eat boiled meat and many vegetables must have salt. Of the millions of tons produced commercially each year, only about three percent is used as table salt. Large quantities are required for refrigeration meat packing, curing and preserving fish, pickles, sauerkraut, and for other foods prepared in brine. A lot of it is needed for livestock. Salt is spread on sidewalks, streets and highways to melt ice in winter. It is used to glaze pottery, sewer pipe and other ceramics. It is required in many metallurgical processes, chemical industries, and the manufacture of such products as leather, glass, soap, bleaching powder and photographic supplies. It has about 14,000 uses.

51

Advanced Underground Gas Storage Concepts: Refrigerated-Mined Cavern Storage, Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past 40 years, cavern storage of LPG's, petrochemicals, such as ethylene and propylene, and other petroleum products has increased dramatically. In 1991, the Gas Processors Association (GPA) lists the total U.S. underground storage capacity for LPG's and related products of approximately 519 million barrels (82.5 million cubic meters) in 1,122 separate caverns. Of this total, 70 are hard rock caverns and the remaining 1,052 are caverns in salt deposits. However, along the eastern seaboard of the U.S. and the Pacific northwest, salt deposits are not available and therefore, storage in hard rocks is required. Limited demand and high cost has prevented the construction of hard rock caverns in this country for a number of years. The storage of natural gas in mined caverns may prove technically feasible if the geology of the targeted market area is suitable; and economically feasible if the cost and convenience of service is competitive with alternative available storage methods for peak supply requirements. Competing methods include LNG facilities and remote underground storage combined with pipeline transportation to the area. It is believed that mined cavern storage can provide the advantages of high delivery rates and multiple fill withdrawal cycles in areas where salt cavern storage is not possible. In this research project, PB-KBB merged advanced mining technologies and gas refrigeration techniques to develop conceptual designs and cost estimates to demonstrate the commercialization potential of the storage of refrigerated natural gas in hard rock caverns. DOE has identified five regions, that have not had favorable geological conditions for underground storage development: New England, Mid-Atlantic (NY/NJ), South Atlantic (DL/MD/VA), South Atlantic (NC/SC/GA), and the Pacific Northwest (WA/OR). PB-KBB reviewed published literature and in-house databases of the geology of these regions to determine suitability of hard rock formations for siting storage caverns, and gas market area storage needs of these regions.

none

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

52

ADVANCED UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE CONCEPTS REFRIGERATED-MINED CAVERN STORAGE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Limited demand and high cost has prevented the construction of hard rock caverns in this country for a number of years. The storage of natural gas in mined caverns may prove technically feasible if the geology of the targeted market area is suitable; and economically feasible if the cost and convenience of service is competitive with alternative available storage methods for peak supply requirements. It is believed that mined cavern storage can provide the advantages of high delivery rates and multiple fill-withdrawal cycles in areas where salt cavern storage is not possible. In this research project, PB-KBB merged advanced mining technologies and gas refrigeration techniques to develop conceptual designs and cost estimates to demonstrate the commercialization potential of the storage of refrigerated natural gas in hard rock caverns. Five regions of the U.S.A. were studied for underground storage development and PB-KBB reviewed the literature to determine if the geology of these regions was suitable for siting hard rock storage caverns. Area gas market conditions in these regions were also studied to determine the need for such storage. Based on an analysis of many factors, a possible site was determined to be in Howard and Montgomery Counties, Maryland. The area has compatible geology and a gas industry infrastructure for the nearby market populous of Baltimore and Washington D.C.. As Gas temperature is lowered, the compressibility of the gas reaches an optimum value. The compressibility of the gas, and the resultant gas density, is a function of temperature and pressure. This relationship can be used to commercial advantage by reducing the size of a storage cavern for a given working volume of natural gas. This study looks at this relationship and and the potential for commercialization of the process in a storage application. A conceptual process design, and cavern design were developed for various operating conditions. Potential site locations were considered and a typical plant layout was developed. In addition a geomechanical review of the proposed cavern design was performed, evaluating the stability of the mine rooms and shafts, and the effects of the refrigerated gas temperatures on the stability of the cavern. Capital and operating cost estimates were also developed for the various temperature cases considered. The cost estimates developed were used to perform a comparative market analysis of this type of gas storage system to other systems that are commercially used in the region of the study.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Natural Gas Salt Caverns Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

253,410 341,213 397,560 456,009 512,279 715,821 1999-2012 253,410 341,213 397,560 456,009 512,279 715,821 1999-2012 Alabama 8,300 15,900 15,900 21,900 21,900 21,900 1999-2012 Arkansas 0 1999-2012 California 0 1999-2012 Colorado 0 1999-2012 Illinois 0 1999-2012 Indiana 0 1999-2012 Kansas 931 931 931 931 931 931 1999-2012 Kentucky 0 1999-2012 Louisiana 61,660 88,806 123,341 142,253 161,668 297,020 1999-2012 Maryland 0 1999-2012 Michigan 3,851 3,827 3,821 3,834 3,834 3,834 1999-2012 Mississippi 45,383 62,424 62,301 82,411 90,452 139,627 1999-2012 Montana 0 1999-2012 Nebraska 0 1999-2012 New Mexico 0 1999-2012 New York 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 0 1999-2012 Ohio 0 1999-2012 Oklahoma 0 1999-2012 Oregon 0 1999-2012 Pennsylvania 0 1999-2012 Tennessee 0 1999-2012 Texas 124,686 160,786 182,725 196,140 224,955 246,310 1999-2012

54

Natural Gas Salt Caverns Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

253,410 341,213 397,560 456,009 512,279 715,821 1999-2012 253,410 341,213 397,560 456,009 512,279 715,821 1999-2012 Alabama 8,300 15,900 15,900 21,900 21,900 21,900 1999-2012 Arkansas 0 1999-2012 California 0 1999-2012 Colorado 0 1999-2012 Illinois 0 1999-2012 Indiana 0 1999-2012 Kansas 931 931 931 931 931 931 1999-2012 Kentucky 0 1999-2012 Louisiana 61,660 88,806 123,341 142,253 161,668 297,020 1999-2012 Maryland 0 1999-2012 Michigan 3,851 3,827 3,821 3,834 3,834 3,834 1999-2012 Mississippi 45,383 62,424 62,301 82,411 90,452 139,627 1999-2012 Montana 0 1999-2012 Nebraska 0 1999-2012 New Mexico 0 1999-2012 New York 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 0 1999-2012 Ohio 0 1999-2012 Oklahoma 0 1999-2012 Oregon 0 1999-2012 Pennsylvania 0 1999-2012 Tennessee 0 1999-2012 Texas 124,686 160,786 182,725 196,140 224,955 246,310 1999-2012

55

Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

230,456 271,785 312,003 351,017 488,268 2008-2012 230,456 271,785 312,003 351,017 488,268 2008-2012 Alabama 11,900 11,900 16,150 16,150 16,150 2008-2012 Arkansas 0 2012-2012 California 0 2012-2012 Colorado 0 2012-2012 Illinois 0 2012-2012 Indiana 0 2012-2012 Kansas 375 375 375 375 375 2008-2012 Kentucky 0 2012-2012 Louisiana 57,630 84,487 100,320 111,849 200,702 2008-2012 Maryland 0 2012-2012 Michigan 2,154 2,150 2,159 2,159 2,159 2008-2012 Mississippi 43,292 43,758 56,928 62,932 100,443 2008-2012 Montana 0 2012-2012 Nebraska 0 2012-2012 New Mexico 0 2012-2012 New York 1,450 1,450 1,450 1,450 0 2008-2012 Ohio 0 2012-2012 Oklahoma 0 2012-2012 Oregon 0 2012-2012 Pennsylvania 0 2012-2012 Tennessee 0 2012-2012 Texas 109,655 123,664 130,621 152,102 164,439 2008-2012 Utah 0 2012-2012 Virginia

56

Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

230,456 271,785 312,003 351,017 2008-2011 Alabama 11,900 11,900 16,150 16,150 2008-2011 Arkansas 0 2011-2011 California 0 2011-2011 Colorado 0 2011-2011 Illinois 0 2011-2011...

57

Gas releases from salt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The occurrence of gas in salt mines and caverns has presented some serious problems to facility operators. Salt mines have long experienced sudden, usually unexpected expulsions of gas and salt from a production face, commonly known as outbursts. Outbursts can release over one million cubic feet of methane and fractured salt, and are responsible for the lives of numerous miners and explosions. Equipment, production time, and even entire mines have been lost due to outbursts. An outburst creates a cornucopian shaped hole that can reach heights of several hundred feet. The potential occurrence of outbursts must be factored into mine design and mining methods. In caverns, the occurrence of outbursts and steady infiltration of gas into stored product can effect the quality of the product, particularly over the long-term, and in some cases renders the product unusable as is or difficult to transport. Gas has also been known to collect in the roof traps of caverns resulting in safety and operational concerns. The intent of this paper is to summarize the existing knowledge on gas releases from salt. The compiled information can provide a better understanding of the phenomena and gain insight into the causative mechanisms that, once established, can help mitigate the variety of problems associated with gas releases from salt. Outbursts, as documented in mines, are discussed first. This is followed by a discussion of the relatively slow gas infiltration into stored crude oil, as observed and modeled in the caverns of the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve. A model that predicts outburst pressure kicks in caverns is also discussed.

Ehgartner, B.; Neal, J.; Hinkebein, T.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) oil storage cavern sulphur mines 2-4-5 certification tests and analysis. Part I: 1981 testing. Part II: 1982 testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well leak tests and a cavern pressure were conducted in June through December 1981, and are described in Part I. The tests did not indicate conclusively that there was no leakage from the cavern, but the data indicate that cavern structural failure during oil storage is unlikely. The test results indicated that retesting and well workover were desirable prior to making a decision on the cavern use. Well leak tests were conducted in March through May 1982, and are described in Part II. The tests indicated that there was no significant leakage from wells 2 and 4 but that the leakage from wells 2A and 5 exceeded the DOE criterion. Because of the proximity of cavern 2-4-5 to the edge of the salt, this cavern should be considered for only one fill/withdrawal cycle prior to extensive reevaluation. 57 figures, 17 tables.

Beasley, R.R.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Cavern Protection (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cavern Protection (Texas) Cavern Protection (Texas) Cavern Protection (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Texas Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Texas General Land Office It is public policy of the state to provide for the protection of caves on or under Texas lands. For the purposes of this legislation, "cave" means any naturally occurring subterranean cavity, and includes or is synonymous with cavern, pit, pothole, well, sinkhole, and grotto. No person may excavate, remove, destroy, injure, alter in any significant manner, or deface any part of a cave owned by the State of Texas, unless the person

60

Gaines Cavern Wind Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cavern Wind Project Cavern Wind Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Gaines Cavern Wind Project Facility Gaines Cavern Wind Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner General Compression Developer Texas Dispatchable Wind 1 LLC Location Gaines County TX Coordinates 32.688556°, -103.062464° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.688556,"lon":-103.062464,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drive salt caverns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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61

Compilation of gas intrusion measurements, variations, and consequence modeling for SPR caverns.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intrusion of gas into oils stored within the SPR has been examined. When oil is stored in domal salts, gases intrude into the stored oil from the surrounding salt. Aspects of the mechanism of gas intrusion have been examined. In all cases, this gas intrusion results in increases in the oil vapor pressure. Data that have been gathered from 1993 to August 2002 are presented to show the resultant increases in bubble-point pressure on a cavern-by-cavern as well as on a stream basis. The measurement techniques are presented with particular emphasis on the TVP 95. Data analysis methods are presented to show the methods required to obtain recombined cavern oil compositions. Gas-oil ratios are also computed from the data and are presented on a cavern-by-cavern and stream basis. The observed increases in bubble-point pressure and gas-oil ratio are further statistically analyzed to allow data interpretation. Emissions plume modeling is used to determine adherence to state air regulations. Gas intrusion is observed to be variable among the sites and within each dome. Gas intrusions at Bryan Mound and Big Hill have resulted in the largest increases in bubble-point pressure for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The streams at Bayou Choctaw and West Hackberry show minimal bubble-point pressure increases. Emissions plume modeling, using the state mandated ISCST code, of oil storage tanks showed that virtually no gas may be released when H2S standards are considered. DOE plans to scavenge H2S to comply with the very tight standards on this gas. With the assumption of scavenging, benzene releases become the next most controlling factor. Model results show that a GOR of 0.6 SCF/BBL may be emissions that are within standards. Employing the benzene gas release standard will significantly improve oil deliverability. New plume modeling using the computational fluid dynamics code, FLUENT, is addressing limitations of the state mandated ISCST model.

Hinkebein, Thomas E.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Observations on vapor pressure in SPR caverns : sources.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The oil of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) represents a national response to any potential emergency or intentional restriction of crude oil supply to this country, and conforms to International Agreements to maintain such a reserve. As assurance this reserve oil will be available in a timely manner should a restriction in supply occur, the oil of the reserve must meet certain transportation criteria. The transportation criteria require that the oil does not evolve dangerous gas, either explosive or toxic, while in the process of transport to, or storage at, the destination facility. This requirement can be a challenge because the stored oil can acquire dissolved gases while in the SPR. There have been a series of reports analyzing in exceptional detail the reasons for the increases, or regains, in gas content; however, there remains some uncertainty in these explanations and an inability to predict why the regains occur. Where the regains are prohibitive and exceed the criteria, the oil must undergo degasification, where excess portions of the volatile gas are removed. There are only two known sources of gas regain, one is the salt dome formation itself which may contain gas inclusions from which gas can be released during oil processing or storage, and the second is increases of the gases release by the volatile components of the crude oil itself during storage, especially if the stored oil undergoes heating or is subject to biological generation processes. In this work, the earlier analyses are reexamined and significant alterations in conclusions are proposed. The alterations are based on how the fluid exchanges of brine and oil uptake gas released from domal salt during solutioning, and thereafter, during further exchanges of fluids. Transparency of the brine/oil interface and the transfer of gas across this interface remains an important unanswered question. The contribution from creep induced damage releasing gas from the salt surrounding the cavern is considered through computations using the Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, suggesting a relative minor, but potentially significant, contribution to the regain process. Apparently, gains in gas content can be generated from the oil itself during storage because the salt dome has been heated by the geothermal gradient of the earth. The heated domal salt transfers heat to the oil stored in the caverns and thereby increases the gas released by the volatile components and raises the boiling point pressure of the oil. The process is essentially a variation on the fractionation of oil, where each of the discrete components of the oil have a discrete temperature range over which that component can be volatized and removed from the remaining components. The most volatile components are methane and ethane, the shortest chain hydrocarbons. Since this fractionation is a fundamental aspect of oil behavior, the volatile component can be removed by degassing, potentially prohibiting the evolution of gas at or below the temperature of the degas process. While this process is well understood, the ability to describe the results of degassing and subsequent regain is not. Trends are not well defined for original gas content, regain, and prescribed effects of degassing. As a result, prediction of cavern response is difficult. As a consequence of this current analysis, it is suggested that solutioning brine of the final fluid exchange of a just completed cavern, immediately prior to the first oil filling, should be analyzed for gas content using existing analysis techniques. This would add important information and clarification to the regain process. It is also proposed that the quantity of volatile components, such as methane, be determined before and after any degasification operation.

Munson, Darrell Eugene

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Salt Caverns ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1990's: 2: 2000's: 2: 2: 2: 2: 2: 2: 2: 2: 2: 2: 2010's: 2: 2-

64

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Salt Cavern Storage ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates

65

All Storage Fields Salt Caverns 4 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

September 2013 22 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Monthly 0 1 2 3 4 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 All Storage Fields

66

Analysis of Multistage and Other Creep Data for Domal Salts  

SciTech Connect

There have existed for some time relatively sparse creep databases for a number of domal salts. Although all of these data were analyzed at the time they were reported, to date there has not been a comprehensive, overall evaluation within the same analysis framework. Such an evaluation may prove of value. The analysis methodology is based on the Multimechanism Deformation (M-D) description of salt creep and the corresponding model parameters determined from conventional creep tests. The constitutive model of creep wss formulated through application of principles involved in micromechanical modeling. It was possible, at minimum, to obtain the steady state parameters of the creep model from the data on the domal salts. When this was done, the creep of the domal salts, as compared to the well-defined Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) bedded clean salt, was either essentially identical to, or significantly harder (more creep resistant) than WIPP salt. Interestingly, the domal salts form two distinct groups, either sofl or hard, where the difference is roughly a factor often in creep rate between the twcl groups. As might be expected, this classification corresponds quite well to the differences in magnitude of effective creep volume losses of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) caverns as determined by the CAVEMAN cavern pressure history analysis, depending upon the specific dome or region within the dome. Creep response shoulcl also correlate to interior cavern conditions that produce salt falls. WMle, in general, the caverns in hard sah have a noticeably greater propensity for salt falls, a smaller number of similar events are exhibited even in the caverns in soft salt.

Munson, D.E.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Commercial potential of natural gas storage in lined rock caverns (LRC)  

SciTech Connect

The geologic conditions in many regions of the United States will not permit the development of economical high-deliverability gas storage in salt caverns. These regions include the entire Eastern Seaboard; several northern states, notably Minnesota and Wisconsin; many of the Rocky Mountain States; and most of the Pacific Northwest. In late 1997, the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) Federal Energy Technology Center engaged Sofregaz US to investigate the commercialization potential of natural gas storage in Lined Rock Caverns (LRC). Sofregaz US teamed with Gaz de France and Sydkraft, who had formed a consortium, called LRC, to perform the study for the USDOE. Underground storage of natural gas is generally achieved in depleted oil and gas fields, aquifers, and solution-mined salt caverns. These storage technologies require specific geologic conditions. Unlined rock caverns have been used for decades to store hydrocarbons - mostly liquids such as crude oil, butane, and propane. The maximum operating pressure in unlined rock caverns is limited, since the host rock is never entirely impervious. The LRC technology allows a significant increase in the maximum operating pressure over the unlined storage cavern concept, since the gas in storage is completely contained with an impervious liner. The LRC technology has been under development in Sweden by Sydkraft since 1987. The development process has included extensive technical studies, laboratory testing, field tests, and most recently includes a storage facility being constructed in southern Sweden (Skallen). The LRC development effort has shown that the concept is technically and economically viable. The Skallen storage facility will have a rock cover of 115 meters (375 feet), a storage volume of 40,000 cubic meters (250,000 petroleum barrels), and a maximum operating pressure of 20 MPa (2,900 psi). There is a potential for commercialization of the LRC technology in the United States. Two regions were studied in some detail - the Northeast and the Southeast. The investment cost for an LRC facility in the Northeast is approximately $182 million and $343 million for a 2.6-billion cubic foot (bcf) working gas facility and a 5.2-bcf working gas storage facility, respectively. The relatively high investment cost is a strong function of the cost of labor in the Northeast. The labor union-related rules and requirements in the Northeast result in much higher underground construction costs than might result in Sweden, for example. The LRC technology gas storage service is compared to other alternative technologies. The LRC technology gas storage service was found to be competitive with other alternative technologies for a variety of market scenarios.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Feasibility report on alternative methods for cooling cavern oils at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oil caverns at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) are subjected to geothermal heating from the surrounding domal salt. This process raises the temperature of the crude oil from around 75 F upon delivery to SPR to as high as 130 F after decades of storage. While this temperature regime is adequate for long-term storage, it poses challenges for offsite delivery, with warm oil evolving gases that pose handling and safety problems. SPR installed high-capacity oil coolers in the mid-1990's to mitigate the emissions problem by lowering the oil delivery temperature. These heat exchanger units use incoming raw water as the cooling fluid, and operate only during a drawdown event where incoming water displaces the outgoing oil. The design criteria for the heat exchangers are to deliver oil at 100 F or less under all drawdown conditions. Increasing crude oil vapor pressures due in part to methane intrusion in the caverns is threatening to produce sufficient emissions at or near 100 F to cause the cooled oil to violate delivery requirements. This impending problem has initiated discussion and analysis of alternative cooling methods to bring the oil temperature even lower than the original design basis of 100 F. For the study described in this report, two alternative cooling methods were explored: (1) cooling during a limited drawdown, and (2) cooling during a degas operation. Both methods employ the heat exchangers currently in place, and do not require extra equipment. An analysis was run using two heat transfer models, HEATEX, and CaveMan, both developed at Sandia National Laboratories. For cooling during a limited drawdown, the cooling water flowrate through the coolers was varied from 1:1 water:oil to about 3:1, with an increased cooling capacity of about 3-7 F for the test cavern Bryan Mound 108 depending upon seasonal temperature effects. For cooling in conjunction with a degas operation in the winter, cavern oil temperatures for the test cavern Big Hill 102 were cooled sufficiently that the cavern required about 9 years to return to the temperature prior to degas. Upon reviewing these results, the authors recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy that a broader study of the cooling during degas be pursued in order to examine the potential benefits of cooling on all caverns in the current degasification schedule.

Levin, Bruce L.; Lord, David L.; Hadgu, Teklu

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Multimechanism-Deformation Parameters of Domal Salts Using Transient Creep Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Use of Gulf Coast salt domes for construction of very large storage caverns by solution mining has grown significantly in the last several decades. In fact, among the largest developers of storage caverns along the Gulf Coast is the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) which has purchased or constructed 62 crude oil storage caverns in four storage sites (domes). Although SPR and commercial caverns have been operated economically for many years, the caverns still exhibit some relatively poorly understood behaviors, especially involving creep closure volume loss and hanging string damage from salt falls. Since it is possible to postulate that some of these behaviors stem from geomechanical or reformational aspects of the salt, a method of correlating the cavern response to mechanical creep behavior as determined in the laboratory could be of considerable value. Recently, detailed study of the creep response of domal salts has cast some insight into the influence of different salt origins on cavern behavior. The study used a simple graphical analysis of limited non-steady state data to establish an approach or bound to steady state, as an estimate of the steady state behavior of a given salt. This permitted analysis of sparse creep databases for domal salts. It appears that a shortcoming of this steady state analysis method is that it obscures some critical differences of the salt material behavior. In an attempt to overcome the steady state analysis shortcomings, a method was developed based on integration of the Multimechanism-Deformation (M-D) creep constitutive model to obtain fits to the transient response. This integration process permits definition of all the material sensitive parameters of the model, while those parameters that are constants or material insensitive parameters are fixed independently. The transient analysis method has proven more sensitive to differences in the creep characteristics and has provided a way of defining different behaviors within a given dome. Characteristics defined by the transient analysis are related quantitatively to the volume loss creep rate of the SPR caverns. This increase in understanding of the domal material creep response already has pointed to the possibility y of delineating the existence of material spines within a specific dome. Further definition of the domal geology and structure seems possible only through expansion of the creep databases for domal salts.

MUNSON, DARRELL E

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Geologic technical assessment of the Stratton Ridge salt dome, Texas, for potential expansion of the U.S. strategic petroleum reserve.  

SciTech Connect

The Stratton Ridge salt dome is a large salt diapir located only some ten miles from the currently active Strategic Petroleum Reserve Site at Bryan Mound, Texas. The dome is approximately 15 miles south-southwest of Houston. The Stratton Ridge salt dome has been intensively developed, in the desirable central portions, with caverns for both brine production and product storage. This geologic technical assessment indicates that the Stratton Ridge salt dome may be considered a viable, if less-than-desirable, candidate site for potential expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Past development of underground caverns significantly limits the potential options for use by the SPR. The current conceptual design layout of proposed caverns for such an expansion facility is based upon a decades-old model of salt geometry, and it is unacceptable, according to this reinterpretation of salt dome geology. The easternmost set of conceptual caverns are located within a 300-ft buffer zone of a very major boundary shear zone, fault, or other structural feature of indeterminate origin. This structure transects the salt stock and subdivides it into an shallow western part and a deeper eastern part. In places, the distance from this structural boundary to the design-basis caverns is as little as 150 ft. A 300-ft distance from this boundary is likely to be the minimum acceptable stand-off, from both a geologic and a regulatory perspective. Repositioning of the proposed cavern field is possible, as sufficient currently undeveloped salt acreage appears to be available. However, such reconfiguration would be subject to limitations related to land-parcel boundaries and other existing infrastructure and topographic constraints. More broadly speaking, the past history of cavern operations at the Stratton Ridge salt dome indicates that operation of potential SPR expansion caverns at this site may be difficult, and correspondingly expensive. Although detailed information is difficult to come by, widely accepted industry rumors are that numerous existing caverns have experienced major operational problems, including salt falls, sheared casings, and unintended releases of stored product(s). Many of these difficulties may be related to on-going differential movement of individual salt spines or to lateral movement at the caprock-salt interface. The history of operational problems, only some of which appear to be a matter of public record, combined with the potential for encountering escaped product from other operations, renders the Stratton Ridge salt dome a less-than-desirable site for SPR purposes.

Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Snider, Anna C.; Looff, Karl M. (Geologic Consultant, Lovelady, TX)

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Numerical Simulations of Leakage from Underground LPG Storage Caverns  

SciTech Connect

To secure a stable supply of petroleum gas, underground storage caverns for liquified petroleum gas (LPG) are commonly used in many countries worldwide. Storing LPG in underground caverns requires that the surrounding rock mass remain saturated with groundwater and that the water pressure be higher than the liquid pressure inside the cavern. In previous studies, gas containment criteria for underground gas storage based on hydraulic gradient and pressure have been discussed, but these studies do not consider the physicochemical characteristics and behavior of LPG such as vaporization and dissolution in groundwater. Therefore, while these studies are very useful for designing storage caverns, they do not provide better understanding of the either the environmental effects of gas contamination or the behavior of vaporized LPG. In this study, we have performed three-phase fluid flow simulations of gas leakage from underground LPG storage caverns, using the multiphase multicomponent nonisothermal simulator TMVOC (Pruess and Battistelli, 2002), which is capable of solving the three-phase nonisothermal flow of water, gas, and a multicomponent mixture of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in multidimensional heterogeneous porous media. A two-dimensional cross-sectional model resembling an actual underground LPG facility in Japan was developed, and gas leakage phenomena were simulated for three different permeability models: (1) a homogeneous model, (2) a single-fault model, and (3) a heterogeneous model. In addition, the behavior of stored LPG was studied for the special case of a water curtain suddenly losing its function because of operational problems, or because of long-term effects such as clogging of boreholes. The results of the study indicate the following: (1) The water curtain system is a very powerful means for preventing gas leakage from underground storage facilities. By operating with appropriate pressure and layout, gas containment can be ensured. (2) However , in highly heterogeneous media such as fractured rock and fault zones, local flow paths within which the gas containment criterion is not satisfied could be formed. To eliminate such zones, treatments such as pre/post grouting or an additional installment of water-curtain boreholes are essential. (3) Along highly conductive features such as faults, even partially saturated zones possess certain effects that can retard or prevent gas leakage, while a fully unsaturated fault connected to the storage cavern can quickly cause a gas blowout. This possibility strongly suggests that ensuring water saturation of the rock surrounding the cavern is a very important requirement. (4) Even if an accident should suddenly impair the water curtain, the gas plume does not quickly penetrate the ground surface. In these simulations, the plume takes several months to reach the ground surface.

Yamamoto, Hajime; Pruess, Karsten

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Anomalous zones in Gulf Coast Salt domes with special reference to Big Hill, TX, and Weeks Island, LA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anomalous features in Gulf Coast Salt domes exhibit deviations from normally pure salt and vary widely in form from one dome to the next, ranging considerably in length and width. They have affected both conventional and solution mining in several ways. Gas outbursts, insolubles, and potash (especially carnallite) have led to the breakage of tubing in a number of caverns, and caused irregular shapes of many caverns through preferential leaching. Such anomalous features essentially have limited the lateral extent of conventional mining at several salt mines, and led to accidents and even the closing of several other mines. Such anomalous features, are often aligned in anomalous zones, and appear to be related to diapiric processes of salt dome development. Evidence indicates that anomalous zones are found between salt spines, where the differential salt intrusion accumulates other materials: Anhydrite bands which are relatively strong, and other, weaker impurities. Shear zones and fault displacement detected at Big Hill and Weeks Island domes have not yet had any known adverse impacts on SPR oil storage, but new caverns at these sites conceivably may encounter some potentially adverse conditions. Seismic reflection profiles at Big Hill dome have shown numerous fractures and faults in the caprock, and verified the earlier recognition of a major shear zone transecting the entire salt stock and forming a graben in the overlying caprock. Casing that is placed in such zones can be at risk. Knowledge of these zones should create awareness of possible effects rather than preclude the future emplacement of caverns. To the extent possible, major anomalous zones and salt stock boundaries should be avoided. Shear zones along overhangs may be particularly hazardous, and otherwise unknown valleys in the top of salt may occur along shear zones. These zones often can be mapped geophysically, especially with high-resolution seismic techniques.

Neal, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Magorian, T.R. [Magorian (Thomas R.), Amherst, NY (United States); Thoms, R.L. [AGM, Inc., College Station, TX (United States); Autin, W.J.; McCulloh, R.P. [Louisiana Geological Survey, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Denzler, S.; Byrne, K.O. [Acres International Corp., Amherst, NY (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Transcatheter Arterial Embolization of Two Symptomatic Giant Cavernous Hemangiomas of the Liver  

SciTech Connect

Cavernous hemangiomas are usually asymptomatic; however, a small percentage may cause symptoms. This case report discusses palliation by transcatheter arterial embolization with polyvinyl alcohol particles.

Althaus, Sandra; Ashdown, Boyd [Department of Radiology, Box 357115, University of Washington School of Medicine, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Coldwell, Douglas [Department of Radiology, Denver General Hospital, 303 Bannock Street, Denver, CO 80204-4507 (United States); Helton, W. Scott [Department of General Surgery, University of Washington School of Medicine, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Freeny, Patrick C. [Department of Radiology, Box 357115, University of Washington School of Medicine, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

1996-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Bryan Mound SPR cavern 113 remedial leach stage 1 analysis.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve implemented the first stage of a leach plan in 2011-2012 to expand storage volume in the existing Bryan Mound 113 cavern from a starting volume of 7.4 million barrels (MMB) to its design volume of 11.2 MMB. The first stage was terminated several months earlier than expected in August, 2012, as the upper section of the leach zone expanded outward more quickly than design. The oil-brine interface was then re-positioned with the intent to resume leaching in the second stage configuration. This report evaluates the as-built configuration of the cavern at the end of the first stage, and recommends changes to the second stage plan in order to accommodate for the variance between the first stage plan and the as-built cavern. SANSMIC leach code simulations are presented and compared with sonar surveys in order to aid in the analysis and offer projections of likely outcomes from the revised plan for the second stage leach.

Rudeen, David Keith [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM; Weber, Paula D.; Lord, David L.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

SPR salt wall leaching experiments in lab-scale vessel : data report.  

SciTech Connect

During cavern leaching in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR), injected raw water mixes with resident brine and eventually interacts with the cavern salt walls. This report provides a record of data acquired during a series of experiments designed to measure the leaching rate of salt walls in a labscale simulated cavern, as well as discussion of the data. These results should be of value to validate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models used to simulate leaching applications. Three experiments were run in the transparent 89-cm (35-inch) ID diameter vessel previously used for several related projects. Diagnostics included tracking the salt wall dissolution rate using ultrasonics, an underwater camera to view pre-installed markers, and pre- and post-test weighing and measuring salt blocks that comprise the walls. In addition, profiles of the local brine/water conductivity and temperature were acquired at three locations by traversing conductivity probes to map out the mixing of injected raw water with the surrounding brine. The data are generally as expected, with stronger dissolution when the salt walls were exposed to water with lower salt saturation, and overall reasonable wall shape profiles. However, there are significant block-to-block variations, even between neighboring salt blocks, so the averaged data are considered more useful for model validation. The remedial leach tests clearly showed that less mixing and longer exposure time to unsaturated water led to higher levels of salt wall dissolution. The data for all three tests showed a dividing line between upper and lower regions, roughly above and below the fresh water injection point, with higher salt wall dissolution in all cases, and stronger (for remedial leach cases) or weaker (for standard leach configuration) concentration gradients above the dividing line.

Webb, Stephen Walter; O'Hern, Timothy John; Hartenberger, Joel David

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

ESS 2012 Peer Review - CAES Geo Performance for Natural Gas and Salt Reservoirs and TMH Response of GSFs - Payton Gardner, SNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CAES Geo Performance CAES Geo Performance for Natural Gas and Salt Reservoirs, Thermal-Mechanical- Hydraulic Response of Geological Storage Formations for CAES 27 September 2012 SJ Bauer, M Martinez, W. Payton Gardner, J Holland 2 CAES Geo Performance for Natural Gas and Salt Reservoirs / Thermal-Mechanical-Hydraulic (T-M-H) Response of Geological Storage Formations for CAES  Problem: Siting of CAES facilities may be limited by specific geologic conditions  Opportunity: Fundamental understanding of T-M-H will enable/extend CAES siting potential throughout the US 3 Images taken from: http://www.rwe.com/ 1. CAES in Mined Salt Caverns  Model large scale salt cavern response to air pressure cycling  Experimentally evaluate thermal cycling effect on domal salt

77

Modeling of coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

caverns for the storage of natural gas, crude oil and compressed air: Geomechanical aspects of construction, operation and abandonment

Rutqvist, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Supai salt karst features: Holbrook Basin, Arizona  

SciTech Connect

More than 300 sinkholes, fissures, depressions, and other collapse features occur along a 70 km (45 mi) dissolution front of the Permian Supai Formation, dipping northward into the Holbrook Basin, also called the Supai Salt Basin. The dissolution front is essentially coincident with the so-called Holbrook Anticline showing local dip reversal; rather than being of tectonic origin, this feature is likely a subsidence-induced monoclinal flexure caused by the northward migrating dissolution front. Three major areas are identified with distinctive attributes: (1) The Sinks, 10 km WNW of Snowflake, containing some 200 sinkholes up to 200 m diameter and 50 m depth, and joint controlled fissures and fissure-sinks; (2) Dry Lake Valley and contiguous areas containing large collapse fissures and sinkholes in jointed Coconino sandstone, some of which drained more than 50 acre-feet ({approximately}6 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3}) of water overnight; and (3) the McCauley Sinks, a localized group of about 40 sinkholes 15 km SE of Winslow along Chevelon Creek, some showing essentially rectangular jointing in the surficial Coconino Formation. Similar salt karst features also occur between these three major areas. The range of features in Supai salt are distinctive, yet similar to those in other evaporate basins. The wide variety of dissolution/collapse features range in development from incipient surface expression to mature and old age. The features began forming at least by Pliocene time and continue to the present, with recent changes reportedly observed and verified on airphotos with 20 year repetition. The evaporate sequence along interstate transportation routes creates a strategic location for underground LPG storage in leached caverns. The existing 11 cavern field at Adamana is safely located about 25 miles away from the dissolution front, but further expansion initiatives will require thorough engineering evaluation.

Neal, J.T.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

79

U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 230,456 271,785 2010's 312,003 351,017 - No Data Reported; -- Not Applicable; NA Not...

80

U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

189,043 218,483 225,958 234,601 239,990 250,532 261,988 253,410 341,213 397,560 2010's 456,009 512,279 - No Data Reported; -- Not Applicable; NA Not Available; W Withheld...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drive salt caverns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Stability Analyses of Differently Shaped Salt Caverns for Underground Natural Gas Storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The primary purpose of underground storage for natural gas is to balance the variable demand for gas in high consumption seasons against the constant supply (more)

Onal, Erol

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Application of the multi-mechanism deformation model for three-dimensional simulations of salt : behavior for the strategic petroleum reserve.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve stores crude oil in 62 solution-mined caverns in salt domes located in Texas and Louisiana. Historically, three-dimensional geomechanical simulations of the behavior of the caverns have been performed using a power law creep model. Using this method, and calibrating the creep coefficient to field data such as cavern closure and surface subsidence, has produced varying degrees of agreement with observed phenomena. However, as new salt dome locations are considered for oil storage facilities, pre-construction geomechanical analyses are required that need site-specific parameters developed from laboratory data obtained from core samples. The multi-mechanism deformation (M-D) model is a rigorous mathematical description of both transient and steady-state creep phenomena. Recent enhancements to the numerical integration algorithm within the model have created a more numerically stable implementation of the M-D model. This report presents computational analyses to compare the results of predictions of the geomechanical behavior at the West Hackberry SPR site using both models. The recently-published results using the power law creep model produced excellent agreement with an extensive set of field data. The M-D model results show similar agreement using parameters developed directly from laboratory data. It is also used to predict the behavior for the construction and operation of oil storage caverns at a new site, to identify potential problems before a final cavern layout is designed.

Ehgartner, Brian L.; Sobolik, Steven Ronald; Bean, James E.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Iodized Salt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iodized Salt Iodized Salt Name: Theresa Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why do they put iodine in salt? Replies: Iodine was introduced into salt at earlier this century when it was discovered that certain areas of the US had a mark deficiency in iodine in the diet of people, and people developed a neck swelling (goiter). The Great Lakes region is one of these areas where the soil is lacking iodine. Goiter can be caused when the thyroid gland swells because of a lack of iodine in the diet. Most medical advise now states that iodine in salt is no longer necessary due to our food sources arising from all over the world. Steve Sample Hi Theresa...see, there are a variety of elements and compounds that are necessary for the proper maintenance of our life. One of these is iodine, since a small quantity of iodine is needed for the adequate functioning of the thyroid gland. A deficiency of iodine produces dire effects, as goiter, where the thyroid gland swollens due to the lack of iodine traces in the diet. The iodine affects directly the tyrhoid gland secretions, which themselves, to a great extent, control heart action, nerve response to stimuli, rate of body growth and metabolism.

84

Advanced Underground Gas Storage Concepts Refrigerated-Mined Cavern Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE CONCEPTS UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE CONCEPTS REFRIGERATED-MINED CAVERN STORAGE FINAL REPORT DOE CONTRACT NUMBER DE-AC26-97FT34349 SUBMITTED BY: PB-KBB INC. 11757 KATY FREEWAY, SUITE 600 HOUSTON, TX 77079 SEPTEMBER 1998 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily

85

Exploring the concept of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns at shallow depth: A modeling study of air tightness and energy balance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

caverns for the storage of natural gas, crude oil and compressed air: Geomechanical aspects of construction, operation and abandonment,caverns involved in CAES include stability, air tightness, acceptable surface subsidence, and (later on) an environmentally safe decommissioning and abandonment [

Kim, H.-M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Holiday Food Drive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Food Drive Food Drive Holiday Food Drive During the recent holiday food drive, employees donated enough food to provide about 23,604 holiday meals for Northern New Mexico families. More than 432 frozen turkeys were donated this year by employees and other donors during 'Bring a Turkey to Work Day,' an annual Lab event that takes places Thanksgiving week. September 16, 2013 LANL employees organize food for the Holiday Food Drive. Contacts Giving Drives Ed Vigil Community Programs Office (505) 665-9205 Email Giving Drives Enrique Trujillo Community Programs Office (505) 665-6384 Email Helping feed Northern New Mexico families Community partners The Food Depot (Santa Fe) Del Norte Credit Union Smith's Food and Drug Giving Holiday Food Drive Holiday Gift Drive LANL Laces Los Alamos Employees' Scholarship Fund

87

Plan for certification and related activities for the Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve oil storage caverns  

SciTech Connect

In order to comply with state laws, protect the environment, and protect the national investment in oil stored, it is necessary to periodically verify the integrity of the Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve (DOE/SPR) oil storage caverns. The task of developing plans for cavern certification was a responsibility in Sandia's role of geotechnical support for the SPR program. As an implementation of this task, this report includes a plan and procedures for tests and related activities to evaluate the integrity of the DOE/SPR oil storage caverns. 2 references.

Goin, K.L.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

AOCS USB Flash Drive  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

1 GB flash drive. AOCS logo printed on aluminum cover. AOCS USB Flash Drive Membership Merchandise Membership Merchandise 7F95621DF44FEA960BA8EE1D1E39CED4 1 GB USB flash drive. AOCS logo printed on aluminum cover. M-USB 17770

89

Modeling of coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in design of natural gas storage in unlined caverns;associated with natural gas storage in Sweden, includingIn the case of natural gas storage, a steel lining provides

Rutqvist, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Molten salt electrolyte separator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A molten salt electrolyte/separator for battery and related electrochemical systems including a molten electrolyte composition and an electrically insulating solid salt dispersed therein, to provide improved performance at higher current densities and alternate designs through ease of fabrication.

Kaun, Thomas D. (New Lenox, IL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Drill drive mechanism  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drill drive mechanism is especially adapted to provide both rotational drive and axial feed for a drill of substantial diameter such as may be used for drilling holes for roof bolts in mine shafts. The drill shaft is made with a helical pattern of scroll-like projections on its surface for removal of cuttings. The drill drive mechanism includes a plurality of sprockets carrying two chains of drive links which are arranged to interlock around the drill shaft with each drive link having depressions which mate with the scroll-like projections. As the chain links move upwardly or downwardly the surfaces of the depressions in the links mate with the scroll projections to move the shaft axially. Tangs on the drive links mate with notch surfaces between scroll projections to provide a means for rotating the shaft. Projections on the drive links mate together at the center to hold the drive links tightly around the drill shaft. The entire chain drive mechanism is rotated around the drill shaft axis by means of a hydraulic motor and gear drive to cause rotation of the drill shaft. This gear drive also connects with a differential gearset which is interconnected with a second gear. A second motor is connected to the spider shaft of the differential gearset to produce differential movement (speeds) at the output gears of the differential gearset. This differential in speed is utilized to drive said second gear at a speed different from the speed of said gear drive, this speed differential being utilized to drive said sprockets for axial movement of said drill shaft.

Dressel, Michael O. (Englewood, CO)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Holiday Gift Drive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Holiday Gift Drive Holiday Gift Drive Holiday Gift Drive Every year, Laboratory employees help fulfill the holiday wishes of children and seniors in our communities. In 2012, our employees helped more than 1,030 Northern New Mexico children, senior citizens and families have a brighter holiday season. September 16, 2013 Every holiday season, employees of Los Alamos National Laboratory donate and distribute gifts to families in need throughout Northern New Mexico. Contacts Giving Drives Ed Vigil Community Programs Office (505) 665-9205 Email Giving Drives Enrique Trujillo Community Programs Office (505) 665-6384 Email Helping New Mexico families feel the holiday spirit The 2013 campaign runs from November 21-December 18. 2012 Holiday Gift Drive partners Boys and Girls Club Del Norte (Abiquiu Site)

93

Results of stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery as primary management for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods: Between 1992 and 2001, 49 patients had radiosurgery for dural-based masses of the cavernous sinus presumed to be meningiomas. The mean patient age was 55.5 years. The mean tumor volume was 10.2 mL; the mean tumor margin dose was 15.9 Gy. The mean follow-up was 58 months (range, 16-144 months). Results: No tumor enlarged after radiosurgery. Twelve of 38 patients (26%) with preexisting diplopia or facial numbness/pain had improvement in cranial nerve function. Five patients (10%) had new (n = 3) or worsened (n = 2) trigeminal dysfunction; 2 of these patients (4%) underwent surgery at 20 and 25 months after radiosurgery despite no evidence of tumor progression. Neither patient improved after partial tumor resection. One patient (2%) developed an oculomotor nerve injury. One patient (2%) had an ischemic stroke related to occlusion of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. Event-free survival was 98%, 85%, and 80% at 1, 3, and 7 years after radiosurgery, respectively. Univariate analysis of patient and dosimetric factors found no analyzed factor correlated with postradiosurgical morbidity. Conclusions: Radiosurgery was an effective primary management strategy for patients with an imaging defined cavernous sinus meningioma. Except in situations of symptomatic mass effect, unusual clinical presentation, or atypical imaging features, surgery to confirm the histologic diagnosis is unlikely to provide clinical benefit.

Pollock, Bruce E. [Department of Neurological Surgery, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States) and Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States)]. E-mail: pollock.bruce@mayo.edu; Stafford, Scott L. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Piezoelectric drive circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A piezoelectric motor drive circuit is provided which utilizes the piezoelectric elements as oscillators and a Meacham half-bridge approach to develop feedback from the motor ground circuit to produce a signal to drive amplifiers to power the motor. The circuit automatically compensates for shifts in harmonic frequency of the piezoelectric elements due to pressure and temperature changes.

Treu, Jr., Charles A. (Raymore, MO)

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

Piezoelectric drive circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A piezoelectric motor drive circuit is provided which utilizes the piezoelectric elements as oscillators and a Meacham half-bridge approach to develop feedback from the motor ground circuit to produce a signal to drive amplifiers to power the motor. The circuit automatically compensates for shifts in harmonic frequency of the piezoelectric elements due to pressure and temperature changes. 7 figs.

Treu, C.A. Jr.

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) geological site characterization report, Big Hill Salt Dome  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geological and geophysical analyses of the Big Hill Salt Dome were performed to determine the suitability of this site for use in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Development of 140 million barrels (MMB) of storage capacity in the Big Hill Salt Dome is planned as part of the SPR expansion to achieve 750 MMB of storage capacity. Objectives of the study were to: (1) Acquire, evaluate, and interpret existing data pertinent to geological characterization of the Big Hill Dome; (2) Characterize the surface and near-surface geology and hydrology; (3) Characterize the geology and hydrology of the overlying cap rock; (4) Define the geometry and geology of the dome; (5) Determine the feasibility of locating and constructing 14 10-MMB storage caverns in the south portion of the dome; and (6) Assess the effects of natural hazards on the SPR site. Recommendations are included. (DMC)

Hart, R.J.; Ortiz, T.S.; Magorian, T.R.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Traction Drive Systems Breakout  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Traction Drive Systems Breakout Traction Drive Systems Breakout John M. Miller, PhD, PE, F.IEEE, F.SAE Oak Ridge National Laboratory Facilitator July 24, 2012 EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Vehicle Technologies Program - Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors eere.energy.gov EV Everywhere Traction Drive System * DOE goals for Electric Traction Drive System (TDS) innovations must be disruptive innovation focused to meet the CY2022 price target ($20,000 $25,000) for a mid-sized 5 passenger sedan having 5 year simple payback. Enhanced Efficiency Reduced Cost Traction Drive System EETT Roadmap: "Therefore, research is needed to develop technologies that are less expensive and, at the same time, smaller, lighter, more efficient, and equally reliable as conventional automotive technologies. "

98

Amine salts of nitroazoles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compositions of matter, a method of providing chemical energy by burning said compositions, and methods of making said compositions. These compositions are amine salts of nitroazoles.

Lee, Kien-yin (Los Alamos, NM); Stinecipher, Mary M. (Los Alamos, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

A Numerical Study of Circulations Induced by a Dry Salt Lake  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of surface winds in the vicinity of a moderate-sized (about 70 km2) dry salt lake by Tapper suggest that differences in albedo and soil thermal properties between the salt and surrounding sand surfaces may be strong enough to drive a ...

W. L. Physick; N. J. Tapper

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Intrusions: What Drives Them?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The driving mechanism for the observed interleaving of water masses is generally assumed to be double-diffusive mixing. However, some observations of intrusions have been made in regions where the mean stratification is stable to double-diffusive ...

Dave Hebert

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drive salt caverns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Control rod drive  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control rod drive uses gravitational forces to insert one or more control rods upwardly into a reactor core from beneath the reactor core under emergency conditions. The preferred control rod drive includes a vertically movable weight and a mechanism operatively associating the weight with the control rod so that downward movement of the weight is translated into upward movement of the control rod. The preferred control rod drive further includes an electric motor for driving the control rods under normal conditions, an electrically actuated clutch which automatically disengages the motor during a power failure and a decelerator for bringing the control rod to a controlled stop when it is inserted under emergency conditions into a reactor core.

Hawke, Basil C. (Solana Beach, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Molten salt electrolyte separator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The patent describes a molten salt electrolyte/separator for battery and related electrochemical systems including a molten electrolyte composition and an electrically insulating solid salt dispersed therein, to provide improved performance at higher current densities and alternate designs through ease of fabrication. 5 figs.

Kaun, T.D.

1996-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

103

CONTROL ROD DRIVE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

BS>A drive mechanism was invented for the control rod of a nuclear reactor. Power is provided by an electric motor and an outside source of fluid pressure is utilized in conjunction with the fluid pressure within the reactor to balance the loadings on the motor. The force exerted on the drive mechanism in the direction of scramming the rod is derived from the reactor fluid pressure so that failure of the outside pressure source will cause prompt scramming of the rod.

Chapellier, R.A.

1960-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

104

School supply drive winding down  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

submit School supply drive winding down The drive is collecting materials for schools throughout Northern New Mexico and will be distributed by the Lab and Self Help, Inc....

105

Electric Drive Status and Challenges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Achieve Traction Drive Cost Target * Inverter: cold plate, drive boards, thermal interface material, bus bar, current sensors, housing, control board, etc. Motor:...

106

Molten salt test loop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the Molten Salt Test Loop Project was to design, construct, and demonstrate operation of an outdoor high temperature molten salt test facility. This facility is operational, and can now be used to evaluate materials and components, and the design features and operating procedures required for molten salt heat transport systems. The initial application of the loop was to demonstrate the feasibility of using molten salt as the heat transport medium for a high temperature distributed collector system. A commercially available eutectic salt blend is used as the heat transfer fluid. This salt has a composition of 40% NaNO/sub 2/, 7% NaNO/sub 3/, and 53% KNO/sub 3/ and is marketed under the trade name Hitec. It has a freezing (solidifying) point of 142/sup 0/C (288/sup 0/F) and has been satisfactorily used at temperatures as high as 594/sup 0/C (1100/sup 0/F). General Atomic (GA) installed a row of Fixed Mirror Solar Concentrators (FMSC's) in the loop. The system was started up and a test program conducted. Startup went smoothly, with the exception of some burned-out trace heaters. Salt temperatures as high as 571/sup 0/C (1060/sup 0/F) were achieved.

Schuster, J.R.; Eggers, G.H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Accelerators for Subcritical Molten-Salt Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Accelerator parameters for subcritical reactors have usually been based on using solid nuclear fuel much like that used in all operating critical reactors as well as the thorium burning accelerator-driven energy amplifier proposed by Rubbia et al. An attractive alternative reactor design that used molten salt fuel was experimentally studied at ORNL in the 1960s, where a critical molten salt reactor was successfully operated using enriched U235 or U233 tetrafluoride fuels. These experiments give confidence that an accelerator-driven subcritical molten salt reactor will work better than conventional reactors, having better efficiency due to their higher operating temperature, having the inherent safety of subcritical operation, and having constant purging of volatile radioactive elements to eliminate their accumulation and potential accidental release in dangerous amounts. Moreover, the requirements to drive a molten salt reactor can be considerably relaxed compared to a solid fuel reactor, especially regarding accelerator reliability and spallation neutron targetry, to the point that much of the required technology exists today. It is proposed that Project-X be developed into a prototype commercial machine to produce energy for the world by, for example, burning thorium in India and nuclear waste from conventional reactors in the USA.

Johnson, Roland (Muons, Inc.)

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

108

Ceramic vane drive joint  

SciTech Connect

A variable geometry gas turbine has an array of ceramic composition vanes positioned by an actuating ring coupled through a plurality of circumferentially spaced turbine vane levers to the outer end of a metallic vane drive shaft at each of the ceramic vanes. Each of the ceramic vanes has an end slot of bow tie configuration including flared end segments and a center slot therebetween. Each of the vane drive shafts has a cross head with ends thereof spaced with respect to the sides of the end slot to define clearance for free expansion of the cross head with respect to the vane and the cross head being configured to uniformly distribute drive loads across bearing surfaces of the vane slot.

Smale, Charles H. (Indianapolis, IN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Current drive, anticurrent drive, and balanced injection  

SciTech Connect

In lower hybrid (LH) discharges, the number of suprathermal electrons is limited by the upper bound on the current density from the q = 1 condition, which is caused by the onset of the m = 1 MHD instability. The stored energy of suprathermal electrons, measured in terms of a poloidal beta, scales with plasma current as I/sub p//sup -1/. Potentially, these bounds represent very restrictive conditions for heating in larger machines. Consequently, it seems necessary to perform experiments where the electrons are driven in both directions, parallel and antiparallel to the magnetic field, i.e., bidirectional scenarios like anticurrent drive or balanced injection. Data from PLT relevant to these ideas are discussed. 6 refs., 4 figs.

von Goeler, S.; Stevens, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bell, R.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.; Cavallo, A.; Chu, T.K.; Fishman, H.; Hill, K.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Salt Waste Processing Initiatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Patricia Suggs Patricia Suggs Salt Processing Team Lead Assistant Manager for Waste Disposition Project Office of Environmental Management Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Initiatives 2 Overview * Current SRS Liquid Waste System status * Opportunity to accelerate salt processing - transformational technologies - Rotary Microfiltration (RMF) and Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) - Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (ARP/MCU) extension with next generation extractant - Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) performance enhancement - Saltstone enhancements * Life-cycle impacts and benefits 3 SRS Liquid Waste Total Volume >37 Million Gallons (Mgal) Total Curies 183 MCi (51% ) 175 MCi (49% ) >358 Million Curies (MCi) Sludge 34.3 Mgal (92% ) 3.0 Mgal (8%)

111

Amine salts of nitroazoles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compositions of matter, a method of providing chemical energy by burning said compositions, and methods of making said compositions are described. These compositions are amine salts of nitroazoles. 1 figure.

Kienyin Lee; Stinecipher, M.M.

1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

112

LCLS Injector Drive Laser  

SciTech Connect

Requirements for the LCLS injector drive laser present significant challenges to the design of the system. While progress has been demonstrated in spatial shape, temporal shape, UV generation and rep-rate, a laser that meets all of the LCLS specifications simultaneously has yet to be demonstrated. These challenges are compounded by the stability and reliability requirements. The drive laser and transport system has been installed and tested. We will report on the current operational state of the laser and plans for future improvements.

Dowell, D.H.; Castro, J.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, A.; Hays, G.; Hering, P.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Loos, H.; Miahnahri, A.; White, W.; /SLAC

2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

113

CONTROL ROD DRIVE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Accurate and controlled drive for the control rod is from an electric motor. A hydraulic arrangement is provided to balance a piston against which a control rod is urged by the application of fluid pressure. The electric motor drive of the control rod for normal operation is made through the aforementioned piston. In the event scramming is required, the fluid pressure urging the control rod against the piston is relieved and an opposite fluid pressure is applied. The lack of mechanical connection between the electric motor and control rod facilitates the scramming operation.

Chapellier, R.A.; Rogers, I.

1961-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

114

Drive5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Drive5 Drive5 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Drive5 Agency/Company /Organization: Drive5 Sector: Energy Focus Area: Vehicles Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website, Mobile Device Website: www.drive5.us Web Application Link: www.drive5.us Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Challenge Generated Drive5 Screenshot References: Drive5[1] Challenge.gov[2] Challenge.gov Submission Page[3] Measure your fuel economy real time with five metrics to save on fuel costs. Overview Drive1: Fuel Economy Drive5 gives you real time fuel economy feedback for any car 1984 and newer by simply utilizing the sensors embedded in your phone or tablet. It uses a statistical algorithm which leverages the fueleconomy.gov's open dataset along with data from thousands of automobile trips. No connections to the

115

Salt Selected (FINAL)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WHY SALT WAS SELECTED AS A DISPOSAL MEDIUM WHY SALT WAS SELECTED AS A DISPOSAL MEDIUM Waste Isolation Pilot Plant U.S. Department Of Energy Government officials and scientists chose the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site through a selection process that started in the 1950s. At that time, the National Academy of Sciences conducted a nationwide search for geological formations stable enough to contain radioactive wastes for thousands of years. In 1955, after extensive

116

Experimental determination of the relationship between permeability and microfracture-induced damage in bedded salt  

SciTech Connect

The development of deep underground structures (e.g., shafts, mines, storage and disposal caverns) significantly alters the stress state in the rock near the structure or opening. The effect of such an opening is to concentrate the far-field stress near the free surface. For soft rock such as salt, the concentrating effect of the opening induces deviatoric stresses in the salt that may be large enough to initiate microcracks which then propagate with time. The volume of rock susceptible to damage by microfracturing is often referred to as the disturbed rock zone and, by its nature, is expected to exhibit high permeability relative to that of the native, far-field rock. This paper presents laboratory data that characterize microfracture-induced damage and the effect this damage has on permeability for bedded salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant located in southeastern New Mexico. Damage is induced in the salt through a series of tertiary creep experiments and quantified in terms of dilatant volumetric strain. The permeability of damaged specimens is then measured using nitrogen gas as the permeant. The range in damage investigated included dilatant volumetric strains from less than 0.03 percent to nearly 4.0 percent. Permeability values corresponding to these damage levels ranged from 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}18} m{sup 2} to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} m{sup 2}. Two simple models were fitted to the data for use in predicting permeability from dilatant volumetric strain.

Pfeifle, T.W. [RE/SPEC Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States); Brodsky, N.S.; Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Stability and support issues in the construction of large span caverns for physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New physics experiments, proposed to study neutrinos and protons, call for the use of large underground particle detectors. In the United States, such detectors would be housed in the US Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL), sited within the footprint of the defunct Homestake Mine, South Dakota. Although the experimental proposals differ in detail, all rely heavily upon the ability of the mined and reinforced rock mass to serve as a stable host for the detector facilities. Experimental proposals, based on the use of Water Cherenkov detector technology, specify rock caverns with excavated volumes in excess of half a million cubic meters, spans of at least 50 m, sited at depths of approximately one to 1.5 kilometers. Although perhaps sited at shallower depth, proposals based on the use of Liquid Argon (LAr) detector technology are no less challenging. LAr proposals not only call for the excavation of large span caverns, but have an additional need for the safe management of large quantities (kilo-tonnes) of cryogenic liquid, including critical provisions for the fail-safe egress of underground personnel and the reliable exhaust of Argon gas in the event of a catastrophic release. These multi-year, high value physics experiments will provide the key experimental data needed to support the research of a new generation of physicists as they probe the behavior of basic particles and the fundamental laws of nature. The rock engineer must deliver caverns that will reliably meet operational requirements and remain stable for periods conservatively estimated to be in excess of twenty years. This paper provides an overview of the DUSEL site conditions and discusses key end-user requirements and design criteria likely to dominate in determining the viability of experimental options. The paper stresses the paramount importance of collecting adequate site-specific data to inform early siting, dimensioning and layout decisions. Given the large-scale of the excavation and likely timeline to construction, the paper also strongly suggests that there are exciting opportunities for the rock mechanics and engineering community to identify and efficiently integrate research components into the design and construction process.

Laughton, C.; /Fermilab

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Fundamental Properties of Salts  

SciTech Connect

Thermal properties of molten salt systems are of interest to electrorefining operations, pertaining to both the Fuel Cycle Research & Development Program (FCR&D) and Spent Fuel Treatment Mission, currently being pursued by the Department of Energy (DOE). The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely impacted by the build-up of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided, during electrorefining operations, include (i) fissile elements build up in the salt that might approach the criticality limits specified for the vessel, (ii) electrolyte freezing at the operating temperature of the electrorefiner due to changes in the liquidus temperature, and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution). The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can be monitored by studying the thermal characteristics of the molten salts as a function of impurity concentration. Simulated salt compositions consisting of the selected rare earth and alkaline earth chlorides, with a eutectic mixture of LiCl-KCl as the carrier electrolyte, were studied to determine the melting points (thermal characteristics) using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). The experimental data were used to model the liquidus temperature. On the basis of the this data, it became possible to predict a spent fuel treatment processing scenario under which electrorefining could no longer be performed as a result of increasing liquidus temperatures of the electrolyte.

Toni Y Gutknecht; Guy L Fredrickson

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Geomechanical testing of MRIG-9 core for the potential SPR siting at the Richton salt dome.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A laboratory testing program was developed to examine the mechanical behavior of salt from the Richton salt dome. The resulting information is intended for use in design and evaluation of a proposed Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage facility in that dome. Core obtained from the drill hole MRIG-9 was obtained from the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology. Mechanical properties testing included: (1) acoustic velocity wave measurements; (2) indirect tensile strength tests; (3) unconfined compressive strength tests; (4) ambient temperature quasi-static triaxial compression tests to evaluate dilational stress states at confining pressures of 725, 1450, 2175, and 2900 psi; and (5) confined triaxial creep experiments to evaluate the time-dependent behavior of the salt at axial stress differences of 4000 psi, 3500 psi, 3000 psi, 2175 psi and 2000 psi at 55 C and 4000 psi at 35 C, all at a constant confining pressure of 4000 psi. All comments, inferences, discussions of the Richton characterization and analysis are caveated by the small number of tests. Additional core and testing from a deeper well located at the proposed site is planned. The Richton rock salt is generally inhomogeneous as expressed by the density and velocity measurements with depth. In fact, we treated the salt as two populations, one clean and relatively pure (> 98% halite), the other salt with abundant (at times) anhydrite. The density has been related to the insoluble content. The limited mechanical testing completed has allowed us to conclude that the dilatational criteria are distinct for the halite-rich and other salts, and that the dilation criteria are pressure dependent. The indirect tensile strengths and unconfined compressive strengths determined are consistently lower than other coastal domal salts. The steady-state-only creep model being developed suggests that Richton salt is intermediate in creep resistance when compared to other domal and bedded salts. The results of the study provide only limited information for structural modeling needed to evaluate the integrity and safety of the proposed cavern field. This study should be augmented with more extensive testing. This report documents a series of test methods, philosophies, and empirical relationships, etc., that are used to define and extend our understanding of the mechanical behavior of the Richton salt. This understanding could be used in conjunction with planned further studies or on its own for initial assessments.

Dunn, Dennis P.; Broome, Scott Thomas; Bronowski, David R.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Hofer, John H.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Untitled-1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introduction to Introduction to Salt Caverns & Their Use for Disposal of Oil Field Wastes An Introduction to Salt Caverns & Their Use for Disposal of Oil Field Wastes 1 What Are Salt Caverns? ........................................................................................... 2 Why Are Salt Caverns Important? ............................................................................ 2 Where Are Salt Deposits and Caverns Found? ......................................................... 3 How Are Caverns Formed? ...................................................................................... 4 How Are Caverns Used? .......................................................................................... 5 What Types of Wastes Are Considered to Be Oil Field Wastes?

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drive salt caverns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Salt Creek Student Homepage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Salt Creek Investigation Salt Creek Investigation</2> "Whales Dying in the Pacific Ocean" "Fish Dying in Lake Michigan" Recent headlines remind us of environmental problems near and far away. Scientists have been wondering if these problems could be due to the warmer temperatures this past spring and summer or could there be other reasons? Lack of rain and near drought conditions have forced many areas to restrict water use. We know from past history that pollution affects our drinking water and marine life. Remember what we read about Lake Erie and from reading A River Ran Wild by Lynne Cherry. There are many factors affecting the environment around us . . . even in Salt Creek which runs through our area. We may not be able to investigate the Pacific Ocean and Lake Michigan

122

Chinese demand drives global deforestation Chinese demand drives global deforestation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chinese demand drives global deforestation Chinese demand drives global deforestation By Tansa Musa zones and do not respect size limits in their quest for maximum financial returns. "I lack words economy. China's demand for hardwood drives illegal logging says "Both illegal and authorized

123

RECHARGEABLE MOLTEN-SALT CELLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KC! /FeS 2 cell lithium-silicon magnesium oxide molten-saltmolten-salt cells Na/Na glass/Na:z.Sn-S cell Na/NazOxA!Symposium on Molten Salts, Physical Electrochemistry

Cairns, Elton J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Metals removal from spent salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for removing metal contaminants from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents may be added to precipitate the metal oxide and/or the metal as either metal oxide, metal hydroxide, or as a salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as waste or can be immobilized as ceramic pellets. More than about 90% of the metals and mineral residues (ashes) present are removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be spray-dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 1.0 ppm of contaminants.

Hsu, Peter C. (Pleasanton, CA); Von Holtz, Erica H. (Livermore, CA); Hipple, David L. (Livermore, CA); Summers, Leslie J. (Livermore, CA); Brummond, William A. (Livermore, CA); Adamson, Martyn G. (Danville, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Actinide removal from spent salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for removing actinide contaminants (uranium and thorium) from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents are added to precipitate the thorium as thorium oxide and/or the uranium as either uranium oxide or as a diuranate salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as radioactive waste. About 90% of the thorium and/or uranium present is removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 0.1 ppm of thorium or uranium.

Hsu, Peter C. (Pleasanton, CA); von Holtz, Erica H. (Livermore, CA); Hipple, David L. (Livermore, CA); Summers, Leslie J. (Livermore, CA); Adamson, Martyn G. (Danville, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Gas Mileage Tips - Driving More Efficiently  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Driving More Efficiently Drive Sensibly frustrated driver Aggressive driving (speeding, rapid acceleration and braking) wastes gas. It can lower your gas mileage by 33 percent at...

127

Strategic petroleum reserve (SPR) geological site characterization report, Bayou Choctaw Salt Dome. Sections I and II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report comprises two sections: Bayou Choctaw cavern stability issues, and geological site characterization of Bayou Choctaw. (DLC)

Hogan, R.G. (ed.)

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Salt Creek Scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scenario Scenario HELP Index Summary Scenario References Student Pages Two branches of Salt Creek run through the city of Rolling Meadows, Illinois, not far from our school. Five members of our team of eighth grade teachers from different subject areas (science, language arts, bilingual education and special education), decided to develop an interdisciplinary study of Salt Creek as a way of giving our students authentic experiences in environmental studies. The unit begins when students enter school in August, running through the third week of September, and resuming for three weeks in October. Extension activities based on using the data gathered at the creek continue throughout the school year, culminating in a presentation at a city council meeting in the spring.

129

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - DRIVE: Drive-Cycle Rapid...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

representative drive cycles from raw data, the tool is capable of comparing vehicle operation to industry standard test cycles and can even select a representative...

130

Rotary drive mechanism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a rotary drive mechanism which includes a rotary solenoid having a stator and multi-poled rotor. A moving member rotates with the rotor and is biased by a biasing device. The biasing device causes a further rotational movement after rotation by the rotary solenoid. Thus, energization of the rotary solenoid moves the member in one direction to one position and biases the biasing device against the member. Subsequently, de- energization of the rotary solenoid causes the biasing device to move the member in the same direction to another position from where the moving member is again movable by energization and de-energization of the rotary solenoid. Preferably, the moving member is a multi-lobed cam having the same number of lobes as the rotor has poles. An anti- overdrive device is also preferably provided for preventing overdrive in the forward direction or a reverse rotation of the moving member and for precisely aligning the moving member.

Kenderdine, E.W.

1991-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

131

Rotary drive mechanism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A rotary drive mechanism includes a rotary solenoid having a stator and multi-poled rotor. A moving member rotates with the rotor and is biased by a biasing device. The biasing device causes a further rotational movement after rotation by the rotary solenoid. Thus, energization of the rotary solenoid moves the member in one direction to one position and biases the biasing device against the member. Subsequently, de-energization of the rotary solenoid causes the biasing device to move the member in the same direction to another position from where the moving member is again movable by energization and de-energization of the rotary solenoid. Preferably, the moving member is a multi-lobed cam having the same number of lobes as the rotor has poles. An anti-overdrive device is also preferably provided for preventing overdrive in the forward direction or a reverse rotation of the moving member and for precisely aligning the moving member.

Kenderdine, Eugene W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

QUICK RELEASABLE DRIVE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A quick releasable mechanical drive system suitable for use in a nuclear reactor is described. A small reversible motor positions a control rod by means of a worm and gear speed reducer, a magnetic torque clutch, and a bell crank. As the control rod is raised to the operating position, a heavy coil spring is compressed. In the event of an emergency indicated by either a''scram'' signal or a power failure, the current to the magnetic clutch is cut off, thereby freeing the coil spring and the bell crank positioner from the motor and speed reduction gearing. The coil spring will immediately act upon the bell crank to cause the insertion of the control rod. This arrangement will allow the slow, accurate positioning of the control rod during reactor operation, while providing an independent force to rapidly insert the rod in the event of an emergency.

Dickson, J.J.

1958-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Hydrogen--electric power drives  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen--electric power drives would consist of most or all of these: chilled hydrogen gas tank, liquid oxygen tank, a bank of fuel cells, dc/ac inverter, ac drive motors, solid state ac speed control, dc sputter-ion vacuum pumps, steam turbine generator set and steam condenser. Each component is described. Optional uses of low pressure extraction steam and warm condensate are listed. Power drive applications are listed. Impact on public utilities, fuel suppliers, and users is discussed.

Hall, F.F.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Salt Caverns Storage Capacity Aquifers Storage Capacity Depleted Fields Storage Capacity Total Working Gas Capacity Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns Working Gas Capacity of...

135

Method to synthesize dense crystallized sodalite pellet for immobilizing halide salt radioactive waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for immobilizing waste chloride salts containing radionuclides such as cesium and strontium and hazardous materials such as barium. A sodalite intermediate is prepared by mixing appropriate amounts of silica, alumina and sodium hydroxide with respect to sodalite and heating the mixture to form the sodalite intermediate and water. Heating is continued to drive off the water to form a water-free intermediate. The water-free intermediate is mixed with either waste salt or waste salt which has been contacted with zeolite to concentrate the radionuclides and hazardous material. The waste salt-intermediate mixture is then compacted and heated under conditions of heat and pressure to form sodalite with the waste salt, radionuclides and hazardous material trapped within the sodalite cage structure. This provides a final product having excellent leach resistant capabilities.

Koyama, Tadafumi (Tokyo, JP)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Method to synthesize dense crystallized sodalite pellet for immobilizing halide salt radioactive waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for immobilizing waste chloride salts containing radionuclides such as cesium and strontium and hazardous materials such as barium. A sodalite intermediate is prepared by mixing appropriate amounts of silica, alumina and sodium hydroxide with respect to sodalite and heating the mixture to form the sodalite intermediate and water. Heating is continued to drive off the water to form a water-free intermediate. The water-free intermediate is mixed with either waste salt or waste salt which has been contacted with zeolite to concentrate the radionuclides and hazardous material. The waste salt-intermediate mixture is then compacted and heated under conditions of heat and pressure to form sodalite with the waste salt, radionuclides and hazardous material trapped within the sodalite cage structure. This provides a final product having excellent leach resistant capabilities.

Koyama, Tadafumi.

1994-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

137

Method to synthesize dense crystallized sodalite pellet for immobilizing halide salt radioactive waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This report describes a method for immobilizing waste chloride salts containing radionuclides such as cesium and strontium and hazardous materials such as barium. A sodalite intermediate is prepared by mixing appropriate amounts of silica, alumina and sodium hydroxide with respect to sodalite and heating the mixture to form the sodalite intermediate and water. Heating is continued to drive off the water to form a water-free intermediate. The water-free intermediate is mixed with either waste salt or waste salt which has been contacted with zeolite to concentrate the radionuclides and hazardous material. The waste salt-intermediate mixture is then compacted and heated under conditions of heat and pressure to form sodalite with the waste salt, radionuclides and hazardous material trapped within the sodalite cage structure. This provides a final product having excellent leach resistant capabilities.

Koyama, T.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Molten salt lithium cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell which may be operated at temperatures between about 100 to 170/sup 0/C. The cell is comprised of an electrolyte, which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode.

Raistrick, I.D.; Poris, J.; Huggins, R.A.

1980-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

139

Molten salt lithium cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

Raistrick, Ian D. (Menlo Park, CA); Poris, Jaime (Portola Valley, CA); Huggins, Robert A. (Stanford, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Molten salt lithium cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

Raistrick, Ian D. (Menlo Park, CA); Poris, Jaime (Portola Valley, CA); Huggins, Robert A. (Stanford, CA)

1982-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drive salt caverns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

salt lake city.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Locations of the Salt Lake City Processing and Disposal Sites Locations of the Salt Lake City Processing and Disposal Sites This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I processing site and disposal site at Salt Lake City, Utah. These sites are managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Salt Lake City, Utah, Processing and Disposal Sites Site Descriptions and History Regulatory Setting The former Salt Lake City processing site is located about 4 miles south-southwest of the center of Salt Lake City, Utah, at 3300 South and Interstate 15. The Vitro Chemical Company processed uranium and vanadium ore at the site from 1951 until 1968. Milling operations conducted at the processing site created radioactive tailings, a predominantly sandy material.

142

Electrolyte salts for nonaqueous electrolytes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal complex salts may be used in lithium ion batteries. Such metal complex salts not only perform as an electrolyte salt in a lithium ion batteries with high solubility and conductivity, but also can act as redox shuttles that provide overcharge protection of individual cells in a battery pack and/or as electrolyte additives to provide other mechanisms to provide overcharge protection to lithium ion batteries. The metal complex salts have at least one aromatic ring. The aromatic moiety may be reversibly oxidized/reduced at a potential slightly higher than the working potential of the positive electrode in the lithium ion battery. The metal complex salts may also be known as overcharge protection salts.

Amine, Khalil; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Chen, Zonghai

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

143

Batteries using molten salt electrolyte  

SciTech Connect

An electrolyte system suitable for a molten salt electrolyte battery is described where the electrolyte system is a molten nitrate compound, an organic compound containing dissolved lithium salts, or a 1-ethyl-3-methlyimidazolium salt with a melting temperature between approximately room temperature and approximately 250.degree. C. With a compatible anode and cathode, the electrolyte system is utilized in a battery as a power source suitable for oil/gas borehole applications and in heat sensors.

Guidotti, Ronald A. (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

144

Electrochromic Salts, Solutions, and Devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McClesky, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

145

Electrochromic salts, solutions, and devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McClesky,7,064,212 T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

146

Electrochromic Salts, Solutions, and Devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McClesky, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

147

Molten Salts, Magnesium and Aluminum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 1, 2011 ... Chloride 2011: Practice and Theory of Chloride-Based Metallurgy: Molten Salts, Magnesium and Aluminum Sponsored by: The Minerals,...

148

Modeling of coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We applied coupled nonisothermal, multiphase fluid flow and geomechanical numerical modeling to study the coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in concrete-lined rock caverns. The paper focuses on CAES in lined caverns at relatively shallow depth (e.g., 100 m depth) in which a typical CAES operational pressure of 5 to 8 MPa is significantly higher than both ambient fluid pressure and in situ stress. We simulated a storage operation that included cyclic compression and decompression of air in the cavern, and investigated how pressure, temperature and stress evolve over several months of operation. We analyzed two different lining options, both with a 50 cm thick low permeability concrete lining, but in one case with an internal synthetic seal such as steel or rubber. For our simulated CAES system, the thermodynamic analysis showed that 96.7% of the energy injected during compression could be recovered during subsequent decompression, while 3.3% of the energy was lost by heat conduction to the surrounding media. Our geomechanical analysis showed that tensile effective stresses as high as 8 MPa could develop in the lining as a result of the air pressure exerted on the inner surface of the lining, whereas thermal stresses were relatively smaller and compressive. With the option of an internal synthetic seal, the maximum effective tensile stress was reduced from 8 to 5 MPa, but was still in substantial tension. We performed one simulation in which the tensile tangential stresses resulted in radial cracks and air leakage though the lining. This air leakage, however, was minor (about 0.16% of the air mass loss from one daily compression) in terms of CAES operational efficiency, and did not significantly impact the overall energy balance of the system. However, despite being minor in terms of energy balance, the air leakage resulted in a distinct pressure increase in the surrounding rock that could be quickly detected using pressure monitoring outside the concrete lining.

Rutqvist, J.; Kim, H. -M.; Ryu, D. -W.; Synn, J. -H.; Song, W. -K.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

ARM - SGP Rural Driving Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rural Driving Hazards Rural Driving Hazards SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Rural Driving Hazards The rural location of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site facilities requires that visitors travel on unpaved, dirt and gravel, roads. Visitors should be aware of the driving hazards this presents by taking the following precautions: Proceed cautiously: Many rural roads have unmarked and blind intersections. Slow down: Sanded and gravel raods can cause a vehicle to swerve. Maintain a safe following distance: During the dry season, vehicles

150

Upgrading coal plant damper drives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The replacement of damper drives on two coal-fired units at the James H. Miller Jr. electric generating plant by Intelligent Contrac electric rotary actuators is discussed. 2 figs.

Hood, N.R.; Simmons, K. [Alamaba Power (United States)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Developments in Molten Salt and Liquid-Salt-Cooled Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the last 5 years, there has been a rapid growth in interest in the use of high-temperature (700 to 1000 deg C) molten and liquid fluoride salts as coolants in nuclear systems. This renewed interest is a consequence of new applications for high-temperature heat and the development of new reactor concepts. Fluoride salts have melting points between 350 and 500 deg C; thus, they are of use only in high-temperature systems. Historically, steam cycles with temperature limits of {approx}550 deg C have been the only efficient method to convert heat to electricity. This limitation produced few incentives to develop high-temperature reactors for electricity production. However, recent advances in Brayton gas turbine technology now make it possible to convert higher-temperature heat efficiency into electricity on an industrial scale and thus have created the enabling technology for more efficient nuclear reactors. Simultaneously, there is a growing interest in using high-temperature nuclear heat for the production of hydrogen and shale oil. Five nuclear-related applications are being investigated: (1) liquid-salt heat-transport systems in hydrogen and shale oil production systems; (2) the advanced high-temperature reactor, which uses a graphite-matrix coated-particle fuel and a liquid salt coolant; (3) the liquid-salt-cooled fast reactor which uses metal-clad fuel and a liquid salt coolant; (4) the molten salt reactor, with the fuel dissolved in the molten salt coolant; and (5) fusion energy systems. The reasons for the new interest in liquid salt coolants, the reactor concepts, and the relevant programs are described. (author)

Forsberg, Charles W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6165 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Direct drive field actuator motors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive-drive field actuator motor is described which includes a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 62 figs.

Grahn, A.R.

1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

153

Mechanical drive for blood pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a highly efficient blood pump to be used as a replacement for a ventricle of the human heart to restore people disabled by heart disease. The mechanical drive of the present invention is designed to operate in conjunction with a thermoelectric converter power source. The mechanical drive system essentially converts the output of a rotary power into pulsatile motion so that the power demand from the thermoelectric converter remains essentially constant while the blood pump output is pulsed. (auth)

Bifano, N.J.; Pouchot, W.D.

1975-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

154

Low backlash direct drive actuator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low backlash direct drive actuator is described which comprises a motor such as a stepper motor having at least 200 steps per revolution; a two part hub assembly comprising a drive hub coaxially attached to the shaft of the motor and having a plurality of drive pins; a driven hub having a plurality of bores in one end thereof in alignment with the drive pins in the drive hub and a threaded shaft coaxially mounted in an opposite end of the driven hub; and a housing having a central bore therein into which are fitted the drive hub and driven hub, the housing having a motor mount on one end thereof to which is mounted the stepper motor, and a closed end portion with a threaded opening therein coaxial with the central bore in the housing and receiving therein the threaded shaft attached to the driven hub. Limit switches mounted to the housing cooperate with an enlarged lip on the driven hub to limit the lateral travel of the driven hub in the housing, which also acts to limit the lateral travel of the threaded shaft which functions as a lead screw.

Kuklo, Thomas C. (Oakland, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Extracting information from the molten salt database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molten salt technology is a catchall phrase that includes some very diverse ... nologies are linked by the general characteristics of molten salts that can function

156

Cone Drive Operations Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

worm gear technology. The company supplies azimuth and elevation drives for solar tracking applications. References Cone Drive Operations Inc1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

157

Electric vehicle drive train with contactor protection ...  

A drive train for an electric vehicle includes a traction battery, a power drive circuit, a main contactor for connecting and disconnecting the ...

158

Driving Green com | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Driving Green com Jump to: navigation, search Name Driving Green.com Place Melbourne, Florida Zip...

159

Scaling Laws for Reduced-Scale Tests of Pulse Jet Mixing Systems in Non-Newtonian Slurries: Mixing Cavern Behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) under construction at the Hanford Site will use pulse jet mixer (PJM) technology for mixing and gas retention control applications in tanks expected to contain waste slurries exhibiting a non-Newtonian rheology. This paper presents the results of theoretical and experimental studies undertaken to establish a methodology to perform reduced-scale mixing tests with PJM systems in non-Newtonian fluids. A theoretical model for mixing cavern formation from steady and pulsed jets is developed and compared with data from a single unsteady jet in a yield stress simulant. Dimensional analysis is used to identify the important dimensionless parameters affecting mixing performance in more complex systems. Scaling laws are proposed based on the modeling and dimensional analysis. Experimental validation of the scaling laws governing unsteady jet mixing in non-Newtonian fluids are also presented. Tests were conducted at three scales using two non-Newtonian simulants. The data were compared non-dimensionally, and the important scale laws were confirmed. The key dimensionless parameters were found to be the Strouhal number (which describes unsteady pulse jet mixer operation), the yield Reynolds number (which governs cavern formation due to non-Newtonian fluid behavior), and the viscous Reynolds number (which determines the flow regime and the degree of turbulence). The experimentally validated scaling laws provide the basis for reduced scale testing of prototypic WTP mixing systems. It is argued that mixing systems developed from reduced scale testing will produce conservative designs at full scale.

Meyer, Perry A.; Kurath, Dean E.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Barnes, Steven M.; Etchells, Arthur W.

2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

160

The design and testing of a molten salt steam generator for solar application  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design and testing of the Steam Generator Subsystem (SGS) for the Molten Salt Electric Experiment at Sandia Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The Molten Salt Electric Experiment (MSEE) has been established to demonstrate the feasibility of the molten salt central receiver concept. The experiment is capable of generating 0.75 megawatts of electric power from solar energy, with the capability of storing seven megawatt-hours of thermal energy. The steam generator subsystem transfers sensible heat from the solar-heated molten nitrate salt to produce steam to drive a conventional turbine. This paper discusses the design requirements dictated by the steam generator application and also reviews the process conditions. Details of each of the SGS components are given, featuring the aspects of the design and performance unique to the solar application. The paper concludes with a summary of the test results confirming the overall design of the subsystem.

Allman, W.A.; Smith, D.C.; Kakarala, C.R.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drive salt caverns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Distribution Drive | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Drive Drive Jump to: navigation, search Name Distribution Drive Place Dallas, Texas Zip 75205 Product Biodiesel fuel distributor. Coordinates 32.778155°, -96.795404° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.778155,"lon":-96.795404,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

162

Molten salt thermal energy storage systems: salt selection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program aimed at the development of a molten salt thermal energy storage system commenced in June 1976. This topical report describes Work performed under Task I: Salt Selection is described. A total of 31 inorganic salts and salt mixtures, including 9 alkali and alkaline earth carbonate mixtures, were evaluated for their suitability as heat-of-fusion thermal energy storage materials at temperatures of 850 to 1000/sup 0/F. Thermophysical properties, safety hazards, corrosion, and cost of these salts were compared on a common basis. We concluded that because alkali carbonate mixtures show high thermal conductivity, low volumetric expansion on melting, low corrosivity and good stability, they are attractive as heat-of-fusion storage materials in this temperature range. A 35 wt percent Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-65 wt percent K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ (50 mole percent Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-50 mole percent K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/) mixture was selected as a model system for further experimental work. This is a eutectoid mixture having a heat of fusion of 148 Btu/lb (82 cal/g) that forms an equimolar compound, LiKCO/sub 3/. The Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ mixture is intended to serve as a model system to define heat transfer characteristics, potential problems, and to provide ''first-cut'' engineering data required for the prototype system. The cost of a thermal energy storage system containing this mixture cannot be predicted until system characteristics are better defined. However, our comparison of different salts indicated that alkali and alkaline earth chlorides may be more attractive from a salt cost point of view. The long-term corrosion characteristics and the effects of volume change on melting for the chlorides should be investigated to determine their overall suitability as a heat-of-fusion storage medium.

Maru, H.C.; Dullea, J.F.; Huang, V.S.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Drive reconfiguration mechanism for tracked robotic vehicle  

SciTech Connect

Drive reconfiguration apparatus for changing the configuration of a drive unit with respect to a vehicle body may comprise a guide system associated with the vehicle body and the drive unit which allows the drive unit to rotate about a center of rotation that is located at about a point where the drive unit contacts the surface being traversed. An actuator mounted to the vehicle body and connected to the drive unit rotates the drive unit about the center of rotation between a first position and a second position.

Willis, W. David (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Hydromechanical transmission with hydrodynamic drive  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This transmission has a first planetary gear assembly having first input means connected to an input shaft, first output means, and first reaction means, and a second planetary gear assembly having second input means connected to the first input means, second output means, and second reaction means connected directly to the first reaction means by a reaction shaft. First clutch means, when engaged, connect the first output means to an output shaft in a high driving range. A hydrodynamic drive is used; for example, a torque converter, which may or may not have a stationary case, has a pump connected to the second output means, a stator grounded by an overrunning clutch to the case, and a turbine connected to an output member, and may be used in a starting phase. Alternatively, a fluid coupling or other type of hydrodynamic drive may be used. Second clutch means, when engaged, for connecting the output member to the output shaft in a low driving range. A variable-displacement hydraulic unit is mechanically connected to the input shaft, and a fixed-displacement hydraulic unit is mechanically connected to the reaction shaft. The hydraulic units are hydraulically connected together so that when one operates as a pump the other acts as a motor, and vice versa. Both clutch means are connected to the output shaft through a forward-reverse shift arrangement. It is possible to lock out the torque converter after the starting phase is over.

Orshansky, Jr., deceased, Elias (LATE OF San Francisco, CA); Weseloh, William E. (San Diego, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Water drives peptide conformational transitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transitions between metastable conformations of a dipeptide are investigated using classical molecular dynamics simulation with explicit water molecules. The distribution of the surrounding water at different moments before the transitions and the dynamical correlations of water with the peptide's configurational motions indicate that water is the main driving force of the conformational changes.

Nerukh, Dmitry

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Anomalous-viscosity current drive  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for maintaining a steady-state current for magnetically confining the plasma in a toroidal magnetic confinement device using anomalous viscosity current drive. A second aspect of this invention relates to an apparatus and method for the start-up of a magnetically confined toroidal plasma.

Stix, T.H.; Ono, M.

1986-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

167

Freshwater fish in salt water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Freshwater fish in salt water Freshwater fish in salt water Name: Shannon Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What would actually happen if a fresh water fish had to live in salt water? Replies: For most fish, they would die. But some, like eels and salmon, can move freely between the two at certain stages of their lives. To do this they have special mechanisms of excretion and absorption of salt and water. --ProfBill If you put a freshwater fish into saltwater, most fish would lose weight (from losing water from its body) and eventually die. Approximately 2% of all 21000 species of fish actually move from freshwater to saltwater or from salt to fresh at some point in their lives, the move would kill any other fish. But even with these special varieties of fish, the move must be gradual so their bodies can adjust, or they too, will die from the change. If you want to learn more about why the freshwater fish will lose water, (or why a saltwater fish in freshwater would gain water), look up the words "diffusion" and "osmosis"

168

US DRIVE Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle Efficiency and Energy Sustainability Partnership Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partnership Plan Partnership Plan March 2013 U.S. DRIVE Partnership Plan Table of Contents Foreword ....................................................................................................................................................... 2 Definition ...................................................................................................................................................... 3 Partners ......................................................................................................................................................... 3 U.S. DRIVE Vision ........................................................................................................................................... 3 U.S. DRIVE Mission ........................................................................................................................................ 4

169

Why Sequence Great Salt Lake?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Great Salt Lake? Great Salt Lake? On average, the Great Salt Lake is four times saltier than the ocean and also has heavy metals, high concentrations of sulfur and petroleum seeps. In spite of all this, the lake is the saltiest body of water to support life. The lake hosts brine shrimp, algae and a diverse array of microbes, not to mention the roughly 5 million birds that migrate there annually. The secret to these microbes' ability to survive under such harsh conditions might be revealed in their genes. Researchers expect the genetic data will provide insight into how the microorganisms tolerate pollutants such as sulfur and detoxify pollutants such as sulfur and heavy metals like mercury. The information could then be used to develop bioremediation techniques. Researchers also expect that sequencing microorganisms sampled

170

Magnetically Coupled Adjustable Speed Drive Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Adjustable speed drive (ASD) technologies have the ability to precisely control motor sytems output and produce a numbr of benefits including energy and demand savings. This report examines the performance and cost effectiveness of a specific class of ASDs called magnetically-coupled adjustable speed drives (MC-ASD) which use the strength of a magnetic field to control the amount of torque transferred between motor and drive shaft. The MagnaDrive Adjustable Speed Coupling System uses fixed rare-earth magnets and varies the distance between rotating plates in the assembly. the PAYBACK Variable Speed Drive uses an electromagnet to control the speed of the drive

Chvala, William D.; Winiarski, David W.

2002-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

171

Salt Lake Community College | .EDUconnections  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SLCC Partners with DOE's Rocky Mountain Solar Training Program This program is a joint partnership between DOE's Solar Energy Technogies Program, Salt Lake Community College, Solar Energy International, and the Utah Solar Energy Association that works to accelerate use of solar electric technologies, training and facilities at community and technical college solar training programs within a 15 western United States region. DOE Solar Instructor Training Network Salt Lake City, Utah DOE Applauds SLCC's Science and Technical Programs Architectural Technology Biology Biotechnology Biomanufacturing Chemistry Computer Science Electric Sector Training Energy Management Engineering Geographic Information Sciences Geosciences InnovaBio Manufacturing & Mechanical Engineering Technology

172

Production of chlorine from chloride salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for converting chloride salts and sulfuric acid to sulfate salts and elemental chlorine is disclosed. A chloride salt and sulfuric acid are combined in a furnace where they react to produce a sulfate salt and hydrogen chloride. Hydrogen chloride from the furnace contacts a molten salt mixture containing an oxygen compound of vanadium, an alkali metal sulfate and an alkali metal pyrosulfate to recover elemental chlorine. In the absence of an oxygen-bearing gas during the contacting, the vanadium is reduced, but is regenerated to its active higher valence state by separately contacting the molten salt mixture with an oxygen-bearing gas.

Rohrmann, Charles A. (Kennewick, WA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

HybriDrive Propulsion System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HybriDrive HybriDrive ® Propulsion System Cleaner, smarter power for transit DOE/FTA Fuel Cell Research Priorities Workshop Washington, DC 7 June 2010 Bart W. Mancini Sr. Principal Systems Engineer BAE Systems Ph: 607-770-4103 bart.mancini@baesystems.com 2 Overview 3 * BAE Systems FC Experience / Deployments * Technology gaps/barriers to full commercialization of fuel cell buses * Well-to-wheels energy efficiency and emissions * Cost metrics * Bus integration issues * Fuel cell bus R&D needs * Future plans BAE Systems FC Experience / Deployments 4 * 1998 - Georgetown/FTA/DOE Fuel Cell Bus #1 (still serviceable) * UTC 100 kW Phosphoric Acid FC using on-board Methanol Reformate, Hybrid propulsion & Electric accessories * 2000 - Georgetown/FTA/DOE Fuel Cell Bus #2 (retired) *

174

Granular gases under extreme driving  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study inelastic gases in two dimensions using event-driven molecular dynamics simulations. Our focus is the nature of the stationary state attained by rare injection of large amounts of energy to balance the dissipation due to collisions. We find that under such extreme driving, with the injection rate much smaller than the collision rate, the velocity distribution has a power-law high energy tail. The numerically measured exponent characterizing this tail is in excellent agreement with predictions of kinetic theory over a wide range of system parameters. We conclude that driving by rare but powerful energy injection leads to a well-mixed gas and constitutes an alternative mechanism for agitating granular matter. In this distinct nonequilibrium steady-state, energy cascades from large to small scales. Our simulations also show that when the injection rate is comparable with the collision rate, the velocity distribution has a stretched exponential tail.

W. Kang; J. Machta; E. Ben-Naim

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

175

BNL Blood Drives: Iron-rich foods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BNL Blood Drives: Iron-Rich Foods Blood Drive Home Seafood: Fish (cod, sardines, tuna, clams, oysters, shrimp) Poultry: Chicken, eggs, yolk Lean Red Meats: Beef, lamb, veal, pork,...

176

Cathode for molten salt batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A molten salt electrochemical system for battery applications comprises tetravalent sulfur as the active cathode material with a molten chloroaluminate solvent comprising a mixture of AlCl.sub.3 and MCl having a molar ratio of AlCl.sub.3 /MCl from greater than 50.0/50.0 to 80/20.

Mamantov, Gleb (Knoxville, TN); Marassi, Roberto (Camerino, IT)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Cleanup of plutonium oxide reduction black salts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work describes pyrochemical processes employed to convert direc oxide reduction (DOR) black salts into discardable white salt and plutonium metal. The DOR process utilizes calcium metal as the reductant in a molten calcium chloride solvent salt to convert plutonium oxide to plutonium metal. An insoluble plutonium-rich dispersion called black salt sometimes forms between the metal phase and the salt phase. Black salts accumulated for processing were treated by one of two methods. One method utilized a scrub alloy of 70 wt % magnesium/30 wt % zinc. The other method utilized a pool of plutonium metal to agglomerate the metal phase. The two processes were similar in that calcium metal reductant and calcium chloride solvent salt were used in both cases. Four runs were performed by each method, and each method produced greater than 93% conversion of the black salt.

Giebel, R.E.; Wing, R.O.

1986-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

178

Dysprosium Extraction Using Molten Salt Electrolysis Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AlCl3 was used as a chlorinating agent in order to enable an efficient dissolution of metal in the molten salt phase in the salt bath. The metal chloride which is...

179

Small Businesses Helping Drive Economy: Clean Energy, Clean Sites...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Businesses Helping Drive Economy: Clean Energy, Clean Sites Small Businesses Helping Drive Economy: Clean Energy, Clean Sites A memo on small businesses helping drive the...

180

Adjustable Speed Drive Industrial Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric motors are significant users of electricity in the United States. Approximately 66 percent of the total electricity in the U.S. is used by electric motors. Electronic adjustable speed drives (ASDs) can save energy, lower maintenance cost and improve product quality. By providing a variable frequency output to ac motors the speed of the motors can be controlled and matched to the process requirements. The benefits that may be derived from using ASDs are described and the type of ASDs, applications and specific case studies of ASD installations are also discussed.

Poole, J. N.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drive salt caverns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Conservation Education, Other Public Initiatives Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Conservation Education,...

182

Analysis of the Black-Capped Vireo habitat at Kickapoo Caverns State Park, Texas using a Geographic Information System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Geographic Information System (GIS) database was developed for Y,-ickapoo Cavern State Park, Tx. The digital database was used to characterize the Black-Capped Vireo ( Vireo Attricapillus Woodhouse) breeding habitat, and to produce a potential habitat map for the area. Relationships between Black-Capped Vireo (BCV) locations and topographic variables (slope and aspect) were investigated. When a chi-square test led to the rejection of a hypothesis inferring that a set of observations (territories) do not follow an expected occurrence pattern, a Bonferroni statistic test was used to evaluate preference or avoidance of a given slope or aspect category. In the park, BCV habitat is located on gentle slopes (012%); however, the analysis did not reveal a strong association between BCV location and slope exposure (aspect). For six-sub-landscapes, with different percentages of BCV suitable habitat, a modified fractal dimension was computed inside the GIS. This fractal dimension calculation describes diversity of a landscape, accounting for shape, patch juxtaposition, and eveness. GIS analysis helped in the proposition of camping sites and hiking trails to minimize the impact on BCV habitat and others preserved areas in the park.

Castiaux, Nathalie

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

DOE Drives Big Data Push  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Volume 9 Issue 2 2 Volume 9 Issue 2 From YAGS to Planetary Biology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DOE Drives Big Data Push . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Sweating Small Scale Genomics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 The Future of the DOE JGI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Save the Date for Meeting 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 also in this issue With a record 488 genomics researchers and bioinformaticians sitting in the Marriott Walnut Creek ballroom, New York Times science writer Carl Zimmer opened the DOE Joint Genome Institute's 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 20, 2012. Sharing his thoughts about being "On the Genome Beat," he informed the audience that he was worn down by seeing news about scientists successfully sequencing yet another genome sequence, and that "maybe some genomes shouldn't be written about." Zimmer's words engaged the audience in a discussion that

184

Current Drive in Recombining Plasma  

SciTech Connect

The Langevin equations describing the average collisional dynamics of suprathermal particles in nonstationary plasma remarkably admit an exact analytical solution in the case of recombining plasma. The current density produced by arbitrary particle fluxes is derived including the effect of charge recombination. Since recombination has the effect of lowering the charge density of the plasma, thus reducing the charged particle collisional frequencies, the evolution of the current density can be modified substantially compared to plasma with fixed charge density. The current drive efficiency is derived and optimized for discrete and continuous pulses of current, leading to the discovery of a nonzero "residual" current density that persists indefinitely under certain conditions, a feature not present in stationary plasmas.

P.F. Schmit and N.J. Fisch

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Current drive in recombining plasma  

SciTech Connect

The Langevin equations describing the average collisional dynamics of suprathermal particles in nonstationary plasma remarkably admit an exact analytical solution in the case of recombining plasma. The current density produced by arbitrary particle fluxes is derived including the influence of charge recombination. Since recombination has the effect of lowering the charge density of the plasma, thus reducing the charged particle collisional frequencies, the evolution of the current density can be modified substantially compared to plasma with fixed charge density. The current drive efficiency is derived and optimized for discrete and continuous pulses of current, leading to the discovery of a nonzero ''residual'' current density that persists indefinitely under certain conditions, a feature not present in stationary plasmas.

Schmit, P. F.; Fisch, N. J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Vehicle Technologies Office: U.S. DRIVE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. DRIVE U.S. DRIVE Logo for U.S. DRIVE - Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability. U.S. DRIVE stands for Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability. It is a non-binding and voluntary government-industry partnership focused on advanced automotive and related infrastructure technology research and development (R&D). Specifically, the Partnership is a forum for pre-competitive technical information exchange among partners to discuss R&D needs, develop joint goals and technology roadmaps, and evaluate R&D progress for a broad range of technical areas. By providing a framework for frequent and regular interaction among technical experts in a common area of expertise, the Partnership -

187

Electric vehicle drive train with contactor protection  

SciTech Connect

A drive train for an electric vehicle includes a traction battery, a power drive circuit, a main contactor for connecting and disconnecting the traction battery and the power drive circuit, a voltage detector across contacts of the main contactor, and a controller for controlling the main contactor to prevent movement of its contacts to the closed position when the voltage across the contacts exceeds a predetermined threshold, to thereby protect the contacts of the contactor. The power drive circuit includes an electric traction motor and a DC-to-AC inverter with a capacitive input filter. The controller also inhibits the power drive circuit from driving the motor and thereby discharging the input capacitor if the contacts are inadvertently opened during motoring. A precharging contactor is controlled to charge the input filter capacitor prior to closing the main contactor to further protect the contacts of the main contactor.

Konrad, Charles E. (Roanoke, VA); Benson, Ralph A. (Roanoke, VA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Electric vehicle drive train with contactor protection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drive train for an electric vehicle includes a traction battery, a power drive circuit, a main contactor for connecting and disconnecting the traction battery and the power drive circuit, a voltage detector across contacts of the main contactor, and a controller for controlling the main contactor to prevent movement of its contacts to the closed position when the voltage across the contacts exceeds a predetermined threshold, to thereby protect the contacts of the contactor. The power drive circuit includes an electric traction motor and a DC-to-AC inverter with a capacitive input filter. The controller also inhibits the power drive circuit from driving the motor and thereby discharging the input capacitor if the contacts are inadvertently opened during motoring. A precharging contactor is controlled to charge the input filter capacitor prior to closing the main contactor to further protect the contacts of the main contactor. 3 figures.

Konrad, C.E.; Benson, R.A.

1994-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

189

Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies January 16, 2011 Maryanne Fuller (MF): Hi there. This is Maryanne Fuller from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory....

190

Wind Turbine Design Innovations Drive Industry Transformation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Turbine Design Innovations Drive Industry Transformation For more than 20 years, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has helped GE and its predecessors achieve...

191

Electric-Drive Vehicle Basics (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Describes the basics of electric-drive vehicles, including hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, all-electric vehicles, and the various charging options.

Not Available

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Electric Drive Vehicles and Their Infrastructure Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Cities Webinar - Electric Drive Vehicles and Their Infrastructure Issues (March 2010) Jim Francfort and Don Karner Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity March 24, 2010 This...

193

Fuel Economy: What Drives Consumer Choice?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Car Buyers and Fuel Economy? Energy Policy, vol. 35, 2007.Fuel Economy: What Drives Consumer Choice? BY TOMyou think about fuel economy? Rather, we listened closely

Turrentine, Tom; Kurani, Kenneth S; Heffner, Reid R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Fuel Economy: What Drives Consumer Choice?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Car Buyers and Fuel Economy? Energy Policy, vol. 35, 2007.Fuel Economy: What Drives Consumer Choice? BY TOMyou think about fuel economy? Rather, we listened closely

Turrentine, Tom; Kurani, Kenneth; Heffner, Rusty

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

High-megawatt Electric Drive Motors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Page 2. ABB BU Machines April 10, 2009 | Slide 2 High-megawatt Electric Drive Motors ... motor concept ... A selection of compressor motors >30MW. ...

2012-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

196

The Salt Defense Disposal Investigations (SDDI)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Salt Defense Disposal Investigations (SDDI) Salt Defense Disposal Investigations (SDDI) will utilize a newly mined Underground Research Lab (URL) in WIPP to perform a cost effective, proof-of-principle field test of the emplacement of heat-generating radioactive waste and validate modeling efforts. The goals of the SDDI Thermal Test are to: * Demonstrate a proof-of-principle concept for in-drift disposal in salt. * Investigate, in a specific emplacement concept, the response of the salt to heat. * Develop a full-scale response for run-of- mine (ROM) salt. * Develop a validated coupled process model for disposal of heat-generating wastes in salt. * Evaluate the environmental conditions of the

197

Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) additional geologic site characterization studies, Bayou Choctaw salt dome, Louisiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report revises and updates the geologic site characterization report that was published in 1980. Revised structure maps and sections show interpretative differences in the dome shape and caprock structural contours, especially a major east-west trending shear zone, not mapped in the 1980 report. Excessive gas influx in Caverns 18 and 20 may be associated with this shear zone. Subsidence values at Bayou Choctaw are among the lowest in the SPR system, averaging only about 10 mm/yr but measurement and interpretation issues persist, as observed values often approximate measurement accuracy. Periodic, temporary flooding is a continuing concern because of the low site elevation (less than 10 ft), and this may intensify as future subsidence lowers the surface even further. Cavern 4 was re-sonared in 1992 and the profiles suggest that significant change has not occurred since 1980, thereby reducing the uncertainty of possible overburden collapse -- as occurred at Cavern 7 in 1954. Other potential integrity issues persist, such as the proximity of Cavern 20 to the dome edge, and the narrow web separating Caverns 15 and 17. Injection wells have been used for the disposal of brine but have been only marginally effective thus far; recompletions into more permeable lower Pleistocene gravels may be a practical way of increasing injection capacity and brinefield efficiency. Cavern storage space is limited on this already crowded dome, but 15 MMBBL could be gained by enlarging Cavern 19 and by constructing a new cavern beneath and slightly north of abandoned Cavern 13. Environmental issues center on the low site elevation: the backswamp environment combined with the potential for periodic flooding create conditions that will require continuing surveillance.

Neal, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Magorian, T.R. [Magorian (Thomas R.), Amherst, NY (United States); Byrne, K.O.; Denzler, S. [Acres International Corp., Amherst, NY (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

SEPARATION OF INORGANIC SALTS FROM ORGANIC SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for recovering the nitrates of uranium and plutonium from solution in oxygen-containing organic solvents such as ketones or ethers. The solution of such salts dissolved in an oxygen-containing organic compound is contacted with an ion exchange resin whereby sorption of the entire salt on the resin takes place and then the salt-depleted liquid and the resin are separated from each other. The reaction seems to be based on an anion formation of the entire salt by complexing with the anion of the resin. Strong base or quaternary ammonium type resins can be used successfully in this process.

Katzin, L.I.; Sullivan, J.C.

1958-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

199

Electrolytic orthoborate salts for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Orthoborate salts suitable for use as electrolytes in lithium batteries and methods for making the electrolyte salts are provided. The electrolytic salts have one of the formulae (I). In this formula anionic orthoborate groups are capped with two bidentate chelating groups, Y1 and Y2. Certain preferred chelating groups are dibasic acid residues, most preferably oxalyl, malonyl and succinyl, disulfonic acid residues, sulfoacetic acid residues and halo-substituted alkylenes. The salts are soluble in non-aqueous solvents and polymeric gels and are useful components of lithium batteries in electrochemical devices.

Angell, Charles Austen (Mesa, AZ); Xu, Wu (Tempe, AZ)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Results of Salt Batch Qualification Testing  

Reviews the past campaigns of salt disposition (Macrobatch 1 and 2). ... Macrobatch 2 processed a total volume of 730,000 gallons from February ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drive salt caverns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Applications of molten salts in plutonium processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plutonium is efficiently recovered from scrap at Los Alamos by a series of chemical reactions and separations conducted at temperatures ranging from 700 to 900/sup 0/C. These processes usually employ a molten salt or salt eutectic as a heat sink and/or reaction medium. Salts for these operations were selected early in the development cycle. The selection criteria are being reevaluated. In this article we describe the processes now in use at Los Alamos and our studies of alternate salts and eutectics.

Bowersox, D.F.; Christensen, D.C.; Williams, J.D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Molten salt safety study. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The considerations concerning safety in using molten salt (40% potassium nitrate, 60% sodium nitrate) in a solar central receiver plant are addressed. The considerations are of a general nature and do not cover any details of equipment or plant operation. The study includes salt chemical reaction, experiments with molten salt, dry storage and handling constraints, and includes data from the National Fire Protection Association. The contents of this report were evaluated by two utility companies and they concluded that no major safety problems exist in using a molten salt solar system.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Metal salts of alkyl catechol dithiophosphoric acids and oil compositions containing the salts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal salts of alkyl catechol esters of dithiophosphoric acid suitable as additives in oil compositions are disclosed in this patent. Oil compositions containing the salts of such esters show improved extreme pressure/anti-wear and anit-oxidant properties.

Yamaguchi, E.S.; Liston, T.V.

1988-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

204

Noncentrosymmetric salt inclusion oxides: Role of salt lattices and counter ions in bulk polarity  

SciTech Connect

The synthesis and structural features of a newly emerged class of salt-inclusion solids (SISs) are reviewed. The descriptive chemistry with respect to the role of ionic salt and its correlation with bulk noncentrosymmetricity and polarity of the covalent oxide lattice in question is discussed by means of structure analysis. These unprecedented discoveries have opened doors to novel materials synthesis via the utilities of salt-inclusion chemistry (SIC) that are otherwise known as the molten-salt approach. The result of these investigations prove that the bulk acentricity, or cancellation of which, can be accounted for from the perspective of ionic and/or salt lattices. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis and structure of newly emerged salt-inclusion solids are reviewed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salt lattice and its symmetry correlation with polar framework are discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Preservation of acentricity is accounted for from the perspective of ionic and salt lattices.

West, J. Palmer [Department of Chemistry, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0973 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0973 (United States); Hwu, Shiou-Jyh, E-mail: shwu@clemson.edu [Department of Chemistry, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0973 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0973 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Control rod drive hydraulic system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydraulic system for a control rod drive (CRD) includes a variable output-pressure CR pump operable in a charging mode for providing pressurized fluid at a charging pressure, and in a normal mode for providing the pressurized fluid at a purge pressure, less than the charging pressure. Charging and purge lines are disposed in parallel flow between the CRD pump and the CRD. A hydraulic control unit is disposed in flow communication in the charging line and includes a scram accumulator. An isolation valve is provided in the charging line between the CRD pump and the scram accumulator. A controller is operatively connected to the CRD pump and the isolation valve and is effective for opening the isolation valve and operating the CRD pump in a charging mode for charging the scram accumulator, and closing the isolation valve and operating the CRD pump in a normal mode for providing to the CRD through the purge line the pressurized fluid at a purge pressure lower than the charging pressure.

Ose, Richard A. (San Jose, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

An Assessment of High Performance AC Motor Drives Versus DC Motor Drives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In today's rapidly changing market place, drive users are applying AC and DC drives in applications that require more demanding speed and torque performance. Properly matching a drive's rating and unit characteristics to an application are two very effective ways of managing unit cost and cost reduction.

1998-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

207

DRIVE Analysis Tool Generates Custom Vehicle Drive Cycles Based on Real-World Data (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory describes the Drive-Cycle Rapid Investigation, Visualization, and Evaluation (DRIVE) analysis tool, which uses GPS and controller area network data to characterize vehicle operation and produce custom vehicle drive cycles, analyzing thousands of hours of data in a matter of minutes.

Not Available

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

UCDavis University of California Learning By Driving  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% 29% 0% 2% 10% 37% 39% 71% Solar Wind Hydro Nuclear Natural Gas Coal The electricity for charging fun with it. "I love the regenerative braking. In fact, I miss it when I drive my other cars." ­ Household 8 "It is like driving a slot car. It is exciting; it is as much fun as accelerating" ­ Survey

California at Davis, University of

209

Electric top drives gain wide industry acceptance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since its introduction, the top drive drilling system has gained acceptance as a productive and safe method for drilling oil and gas wells. Originally, the system was used mostly for offshore and higher cost land drilling, and it had to be installed as a permanent installation because of its enormous weight and size. Essentially, a top drive replaces the kelly and rotary table as the means of rotating drillpipe on oil, gas and geothermal rigs and is considered to be 15% to 40% more efficient than a kelly drive. Top drive systems allow the operator to drill and maintain directional orientation for triple stands and provide tripping efficiency because of the ability to ream and circulate with triple stands, to reduce the risk of stuck pipe or lost wells, and to improve well control and pipe handling safety. The paper describes electric top drives with DC motors, top drives with AC motors, top drives with permanent magnet motors, and top drives with permanent magnet brushless synchronous motors.

Riahi, M.L.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Gas Mileage Tips - Driving More Efficiently  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Driving More Efficiently Driving More Efficiently Personalize Fuel Prices Select the fuel type and enter your fuel price to personalize savings estimates. Regular Midgrade Premium Diesel E85 CNG LPG $ 3.33 /gal Save My Prices Use Default Prices Click "Save My Prices" to apply your prices to other pages, or click "Use Default Prices" use national average prices. Drive Sensibly frustrated driver Aggressive driving (speeding, rapid acceleration and braking) wastes gas. It can lower your gas mileage by 33% at highway speeds and by 5% around town. Sensible driving is also safer for you and others, so you may save more than gas money. Fuel Economy Benefit: 5%-33% Equivalent Gasoline Savings: $0.17-$1.10/gallon Observe the Speed Limit (New Information) Graph showing MPG decreases rapidly at speeds above 50 mph

211

Electrifying Your Drive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electrifying Your Drive Electrifying Your Drive Electrifying Your Drive April 27, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program For anyone who grew up watching The Jetsons (or Back to the Future, depending on your generation), the "Car of the Future!" flew through the skies with the greatest of ease. Although most of us have given up on our hopes of a flying car, anything beyond the internal combustion engine has seemed hopelessly out of reach until recently. However, with several manufacturers planning on producing plug-in and all-electric vehicles, the Car of the Future will be available soon! But before you put down a deposit, it's helpful to understand the different types of electric drive technologies. The most basic form of electric drive

212

Electrifying Your Drive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electrifying Your Drive Electrifying Your Drive Electrifying Your Drive April 27, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program For anyone who grew up watching The Jetsons (or Back to the Future, depending on your generation), the "Car of the Future!" flew through the skies with the greatest of ease. Although most of us have given up on our hopes of a flying car, anything beyond the internal combustion engine has seemed hopelessly out of reach until recently. However, with several manufacturers planning on producing plug-in and all-electric vehicles, the Car of the Future will be available soon! But before you put down a deposit, it's helpful to understand the different types of electric drive technologies. The most basic form of electric drive

213

Exploring the concept of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns at shallow depth: A modeling study of air tightness and energy balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a numerical modeling study of coupled thermodynamic, multiphase fluid flow and heat transport associated with underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns. Specifically, we explored the concept of using concrete lined caverns at a relatively shallow depth for which constructing and operational costs may be reduced if air tightness and stability can be assured. Our analysis showed that the key parameter to assure long-term air tightness in such a system was the permeability of both the concrete lining and the surrounding rock. The analysis also indicated that a concrete lining with a permeability of less than 110{sup -18} m{sup 2} would result in an acceptable air leakage rate of less than 1%, with the operational pressure range between 5 and 8 MPa at a depth of 100 m. It was further noted that capillary retention properties and the initial liquid saturation of the lining were very important. Indeed, air leakage could be effectively prevented when the air-entry pressure of the concrete lining is higher than the operational air pressure and when the lining is kept moist at a relatively high liquid saturation. Our subsequent energy-balance analysis demonstrated that the energy loss for a daily compression and decompression cycle is governed by the air-pressure loss, as well as heat loss by conduction to the concrete liner and surrounding rock. For a sufficiently tight system, i.e., for a concrete permeability off less than 110{sup -18} m{sup 2}, heat loss by heat conduction tends to become proportionally more important. However, the energy loss by heat conduction can be minimized by keeping the air-injection temperature of compressed air closer to the ambient temperature of the underground storage cavern. In such a case, almost all the heat loss during compression is gained back during subsequent decompression. Finally, our numerical simulation study showed that CAES in shallow rock caverns is feasible from a leakage and energy efficiency viewpoint. Our numerical approach and energy analysis will next be applied in designing and evaluating the performance of a planned full-scale pilot test of the proposed underground CAES concept.

Kim, H.-M.; Rutqvist, J.; Ryu, D.-W.; Choi, B.-H.; Sunwoo, C.; Song, W.-K.

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Metal salt catalysts for enhancing hydrogen spillover  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for hydrogen storage includes a receptor, a hydrogen dissociating metal doped on the receptor, and a metal salt doped on the receptor. The hydrogen dissociating metal is configured to spill over hydrogen to the receptor, and the metal salt is configured to increase a rate of the spill over of the hydrogen to the receptor.

Yang, Ralph T; Wang, Yuhe

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

215

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Efficient Driving Behaviors to Conserve Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Efficient Driving Efficient Driving Behaviors to Conserve Fuel to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Efficient Driving Behaviors to Conserve Fuel on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Efficient Driving Behaviors to Conserve Fuel on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Efficient Driving Behaviors to Conserve Fuel on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Efficient Driving Behaviors to Conserve Fuel on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Efficient Driving Behaviors to Conserve Fuel on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Efficient Driving Behaviors to Conserve Fuel on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Parts & Equipment Maintenance Driving Behavior Management Strategies

216

Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Abstract No abstract available. Author Bureau of Land Management Published U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada, 09/14/2009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Citation Bureau of Land Management. Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) [Internet]. 09/14/2009. Carson City, NV. U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management,

217

SEPARATION OF METAL SALTS BY ADSORPTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It has been found that certain metal salts, particularly the halides of iron, cobalt, nickel, and the actinide metals, arc readily absorbed on aluminum oxide, while certain other salts, particularly rare earth metal halides, are not so absorbed. Use is made of this discovery to separate uranium from the rare earths. The metal salts are first dissolved in a molten mixture of alkali metal nitrates, e.g., the eutectic mixture of lithium nitrate and potassium nitrate, and then the molten salt solution is contacted with alumina, either by slurrying or by passing the salt solution through an absorption tower. The process is particularly valuable for the separation of actinides from lanthanum-group rare earths.

Gruen, D.M.

1959-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

218

Evaluation of Salt Coolants for Reactor Applications  

SciTech Connect

Molten fluorides were initially developed for use in the nuclear industry as the high-temperature fluid fuel for the Molten Salt Reactor (MSR). The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy is exploring the use of molten salts as primary and secondary coolants in a new generation of solid-fueled, thermal-spectrum, hightemperature reactors. This paper provides a review of relevant properties for use in evaluation and ranking of salt coolants for high-temperature reactors. Nuclear, physical, and chemical properties were reviewed, and metrics for evaluation are recommended. Chemical properties of the salt were examined to identify factors that affect materials compatibility (i.e., corrosion). Some preliminary consideration of economic factors for the candidate salts is also presented.

Williams, David F [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Control rod drive for reactor shutdown  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A means for rapidly shutting down or scramming a nuclear reactor, such as a liquid metal-cooled fast breeder reactor, and serves as a backup to the primary shutdown system. The control rod drive consists basically of an in-core assembly, a drive shaft and seal assembly, and a control drive mechanism. The control rod is driven into the core region of the reactor by gravity and hydraulic pressure forces supplied by the reactor coolant, thus assuring that common mode failures will not interfere with or prohibit scramming the reactor when necessary.

McKeehan, Ernest R. (Los Gatos, CA); Shawver, Bruce M. (San Jose, CA); Schiro, Donald J. (San Jose, CA); Taft, William E. (Los Gatos, CA)

1976-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

220

Modeling of Porous Electrodes in Molten-Salt Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Porous Electrodes in Molten-Salt Systems^ John Newmanon High-Temperature Molten Salt B a t - teries, Argonneby the modeling of molten-salt cells, including some

Newman, John

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drive salt caverns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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221

Direct and Indirect Shortwave Radiative Effects of Sea Salt Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sea salt aerosols play a dual role in affecting the atmospheric radiative balance. Directly, sea salt particles scatter the incoming solar radiation and absorb the outgoing terrestrial radiation. By acting as cloud condensation nuclei, sea salt ...

Tarek Ayash; Sunling Gong; Charles Q. Jia

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Image fusion for a nighttime driving display  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An investigation into image fusion for a nighttime driving display application was performed. Most of the image fusion techniques being investigated in this application were developed for other purposes. When comparing the ...

Herrington, William Frederick

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Driving Demand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

even know they have. This section explains how you can use effective marketing to drive demand for energy upgrades in your community. Following the lead of many Better Buildings...

224

Direct drive wind turbine - Energy Innovation Portal  

A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The ...

225

Consider Steam Turbine Drives for Rotating Equipment  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on steam turbine drives for rotating equipment provides how-to advice for improving the system using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Driving Efficiencies Track | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Driving Efficiencies Track Driving Efficiencies Track Driving Efficiencies Track Driving Efficiencies Track Tuesday April 17, 2012 From E-Mail to "The Stream" by Don Burke Taking Records Inventory Into the 21st Century by Lorie A. Robb Engineering and Operations Control: Embrace the Culture by Cheryl Bolen IT Project Management Framework by Denise Hill Wednesday April 18, 2012 Records Warehouse Operations and Records Storage for External Customers by Karen Hatch Preservation of Long-Term Temporary Records by Jeanie Gueretta Mobile Initiatives Effecting Change at Hanford by Don Stewart DOE's CIO's EWA by Sarah Gamage, Don Schade and Alan Andon Green IT 2012: Sustainable Electronics by Edwin Luevanos and Jeff Eagan Thursday April 19, 2012 Document Management and Control System by Melissa Ruth

227

Geothermometry At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Area...

228

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Tatum Salt Dome Test Site...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Tatum Salt Dome Test Site - MS 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Tatum Salt Dome Test Site (MS.01) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site...

229

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes...

230

Notice of Availability of Section 3116 Determination for Salt...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Notice of Availability of Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site Notice of Availability of Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste Disposal...

231

Molten Salt Breeder Reactors Academia Sinica, ITRI, NTHU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power 4/8/12 Frank H. Shu Gen IV MSBR/LFTR Liquid fuel (molten salt) Molten salt coolant (unpopulated

Wang, Ming-Jye

232

Corrosion of High Temperature Alloys in Molten Salts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluoride and chloride salts are among the candidates for this application. However, materials corrosion is an issue in these molten salts, particularly in molten...

233

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility - August 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility - August 2013 August 2013 Review...

234

Frequency modulation drive for a piezoelectric motor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A piezoelectric motor has peak performance at a specific frequency f.sub.1 that may vary over a range of frequencies. A drive system is disclosed for operating such a motor at peak performance without feedback. The drive system consists of the motor and an ac source connected to power the motor, the ac source repeatedly generating a frequency over a range from f.sub.1 -.DELTA.x to f.sub.1 +.DELTA.y.

Mittas, Anthony (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Energy Department Announces $60 Million to Drive Affordable,...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

60 Million to Drive Affordable, Efficient Solar Power Energy Department Announces 60 Million to Drive Affordable, Efficient Solar Power October 22, 2013 - 11:45am Addthis News...

236

Energy Department Announces $60 Million to Drive Affordable,...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Million to Drive Affordable, Efficient Solar Power Energy Department Announces 60 Million to Drive Affordable, Efficient Solar Power October 22, 2013 - 11:45am Addthis News...

237

Microsoft Word - Compare Driving Styles_ ETEC Hymotion Prius...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Driving intensity is the energy at the wheels used for propulsion. Recaptured energy through regenerative braking is not considered when calculating driving intensity....

238

The Transportation Leapfrog: Using Smart Phones to Collect Driving...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Leapfrog: Using Smart Phones to Collect Driving Data and Model Fuel Economy in India Title The Transportation Leapfrog: Using Smart Phones to Collect Driving Data...

239

PHEV and Other Electric Drive Testing Results and Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity PHEV and Other Electric Drive Testing Results and Resources Jim Francfort Electric Drive Session Alternative Fuels & Vehicles Las Vegas, Nevada -...

240

Energy Department Invests to Drive Down Costs of Carbon Capture...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Drive Down Costs of Carbon Capture, Support Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Pollution Energy Department Invests to Drive Down Costs of Carbon Capture, Support Reductions in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drive salt caverns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Secretary Moniz Announces New Biofuels Projects to Drive Cost...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announces New Biofuels Projects to Drive Cost Reductions, Technological Breakthroughs Secretary Moniz Announces New Biofuels Projects to Drive Cost Reductions, Technological...

242

Category:Salt Lake City, UT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UT UT Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Salt Lake City, UT" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVFullServiceRestauran... 57 KB SVHospital Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVHospital Salt Lake C... 57 KB SVLargeHotel Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVLargeHotel Salt Lake... 55 KB SVLargeOffice Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVLargeOffice Salt Lak... 57 KB SVMediumOffice Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVMediumOffice Salt La... 62 KB SVMidriseApartment Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png

243

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area (Redirected from Salt Wells Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

244

Plutonium and americium separation from salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Salts or materials containing plutonium and americium are dissolved in hydrochloric acid, heated, and contacted with an alkali metal carbonate solution to precipitate plutonium and americium carbonates which are thereafter readily separable from the solution.

Hagan, Paul G. (Northglenn, CO); Miner, Frend J. (Boulder, CO)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Molten salt destruction of energetic waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A molten salt destruction process is used to treat and destroy energetic waste materials such as high explosives, propellants, and rocket fuels. The energetic material is pre-blended with a solid or fluid diluent in safe proportions to form a fluid fuel mixture. The fuel mixture is rapidly introduced into a high temperature molten salt bath. A stream of molten salt is removed from the vessel and may be recycled as diluent. Additionally, the molten salt stream may be pumped from the reactor, circulated outside the reactor for further processing, and delivered back into the reactor or cooled and circulated to the feed delivery system to further dilute the fuel mixture entering the reactor.

Brummond, William A. (Livermore, CA); Upadhye, Ravindra S. (Pleasanton, CA); Pruneda, Cesar O. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Molten salt destruction of energetic waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A molten salt destruction process is used to treat and destroy energetic waste materials such as high explosives, propellants, and rocket fuels. The energetic material is pre-blended with a solid or fluid diluent in safe proportions to form a fluid fuel mixture. The fuel mixture is rapidly introduced into a high temperature molten salt bath. A stream of molten salt is removed from the vessel and may be recycled as diluent. Additionally, the molten salt stream may be pumped from the reactor, circulated outside the reactor for further processing, and delivered back into the reactor or cooled and circulated to the feed delivery system to further dilute the fuel mixture entering the reactor. 4 figs.

Brummond, W.A.; Upadhye, R.S.; Pruneda, C.O.

1995-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

247

Salt Lake City- High Performance Buildings Requirement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Salt Lake City's mayor issued an executive order in July 2005 requiring that all public buildings owned and controlled by the city be built or renovated to meet the requirements of LEED "silver"...

248

Salt Dispersion in the Hudson Estuary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seaward transport of salt by river discharge through an estuary is balanced under steady conditions by landward dispersion effected by various physical mixing processes. Observations of current and salinity in the lower Hudson estuary provide ...

Kenneth Hunkins

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

PROCESSING OF MOLTEN SALT POWER REACTOR FUEL  

SciTech Connect

ABS> Fuel reprocessing methods are being investigated for molten salt nuclear reactors which use LiF--BeF/sub 2/ salt as a solvent for UF/sub 4/ and ThF/sub 4/. A liquid HF dissolution procedure coupled with fluorination has been developed for recovery of the uranium and LiF- BeF/sub 2/ solvent salt which is highly enriched in Li/sup 7/. The recovered salt is decontaminated in the process from the major reactor poisons; namely, rare earths and neptunium. A brief investigation of alternate methods, including oxide precipitation, partial freezing, and metal reduction, indicated that such methods may give some separation of the solvent salt from reactor poisons, but they do not appear to be sufficiently quantitative for a simple processing operation. Solubilities of LiF and BeF/sub 2/ in aqueous 70t0 100% HF are presented. The BeF/sub 2/ solubility is appreciably increased in the presence of water and large amounts of LiF. Salt solubilities of 150 g/liter are attainable. Tracer experiments indicate that rare earth solubilities, relative to LiF-- BeF/sub 2/ solvent salt solubility, increase from about 10/sup -4/ mole% in 98% HF to 0.003 mole% in 80% HF. Fluorination of uranium from LiF--BeF/sub 2/ salt was demonstrated. This appears feasible also for the recovery of the relatively small ccncentration of uranium produced in the LiF- BeF/sub 2/ThF/sub 4/ blanket. A proposed chemical flowsheet is presented on the basis of this exploratory work as applied to the semicontinuous processing of a 600 Mw power reactor. (auth)

Campbell, D.O.; Cathers, G.I.

1959-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Thermal Characterization of Molten Salt Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner (ER) may be adversely affected by the buildup of sodium, fission products, and transuranics in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided are the following: (1) salt freezing due to an unexpected change in the liquidus temperature, (2) phase separation or non-homogeneity of the molten salt due to the precipitation of solids or formation of immiscible liquids, and (3) any mechanism that can result in the separation and concentration of fissile elements from the molten salt. Any of these situations would result in an off-normal condition outside the established safety basis for electrorefiner (ER) operations. The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can potentially be monitored through the thermal characterization of the salts, which can be a function of impurity concentration. This report describes the experimental results of typical salts compositions, which consist of chlorides of potassium, lithium, strontium, samarium, praseodymium, lanthanum, barium, cerium, cesium, neodymium, sodium and gadolinium chlorides as a surrogate for both uranium and plutonium, used for the processing of used nuclear fuels.

Toni Y. Gutknecht; Guy L. Fredrickson

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Portable top drive cuts horizontal drilling costs  

SciTech Connect

Economic analysis of a seven-well, long-reach horizontal drilling program into an unconsolidated, heavy-oil-bearing reservoir in Winter field near the Alberta/Saskatchewan border in Canada reveals that -- in the right application -- renting a portable top drive drilling system can reduce total drilling costs. Use of the portable top drive combined with other cost-saving measures enabled Saskoil, one of Canada`s larger independents, to drill more cheaply, on a cost-per-meter basis, in 1993 than in 1992. This was despite significant rental rates for drilling rigs and directional drilling services caused by increased demand in Western Canada. Total cost savings of 10% on wells that would otherwise cost in the (C) $500,000 range are believed realistic. Based on this year`s performance, Saskoil recommends top drive for the company`s future horizontal wells in this area. This article describes the operator`s horizontal well program, advantages of top drive in that program and how it was installed and applied. Estimated time savings for six wells, plus other ways top drive can cut costs and improve operations are discussed.

Jackson, B. [Saskoil, Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada); Yager, D. [Tesco Drilling Tech., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Objective methods of assessment of influence of alcohol on driving safety: study performed driving simulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper is focused on an introduction of a set of experiments focused on objective methods used for detection of driving impairment caused by influence of different level of alcohol in blood. It introduces the initial experiments which were performed ... Keywords: alcohol, driver's impairment, driving simulation

Roman Pieknk; Stanislav Novotny; Petr Bouchner

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Conservation Education, Other Public Initiatives Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Conservation Education, Other Public Initiatives November 14, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Approximately 1.8 million tons of salt have been mined out of the underground at WIPP. Approximately 1.8 million tons of salt have been mined out of the underground at WIPP. Proceeds from the WIPP salt allowed hundreds of southeast New Mexico students to learn about resource conservation. Proceeds from the WIPP salt allowed hundreds of southeast New Mexico students to learn about resource conservation. The crushed salt is used as a supplement in cattle feed. Since the salt from WIPP has been mined from the middle of a large salt formation, its quality is high, according to Magnum Minerals.

254

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Conservation Education, Other Public Initiatives Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Conservation Education, Other Public Initiatives November 14, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Approximately 1.8 million tons of salt have been mined out of the underground at WIPP. Approximately 1.8 million tons of salt have been mined out of the underground at WIPP. Proceeds from the WIPP salt allowed hundreds of southeast New Mexico students to learn about resource conservation. Proceeds from the WIPP salt allowed hundreds of southeast New Mexico students to learn about resource conservation. The crushed salt is used as a supplement in cattle feed. Since the salt from WIPP has been mined from the middle of a large salt formation, its quality is high, according to Magnum Minerals.

255

DistributionDrive | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DistributionDrive DistributionDrive Jump to: navigation, search Name DistributionDrive Place Addison, Texas Zip 75001 Product Supplier of Biodiesel, Straight Vegetable Oil (SVO), Recycled Vegetable Oil (WVO) and Engine Conversion Kits to use this fuels. Coordinates 38.477365°, -80.412149° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.477365,"lon":-80.412149,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

256

Drive Less, Save More | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Drive Less, Save More Drive Less, Save More Drive Less, Save More May 24, 2011 - 12:31pm Addthis Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program For someone who works in the Vehicle Technologies Program, I actually don't spend that much time in my automobile. I usually get around using a combination of public transit, my bike, and my own two feet. But I'm an exception. In the U.S., the vehicle miles travelled per person is actually twice as high as it is in Western Europe and three times higher than in Japan. However, alternatives to using your car have a wealth of benefits. In addition to reducing petroleum consumption, they can lower greenhouse gas emissions, improve air quality, decrease stress, and bring communities together. Fortunately, there are a variety of ways to minimize the distance

257

Drive Less, Save More | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Drive Less, Save More Drive Less, Save More Drive Less, Save More May 24, 2011 - 12:31pm Addthis Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program For someone who works in the Vehicle Technologies Program, I actually don't spend that much time in my automobile. I usually get around using a combination of public transit, my bike, and my own two feet. But I'm an exception. In the U.S., the vehicle miles travelled per person is actually twice as high as it is in Western Europe and three times higher than in Japan. However, alternatives to using your car have a wealth of benefits. In addition to reducing petroleum consumption, they can lower greenhouse gas emissions, improve air quality, decrease stress, and bring communities together. Fortunately, there are a variety of ways to minimize the distance

258

Brines formed by multi-salt deliquescence  

SciTech Connect

The FY05 Waste Package Environment testing program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory focused on determining the temperature, relative humidity, and solution compositions of brines formed due to the deliquescence of NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} and NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3}-Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} salt mixtures. Understanding the physical and chemical behavior of these brines is important because they define conditions under which brines may react with waste canister surfaces. Boiling point experiments show that NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} and NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3}-Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} salt mixtures form brines that transform to hydrous melts that do not truly 'dry out' until temperatures exceed 300 and 400 C, respectively. Thus a conducting solution is present for these salt assemblages over the thermal history of the repository. The corresponding brines form at lower relative humidity at higher temperatures. The NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture has a mutual deliquescence relative humidity (MDRH) of 25.9% at 120 C and 10.8% at 180 C. Similarly, the KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture has MDRH of 26.4% at 120 C and 20.0% at 150 C. The KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture salts also absorb some water (but do not appear to deliquesce) at 180 C and thus may also contribute to the transfer of electrons at interface between dust and the waste package surface. There is no experimental evidence to suggest that these brines will degas and form less deliquescent salt assemblages. Ammonium present in atmospheric and tunnel dust (as the chloride, nitrate, or sulfate) will readily decompose in the initial heating phase of the repository, and will affect subsequent behavior of the remaining salt mixture only through the removal of a stoichiometric equivalent of one or more anions. Although K-Na-NO{sub 3}-Cl brines form at high temperature and low relative humidity, these brines are dominated by nitrate, which is known to inhibit corrosion at lower temperature. Nitrate to chloride ratios of the NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture are about NO{sub 3}:Cl = 19:1. The role of nitrate on corrosion at higher temperatures is addressed in a companion report (Dixit et al., 2005).

Carroll, S; Rard, J; Alai, M; Staggs, K

2005-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

259

Microsoft Word - ORNL Hard Drives Final 08132010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inspections and Special Inquires Inspections and Special Inquires Inspection Report Internal Controls over Computer Hard Drives at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory INS-O-10-03 August 2010 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 August 16, 2010 MEMORANDUM FOR THE DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF SCIENCE FROM: Sandra D. Bruce Assistant Inspector General for Inspections and Special Inquiries SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Internal Controls over Computer Hard Drives at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's (Department) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak

260

Plutonium and americium recovery from spent molten-salt-extraction salts with aluminum-magnesium alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development work was performed to determine the feasibility of removing plutonium and americium from spent molten-salt-extraction (MSE) salts using Al-Mg alloys. If the product buttons from this process are compatible with subsequent aqueous processing, the complex chloride-to-nitrate aqueous conversion step which is presently required for these salts may be eliminated. The optimum alloy composition used to treat spent 8 wt % MSE salts in the past yielded poor phase-disengagement characteristics when applied to 30 mol % salts. After a limited investigation of other alloy compositions in the Al-Mg-Pu-Am system, it was determined that the Al-Pu-Am system could yield a compatible alloy. In this system, experiments were performed to investigate the effects of plutonium loading in the alloy, excess magnesium, age of the spent salt on actinide recovery, phase disengagement, and button homogeneity. Experimental results indicate that 95 percent plutonium recoveries can be attained for fresh salts. Further development is required for backlog salts generated prior to 1981. A homogeneous product alloy, as required for aqueous processing, could not be produced.

Cusick, M.J.; Sherwood, W.G.; Fitzpatrick, R.F.

1984-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drive salt caverns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Salt Mechanics Primer for Near-Salt and Sub-Salt Deepwater Gulf of Mexico Field Developments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gulf of Mexico (GoM) is the most active deepwater region in the world and provides some of the greatest challenges in scope and opportunity for the oil and gas industry. The complex geologic settings and significant water and reservoir depths necessitate high development costs, in addition to requiring innovating technology. The investment costs are substantial: because of the extreme water depths (up to 8000 feet) and considerable reservoir depths (to 30,000 feet below mudline), the cost of drilling a single well can be upwards of 50 to 100 million dollars. Central, therefore, to successful economic exploitation are developments with a minimum number of wells combined with a well service lifetime of twenty to thirty years. Many of the wells that are planned for the most significant developments will penetrate thick salt formations, and the combined drilling costs for these fields are estimated in the tens of billions of dollars. In May 2001, Sandia National Laboratories initiated a Joint Industry Project focused on the identification, quantification, and mitigation of potential well integrity issues associated with sub-salt and near-salt deepwater GoM reservoirs. The project is jointly funded by the DOE (Natural Gas and Oil Technology Partnership) and nine oil companies (BHP Billiton Petroleum, BP, ChevronTexaco, Conoco, ExxonMobil, Halliburton, Kerr-McGee, Phillips Petroleum, and Shell). This report provides an assessment of the state of the art of salt mechanics, and identifies potential well integrity issues relevant to deepwater GoM field developments. Salt deformation is discussed and a deformation mechanism map is provided for salt. A bounding steady-state strain rate contour map is constructed for deepwater GoM field developments, and the critical issue of constraint in the subsurface, and resultant necessity for numerical analyses is discussed.

FOSSUM, ARLO F.; FREDRICH, JOANNE T.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Corrosion of aluminides by molten nitrate salt  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The corrosion of titanium-, iron-, and nickel-based aluminides by a highly aggressive, oxidizing NaNO{sub 3}(-KNO{sub 3})-Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} has been studied at 650{degree}C. It was shown that weight changes could be used to effectively evaluate corrosion behavior in the subject nitrate salt environments provided these data were combined with salt analyses and microstructural examinations. The studies indicated that the corrosion of relatively resistant aluminides by these nitrate salts proceeded by oxidation and a slow release from an aluminum-rich product layer into the salt at rates lower than that associated with many other types of metallic materials. The overall corrosion process and resulting rate depended on the particular aluminide being exposed. In order to minimize corrosion of nickel or iron aluminides, it was necessary to have aluminum concentrations in excess of 30 at. %. However, even at a concentration of 50 at. % Al, the corrosion resistance of TiAl was inferior to that of Ni{sub 3}Al and Fe{sub 3}Al. At higher aluminum concentrations, iron, nickel, and iron-nickel aluminides exhibited quite similar weight changes, indicative of the principal role of aluminum in controlling the corrosion process in NaNO{sub 3}(-KNO{sub 3})-Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} salts. 20 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Tortorelli, P.F.; Bishop, P.S.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Query processing techniques for solid state drives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid state drives perform random reads more than 100x faster than traditional magnetic hard disks, while offering comparable sequential read and write bandwidth. Because of their potential to speed up applications, as well as their reduced power consumption, ... Keywords: columnar storage, flash memory, join index, late materialization, semi-join reduction, ssd

Dimitris Tsirogiannis; Stavros Harizopoulos; Mehul A. Shah; Janet L. Wiener; Goetz Graefe

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

PCTS Local Driving Directions Princeton University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PCTS Local Driving Directions Princeton University Princeton Center for Theoretical Science Jadwin to Jadwin Hall, there are several parking options. a) There are limited visitors' parking spots directly, in the first aisle, after you turn into the parking lot, which is located on Ivy Lane. (Use the directions

265

Conditions driving chemical freeze-out  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose the entropy density as the thermodynamic condition driving best the chemical freeze-out in heavy-ion collisions. Taking its value from lattice calculations at zero chemical potential, we find that it is excellent in reproducing the experimentally estimated freeze-out parameters. The two characteristic endpoints in the freeze-out diagram are reproduced as well.

A. Tawfik

2004-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

266

Multilevel converters for large electric drives  

SciTech Connect

Traditional two-level high frequency pulse width modulation (PWM) inverters for motor drives have several problems associated with their high frequency switching which produces common-mode voltage and high voltage change (dV/dt) rates to the motor windings. Multilevel inverters solve these problems because their devices can switch at a much lower frequency. Two different multilevel topologies are identified for use as a converter for electric drives, a cascade inverter with separate dc sources and a back-to-back diode clamped converter. The cascade inverter is a natural fit for large automotive all electric drives because of the high VA ratings possible and because it uses several levels of dc voltage sources which would be available from batteries or fuel cells. The back to back diode damped converter is ideal where a source of ac voltage is available such as a hybrid electric vehicle. Simulation and experimental results show the superiority of these two converters over PWM based drives.

Tolbert, L.M.; Peng, F.Z.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Oscillation control system for electric motor drive  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A feedback system for controlling mechanical oscillations in the torsionally complaint drive train of an electric or other vehicle. Motor speed is converted in a processor to estimate state signals in which a plant model which are used to electronically modify the torque commands applied to the motor. 5 figs.

Slicker, J.M.; Sereshteh, A.

1988-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

268

Oscillation control system for electric motor drive  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A feedback system for controlling mechanical oscillations in the torsionally complaint drive train of an electric or other vehicle. Motor speed is converted in a processor to estimate state signals in which a plant model which are used to electronically modify thetorque commands applied to the motor.

Slicker, James M. (Union Lake, MI); Sereshteh, Ahmad (Union Lake, MI)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

270

Salt Wells Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Project Salt Wells Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Salt Wells Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 39.580833333333°, -118.33444444444° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.580833333333,"lon":-118.33444444444,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

271

Brine flow in heated geologic salt.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the physical processes, primary governing equations, solution approaches, and historic testing related to brine migration in geologic salt. Although most information presented in this report is not new, we synthesize a large amount of material scattered across dozens of laboratory reports, journal papers, conference proceedings, and textbooks. We present a mathematical description of the governing brine flow mechanisms in geologic salt. We outline the general coupled thermal, multi-phase hydrologic, and mechanical processes. We derive these processes' governing equations, which can be used to predict brine flow. These equations are valid under a wide variety of conditions applicable to radioactive waste disposal in rooms and boreholes excavated into geologic salt.

Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Malama, Bwalya

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Texas Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

273

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

274

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Maine Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

275

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Federal Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

276

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Florida Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Florida Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Florida Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Florida Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Florida Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Florida Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Florida Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Florida Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

277

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Iowa Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Iowa Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Iowa Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Iowa Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Iowa Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Iowa Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Iowa Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Iowa Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

278

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Maryland Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

279

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alaska Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

280

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Vermont Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drive salt caverns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #452: January 15, 2007 Driving  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2: January 15, 2: January 15, 2007 Driving Differences to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #452: January 15, 2007 Driving Differences on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #452: January 15, 2007 Driving Differences on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #452: January 15, 2007 Driving Differences on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #452: January 15, 2007 Driving Differences on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #452: January 15, 2007 Driving Differences on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #452: January 15, 2007 Driving Differences on AddThis.com... Fact #452: January 15, 2007 Driving Differences Those living in the center city drive fewer miles in a day than those in

282

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Indiana Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Indiana Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Indiana Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Indiana Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Indiana Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Indiana Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Indiana Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Indiana Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

283

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Delaware Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

284

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

285

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

286

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

287

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Virginia Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

288

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

289

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Oregon Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

290

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

291

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Missouri Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

292

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Utah Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

293

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idaho Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

294

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Illinois Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

295

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

296

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

297

Drive piston assembly for a valve actuator assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drive piston assembly is provided that is operable to selectively open a poppet valve. The drive piston assembly includes a cartridge defining a generally stepped bore. A drive piston is movable within the generally stepped bore and a boost sleeve is coaxially disposed with respect to the drive piston. A main fluid chamber is at least partially defined by the generally stepped bore, drive piston, and boost sleeve. First and second feedback chambers are at least partially defined by the drive piston and each are disposed at opposite ends of the drive piston. At least one of the drive piston and the boost sleeve is sufficiently configured to move within the generally stepped bore in response to fluid pressure within the main fluid chamber to selectively open the poppet valve. A valve actuator assembly and engine are also provided incorporating the disclosed drive piston assembly.

Sun, Zongxuan (Troy, MI)

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

298

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Arizona Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

299

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Nevada Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

300

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Montana Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drive salt caverns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Colorado Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

302

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Kansas Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

303

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

304

Molten nitrate salt technology development status report  

SciTech Connect

Recognizing thermal energy storage as potentially critical to the successful commercialization of solar thermal power systems, the Department of Energy (DOE) has established a comprehensive and aggressive thermal energy storage technology development program. Of the fluids proposed for heat transfer and energy storage molten nitrate salts offer significant economic advantages. The nitrate salt of most interest is a binary mixture of NaNO/sub 3/ and KNO/sub 3/. Although nitrate/nitrite mixtures have been used for decades as heat transfer and heat treatment fluids the use has been at temperatures of about 450/sup 0/C and lower. In solar thermal power systems the salts will experience a temperature range of 350 to 600/sup 0/C. Because central receiver applications place more rigorous demands and higher temperatures on nitrate salts a comprehensive experimental program has been developed to examine what effects, if any, the new demands and temperatures have on the salts. The experiments include corrosion testing, environmental cracking of containment materials, and determinations of physical properties and decomposition mechanisms. This report details the work done at Sandia National Laboratories in each area listed. In addition, summaries of the experimental programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of New York, EIC Laboratories, Inc., and the Norwegian Institute of Technology on molten nitrate salts are given. Also discussed is how the experimental programs will influence the near-term central receiver programs such as utility repowering/industrial retrofit and cogeneration. The report is designed to provide easy access to the latest information and data on molten NaNO/sub 3//KNO/sub 3/ for the designers and engineers of future central receiver projects.

Carling, R.W.; Kramer, C.M.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Nissen, D.A.; Goods, S.H.; Mar, R.W.; Munford, J.W.; Karnowsky, M.M.; Biefeld, R.N.; Norem, N.J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Fast Spectrum Molten Salt Reactor Options  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 2010, fast-spectrum molten-salt reactors (FS-MSRs) were selected as a transformational reactor concept for light-water reactor (LWR)-derived heavy actinide disposition by the Department of Energy-Nuclear Energy Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC) program and were the subject of a preliminary scoping investigation. Much of the reactor description information presented in this report derives from the preliminary studies performed for the ARC project. This report, however, has a somewhat broader scope-providing a conceptual overview of the characteristics and design options for FS-MSRs. It does not present in-depth evaluation of any FS-MSR particular characteristic, but instead provides an overview of all of the major reactor system technologies and characteristics, including the technology developments since the end of major molten salt reactor (MSR) development efforts in the 1970s. This report first presents a historical overview of the FS-MSR technology and describes the innovative characteristics of an FS-MSR. Next, it provides an overview of possible reactor configurations. The following design features/options and performance considerations are described including: (1) reactor salt options-both chloride and fluoride salts; (2) the impact of changing the carrier salt and actinide concentration on conversion ratio; (3) the conversion ratio; (4) an overview of the fuel salt chemical processing; (5) potential power cycles and hydrogen production options; and (6) overview of the performance characteristics of FS-MSRs, including general comparative metrics with LWRs. The conceptual-level evaluation includes resource sustainability, proliferation resistance, economics, and safety. The report concludes with a description of the work necessary to begin more detailed evaluation of FS-MSRs as a realistic reactor and fuel cycle option.

Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Patton, Bruce W [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL; Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Heated muds solve squeezing-salt problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Squeezing salts have been responsible for major drilling problems in many areas of the world for over half a century. In NAM's area of operations, they occur primarily in the Zechstein group of evaporites. They are responsible for problems such as stuck pipe during drilling and casing failure during both drilling and casing failure during both drilling and production, sometimes as much as 12 years after drilling. Since 1960, some US $170 million (at 1992 drilling costs) have been spent redrilling wells with failed casing strings. In 1991, NAM was associated with a Billiton project to drill 2 wells for the solution mining of magnesium and potassium salts. Gauge holes were a prerequisite to identify the objective salts by electric logging. Excellent results were achieved by drilling with a heated salt mud that had been saturated on surface to downhole conditions. The heating requirements for the Billiton project were modest, as the top of the squeezing salt occurred at approximately 1,500 m (4,920 ft), requiring a circulating temperature of 45 C (113 F) to achieve the necessary saturation level. However, in NAM's operations, the top of the squeezing salt generally occurs between 2.500 m and 3,000 m (8,200 ft and 9,850 ft), requiring temperatures on the order of 70 C (158 F). Despite the need for higher temperatures, the success of the Billiton project prompted NAM to introduce the heating system on a trial basis. To date eight wells have been drilled using the system, resulting in the drilling of a virtual gauge hole with successful cementations being achieved in each case.

Muecke, N.B. (Nederlandse Aardolie, Maatschappij (Netherlands))

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Proceedings of the 35th conference on Winter simulation: driving innovation: driving innovation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2003 Winter Simulation Conference (WSC) continues a thirty-six year tradition as the premier event in discrete-event and combined discrete-continuous simulation. The conference theme, Driving Innovation, invites you to push the boundaries and find ...

David Ferrin; Douglas J. Morrice

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Argonne's GREET Model - Driving Transportation Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Driving Driving Transportation Solutions Model Argonne's GREET D r i v i n g Tr a n s p o r t a t i o n S o l u t i o n s ARGONNE'S GREET Argonne's GREET model is widely recognized as the "gold standard" for evaluating and comparing the energy and environmental impacts of transportation fuels and advanced vehicles. The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model is a one-of-a-kind analytical tool that simulates the energy use and emissions output of various vehicle and fuel combinations. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, the free software program gives researchers the unique ability to analyze technologies over an entire life cycle - from well to wheels and from raw material mining to vehicle disposal.

309

Integrated Inverter For Driving Multiple Electric Machines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electric machine drive (50) has a plurality of inverters (50a, 50b) for controlling respective electric machines (57, 62), which may include a three-phase main traction machine (57) and two-phase accessory machines (62) in a hybrid or electric vehicle. The drive (50) has a common control section (53, 54) for controlling the plurality of inverters (50a, 50b) with only one microelectronic processor (54) for controlling the plurality of inverters (50a, 50b), only one gate driver circuit (53) for controlling conduction of semiconductor switches (S1-S10) in the plurality of inverters (50a, 50b), and also includes a common dc bus (70), a common dc bus filtering capacitor (C1) and a common dc bus voltage sensor (67). The electric machines (57, 62) may be synchronous machines, induction machines, or PM machines and may be operated in a motoring mode or a generating mode.

Su, Gui-Jia [Knoxville, TN; Hsu, John S [Oak Ridge, TN

2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

310

Enhancing cavity cooling with cavity driving  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cavity-mediated cooling has the potential to become one of the most efficient techniques to cool molecular species down to very low temperatures. However, theoretical schemes with single-laser driving require relatively strong trapping potentials and relatively long cavity photon life times which are hard to realise experimentally. In this paper we therefore consider an alternative cavity cooling scenario with double-laser driving. It is shown that the second laser can enhance the phonon-photon coherence which governs the time evolution of the mean phonon number, thereby resulting in higher cooling rates and a lower final temperature, when the cavity decay rate kappa is four or more times larger than the phonon frequency nu of the trapped particle.

Blake, Tony; Beige, Almut

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Heating and current drive systems for TPX  

SciTech Connect

The heating and current drive (H and CD) system proposed for the TPX tokamak will consist of ion cyclotron, neutral beam, and lower hybrid systems. It will have 17.5 MW of installed H and CD power initially, and can be upgraded to 45 MW. It will be used to explore advanced confinement and fully current-driven plasma regimes with pulse lengths of up to 1,000 s.

Swain, D.; Goranson, P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Halle, A. von; Bernabei, S.; Greenough, N. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.

1994-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

312

NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL ROD DRIVE APPARATUS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

ABS>A suspension mechanism between a vertically movable nuclear reactor control rod and a rod extension, which also provides information for the operator or an automatic control signal, is described. A spring connects the rod extension to a drive shift. The extension of the spring indicates whether (1) the rod is at rest on the reactor, (2) the rod and extension are suspended, or (3) the extension alone is suspended, the spring controlling a 3-position electrical switch.

Oakes, L.C.; Walker, C.S.

1959-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

Batteries for Electric Drive Vehicles - Status 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercial availability of advanced battery systems that meet the cost, performance, and durability requirements of electric drive vehicles (EDVs) is a crucial challenge to the growth of markets for these vehicles. Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) are a subset of the family of EDVs, which include battery electric vehicles (BEVs), power assist hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), and fuel cell vehicles. This study evaluates the state of advanced battery technology, presents u...

2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

314

A MOLTEN SALT NATURAL CONVECTION REACTOR SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

Fuel-salt volumes external to the core of a molten-salt reactor are calculated for a system in which the fuel salt circulates through the core and primary exchanger by free convection. In the calculation of these volumes, the exchanger heights above the core top range from 5 to 20 ft. Coolants considered for the primary exchanger are a second molten salt and helium. External fuel holdup is found to be the same with either coolant. Two sets of terminal temperatures are selected for the helium. The first combination permits steam generation at 850 psia, 900 deg F. The second set is selected for a closed gas turbine cycle with an 1100 deg F turbine inlet temperature. Specific power (thermal kw/kg 235) is found to be about 900 Mv/kg, based on initial, clean conditions and a 60 Mw (thermal) output. A specific power of 1275 kw/kg is estimated for a forced convection system of the same rating. (auth)

Romie, F.E.; Kinyon, B.W.

1958-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Salt repository project closeout status report  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of the scope and status of the US Department of Energy (DOE`s) Salt Repository Project (SRP) at the time when the project was terminated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987. The report reviews the 10-year program of siting a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste in rock salt formations. Its purpose is to aid persons interested in the information developed during the course of this effort. Each area is briefly described and the major items of information are noted. This report, the three salt Environmental Assessments, and the Site Characterization Plan are the suggested starting points for any search of the literature and information developed by the program participants. Prior to termination, DOE was preparing to characterize three candidate sites for the first mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The sites were in Nevada, a site in volcanic tuff; Texas, a site in bedded salt (halite); and Washington, a site in basalt. These sites, identified by the screening process described in Chapter 3, were selected from the nine potentially acceptable sites shown on Figure I-1. These sites were identified in accordance with provisions of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. 196 refs., 21 figs., 11 tabs.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Internal Wave Overturns Produced by Salt Fingers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The salt finger fluxes obtained in small-domain direct numerical simulations (DNSs) are used to parameterize the fluxes in a larger domain that resolves internal gravity waves. For the case in which the molecular diffusivity ratio ? = KS/KT < 1 ...

Melvin E. Stern; Julian A. Simeonov

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

GenDrive Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GenDrive Limited GenDrive Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name GenDrive Limited Place Cambridge, United Kingdom Zip CB23 3GY Sector Renewable Energy, Solar, Wind energy Product Developing a range of grid-connected inverters, 'Plug & Play', for renewable energy (mostly solar and wind) systems. These are intended to improve ease of installation. Coordinates 43.003745°, -89.017499° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.003745,"lon":-89.017499,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

318

Energetic Drives LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energetic Drives LLC Energetic Drives LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Energetic Drives LLC Place Gresham, Oregon Zip 97030 Sector Efficiency, Wind energy Product Oregon-based engineering firm that conducts industrial efficiency improvements, as well as repair and maintenance work for grid-tie inverters and wind turbines ranging from 10kW to 1.2MW. Coordinates 44.84866°, -88.786959° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.84866,"lon":-88.786959,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

319

Quasi-spherical direct drive fusion.  

SciTech Connect

The authors present designs of quasi-spherical direction drive z-pinch loads for machines such as ZR at 28 MA load current with a 150 ns implosion time (QSDDI). A double shell system for ZR has produced a 2D simulated yield of 12 MJ, but the drive for this system on ZR has essentially no margin. A double shell system for a 56 MA driver at 150 ns implosion has produced a simulated yield of 130 MJ with considerable margin in attaining the necessary temperature and density-radius product for ignition. They also represent designs for a magnetically insulated current amplifier, (MICA), that modify the attainable ZR load current to 36 MA with a 28 ns rise time. The faster pulse provided by a MICA makes it possible to drive quasi-spherical single shell implosions (QSDD2). They present results from 1D LASNEX and 2D MACH2 simulations of promising low-adiabat cryogenic QSDD2 capsules and 1D LASNEX results of high-adiabat cryogenic QSDD2 capsules.

VanDevender, J. Pace; Abbott, Lucas M.; Langston, William L.; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Nash, Thomas J.; Roderick, Norman Frederick; Silva, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Published Online Nevada Encyclopedia, 2009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Citation Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology. Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat [Internet]. 2009. Online Nevada Encyclopedia. [updated 2009/03/24;cited 2013/08/07]. Available from: http://www.onlinenevada.org/articles/salt-wells-eight-mile-flat Related Geothermal Exploration Activities Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Salt Wells Geothermal Area

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drive salt caverns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Experiments were used to examine water content in Permian salt samples (Salado Formation) collected from the WIPP site. The profile of water release and movement is recognized as a function of temperature from 30 to 275 oC using classical gravimetric methods to measure weight loss as a result of heating. The amount of water released from heating the salt was found to be correlated with the salts accessory mineral content (clay, other secondary minerals lost up to 3 wt % while pure halite salt lost less than 0.5 wt % water). Water released from salt at lower temperature was reversible and is attributed to clay hydration and dehydration processes. The analysis

322

The Salt Finger Experiments of Jevons (1857) and Rayleigh (1880)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over a century before Melvin Stern discovered salt fingers, W. Stanley Jevons performed the first salt finger experiment in an attempt to model cirrus clouds. Remarkably, he seemed to realize that a more rapid diffusion of heat relative to solute ...

Raymond W. Schmitt

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

SunShot Initiative: Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant on Facebook Tweet about SunShot...

324

DOE Issues Salt Waste Determination for the Savannah River Site...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt Waste Determination for the Savannah River Site DOE Issues Salt Waste Determination for the Savannah River Site January 18, 2006 - 10:49am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S....

325

Colloidal stability of magnetic nanoparticles in molten salts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molten salts are important heat transfer fluids used in nuclear, solar and other high temperature engineering systems. Dispersing nanoparticles in molten salts can enhance the heat transfer capabilities of the fluid. High ...

Somani, Vaibhav (Vaibhav Basantkumar)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Similarity measures for spectral discrimination of salt-affected soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper illustrates a pilot study designed to examine the spectral response of soils due to salt variations. The aim of the study includes determining whether salt-affected soils can be discriminated based on their spectral characteristics, by establishing ...

J. Farifteh; F. van der Meer; E. J. M. Carranza

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Experiments were used to examine water content in Permian salt samples (Salado Formation) collected from the WIPP site. The profile of water release and movement is recognized as a function of temperature from 30 to 275 oC using classical gravimetric methods to measure weight loss as a result of heating. The amount of water released from heating the salt was found to be correlated with the salts accessory mineral content (clay, other secondary minerals lost up to 3 wt % while pure halite salt lost less than 0.5 wt % water). Water released from salt at lower temperature was reversible and is attributed to clay hydration and dehydration processes. The analysis

328

Energy Efficient Buildings, Salt Lake County, Utah  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary Salt Lake County's Solar Photovoltaic Project - an unprecedented public/private partnership Salt Lake County is pleased to announce the completion of its unprecedented solar photovoltaic (PV) installation on the Calvin R. Rampton Salt Palace Convention Center. This 1.65 MW installation will be one the largest solar roof top installations in the country and will more than double the current installed solar capacity in the state of Utah. Construction is complete and the system will be operational in May 2012. The County has accomplished this project using a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) financing model. In a PPA model a third-party solar developer will finance, develop, own, operate, and maintain the solar array. Salt Lake County will lease its roof, and purchase the power from this third-party under a long-term Power Purchase Agreement contract. In fact, this will be one of the first projects in the state of Utah to take advantage of the recent (March 2010) legislation which makes PPA models possible for projects of this type. In addition to utilizing a PPA, this solar project will employ public and private capital, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants (EECBG), and public/private subsidized bonds that are able to work together efficiently because of the recent stimulus bill. The project also makes use of recent changes to federal tax rules, and the recent re-awakening of private capital markets that make a significant public-private partnership possible. This is an extremely innovative project, and will mark the first time that all of these incentives (EECBG grants, Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds, New Markets tax credits, investment tax credits, public and private funds) have been packaged into one project. All of Salt Lake County's research documents and studies, agreements, and technical information is available to the public. In addition, the County has already shared a variety of information with the public through webinars, site tours, presentations, and written correspondence.

Barnett, Kimberly

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

329

Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

330

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Driving  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

331

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Laws and Incentives for Driving  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

332

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Driving  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

333

Secrets of the Motor That Drives Archaea Revealed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Secrets of the Motor That Drives Archaea Revealed Secrets of the Motor That Drives Archaea Revealed Print Thursday, 14 February 2013 00:00 An international team led by John Tainer...

334

Driving Home to a Clean Energy Future | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Driving Home to a Clean Energy Future Driving Home to a Clean Energy Future June 7, 2011 - 10:57am Addthis Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy...

335

Driving Battery Production in Ohio | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Driving Battery Production in Ohio Driving Battery Production in Ohio November 1, 2010 - 6:19pm Addthis Randy Turk, Elyria Site Manager; Rep. Betty Sutton (OH); Frank Bozich,...

336

Do You Drive a Hybrid Electric Vehicle? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Drive a Hybrid Electric Vehicle? Do You Drive a Hybrid Electric Vehicle? July 9, 2009 - 1:34am Addthis In Tuesday's entry, Francis X. Vogel from the Wisconsin Clean Cities...

337

NREL: News Feature - NREL Drives Toward the Future with Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drives Toward the Future with Fuel Cell EVs June 21, 2013 A hydrogen fuel cell powered Toyota sport utility vehicle emblazoned with an NREL logo drives past a building on the NREL...

338

DIRECT-DRIVE AND EDDY-CURRENT SEPTUM MAGNETS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

laminations and leakage fields are summarized in Appendices A and B, respectively. 2. Direct-Drive Septum For the upper half of the 2-D direct-drive septum magnet in Fig. 1 the...

339

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #420: April 17, 2006 Driving...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0: April 17, 2006 Driving Less Due to Gasoline Prices to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 420: April 17, 2006 Driving Less Due to Gasoline Prices on...

340

Optimization of Driving Styles for Fuel Economy Improvement  

SciTech Connect

Modern vehicles have sophisticated electronic control units, particularly to control engine operation with respect to a balance between fuel economy, emissions, and power. These control units are designed for specific driving conditions and testing. However, each individual driving style is different and rarely meets those driving conditions. In the research reported here we investigate those driving style factors that have a major impact on fuel economy. An optimization framework is proposed with the aim of optimizing driving styles with respect to these driving factors. A set of polynomial metamodels are constructed to reflect the responses produced by changes of the driving factors. Then we compare the optimized driving styles to the original ones and evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of the optimization formulation.

Malikopoulos, Andreas [ORNL; Aguilar, Juan P. [Georgia Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drive salt caverns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Personalized driving behavior monitoring and analysis for emerging hybrid vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emerging electric-drive vehicles, such as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and plug-in HEVs (PHEVs), hold the potential for substantial reduction of fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. User driving behavior, which varies from person ...

Kun Li; Man Lu; Fenglong Lu; Qin Lv; Li Shang; Dragan Maksimovic

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Driving Training  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel-Efficient Driving Training to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Driving Training on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center:...

343

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

344

Removal of uranium and salt from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment  

SciTech Connect

In 1994, migration of {sup 233}U was discovered to have occurred at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This paper describes the actions now underway to remove uranium from the off-gas piping and the charcoal bed, to remove and stabilize the salts, and to convert the uranium to a stable oxide for long-term storage.

Peretz, F.J.; Rushton, J.E.; Faulkner, R.L.; Walker, K.L.; Del Cul, G.D.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Studies on the Effects of Inorganic Salts on Biochemical Treatment ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of two inorganic salts (sodium chloride and sodium sulphate) on biochemical ... Numerical Investigation of Heat Transfer Characteristics in Microwave...

346

Method for preparing salt solutions having desired properties  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The specification discloses a method for preparing salt solutions which exhibit desired thermodynamic properties. The method enables prediction of the value of the thermodynamic properties for single and multiple salt solutions over a wide range of conditions from activity data and constants which are independent of concentration and temperature. A particular application of the invention is in the control of salt solutions in a process to provide a salt solution which exhibits the desired properties.

Ally, Moonis R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Braunstein, Jerry (Clinton, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Molten Salt Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) - Energy Innovation Portal  

Solar Thermal Industrial Technologies Energy Storage Molten Salt Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) Sandia National Laboratories. Contact SNL About This ...

348

CO2 Emission Reduction through Innovative Molten Salt Electrolysis ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrochemical metallurgy especially through high temperature molten salt electrolysis with renewable electricity stands for a great opportunity for producing

349

Electricity use by machine drives varies significantly by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions. ... Fossil fuels may be used to drive turbines, reciprocating engines, ...

350

Clean Cities 2011 Stakeholders Summit - Electric Drive Vehicles...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program Vehicle Technologies Program - Clean Cities 2011 Stakeholders Summit - Electric Drive Vehicles and Charging Infrastructure...

351

DC Drive Ride-Through Technology Alternatives and Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adjustable speed drive (ASD) ride-through issues have caused increased concerns due to drive susceptibility to power disturbances and the costly results of process disruptions. Losses incurred due to DC drive trips can be avoided for critical production processes by employing ride-through alternatives. The purpose of this study is to determine the DC drive ride-through requirements of industrial customers and match those ride-through needs with possible solutions.

1998-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

352

New aggregation programs drive consumer participation in Illinois ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

New aggregation programs drive consumer participation ... Ameren Energy Marketing, Direct Energy ... (buying their electricity from renewable generators) ...

353

PHEV Energy Storage and Drive Cycle Impacts (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plug-in Hybrid vehicles energy storage and drive cycle impacts, presented at the 7th Advanced Automotive Battery Conference.

Markel, T.; Pesaran, A.

2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

354

Electrical Motor Drive Apparatus and Method - Energy Innovation Portal  

Vehicles and Fuels Industrial Technologies Electrical ... Auto manufacturers ; Industrial motor drive manufacturers; Patents and Patent Applications. ID Number.

355

SOLUTION MINING IN SALT DOMES OF THE GULF COAST EMBAYMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following a description of salt resources in the salt domes of the gulf coast embayment, mining, particularly solution mining, is described. A scenario is constructed which could lead to release of radioactive waste stored in a salt dome via inadvertent solution mining and the consequences of this scenario are analyzed.

Griswold, G. B.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

CONTROL ROD DRIVE MECHANISM FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lead-screw-type control rod drive featuring an electric motor and a fluid motor arranged to provide a selectably alternative driving means is described. The electric motor serves to drive the control rod slowly during normal operation, while the fluid motor, assisted by an automatic declutching of the electric motor, affords high-speed rod insertion during a scram. (AEC)

Hawke, B.C.; Liederbach, F.J.; Lones, W.

1963-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

357

Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns Working Gas Capacity of Aquifers Working Gas Capacity of Depleted Fields Total Number of Existing Fields Number of Existing Salt...

358

Mechanized roadway driving and roofbolting experiment successful in German mine. [Salts also act as anchors for steel mesh  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to build an intergrated heading and roofbolting unit, the Austrian firms Voeest Alpine and Boehler Bohr und Dricklufttechnik worked in cooperation. A Boehler all-hydraulic rotary drilling unit as mounted on each side of the slewing gear of the AM 50. Each drilling unit comprised a chain feed carriage for rotary drilling and a hydraulically operated boom to position the drill feed wherever required. The hydraulic drill with hydraulic driven chain feed is only 0.25 meter (10 inches) long. Thus with a chain feed length of 2.62 meters (8.6 feed), 2.25-meter (7.5-foot) holes can be drilled. Maximum drill thrust is 2.5 tons; the total thrust on the drill feed carriage directed against the face is 3 tons. The drill makes 1000 revolutions per minute and the motor can be rotated in both directions. In the non-operating position both drill booms are swung parallel to the AM 50 cutting boom. Since the hydraulic power pack of the AM 50 is not powerful enough to handle the extra drilling equipment Voeest Alpine developed an additional hydraulic unit comprising two pumps, each of 100-liter-per-minute capacity. Because of the extra weight of the modified unit (about 5 tons), the traveling ear of the AM 50 had to be modified to avoid overstraining the traveling motors. It was expected that the drill feed carriages would hinder the AM 50 operator's vision and thus cause difficulties during tunneling. In practice this did not happen. After getting used to the system the AM 50 operator was able to cut the roadway to the desired profile at a satisfactory speed. The additional weight increased the machine's stability.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Oscillatory nonhmic current drive for maintaining a plasma current  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method of the invention maintain a plasma current with an oscillatory nonohmic current drive. Each cycle of operation has a generation period in which current driving energy is applied to the plasma, and a relaxation period in which current driving energy is removed. Plasma parameters, such as plasma temperature or plasma average ionic charge state, are modified during the generation period so as to oscillate plasma resistivity in synchronism with the application of current driving energy. The invention improves overall current drive efficiencies.

Fisch, Nathaniel J. (Princeton, NJ)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Oscillatory nonohomic current drive for maintaining a plasma current  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and methods are described for maintaining a plasma current with an oscillatory nonohmic current drive. Each cycle of operation has a generation period in which current driving energy is applied to the plasma, and a relaxation period in which current driving energy is removed. Plasma parameters, such as plasma temperature or plasma average ionic charge state, are modified during the generation period so as to oscillate plasma resistivity in synchronism with the application of current driving energy. The invention improves overall current drive efficiencies.

Fisch, N.J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drive salt caverns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

High efficiency compressor uses direct drive  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article focuses on the high efficiency of a compressor which uses only direct drive. This compressor was evaluated by judges and won Top Honors in the 1982 Chemical Processing magazine Vaaler Awards category of compressors, blowers and fans. Applications for the compressor include combustion air, process air and gas booster, incineration, fermentation, and vacuum filtration systems. In addition to a 50% reduction in power comsumption, the use of the compressor eliminated the need for a water seal, thus saving 200 gpm of water. And, since the elimination of the water seal reduced the necessary downtime for seal maintenance, on stream time was increased by 5%.

Not Available

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Salt River Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt River Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Salt River Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Salt River Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Ventilation Heat Pumps Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies by technology Provider Salt River Electric Cooperative Salt River Electric serves as the rural electric provider in Kentucky's Bullitt, Nelson, Spencer, and Washington counties. Residential customers are eligible for a variety of cash incentives for energy efficiency. The Touchstone Energy Home Program provides a rebate of up to $250 to customers

363

Salt River Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Project Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Salt River Project Place Tempe, Arizona Utility Id 16572 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] SGIC[2] Energy Information Administration Form 826[3] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Salt River Project Smart Grid Project was awarded $56,859,359 Recovery Act Funding with a total project value of $114,003,719.

364

Molten salts database for energy applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The growing interest in energy applications of molten salts is justified by several of their properties. Their possibilities of usage as a coolant, heat transfer fluid or heat storage substrate, require thermo-hydrodynamic refined calculations. Many researchers are using simulation techniques, such as Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for their projects or conceptual designs. The aim of this work is providing a review of basic properties (density, viscosity, thermal conductivity and heat capacity) of the most common and referred salt mixtures. After checking data, tabulated and graphical outputs are given in order to offer the most suitable available values to be used as input parameters for other calculations or simulations. The reviewed values show a general scattering in characterization, mainly in thermal properties. This disagreement suggests that, in several cases, new studies must be started (and even new measurement techniques should be developed) to obtain accurate values.

Serrano-Lpez, Roberto; Cuesta-Lpez, Santiago

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

NREL: Fleet Test and Evaluation - Hybrid Electric Drive Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Electric Drive Systems Hybrid Electric Drive Systems The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team conducts performance evaluations of hybrid electric drive systems in fleets of delivery vehicles and transit buses. Hybrid electric drive systems combine a primary power source, an energy storage system, and an electric motor to achieve a combination of emissions, fuel economy, and range benefits unattainable with any of these technologies alone. Hybrid electric drive systems use less petroleum-based fuel and capture energy created during breaking and idling. This collected energy is used to propel the vehicle during normal drive cycles. The batteries supply additional power for acceleration and hill climbing. Learn more about the team's hybrid electric drive system evaluations: Delivery Vehicles

366

Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Hybrid and for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines

367

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Energy Upgrade California Drives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Upgrade Energy Upgrade California Drives Demand From Behind the Wheel to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Energy Upgrade California Drives Demand From Behind the Wheel on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Energy Upgrade California Drives Demand From Behind the Wheel on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Energy Upgrade California Drives Demand From Behind the Wheel on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Energy Upgrade California Drives Demand From Behind the Wheel on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Energy Upgrade California Drives Demand From Behind the Wheel on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Energy Upgrade California Drives Demand From Behind the Wheel on

368

Energy Efficient Buildings, Salt Lake County, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Salt Lake County is pleased to announce the completion of its unprecedented solar photovoltaic (PV) installation on the Calvin R. Rampton Salt Palace Convention Center. This 1.65 MW installation will be one the largest solar roof top installations in the country and will more than double the current installed solar capacity in the state of Utah. Construction is complete and the system will be operational in May 2012. The County has accomplished this project using a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) financing model. In a PPA model a third-party solar developer will finance, develop, own, operate, and maintain the solar array. Salt Lake County will lease its roof, and purchase the power from this third-party under a long-term Power Purchase Agreement contract. In fact, this will be one of the first projects in the state of Utah to take advantage of the recent (March 2010) legislation which makes PPA models possible for projects of this type. In addition to utilizing a PPA, this solar project will employ public and private capital, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants (EECBG), and public/private subsidized bonds that are able to work together efficiently because of the recent stimulus bill. The project also makes use of recent changes to federal tax rules, and the recent re-awakening of private capital markets that make a significant public-private partnership possible. This is an extremely innovative project, and will mark the first time that all of these incentives (EECBG grants, Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds, New Markets tax credits, investment tax credits, public and private funds) have been packaged into one project. All of Salt Lake County's research documents and studies, agreements, and technical information is available to the public. In addition, the County has already shared a variety of information with the public through webinars, site tours, presentations, and written correspondence.

Barnett, Kimberly

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

369

Molten salt battery having inorganic paper separator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature secondary battery comprises an anode containing lithium, a cathode containing a chalcogen or chalcogenide, a molten salt electrolyte containing lithium ions, and a separator comprising a porous sheet comprising a homogenous mixture of 2-20 wt.% chrysotile asbestos fibers and the remainder inorganic material non-reactive with the battery components. The non-reactive material is present as fibers, powder, or a fiber-powder mixture.

Walker, Jr., Robert D. (Gainesville, FL)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

SALT-ANL. Systems Analysis Process Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SALT (Systems Analysis Language Translator), a systems- analysis and process-simulation program for steady-state and dynamic systems, can also be used for optimization and sensitivity studies. SALT employs state-of-the-art numerical techniques including a hybrid steepest-descent/quasi-Newtonian multidimensional nonlinear equation solver, sequential quadratic programming methods for optimization, and multistep integration methods for both stiff and nonstiff systems of differential equations. Based on a preprocessor concept where a `new` system driver can be written for each application, SALT-ANL contains precompiled component models, several flow types, and a number of thermodynamic and transport property routines, including a gas chemical-equilibrium code. It has been applied to the study of open-cycle and liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic systems, fuel cells, ocean thermal energy conversion, municipal solid-waste processing, fusion, breeder reactors, and geothermal and solar-energy systems. Models available include: combustor, compressor, deaerator, gas-diffuser, fuel-dryer, feedwater-heater, flash-tank, gas-turbine, heater, heat-exchanger, flow-initiator, fuel-flow-initiator, molten-carbonate fuel-cell, liquid-metal diffuser, magnetohydrodynamic-generator, liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic-generator, liquid-metal nozzle, liquid-metal pipe, flow-mixer, gas-nozzle, phosphoric acid fuel-cell, pump, pipe-calculator, steam-condenser, steam-drum, liquid-gas separator, stack, solid-oxide fuel-cell, flow-splitter, steam-turbine, two-phase diffuser, two-phase mixer, and two-phase nozzle. Input data to the SALT program describe the system configuration for the specific problem to be analyzed and provide instructions defining system constraints, objective functions, parameter sweeps, etc. to generate a PL/I program representing the system problem and performing the various analytic tasks.

Berry, G.F.; Geyer, H.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1992-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

371

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics The report addresses granular salt reconsolidation from three vantage points: laboratory testing, modeling, and petrofabrics. The experimental data 1) provide greater insight and understanding into the role of elevated temperature and pressure regimes on physical properties of reconsolidated crushed salt, 2) can supplement an existing database used to develop a reconsolidation constitutive model and 3) provide data for model evaluation. The constitutive model accounts for the effects of moisture through pressure solution and dislocation creep, with both terms dependent

372

Aksaray And Ecemis Faults - Diapiric Salt Relationships- Relevance To The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aksaray And Ecemis Faults - Diapiric Salt Relationships- Relevance To The Aksaray And Ecemis Faults - Diapiric Salt Relationships- Relevance To The Hydrocarbon Exploration In The Tuz Golu (Salt Lake) Basin, Central Anatolia, Turkey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Aksaray And Ecemis Faults - Diapiric Salt Relationships- Relevance To The Hydrocarbon Exploration In The Tuz Golu (Salt Lake) Basin, Central Anatolia, Turkey Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Due to activitiy of the Aksaray and Ecemis Faults, volcanic intrusion and westward movement of the Anatolian plate, diapiric salt structures were occurred in the Tuz Golu (Salt Lake) basin in central Anatolia, Turkey. With the collisions of the Arabian and Anatolian plates during the late Cretaceous and Miocene times, prominent ophiolitic

373

WIPP Shares Expertise with Salt Club Members | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shares Expertise with Salt Club Members Shares Expertise with Salt Club Members WIPP Shares Expertise with Salt Club Members November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Carlsbad Field Office’s Abe Van Luik, third from right, examines rock salt taken from the Morsleben mine in Germany. Carlsbad Field Office's Abe Van Luik, third from right, examines rock salt taken from the Morsleben mine in Germany. CARLSBAD, N.M. - EM's Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) participated in the second meeting of the Nuclear Energy Agency's (NEA) Salt Club and the 4th U.S.-German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design & Operation in Berlin. CBFO, which has responsibility for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and the National Transuranic (TRU) Program, was represented by International Programs and Policy Advisor Dr. Abe Van Luik.

374

Salt Waste Contractor Reaches Contract Milestone | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt Waste Contractor Reaches Contract Milestone Salt Waste Contractor Reaches Contract Milestone Salt Waste Contractor Reaches Contract Milestone April 29, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Robert Brown, SRR tank farm operator, performs daily inspections of a salt disposition process facility. The inspections and improvement upgrades have resulted in continued successful operations. Robert Brown, SRR tank farm operator, performs daily inspections of a salt disposition process facility. The inspections and improvement upgrades have resulted in continued successful operations. AIKEN, S.C. - The liquid waste cleanup contractor for the EM program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) recently surpassed a 2013 contract milestone by processing more than 600,000 gallons of salt waste. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) salt disposition process facilities

375

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics The report addresses granular salt reconsolidation from three vantage points: laboratory testing, modeling, and petrofabrics. The experimental data 1) provide greater insight and understanding into the role of elevated temperature and pressure regimes on physical properties of reconsolidated crushed salt, 2) can supplement an existing database used to develop a reconsolidation constitutive model and 3) provide data for model evaluation. The constitutive model accounts for the effects of moisture through pressure solution and dislocation creep, with both terms dependent

376

Polymeric salt bridges for conducting electric current in microfluidic devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A "cast-in-place" monolithic microporous polymer salt bridge for conducting electrical current in microfluidic devices, and methods for manufacture thereof is disclosed. Polymeric salt bridges are formed in place in capillaries or microchannels. Formulations are prepared with monomer, suitable cross-linkers, solvent, and a thermal or radiation responsive initiator. The formulation is placed in a desired location and then suitable radiation such as UV light is used to polymerize the salt bridge within a desired structural location. Embodiments are provided wherein the polymeric salt bridges have sufficient porosity to allow ionic migration without bulk flow of solvents therethrough. The salt bridges form barriers that seal against fluid pressures in excess of 5000 pounds per square inch. The salt bridges can be formulated for carriage of suitable amperage at a desired voltage, and thus microfluidic devices using such salt bridges can be specifically constructed to meet selected analytical requirements.

Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA); Tichenor, Mark S. (San Diego, CA); Artau, Alexander (Humacao, PR)

2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

377

Pyrochemical process for extracting plutonium from an electrolyte salt  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pyrochemical process for extracting plutonium from a plutonium-bearing salt is disclosed. The process is particularly useful in the recovery of plutonium from electrolyte salts which are left over from the electrorefining of plutonium. In accordance with the process, the plutonium-bearing salt is melted and mixed with metallic calcium. The calcium reduces ionized plutonium in the salt to plutonium metal, and also causes metallic plutonium in the salt, which is typically present as finely dispersed metallic shot, to coalesce. The reduced and coalesced plutonium separates out on the bottom of the reaction vessel as a separate metallic phase which is readily separable from the overlying salt upon cooling of the mixture. Yields of plutonium are typically on the order of 95%. The stripped salt is virtually free of plutonium and may be discarded to low-level waste storage.

Mullins, Lawrence J. (Los Alamos, NM); Christensen, Dana C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Cementitious Stabilization of Mixed Wastes with High Salt Loadings  

SciTech Connect

Salt loadings approaching 50 wt % were tolerated in cementitious waste forms that still met leach and strength criteria, addressing a Technology Deficiency of low salt loadings previously identified by the Mixed Waste Focus Area. A statistical design quantified the effect of different stabilizing ingredients and salt loading on performance at lower loadings, allowing selection of the more effective ingredients for studying the higher salt loadings. In general, the final waste form needed to consist of 25 wt % of the dry stabilizing ingredients to meet the criteria used and 25 wt % water to form a workable paste, leaving 50 wt % for waste solids. The salt loading depends on the salt content of the waste solids but could be as high as 50 wt % if all the waste solids are salt.

Spence, R.D.; Burgess, M.W.; Fedorov, V.V.; Downing, D.J.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Pyrochemical process for extracting plutonium from an electrolyte salt  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pyrochemical process for extracting plutonium from a plutonium-bearing salt is disclosed. The process is particularly useful in the recovery of plutonium for electrolyte salts which are left over from the electrorefining of plutonium. In accordance with the process, the plutonium-bearing salt is melted and mixed with metallic calcium. The calcium reduces ionized plutonium in the salt to plutonium metal, and also causes metallic plutonium in the salt, which is typically present as finely dispersed metallic shot, to coalesce. The reduced and coalesced plutonium separates out on the bottom of the reaction vessel as a separate metallic phase which is readily separable from the overlying salt upon cooling of the mixture. Yields of plutonium are typically on the order of 95%. The stripped salt is virtually free of plutonium and may be discarded to low-level waste storage.

Mullins, L.J.; Christensen, D.C.

1982-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

380

Reference repository design concept for bedded salt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A reference design concept is presented for the subsurface portions of a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt. General geologic, geotechnical, hydrologic and geochemical data as well as descriptions of the physical systems are provided for use on generic analyses of the pre- and post-sealing performance of repositories in this geologic medium. The geology of bedded salt deposits and the regional and repository horizon stratigraphy are discussed. Structural features of salt beds including discontinuities and dissolution features are presented and their effect on repository performance is discussed. Seismic hazards and the potential effects of earthquakes on underground repositories are presented. The effect on structural stability and worker safety during construction from hydrocarbon and inorganic gases is described. Geohydrologic considerations including regional hydrology, repository scale hydrology and several hydrological failure modes are presented in detail as well as the hydrological considerations that effect repository design. Operational phase performance is discussed with respect to operations, ventilation system, shaft conveyances, waste handling and retrieval systems and receival rates of nuclear waste. Performance analysis of the post sealing period of a nuclear repository is discussed, and parameters to be used in such an analysis are presented along with regulatory constraints. Some judgements are made regarding hydrologic failure scenarios. Finally, the design and licensing process, consistent with the current licensing procedure is described in a format that can be easily understood.

Carpenter, D.W.; Martin, R.W.

1980-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drive salt caverns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Preliminary Neutronics Design Studies for a Molten Salt Blanket LIFE Engine  

SciTech Connect

The Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) Program being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) aims to design a hybrid fission-fusion subcritical nuclear engine that uses a laser-driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) system to drive a subcritical fission blanket. This combined fusion-fission hybrid system could be used for generating electricity, material transmutation or incineration, or other applications. LIFE does not require enriched fuel since it is a sub-critical system and LIFE can sustain power operation beyond the burnup levels at which typical fission reactors need to be refueled. In light of these factors, numerous options have been suggested and are being investigated. Options being investigated include fueling LIFE engines with spent nuclear fuel to aid in disposal/incineration of commercial spent nuclear fuel or using depleted uranium or thorium fueled options to enhance proliferation resistance and utilize non-fissile materials [1]. LIFE engine blanket designs using a molten salt fuel system represent one area of investigation. Possible applications of a LIFE engine with a molten salt blanket include uses as a spent nuclear fuel burner, fissile fuel breeding platform, and providing a backup alternative to other LIFE engine blanket designs using TRISO fuel particles in case the TRISO particles are found to be unable to withstand the irradiation they will be subjected to. These molten salts consist of a mixture of LiF with UF{sub 4} or ThF{sub 4} or some combination thereof. Future systems could look at using PuF{sub 3} or PuF{sub 4} as well, though no work on such system with initial plutonium loadings has been performed for studies documented in this report. The purpose of this report is to document preliminary neutronics design studies performed to support the development of a molten salt blanket LIFE engine option, as part of the LIFE Program being performed at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory. Preliminary design studies looking at fast ignition and hot spot ignition fusion options are documented, along with limited scoping studies performed to investigate other options of interest that surfaced during the main design effort. Lastly, side studies that were not part of the main design effort but may alter future work performed on LIFE engine designs are shown. The majority of all work reported in this document was performed during the Molten Salt Fast Ignition Moderator Study (MSFIMS) which sought to optimize the amount of moderator mixed into the molten salt region in order to produce the most compelling design. The studies in this report are of a limited scope and are intended to provide a preliminary neutronics analysis of the design concepts described herein to help guide decision processes and explore various options that a LIFE engine with a molten salt blanket might enable. None of the designs shown in this report, even reference cases selected for detailed description and analysis, have been fully optimized. The analyses were performed primarily as a neutronics study, though some consultation was made regarding thermal-hydraulic and structural concerns during both scoping out an initial model and subsequent to identifying a neutronics-based reference case to ensure that the design work contained no glaring mechanical or thermal issues that would preclude its feasibility. Any analyses and recommendations made in this report are either primarily or solely from the point of view of LIFE neutronics and ignore other fundamental issues related to molten salt fuel blankets such as chemical processing feasibility and political feasibility of a molten salt system.

Powers, J

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

382

OMEGA polar-drive target designs  

SciTech Connect

Low-adiabat polar-drive (PD) [Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004)] implosion designs for the OMEGA [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] laser are described. These designs for cryogenic deuterium-tritium and warm plastic shells use a temporal laser pulse shape with three pickets followed by a main pulse [Goncharov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 165001 (2010)]. The designs are at two different on-target laser intensities, with different in-flight aspect ratios (IFARs). These designs permit studies of implosion energetics and target performance closer to ignition-relevant intensities ({approx}7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} at the quarter-critical surface, where nonlocal heat conduction and laser-plasma interactions can play an important role) but at lower values of IFAR {approx} 22 or at lower intensity ({approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}) but at a higher IFAR (IFAR {approx} 32, where shell instability can play an important role). PD geometry requires repointing of laser beams to improve shell symmetry. The higher-intensity designs optimize target performance by repointing beams to a lesser extent, compensating for the reduced equatorial drive by increasing the energies of the repointed beams. They also use custom beam profiles that improve equatorial illumination at the expense of irradiation at higher latitudes. These latter designs will be studied when new phase plates for the OMEGA Laser System, corresponding to the custom beam profiles, are obtained.

Radha, P. B.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Shvydky, A.; Collins, T. J. B.; Goncharov, V. N.; McKenty, P. W.; Sangster, T. C.; Skupsky, S. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 E. River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 E. River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Department of Physics, University of Rochester, 250 E. River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

An Overview of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transport Technology  

SciTech Connect

Liquid fluoride salts are a leading candidate heat transport medium for high-temperature applications. This report provides an overview of the current status of liquid salt heat transport technology. The report includes a high-level, parametric evaluation of liquid fluoride salt heat transport loop performance to allow intercomparisons between heat-transport fluid options as well as providing an overview of the properties and requirements for a representative loop. Much of the information presented here derives from the earlier molten salt reactor program and a significant advantage of fluoride salts, as high temperature heat transport media is their consequent relative technological maturity. The report also includes a compilation of relevant thermophysical properties of useful heat transport fluoride salts. Fluoride salts are both thermally stable and with proper chemistry control can be relatively chemically inert. Fluoride salts can, however, be highly corrosive depending on the container materials selected, the salt chemistry, and the operating procedures used. The report also provides an overview of the state-of-the-art in reduction-oxidation chemistry control methodologies employed to minimize salt corrosion as well as providing a general discussion of heat transfer loop operational issues such as start-up procedures and freeze-up vulnerability.

Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Salt disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the state of salt repository science, reviews many of the technical issues pertaining to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in salt, and proposes several avenues for future science-based activities to further the technical basis for disposal in salt. There are extensive salt formations in the forty-eight contiguous states, and many of them may be worthy of consideration for nuclear waste disposal. The United States has extensive experience in salt repository sciences, including an operating facility for disposal of transuranic wastes. The scientific background for salt disposal including laboratory and field tests at ambient and elevated temperature, principles of salt behavior, potential for fracture damage and its mitigation, seal systems, chemical conditions, advanced modeling capabilities and near-future developments, performance assessment processes, and international collaboration are all discussed. The discussion of salt disposal issues is brought current, including a summary of recent international workshops dedicated to high-level waste disposal in salt. Lessons learned from Sandia National Laboratories' experience on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the Yucca Mountain Project as well as related salt experience with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve are applied in this assessment. Disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in a suitable salt formation is attractive because the material is essentially impermeable, self-sealing, and thermally conductive. Conditions are chemically beneficial, and a significant experience base exists in understanding this environment. Within the period of institutional control, overburden pressure will seal fractures and provide a repository setting that limits radionuclide movement. A salt repository could potentially achieve total containment, with no releases to the environment in undisturbed scenarios for as long as the region is geologically stable. Much of the experience gained from United States repository development, such as seal system design, coupled process simulation, and application of performance assessment methodology, helps define a clear strategy for a heat-generating nuclear waste repository in salt.

Leigh, Christi D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM); Hansen, Francis D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Driving Membrane Curvature | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unlocking the Nanoscale Secrets of Bird-Feather Colors Unlocking the Nanoscale Secrets of Bird-Feather Colors An Unlikely Route to Ferroelectricity How to Make a Splash Pressure-Tuning the Quantum Phase Transition in a Model 2-D Magnet Reappearing Superconductivity Surprises Scientists Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Driving Membrane Curvature JUNE 14, 2012 Bookmark and Share Model of conformational change in the HIV gp41 fusion protein induced by cholesterol composition of lipid monolayers. In biological systems, membranes are as important as water. They form the barrier between the inner world, within our cells, where we perform the chemical reactions of life, and the outside environment.

386

Direct Drive Systems DDS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Systems DDS Systems DDS Jump to: navigation, search Name Direct Drive Systems (DDS) Place Cerritos, California Zip CA 90703 Product Manufactures high speed, permanent magnet (PM), high-power motors, generators and power electronics. Coordinates 33.868545°, -118.063704° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.868545,"lon":-118.063704,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

387

Kinetics driving high-density chlorine plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple fluid model was developed in order to investigate the driving kinetics of neutral and charged species in high-density chlorine plasmas. It was found that the dissociation degree of Cl{sub 2} molecules is directly linked to the power balance of the discharge which controls the electron density. The model was also used to identify those reactions that could be neglected in the particle balance of charged species and those that must be included. Our results further indicate that diffusion losses need to be considered up to a pressure that depends on magnetic-field intensity and reactor aspect ratio. Finally, it is shown that the dominant charged carriers are linked to the dissociation level of Cl{sub 2} molecules.

Stafford, L.; Margot, J.; Vidal, F.; Chaker, M.; Giroux, K.; Poirier, J.-S.; Quintal-Leonard, A.; Saussac, J. [Department de physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); INRS-Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, Varennes, Quebec (Canada); Department de physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Three dimensional simulation for bayou choctaw strategic petroleum reserve (SPR).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three dimensional finite element analyses were performed to evaluate the structural integrity of the caverns located at the Bayou Choctaw (BC) site which is considered a candidate for expansion. Fifteen active and nine abandoned caverns exist at BC, with a total cavern volume of some 164 MMB. A 3D model allowing control of each cavern individually was constructed because the location and depth of caverns and the date of excavation are irregular. The total cavern volume has practical interest, as this void space affects total creep closure in the BC salt mass. Operations including both cavern workover, where wellhead pressures are temporarily reduced to atmospheric, and cavern enlargement due to leaching during oil drawdowns that use water to displace the oil from the caverns, were modeled to account for as many as the five future oil drawdowns in the six SPR caverns. The impacts on cavern stability, underground creep closure, surface subsidence, infrastructure, and well integrity were quantified.

Ehgartner, Brian L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Park, Byoung Yoon; Lee, Moo Yul

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

DRIVE(tm) Mobile App | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DRIVE(tm) Mobile App DRIVE(tm) Mobile App Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: DRIVE(tm) Mobile App Agency/Company /Organization: Apps for Energy Challenge Participant Sector: Energy Resource Type: Application prototype User Interface: Website, Mobile Device Website: ikehu.cloudapp.net/Drive OpenEI Keyword(s): Challenge Generated, Green Button Apps Language: English References: Apps for Energy[1] The DRIVE(tm) System is a patent-pending solution that provides incentives to residential customers to reduce power consumption during peak and critical peak times. It rewards desired consumer behavior with points or airline miles. The DRIVE(tm) System is a patent-pending solution that provides incentives to residential customers to reduce power consumption during peak and

390

Traction drive automatic transmission for gas turbine engine driveline  

SciTech Connect

A transaxle driveline for a wheeled vehicle has a high speed turbine engine and a torque splitting gearset that includes a traction drive unit and a torque converter on a common axis transversely arranged with respect to the longitudinal centerline of the vehicle. The drive wheels of the vehicle are mounted on a shaft parallel to the turbine shaft and carry a final drive gearset for driving the axle shafts. A second embodiment of the final drive gearing produces an overdrive ratio between the output of the first gearset and the axle shafts. A continuously variable range of speed ratios is produced by varying the position of the drive rollers of the traction unit. After starting the vehicle from rest, the transmission is set for operation in the high speed range by engaging a first lockup clutch that joins the torque converter impeller to the turbine for operation as a hydraulic coupling.

Carriere, Donald L. (Livonia, MI)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Independent Oversight Assessment, Salt Waste Processing Facility Project -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt Waste Processing Facility Salt Waste Processing Facility Project - January 2013 Independent Oversight Assessment, Salt Waste Processing Facility Project - January 2013 January 2013 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent assessment of nuclear safety culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) Project. The primary objective of the evaluation was to provide information regarding the status of the safety culture at the SWPF Project. The data collection phase of the assessment occurred during August - September 2012. Independent Oversight Assessment, Salt Waste Processing Facility Project -

392

Disposing of nuclear waste in a salt bed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disposing of nuclear waste in a salt bed Disposing of nuclear waste in a salt bed 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues » submit Disposing of nuclear waste in a salt bed Decades' worth of transuranic waste from Los Alamos is being laid to rest at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeastern New Mexico March 25, 2013 Disposing of nuclear waste in a salt bed Depending on the impurities embedded within it, the salt from WIPP can be anything from a reddish, relatively opaque rock to a clear crystal like the one shown here. Ordinary salt effectively seals transuranic waste in a long-term repository Transuranic waste, made of items such as lab coats and equipment that have been contaminated by radioactive elements heavier than uranium, is being shipped from the Los Alamos National Laboratory to a long-term storage

393

Genomic insights into salt adaptation in a desert poplar  

SciTech Connect

Despite the high economic and ecological importance of forests, our knowledge of the genomic evolution of trees under salt stress remains very limited. Here we report the genome sequence of the desert poplar, Populus euphratica, which exhibits high tolerance to sa lt stress. Its genome is very similar and collinear to that of the closely related mesophytic congener, P trichocarpa. However, we find that several gene families likely to be involved in tolerance to salt stress contain significantly more gene copies within the P euphratica lineage. Furthermore, genes showing evidence of positive selection are significantly enriched in functional categories related to salt stress. Some of these genes, and others within the same categories, are significantly upregulated under salt stress relative to their expression in another salt-sensitive poplar. Our results provide an important background for understanding tree adaptation to salt stress and facilitating the genetic improvement of cultivated poplars for saline soils.

Ma, Tao [Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences] [Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Wang, Junyi [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Zhou, Gongke [Key laboratory of Biofuels and Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Instit] [Key laboratory of Biofuels and Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Instit; Yue, Zhen [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Hu, Quanjun [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Chen, Yan [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Liu, Bingbing [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Qiu, Qiang [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Wang, Zhuo [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Zhang, Jian [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Wang, Kun [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Jaing, Dechun [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Gou, Caiyun [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Yu, Lili [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Zhan, Dongliang [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Zhou, Ran [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Luo, Wenchun [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Ma, Hui [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Yang, Yongzhi [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Pan, Shengkai [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Fang, Dongming [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Luo, Yadan [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Wang, Xia [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Wang, Gaini [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Wang, Juan [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Wang, Qian [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Lu, Xu [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Chen, Zhe [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Liu, Jinchao [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Lu, Yao [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Yin, Ye [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Yang, Huanming [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Abbott, Richard [School of Biology, University of St. Andrews, St andrews, Fife KY16 9TH, UK] [School of Biology, University of St. Andrews, St andrews, Fife KY16 9TH, UK; Wu, Yuxia [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Wan, Dongshi [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Li, Jia [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Wind turbine ring/shroud drive system - Energy Innovation Portal  

A wind turbine capable of driving multiple electric generators having a ring or shroud structure for reducing blade root bending moments, hub loads, blade fastener ...

395

Combined Electric Machine and Current Source Inverter Drive System  

This integration of these two ORNL ... elimination of several components reduces drive system cost, weight, and volume. ... Energy and Transportation Science Division

396

Electrical motor/generator drive apparatus and method - Energy ...  

The present disclosure includes electrical motor/generator drive systems and methods that significantly reduce inverter direct-current (DC) bus ripple currents and ...

397

Combined Electric Machine and Current Source Inverter Drive System ...  

Wind power generators ; Industrial power generators; More Information John S. Hsu. Combined Electric Machine and Current Source Invertor Drive System, U.S ...

398

Electric vehicle drive train with direct coupling transmission ...  

An electric vehicle drive train includes an electric motor and an associated speed sensor, a transmission operable in a speed reduction mode or a direct coupled mode ...

399

Combination spindle-drive system for high precision machining  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combination spindle-drive is provided for fabrication of optical quality surface finishes. Both the spindle-and-drive utilize the spindle bearings for support, thereby removing the conventional drive-means bearings as a source of vibration. An airbearing spindle is modified to carry at the drive end a highly conductive cup-shaped rotor which is aligned with a stationary stator to produce torque in the cup-shaped rotor through the reaction of eddy currents induced in the rotor. This arrangement eliminates magnetic attraction forces and all force is in the form of torque on the cup-shaped rotor.

Gerth, Howard L. (Knoxville, TN)

1977-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

400

Battery Electric Vehicle Driving and Charging Behavior Observed...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Electric Vehicle Driving and Charging Behavior Observed Early in The EV Project The EV Project John Smart, Idaho National Laboratory Stephen Schey, ECOtality North America...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drive salt caverns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

EA-1851: Delphi Automotive Systems Electric Drive Vehicle Battery...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here Home EA-1851: Delphi Automotive Systems Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative EA-1851: Delphi Automotive Systems Electric...

402

Design of Electric Drive Vehicle Batteries for Long Life and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kandler Smith, NREL EDV Battery Robust Design - 1 Design of Electric Drive Vehicle Batteries for Long Life and Low Cost Robustness to Geographic and Consumer-Usage Variation...

403

EA-1722: Toxco, Inc. Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home EA-1722: Toxco, Inc. Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative, Lancaster, OH EA-1722: Toxco, Inc. Electric...

404

Electrical motor/generator drive apparatus and method  

SciTech Connect

The present disclosure includes electrical motor/generator drive systems and methods that significantly reduce inverter direct-current (DC) bus ripple currents and thus the volume and cost of a capacitor. The drive methodology is based on a segmented drive system that does not add switches or passive components but involves reconfiguring inverter switches and motor stator winding connections in a way that allows the formation of multiple, independent drive units and the use of simple alternated switching and optimized Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) schemes to eliminate or significantly reduce the capacitor ripple current.

Su, Gui Jia

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

405

Direct drive field actuator motors - Energy Innovation Portal  

A positive-drive field actuator motor including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field ...

406

High Temperature Universal Silicon on Insulator (SOI) Gate Drive  

higher current drive, on-chip regulation capacitors, and more space efficient and robust on-chip layout. ... Development of high temperature galvanic isolation

407

Gasoline product supplied may reflect snowstorm effects on driving ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... driving that does not take place due to poor road conditions is ... which may have contributed to the large weekly gasoline stock builds seen in January ...

408

ELECTRICAL MOTOR/GENERATOR DRIVE APPARATUS AND METHOD - Energy ...  

The present disclosure includes electrical motor/generator drive systems and methods that significantly reduce inverter direct-current (DC) bus ripple ...

409

Factors driving wind power development in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s Largest Purchase of Wind Power, September 17, 2001.FACTORS DRIVING WIND POWER DEVELOPMENT IN THE UNITED STATESthe United States third in wind power capacity globally,

Bird, Lori A.; Parsons, Brian; Gagliano, Troy; Brown, Matthew H.; Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Integrated demonstration of molten salt oxidation with salt recycle for mixed waste treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) is a thermal, nonflame process that has the inherent capability of completely destroying organic constituents of mixed wastes, hazardous wastes, and energetic materials while retaining inorganic and radioactive constituents in the salt. For this reason, MSO is considered a promising alternative to incineration for the treatment of a variety of organic wastes. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has prepared a facility and constructed an integrated pilot-scale MSO treatment system in which tests and demonstrations are performed under carefully controlled (experimental) conditions. The system consists of a MSO processor with dedicated off-gas treatment, a salt recycle system, feed preparation equipment, and equipment for preparing ceramic final waste forms. This integrated system was designed and engineered based on laboratory experience with a smaller engineering-scale reactor unit and extensive laboratory development on salt recycle and final forms preparation. In this paper we present design and engineering details of the system and discuss its capabilities as well as preliminary process demonstration data. A primary purpose of these demonstrations is identification of the most suitable waste streams and waste types for MSO treatment.

Hsu, P.C.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Delivery system for molten salt oxidation of solid waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a delivery system for safety injecting solid waste particles, including mixed wastes, into a molten salt bath for destruction by the process of molten salt oxidation. The delivery system includes a feeder system and an injector that allow the solid waste stream to be accurately metered, evenly dispersed in the oxidant gas, and maintained at a temperature below incineration temperature while entering the molten salt reactor.

Brummond, William A. (Livermore, CA); Squire, Dwight V. (Livermore, CA); Robinson, Jeffrey A. (Manteca, CA); House, Palmer A. (Walnut Creek, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Salts of alkali metal anions and process of preparing same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compounds of alkali metal anion salts of alkali metal cations in bicyclic polyoxadiamines are disclosed. The salts are prepared by contacting an excess of alkali metal with an alkali metal dissolving solution consisting of a bicyclic polyoxadiamine in a suitable solvent, and recovered by precipitation. The salts have a gold-color crystalline appearance and are stable in a vacuum at -10.degree. C. and below.

Dye, James L. (East Lansing, MI); Ceraso, Joseph M. (Lansing, MI); Tehan, Frederick J. (Utica, NY); Lok, Mei Tak (Urbana, IL)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Analysis of national pay-as-you-drive insurance systems and other variable driving charges  

SciTech Connect

Under Pay as You Drive insurance (PAYD), drivers would pay part of their automobile insurance premium as a per-gallon surcharge every time they filled their gas tank. By transfering a portion of the cost of owning a vehicle from a fixed cost to a variable cost, PAYD would discourage driving. PAYD has been proposed recently in California as a means of reforming how auto insurance is provided. PAYD proponents claim that, by forcing drivers to purchase at least part of their insurance every time they refuel their car, PAYD would reduce or eliminate the need for uninsured motorist coverage. Some versions of PAYD proposed in California have been combined with a no-fault insurance system, with the intention of further reducing premiums for the average driver. Other states have proposed PAYD systems that would base insurance premiums on annual miles driven. In this report we discuss some of the qualitative issues surrounding adoption of PAYD and other policies that would convert other fixed costs of driving (vehicle registration, safety/emission control system inspection, and driver license renewal) to variable costs. We examine the effects of these policies on two sets of objectives: objectives related to auto insurance reform, and those related to reducing fuel consumption, CO{sub 2} emissions, and vehicle miles traveled. We pay particular attention to the first objective, insurance reform, since this has generated the most interest in PAYD to date, at least at the state level.

Wenzel, T.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area (Redirected from Columbus Salt Marsh Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure

415

Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA, Including Warm Ground, Borate Deposits, and Siliceous Alteration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

416

Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells...

417

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and...

418

Natural Convection Fluoride Salt High Temperature Reactor Process ...  

... oil shale processing, hydrogen production, and production of synfuels from coal. The new nuclear reactor design employs a molten salt coolant in a natural ...

419

Energy Department Completes Salt Coolant Material Transfer to...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Republic's Ministry of Industry and Trade to complete the transfer of 75 kilograms of fluoride salt from the Department's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to the Czech Nuclear...

420

Electrochemical Behavior of Calcium-Bismuth Alloys in Molten Salt ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The electrochemical properties of calcium-bismuth alloys were investigated to ... Behavior of Silicon Electrodepositing in Fluoride Molten Salts.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drive salt caverns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Synthesis of acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid ...  

A process of preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinc acid comprising: a) dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and hexamethylenetetramine in a ...

422

Haynesville-Bossier Shale Play, Texas-Louisiana Salt Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Haynesville-Bossier Shale Play, Texas-Louisiana Salt Basin Source: Energy Information Administration based on data from HPDI, TX Railroad Commission, ...

423

Savannah River Site (SRS) Experience with Preparing Salt Batches  

Beneficially reuse existing waste. 6 SRS Liquid Waste System Salt Processing. 7 Background Tk49 is the feed tank to ARP / MCU facilities

424

Molten salt bath circulation design for an electrolytic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrolytic cell for reduction of a metal oxide to a metal and oxygen has an inert anode and an upwardly angled roof covering the inert mode. The angled roof diverts oxygen bubbles into an upcomer channel, thereby agitating a molten salt bath in the upcomer channel and improving dissolution of a metal oxide in the molten salt bath. The molten salt bath has a lower velocity adjacent the inert anode in order to minimize corrosion by substances in the bath. A particularly preferred cell produces aluminum by electrolysis of alumina in a molten salt bath containing aluminum fluoride and sodium fluoride.

Dawless, Robert K. (Monroeville, PA); LaCamera, Alfred F. (Trafford, PA); Troup, R. Lee (Murrysville, PA); Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Hosler, Robert B. (Sarver, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Salt Fluxes for Alkali and Alkaline Earth Element Removal from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 1, 2001... for Alkali and Alkaline Earth Element Removal from Molten Aluminum ... Solid chloride salts containing MgC2 can be used to remove alkali...

426

Ion Beam Experiment to Simulate Simultaneous Molten Salt ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments to expose candidate materials to simultaneous molten salt corrosion and ion-beam damage are staged at the Ion Beam Materials Laboratory at Los...

427

Molten Salt Electrolysis for the Synthesis of Elemental Boron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alternative method using molten salt electrolysis was developed in this work. The electrolyte system evaluated was MgF2-NaF-LiF with...

428

Molten salt bath circulation design for an electrolytic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrolytic cell for reduction of a metal oxide to a metal and oxygen has an inert anode and an upwardly angled roof covering the inert mode. The angled roof diverts oxygen bubbles into an upcomer channel, thereby agitating a molten salt bath in the upcomer channel and improving dissolution of a metal oxide in the molten salt bath. The molten salt bath has a lower velocity adjacent the inert anode in order to minimize corrosion by substances in the bath. A particularly preferred cell produces aluminum by electrolysis of alumina in a molten salt bath containing aluminum fluoride and sodium fluoride. 4 figs.

Dawless, R.K.; LaCamera, A.F.; Troup, R.L.; Ray, S.P.; Hosler, R.B.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

429

Sensor Technology for Real Time Monitoring of Molten Salt ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Sensor Technology for Real Time Monitoring of Molten Salt Electrolytes During Nuclear Fuel Electrorefining. Author(s), Michael F. Simpson,...

430

Method for the production of uranium chloride salt  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the production of UCl.sub.3 salt without the use of hazardous chemicals or multiple apparatuses for synthesis and purification is provided. Uranium metal is combined in a reaction vessel with a metal chloride and a eutectic salt- and heated to a first temperature under vacuum conditions to promote reaction of the uranium metal with the metal chloride for the production of a UCl.sub.3 salt. After the reaction has run substantially to completion, the furnace is heated to a second temperature under vacuum conditions. The second temperature is sufficiently high to selectively vaporize the chloride salts and distill them into a condenser region.

Westphal, Brian R.; Mariani, Robert D.

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

431

Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development May 2011 August 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement...

432

Evaluation of the Miamsburg Salt-Gradient, Solar Pond  

SciTech Connect

This project is directed toward data collection and evaluation of the performance of the largest working, salt-gradient, solar pond in the world.

Wittenberg, Layton J.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Areas in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Regional Gravity...

434

Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements Title Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2010 Authors Fuller, Merrian C., Cathy Kunkel, Mark Zimring, Ian M. Hoffman, Katie L. Soroye, and Charles A. Goldman Tertiary Authors Borgeson, Merrian Pagination 136 Date Published 09/2010 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract Policy makers and program designers in the U.S. and abroad are deeply concerned with the question of how to scale up energy efficiency to a level that is commensurate both to the energy and climate challenges we face, and to the potential for energy savings that has been touted for decades. When policy makers ask what energy efficiency can do, the answers usually revolve around the technical and economic potential of energy efficiency-they rarely hone in on the element of energy demand that matters most for changing energy usage in existing homes: the consumer. A growing literature is concerned with the behavioral underpinnings of energy consumption. We examine a narrower, related subject: How can millions of Americans be persuaded to divert valued time and resources into upgrading their homes to eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy? With hundreds of millions of public dollars1 flowing into incentives, workforce training, and other initiatives to support comprehensive home energy improvements2, it makes sense to review the history of these programs and begin gleaning best practices for encouraging comprehensive home energy improvements. Looking across 30 years of energy efficiency programs that targeted the residential market, many of the same issues that confronted past program administrators are relevant today: How do we cost-effectively motivate customers to take action? Who can we partner with to increase program participation? How do we get residential efficiency programs to scale? While there is no proven formula-and only limited success to date with reliably motivating large numbers of Americans to invest in comprehensive home energy improvements, especially if they are being asked to pay for a majority of the improvement costs-there is a rich and varied history of experiences that new programs can draw upon. Our primary audiences are policy makers and program designers-especially those that are relatively new to the field, such as the over 2,000 towns, cities, states, and regions who are recipients of American Reinvestment and Recovery Act funds for clean energy programs. This report synthesizes lessons from first generation programs, highlights emerging best practices, and suggests methods and approaches to use in designing, implementing, and evaluating these programs. We examined 14 residential energy efficiency programs, conducted an extensive literature review, interviewed industry experts, and surveyed residential contractors to draw out these lessons.

435

Conceptual Design - Polar Drive Ignition Campaign  

SciTech Connect

The Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester is proposing a collaborative effort with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL), the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), and General Atomics (GA) with the goal of developing a cryogenic polar drive (PD) ignition platform on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The scope of this proposed project requires close discourse among theorists, experimentalists, and laser and system engineers. This document describes how this proposed project can be broken into a series of parallel independent activities that, if implemented, could deliver this goal in the 2017 timeframe. This Conceptual Design document is arranged into two sections: mission need and design requirements. Design requirements are divided into four subsystems: (1) A point design that details the necessary target specifications and laser pulse requirements; (2) The beam smoothing subsystem that describes the MultiFM 1D smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD); (3) New optical elements that include continuous phase plates (CPP's) and distributed polarization rotators (DPR's); and (4) The cryogenic target handling and insertion subsystem, which includes the design, fabrication, testing, and deployment of a dedicated PD ignition target insertion cryostat (PD-ITIC). This document includes appendices covering: the primary criteria and functional requirements, the system design requirements, the work breakdown structure, the target point design, the experimental implementation plan, the theoretical unknowns and technical implementation risks, the estimated cost and schedule, the development plan for the DPR's, the development plan for MultiFM 1D SSD, and a list of acronym definitions. While work on the facility modifications required for PD ignition has been in progress for some time, some of the technical details required to define the specific modifications for a Conceptual Design Review (CDR) remain to be defined. In all cases, the facility modifications represent functional changes to existing systems or capabilities. The bulk of the scope yet to be identified is associated with the DPR's and MultiFM beam smoothing. Detailed development plans for these two subsystems are provided in Appendices H and I; additional discussion of subsystem requirements based on the physics of PD ignition is given in Section 3. Accordingly, LLE will work closely with LLNL to develop detailed conceptual designs for the PD-specific facility modifications, including assessments of the operational impact of implementation (e.g., changing optics for direct rather than indirect-drive illumination and swapping from a hohlraum-based ITIC to one that supports PD). Furthermore, the experimental implementation plan represents the current best understanding of the experimental campaigns required to achieve PD ignition. This plan will evolve based on the lessons learned from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) and ongoing indirect-drive ignition experiments. The plan does not take the operational realities of the PD configuration into account; configuration planning for the proposed PD experiments is beyond the scope of this document.

Hansen, R

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

436

Conceptual Design - Polar Drive Ignition Campaign  

SciTech Connect

The Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester is proposing a collaborative effort with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL), the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), and General Atomics (GA) with the goal of developing a cryogenic polar drive (PD) ignition platform on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The scope of this proposed project requires close discourse among theorists, experimentalists, and laser and system engineers. This document describes how this proposed project can be broken into a series of parallel independent activities that, if implemented, could deliver this goal in the 2017 timeframe. This Conceptual Design document is arranged into two sections: mission need and design requirements. Design requirements are divided into four subsystems: (1) A point design that details the necessary target specifications and laser pulse requirements; (2) The beam smoothing subsystem that describes the MultiFM 1D smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD); (3) New optical elements that include continuous phase plates (CPP's) and distributed polarization rotators (DPR's); and (4) The cryogenic target handling and insertion subsystem, which includes the design, fabrication, testing, and deployment of a dedicated PD ignition target insertion cryostat (PD-ITIC). This document includes appendices covering: the primary criteria and functional requirements, the system design requirements, the work breakdown structure, the target point design, the experimental implementation plan, the theoretical unknowns and technical implementation risks, the estimated cost and schedule, the development plan for the DPR's, the development plan for MultiFM 1D SSD, and a list of acronym definitions. While work on the facility modifications required for PD ignition has been in progress for some time, some of the technical details required to define the specific modifications for a Conceptual Design Review (CDR) remain to be defined. In all cases, the facility modifications represent functional changes to existing systems or capabilities. The bulk of the scope yet to be identified is associated with the DPR's and MultiFM beam smoothing. Detailed development plans for these two subsystems are provided in Appendices H and I; additional discussion of subsystem requirements based on the physics of PD ignition is given in Section 3. Accordingly, LLE will work closely with LLNL to develop detailed conceptual designs for the PD-specific facility modifications, including assessments of the operational impact of implementation (e.g., changing optics for direct rather than indirect-drive illumination and swapping from a hohlraum-based ITIC to one that supports PD). Furthermore, the experimental implementation plan represents the current best understanding of the experimental campaigns required to achieve PD ignition. This plan will evolve based on the lessons learned from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) and ongoing indirect-drive ignition experiments. The plan does not take the operational realities of the PD configuration into account; configuration planning for the proposed PD experiments is beyond the scope of this document.

Hansen, R

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

437

An Overview of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transport Systems  

SciTech Connect

Heat transport is central to all thermal-based forms of electricity generation. The ever increasing demand for higher thermal efficiency necessitates power generation cycles transitioning to progressively higher temperatures. Similarly, the desire to provide direct thermal coupling between heat sources and higher temperature chemical processes provides the underlying incentive to move toward higher temperature heat transfer loops. As the system temperature rises, the available materials and technology choices become progressively more limited. Superficially, fluoride salts at {approx}700 C resemble water at room temperature being optically transparent and having similar heat capacity, roughly three times the viscosity, and about twice the density. Fluoride salts are a leading candidate heat-transport material at high temperatures. Fluoride salts have been extensively used in specialized industrial processes for decades, yet they have not entered widespread deployment for general heat transport purposes. This report does not provide an exhaustive screening of potential heat transfer media and other high temperature liquids such as alkali metal carbonate eutectics or chloride salts may have economic or technological advantages. A particular advantage of fluoride salts is that the technology for their use is relatively mature as they were extensively studied during the 1940s-1970s as part of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's program to develop molten salt reactors (MSRs). However, the instrumentation, components, and practices for use of fluoride salts are not yet developed sufficiently for commercial implementation. This report provides an overview of the current understanding of the technologies involved in liquid salt heat transport (LSHT) along with providing references to the more detailed primary information resources. Much of the information presented here derives from the earlier MSR program. However, technology has evolved over the intervening years, and this report also describes more recently developed technologies such as dry gas seals. This report also provides a high-level, parametric evaluation of LSHT loop performance to allow general intercomparisons between heat-transport fluid options as well as provide an overview of the properties and requirements for a representative loop. A compilation of relevant thermophysical properties of useful fluoride salts is also included for salt heat transport systems. Fluoride salts can be highly corrosive depending on the container materials selected, the salt chemistry, and the operating procedures used. The report includes an overview of the state-of-the-art in reduction-oxidation chemistry control methodologies employed to minimize corrosion issues. Salt chemistry control technology, however, remains at too low a level of understanding for widespread industrial usage. Loop operational issues such as start-up procedures and system freeze-up vulnerability are also discussed. Liquid fluoride salts are a leading candidate heat transport medium for high-temperature applications. This report provides an overview of the current status of liquid salt heat transport technology. The report includes a high-level, parametric evaluation of liquid fluoride salt heat transport loop performance to allow intercomparisons between heat-transport fluid options as well as providing an overview of the properties and requirements for a representative loop. Much of the information presented here derives from the earlier molten salt reactor program and a significant advantage of fluoride salts, as high temperature heat transport media is their consequent relative technological maturity. The report also includes a compilation of relevant thermophysical properties of useful heat transport fluoride salts. Fluoride salts are both thermally stable and with proper chemistry control can be relatively chemically inert. Fluoride salts can, however, be highly corrosive depending on the container materials selected, the salt chemistry, and the operating procedures used. The report also provides an over

Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit [ORNL

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Structural restoration of Louann Salt and overlying sediments, De Soto Canyon Salt Basin, northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The continental margin of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico is suited for seismic stratigraphic analysis and salt tectonism analysis. Jurassic strata include the Louann Salt on the continental shelf and upper slope of the Destin Dome OCS area, northeastern Gulf of Mexico. These sediments were deposited in a slowly subsiding, stable tectonic environment. Two-dimensional (2-D) seismic data, supplemented with well log, paleontologic and velocity information were used to infer structural and stratigraphic features, especially small faults in the deep part of the De Soto Canyon Salt Basin area. Six sequence boundaries or correlative paleohorizons were interpreted on Landmark seismic interpretation workstation. They are Base of Salt or Equivalent, Top of Salt, Top of Smackover Formation, Top of Cotton Valley Group, Middle Cretaceous sequence boundary, and Top of Upper Cretaceous. Information generated from structural and stratigraphic analysis are used to analyze the evolution of salt movement and salt mechanism in this area. I used a software package Restore (Dan Schultz-Ela and Ken Duncan, 1991) for structural restoration. This program is suitable for extensional terrane. The restoration of one depth section was achieved through steps introduced by Restore. Regional extension, gravity spreading, and gliding are the most important mechanism of salt flow, buoyancy and differential loading mainly contribute to the vertical development of salt structure in this area.

Guo, Mengdong

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Savannah River Site - Salt Waste Processing Facility: Briefing on the Salt Waste Processing Facility Independent Technical Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a presentation outlining the Salt Waste Processing Facility process, major risks, approach for conducting reviews, discussion of the findings, and conclusions.

440

Base drive and overlap protection circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An inverter (34) which provides power to an A. C. machine (28) is controlled by a circuit (36) employing PWM control strategy whereby A. C. power is supplied to the machine at a preselectable frequency and preselectable voltage. This is accomplished by the technique of waveform notching in which the shapes of the notches are varied to determine the average energy content of the overall waveform. Through this arrangement, the operational efficiency of the A. C. machine is optimized. The control circuit includes a microcomputer and memory element which receive various parametric inputs and calculate optimized machine control data signals therefrom. The control data is asynchronously loaded into the inverter through an intermediate buffer (38). A base drive and overlap protection circuit is included to insure that both transistors of a complimentary pair are not conducting at the same time. In its preferred embodiment, the present invention is incorporated within an electric vehicle (10) employing a 144 VDC battery pack (32) and a three-phase induction motor (18).

Gritter, David J. (Southfield, MI)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drive salt caverns" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Ketone Production from the Thermal Decomposition of Carboxylate Salts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MixAlco process uses an anaerobic, mixed-culture fermentation to convert lignocellulosic biomass to carboxylate salts. The fermentation broth must be clarified so that only carboxylate salts, water, and minimal impurities remain. Carboxylate salts are concentrated by evaporation and thermally decomposed into ketones. The ketones can then be chemically converted to a wide variety of chemicals and fuels. The presence of excess lime in the thermal decomposition step reduced product yield. Mixtures of calcium carboxylate salts were thermally decomposed at 450 degrees C. Low lime-to-salt ratios (g Ca(OH)2/g salt) of 0.00134 and less had a negligible effect on ketone yield. In contrast, salts with higher lime-to-salt ratios of 0.00461, 0.0190, and 0.272 showed 3.5, 4.6, and 9.4% loss in ketone yield, respectively. These losses were caused primarily by increases in tars and heavy oils; however, a three-fold increase in hydrocarbon production occurred as well. To predict ketone product distribution, a random-pairing and a Gibbs free energy minimization model were applied to thermal decompositions of mixed calcium and sodium carboxylate salts. Random pairing appears to better predict ketone product composition. For sodium and calcium acetate, two types of mixed sodium carboxylate salts, and two types of mixed calcium carboxylate salts, activation energy (EA) was determined using three isoconversional methods. For each salt type, EA varied significantly with conversion. The average EA for sodium and calcium acetate was 226.65 and 556.75 kJ/mol, respectively. The average EA for the two mixed sodium carboxylate salts were 195.61, and 218.18 kJ/mol. The average EA for the two mixed calcium carboxylate salts were 232.78, and 176.55 kJ/mol. In addition, three functions of conversion were employed to see which one best modeled the experimental data. The Sestak-Berggren model was the best overall. Possible reactor designs and configurations that address the challenges associated with the continuous thermal decomposition of carboxylate salts are also presented and discussed. Methods of fermentation broth clarification were tested. Flocculation showed little improvement in broth purity. Coagulation yielded broth of 93.23% purity. Filtration using pore sizes from 1 micrometer to 240 Daltons increased broth purity (90.79 to 98.33%) with decreasing pore size.

Landoll, Michael 1984-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Working on new gas turbine cycle for heat pump drive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Working on new gas turbine cycle for heat pump drive FILE COPY TAP By Irwin Stambler, Field Editor DO NOT 16 0 REMOVE 16 Small recuperated gas turbine engine, design rated at 13 hp and 27% efficiency of the cycle- as a heat pump drive for commercial installations. Company is testing prototype gas turbine

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

443

Minimizing Change Aversion for the Google Drive Launch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minimizing Change Aversion for the Google Drive Launch Abstract Change aversion is a natural of the Google Docs List to Google Drive, a product for file storage in the cloud. We describe actions­May 2, 2013, Paris, France. ACM 978-1-4503-1952-2/13/04. Aaron Sedley Google, Inc. 1600 Amphitheatre

Cortes, Corinna

444

Electromechanical coupling model for cutterhead driving system of shield machines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The synchronization of the cutterhead driving system of shield machines is affected by not only the nonlinearity of mechanical transmission mechanism and the characteristics of driving motors, but also their interaction. In this paper, dynamics of the ... Keywords: cutterhead, electromechanical coupling, synchronization

Jianzhong Sun; Ran Liu; Yaqin Luo; Wei Sun

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Computer Hard Drive Geolocation by HTTP Feature Extraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

files of a set of computers acquired in China, part of a larger research data set of real user data [10Computer Hard Drive Geolocation by HTTP Feature Extraction Technical Report UCSC-SSRC-12-04 May://www.ssrc.ucsc.edu/ #12;Computer Hard Drive Geolocation by HTTP Feature Extraction Ziqian Wan Sichuan University Alex J

Miller, Ethan L.

446

Driving Transformation to Energy Efficient Buildings:Policies and Actions |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Driving Transformation to Energy Efficient Buildings:Policies and Actions Driving Transformation to Energy Efficient Buildings:Policies and Actions Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Driving Transformation to Energy Efficient Buildings:Policies and Actions Agency/Company /Organization: Johnson Controls Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications Website: www.institutebe.com/ Cost: Free Driving Transformation to Energy Efficient Buildings:Policies and Actions Screenshot References: Driving Transformation to Energy Efficient Buildings:Policies and Actions[1] "The aim of this paper is to review policy options available for policymakers in developing countries that can accelerate energy efficiency improvements in the built environment and track results over time. It

447

Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive Provides 640 Turkeys to People in Need Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive Provides 640 Turkeys to People in Need November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Volunteers from West Valley Demonstration Project gather before distributing items collected in an annual food drive. Volunteers from West Valley Demonstration Project gather before distributing items collected in an annual food drive. Volunteer John Schelble helps unload a delivery truck at a food pantry. Volunteer John Schelble helps unload a delivery truck at a food pantry. John Rizzo passes canned food to John Rendall to deliver to a food pantry. John Rizzo passes canned food to John Rendall to deliver to a food pantry.

448

NREL: Fleet Test and Evaluation - Hydraulic Hybrid Drive Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydraulic Hybrid Drive Systems Hydraulic Hybrid Drive Systems NREL's Fleet Test and Evaluation Team conducts performance evaluations of hydraulic hybrid drive systems in delivery vehicles. Because hydraulic hybrids feature highly efficient regenerative braking systems and "engine off at idle" capabilities, they are ideal for parcel delivery applications where stop-and-go traffic is common. Hydraulic hybrid systems can capture up to 70% of the kinetic energy that would otherwise be lost during braking. This energy drives a pump, which transfers hydraulic fluid from a low-pressure reservoir to a high-pressure accumulator. When the vehicle accelerates, fluid in the high-pressure accumulator moves to the lower-pressure reservoir, which drives a motor and provides extra torque. This process can improve the vehicle's fuel economy

449

Test Drive: Honda FCX Clarity | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Test Drive: Honda FCX Clarity Test Drive: Honda FCX Clarity Test Drive: Honda FCX Clarity May 14, 2010 - 10:52am Addthis A member of the Energy Empowers team takes the Honda FCX Clarity for a drive outside the U.S. Department of Energy in Washington, D.C. | Photo by Sunita Satyapal A member of the Energy Empowers team takes the Honda FCX Clarity for a drive outside the U.S. Department of Energy in Washington, D.C. | Photo by Sunita Satyapal Paul Lester Communications Specialist for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Stepping into the driver's seat of the hydrogen powered Honda FCX Clarity is like stepping into the future. A glowing blue 3-D dashboard displays hydrogen and battery levels and a power button fires up fuel cells that provide electricity. An advanced braking system warns the driver about

450

Test Drive: Honda FCX Clarity | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Test Drive: Honda FCX Clarity Test Drive: Honda FCX Clarity Test Drive: Honda FCX Clarity May 14, 2010 - 10:52am Addthis A member of the Energy Empowers team takes the Honda FCX Clarity for a <