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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Drinking Water Problems: Lead  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lead in drinking water can damage the brain, kidneys, nervous system and red blood cells. This publication explains how lead can enter drinking water, how to have your water tested, and how to eliminate lead from drinking water.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

2

Drinking Water Problems: Copper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High levels of copper in drinking water can cause health problems. This publication explains the effects of copper in water and methods of removing it. 4 pp.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

3

Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High levels of nitrates in drinking water can be harmful for very young infants and susceptible adults. This publication explains how people are exposed to nitrates, what health effects are caused by them in drinking water and how to remove them.

Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

4

Drinking Water Problems: Arsenic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High levels of arsenic in drinking water can poison and even kill people. This publication explains the symptoms of arsenic poisoning and common treatment methods for removing arsenic from your water supply.

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

5

Drinking Water Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication explains the federal safety standards for drinking water provided by public water supply systems. It discusses the legal requirements for public water supplies, the maximum level allowed for contaminants in the water, and the potential health effects of each contaminant regulated. People who use water from private sources such as wells can also use these standards as a guide in checking whether their water is safe.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

6

Drinking Water Problems: Radionuclides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radionuclides in drinking water can cause serious health problems for people. This publication explains what the sources of radionuclides in water are, where high levels have been found in Texas, how they affect health and how to treat water to remove them.

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

7

Brookhaven's Drinking-Water Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Quality Water Quality The Lab's finished drinking water is produced with pride by the staff of BNL's Water Treatment Facility Home Groundwater Consumer Confidence Reports Water Treatment Process Resources Tap Water Recommendations Water Cooler Cleaning Additional Resources Brookhaven Lab Drinking Water Brookhaven produces its own drinking water for all employees, facility-users, guests, residents, and visitors on site at its Water Treatment Facility (WTF). BNL's drinking water is pumped from groundwater by five active wells and processed at the WTF which can handle up to 6 million gallons per day. The "finished" water is sent to the Lab's two storage towers and then distributed around the site via 45 miles of pipeline. To ensure that Brookhaven's water meets all applicable local, state, and

8

Drinking Water Problems: Radionuclides (Spanish)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radionuclides in drinking water can cause serious health problems for people. This publication explains what the sources of radionuclides in water are, where high levels have been found in Texas, how they affect health and how to treat water to remove them.

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

9

The Drinking Water Security and Safety Amendments of 2002: Is America's Drinking Water Infrastructure Safer Four Years Later?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Threats to Drinking Water Security . a.The Drinking Water Security and Safety Amendments2002: Is America's Drinking Water Infrastructure Safer Four

Shermer, Steven D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Safe Drinking Water Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Act Act Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Safe Drinking Water Act Year 1974 Url SDWA.jpg Description The Safe Drinking Water Act was established to protect the quality of drinking water in the U.S. References SDWA of 1974[1] Federal Oil and Gas[2] The Safe Drinking Water Act was established to protect the quality of drinking water in the U.S. This law focuses on all waters actually or potentially designated for drinking use, whether from above ground or underground sources. The Act authorized EPA to establish safe standards of purity and required all owners or operators of public water systems to comply with primary (health-related) standards. State governments, which assume this power from EPA, also encourage attainment of secondary standards (nuisance-related).

11

Arsenic Remediation of Bangladesh Drinking Water using Iron-oxide...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arsenic Remediation of Bangladesh Drinking Water using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash Title Arsenic Remediation of Bangladesh Drinking Water using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash...

12

Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund (New Mexico) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund (New Mexico) Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund (New Mexico) Eligibility Local Government Savings For Other Solar Buying & Making...

13

Drinking Water Program 1992 annual report  

SciTech Connect

EG&G Idaho, Inc., initiated a monitoring program for drinking water in 1988 for the US Department of Energy at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. EG&G Idaho structured this monitoring program to ensure that they exceeded the minimum regulatory requirements for monitoring drinking water. This program involves tracking the bacteriological, chemical, and radiological parameters that are required for a {open_quotes}community water system{close_quotes} (maximum requirements). This annual report describes the drinking water monitoring activities conducted at the 17 EG&G Idaho operated production wells and 11 distribution systems. It also contains all of the drinking water parameters that were detected and the regulatory limits that were exceeded during 1992. In addition, ground water quality is discussed as it relates to contaminants identified at the wellhead for EG&G Idaho production wells.

Andersen, B.D.; Peterson-Wright, L.J.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Occurrence and Potential Human-Health Relevance of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water from Domestic Wells in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Laboratory Reporting Level MCL, Maximum Contaminant Level MRL, Maximum Reporting Level MTBE, Methyl tert Figures 3 #12;Abstract BACKGROUND: As the population and demand for safe drinking water from domestic concentrations to U.S. EPA Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) and Health-Based Screening Levels. RESULTS: VOCs

15

THE EFFECT OF CHLORINE ON CORROSION IN DRINKING WATER SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table of Contents Abstract...................................................................................................................................................... 4 THE EFFECT OF CHLORINE ON CORROSION IN DRINKING WATER SYSTEMS.................................................................................................................................................. 5

F. Cantor; Jae K. Park, Ph.D.; Prasit Vaiyavatjamai

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Performance Comparison of Large Diameter Residential Drinking Water Wells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Published scientific work indicates that residential large diameter drinking water wells are at a higher risk of contamination from surface water impacts than drilled wells.… (more)

Javor, Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

DW = Drinking Water NPW = Non-Potable Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Key: Matrices: DW = Drinking Water NPW = Non-Potable Water SCM = Solid and Chemical Materials PA 17322 717-878-2858 Douglas F. Zeigler S BNPW Hunsberger- DW: NPW: SCM: 0374301 GettysburgCarthy- DW: NPW: SCM: 0071501 Knouse Foods Cooperative Inc - Environmental Laboratory 53 East Hanover Street

Colby, Ralph H.

18

Mineral balances, including in drinking water, estimated for Merced County dairy herds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and daily drinking-water intake, calculated using NRC (2001)they represent total water intake. Feeding certain mineralsand daily drinking water intake, which was calcu- lated

Castillo, Alejandro R Dr.; Santos, Jose Eduardo P.; Tabone, Tom J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Reassessing Radon in Drinking Water: Searching for Perspective on Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reassessing Radon in Drinking Water: Searching for Perspective on Radiation Reassessing Radon in Drinking Water: Searching for Perspective on Radiation Risks Speaker(s): Richard Sextro Date: October 27, 1998 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3148 Although most of the exposures to radon and its radioactive decay products arise from indoor airborne radon originating in the soil adjacent to buildings, some contact with radon can occur due to its presence in drinking water. The exposures and health risks associated with radon dissolved in drinking water are typically much smaller, although the magnitude of the exposures and risks have been uncertain and the subject of some controversy. The 1996 Amendments to the (U.S.) Safe Drinking Water Act required the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to contract with the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to re-evaluate the risks associated with

20

Taps: The Dangers of Drinking Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of food groups and water intake to colon cancer risk. Cancerexamined both solid food intake and water consumption. Women

Burgess, Michael

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Taps: The Dangers of Drinking Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

produced this study "as part of a formal petition to the FDA calling on the agency to strengthen national bottled water regulations

Burgess, Michael

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Drinking Water Problems: Iron and Manganese  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iron and manganese can give water an unpleasant taste, odor and color. In this publication you'll learn how to know whether your water contains iron or manganese and how to eliminate these contaminants with various treatment methods such as aeration and chemical oxidation.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

23

2012 Edition of the Drinking Water Standards and Health Advisories (EPA 822-S-12-001)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Edition of the Drinking Edition of the Drinking Water Standards and Health Advisories 2012 Edition of the Drinking Water Standards and Health Advisories EPA 822-S-12-001 Office of Water U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC Spring 2012 Date of update: April, 2012 Recycled/Recyclable Printed on paper that contains at least 50% recycled fiber. Drinking Water Standards and Health Advisories Spring 2012 Page iii of vi iii The Health Advisory (HA) Program, sponsored by the EPA's Office of Water (OW), publishes concentrations of drinking water contaminants at Drinking Water Specific Risk Level Concentration for cancer (10 -4 Cancer Risk) and concentrations of drinking water contaminants at which noncancer adverse health effects are not anticipated to occur over specific exposure

24

Residential exposure to drinking water arsenic in Inner Mongolia, China  

SciTech Connect

In the Ba Men region of Inner Mongolia, China, a high prevalence of chronic arsenism has been reported in earlier studies. A survey of the arsenic contamination among wells from groundwater was conducted to better understand the occurrence of arsenic (As) in drinking water. A total of 14,866 wells (30% of all wells in the region) were analyzed for their arsenic-content. Methods used to detect arsenic were Spectrophotometric methods with DCC-Ag (detection limit, 0.5 {mu}g of As/L); Spot method (detection limit, 10 {mu}g of As/L); and air assisted Colorimetry method (detection limit, 20 {mu}g of As/L). Arsenic-concentrations ranged from below limit of detection to 1200 {mu}g of As/L. Elevated concentrations were related to well depth (10 to 29 m), the date the well was built (peaks from 1980-1990), and geographic location (near mountain range). Over 25,900 individuals utilized wells with drinking water arsenic concentrations above 20 {mu}g of As/L (14,500 above 50 {mu}g of As/L-the current China national standard in drinking water and 2198 above 300 {mu}g of As/L). The presented database of arsenic in wells of the Ba Men region provides a useful tool for planning future water explorations when combined with geological information as well as support for designing upcoming epidemiological studies on the effects of arsenic in drinking water for this region.

Ning Zhixiong [Ba Men Anti-Epidemic Station, Lin He, Inner Mongolia (China); Lobdell, Danelle T. [Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch, Human Studies Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA, Chapel Hill (United States); Kwok, Richard K. [RTI International, P.O. Box 12194, 3040 Cornwallis Rd, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2194 (United States)], E-mail: rkwok@rti.org; Liu Zhiyi; Zhang Shiying; Ma Chenglong [Ba Men Anti-Epidemic Station, Lin He, Inner Mongolia (China); Riediker, Michael [Institut Universitaire Romand de Sante au Travail, Lausanne (Switzerland); Mumford, Judy L. [Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch, Human Studies Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA, Chapel Hill (United States)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Arsenic in drinking water and lung cancer: A systematic review  

SciTech Connect

Exposure to inorganic arsenic via drinking water is a growing public health concern. We conducted a systematic review of the literature examining the association between arsenic in drinking water and the risk of lung cancer in humans. Towards this aim, we searched electronic databases for articles published through April 2006. Nine ecological studies, two case-control studies, and six cohort studies were identified. The majority of the studies were conducted in areas of high arsenic exposure (100 {mu}g/L) such as southwestern Taiwan, the Niigata Prefecture, Japan, and Northern Chile. Most of the studies reported markedly higher risks of lung cancer mortality or incidence in high arsenic areas compared to the general population or a low arsenic exposed reference group. The quality assessment showed that, among the studies identified, only four assessed arsenic exposure at the individual level. Further, only one of the ecological studies presented results adjusted for potential confounders other than age; of the cohort and case-control studies, only one-half adjusted for cigarette smoking status in the analysis. Despite these methodologic limitations, the consistent observation of strong, statistically significant associations from different study designs carried out in different regions provide support for a causal association between ingesting drinking water with high concentrations of arsenic and lung cancer. The lung cancer risk at lower exposure concentrations remains uncertain.

Celik, Ismail [Department of Medical Oncology, Hacettepe University Institute of Oncology, Ankara (Turkey); Gallicchio, Lisa [Prevention and Research Center, Mercy Medical Center (United States); Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Boyd, Kristina; Lam, Tram K.; Matanoski, Genevieve [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Tao Xuguang [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States); Shiels, Meredith; Hammond, Edward [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Chen Liwei [Department of International Health, Center for Human Nutrition, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Robinson, Karen A. [Department of General Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States); Caulfield, Laura E. [Department of International Health, Center for Human Nutrition, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Herman, James G. [Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States); Guallar, Eliseo [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Alberg, Anthony J. [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Hollings Cancer Center, and Department of Biostatistics, Bioinformatics and Epidemiology, Medical University of South Carolina (United States)], E-mail: alberg@musc.edu

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

GRR/Section 6-UT-c - Drinking Water Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6-UT-c - Drinking Water Permit 6-UT-c - Drinking Water Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-UT-c - Drinking Water Permit 06UTCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies R309-100 Administration: Drinking Water Program Utah Water Well Rules R655-4 Safe Drinking Water Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06UTCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Public water systems are responsible for drinking water infastructure,

27

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results & Policy Implications Title Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results & Policy Implications Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2009 Authors Mathieu, Johanna L., Ashok J. Gadgil, Kristin Kowolik, and Susan E. Addy Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract of arsenic from drinking water in Bangladesh. During fieldwork in four sub-districts of the country, ARUBA reduced arsenic levels ranging from 200 to 900 ppb to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. The technology is cost-effective because the substrate-bottom ash from coal fired power plants-is a waste material readily available in South Asia. In comparison to similar technologies, ARUBA uses less media for arsenic removal due to its high surface area to volume ratio. Hence, less waste is produced. A number of experiments were conducted in Bangladesh to determine the effectiveness of various water treatment protocols. It was found that (1) ARUBA removes more thanhalf of the arsenic from water within five minutes of treatment, (2) ARUBA, that has settled at the bottom of a treatment vessel, continues to remove arsenic for 2-3 days, (3) ARUBA's arsenic removal efficiency can be improved through sequential partial dosing (adding a given amount of ARUBA in fractions versus all at once), and (4) allowing water to first stand for two to three days followed by treatment with ARUBA produced final arsenic levels ten times lower than treating water directly out of the well. Our findings imply a number of tradeoffs between ARUBA's effective arsenic removal capacity, treatment system costs, and waste output. These tradeoffs, some a function of arsenic-related policies in Bangladesh (e.g., waste disposal regulations), must be considered when designing anarsenic removal system. We propose that the most attractive option is to use ARUBA in communityscale water treatment centers, installed as public-private partnerships, in Bangladeshi villages

28

Combined heat and power for drinking water production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ABB Kraftwerke AG, of Mannheim, Germany, is presently involved in two huge projects aimed at supplying electric power and drinking water in the Arabian Gulf. To limit fuel consumption as much as possible, electricity and water are produced in CHP plants. These plants are powered either by gas turbines equipped with HRSGs, or by conventional boilers feeding controlled extraction-condensing steam turbines. The selection of one of the two systems depends mainly on the type of fuel available (oil or natural gas), on the power/water loads through the year and other local factors. The gas turbine-based CHP systems can be setup in a shorter time and feature a slightly higher overall efficiency. The steam turbine solution, once the plant is commissioned, needs less maintenance. In the final analysis, operating costs of the two solutions are equivalent.

Chellini, R.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

GRR/Section 6-AK-c - Drinking Water Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6-AK-c - Drinking Water Permit 6-AK-c - Drinking Water Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-AK-c - Drinking Water Permit 06AKCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation Regulations & Policies 18 AAC 80 Drinking Water 40 CFR 141 40 CFR 142 40 CFR 143 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06AKCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Alaska's drinking water program is monitored under the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation. The type of permit required depends on the

30

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY An ENERGY STAR Resource Guidedrinking water supply industry to reduce energy consumptionenergy is used in the public drinking water supply industry.

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Drinking water quality standards and standard tests: Worldwide. (Latest citations from Food Science & Technology Abstracts (FSTA)). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the laws, regulations, standards, and testing methods for drinking water from domestic and international sources. Citations discuss quality standardization and control. Topics include safety codes for drinking water systems and installations, contaminated water and toxicity analyses, biological and chemical standards, diseases derived from drinking water, plastic materials for water packaging, and natural mineral drinking water. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Hawaii Department of Health Safe Drinking Water Branch | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Branch Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Health Safe Drinking Water Branch Address 919 Ala Moana Blvd Room 308 Place Honolulu, Hawaii Zip 96814 Coordinates 21.294755°, -157.858979° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.294755,"lon":-157.858979,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

33

Determining the removal effectiveness of flame retardants from drinking water treatment processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low concentrations of xenobiotic chemicals have recently become a concern in the surface water environment. The concern expands to drinking water treatment processes, and whether or not they remove these chemicals while ...

Lin, Joseph C. (Joseph Chris), 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

TO: US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001, which works to improve public water supply and sanitation. Thank you for the opportunity to submit a comment on the viability of bottled water as an alternative compliance option for chronic water contaminants for non-transient noncommunity water systems (NTNCWS), which are regulated under the Safe Water Drinking Act (SDWA) and 40 CFR s.141.101. Currently, bottled water may not be used by public water systems to achieve compliance with a Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL). This has been the policy over the past eight years. However, bottled water may be used on a temporary basis to avoid unreasonable risk to health. NTNCWS are public water systems. To put matters into perspective: According to the “Public Drinking Water Systems: Facts and Figures ” page on the EPA web site, last updated on February 28, 2006, almost 284 million people in the US are served by public water systems. Of these, only 6.9 million, or just under 2.5%, are served by NTNCWS. There are a total of 20,559 NTNCWS in the US. Type of Water Source: ? 821 of these systems rely on surface water, and serve 932,000 people.

Non-transient Non-community; Water Systems; Comment Arthur Cohen; Mph Convenor Of Saniplan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Treated bottom ash medium and method of arsenic removal from drinking water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for low-cost arsenic removal from drinking water using chemically prepared bottom ash pre-treated with ferrous sulfate and then sodium hydroxide. Deposits on the surface of particles of bottom ash form of activated iron adsorbent with a high affinity for arsenic. In laboratory tests, a miniscule 5 grams of pre-treated bottom ash was sufficient to remove the arsenic from 2 liters of 2400 ppb (parts per billion) arsenic-laden water to a level below 50 ppb (the present United States Environmental Protection Agency limit). By increasing the amount of pre-treated bottom ash, even lower levels of post-treatment arsenic are expected. It is further expected that this invention supplies a very low-cost solution to arsenic poisoning for large population segments.

Gadgil, Ashok (El Cerrito, CA)

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

36

GRR/Section 6-NV-c - Drinking Water Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 6-NV-c - Drinking Water Permit GRR/Section 6-NV-c - Drinking Water Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-NV-c - Drinking Water Permit 06NVCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Nevada Division of Water Resources Nevada Division of Environmental Protection Public Utilities Commission of Nevada Regulations & Policies NRS 445A Water Controls NAC 445A Water Controls (Regulations) Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06NVCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative According to NRS 445A, the Nevada Division of Water Resources is charged

37

Drinking Water as a Source of Indoor Air Pollution: In-Home Formation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drinking Water as a Source of Indoor Air Pollution: In-Home Formation & Cross-Media Transfer Speaker(s): David Olson Date: April 19, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host...

38

The Drinking Water Security and Safety Amendments of 2002: Is America's Drinking Water Infrastructure Safer Four Years Later?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pumping station, or water intake could deprive large areasthe pre-treatment and water intake part of the system; and 'around intakes; intruder resis- tant fences enclosing water

Shermer, Steven D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Removal of beryllium from drinking water by chemical coagulation and lime softening  

SciTech Connect

The effectiveness of conventional drinking water treatment and lime softening was evaluated for beryllium removal from two drinking water sources. Jar test studies were conducted to determine how common coagulants (aluminum sulfate and ferric chloride) and lime softening performed in removing beryllium from spiked waters. Centrifugation was used to simulate filtration. The two source waters used were raw Ohio River water and groundwater from the Great Miami Aquifer. The impact of initial beryllium concentration, coagulant dose, turbidity and pH on beryllium removal was examined and optimum treatment conditions were determined. Jar tests using alum and ferric chloride coagulants were able to achieve 95% and 85% removal of beryllium respectively from surface water. Removal efficiency increased as the pH was increased. Based on the data collected in the study, coprecipitation and precipitation are the two likely mechanisms responsible for beryllium removal.

Lytle, D.A.; Summers, R.S.; Sorg, T.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

COST IMPACT OF SAFE DRINKING WATER ACT COMPLIANCE FOR COMMISSION-REGULATED WATER UTILITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(NRRI) with funding provided by participating member commissions of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC). The views and opinions of the authors do not necessarily state or reflect the views, opinions, or policies of the NRRI, the NARUC, or NARUC member commissions. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This study was prepared for state public utility commissioners and their staff in response to the growing concern about the effect of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) on water utilities under their jurisdiction. Compliance with the SDWA is expected to have a significant impact on water utilities and the rates they charge for service. A sensitivity analysis was developed for this report using a hypothetical water company to identify the costs associated with alternative treatment processes. A total of eighteen different treatment processes are considered, from conventional treatment to granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption and reverse osmosis. Capital costs for these processes range from $100,000 to $3.25 million for a water plant with a designed capacity of one million

Patrick C. Mann; Janice A. Beecher

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Methane contamination of drinking water accompanying gas-well drilling and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- matically increasing natural-gas extraction. In aquifers overlying the Marcellus and Utica shale formations of drinking water associated with shale- gas extraction. In active gas-extraction areas (one or more gas wells methane sources such as the Marcellus and Utica shales at the active sites and matched gas geochemistry

42

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas Pennsylvania, ex- amining natural gas concentrations and isotopic signatures with proximity to shale gas wells this transformation, with shale gas and other unconventional sources now yielding more than one- half of all US

Jackson, Robert B.

43

Estimated Water Flows in 2005: United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flow charts depicting water use in the United States have been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of water use patterns. Approximately 410,500 million gallons per day of water are managed throughout the United States for use in farming, power production, residential, commercial, and industrial applications. Water is obtained from four major resource classes: fresh surface-water, saline (ocean) surface-water, fresh groundwater and saline (brackish) groundwater. Water that is not consumed or evaporated during its use is returned to surface bodies of water. The flow patterns are represented in a compact 'visual atlas' of 52 state-level (all 50 states in addition to Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands) and one national water flow chart representing a comprehensive systems view of national water resources, use, and disposition.

Smith, C A; Belles, R D; Simon, A J

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

44

Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund (New Mexico) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All...

45

The effects of wavelength, metals, and reactive oxygen species on the sunlight inactivation of microorganisms: observations and applications to the solar disinfection of drinking water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of batch-process solar disinfectors. Water Research 35(4),Batch process solar disinfection is an efficient means of disinfecting drinking water

Fisher, Michael Benjamin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Study on radon and radium concentrations in drinking water in west region of Iran  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the most important characterizations of social health is existence the availability of safe drinking water. Since one of the sources of water contamination is nuclear contamination from radon gas, so in this research radon 222 concentration levels in water supplies in the Toyserkan (a region located in the west of Iran) is investigated. For measuring radon gas in water wells and springs Lucas chamber method is used. Review the results of these measurements that taken from 15th place show that, only five sites have radon concentrations above the limit dose. To reduce radon concentration, it is better to keep water in open pools in contact with air before the water is delivered to users.

Forozani, Ghasem

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Fisk-based criteria to support validation of detection methods for drinking water and air.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was prepared to support the validation of analytical methods for threat contaminants under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC) program. It is designed to serve as a resource for certain applications of benchmark and fate information for homeland security threat contaminants. The report identifies risk-based criteria from existing health benchmarks for drinking water and air for potential use as validation targets. The focus is on benchmarks for chronic public exposures. The priority sources are standard EPA concentration limits for drinking water and air, along with oral and inhalation toxicity values. Many contaminants identified as homeland security threats to drinking water or air would convert to other chemicals within minutes to hours of being released. For this reason, a fate analysis has been performed to identify potential transformation products and removal half-lives in air and water so appropriate forms can be targeted for detection over time. The risk-based criteria presented in this report to frame method validation are expected to be lower than actual operational targets based on realistic exposures following a release. Note that many target criteria provided in this report are taken from available benchmarks without assessing the underlying toxicological details. That is, although the relevance of the chemical form and analogues are evaluated, the toxicological interpretations and extrapolations conducted by the authoring organizations are not. It is also important to emphasize that such targets in the current analysis are not health-based advisory levels to guide homeland security responses. This integrated evaluation of chronic public benchmarks and contaminant fate has identified more than 200 risk-based criteria as method validation targets across numerous contaminants and fate products in drinking water and air combined. The gap in directly applicable values is considerable across the full set of threat contaminants, so preliminary indicators were developed from other well-documented benchmarks to serve as a starting point for validation efforts. By this approach, at least preliminary context is available for water or air, and sometimes both, for all chemicals on the NHSRC list that was provided for this evaluation. This means that a number of concentrations presented in this report represent indirect measures derived from related benchmarks or surrogate chemicals, as described within the many results tables provided in this report.

MacDonell, M.; Bhattacharyya, M.; Finster, M.; Williams, M.; Picel, K.; Chang, Y.-S.; Peterson, J.; Adeshina, F.; Sonich-Mullin, C.; Environmental Science Division; EPA

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

48

Decontamination of Biological Threats in Water Supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decontamination of Biological Threats in Water Supplies. ... The availability of safe pure drinking water in the United States is taken for granted. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Persistence and decontamination of surrogate radioisotopes in a model drinking water distribution system  

SciTech Connect

Contamination of a model drinking water system with surrogate radioisotopes was examined with respect to persistence on and decontamination of infrastructure surfaces. Cesium and cobalt chloride salts were used as surrogates for cesium-137 and cobalt-60. Studies were conducted in biofilm annular reactors containing heavily corroded iron surfaces formed under shear and constantly submerged in drinking water. Cesium was not detected on the corroded iron surface after equilibration with 10 and 100 mg L{sup -1} solutions of cesium chloride, but cobalt was detected on corroded iron coupons at both initial concentrations. The amount of adhered cobalt decreased over the next six weeks, but was still present when monitoring stopped. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) showed that adhered cobalt was in the III oxidation state. The adsorbed cobalt was strongly resistant to decontamination by various physicochemical methods. Simulated flushing, use of free chlorine and dilute ammonia were found to be ineffective whereas use of aggressive methods like 14.5 M ammonia and 0.36 M sulfuric acid removed 37 and 92% of the sorbed cobalt, respectively.

Szabo, Jeffrey G.; Impellitteri, Christopher A.; Govindaswamy, Shekar; Hall, John S.; (EPA); (Lakeshore)

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

50

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash Title Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2010 Authors Mathieu, Johanna L., Ashok J. Gadgil, Susan E. Addy, and Kristin Kowolik Journal Environmental Science and Health Keywords airflow and pollutant transport group, arsenic, bangladesh, coal bottom ash, drinking water, indoor environment department, water contaminants, water treatment Abstract We describe laboratory and field results of a novel arsenic removal adsorbent called 'Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash' (ARUBA). ARUBA is prepared by coating particles of coal bottom ash, a waste material from coal fired power plants, with iron (hydr)oxide. The coating process is simple and conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Material costs for ARUBA are estimated to be low (~$0.08 per kg) and arsenic remediation with ARUBA has the potential to be affordable to resource-constrained communities. ARUBA is used for removing arsenic via a dispersal-and-removal process, and we envision that ARUBA would be used in community-scale water treatment centers. We show that ARUBA is able to reduce arsenic concentrations in contaminated Bangladesh groundwater to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. Using the Langmuir isotherm (R2 = 0.77) ARUBA's adsorption capacity in treating real groundwater is 2.6×10-6 mol/g (0.20 mg/g). Time-to-90% (defined as the time interval for ARUBA to remove 90% of the total amount of arsenic that is removed at equilibrium) is less than one hour. Reaction rates (pseudo-second-order kinetic model, R2 ≥ 0.99) increase from 2.4×105 to 7.2×105 g mol-1 min-1 as the groundwater arsenic concentration decreases from 560 to 170 ppb. We show that ARUBA's arsenic adsorption density (AAD), defined as the milligrams of arsenic removed at equilibrium per gram of ARUBA added, is linearly dependent on the initial arsenic concentration of the groundwater sample, for initial arsenic concentrations of up to 1600 ppb and an ARUBA dose of 4.0 g/L. This makes it easy to determine the amount of ARUBA required to treat a groundwater source when its arsenic concentration is known and less than 1600 ppb. Storing contaminated groundwater for two to three days before treatment is seen to significantly increase ARUBA's AAD. ARUBA can be separated from treated water by coagulation and clarification, which is expected to be less expensive than filtration of micron-scale particles, further contributing to the affordability of a community-scale water treatment center

51

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph Bottled Water: United States Consumers and Their Perceptions of Water Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Consumption of bottled water is increasing worldwide. Prior research shows many consumers believe bottled water is convenient and has better taste than tap water, despite reports of a number of water quality incidents with bottled water. The authors explore the demographic and social factors associated with bottled water users in the U.S. and the relationship between bottled water use and perceptions of the quality of local water supply. They find that U.S. consumers are more likely to report bottled water as their primary drinking water source when they perceive that drinking water is not safe. Furthermore, those who give lower ratings to the quality of their ground water are more likely to regularly purchase bottle water for drinking and use bottle water as their primary drinking water source.

Zhihua Hu; Lois Wright Morton; Robert L. Mahler

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Drinking water arsenic exposure and blood pressure in healthy women of reproductive age in Inner Mongolia, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extremely high exposure levels evaluated in prior investigations relating elevated levels of drinking water arsenic and hypertension prevalence make extrapolation to potential vascular effects at lower exposure levels very difficult. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 8790 women who had recently been pregnant in an area of Inner Mongolia, China known to have a gradient of drinking water arsenic exposure. This study observed increased systolic blood pressure levels with increasing drinking water arsenic, at lower exposure levels than previously reported in the literature. As compared to the referent category (below limit of detection to 20 {mu}g of As/L), the overall population mean systolic blood pressure rose 1.29 mm Hg (95% CI 0.82, 1.75), 1.28 mm Hg (95% CI 0.49, 2.07), and 2.22 mm Hg (95% CI 1.46, 2.97) as drinking water arsenic concentration increased from 21 to 50, 51 to 100, and > 100 {mu}g of As/L, respectively. Controlling for age and body weight (n = 3260), the population mean systolic blood pressure rose 1.88 mm Hg (95% CI 1.03, 2.73), 3.90 mm Hg (95% CI 2.52, 5.29), and 6.83 mm Hg (95% CI 5.39, 8.27) as drinking water arsenic concentration increased, respectively. For diastolic blood pressure effect, while statistically significant, was not as pronounced as systolic blood pressure. Mean diastolic blood pressure rose 0.78 mm Hg (95% CI 0.39, 1.16), 1.57 mm Hg (95% CI 0.91, 2.22) and 1.32 mm Hg (95% CI 0.70, 1.95), respectively, for the overall population and rose 2.11 mm Hg (95% CI 1.38, 2.84), 2.74 mm Hg (95% CI 1.55, 3.93), and 3.08 mm Hg (95% CI 1.84, 4.31), respectively, for the adjusted population (n = 3260) at drinking water arsenic concentrations of 21 to 50, 51 to 100, and > 100 {mu}g of As/L. If our study results are confirmed in other populations, the potential burden of cardiovascular disease attributable to drinking water arsenic is significant.

Kwok, Richard K. [RTI International, PO Box 12194, 3040 Cornwallis Rd., Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2194 (United States)], E-mail: rkwok@rti.org; Mendola, Pauline [Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch, Human Studies Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, MD-58, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Liu Zhiyi [Ba Men Anti-Epidemic Station, Lin He, Inner Mongolia (China); Savitz, David A. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1057, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Heiss, Gerardo [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Ling Heling [Ba Men Anti-Epidemic Station, Lin He, Inner Mongolia (China); Xia Yajuan [Inner Mongolia Center for Endemic Disease Control and Research, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia (China); Lobdell, Danelle [Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch, Human Studies Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, MD-58, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Zeng Donglin [Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Thorp, John M. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Creason, John P.; Mumford, Judy L. [Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch, Human Studies Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, MD-58, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results and Policy Implications  

SciTech Connect

ARUBA (Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash) has proven effective at removing high concentrations of arsenic from drinking water in Bangladesh. During fieldwork in four sub-districts of the country, ARUBA reduced arsenic levels ranging from 200 to 900 ppb to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. The technology is cost-effective because the substrate--bottom ash from coal fired power plants--is a waste material readily available in South Asia. In comparison to similar technologies, ARUBA uses less media for arsenic removal due to its high surface area to volume ratio. Hence, less waste is produced. A number of experiments were conducted in Bangladesh to determine the effectiveness of various water treatment protocols. It was found that (1) ARUBA removes more than half of the arsenic from water within five minutes of treatment, (2) ARUBA, that has settled at the bottom of a treatment vessel, continues to remove arsenic for 2-3 days, (3) ARUBA's arsenic removal efficiency can be improved through sequential partial dosing (adding a given amount of ARUBA in fractions versus all at once), and (4) allowing water to first stand for two to three days followed by treatment with ARUBA produced final arsenic levels ten times lower than treating water directly out of the well. Our findings imply a number of tradeoffs between ARUBA's effective arsenic removal capacity, treatment system costs, and waste output. These tradeoffs, some a function of arsenic-related policies in Bangladesh (e.g., waste disposal regulations), must be considered when designing an arsenic removal system. We propose that the most attractive option is to use ARUBA in communityscale water treatment centers, installed as public-private partnerships, in Bangladeshi villages.

Mathieu, Johanna L.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Kowolik, Kristin; Addy, Susan E.A.

2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

54

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect

As American drinking water agencies face higher production costs, demand, and energy prices, they seek opportunities to reduce costs without negatively affecting the quality of the water they deliver. This guide describes resources for cost-effectively improving the energy efficiency of U.S. public drinking water facilities. The guide (1) describes areas of opportunity for improving energy efficiency in drinking water facilities; (2) provides detailed descriptions of resources to consult for each area of opportunity; (3) offers supplementary suggestions and information for the area; and (4) presents illustrative case studies, including analysis of cost-effectiveness.

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich; Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Brown, Rich

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

55

High density polyethylene (HDPE) containers as an alternative to polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles for solar disinfection of drinking water in northern region, Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to investigate the technical feasibility of high density polyethylene (HDPE) containers as an alternative to polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles for the solar disinfection of drinking water ...

Yazdani, Iman

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Policy Office of Drinking Water Title: Two-connection Residential Water System Number: P A.13 – Administration References: WAC 246-291-030(3) Supersedes: P A.13 Two Connection Residential Public Water Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Drinking Water policies are written descriptions of the approach taken by the Office to implement a statute, regulation, court order, or other agency order, and may include the Office’s current practice, procedure, or method of action based on that approach. Any generally applicable directives or criteria that provide the basis for imposing penalties or sanctions, or for granting or denying Office approvals, must either be in statute or established in a rule. PURPOSE The Office of Drinking Water will waive all water system requirements for water systems with only two-residential connections, where each connection is a single family home. NOTE: This policy does not prevent a local health jurisdiction from regulating two-connection residential water systems. DIRECTION When individuals propose a water system with only two residential connections, where each connection is only a single family home, the Office of Drinking Water will provide a copy of this policy and notice which states the Office of Drinking Water has waived the requirements of chapter 246-291 WAC. The Office of Drinking Water will direct individuals to check with their local

Contact Karen Valenzuela; Denise A. Clifford; Office Of Drinking Water

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

WATER RESOURCES Water Resources is a unit concerned with the development of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Institutional Aspects of Water Resources Management," 1975 background paper produced by the Food and Agricultureq SECTION II WATER RESOURCES Water Resources is a unit concerned with the development of public policy and the use or misuse of the national water supply. Subsection topics in this unit are general

US Army Corps of Engineers

58

A Ten-year Survey of Giardia Cysts in Drinking Water Supplies of Seoul, the Republic of Korea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: To understand the distribution of Giardia cysts in drinking water supplies in Seoul, Korea, we collected water samples quarterly at 6 intakes in the Han River, its largest stream and 6 conventional water treatment plants (WTPs) serving drinking water, from 2000 to 2009. Giardia cysts in each of 10 L water were confirmed in 35.0 % of intake water samples and the arithmetic mean was 1.65 cysts/10 L (range 0-35 cysts/10 L). The lowest cyst density was observed at Paldang and Kangbuk intakes, and the pollution level was higher at 4 intakes downstream. It seemed that these 4 intakes were under influence of Wangsuk stream at the end of which cysts were found in all samples with the mean of 140 cysts/10 L. The annual mean number of cysts was 0.21-4.21 cysts/10 L, and the cyst level at the second half of the 10 years was about 1/5 of that at first half on average. The cysts were more frequently found in winter, and their mean density was 3.74 cysts/10 L in winter and 0.80-1.08 cysts/10 L in other seasons. All finished water samples collected at 6 WTPs were negative for Giardia in each of 100 L sample for 10 years and cyst removal by physical process was average 2.9-log. It was concluded that conventional water treatment at 6 WTPs of Seoul appears to remove the cysts effectively under the present level of their source water. Domestic wastewater from the urban region could be an important source of Giardia pollution

Mok-young Lee; Eun-joo Cho; Jin-hyo Lee; Sun-hee Han; Yong-sang Park

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Analysis of Water Rate Escalations across the United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis of Water Rate Escalations across the United States Analysis of Water Rate Escalations across the United States Elisabeth Giever Kate McMordie Stoughton Susan Loper October 2010 Executive Summary This document provides an overview of an analysis that examined changes in water rates across the country to develop a basic understanding of water rate escalations and how water rates are impacted from outside influences. The analysis investigated how water rates are influenced by the geographic region, water source, and drought tendencies. For example, one observation of the analysis found that cities located in regions of long term drought may have higher escalation rates than cities in water rich environments. Typical escalation rates were found to be between 4 and 8%. This information can be

60

United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Water Washington, D. C. 20460 United States States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) hereby establish the policy and procedures pursuant to which 19, 1989, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY/ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT CONCERNING

US Army Corps of Engineers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Estimated general population control limits for unitary agents in drinking water, milk, soil, and unprocessed food items  

SciTech Connect

In the event of an unplanned release of chemical agent during any stage of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), the potential exists for contamination of drinking water, forage crops, grains, garden produce, and livestock. Persistent agents such as VX or sulfur mustard pose the greatest human health concern for reentry. This White Paper has been prepared to provide technical bases for these decisions by developing working estimates of agent control limits in selected environmental media considered principal sources of potential human exposure. To date, control limits for public exposure to unitary agents have been established for atmospheric concentrations only. The current analysis builds on previous work to calculate working estimates of control limits for ingestion and dermal exposure to potentially contaminated drinking water, milk, soil, and unprocessed food items such as garden produce. Information characterizing agent desorption from, and detection on or in, contaminated porous media are presently too developed to permit reasonable estimation of dermal exposure from this source. Thus, dermal contact with potentially contaminated porous surfaces is not considered in this document.

Watson, A.P.; Adams, J.D.; Cerar, R.J.; Hess, T.L.; Kistner, S.L.; Leffingwell, S.S.; MacIntosh, R.G.; Ward, J.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Water Rx - The Problem of Pharmaceuticals in Our Nation's Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IN OUR NATION'S WATERS intake via drinking water wastherapeutic dose and intake via drinking water was 150,000

Leitman, Melanie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Table HC2.8 Water Heating Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Water Heating Characteristics Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings Housing With--Units (millions) Energy Information Administration

64

Current and Long-Term Effects of Delta Water Quality on Drinking Water Treatment Costs from Disinfection Byproduct Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

current Delta water Plant and Intake Location System Size (future water quality conditions at different Delta intakesusing the intake with the better water quality between Old

Chen, Wei-Hsiang; Haunschild, Kristine; Lund, Jay R.; Fleenor, William E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Produced water volumes and management practices in the United States.  

SciTech Connect

Produced water volume generation and management in the United States are not well characterized at a national level. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) asked Argonne National Laboratory to compile data on produced water associated with oil and gas production to better understand the production volumes and management of this water. The purpose of this report is to improve understanding of produced water by providing detailed information on the volume of produced water generated in the United States and the ways in which produced water is disposed or reused. As the demand for fresh water resources increases, with no concomitant increase in surface or ground water supplies, alternate water sources, like produced water, may play an important role. Produced water is water from underground formations that is brought to the surface during oil or gas production. Because the water has been in contact with hydrocarbon-bearing formations, it contains some of the chemical characteristics of the formations and the hydrocarbons. It may include water from the reservoir, water previously injected into the formation, and any chemicals added during the production processes. The physical and chemical properties of produced water vary considerably depending on the geographic location of the field, the geologic formation, and the type of hydrocarbon product being produced. Produced water properties and volume also vary throughout the lifetime of a reservoir. Produced water is the largest volume by-product or waste stream associated with oil and gas exploration and production. Previous national produced water volume estimates are in the range of 15 to 20 billion barrels (bbl; 1 bbl = 42 U.S. gallons) generated each year in the United States (API 1988, 2000; Veil et al. 2004). However, the details on generation and management of produced water are not well understood on a national scale. Argonne National Laboratory developed detailed national-level information on the volume of produced water generated in the United States and the manner in which produced water is managed. This report presents an overview of produced water, summarizes the study, and presents results from the study at both the national level and the state level. Chapter 2 presents background information on produced water, describing its chemical and physical characteristics, where it is produced, and the potential impacts of produced water to the environment and to oil and gas operations. A review of relevant literature is also included. Chapter 3 describes the methods used to collect information, including outreach efforts to state oil and gas agencies and related federal programs. Because of the inconsistency in the level of detail provided by various state agencies, the approaches and assumptions used to extrapolate data values are also discussed. In Chapter 4, the data are presented, and national trends and observations are discussed. Chapter 5 presents detailed results for each state, while Chapter 6 presents results from federal sources for oil and gas production (i.e., offshore, onshore, and tribal lands). Chapter 7 summarizes the study and presents conclusions.

Clark, C. E.; Veil, J. A. (Environmental Science Division)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Bubble deaeration of water at reduced unit loads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Whenever the load is reduced, the parameters of the water and steam being introduced into the deaerator, as well as the pressure, also change. A study was conducted to ascertain the reasons for the improvement in water deaeration whenever the unit load is reduced. The study of the deaerator demonstrated that reducing the load on the turbine produces a reduction in the amount of oxygen contained in the feedwater from 25-30 to 8-12 ..mu..g/kg.

Kondrat'ev, A.D.; Kurnyk, L.N.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Meeting the Need for Safe Drinking Water in Rural Mexico through Point-of-Use Treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are boiling and adding chlorine in the form of tablets orto water quality problems. Chlorine pills and bleach requireassociated with boiling, chlorine tablets, and bleach. Two

Lang, Micah; Kaser, Forrest; Reygadas, Fermin; Nelson, Kara; Kammen, Daniel M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

The effects of sulfate fertilization and high levels of sulfate and salt drinking water on the growth and mineral status of ruminants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three experiments were conducted to determine the effects of sulfate (SO?²?) in forage and drinking water on the performance and mineral status of cattle and sheep. In Experiment 1, forty-eight late gestation crossbred cows were grazed on twelve 10-acre oat pastures for 112 days (Jan 6 to Apr 28) to determine the effects of oat forage fertilized with ammonium sulfate ((NH?)?SO?) on serum Ca, Mg and P status of cows. Pastures were assigned to either an (NH?)?SO? (400 kg/ha) or ammonium nitrate (NH?NO?, 247 kg\\ha) fertilizer treatment. The forage sulfur (S) concentrations were higher (P water on the performance and mineral status of growing cattle. Twelve crossbred growing cattle were grazed on twelve 1.4-hectare native pastures for 56 d (from Jun 16 to Aug 11). The cattle were given a single source of water: tap water (n=4), SO?²? water (1139 mg SO?²?/L, n=4) and SO?²?/NaCl water (1546mg SO?²?/L and 3489 mg Na/L, n=4). The average daily gain (ADG) of cattle provided with tap water and SO?²? water was greater than that of cattle drinking SO?²?/NaCl water (Pwater sources (P>.05). There was no difference in serum Ca, P, Mg, K and Cu of the cattle due to source of water (P> .05). ne water intake of cattle with different treatments was associated with climatic factors differently. In Experiment 3, nine growing wethers were randomly assigned to an individual pen in the metallic laboratory to determine mineral balance in sheep provided with tap water, SO?²? watwe or SO?²?/NaCl water. The periods of the feeding and metabolic trial were 28 d and 12 d, respectively. There were no significant differences for ADG and feed efficiency of animals provided the treatments (P>.05). There was no difference for serum Na, Ca, P, Mg and Zn in sheep among the treatments (P> .05). But serum Cu of the sheep drinking tap water was Feater than that of the sheep drinking SO?²?/NaCl water (Pwater and SO?²?/NaCl water did not affect the OM intake, digestibility of OM and NDF, and ADG of sheep during the trial (P>.05).

Xie, Kehe

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

The Potential of Desalination as an Alternative Water Supply in the United States.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Many parts of the United States are facing water shortages. Planners have to ensure that there will be an adequate water supply to meet the… (more)

Naini, Anjali Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe laboratory and field results of a novel arsenic removal adsorbent called 'Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash' (ARUBA). ARUBA is prepared by coating particles of coal bottom ash, a waste material from coal fired power plants, with iron (hydr)oxide. The coating process is simple and conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Material costs for ARUBA are estimated to be low (~;;$0.08 per kg) and arsenic remediation with ARUBA has the potential to be affordable to resource-constrained communities. ARUBA is used for removing arsenic via a dispersal-and-removal process, and we envision that ARUBA would be used in community-scale water treatment centers. We show that ARUBA is able to reduce arsenic concentrations in contaminated Bangladesh groundwater to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. Using the Langmuir isotherm (R2 = 0.77) ARUBA's adsorption capacity in treating real groundwater is 2.6x10-6 mol/g (0.20 mg/g). Time-to-90percent (defined as the time interval for ARUBA to remove 90percent of the total amount of arsenic that is removed at equilibrium) is less than one hour. Reaction rates (pseudo-second-order kinetic model, R2>_ 0.99) increase from 2.4x105 to 7.2x105 g mol-1 min-1 as the groundwater arsenic concentration decreases from 560 to 170 ppb. We show that ARUBA's arsenic adsorption density (AAD), defined as the milligrams of arsenic removed at equilibrium per gram of ARUBA added, is linearly dependent on the initial arsenic concentration of the groundwater sample, for initial arsenic concentrations of up to 1600 ppb and an ARUBA dose of 4.0 g/L. This makes it easy to determine the amount of ARUBA required to treat a groundwater source when its arsenic concentration is known and less than 1600 ppb. Storing contaminated groundwater for two to three days before treatment is seen to significantly increase ARUBA's AAD. ARUBA can be separated from treated water by coagulation and clarification, which is expected to be less expensive than filtration of micron-scale particles, further contributing to the affordability of a community-scale water treatment center.

MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.; GADGIL, ASHOK J.; ADDY, SUSAN E.A.; KOWOLIK, KRISTIN

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Summary of resources available to small water systems for meeting the 10 ppb arsenic drinking water limit.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the lowering of the EPA maximum contaminant level of arsenic from 50 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 ppb, many public water systems in the country and in New Mexico in particular, are faced with making decisions about how to bring their system into compliance. This document provides detail on the options available to the water systems and the steps they need to take to achieve compliance with this regulation. Additionally, this document provides extensive resources and reference information for additional outreach support, financing options, vendors for treatment systems, and media pilot project results.

Krumhansl, James Lee; Thomson, Bruce M. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Ziegler, Matt (New Mexico Tech, Albuquerque, NM); Butler, Susan (New Mexico Tech, Albuquerque, NM); Himmelberger, Heather (New Mexico Tech, Albuquerque, NM); Holt, Kathleen Caroline

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

An evaluation of household drinking water treatment systems in Peru : the table filter and the safe water system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) storage, and education. Tests on the SWSs in Peru demonstrated 99.6% E.coli removal and 95% total coliform removal. Only 30% of the SWSs tested contained water at or above the WHO-recommended concentration of free ...

Coulbert, Brittany, 1981-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Solar hot water systems for the southeastern United States: principles and construction of breadbox water heaters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of solar energy to provide hot water is among the easier solar technologies for homeowners to utilize. In the Southeastern United States, because of the mild climate and abundant sunshine, solar energy can be harnessed to provide a household's hot water needs during the non-freezing weather period mid-April and mid-October. This workbook contains detailed plans for building breadbox solar water heaters that can provide up to 65% of your hot water needs during warm weather. If fuel costs continue to rise, the annual savings obtained from a solar water heater will grow dramatically. The designs in this workbook use readily available materials and the construction costs are low. Although these designs may not be as efficient as some commercially available systems, most of a household's hot water needs can be met with them. The description of the breadbox water heater and other types of solar systems will help you make an informed decision between constructing a solar water heater or purchasing one. This workbook is intended for use in the southeastern United States and the designs may not be suitable for use in colder climates.

None

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

20121114 Riverton drinking wa...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Where Does My Drinking Water Come From? Where Does My Drinking Water Come From? Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site F A C T S H E E T ENERGY Legacy Management U.S. DEPARTMENT OF This fact sheet provides information about the Alternative Water Supply System and domestic wells at the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I processing site at Riverton, Wyoming. The Riverton site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Where Is the Riverton Site? The former Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site is in Fremont County, 2 miles southwest of the town of Riverton and within the boundaries of the Wind River Indian Reservation (Northern Arapaho and Eastern Shoshone). Why Is It a "Site"? A uranium- and vanadium-ore-processing mill operated on the property from 1958 to 1963. Milling operations created

75

Treatment of produced water using chemical and biological unit operations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Water generated along with oil and gas during coal bed methane and oil shale operations is commonly known as produced water, formation water, or oilfield… (more)

Li, Liang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Demonstration of Clyde Bergemann Water Cannons at Alabama Power Company's Plant Miller Unit 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the findings of a demonstration of Clyde Bergemann Water Cannons at Alabama Power Company's Plant Miller Unit 1.

2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

77

Estimated general population control limits for unitary agents in drinking water, milk, soil, and unprocessed food items. For use in reentry decision-making  

SciTech Connect

In the event of an unplanned release of chemical agent during any stage of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), the potential exists for contamination of drinking water, forage crops, grains, garden produce, and livestock. Persistent agents such as VX or sulfur mustard pose the greatest human health concern for reentry. This White Paper has been prepared to provide technical bases for these decisions by developing working estimates of agent control limits in selected environmental media considered principal sources of potential human exposure. To date, control limits for public exposure to unitary agents have been established for atmospheric concentrations only. The current analysis builds on previous work to calculate working estimates of control limits for ingestion and dermal exposure to potentially contaminated drinking water, milk, soil, and unprocessed food items such as garden produce. Information characterizing agent desorption from, and detection on or in, contaminated porous media are presently too developed to permit reasonable estimation of dermal exposure from this source. Thus, dermal contact with potentially contaminated porous surfaces is not considered in this document.

Watson, A.P.; Adams, J.D.; Cerar, R.J.; Hess, T.L.; Kistner, S.L.; Leffingwell, S.S.; MacIntosh, R.G.; Ward, J.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Precipitation Trends and Water Consumption Related to Population in the Southwestern United States, 1930–83  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possible effects of climatic fluctuations on renewable water supplies in the western United States was examined, especially as it is impacted by the growth of population and water consumption in recent decades.

Henry F. Diaz; Ronald L. Holle; Joe W. Thorn Jr.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Modeling Water Withdrawal and Consumption for Electricity Generation in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water withdrawals for thermoelectric cooling account for a significant portion of total water use in the United States. Any change in electrical energy generation policy and technologies has the potential to have a major ...

Strzepek, Kenneth M.

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Meeting the mandate for clean water : an evaluation of privately managed U.S. water and wastewater systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reliable provision of clean and safe drinking water is critical for public health, economic stability and growth in the United States. Due to a combination of financial, regulatory and operational challenges, however, it ...

Freund, Evan Benjamin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Fact Sheet on Water Use in the United States The United States continues to improve water-use efficiency.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

time, the economic productivity of water ­ measured as dollars of GDP produced with every hundred the dollars of gross domestic product (GDP) produced with every 100 gallons of water used. The U.S. now produces far more wealth, with far less water, than at any time in the past. Not all the news about water

82

Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

driven by first cost considerations and the availability of power vent and condensing water heaters. Little analysis has been performed to assess the economic impacts of the...

83

Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

single-family home construction market, the choice of what gas furnace and gas water heater combination to install is primarily driven by first cost considerations. In this...

84

Long-Term Water Prospects in the Western United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the changes in the size of closed basin lakes, the author shows that water availability has undergone large fluctuations in response to conditions experienced during full glacial time and during the period of deglaciation. Based on these ...

Wallace Broecker

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Efficacy of gravity-fed chlorination system for community-scale water disinfection in northern Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although chlorine is one of the lowest cost ways of providing disinfection, currently billions of people lack drinking water that has had this simple treatment. Arch Chemical's Pulsar 1 unit is an innovation in chlorine ...

Fitzpatrick, Daniel Cash

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Inspecting the Circulating Water System at Crystal River Unit 3 for Evidence of Microbial Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water line inspections at the Florida Power Company Crystal River unit 3 revealed microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) in welded regions of inlet piping. Recommendations for decreasing MIC in those regions include removal of inlet pipe girth welds, rewelding with high-nickel filler rods, and treating cooling water with biocides.

1989-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

"Table HC3.8 Water Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Water Heating Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,74.5,60.9,4,1.8,2.2,5.5 "2 or More",3.7,3.3,3,"Q","Q","Q","Q" "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.3,"Q","Q","N","Q","Q"

88

"Table HC4.8 Water Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Water Heating Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,33,8,3.4,5.9,14.4,1.2 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,31.9,7.9,3.4,5.8,13.7,1.1 "2 or More",3.7,0.4,"Q","Q","Q","Q","N" "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.7,"Q","Q","Q",0.6,"Q"

89

Econometric Analyses of Public Water Demand in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two broad surveys of community- level water consumption and pricing behavior are used to answer questions about water demand in a more flexible and dynamic context than is provided in the literature. Central themes of price representation, aggregation, and dynamic adjustment tie together three econometric demand analyses. The centerpiece of each analysis is an exogenous weighted price representation. A model in first-differences is estimated by ordinary least squares using data from a personally-conducted survey of Texas urban water suppliers. Annual price elasticity is found to vary with weather and income, with a value of -0.127 at the data mean. The dynamic model becomes a periodic error correction model when the residuals of 12 static monthly models are inserted into the difference model. Distinct residential, commercial, and industrial variables and historical climatic conditions are added to the integrated model, using new national data. Quantity demanded is found to be periodically integrated with a common stochastic root. Because of this, the structural monthly models must be cointegrated to be consistent, which they appear to be. The error correction coefficient is estimated at -0.187. Demand is found to be seasonal and slow to adjust to shocks, with little or no adjustment in a single year and 90% adjustment taking a decade or more. Residential and commercial demand parameters are found to be indistinguishable. The sources of price endogeneity and historical fixes are reviewed. Ideal properties of a weighted price index are identified. For schedules containing exactly two rates, weighting is equivalent to a distribution function in consumption. This property is exploited to derive empirical weights from the national data, using values from a nonparametric generalization of the structural demand model and a nonparametric cumulative density function. The result is a generalization of the price difference metric to a weighted level-price index. The validity of a uniform weighting is not rejected. The weighted price index is data intensive, but the payoff is increased depth and precision for the economist and accessibility for the practitioner.

Bell, David

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Mass transfer of volatile organic compounds from drinking water to indoor air: The role of residential dishwashers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contaminated tap water may be a source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in residential indoor air. To better understand the extent and impact of chemical emissions from this source, a two-phase mass balance model was developed based on mass transfer kinetics between each phase. Twenty-nine experiments were completed using a residential dishwasher to determine model parameters. During each experiment, inflow water was spiked with a cocktail of chemical tracers with a wide range of physicochemical properties. In each case, the effects of water temperature, detergent, and dish-loading pattern on chemical stripping efficiencies and mass transfer coefficients were determined. Dishwasher headspace ventilation rates were also measured using an isobutylene tracer gas. Chemical stripping efficiencies for a single cycle ranged from 18% to 55% for acetone, from 96% to 98% for toluene, and from 97% to 98% for ethylbenzene and were consistently 100% for cyclohexane. Experimental results indicate that dishwashers have a relatively low but continuous ventilation rate that results in significant chemical storage within the headspace of the dishwasher. In conjunction with relatively high mass transfer coefficients, low ventilation rates generally lead to emissions that are limited by equilibrium conditions after approximately 1--2 min of dishwasher operation.

Howard-Reed, C.; Corsi, R.L. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Moya, J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Biological denitrification of water  

SciTech Connect

The authors discuss research regarding the denitrification of drinking water. Most work has been done in Europe. As a consequence there may be a gap in the understanding of the international state of the art with regard to drinking-water denitrification. Numerous substrates have been evaluated including methanol, ethanol, acetic acid, methane, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and various sulfur compounds. Various unit processes have been utilized including biofilters, fluidized-bed and packed-bed reactors, packed towers containing cells immobilized in polymer gels, and completely mixed reactors with cells attached to bouyant porous carriers. There are several commercial facilities currently providing drinking water to European communities. Most include post-treatment with flocculation, filtration, and disinfection. A common concern in denitrification operations is the minimization of nitrite accumulation.

Gayle, B.P. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (USA)); Boardman, G.D.; Sherrard, J.H. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Benoit, R.E. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (USA). Dept. of Biology)

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Evaluation of Natural Radioactivity in Subsurface Air, Water and Soil in Western Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surveys of radon concentrations in western Japan were carried out to estimate the contents not only of waters in the environment but also in soil gas. The maximum concentration measured for drinking water as public supply exceeded the 1991 United States Environmental Protection Agency?recommended limit for drinking water (11? Bq ? L ?1 ) but did not exceed that of several European countries (100? Bq ? L ?1 ). Overall

Masami Fukui

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United States Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United States New Construction Market Speaker(s): Alex Lekov Gabrielle Wong-Parodi James McMahon Victor Franco Date: May 8, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 In the new single-family home construction market, the choice of what gas furnace and gas water heater combination to install is primarily driven by first cost considerations. In this study, the authors use a life-cycle cost analysis approach that accounts for uncertainty and variability of inputs to assess the economic benefits of installing different gas furnace and water heater combinations. Among other factors, it assesses the economic feasibility of eliminating the traditional metal vents and replacing them with vents made of plastic materials used in condensing and power vent

94

Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and desalination. Some of the direct approaches, such as dry air cooling, desalination, and recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, are costly and are deployed primarily in countries with severe water shortages, such as China, Australia, and South Africa. Table 1 shows drivers and approaches for reducing freshwater consumption in several countries outside the United States. Indirect approaches reduce water consumption while meeting other objectives, such as improving plant efficiency. Plants with higher efficiencies use less energy to produce electricity, and because the greater the energy production, the greater the cooling water needs, increased efficiency will help reduce water consumption. Approaches for improving efficiency (and for indirectly reducing water consumption) include increasing the operating steam parameters (temperature and pressure); using more efficient coal-fired technologies such as cogeneration, IGCC, and direct firing of gas turbines with coal; replacing or retrofitting existing inefficient plants to make them more efficient; installing high-performance monitoring and process controls; and coal drying. The motivations for increasing power plant efficiency outside the United States (and indirectly reducing water consumption) include the following: (1) countries that agreed to reduce carbon emissions (by ratifying the Kyoto protocol) find that one of the most effective ways to do so is to improve plant efficiency; (2) countries that import fuel (e.g., Japan) need highly efficient plants to compensate for higher coal costs; (3) countries with particularly large and growing energy demands, such as China and India, need large, efficient plants; (4) countries with large supplies of low-rank coals, such as Germany, need efficient processes to use such low-energy coals. Some countries have policies that encourage or mandate reduced water consumption - either directly or indirectly. For example, the European Union encourages increased efficiency through its cogeneration directive, which requires member states to assess their

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

95

Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.  

SciTech Connect

Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and desalination. Some of the direct approaches, such as dry air cooling, desalination, and recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, are costly and are deployed primarily in countries with severe water shortages, such as China, Australia, and South Africa. Table 1 shows drivers and approaches for reducing freshwater consumption in several countries outside the United States. Indirect approaches reduce water consumption while meeting other objectives, such as improving plant efficiency. Plants with higher efficiencies use less energy to produce electricity, and because the greater the energy production, the greater the cooling water needs, increased efficiency will help reduce water consumption. Approaches for improving efficiency (and for indirectly reducing water consumption) include increasing the operating steam parameters (temperature and pressure); using more efficient coal-fired technologies such as cogeneration, IGCC, and direct firing of gas turbines with coal; replacing or retrofitting existing inefficient plants to make them more efficient; installing high-performance monitoring and process controls; and coal drying. The motivations for increasing power plant efficiency outside the United States (and indirectly reducing water consumption) include the following: (1) countries that agreed to reduce carbon emissions (by ratifying the Kyoto protocol) find that one of the most effective ways to do so is to improve plant efficiency; (2) countries that import fuel (e.g., Japan) need highly efficient plants to compensate for higher coal costs; (3) countries with particularly large and growing energy demands, such as China and India, need large, efficient plants; (4) countries with large supplies of low-rank coals, such as Germany, need efficient processes to use such low-energy coals. Some countries have policies that encourage or mandate reduced water consumption - either directly or indirectly. For example, the European Union encourages increased efficiency through its cogeneration directive, which requires member states to assess their

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

96

Solar Desalination in the Southwest United States: A Thermoeconomic Analysis Utilizing the Sun to Desalt Water in High Irradiance Regions .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Water scarcity and high irradiance overlap in the southwestern United States. This thesis explores solar energy as a method to power desalination in the Southwest.… (more)

Stroud, Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Solar desalination in the southwest United States| A thermoeconomic analysis utilizing the sun to desalt water in high irradiance regions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Water scarcity and high irradiance overlap in the southwestern United States. This thesis explores solar energy as a method to power desalination in the… (more)

Stroud, Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13- Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this regulation is to limit emissions of particulate matter from fossil fuel fired and wood-fired steam or hot water generating units.

99

Review of water resource potential for developing geothermal resource sites in the western United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water resources at 28 known geothermal resource areas (KGRAs) in the western United States are reviewed. Primary emphasis is placed upon examination of the waer resources, both surface and ground, that exist in the vicinity of the KGRAs located in the southwestern states of California, Arizona, Utah, Nevada, and New Mexico. In most of these regions water has been in short supply for many years and consequently a discussion of competing demands is included to provide an appropriate perspective on overall usage. A discussion of the water resources in the vicinity of KGRAs in the States of Montana, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington are also included.

Sonnichsen, J.C. Jr.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Energy Savings and Breakeven Cost for Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have recently reemerged in the U.S. residential water heating market and have the potential to provide homeowners with significant energy savings. However, there are questions as to the actual performance and energy savings potential of these units, in particular in regards to the heat pump's performance in unconditioned space and the impact of the heat pump on space heating and cooling loads when it is located in conditioned space. To help answer these questions, simulations were performed of a HPWH in both conditioned and unconditioned space at over 900 locations across the continental United States and Hawaii. Simulations included a Building America benchmark home so that any interaction between the HPWH and the home's HVAC equipment could be captured. Comparisons were performed to typical gas and electric water heaters to determine the energy savings potential and cost effectiveness of a HPWH relative to these technologies. HPWHs were found to have a significant source energy savings potential when replacing typical electric water heaters, but only saved source energy relative to gas water heater in the most favorable installation locations in the southern US. When replacing an electric water heater, the HPWH is likely to break even in California, the southern US, and parts of the northeast in most situations. However, the HPWH will only break even when replacing a gas water heater in a few southern states.

Maguire, J.; Burch, J.; Merrigan, T.; Ong, S.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Intercomparison of Global Reanalyses and Regional Simulations of Cold Season Water Budgets in the Western United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimating water budgets of river basins in the western United States is a challenge because of the effects of complex terrain and lack of comprehensive observational datasets. This study aims at comparing different estimates of cold season water ...

L. Ruby Leung; Yun Qian; Jongil Han; John O. Roads

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Bottom-up derivation of an effective thermostat for united atoms simulations of water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article we derive the effective pairwise interactions in a Langevin type united atoms model of water. The interactions are determined from the trajectories of a detailed molecular dynamics simulation of simple point charge water. A standard method is used for estimating the conservative interaction, whereas a new "bottom-up" method is used to determine the effective dissipative and stochastic interactions. We demonstrate that, when compared to the standard united atoms model, the transport properties of the coarse-grained model is significantly improved by the introduction of the derived dissipative and stochastic interactions. The results are compared to a previous study, where a "top-down" approach was used to obtain transport properties consistent with those of the simple point charge water model.

Eriksson, Anders; Nystrom, Johan; Tunstrom, Kolbjorn

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010. ) AWWA. 2006. Water Conservation Programs—A PlanningWater Conservation..staff (Caffal, 1995). Water Conservation Beyond optimizing

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Developing a tool to estimate water withdrawal and consumption in electricity generation in the United States.  

SciTech Connect

Freshwater consumption for electricity generation is projected to increase dramatically in the next couple of decades in the United States. The increased demand is likely to further strain freshwater resources in regions where water has already become scarce. Meanwhile, the automotive industry has stepped up its research, development, and deployment efforts on electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Large-scale, escalated production of EVs and PHEVs nationwide would require increased electricity production, and so meeting the water demand becomes an even greater challenge. The goal of this study is to provide a baseline assessment of freshwater use in electricity generation in the United States and at the state level. Freshwater withdrawal and consumption requirements for power generated from fossil, nonfossil, and renewable sources via various technologies and by use of different cooling systems are examined. A data inventory has been developed that compiles data from government statistics, reports, and literature issued by major research institutes. A spreadsheet-based model has been developed to conduct the estimates by means of a transparent and interactive process. The model further allows us to project future water withdrawal and consumption in electricity production under the forecasted increases in demand. This tool is intended to provide decision makers with the means to make a quick comparison among various fuel, technology, and cooling system options. The model output can be used to address water resource sustainability when considering new projects or expansion of existing plants.

Wu, M.; Peng, J. (Energy Systems); ( NE)

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

105

Smoking, Drinking, and Income  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A growing literature identifies a beneficial effect of moderate and even heavy drinking on wages and a negative effect of smoking on wages. An outstanding issue is whether these results obtain because of a causal effect of substance use on wages or whether the observed correlations reflect the effects of income on consumption or other endogeneity problems. This paper presents full information estimates of the structural parameters of a simultaneous model of drinking and smoking status and income using repeated cross--section data. With all else in the system held constant, both smoking and drinking behaviour still have large effects on income, and the income elasticities of smoking and drinking are shown to be larger in magnitude when controlling for endogeneity. JEL Classification: I12 Keywords: alcohol, tobacco, simultaneous equations, maximum simulated likelihood, multinomial probit, limited dependent variables 1 I thank Cam Donaldson, Herb Emery, David Feeny, Chris Ferrall, Jon ...

Mingshan Lu; James Mackinnon; Ken Mckenzie; Harry Paarsche; Seminar Participants; M. Christopher Auld; M. Christopher Auld

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Extreme-Value Statistics for Snowpack Water Equivalent in the Northeastern United States Using the Cooperative Observer Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A procedure is developed to estimate extreme-value statistics for snowpack water equivalent (SWE) using historical snow depth measurements at cooperative observer stations in the northeastern United States. The method specifies “pseudodensities” ...

Daniel S. Wilks; Megan McKay

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

market research on solar water heaters. National Renewabletankless combined space/water heaterds, solar water heaters,combined solar space/water heater, electric water heaters

Lekov, Alex B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Feasibility Study of Developing a Virtual Chilled Water Flow Meter at Air Handling Unit Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, a virtual Air handling unit (AHU) level water flow meter is explored by using a control valve as a measurement device. The flow through the valve is indirectly calculated using differential pressure over both the valve and its associated coil and valve stem position. Thus, the non-intrusive virtual flow meter introduced in this paper provides a solution to one of the measurement barriers and challenges: a low cost, reliable energy metering system at the AHU level. Mathematical models were built and the preliminary experiments were conducted to investigate the feasibility of the virtual flow meter applications. As a result, the valve flow meter can be a cost effective means for water flow measurements at the AHU and thus provides an effective index for detecting and diagnosing the AHU operation faults.

Song, L.; Swamy, A.; Shim, G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Uncertainty Analysis for a Virtual Flow Meter Using an Air-Handling Unit Chilled Water Valve  

SciTech Connect

A virtual water flow meter is developed that uses the chilled water control valve on an air-handling unit as a measurement device. The flow rate of water through the valve is calculated using the differential pressure across the valve and its associated coil, the valve command, and an empirically determined valve characteristic curve. Thus, the probability of error in the measurements is significantly greater than for conventionally manufactured flow meters. In this paper, mathematical models are developed and used to conduct uncertainty analysis for the virtual flow meter, and the results from the virtual meter are compared to measurements made with an ultrasonic flow meter. Theoretical uncertainty analysis shows that the total uncertainty in flow rates from the virtual flow meter is 1.46% with 95% confidence; comparison of virtual flow meter results with measurements from an ultrasonic flow meter yielded anuncertainty of 1.46% with 99% confidence. The comparable results from the theoretical uncertainty analysis and empirical comparison with the ultrasonic flow meter corroborate each other, and tend to validate the approach to computationally estimating uncertainty for virtual sensors introduced in this study.

Song, Li; Wang, Gang; Brambley, Michael R.

2013-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

110

A Survey of Water Use and Sustainability in the United States with a Focus on Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has identified water resource sustainability and its relation to electric power as one of the key challenges within EPRI's Electricity Technology Roadmap. This report presents an overview of present and future freshwater availability and generation demand for fresh water in the United States. The report takes a first step toward development of a comprehensive framework for evaluating possible impacts of water supply limitations on electric power generation and management approaches to limiting these...

2003-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

111

Effects of Age on Pavlovian Autoshaping of Ethanol Drinking in Non-Deprived Rats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wa- ter drinking and g/kg water intake were assessed using1. Mean daily g/kg water intake from the sipper CS duringsame sessions g/kg fluid intake in the Water groups did not

Tomie, Arthur; Mohamed, Walaa M.; Pohorecky, Larissa A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Post-Remediation Biomonitoring of Pesticides in Marine Waters Near the United Heckathorn Superfund Site, Richmond, California  

SciTech Connect

This report, PNNL-11911 Rev. 1, was published in July 2000 and replaces PNNL-11911, which was published in September 1998. The revision corrects tissue concentration units that were reported as dry weight but were actually wet weight, and updates conclusions based on the correct reporting units. Marine sediment remediation at the United Heckathorn Superfund Site was completed in April 1997. Water and mussel tissues were sampled in January 1998 from four stations near Lauritzen Canal in Richmond, California, for the first post-remediation monitoring of marine areas near the United Heckathorn Site. Dieldrin and DDT were analyzed in water samples, tissue samples from resident mussels, and tissue samples from transplanted mussels deployed for 4 months. Concentrations of dieldrin and total DDT in water and total DDT in tissue were compared to pre-remediation data available from the California State Mussel Watch program (tissues) and the Ecological Risk Assessment for the United Heckathorn Superfund Site (tissues and water). Chlorinated pesticide concentrations in water samples were similar to pre-remediation levels and did not meet remediation goals. Mean dieldrin concentrations in water ranged from 0.65 ng/L to 18.1 ng/L and were higher than the remediation goal (0.14 ng/L) at all stations. Mean total DDT concentrations in water ranged from 0.65 ng/L to 103 ng/L and exceeded the remediation goal of 0.59 ng/L. The highest concentrations of both pesticides were found in Lauritzen Canal, and the lowest levels were from the Richmond Inner Harbor Channel water. Unusual amounts of detritus in the water column at the time of sampling, particularly in Lauritzen Canal, could have contributed to the elevated pesticide concentrations and poor analytical precision.

LD Antrim; NP Kohn

2000-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

113

Ultraviolet Water Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

UV Ray of Hope for Safer Drinking Water. ... It is not, however, too soon for the American Water Works Association to express its appreciation. ...

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

114

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lists the treatment methods and the percentage of utilitieslists the characteristics of the water sources used by utilities

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Bordering on Water Management: Ground and Wastewater in the United States - Mexico Transboundary Santa Cruz Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

change and global water resources. Global Environmentalin Managing International Water Resources (No. WPS 1303):Darcy Lecture Tour. Ground Water, 45(4), 390-391. Sadoff,

Milman, Anita Dale

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1975 - 1976  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.Thermograph record of intake water at Pacific Gas andtakes daily water temperatures at the intake pipe to their

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1994  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generators. The plant's water intake structure, which isoff the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory, andat the aquarium's water system intake located in a deep

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1977  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.Thermograph record of intake water at Pacific Gas andtemperatures and water samples at the intake pipe to their

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1978  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory.Off rocks near water intake for laboratory Thermographthat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), Office of IndustrialSeptember 4, 2010. ) U.S. DOE EERE. Industrial Technologies25, 2011. ) U.S. DOE EERE. 2002. United States Industrial

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rural businesses, for instance for energy audits. In FY2010,Business_Programs/ind ustriallighting_bestpracticessheet.pdf. Water & Wastewater Treatment Energy Use Self-Audit

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPRI. 1997. Quality Energy Efficiency Retrofits for WaterIndustry. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy,Finding Money for Your Energy Efficiency Projects. (A Primer

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

31, 2010. ) U.S. DOE Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (3, 2010. ) Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, ElectricEPRI. 1997. Quality Energy Efficiency Retrofits for Water

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Dynamics of the Cold-Water Event off the Southeast Coast of the United States in the Summer of 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cold-water event along the southeast coast of the United States in the summer of 2003 is studied using satellite data combined with in situ observations. The analysis suggests that the cooling is produced by wind-driven coastal upwelling, ...

Dongliang Yuan

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Comparison of EC-Kit with Quanti-Tray[tm] : testing, verification, and drinking water quality mapping in Capiz Province, Philippines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis accomplishes three tasks. First, it verifies the EC-Kit under different water source conditions by comparing it to a laboratory standard method, the IDEXX Quanti-Tray[tm]. The EC-Kit is a simple, inexpensive ...

Chuang, Patty

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1984  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. MonoStation Off rocks near water intake for laboratory Trinidadthat monitors the cool- ing intake water for the generators.

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Surface Water Temperatures and Salinities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1987  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. Thethat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.at the intake pipe to their aquarium water system located in

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1989  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. Thethat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.at the intake pipe to their aquarium water system located in

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1974  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.takes daily water temperatures at the intake pipe to theirof hot water is outside the bay, the intake temperatures are

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1982  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory.that monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.for rocks near water laboratory intake Granite Canyon 55.0'W

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1988  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. Thethat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.at the intake pipe to their aquarium water system located in

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1991  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off tlw rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. T hthat monitors the cooling intake water for the gen- erators.of hot water is outside the bay, the intake temperatures are

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1973  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.takes daily water temperatures at the intake pipe to theirof hot water is outside the bay, the intake temperatures are

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1980  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

has a large-volume water intake from which the daily wateroff the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory.Off rocks near water Intake for laboratory Thermograph

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1986  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. MonoStation Off rocks near water intake for laboratory Farallónthat monitors the cool­ ing intake water for the generators.

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1983  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. MonoStation Off rocks near water intake for laboratory Granitethat monitors the cool­ ing intake water for the generators.

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1990  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. Thethat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.of hot water is outside the bay, the intake temperatures

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1992  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. Thethat monitors the cooling intake water for the gen­ erators.of hot water is outside the bay, the intake temperatures are

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1985  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory.Station Off rocks near water intake for laboratory Farallónthat monitors the cool­ ing intake water for the generators.

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1993  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. T hthat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.of hot water is outside the bay, the intake temperatures are

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Water treatment by reverse osmosis. November 1970-October 1989 (Citations from the US Patent data base). Report for November 1970-October 1989  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning water purification systems and components using reverse-osmosis technology. Patents include systems and devices for sea water, waste water, and drinking water purification. Topics include complete purification systems, valves and distribution components, membranes, supports, storage units, and monitors. Water purification systems using activated charcoal are referenced in a related published bibliography. (Contains 103 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. Winiarski. (1999). WHAM: Simplified tool for calculatingDepartment of Energy 2009b). WHAM yields total water heaterWater Heater Analysis Model (WHAM) method (Lutz et al. 1999)

Lekov, Alex B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Water treatment by reverse osmosis. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning water purification systems and components using reverse osmosis technology. Patents include purification systems and devices for seawater, waste water, and drinking water. Topics also include complete purification systems, valves and distribution components, membranes, supports, storage units, and monitors. Water purification systems using activated charcoal are referenced in a related bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 146 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Water treatment by reverse osmosis. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning water purification systems and components using reverse osmosis technology. Patents include purification systems and devices for seawater, waste water, and drinking water. Topics also include complete purification systems, valves and distribution components, membranes, supports, storage units, and monitors. Water purification systems using activated charcoal are referenced in a related bibliography. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heating appliances 3 , solar water heating, district heatingOther includes solar, wood, no heating c Electric resistance

Lekov, Alex B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refrigeration Institute 2008a). The efficiency of water heaters, depending on the rated volume and other design

Lekov, Alex B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1981  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

o f f the rocks near the water intake f o r the laboratory.a t monitors the cooling intake water f o r the generators.Thermograph record o f intake water a t P a c i f i c Gas

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Break-Even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Break-even Cost for Residential Break-even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities Hannah Cassard, Paul Denholm, and Sean Ong Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-48986 February 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Break-even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities Hannah Cassard, Paul Denholm, and Sean Ong Prepared under Task No. SS10.2110 Technical Report

149

Jurisdictional waters of the United States Wetlands Assessment Analysis and Delineation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To improve and develop my professional skills, a wetland assessment and delineation was performed for Lakewood Heights, a proposed residential subdivision consisting of 133 hectares, more or less, located in northeast Harris County, Texas. The subject property was evaluated for its content of jurisdictional wetlands, based on U.S. Army corps of Engineers criteria, using interpretation of historical aerial photography, topographic maps, hydrology indicators, and data gathered from site reconnaissance activities. The identified wetland areas were delineated as accurately as possible, based on available information, and were mapped on a survey plat of the property. These areas were contrasted with surrounding uplands, which were mapped as well. Broad scale mapping of soil types by the SCS appears to have been moderately accurate. Through site reconnaissance activities, I verified the scs soil mapping, identified previously unmapped hydric soils, and evaluated and documented vegetation communities that further delineated wetland/upland boundaries. By employing the methods outlined in the 1987 Corps of Engineers Delineation manual that call for evaluations of hydric soils, hydrology indicators, and hydrophytic vegetation, I concluded that approximately 14.68 hectares of the subject property were jurisdictional wetlands. The remaining 118.32 hectares were classified as upland (non-wetland). The wetland delineations made on the subject property were approached in a conservative manner, taking into account transitional or overflow areas which are sometimes hard to define. Those areas which appeared adjacent to a saturated or inundated wetland within the same hydrologic and hydrophytic vegetation regime were included in wetland boundaries. This method of delineation, in my opinion, provides the highest reliability for, even under varying seasonal circumstances, those areas that would appear as jurisdictional waters of the United states. upon completion of the field assessment, the data were assembled into a technical report and presented to the client for his use. we discussed my findings, reviewed the methodology used to determine that wetlands did, in fact, exist on the property and examined land management options, including u.s. Army Corps of Engineers permit procedures.

Siems-Alford, Susan

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Water use and supply concerns for utility-scale solar projects in the Southwestern United States.  

SciTech Connect

As large utility-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities are currently being built and planned for locations in the U.S. with the greatest solar resource potential, an understanding of water use for construction and operations is needed as siting tends to target locations with low natural rainfall and where most existing freshwater is already appropriated. Using methods outlined by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine water used in designated solar energy zones (SEZs) for construction and operations&maintenance, an estimate of water used over the lifetime at the solar power plant is determined and applied to each watershed in six Southwestern states. Results indicate that that PV systems overall use little water, though construction usage is high compared to O&M water use over the lifetime of the facility. Also noted is a transition being made from wet cooled to dry cooled CSP facilities that will significantly reduce operational water use at these facilities. Using these water use factors, estimates of future water demand for current and planned solar development was made. In efforts to determine where water could be a limiting factor in solar energy development, water availability, cost, and projected future competing demands were mapped for the six Southwestern states. Ten watersheds, 9 in California, and one in New Mexico were identified as being of particular concern because of limited water availability.

Klise, Geoffrey Taylor; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Reno, Marissa Devan; Moreland, Barbara D.; Zemlick, Katie; Macknick, Jordan [National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, CO

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

UV Treated Water Dangers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

there are chances of developing cancer or such growth due to radiation on drinking water & it's continuous intake? What are other hazards that may cause problems for human...

152

INEEL Source Water Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) covers approximately 890 mi2 and includes 12 public water systems that must be evaluated for Source water protection purposes under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Because of its size and location, six watersheds and five aquifers could potentially affect the INEEL’s drinking water sources. Based on a preliminary evaluation of the available information, it was determined that the Big Lost River, Birch Creek, and Little Lost River Watersheds and the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer needed to be assessed. These watersheds were delineated using the United States Geologic Survey’s Hydrological Unit scheme. Well capture zones were originally estimated using the RESSQC module of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Well Head Protection Area model, and the initial modeling assumptions and results were checked by running several scenarios using Modflow modeling. After a technical review, the resulting capture zones were expanded to account for the uncertainties associated with changing groundwater flow directions, a thick vadose zone, and other data uncertainties. Finally, all well capture zones at a given facility were merged to a single wellhead protection area at each facility. A contaminant source inventory was conducted, and the results were integrated with the well capture zones, watershed and aquifer information, and facility information using geographic information system technology to complete the INEEL’s Source Water Assessment. Of the INEEL’s 12 public water systems, three systems rated as low susceptibility (EBR-I, Main Gate, and Gun Range), and the remainder rated as moderate susceptibility. No INEEL public water system rated as high susceptibility. We are using this information to develop a source water management plan from which we will subsequently implement an INEEL-wide source water management program. The results are a very robust set of wellhead protection areas that will protect the INEEL’s public water systems yet not too conservative to inhibit the INEEL from carrying out its missions.

Sehlke, Gerald

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Technical Potential of Solar Water Heating to Reduce Fossil Fuel Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Use of solar water heating (SWH) in the United States grew significantly in the late 1970s and early 1980s, as a result of increasing energy prices and generous tax credits. Since 1985, however, expiration of federal tax credits and decreased energy prices have virtually eliminated the U.S. market for SWH. More recently, increases in energy prices, concerns regarding emissions of greenhouse gases, and improvements in SWH systems have created new interest in the potential of this technology. SWH, which uses the sun to heat water directly or via a heat-transfer fluid in a collector, may be particularly important in its ability to reduce natural gas use. Dependence on natural gas as an energy resource in the United States has significantly increased in the past decade, along with increased prices, price volatility, and concerns about sustainability and security of supply. One of the readily deployable technologies available to decrease use of natural gas is solar water heating. This report provides an overview of the technical potential of solar water heating to reduce fossil fuel consumption and associated greenhouse gas emissions in U.S. residential and commercial buildings.

Denholm, P.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

SciTech Connect

New single-family home construction represents a significant and important market for the introduction of energy-efficient gas-fired space heating and water-heating equipment. In the new construction market, the choice of furnace and water-heater type is primarily driven by first cost considerations and the availability of power vent and condensing water heaters. Few analysis have been performed to assess the economic impacts of the different combinations of space and water-heating equipment. Thus, equipment is often installed without taking into consideration the potential economic and energy savings of installing space and water-heating equipment combinations. In this study, we use a life-cycle cost analysis that accounts for uncertainty and variability of the analysis inputs to assess the economic benefits of gas furnace and water-heater design combinations. This study accounts not only for the equipment cost but also for the cost of installing, maintaining, repairing, and operating the equipment over its lifetime. Overall, this study, which is focused on US single-family new construction households that install gas furnaces and storage water heaters, finds that installing a condensing or power-vent water heater together with condensing furnace is the most cost-effective option for the majority of these houses. Furthermore, the findings suggest that the new construction residential market could be a target market for the large-scale introduction of a combination of condensing or power-vent water heaters with condensing furnaces.

Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

155

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiences of residential consumers and utilities. OakStar (2008). Energy Star Residential Water Heaters: Finalefficiency improvements for residential gas furnaces in the

Lekov, Alex B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Comparison of energy storage systems in the United States chilled water versus two types of ice storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current US production non-storage heat pumps are compared to heat pumps using stored hot water and stored chilled water and to heat pumps using ice-on-coils as a means of using latent heat of fusion of water as a heat source. This equipment is also used as a means of stored cooling for air conditioning during hot weather. An ice-making heat pump which harvests ice as sheets of ice 3 to 4 times per hour and stores the ice in a large inexpensive bin is discussed. The advantages of such an ice-making heat pump to heat in cold weather and cool in hot weather is discussed as it relates to Electric Utility load management in different parts of the United States.

Fischer, H.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Comparison of Advanced Residential Water Heating Technologies in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Gas storage, gas tankless, condensing, electric storage, heat pump, and solar water heaters were simulated in several different climates across the US installed in both conditioned and unconditioned space and subjected to several different draw profiles. While many preexisting models were used, new models of condensing and heat pump water heaters were created specifically for this work.

Maguire, J.; Fang, X.; Wilson, E.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the US Jeff Maguire 4/30/13 Outline * Why HPWHs? * US Water Heating Market * Overview of HPWHs * Model Description * Results o HPWH Performance o Energy Savings Potential o Breakeven Cost 2 Heat Pump Water Heaters Save $300 a year over standard electric? Save $100 a year over standard gas? Heat Pump Electric Gas 3 Questions about HPWHs * Are HPWHs a good replacement for typical gas and electric storage water heaters? o In different locations across the country? o In conditioned/unconditioned space? o Source energy savings?

159

A Simple Method for Specifying Snowpack Water Equivalent in the Northeastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistical regression models were developed to estimate snowpack water equivalent (SWE) using only meteorological variables available at National Co-operative Observer Program (co-op) sites. These include the square root of snow depth, the ...

D. Samelson; D. S. Wilks

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL WATERING DEVICE  

SciTech Connect

A device for watering experimental animals confined in a battery of individual plastic enclosures is described. It consists of a rectangular plastic enclosure having a plurality of fluid-tight compartments, each with a drinking hole near the bottom and a filling hole on the top. The enclosure is immersed in water until filled, its drinking holes sealed with a strip of tape, and it is then placed in the battery. The tape sealing prevents the flow of water from the device, but permits animals to drink by licking the drinking holes. (AEC)

Finkel, M.P.

1964-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

On the Potential Change in Surface Water Vapor Deposition over the Continental United States due to Increases in Atmospheric Greenhouse Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characteristics of surface water vapor deposition (WVD) over the continental United States under the present climate and a future climate scenario reflecting the mid-twenty-first-century increased greenhouse gas concentrations were evaluated by ...

Zaitao Pan; Moti Segal; Charles Graves

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Oceanographic Considerations for Desalination Plants in Southern California Coastal Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of product drinking water produced by this plant will begallon of product water produced, the proposed desalinationof the time if product water is produced by the desalination

Jenkins, Scott A; Wasyl, Joseph

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Hydraulic Fracturing on Drinking Water Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disclaimer Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use.

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Break-Even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the break-even cost for residential rooftop solar water heating (SWH) technology, defined as the point where the cost of the energy saved with a SWH system equals the cost of a conventional heating fuel purchased from the grid (either electricity or natural gas). We examine the break-even cost for the largest 1,000 electric and natural gas utilities serving residential customers in the United States as of 2008. Currently, the break-even cost of SWH in the United States varies by more than a factor of five for both electricity and natural gas, despite a much smaller variation in the amount of energy saved by the systems (a factor of approximately one and a half). The break-even price for natural gas is lower than that for electricity due to a lower fuel cost. We also consider the relationship between SWH price and solar fraction and examine the key drivers behind break-even costs. Overall, the key drivers of the break-even cost of SWH are a combination of fuel price, local incentives, and technical factors including the solar resource location, system size, and hot water draw.

Cassard, H.; Denholm, P.; Ong, S.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Evaluating the energy and carbon footprint of water conveyance system and future water supply options for Las Vegas, Nevada.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Water production requires the use of energy to transport water from distant locations, pump groundwater from deep aquifers and treat water to meet stringent drinking… (more)

Shrestha, Eleeja

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Post-Remediation Biomonitoring of Pesticides and Other Contaminants in Marine Waters and Sediment Near the United Heckathorn Superfund Site, Richmond, California  

SciTech Connect

This report, PNNL-1 3059 Rev. 1, was published in July 2000 and replaces PNNL-1 3059 which is dated October 1999. The revision corrects tissue concentration units that were reported as dry weight but were actually wet weight, and updates conclusions based on the correct reporting units. Marine sediment remediation at the United Heckathorn Superfund Site was completed in April 1997. Water and mussel tissues were sampled in February 1999 from four stations near Lauritzen Canal in Richmond, California, for Year 2 of post-remediation monitoring of marine areas near the United Heckathom Site. Dieldrin and dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane (DDT) were analyzed in water samples, tissue samples from resident mussels, and tissue samples from transplanted mussels deployed for 4 months. Concentrations of dieldrin and total DDT in water and total DDT in tissue were compared with Year 1 of post-remediation monitoring, and with preremediation data from the California State Mussel Watch program (tissue s) and the Ecological Risk Assessment for the United Heckathorn Superfund Site (tissues and water). Mussel tissues were also analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), which were detected in sediment samples. Chlorinated pesticide concentrations in water samples were similar to preremediation levels and did not meet remediation goals. Mean dieldrin concentrations in water ranged from 0.62 ng/L to 12.5 ng/L and were higher than the remediation goal (0.14 ng/L) at all stations. Mean total DDT concentrations in water ranged from 14.4 ng/L to 62.3 ng/L and exceeded the remediation goal (0.59 ng/L) at all stations. The highest concentrations of both DDT and dieldrin were found at the Lauritzen Canal/End station. Despite exceedence of the remediation goals, chlorinated pesticide concentrations in Lauritzen Canal water samples were notably lower in 1999 than in 1998. PCBS were not detected in water samples in 1999.

LD Antrim; NP Kohn

2000-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

167

Information Sources for Small Water Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managers of small waters systems must have information about a variety of topics. This publication lists essential printed and electronic resources on disaster preparedness, national drinking water standards, private water well management, water treatment, and many other topics.

Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

2007-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

168

DESTRUCTIVE EXAMINATION OF 3-CYCLE LWR (LIGHT WATER REACTOR) FUEL RODS FROM TURKEY POINT UNIT 3 FOR THE CLIMAX - SPENT FUEL TEST  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The destructive examination results of five light water reactor rods from the Turkey Point Unit 3 reactor are presented. The examinations included fission gas collection and analyses, burnup and hydrogen analyses, and a metallographic evaluation of the fuel, cladding, oxide, and hydrides. The rods exhibited a low fission gas release with all other results appearing representative for pressurized water reator fuel rods with similar burnups (28 GWd/MTU) and operating histories.

ATKIN SD

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Evaluation of the Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS) flowsheet for decontamination of high-activity-level water at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Nuclear Power Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS) flowsheet for decontamination of the high-activity-level water at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Nuclear Power Station was evaluated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a study that included filtration tests, ion exchange column tests, and ion exchange distribution tests. The contaminated waters, the SDS flowsheet, and the experiments made are described. The experimental results were used to predict the SDS performance and to indicate potential improvements.

Campbell, D.O., Collins, E.D., King, L.J., Knauer, J.B.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Energy Expenditure and Water Flux of Ruppell's Foxes in Saudi Arabia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), sometimes in excess of 50 C, intense solar radiation, desiccating winds, lack of surface water for drinking

Williams, Jos. B.

171

Drinking Water Standards Drinking water from a local public supply must  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

leaks; metals like copper, zinc, cadmium, lead, and arsenic from mine wastes and natural sources wastes; l radiological contaminants such as radon or uranium mill wastes from human or 24 #12;To assure

Dyer, Bill

172

GRR/Section 14 - Water Resource Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- Water Resource Assessment - Water Resource Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14 - Water Resource Assessment 14 - WaterResourceAssessment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies United States Environmental Protection Agency Bureau of Land Management US Army Corps of Engineers Federal Emergency Management Agency Regulations & Policies Clean Water Act Coastal Zone Management Act Coastal Barrier Resources Act Safe Drinking Water Act Sole Source Aquifer Demonstration Program Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973 NPDES Rules National Flood Insurance Act Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14 - WaterResourceAssessment.pdf

173

Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laws Envirosearch Institutional Controls NEPA Activities RCRA RQ*Calculator Water HSS Logo Water Laws Overview of water-related legislation affecting DOE sites Clean...

174

Framework to Evaluate Water Demands and Availability for Electrical Power Production Within Watersheds Across the United States: Dev elopment and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A framework to evaluate the water resources available to sustain present and projected electrical power production is under development and has been applied to four case studies around the United States. Those case studies are: the Lower Coosa River Basin (AL), the Muskingum River Basin (OH), the San Juan River Basin (CO, UT, AZ, NM), and the Platte River Basin (NE, CO, WY). The river basins were chosen for the case studies because of the difference among these basins, including climatic conditions, wate...

2005-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

175

Engineering design construction and testing of a salt-water absorption unit optimized for use with a solar collector heat source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of a 3 ton direct evaporatively cooled LiBr chiller and the construction of three operable field test units suitable for use with flat plate collectors is reported. Compared to conventional LiBr chillers using shell and tube heat exchangers and a separate cooling tower this approach aims to reduce first cost, installation cost and parasitic power. The unit is packaged into a size approximately 94 cm square and 2 meters tall. It produces 7.2/sup 0/C (45F) chilled water with a .72 COP when fired with 89.4/sup 0/C (193F) hot water while rejecting heat to 25.6/sup 0/C (78F) wb ambient air. Power to operate the condenser fan, solution pump and surface wetting pump is 450 watts. This unit deals with water freezing by making the sump and wetting pump freeze resistant so that seasonal draining is not required. Low heat flux through the wetted surfaces yields performance insensitivity to the accumulation of scale.

Ferguson, T.; Merrick, R.H.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Base unit definitions: Kilogram  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Unit of mass (kilogram), Abbreviations: CGPM, CIPM, BIPM. At the end of the 18th century, a kilogram was the mass of a cubic decimeter of water. ...

177

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

that do not contain a storage tank. The water is only heated as it passes through the heat exchanger. 3Use of a water heater for another housing unit also includes the use of...

178

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

that do not contain a storage tank. The water is only heated as it passes through the heat exchanger. 4Use of a water heater for another housing unit also includes the use of...

179

Atrazine Contamination in a Rural Source-Water Supply: Spa Lake, Lewisburg, Kentucky.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In 1998, Western Kentucky University (WKU) worked in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Drinking Water Protection Division, to investigate methods to improve source-water… (more)

Seadler, Kathryn

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Probability distributions of hydraulic conductivity for the hydrogeologic units of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of geologic information such as lithology and rock properties is important to constrain conceptual and numerical hydrogeologic models. This geologic information is difficult to apply explicitly to numerical modeling and analyses because it tends to be qualitative rather than quantitative. This study uses a compilation of hydraulic-conductivity measurements to derive estimates of the probability distributions for several hydrogeologic units within the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, a geologically and hydrologicaly complex region underlain by basin-fill sediments, volcanic, intrusive, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Probability distributions of hydraulic conductivity for general rock types have been studied previously; however, this study provides more detailed definition of hydrogeologic units based on lithostratigraphy, lithology, alteration, and fracturing and compares the probability distributions to the aquifer test data. Results suggest that these probability distributions can be used for studies involving, for example, numerical flow modeling, recharge, evapotranspiration, and rainfall runoff. These probability distributions can be used for such studies involving the hydrogeologic units in the region, as well as for similar rock types elsewhere. Within the study area, fracturing appears to have the greatest influence on the hydraulic conductivity of carbonate bedrock hydrogeologic units. Similar to earlier studies, we find that alteration and welding in the Tertiary volcanic rocks greatly influence conductivity. As alteration increases, hydraulic conductivity tends to decrease. Increasing degrees of welding appears to increase hydraulic conductivity because welding increases the brittleness of the volcanic rocks, thus increasing the amount of fracturing.

Belcher, W.R.; Sweetkind, D.S.; Elliott, P.E.

2002-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Atmospheric Water Vapor Transport in NCEP–NCAR Reanalyses: Comparison with River Discharge in the Central United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors extract the water transport produced by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction reanalysis for a 10-yr period, 1984–93, and compare its convergence into two river basins with an independent dataset, river discharge (...

William J. Gutowski Jr.; Yibin Chen; Zekai Ötles

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Unit Conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unit Conversion. ... Unit Conversion Example. "If you have an amount of unit of A, how much is that in unit B?"; Dimensional Analysis; ...

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

183

Performance Evaluation of a 4.5 kW (1.3 Refrigeration Tons) Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide/Water Solar Powered (Hot-Water-Fired) Absorption Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the summer months, air-conditioning (cooling) is the single largest use of electricity in both residential and commercial buildings with the major impact on peak electric demand. Improved air-conditioning technology has by far the greatest potential impact on the electric industry compared to any other technology that uses electricity. Thermally activated absorption air-conditioning (absorption chillers) can provide overall peak load reduction and electric grid relief for summer peak demand. This innovative absorption technology is based on integrated rotating heat exchangers to enhance heat and mass transfer resulting in a potential reduction of size, cost, and weight of the "next generation" absorption units. Rotartica Absorption Chiller (RAC) is a 4.5 kW (1.3 refrigeration tons or RT) air-cooled lithium bromide (LiBr)/water unit powered by hot water generated using the solar energy and/or waste heat. Typically LiBr/water absorption chillers are water-cooled units which use a cooling tower to reject heat. Cooling towers require a large amount of space, increase start-up and maintenance costs. However, RAC is an air-cooled absorption chiller (no cooling tower). The purpose of this evaluation is to verify RAC performance by comparing the Coefficient of Performance (COP or ratio of cooling capacity to energy input) and the cooling capacity results with those of the manufacturer. The performance of the RAC was tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a controlled environment at various hot and chilled water flow rates, air handler flow rates, and ambient temperatures. Temperature probes, mass flow meters, rotational speed measuring device, pressure transducers, and a web camera mounted inside the unit were used to monitor the RAC via a web control-based data acquisition system using Automated Logic Controller (ALC). Results showed a COP and cooling capacity of approximately 0.58 and 3.7 kW respectively at 35 C (95 F) design condition for ambient temperature with 40 C (104 F) cooling water temperature. This is in close agreement with the manufacturer data of 0.60 for COP and 3.9 kW for cooling capacity. This study resulted in a complete performance map of RAC which will be used to evaluate the potential benefits of rotating heat exchangers in making the "next-generation" absorption chillers more compact and cost effective without any significant degradation in the performance. In addition, the feasibility of using rotating heat exchangers in other applications will be evaluated.

Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Petrov, Andrei Y [ORNL; Linkous, Randall Lee [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

united stadium. united station.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??DC United is one of Major League Soccerâs most decorated franchises, yet it still plays its home games within the crumbling confines of RFK Stadium.… (more)

Groff, David R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Control of water infiltration into near surface LLW disposal units. Progress report on field experiments at a humid region site, Beltsville, Maryland: Volume 8  

SciTech Connect

This study`s objective is to assess means for controlling water infiltration through waste disposal unit covers in humid regions. Experimental work is being performed in large-scale lysimeters 21.34 m x 13.72 m x 3.05 m (75 ft x 45 ft x 10 ft) at Beltsville, Maryland. Results of the assessment are applicable to disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW), uranium mill tailings, hazardous waste, and sanitary landfills. Three kinds of waste disposal unit covers or barriers to water infiltration are being investigated: (1) resistive layer barrier, (2) conductive layer barrier, and (3) bioengineering management. The resistive layer barrier consists of compacted earthen material (e.g., clay). The conductive layer barrier consists of a conductive layer in conjunction with a capillary break. As long as unsaturated flow conditions are maintained, the conductive layer will wick water around the capillary break. Below-grade layered covers such as (1) and (2) will fail if there is appreciable subsidence of the cover, and remedial action for this kind of failure will be difficult. A surface cover, called bioengineering management, is meant to overcome this problem. The bioengineering management surface barrier is easily repairable if damaged by subsidence; therefore, it could be the system of choice under active subsidence conditions. The bioengineering management procedure also has been shown to be effective in dewatering saturated trenches and could be used for remedial action efforts. After cessation of subsidence, that procedure could be replaced by a resistive layer barrier or, perhaps even better, by a resistive layer barrier/conductive layer barrier system. The latter system would then give long-term effective protection against water entry into waste without institutional care.

Schulz, R.K. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ridky, R.W. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Geology; O`Donnell, E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Source Water Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) covers approximately 890 square miles and includes 12 public water systems that must be evaluated for Source water protection purposes under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Because of its size and location, six watersheds and five aquifers could potentially affect the INEEL's drinking water sources. Based on a preliminary evaluation of the available information, it was determined that the Big Lost River, Birch Creek, and Little Lost River Watersheds and the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer needed to be assessed. These watersheds were delineated using the United States Geologic Survey's Hydrological Unit scheme. Well capture zones were originally estimated using the RESSQC module of the Environmental Protection Agency's Well Head Protection Area model, and the initial modeling assumptions and results were checked by running several scenarios using Modflow modeling. After a technical review, the resulting capture zones were expanded to account for the uncertainties associated with changing groundwater flow directions, a this vadose zone, and other data uncertainties. Finally, all well capture zones at a given facility were merged to a single wellhead protection area at each facility. A contaminant source inventory was conducted, and the results were integrated with the well capture zones, watershed and aquifer information, and facility information using geographic information system technology to complete the INEEL's Source Water Assessment. Of the INEEL's 12 public water systems, three systems rated as low susceptibility (EBR-1, Main Gate, and Gun Range), and the remainder rated as moderate susceptibility. No INEEL public water system rated as high susceptibility. We are using this information to develop a source water management plan from which we will subsequently implement an INEEL-wide source water management program. The results are a very robust set of wellhead protection areas that will protect the INEEL's public water systems yet not too conservative to inhibit the INEEL from carrying out its missions.

Sehlke, G.

2003-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

187

A Critique of the Climatic Record of “Water Equivalent of Snow on the Ground” in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water equivalent of snow on the ground (SWE) has been measured daily since 1952 at National Weather Service first-order stations whenever snow depth exceeded 5 cm (2 in). These data are used in snowmelt analyses, snow climatology, and snow ...

Thomas W. Schmidlin

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Water is Vital--Especially after a Disaster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dehydration can be a serious threat after a disaster, when supplies of clean drinking water may be limited. Learn how you can find and use hidden sources of water in your home and purify water to make it safe for drinking.

Crocker, Andrew

2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

189

2012 BNL Water Quality Consumer Confidence Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

because it comes from one of the two drinking- water wells that produces water naturally low in iron water is produced with pride by the staff of BNL's Water Treatment Facility (WTF) of the Energy & Utilities Division. Producing BNL's finished water are five water- treatment engineers, each having NYSDOH

Ohta, Shigemi

190

Safe river water: A ubiquitous and collaborative water quality monitoring solution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water quality is vital to human life and economy. However, one sixth of the world's population suffers from lack of safe drinking and domestic water. Aiming to improve the capability of predicting and responding to river pollution disasters, this project ...

Bin Hu; Bo Hu; JiZheng Wan; Huilan Nie; Chongzhi Zhai

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Results of Water and Sediment Toxicity Tests and Chemical Analyses Conducted at the Central Shops Burning Rubble Pit Waste Unit, January 1999  

SciTech Connect

The Central Shops Burning Rubble Pit Operable Unit consists of two inactive rubble pits (631-1G and 631-3G) that have been capped, and one active burning rubble pit (631-2G), where wooden pallets and other non-hazardous debris are periodically burned. The inactive rubble pits may have received hazardous materials, such as asbestos, batteries, and paint cans, as well as non-hazardous materials, such as ash, paper, and glass. In an effort to determine if long term surface water flows of potentially contaminated water from the 631-1G, 631-3G, and 631-2G areas have resulted in an accumulation of chemical constituents at toxic levels in the vicinity of the settling basin and wetlands area, chemical analyses for significant ecological preliminary constituents of concern (pCOCs) were performed on aqueous and sediment samples. In addition, aquatic and sediment toxicity tests were performed in accordance with U.S. EPA methods (U.S. EPA 1989, 1994). Based on the results of the chemical analyses, unfiltered water samples collected from a wetland and settling basins located adjacent to the CSBRP Operable Unit exceed Toxicity Reference Values (TRVs) for aluminum, barium, chromium, copper, iron, lead, and vanadium at one or more of the four locations that were sampled. The water contained very high concentrations of clay particles that were present as suspended solids. A substantial portion of the metals were present as filterable particulates, bound to the clay particles, and were therefore not biologically available. Based on dissolved metal concentrations, the wetland and settling basin exceeded TRVs for aluminum and barium. However, the background reference location also exceeded the TRV for barium, which suggests that this value may be too low, based on local geochemistry. The detection limits for both total and dissolved mercury were higher than the TRV, so it was not possible to determine if the TRV for mercury was exceeded. Dissolved metal levels of chromium, copper, iron, lead and vanadium were below the TRVs. Metal concentrations in the sediment exceeded the TRVs for arsenic, chromium, copper, and mercury but not for antimony and lead. The results of the water toxicity tests indicated no evidence of acute toxicity in any of the samples. The results of the chronic toxicity tests indicated possible reproductive impairment at two locations. However, the results appear to be anomalous, since the toxicity was unrelated to concentration, and because the concentrations of pCOCs were similar in the toxic and the non-toxic samples. The results of the sediment toxicity tests indicated significant mortality in all but one sample, including the background reference sediment. When the results of the CSBRP sediment toxicity tests were statistically compared to the result from the background reference sediment, there was no significant mortality. These results suggest that the surface water and sediment at the CSBRP Operable Unit are not toxic to the biota that inhabit the wetland and the settling basin.

Specht, W.L.

1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

192

Texas Hot Water Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

coil hot water storage tank, a backup instantaneous electric water heater, a hydronic fan coil unit for space heating, and an efficient plumbing manifold for domestic hot water...

193

Israel -the " BACK TO THE FUTURE" opportunity for the Global Water Arena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consequences of climate change: Drought and lack of fresh drinking water The aging water infrastructure can with the water arena, involves many players Water Utility Government Regulator Solution Provider Technology

Mark, Pinsky

194

Method of arsenic removal from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for low-cost arsenic removal from drinking water using chemically prepared bottom ash pre-treated with ferrous sulfate and then sodium hydroxide. Deposits on the surface of particles of bottom ash form of activated iron adsorbent with a high affinity for arsenic. In laboratory tests, a miniscule 5 grams of pre-treated bottom ash was sufficient to remove the arsenic from 2 liters of 2400 ppb (parts per billion) arsenic-laden water to a level below 50 ppb (the present United States Environmental Protection Agency limit). By increasing the amount of pre-treated bottom ash, even lower levels of post-treatment arsenic are expected. It is further expected that this invention supplies a very low-cost solution to arsenic poisoning for large population segments.

Gadgil, Ashok (El Cerrito, CA)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

195

Feasibility Assessment of Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water energy resource sites identified in the resource assessment study reported in Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources, DOE/ID-11111, April 2004 were evaluated to identify which could feasibly be developed using a set of feasibility criteria. The gross power potential of the sites estimated in the previous study was refined to determine the realistic hydropower potential of the sites using a set of development criteria assuming they are developed as low power (less than 1 MW) or small hydro (between 1 and 30 MW) projects. The methodologies for performing the feasibility assessment and estimating hydropower potential are described. The results for the country in terms of the number of feasible sites, their total gross power potential, and their total hydropower potential are presented. The spatial distribution of the feasible potential projects is presented on maps of the conterminous U.S. and Alaska and Hawaii. Results summaries for each of the 50 states are presented in an appendix. The results of the study are also viewable using a Virtual Hydropower Prospector geographic information system application accessible on the Internet at: http://hydropower.inl.gov/prospector.

Douglas G. Hall

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Solving Water Quality Problems in the Home  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If your drinking water comes from a private water well, there are certain procedures you can follow to make sure the water is safe. This publication explains how to get your water tested and, if treatment is necessary, to select the correct treatment equipment. Tables display common water problems and the equipment used to treat them.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

197

CLIMATE CHANGE AND WATER SUPPLY SECURITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of developing the infrastructure to produce and deliver recycled water, so it seems logical and fair because unlike recycled water, the water produced is considered to be of drinking water quality or better CLIMATE CHANGE AND WATER SUPPLY SECURITY: Reconfiguring Groundwater Management to Reduce

198

Partnering to Save Water  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partnering Partnering to Save Water Phill Consiglio Southern California Edison What We Are Going to Discuss * A Little Bit About Water * The Energy Cost of Water * Water Technologies * What We Have Done * Where We Are Going A Little Bit About Water *The Earth Has A Finite Supply Of Fresh Water. - Water Is Stored In Aquifers, Surface Waters And The Atmosphere - Sometimes Oceans Are Mistaken For Available Water, But The Amount Of Energy Needed To Convert Saline Water To Potable Water Is Prohibitive Today *This Has Created A Water Crisis Due To: - Inadequate Access To Safe Drinking Water For About 884 Million People - Inadequate Access To Water For Sanitation And Waste Disposal For 2.5 Billion People - Groundwater Overdrafting (Excessive Use) Leading To Diminished Agricultural Yields

199

Legend Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Syntax: LEGEND UNIT units> where is an integer number or parameter in the range 1 to 100 that specifies the legend identifier; and ...

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

200

Public Health Issues Associated with Small Drinking Water Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the combined efforts of epidemiologists, environmental health specialists, and laboratory personnel from technical assistance to state and local environmental health agencies to enhance laboratory capacity, environmental health services, and epidemiologic expertise. NCEH proposed a number of specific projects

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

San Luis Unit technical record of design and construction. Volume 5. Construction Dos Amigos Pumping Plant, Pleasant Valley Pumping Plant. Central Valley Project, West San Joaquin Division, San Luis Unit, California. A water resources technical publication. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The technical record of design and construction of the San Luis unit is divided into seven volumes. This volume, number V, deals with the construction of two specific features of the San Luis unit, Dos Amigos Pumping Plant and Pleasant Valley Pumping Plant.

1974-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Potential for crop drying with geothermal hot water resources in the western United States: alfalfa, a case study. Report 305-100-02  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary results of engineering, economic, and geographic analysis of the use of low-temperature geothermal heat for the commercial drying of grains, grasses, fruits, vegetables and livestock products in the United States are reported. Alfalfa (lucerne) dehydration was chosen for detailed process and cost study. Six different geothermal heat exchanger/dryer configurations were examined. A conveyor type that could utilize geothermal hot water for its entire heat requirement proved to be the most economical. A capital cost estimate for an all-geothermal alfalfa dehydration plant near the Heber Known Geothermal Resource Area in the Imperial Valley, California was prepared. The combined cost for heat exchangers and dryer is about $1.6 million. Output is about 11 metric tons per hour. Acreage, production and dollar value data for 22 dryable crops were compiled for the areas surrounding identified hydrothermal resources in 11 western states. The potential magnitude of fossil fuel use that could be replaced by geothermal heat for drying these crops will be estimated.

Wright, T.C.

1977-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

203

Health and water quality monitoring of Pure Home Water's ceramic filter dissemination in the northern region of Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pure Home Water (PHW) is a social enterprise that promotes and disseminates household drinking water technologies in the Northern Region of Ghana. Currently their main product is a pot-shaped Potters for Peace-type ceramic ...

Johnson, Sophie M. (Sophie Marie)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Disinfecting Water Wells by Shock Chlorination (Spanish)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If your well has been flooded, it must be shock chlorinated before it can be used as a source of drinking water. This publication explains how to disinfect a well using either dry chlorine or liquid household bleach.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2007-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

205

Disinfecting Water Wells by Shock Chlorination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If your well has been flooded, it must be shock chlorinated before it can be used as a source of drinking water. This publication explains how to disinfect a well using either dry chlorine or liquid household bleach.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

206

Safe water storage in Kenya's modified clay pot : standardization, tap design, and cost recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the main components necessary for providing safe drinking water for users who lack piped water in the home is the ability to safely store it in the home. Users in the Nyanza Province of Kenya frequently carry water ...

Young, Suzanne E

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Biosand filtration of high turbidity water : modified filter design and safe filtrate storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unsafe drinking water is a major cause of water-related diseases that predominantly affect people living in developing countries. The most prevalent water-related disease is diarrhea, estimated to kill 1.8 million children ...

Collin, Clair

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

The Drinking Water Security and Safety Amendments of 2002: Is America's Drinking Water Infrastructure Safer Four Years Later?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

specific chemicals, including chlorine, as opposed to otherat 927 (". . . [a] strike on a chlorine disinfectant tankof an airborne toxic chlorine cloud which could prove

Shermer, Steven D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

The Drinking Water Security and Safety Amendments of 2002: Is America's Drinking Water Infrastructure Safer Four Years Later?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NAT'L STRATEGY FOR HOME- LAND SECURITY, supra note 50, at 9.on Creating the Home- land Security Department, supra noteM. Merriam, Homeland Security Begins At Home: Local Planning

Shermer, Steven D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Summary Max Total Units  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

211

Use of reclaimed water for power plant cooling.  

SciTech Connect

Freshwater demands are steadily increasing throughout the United States. As its population increases, more water is needed for domestic use (drinking, cooking, cleaning, etc.) and to supply power and food. In arid parts of the country, existing freshwater supplies are not able to meet the increasing demands for water. New water users are often forced to look to alternative sources of water to meet their needs. Over the past few years, utilities in many locations, including parts of the country not traditionally water-poor (e.g., Georgia, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, and North Carolina) have needed to reevaluate the availability of water to meet their cooling needs. This trend will only become more extreme with time. Other trends are likely to increase pressure on freshwater supplies, too. For example, as populations increase, they will require more food. This in turn will likely increase demands for water by the agricultural sector. Another example is the recent increased interest in producing biofuels. Additional water will be required to grow more crops to serve as the raw materials for biofuels and to process the raw materials into biofuels. This report provides information about an opportunity to reuse an abundant water source -- treated municipal wastewater, also known as 'reclaimed water' -- for cooling and process water in electric generating facilities. The report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Innovations for Existing Plants research program (Feeley 2005). This program initiated an energy-water research effort in 2003 that includes the availability and use of 'nontraditional sources' of water for use at power plants. This report represents a unique reference for information on the use of reclaimed water for power plant cooling. In particular, the database of reclaimed water user facilities described in Chapter 2 is the first comprehensive national effort to identify and catalog those plants that are using reclaimed water for cooling.

Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

212

English Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

English Units. A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J. 1, Steam Point Calculator: English Units, ... 6, Height of steam point apparatus above ground (ft.), 0, ft. ...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

213

Unit Conversions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... volume flow units, which contain "atm", assume that the gas is: ideal; at a pressure of 101325 Pa; at a temperature of 0 °C. Be aware that the unit "atm ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

214

EPA Final Ground Water Rule  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Nuclear Safety and Environment Office of Nuclear Safety and Environment Nuclear Safety and Environment Information Brief HS-20-IB-2007-02 (March 2007) EPA Final Ground Water Rule Safe Drinking Water Act: National Primary Drinking Water Regulations Ground Water Rule - 40 CFR Parts 9, 141 and 142 Final Rule: 71 FR 65574 Effective Date: January 8, 2007 1 RULE SYNOPSIS On November 8, 2006, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a final Ground Water Rule (GWR) to promote increased protection against microbial pathogens that may be present in public water systems (PWSs) that use ground water sources for their supply (these systems are known as ground water systems). This Rule establishes a risk-targeted approach

215

Dezincification and Brass Lead Leaching in Premise Plumbing Systems: Effects of Alloy, Physical Conditions and Water Chemistry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Brass components are widely used in drinking water distribution systems as valves, faucets and other fixtures. They can be corroded by âdezincification,â which is the… (more)

Zhang, Yaofu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

THE UV-TUBE AS AN APPROPRIATE WATER DISINFECTION TECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Tube, as the cost per liter of water produced decreases as water use increases. The water quality is regulatedi THE UV-TUBE AS AN APPROPRIATE WATER DISINFECTION TECHNOLOGY: An Assessment of Technical of contaminated drinking water ­ which causes so many deaths and so much illness ­ should have a simple technical

Kammen, Daniel M.

217

Water pollution diagnosis with a multi-agent approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Providing high quality drinking water with no disruption is the main objective of every municipal water system. The paper presents the application of a multi-agent approach to water pollution diagnosis in a municipal water system. The main benefit of ... Keywords: artificial intelligence, environmental protection, multi-agent system, water pollution diagnosis

Constantin Nichita; Mihaela Oprea

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

News Release: DOE Announces Riverton Water Sampling Results | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announces Riverton Water Sampling Results Announces Riverton Water Sampling Results News Release: DOE Announces Riverton Water Sampling Results May 11, 2012 - 3:25pm Addthis News Contact: Contractor, Judy Miller, S.M. Stoller Corporation Public Affairs (970) 248-6363 jmiller@lm.doe.gov Laboratory results indicate water from the alternative water supply system is safe for residents to drink The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that residential drinking water testing from an alternative water supply system in Riverton, Wyoming, confirmed the water is safe. Results from ater samples collected on May 3, 2012, show that uranium levels at 0.0001 milligrams per liter, well below the drinking water standard set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. "We take the issue of potential water contamination very seriously and

219

Designing of a prototype heat-sealer to manufacture solar water sterilization pouches for use in developing nations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water purification proves to be a difficult task in many developing nations. The SODIS (SOlar water DISinfection) process is a method which improves the microbiological quality of water making it safer for drinking and ...

Quinlan, Saundra S

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Shock Chlorination of Stored Water Supplies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Treatment of drinking water to improve its sanitary or bacteriological quality is referred to as disinfection. Shock chlorination is one disinfection method employed by public suppliers to reduce bacterial contamination of water. This method also can be used by private-water-well owners.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Shock Chlorination of Stored Water Supplies (Spanish)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Treatment of drinking water to improve its sanitary or bacteriological quality is referred to as disinfection. Shock chlorination is one disinfection method employed by public suppliers to reduce bacterial contamination of water. This method also can be used by private-water-well owners.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

222

Assessing the impacts of future demand for saline groundwater on commercial deployment of CCS in the United States  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a preliminary assessment of the potential impact that future demand for groundwater might have on the commercial deployment of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies within the United States. A number of regions within the U.S. have populations, agriculture and industries that are particularly dependent upon groundwater. Moreover, some key freshwater aquifers are already over-utilized or depleted, and others are likely to be moving toward depletion as demand grows. The need to meet future water demands may lead some parts of the nation to consider supplementing existing supplies with lower quality groundwater resources, including brackish waters that are currently not considered sources of drinking water but which could provide supplemental water via desalination. In some areas, these same deep saline-filled geologic formations also represent possible candidate carbon dioxide (CO2) storage reservoirs. The analysis presented here suggests that future constraints on CCS deployment due to potential needs to supplement conventional water supplies by desalinating deeper and more brackish waters are likely to be necessary only in limited regions across the country, particularly in areas that are already experiencing water stress.

Davidson, Casie L.; Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

223

Economic and Financial Costs of Saving Water and Energy: Preliminary Analysis for Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) – Replacement of Pipeline Units I-7A, I-18, and I-22  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a three-component capital renovation project proposed by Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2. The proposed project primarily consists of replacing aged mortar-joint pipe in pipeline units I-7A, I-18, and I-22 with new rubber-gasketed, reinforced concrete pipe. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for the cost of saving water are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 485 ac-ft of water per year and 179,486,553 BTUs {52,604 kwh} of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost-of-saving water is estimated to be $385.46 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost-of-saving energy is estimated to be $0.0010735 per BTU {$3.663 per kwh}. In addition, expected real (vs. nominal) values are provided for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in U.S. Public Law 106-576. The aggregate initial construction cost per ac-ft of water saved measure is $510.92. The aggregate initial construction cost per unit of energy saved measure is $0.0013798 per BTU {$4.708 per kwh}. The aggregate ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -2.53.

Sturdivant, Allen W.; Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Given that water is the sine qua non of life, it is intriguing that animals can live in deserts, environments with little  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in deserts, environments with little drinking water, high ambient temperatures (Ta), intense solar radiation, low humidity and desiccating winds. Because desert birds are typically diurnal, at times

Williams, Jos. B.

225

Statement of Patricia Hoffman before the United States House...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

before the United States House of Representatives House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development Statement of Patricia Hoffman before the United States House of...

226

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 8): Anaconda Smelter site, (Operable Unit 11 - Flue Dust), Deer Lodge County, Anaconda, MT. (Second remedial action), September 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 6,000-acre Anaconda Smelter site is a former copper and ore processing facility in Deer Lodge County, Montana. Land use in the area is predominantly residential. The site is bounded on the north and east, respectively, by the Warm Springs Creek and Mill Creek, both of which are potential sources of drinking water. From 1884 until 1980 when activities ceased, the site was used for ore processing and smelting operations. In 1988, EPA conducted an investigation to determine the nature and extent of the flue dust contamination. A 1988 ROD addressed the Mill Creek Operable Unit (OU15) and documented the relocation of residents from the community surrounding the smelter site as the selected remedial action. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses the Flue Dust Operable Unit (OU11). The primary contaminants of concern affecting this site from the flue dust materials are metals including arsenic, cadmium, and lead. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

Not Available

1991-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

227

Household water treatment and safe storage options for Northern Region Ghana : consumer preference and relative cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A range of household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) products are available in Northern Region Ghana which have the potential to significantly improve local drinking water quality. However, to date, the region has ...

Green, Vanessa (Vanessa Layton)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Appropriate technology water treatment processes for MaeLa Temporary Shelter, Thailand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis recommends the use of horizontal-flow roughing filters to treat spring water of variable annual quality in MaeLa Temporary Shelter, Thailand. The public drinking water system for 45,000 refugees is overseen by ...

Vater, Katherine Ann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Cross-sectional epidemiological study on water and sanitation practices in the northern region of Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cross-sectional epidemiological study was conducted to obtain baseline data on drinking water and sanitation practices in the Northern Region of Ghana. This study was performed in conjunction with Pure Home Water (PHW) ...

Peletz, Rachel Louise

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Ceramic filter manufacturing in Northern Ghana : water storage and quality control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2009, Pure Home Water (PHW), a Ghana based non-profit organization working to provide affordable and safe drinking water to people in the Northern Region of Ghana, began the construction of a ceramic pot filter (CPF) ...

Kleiman, Shanti Lisa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,1.8,0.1,0.2,0.6,0.1 1,108.1,67.5,6.5,8.8,18.5,6.8 "2 or More",2.7,2.5,0.1,"Q","Q","Q" "Number of Tankless Water Heaters2" 0,110.4,69.5,6.5,8.9,18.6,6.8 1,3.1,2.2,0.2,0.2,0.5,"Q"

232

Metric Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J. 1, Steam Point Calculator: Metric Units, Elevation Converter, ... 6, Height of steam point apparatus above ground (m), 0, m, ...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

233

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

- I - I United States Department of Energy D lSCk Al M E R "This book was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency

234

The Validation of AIRS Retrievals of Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor Using Measurements from a Network of Ground-Based GPS Receivers over the Contiguous United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A robust and easily implemented verification procedure based on the column-integrated precipitable water (IPW) vapor estimates derived from a network of ground-based global positioning system (GPS) receivers has been used to assess the quality of ...

M. K. Rama Varma Raja; Seth I. Gutman; James G. Yoe; Larry M. McMillin; Jiang Zhao

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Global Linear Stability of the Two-Dimensional Shallow-Water Equations: An Application of the Distributive Theorem of Roots for Polynomials on the Unit Circle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with the numerical stability of the linearized shallow-water dynamic and thermodynamic system using centered spatial differencing and leapfrog time differencing. The nonlinear version of the equations is commonly used in both 2D ...

Jia Wang

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Recommendations for at-risk water supplies in Capiz Province, Philippines : using water source and community assessments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The following thesis is part of a larger project which began in response to a request by the Provincial Health Office (PHO) in Capiz Province, Philippines for expert advice to support its drinking water quality testing ...

Patrick, Jessica Molly

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

United States General Accounting Office GAO Report to Congressional Requesters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the standard. The tritium was found to be leaking from the laboratory's High Flux Beam Reactor's spent 32 times drinking water standards. Jan. Fuel pool leak test performed using different technology Resources, Community, and Economic Development Division B-276754 November 4, 1997 The Honorable F. James

Homes, Christopher C.

238

Water is used for many purposes, includ-ing growing crops, producing copper,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WATER USES Water is used for many purposes, includ- ing growing crops, producing copper, generating electricity, watering lawns, keeping clean, drinking and recreation. Bal- ancing the water budget comes down of the water budget. Reducing demand involves re- ducing how much water each person uses, lim- iting the number

239

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BP Energy Company BP Energy Company OE Docket No. EA- 3 14 Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-3 14 February 22,2007 BP Energy Company Order No. EA-314 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(Q of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7 15 l(b), 7172(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.S24a(e)) . On May 22,2006, BP Energy Company (BP Energy) applied to DOE for an authorization to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico as a power marketer. BP Energy proposes to purchase surplus electric energy from electric utilities and other suppliers within the United States and to export that energy to ~Mexico. The cnergy

240

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Office of Research and EPA 600/R-941209 Environmental Protection Development January 1993 Agency Washington, DC 20460 Offsite Environmental 57,,7 Monitoring Report Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1992 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING SYSTEMS LABORATORY-LAS VEGAS P.O. BOX 93478 LAS VEGAS. NEVADA 891 93-3478 702/798-2100 Dear Reader: Since 1954, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and its predecessor the U.S, Public Health Service (PHs) has conducted radiological monitoring in the offsite areas around United States nuclear test areas. The primary objective of this monitoring has been the protection of the health and safety of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A Realistic Hot Water Draw Specification for Rating Solar Water...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

thornton@tess-inc.com ABSTRACT In the United States, annual performance ratings for solar water heaters are simulated, using TMY weather and specified water draw. Bias...

242

Energy and water development appropriations for fiscal year 1994. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session  

SciTech Connect

The hearings (H.R. 2445) address the Energy & Water Development Appropriations for Fiscal Year 1994. The Bonneville Power Administrations budget proposal were discussed. The need for cost cutting and a competitive rate structure were stressed. Statements and documents submitted for record by government officials are included.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

Resources, and the United States Environmental Protection AgencyDesigning Rate Structures that Support Your Objectives: Guidelines for NC Water Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose for these rate setting guidelines is to provide water and wastewater utility managers and technical assistance providers with a framework in setting water and wastewater rates and rate structures that would meet the state’s and the utility’s policies and objectives. These guidelines provide step by step instructions and necessary information to allow the utility manager to make an informed policy-driven choice on the rate structure design. These guidelines do not provide instruction on how to project revenues and costs and how to calculate rates (dollar amounts) to balance a budget, but references other documents that provide such guidelines. These rate setting guidelines were developed by the Environmental Finance Center at the

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Water Heating Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,68.7,7.4,7.6,15.9,6.7 "2 or More",3.7,3.2,"Q","Q","Q","Q" "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,"Q","Q","Q",0.6,"Q" "Housing Units Served by Main Water Heater"

245

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

E-T Global Energy, LLC E-T Global Energy, LLC OE Docket No. EA-381 Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-381 June 10, 2011 I. BACKGROUND E-T Global Energy, LLC Order No. EA-381 Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(f) of the Department ofEnergy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7151(b), 7172(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) ofthe Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.824a(e)) 1 * On May 10,2011, DOE received an application from E-T Global Energy, LLC (E-T Global) for authority to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico for five years as a power marketer using existing international transmission facilities. E-

246

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WASHINGTON, TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 1983 @nngmeional Ruord United States of America .__ -- . . ,- PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE 9@ CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION United States Government Printing Office SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS Washmgton, D C 20402 OFFICIAL BUSINESS Penalty Ior pwate use. $xX Congresstonal Record (USPS 087-390) Postage and Fees Pad U S Government Prlnhng 0ffv.X 375 SECOND CLASS NEWSPAPER H.4578 ' C.QNGRESSIONAL RECORD - HOUSE June 28, 1983 H.J. Res. 273: Mr. BOUND. Mr. W~.XMAN. Mr. OBERSTAR, Mr. BEDELL. Mr. BONER of Tennessee, Mr. OWENS. Mr. DAUB, Mr. CONTE. Mr. RAHALL; Mr. GRAY, Mr. VANDER JACT. Mr. TRAKLER, and Mr. Vxrrro. H. Con. Res. 107: Mr. KASICH. Mr. AUCOIN. Mr. CARPER, and Mr. SIZHFIJER. H. Con. Res. 118: Mr. FISH. Mr. LANTOS.

247

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ongrees;ional Record ongrees;ional Record United States of America __._ -.. I. :- PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE 9tth CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION United States Government Printing Office SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS Washmcqton. Cl C 20402 OFFICIAL BUSINESS Penalty Ior pwate use. $300 Congressmal Record (USPS 087-390) Postage and Fees Pad U S Governme3n:jPnntmg OfIce SECOND CLASS NEWSPAPER H.4578 ' June 28, 1983 -: I H.J. Res. 273: Mr. BOLAND, Mr. WA-. Mr. OBERSTAFC, M' r. BEDELL, Mr. BONER of Tennessee, Mr. OWENS. Mr. DAUB. Mr. CONTE. Mr. RAHALL,. Mr. GRAY, Mr. VANDER JAGT. Mr. TRAKLER. and Mr. VENTO. H. Con. Res. iO7: Mr. KASICH. Mr. ALCOIN. Mr. CARPER. and Mr. SCHEUER. H. Con. Res. 118: Mr. FISH, Mr. LANTOS. Mr. KILDEE. Mr. SOLARZ Mr. Bmrr, Mr. BELWLL, Mr. RANG~L, Mr. DYMALLY. Mr.

248

Phase II Documentation Overview of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) initiated the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Subproject to assess and evaluate radiologic groundwater contamination resulting from underground nuclear testing at the NTS. These activities are overseen by the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996, as amended March 2010). For Frenchman Flat, the UGTA Subproject addresses media contaminated by the underground nuclear tests, which is limited to geologic formations within the saturated zone or 100 meters (m) or less above the water table. Transport in groundwater is judged to be the primary mechanism of migration for the subsurface contamination away from the Frenchman Flat underground nuclear tests. The intent of the UGTA Subproject is to assess the risk to the public from the groundwater contamination produced as a result of nuclear testing. The primary method used to assess this risk is the development of models of flow and contaminant transport to forecast the extent of potentially contaminated groundwater for the next 1,000 years, establish restrictions to groundwater usage, and implement a monitoring program to verify protectiveness. For the UGTA Subproject, contaminated groundwater is that which exceeds the radiological standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act (CFR, 2009) the State of Nevada’s groundwater quality standard to protect human health and the environment. Contaminant forecasts are expected to be uncertain, and groundwater monitoring will be used in combination with land-use control to build confidence in model results and reduce risk to the public. Modeling forecasts of contaminant transport will provide the basis for negotiating a compliance boundary for the Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU). This compliance boundary represents a regulatory-based distinction between groundwater contaminated or not contaminated by underground testing. Transport modeling simulations are used to compute radionuclide concentrations in time and space within the CAU for the 1,000-year contaminant boundary. These three-dimensional (3-D) concentration simulations are integrated into probabilistic forecasts of the likelihood of groundwater exceeding or remaining below the radiological standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act (CFR, 2009) defined as the contaminant boundary. Contaminant boundaries are not discrete predictions of the location or concentration of contaminants, but instead are spatial representations of the probability of exceeding Safe Drinking Water Act radiological standards. The forecasts provide planning tools to facilitate regulatory decisions designed to protect the health and safety of the public.

Greg Ruskauff

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CC-1-I Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives served through the facilities of Carolina Power & Light Company, Western Division (hereinafter called the Customers). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy available from the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Cheatham, Old Hickory, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereinafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and sold in wholesale quantities. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating

250

Definition: British thermal unit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

thermal unit thermal unit Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png British thermal unit The amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one pound of water one degree Fahrenheit; often used as a unit of measure for the energy content of fuels.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition The British thermal unit (BTU or Btu) is a traditional unit of energy equal to about 1055 joules. It is the amount of energy needed to cool or heat one pound of water by one degree Fahrenheit. In scientific contexts the BTU has largely been replaced by the SI unit of energy, the joule. The unit is most often used as a measure of power (as BTU/h) in the power, steam generation, heating, and air conditioning industries, and also as a measure of agricultural energy production (BTU/kg). It is still used

251

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tenaslta Power Services Co. Tenaslta Power Services Co. OE Docket No. EA-243-A Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Canada Order No. EA-243-A March 1,2007 Tenaska Power Services Co. Order No. EA-243-A I. BACKGROUND Exports of elcctricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 30 I(b) and 402(f) of the Departrncnt of' Energy Organizatio~l Act (42 U, S.C. 7 15 1 (b), 7 1 72Cf)) and rcquirc authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) ( Z 6 U. s.c.824a(e)j1. On August 16,2001, DOE issued Order No. EA-243 authorizing Tenaska Power Scrvices Co. (Tenaska) to transmit electric cncrgy from the United States to Canada as a power marketer. That authority expired on August 16,2003. On August 14,2006, Teilaska applied to renew the electricity export authority

252

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TexMex Energy, LLC TexMex Energy, LLC OE Docket No. EA-294-A Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-294-A February 22, 2007 TexMex Energy, LLC Order No. EA-294-A I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign count~y are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(f) of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7 15 1 (b), 71 72(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.824a(e)) . On August 25,2004, DOE issued Order No. EA-294 authorizing TexMex Energy LLC (TexMex) to transmit electric energy fiom the United States to Mexico as a power marketer. That authority expired on August 25, 2006. On September 8, 2006, TexMex applied to renew the electricity export authority

253

United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

United States United States Coal ................................................ 4,367 4,077 4,747 4,181 4,473 4,125 4,983 4,330 4,414 4,003 4,796 4,178 4,344 4,479 4,348 Natural Gas .................................... 2,802 2,843 3,694 2,863 2,713 2,880 3,636 2,707 2,792 2,972 3,815 2,849 3,052 2,986 3,109 Petroleum (a) .................................. 74 73 81 67 73 70 75 66 75 70 76 66 74 71 71 Other Gases ................................... 32 33 36 32 32 34 37 33 33 35 39 34 33 34 35 Nuclear ........................................... 2,176 2,044 2,257 2,170 2,106 2,037 2,167 2,010 2,144 2,074 2,206 2,055 2,162 2,080 2,120 Renewable Energy Sources: Conventional Hydropower ........... 736 886 716 633 765 887 708 646 767 919 729 659 742 751 768 Wind ............................................ 491 520 353 449 477 521 379 475

254

Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection: Volume 4 -- Gas reburning-sorbent injection at Lakeside Unit 7, City Water, Light and Power, Springfield, Illinois. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A demonstration of Gas Reburning-Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) has been completed at a cyclone-fired utility boiler. The Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) has designed, retrofitted and tested a GR-SI system at City Water Light and Power`s 33 MWe Lakeside Station Unit 7. The program goals of 60% NO{sub x} emissions reduction and 50% SO{sub 2} emissions reduction were exceeded over the long-term testing period; the NO{sub x} reduction averaged 63% and the SO{sub 2} reduction averaged 58%. These were achieved with an average gas heat input of 22% and a calcium (sorbent) to sulfur (coal) molar ratio of 1.8. GR-SI resulted in a reduction in thermal efficiency of approximately 1% at full load due to firing natural gas which forms more moisture in flue gas than coal and also results in a slight increase in air heater exit gas temperature. Minor impacts on other areas of unit performance were measured and are detailed in this report. The project at Lakeside was carried out in three phases, in which EER designed the GR-SI system (Phase 1), completed construction and start-up activities (Phase 2), and evaluated its performance with both short parametric tests and a long-term demonstration (Phase 3). This report contains design and technical performance data; the economics data for all sites are presented in Volume 5.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bangor Hydro-Electric Company Bangor Hydro-Electric Company OE Docket No. PP-89-1 Amendment to Presidential Permit Order No. PP-89-1 December 30,2005 PRESIDENTIAL PERMIT AMENDMENT Bangor Hydro-Electric Company Order No. PP-89-1 I. BACKGROUND The Department of Energy (DOE) has responsibility for implementing Executive Order (E.O.) 10485, as amended by E.O. 12038, which requires the issuance of a Presidential permit by DOE before electric trans~nission facilities may be constructed, operated, maintained, or connected at the borders of the United States. DOE may issue such a permit if it determines that the permit is in the public interest and after obtaining favorable recommendations from the U.S. Departments of State and Defense. On December 16, 1988, Bangor Hydro-Electric Company (BHE) applied to DOE

256

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CTV-1-H Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to the Tennessee Valley Authority (hereinafter called TVA). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy generated at the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Old Hickory, Cheatham, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and the Laurel Project sold under agreement between the Department of Energy and TVA. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating current at a frequency of approximately 60 hertz at the outgoing terminals of the Cumberland

257

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CTVI-1-A Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to customers (hereinafter called the Customer) who are or were formerly in the Tennessee Valley Authority (hereinafter called TVA) service area. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy generated at the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Old Hickory, Cheatham, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and the Laurel Project sold under agreement between the Department of Energy and the Customer. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating

258

UNITED STATES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

f).~<~~ \--\c :y-,ai F p"- KG f).~<~~ \--\c :y-,ai F p"- KG WASHINOTDN 28.0. C. ' -lr ' \ ' ' --- ".I ?--" ' z I. .~;-4.' J frr*o& 2 ii, - - -4 70-147 LRL:JCD JAN !! 8 1958 Oregon Metallurgical Corporation P. 0. Box 484 Albany, Oregon Attention: Mr. Stephen M. Shelton General Manager Gentlemen: Enclosed is Special Nuclear Material License No. SNM-144, as amended. Very 33uly yours, r:; I,;, ll)~gQ""d".- Lyall Johnson Chief, Licensing Branch Division of Licensing & Regulation Enclosure: SNM-144, as amended Distribution: bRO0 Attn: Dr. H.M.Roth DFMusser NMM MMMann INS JCRyan FIN (2) HSteele LRL SRGustavson LRL Document room Formal file Suppl. file Br & Div rf's ' .b liwwArry s/VW- ' q+ ' yj/ 2; 2-' , COP' 1 J JAM01958 -- UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION

259

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule JW-2-F Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to the Florida Power Corporation (or Progress Energy Florida, hereinafter called the Company). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric energy generated at the Jim Woodruff Project (hereinafter called the Project) and sold to the Company in wholesale quantities. Points of Delivery: Power sold to the Company by the Government will be delivered at the connection of the Company's transmission system with the Project bus. Character of Service: Electric power delivered to the Company will be three-phase alternating current at a nominal frequency of 60 cycles per second.

260

Household ceramic water filter evaluation using three simple low-cost methods : membrane filtration, 3M Petrifilm and hydrogen sulfide bacteria in northern region, Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drinking water continues to be a major source of waterborne diseases and death in the world because many points of water collection remain unsafe. This thesis reports high level of fecal contamination found in rivers and ...

Mattelet, Claire (Claire Eliane H. Y.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters"

262

Willamette River Water Treatment Plant - Wilsonville, Oregon [EDRA / Places Awards, 20004 -- Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

per-day drinking-water EDRA/Places Awards 2004 In this issuewe present the EDRA/ Places awards for 2004.These awards, in design, planning and research, highlight

Sensenig, Chris

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Pilot study of horizontal roughing filtration in northern Ghana as pretreatment for highly turbid dugout water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Northern Region Ghana (NRG), highly turbid rainwater runoff and intermittent streams are collected in earthen dams called dugouts. These dams serve as many communities' main source of drinking and domestic water despite ...

Losleben, Tamar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Water driven : New Orleans City Hall as a sustainable civic center for 21st century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The devastating struck of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans in late summer of 2005 was deadly and immense. The storm destroyed over 170 drinking water facilities and 47 wastewater treatments around the city, and resulted ...

Sangthong, Pholkrit

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Statement of Patricia Hoffman before the United States House of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

before the United States House of before the United States House of Representatives House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development Statement of Patricia Hoffman before the United States House of Representatives House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development Statement of Patricia Hoffman before the United States House of Representatives House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development to appear before you today to discuss the President's Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 budget request for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE). Statement of Patricia Hoffman before the United States House of Representatives House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development More Documents & Publications

266

Efficiency United (Gas) - Commercial Efficiency Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency United (Gas) - Commercial Efficiency Program Efficiency United (Gas) - Commercial Efficiency Program Efficiency United (Gas) - Commercial Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Other Construction Manufacturing Water Heating Maximum Rebate See Page Four of Utility Application: $100-$50,000/customer/year depending on utility and remaining funding Custom:40% of project cost Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Trap Repair or Replacement: $50/unit Boilers: $1-$1.50/MBH Furnace Replacement: $1.50/MBH or $150/unit Boiler Modulation Burner Control Retrofit: $1000/unit Boiler Water Reset Control: $300/unit

267

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Sacramento Army Depot, Operable Unit 4, Sacramento, CA. (Third remedial action), September 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 485-acre Sacramento Army Depot (SAAD) site is a military facility in Sacramento County, California. Land use in the area is predominantly commercial and light industrial, with wetlands in the vicinity of several oxidation lagoons. The estimated 56,398 people who live within 2 to 3 miles of the site use municipal water as their drinking water supply. From 1950 to 1972, the lagoons received mostly industrial waste water from metal plating processes and domestic wastewater. The selected remedial action for the site includes excavating and treating approximately 15,500 cubic yards of contaminated soil onsite using soil washing; dewatering and then backfilling the treated soil onsite in the excavation areas, and storing the rinsate temporarily in onsite holding tanks for recycling; treating rinsate from the treatment process using chemical precipitation, clarification/flocculation, and chemical coagulation to remove metals, prior to discharge into the sanitary sewer; dewatering the sludge containing the precipitated metals, and stabilizing this if necessary, followed by disposal in an RCRA landfill or recovery at an offsite reclamation unit. The estimated present worth cost for this remedial action is $5,020,000. There are no O M costs associated with the remedial action.

Not Available

1992-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

268

New Mexico grape growers unite  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Mexico grape growers unite, increase production New Mexico grape growers unite, increase production Grape Growers Association enlivens agriculture Growers association unites small parcels of land, enlivens production, protects water rights for Northern New Mexico agriculturists. August 6, 2012 Northern New Mexico Micro Grape Growers Association The NMSBA Entrepreneurial Networking program is helping Lucia Sanchez (C) Tim Martinez (R) and Robert Naranjo, the Northern New Mexico Micro Grape Growers Association, put small parcels of land back into production in Rio Arriba County. Contact Mariann Johnston (505) 667-4391 Email New Mexico grape growers unite to increase production, with help of Northern New Mexico Connect Over the last decade, a string of wineries has come to grace the scenic High Road to Taos. In 2010, Robert Naranjo, network facilitator for the

269

USGS Study: Water Quality A Potential Concern in Private Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USGS Study: Water Quality A Potential Concern in Private Wells More than 20 percent of private domestic wells sampled nationwide contain at least one contaminant at levels of potential health concern's population, use private wells, which are not regulated by the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. USGS

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

270

Metering Secondary Water in Residential Irrigation Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The use of residential secondary or dual water systems for irrigation purposes is common in the western United States where water supplies are scarce. While… (more)

Richards, Gregory L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Canopy architecture and water productivity in sorghum.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Increasing crop water use efficiency (WUE), the amount of biomass produced per unit water consumed, can enhance crop productivity and yield potential. The objective of… (more)

Narayanan, Sruthi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Water Heating Characteristics",,"City","Town","Surburbs","Rural" "Total",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,45.5,18.2,21.6,21 "2 or More",3.7,1,0.6,0.9,1.1 "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.6,"Q","Q","Q" "Housing Units Served by Main Water Heater" "One Housing Unit",99.7,39.4,17.4,21,21.8 "Two or More Housing Units",10.3,7.1,1.4,1.5,"Q" "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.6,"Q","Q","Q"

273

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

UOEF 1325.8 UOEF 1325.8 (5831 , - a.. L . . L. . c ,, . . . t ,' <, .* -,. .--1^ a "-2 (J 7 , pe-;L, United States Government memorandum Departmen: of Energy DATEAUG 1 0 1984 REPLY TO Al-fN OF: NE-20 SUBJECT: Action Description Memorandum (ADM) Review: Wayne, New Jersey Proposed 1984 Remedial Actions at TO: File After reviewing all of the pertinent facts including the attached Action Description Memorandum (ADM), I have determined that the remedial action described in the subject ADM is an action which in and of itself will have a clearly insignificant impact on the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), 42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq. The Conference Report accompanying the Energy and Water Appropriation Act

274

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DOEF1325.8 P4 0 * 1 - 1 DOEF1325.8 P4 0 * 1 - 1 - Iq \ b- United States Government memorandum pJ .T\ \b Department of Energy DATE: OCT 9 1984 REPLY TO NE-20 All-N OF: .- Authorizations for Actions Under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action SUBJECT: Program (FUSRAP) at the St. Louis Airport Storage Site, St. Louis, MO. and the W. R. Grace Site at Curtis Bay, Md. To: J. LaGrone, Manager Oak Ridge Operations Office St. Louis Airport Storage Site, MO The House and Senate Reports for the Energy and Water Development Appropriation Act (P.L. 98-360) directed the Department of Energy "...to take the necessary steps to consolidate and dispose of the waste material from the Latty Avenue site and nearby St. Louis Airport vicinity properties locally, by reacquiring, stabilizing, and using the old 21.7

275

NNSA Small Business Week Day 2: United Drilling, Inc. | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

business based in Roswell, N.M. United Drilling drills oil, gas, water, geothermal, and environmental wells throughout the southwestern U.S. The small business has...

276

Monticello Mill Tailings, Operable Unit III Surface and Ground...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Action activities included millsite dewatering and treatment, initiation of a ground water management policy to prevent use Monticello Mill Tailings Site, Operable Unit III...

277

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT: CAMPUS ADDRESS: CLASSIFICATION / TITLE: DEPARTMENT EMAIL ADDRESS: DEPARTMENT TELEPHONE: 2011 FRANKLIN STAFF SERVICE AWARDS START DATE IN DEPARTMENT / UNIT: ACTUAL NUMBER MEMBER DEADLINE: FRIDAY MARCH 4, 2011 ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: Signature of Head / Director of Nominee's Unit

Arnold, Jonathan

278

Unit Outline Training Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unit Outline Builder Training Guide Document Status: Final Revision Number: 6.0 Revision Date: 14 Approved #12;Online Unit Outline Builder Training Guide Curtin University of Technology Page 2 TABLE................................................................................................................. 4 4. Log in and Select a Unit Outline

279

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT: CAMPUS ADDRESS: CLASSIFICATION / TITLE: DEPARTMENT EMAIL ADDRESS: DEPARTMENT TELEPHONE: 2013 FRANKLIN STAFF SERVICE AWARDS START DATE IN DEPARTMENT / UNIT: ACTUAL NUMBER MEMBER DEADLINE: MARCH 5, 2013 ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: Signature of Head / Director of Nominee's Unit

Arnold, Jonathan

280

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT: CAMPUS ADDRESS: CLASSIFICATION / TITLE: DEPARTMENT EMAIL ADDRESS: DEPARTMENT TELEPHONE: 2012 FRANKLIN STAFF SERVICE AWARDS START DATE IN DEPARTMENT / UNIT: ACTUAL NUMBER MEMBER DEADLINE: FRIDAY MARCH 2, 2012 ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: Signature of Head / Director of Nominee's Unit

Arnold, Jonathan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT: CAMPUS ADDRESS: CLASSIFICATION / TITLE: DEPARTMENT EMAIL ADDRESS: DEPARTMENT TELEPHONE: 2014 FRANKLIN STAFF SERVICE AWARDS START DATE IN DEPARTMENT / UNIT: ACTUAL NUMBER MEMBER DEADLINE: MARCH 7, 2014 ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: Signature of Head / Director of Nominee's Unit

Arnold, Jonathan

282

Arizona Water Atlas Volume 3 Duncan Valley Basin References and Supplemental Reading References  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

_____, 2005b, ADEQWWTP: Data file, received August 2005. _____, 2005c, Azurite: Data file, received September 2005. _____, 2005d, Impaired lakes and reaches: GIS cover, received January 2006. _____, 2005e, WWTP and permit files: Miscellaneous working files, received July 2005. _____, 2004a, Water quality exceedences by watershed: Data file, received June 2004. _____, 2004b, Water quality exceedences for drinking water providers in Arizona: Data file,

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

GIS representation and assessment of water distribution system for Mae La Temporary Shelter, Thailand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ArcGIS is used to analyze water access in Mae La, Thailand, home to 45,000 residents living as refugees in a temporary camp. Drinking water for the shelter is supplied at public tap stands while water for hygienic purposes ...

Harding, Mary Pierce

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

WATER USE BENCHMARKS FOR THERMOELECTRIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cooling Process ................................................................................I-4 Types of Cooling Systems .......................................................................I-5 Quantifying............................................................................ V-4 Unit Withdrawals by Different Types of Cooling Systems.................... V-4 Average Water Use

Dziegielewski, Ben

285

Water | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Water Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal consumption csp factors geothermal PV renewable energy technologies Water wind withdrawal Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies (xlsx, 77.7 KiB)

286

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Water Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,28.8,33.4,17.4,15.3,11.4 "2 or More",3.7,0.6,1.1,0.8,0.5,0.6 "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.6,0.3,"Q","Q","Q" "Housing Units Served by Main Water Heater" "One Housing Unit",99.7,25.3,31.8,16.6,14.6,11.3 "Two or More Housing Units",10.3,4.2,2.7,1.6,1.2,0.6

287

We Should Drink No Wine Before Its Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

average effective tax rate increases and quantity decreases.average per unit tax rate increases, remains unchanged, ornegative as the tax rate increases and quantity decreases. 4

Goodhue, Rachael E.; LaFrance, Jeffrey T.; Simon, Leo K.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Tankless Demand Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Water Heaters Tankless Demand Water Heaters August 19, 2013 - 2:57pm Addthis Illustration of an electric demand water heater. At the top of the image, the heating unit is...

289

Instantaneous gas water heater  

SciTech Connect

Hot water supply temperature is set by a temperature setting device in response to an instantaneous flow rate signal from a water flow rate sensor arranged in a water supply pipe and a feeding water temperature signal from a feeding water temperature sensor which are compared with a predetermined hot water supply temperature and calculated in a control unit. A proportional valve and other devices in a gas supply pipe are controlled in response to the result of the comparison and calculation to define a required volume of gas for ignition and heating. At the same time, a fan damper is controlled by a damper control device so as to adjust the volume of combustion air. A signal representing discharging hot water temperature from a discharging hot water temperature sensor arranged in a hot water feeding pipe is fed back to the control unit and calculated therein, and a valve in the hot water supply pipe is adjusted in response to the result of calculation to attain the desired hot water supply temperature. In order to prevent freezing in the system in winter season, a signal from a thermostat in the water feeding pipe is transmitted to a heater arranged in an air supply chamber so as to heat a heat exchanger pipe and, at the same time, heaters arranged in the water feeding pipe and the hot water supply pipe are also controlled to prevent freezing.

Tsutsui, O.; Kuwahara, H.; Murakami, Sh.; Yasunaga, Sh.

1985-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

290

Speeding up solar disinfection : effects of hydrogen peroxide, temperature, and copper plus ascorbate on the photoinactivation of E. coli in Charles River water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sunlight efficiently disinfects drinking water in plastic bottles over two days, but simple additives may show promise for reducing this time to several hours. This study found that adding up to 500 [micro]M hydrogen ...

Fisher, Michael Benjamin, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Demands Using Alternative Water Supplies: Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Demands Using Alternative Water Supplies: Power Demand Options in Regions of Water Stress and Future Carbon Management Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting a regional modeling assessment of non-traditional water sources for use in thermoelectric power plants. The assessment includes the development of a model to characterize water quantity and quality from several sources of non-traditional water, initially focused within the Southeastern United States. The project includes four primary tasks: (1) identify water sources, needs, and treatment options; (2) assess and model non-traditional water quantity and quality; (3) identify and characterize water treatment options including an assessment of cost; and (4) develop a framework of metrics, processes, and modeling aspects that can be applied to other regions of the United States.

292

Ethanol as Internal Standard for Quantitative Determination of Volatile Compounds in Spirit Drinks by Gas Chromatography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The new methodical approach of using ethanol as internal standard in gas chromatographic analysis of volatile compounds in spirit drinks in daily practice of testing laboratories is proposed. This method provides determination of volatile compounds concentrations in spirit drinks directly expressed in milligrams per liter (mg/L) of absolute alcohol according to official methods without measuring of alcohol strength of analyzed sample. The experimental demonstration of this method for determination of volatile compounds in spirit drinks by gas chromatography is described. Its validation was carried out by comparison with experimental results obtained by internal standard method and external standard method.

Charapitsa, Siarhei V; Kulevich, Nikita V; Makoed, Nicolai M; Mazanik, Arkadzi L; Sytova, Svetlana N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

RFI Comments - WEF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In the United States, drinking water and wastewater utilities, collectively known as the Water Sector, are charged with implementing programs to ...

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

294

Hot tips on water heating  

SciTech Connect

Water-heater manufacturers responded to the call for energy conservation with innovations and efficiency standards for the home, business, and plant. Conventional tank-type water heaters offer better design and insulation, but the heat-pump water heater offers the highest efficiency. Available in add-on units and integral units, they now represent up to 40% of manufacturers' sales. Other advances are the desuperheater devices which recapture air-conditioner waste heat, solar-water-heating systems, instantaneous water heaters, and industrial heat-recovery systems for process water. 1 figure. (DCK)

Forker, J.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY UNITED TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION (UNITED  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RTGHTS TO INVENTIONS MADE UNDER RTGHTS TO INVENTIONS MADE UNDER COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NUMBER DE-FC04-02AL67628, DOE WAIVER NO. W(A) 02-038. The Petitioner, United Technologies, acting through the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), has requested a waiver of all domestic and foreign patent iights to inventions that may be conceived or first actually reduced to practice in the course of UTRC's work as the prime contractor under Cooperative Agreement Number DI-FC04- 02AL67628 entitled "On-Board Vehicle, Cost Effective, Hydrogen Enhancement Technology PEM Fuel Cells" with the U S. Department of Energy (DOE). The work to be done will be the development and fabrication of an integrated high temperature water gas shift reactor/hydrogen separator for use in a PEM fuel cell power

296

Unit Cost Natural Gas | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281532 Varnish cache server Unit Cost Natural Gas Dataset Summary Description Provides annual energy usage for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage (kWh), natural gas usage (Mcf), associated costs. Also provides water consumption for 2005 through 2010. Source University of Texas (UT) at Austin, Utilities & Energy Management Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Electricity Consumption Natural Gas Texas Unit Cost Electricity Unit Cost Natural Gas University Water Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Energy and Water Use Data for UT-Austin (xls, 32.8 KiB) Quality Metrics

297

Unit Cost Electricity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8 8 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281518 Varnish cache server Unit Cost Electricity Dataset Summary Description Provides annual energy usage for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage (kWh), natural gas usage (Mcf), associated costs. Also provides water consumption for 2005 through 2010. Source University of Texas (UT) at Austin, Utilities & Energy Management Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Electricity Consumption Natural Gas Texas Unit Cost Electricity Unit Cost Natural Gas University Water Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Energy and Water Use Data for UT-Austin (xls, 32.8 KiB) Quality Metrics

298

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" 7 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,1.3,0.4,0.7,0.5 1,108.1,19.3,25,40.2,23.6 "2 or More",2.7,0.2,0.5,1.2,0.7 "Number of Tankless Water Heaters2" 0,110.4,19.4,25.6,41.2,24.2 1,3.1,1.4,0.3,0.8,0.6 "2 or More",0.1,"Q","N","Q","Q" "Main Water Heater" "Main Water Heater Type" "Storage Tank",110.6,19.4,25.5,41.3,24.3

299

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT: CAMPUS ADDRESS: JOB TITLE: DEPARTMENT EMAIL ADDRESS: DEPARTMENT TELEPHONE: 2014 FRANKLIN STAFF EXCELLENCE AWARDS START DATE IN DEPARTMENT / UNIT: Nominee Information NAME / RESEARCHPROFESSIONAL Signature of Head / Director of Nominee's Unit: NOMINATION PACKET DEADLINE: MARCH 7, 2014 PLEASE

Arnold, Jonathan

300

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT: CAMPUS ADDRESS: JOB TITLE: DEPARTMENT EMAIL ADDRESS: DEPARTMENT TELEPHONE: 2012 FRANKLIN STAFF EXCELLENCE AWARDS START DATE IN DEPARTMENT / UNIT: Nominee Information NAME / RESEARCHPROFESSIONAL Signature of Head / Director of Nominee's Unit: NOMINATION PACKET DEADLINE: FRIDAY MARCH 2, 2012

Arnold, Jonathan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT: CAMPUS ADDRESS: JOB TITLE: DEPARTMENT EMAIL ADDRESS: DEPARTMENT TELEPHONE: 2011 FRANKLIN STAFF EXCELLENCE AWARDS START DATE IN DEPARTMENT / UNIT: Nominee Information NAME / RESEARCHPROFESSIONAL Signature of Head / Director of Nominee's Unit: NOMINATION PACKET DEADLINE: FRIDAY MARCH 4, 2011

Arnold, Jonathan

302

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT: CAMPUS ADDRESS: JOB TITLE: DEPARTMENT EMAIL ADDRESS: DEPARTMENT TELEPHONE: 2013 FRANKLIN STAFF EXCELLENCE AWARDS START DATE IN DEPARTMENT / UNIT: Nominee Information NAME / RESEARCHPROFESSIONAL Signature of Head / Director of Nominee's Unit: NOMINATION PACKET DEADLINE: MARCH 5, 2013 PLEASE

Arnold, Jonathan

303

Phase I Flow and Transport Model Document for Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Underground Test Area (UGTA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 97, Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, in the northeast part of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) requires environmental corrective action activities to assess contamination resulting from underground nuclear testing. These activities are necessary to comply with the UGTA corrective action strategy (referred to as the UGTA strategy). The corrective action investigation phase of the UGTA strategy requires the development of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models whose purpose is to identify the lateral and vertical extent of contaminant migration over the next 1,000 years. In particular, the goal is to calculate the contaminant boundary, which is defined as a probabilistic model-forecast perimeter and a lower hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU) boundary that delineate the possible extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater from underground nuclear testing. Because of structural uncertainty in the contaminant boundary, a range of potential contaminant boundaries was forecast, resulting in an ensemble of contaminant boundaries. The contaminant boundary extent is determined by the volume of groundwater that has at least a 5 percent chance of exceeding the radiological standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) (CFR, 2012).

Andrews, Robert

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Solar hot water heater  

SciTech Connect

A solar hot water heater includes an insulated box having one or more hot water storage tanks contained inside and further having a lid which may be opened to permit solar radiation to heat a supply of water contained within the one or more hot water storage tanks. A heat-actuated control unit is mounted on an external portion of the box, such control unit having a single pole double throw thermostat which selectively activates an electric winch gear motor to either open or close the box lid. The control unit operates to open the lid to a predetermined position when exposed to the sun's rays, and further operates to immediately close the lid in response to any sudden drop in temperature, such as might occur during a rainstorm, clouds moving in front of the sun, or the like.

Melvin, H.A.

1982-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

305

Water efficiency in buildings: assessment of its impact on energy efficiency and reducing GHG emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nowadays humanity uses about 50% of existing drinking-water, but in the next 15 years this percentage will reach 75%. Consequently, hydric stress risk will rise significantly across the entire planet. Accordingly, several countries will have to apply ... Keywords: GHG emissions, efficient water devices, energy efficiency, hydric efficiency

A. Silva-Afonso; F. Rodrigues; C. Pimentel-Rodrigues

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Performance of Large Diameter Residential Drinking Water Wells - Biofilm Growth: Laboratory and Field Testing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the first phase of this project three enhanced large diameter (> 60 cm) residential wells were constructed at a study site in Lindsay, Ontario.… (more)

Ruiz Salazar, Hector Fabio

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash. In Arsenic Contaminationwater using  iron?oxide coated coal bottom ash  Johanna L.  using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash JOHANNA L. MATHIEU

MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Mineral balances, including in drinking water, estimated for Merced County dairy herds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intake, calculated using NRC (2001) recommended formula.lactation and growth (NRC 2001). ND = not detected. http://J Dairy Sci 88:3721–33. [NRC] National Research Council.

Castillo, Alejandro R Dr.; Santos, Jose Eduardo P.; Tabone, Tom J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

What steps should be taken that will protect the country's valuable groundwater and drinking water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to carry tar sands oil (about 830,000 barrels per day) to Texas refineries unless sufficient objections reserves of conventional oil and gas are enough to take atmospheric CO2 well above 400 ppm. However, if emissions from coal are phased out over the next few decades and if unconventional fossil fuels are left

Peterson, Blake R.

310

Mineral balances, including in drinking water, estimated for Merced County dairy herds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proteins and byproducts Canola meal 50 to 75 25 to 50 Wheatn = 33. cottonseed and canola meal (table 1). Between 50%

Castillo, Alejandro R Dr.; Santos, Jose Eduardo P.; Tabone, Tom J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results and Policy Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bottom ash from coal fired power plants—is a waste materialmaterial from coal-fired power plants, which are common inobtained from a coal fired power plant in Eklahare, Nasik,

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

A RAPID METHOD OF Cs-137 ISOLATION FROM RIVER AND DRINKING WATER  

SciTech Connect

Measurement accuracy demands knowledge of the concentration of the radioactive substances, the inactive ballast separation in the sample, and the individual isotope isolation. Possibilities of using the extraction process for isolating and concentrating radiocesium are determined. (L.N.N.)

Kyrs, M.; Neumann, L.

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an MCL. Table 9. US EPA TCLP Contaminant Regulatory Levels (Hazardous Waste Fact Sheet: TCLP: Toxicity Characteristic2010. http://www.ehso.com/cssepa/TCLP%20fact%20sheet%20from%

MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Record of Decision for Tank Farm Soil and INTEC Groundwater, Operable Unit 3-14  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This decision document presents the selected remedy for Operable Unit (OU) 3-14 tank farm soil and groundwater at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is located on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site. The tank farm was initially evaluated in the OU 3-13 Record of Decision (ROD), and it was determined that additional information was needed to make a final decision. Additional information has been obtained on the nature and extent of contamination in the tank farm and on the impact to groundwater. The selected remedy was chosen in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Liability and Compensation Act of 1980 (CERCLA) (42 USC 9601 et seq.), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) and the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (40 CFR 300). The selected remedy is intended to be the final action for tank farm soil and groundwater at INTEC. The response action selected in this ROD is necessary to protect the public health, welfare, or the environment from actual or threatened releases of hazardous substances into the environment. Such a release or threat of release may present an imminent and substantial endangerment to public health, welfare, or the environment. The remedial actions selected in this ROD are designed to reduce the potential threats to human health and the environment to acceptable levels. In addition, DOE-ID, EPA, and DEQ (the Agencies) have determined that no action is necessary under CERCLA to protect public health, welfare, or the environment at 16 sites located outside the tank farm boundary. The purposes of the selected remedy are to (1) contain contaminated soil as the radionuclides decay in place, (2) isolate current and future workers and biological receptors from contact with contaminated soil, and (3) restore the portion of Snake River Plain Aquifer contaminated by INTEC releases to Idaho Ground Water Quality standards (same as maximum contaminant levels) by reducing water infiltration through strontium-90 contaminated perched water and interbeds. In addition, the remedy will prevent future drinking water wells from being drilled into the contaminated portion of the aquifer that is in and near the INTEC facility until such time as the water is restored to maximum contaminant levels or below.

L. S. Cahn

2007-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

315

Biological pretreatment of produced water for reuse applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry represents a significant waste stream in the United States. Produced water is characterized by high levels of… (more)

Kwon, Soondong, 1973-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

United Power - Renewable Energy Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United Power - Renewable Energy Rebate Program United Power - Renewable Energy Rebate Program United Power - Renewable Energy Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Wind Maximum Rebate PV: 2,250 Wind: 1,500 Solar Water Heating: 1,000 Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount PV: 0.75/W Wind: 0.50/W Solar Water Heating: 25/MBtu Provider United Power United Power is providing rebates to their customers for the purchase of photovoltaic (PV), wind, and solar water heating systems. These incentives are separate from the rebates provided by the Colorado Governor's Energy Office and require separate applications. PV and wind systems must be grid-connected. Systems up to 25 kW in capacity may be installed, but

317

CO2 Emissions - United Korea  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Centrally Planned Asia United Korea CO2 Emissions from United Korea Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from United Korea...

318

Energy and water development appropriations for Fiscal Year 1983. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, United States Senate, Ninety-Seventh Congress, Second Session, Part 4 (Pages 2185-2717), Nondepartmental witnesses  

SciTech Connect

Part four of the hearing record covers the testimony of nondepartmental witnesses, including congressmen from affected states, on water- and energy-related projects. The record includes their prepared statements, supporting documents, and responses to committee questions. (DCK)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Disposable Absorbent Material for the Removal of Arsenic from Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soils and groundwater at many substation sites are contaminated with arsenic-containing compounds. Cost effective water treatment technologies are needed to remove arsenic and other trace metals from underlying aquifers, especially now that drinking water standard for arsenic has been lowered to 10 g/L from the previous value of 50 g/L. The current project tested a disposable ferric oxide adsorbent material, Bayoxide E33, which has been reported to have a high capacity for arsenic removal.

2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

320

BNL United Way Campaign  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

about Long Island issues and challenges. Because we care, we come together to raise money towards The United Way of Long Island, which provides "services to children and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

'OQOl - United States Government - Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration memorandum January 19, 201 1 DATE. REPLY TO ATTN OF: Y12-60:Gorman SUBJECT ANNUAL...

322

UnitOverview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UNIT OVERVIEW A general overview of LHC physics, accelerator and detector design, and how data inform claims and reasoning begins with an exploration of the "Big Questions" that...

323

Redefining the SI Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and accuracy, simplify and normalize the unit definitions, and liberate the system from dependence on the prototype kilogram, an artifact adopted in ...

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

324

United States Patent  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

( 1 of 1 ) United States Patent 6,994,831 Gentile , et al. February 7, 2006 Oxidative tritium decontamination system Abstract The Oxidative Tritium Decontamination System, OTDS,...

325

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Appliances in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South...

326

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Home Appliances in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle...

327

Rooftop Unit Campaign  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

919-943-7291 April 4, 2013 BTO Program Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives - Problem Statement * Packaged rooftop units (RTUs)...

328

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to this report. INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The European Laboratory for Particle Physics, CERN, in collaboration with the United States (U.S.) and other non-member states,...

329

Current and Long-Term Effects of Delta Water Quality on Drinking Water Treatment Costs from Disinfection Byproduct Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of its reactions with chlorine or ozone to form severalirradiation. Ozone can replace chlorine and chloramines fortion, filtration, and chlorine/chloramine application for

Chen, Wei-Hsiang; Haunschild, Kristine; Lund, Jay R.; Fleenor, William E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Global Access to Energy and Fresh Water - Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Access to Energy and Fresh Water Global Access to Energy and Fresh Water International Safety Projects Overview Hydrogen as an Energy Carrier Global access to energy and fresh water International cooperation on safety of nuclear plants Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr International Safety Projects Global Access to Energy and Fresh Water Bookmark and Share Water Water shortages, unreliable water supplies, and poor water quality have been considered in recent years to be major obstacles to sustainable development and poverty alleviation that require urgent attention. Over 1 billion people lack access to safe drinking water. In such areas, water shortages are increasingly limiting development options.

331

Composite stabilizer unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an improved fin stabilized projectile including multiple stabilizer fins upon a stabilizer unit situated at the aft end of the projectile is provided, the improvement wherein the stabilizer fins are joined into the stabilizer unit by an injection molded engineering grade polymer.

Ebaugh, L.R.; Sadler, C.P.; Carter, G.D.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

Composite stabilizer unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an improved fin stabilized projectile including multiple stabilizer fins upon a stabilizer unit situated at the aft end of the projectile is provided, the improvement wherein the stabilizer fins are joined into the stabilizer unit by an injection molded engineering grade polymer.

Ebaugh, L.R.; Sadler, C.P.; Carter, G.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Composite stabilizer unit  

SciTech Connect

An improved fin stabilized projectile including multiple stabilizer fins upon a stabilizer unit situated at the aft end of the projectile is provided, the improvement wherein the stabilizer fins are joined into the stabillizer unit by an injection molded engineering grade polymer.

Ebaugh, Larry R. (Los Alamos, NM); Sadler, Collin P. (Los Alamos, NM); Carter, Gary D. (Espanola, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Associative list processing unit  

SciTech Connect

An associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and permitting inserts to occur in a single clock cycle if all of the cell blocks are not full. Also, an associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and using a tree of prioritized multiplexers descending from the plurality of cell blocks.

Hemmert, Karl Scott; Underwood, Keith D.

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

335

Ozone (o3) efficacy on reduction of phytophthora capsici in recirculated horticultural irrigation water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microorganisms that cause plant disease have been isolated in recirculated irrigation water and increase the risks of disease incidence in horticultural operations. Ozone is an effective oxidizer used to disinfect drinking water supplies and treat industrial wastewater. The objective of this research was to investigate using ozone gas as part of a strategy to reduce the incidence of Phytophthora deBary in recirculated irrigation water. An isolate of Phytophthora capsici Leonian was cultured to induce sporulation. Spore dilutions were placed in aliquots of reverse osmosis water and bubbled with ozone gas (O3) to concentrations of 0 to 1.5 mg·L-1. Ozonated samples were plated and observed for colony forming units. Increasing ozone concentrations reduced the number of colony forming units to 0 at 1.5 mg· L-1 03. Turbidity effects on efficacy on Phytophthora capsici were tested using bentonite clay at 0 to 2.0 nephelometric turbidity units and ozone concentrations of 0 to 1.5 mg· L-1. Increasing bentonite did not affect the efficacy of increasing ozone concentrations on reducing colony formation to 0 at 1.5 mg·L-1 O3. Bioassays using Phytophthora capsici on Capsicum annuum L. seedlings confirmed apparent pathogenicity. Reverse osmosis water, containing a soluble fertilizer at 0 to 300 mg· L-1 N, was ozonated to concentrations of 0 to 1.5 mg·L-1 O3 and used to irrigate Chrysanthemum x morifolium T. de Romatuelle. Increasing ozone concentrations did not interact with increasing fertilizer levels to affect the final growth parameters. Chrysanthemum exposed to ozone gas concentrations of 0.5 to 1.5 mg·L-1 showed symptomatic ozone damage. Complete soluble fertilizer solutions with micronutrients were ozonated from 0 to 1.5 mg·L-1 O3 and analysed for nutrient content. Increasing ozone levels did not interact with fertilizers to affect macronutrients. Increasing ozone interacted with iron at a high fertilizer level. Ozone did not affect the efficacy of paclobutralzol in controlling growth in Viola x wittrockiana. Ozone was effective in controlling Phytophthora capsici in recirculated irrigation water with minimum impact on plant growth. Adjustments in fertility regiemes may be needed to counteract the oxidizing affect of ozone on micronutrients.

McDonald, Garry Vernon

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Energy and water development appropriations for fiscal year 1982. Part 3A. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, United States Senate, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session on H. R. 4144  

SciTech Connect

The testimony of nondepartmental witnesses and their submissions of additional material for the record are part of a series of hearings held to assist the committee in evaluating various public works projects needing funding during fiscal 1982. At issue are the justifications for many of the projects and alternative water-management options. Among the projects under consideration are several involving water supply, flood control, navigation, and beach control in Florida. Other witnesses spoke in support of projects in New York, the Delaware Bay area, Arizona, and elsewhere. (DCK)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Energy and water development appropriations for fiscal year 1985. Part 4. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, United States Senate, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session on H. R. 5653  

SciTech Connect

Part 4 of the Senate hearing record on H.R. 5653, which would appropriate funds for energy and water developments during fiscal year 1985, covers two days of testimony by nondepartmental witnesses. Their testimony covers navigation projects on the lower Mississippi River, flood control on the upper Mississippi, flood control and saltwater barrier projects in Texas, support of the Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA) project to develop the continuous electron beam accelerator facility (CEBAF) at Newport News, Virginia, and water development projects in California. This volume covers pages 2005-2743 of the hearing record.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

United States-Sustainable Communities Leadership Academy (SCLA) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States-Sustainable Communities Leadership Academy (SCLA) United States-Sustainable Communities Leadership Academy (SCLA) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: United States-Sustainable Communities Leadership Academy (SCLA) Name United States-Sustainable Communities Leadership Academy (SCLA) Agency/Company /Organization Institute for Sustainable Communities (ISC) Partner Smart Growth America, Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Food Supply, Greenhouse Gas, Land Use, People and Policy, Transportation, Water Conservation Topics Adaptation, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2008 Program End 2015 Country United States Northern America References Sustainable Communities Leadership Academy[1]

339

Energy and water development appropriations for fiscal year 1982. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, United States Senate, Nineth-Seventh Congress, First Session on H. R. 4144. Part 4. Nondepartmental witnesses  

SciTech Connect

Part 4 of the hearing record covers the testimony of nondepartmental witnesses from both the public and private sectors on the 1982 appropriations. The witnesses described a variety of flood control, conservation, lumbering, dam construction, and other projects and activities affected by the federal budget that are related to developing and conserving the nation's water resources. (DCK)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

ii Produced Water Pretreatment for Water Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal drilling and slickwater hydrofracturing have enabled shale gas to become a significant contributor to the United States ’ energy supply. Hydrofracturing typically requires 2MM – 6.5MM gallons of water per shale gas well. About 15-25 % of this water returns to the surface as “flowback ” within 30 days after hydrofracturing. “Produced water ” continues to flow at a much reduced rate, e.g. 2-10 bbl/day, for the life of the well. In addition to high salinity and hardness levels (Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba), much Marcellus produced water also contains significant levels of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), particularly radium. The near absence of disposal wells in Pennsylvania initially forced much of the produced water to be trucked into Ohio for disposal by deep-well injection (UIC). Currently up to 95 % of the

Principal Investigator; James M. Silva; James M. Silva; Hope Matis; William L. Kostedt Iv; Vicki Watkins

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Window solar heating unit  

SciTech Connect

The unit may be mounted either in a window or between the studs of a building that is to be supplied with solar heat. The bottom of the unit extends farther from the building than the top and is wider than the top of the unit such that the transparent side away from the building has an arcuate form and is gradually flared outwardly in a downward direction to increase the exposure to the sun during the day. A plurality of absorptive tubes within the unit are slanted from the upper portion of the unit downwardly and outwardly to the front arcuate portion of the bottom. Openings between the unit and the building are provided for air flow, and a thermostatically controlled fan is mounted in one of the openings. A baffle is mounted between the absorptive tubes and the mounting side of the solar heating unit, and the surfaces of the baffle and the absorptive tubes are painted a dull black for absorbing heat transmitted from the sun through the transparent, slanting side.

Davis, E.J.

1978-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

342

Domestic Hot Water Event Schedule Generator - Energy ...  

Residential hot water use in the United States accounts for 14-25% of all the energy consumed in a home. With the rise of more advanced water heating ...

343

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

water temperatures between 10C (50F) to 26C (79F). The southern boundary is the United States-Mexico maritime boundary. The northern boundary is defined as the position...

344

Large-Scale Aspects of the United States Hydrologic Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large-scale, gridpoint, atmospheric, hydrologic climatology consisting of atmospheric precipitable water, precipitation, atmospheric moisture flux convergence, and a residual evaporation for the conterminous United States is described. A large-...

John O. Roads; Shyh-C. Chen; Alexander K. Guetter; Konstantine P. Georgakakos

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Interannual Climate Variability and Snowpack in the Western United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important part of the water supply in the western United States is derived from runoff fed by mountain snowmelt Snow accumulation responds to both precipitation and temperature variations, and forms an interesting climatic index, since it ...

Daniel R. Cayan

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Operational Soil Moisture Estimation for the Midwestern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An operational soil moisture monitoring capability for the midwestern United States is developed using a multilayer soil water balance model which incorporates daily weather data to calculate precipitation, soil evaporation, plant transpiration, ...

Kenneth E. Kunkel

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Teton Coin Op Laundry: heat recovery unit. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Experience with a heat recovery unit using Freon 11 refrigerant as a transfer medium is reported. Heat exchangers were fabricated for use in dryer stacks and the waste heat was used in heating the water for the laundry. (MHR)

1984-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

348

Atmospheric Rivers and Flooding over the Central United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper undertakes a hydrometeorological analysis of flood events in the central United States. Vertically integrated horizontal water vapor transport over 1979–2011 is calculated in the ECMWF Interim Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim) and used in an ...

David A. Lavers; Gabriele Villarini

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Next Generation Rooftop Unit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Rooftop Unit - Next Generation Rooftop Unit - CRADA Bo Shen Oak Ridge National Laboratory shenb@ornl.gov; 865-574-5745 April 3, 2013 ET R&D project in support of DOE/BTO Goal of 50% Reduction in Building Energy Use by 2030. CRADA project with Trane TOP US Commercial HVAC Equipment OEM 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: half of all US commercial floor space cooled by packaged AC units, consumes more than 1.0 Quad source energy/year; highly efficient systems needed

350

Next Generation Rooftop Unit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Generation Rooftop Unit - Next Generation Rooftop Unit - CRADA Bo Shen Oak Ridge National Laboratory shenb@ornl.gov; 865-574-5745 April 3, 2013 ET R&D project in support of DOE/BTO Goal of 50% Reduction in Building Energy Use by 2030. CRADA project with Trane TOP US Commercial HVAC Equipment OEM 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: half of all US commercial floor space cooled by packaged AC units, consumes more than 1.0 Quad source energy/year; highly efficient systems needed

351

United Power - Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Energy Efficiency Rebate Program United Power - Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Manufacturing Water Heating Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Geothermal Heat Pump: $2,500 + $150/ton TSGT rebate* Air-Source Heat Pumps: $400 + $125-150/ton TSGT rebate Terminal Units: $235 Energy Star Heat Pump Bonus: $100 - $150 Electric Water Heater: $70 - $650, depending on conditions and features Electric Resistive Heat Units: $350/unit Electric Thermal Storage Units: $350/unit + $16/kW TSGT rebate Energy Star Appliances Refrigerator/Freezer: $40 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $75

352

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford Facilities: Progress report for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989 - Volume 1 - Text  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is Volume 1 of a two-volume document that describes the progress of 14 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989. This volume discusses the projects; Volume 2 provides as-built diagrams, completion/inspection reports, drilling logs, and geophysical logs for wells drilled, completed, or logged during this period. Volume 2 can be found on microfiche in the back pocket of Volume 1. The work described in this document is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the management of Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Concentrations of ground-water constituents are compared to federal drinking water standards throughout this document for reference purposes. All drinking water supplied from the sampled aquifer meets regulatory standards for drinking water quality.

Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

The Disinfection Efficacy of Chlorine on Sulfate-reducing Bacteria and Iron Bacteria in Water Supply Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and iron reducing bacteria (IRB) that widely exist in water supply networks are the main microorganisms leading to metal corrosion in pipelines. Chlorine is widely used in drinking water supply systems for sterilization. ... Keywords: Chlorine, SRB, IRB, disinfection efficacy

Qi Beimenr; Wu Chenguang; Chen Xiaoju; Yuan Yixing

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Energy Conservation Opportunities in Carbonated Soft Drink Canning/Bottling Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The processes in carbonated soft drink production are discussed with an emphasis on energy consumption, current prevalent practices in the industry are outlined, and potential measures for energy use and cost savings are elaborated. The results from detailed energy audits of a few large soft drink plants in California are presented. Major savings identified are in process modification, lighting, refrigeration, compressed air and most importantly combined heat and power. Although each facility has it own unique features the measures identified can have applications in most plants.

Ganji, A. R.; Hackett, B.; Chow, S.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Simulating Hydrological Drought Properties at Different Spatial Units in the United States Based on Wavelet–Bayesian Regression Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of their stochastic nature, droughts vary in space and time, and therefore quantifying droughts at different time units is important for water resources planning. The authors investigated the relationship between meteorological variables ...

Ashok K. Mishra; Vijay P. Singh

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Energy and water development appropriations for fiscal year 1986. Part 1. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, United States Senate, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session on H. R. 2959  

SciTech Connect

Part 1 of the hearing record covers fiscal year 1986 appropriations for the Corps of Engineers' civil work, the Department of the Interior's Bureau of Reclamation, and the Tennessee Valley Authority as authorized in H.R. 2959. Four witnesses for the Corps of Engineers described the civil works program and requested legislative action to reverse some of the retrenchment of recent years. A specific request for a new Congressional charter for water resources development and management would put the federal, state, and local governments in partnership. Interior Secretary Hodel and two other witnesses spoke of the need for a water management strategy that would serve national interests, one that would address supply, quality, and cost together. Two directors of the Tennessee Valley Authority described the impact of the proposed budget cuts and their effect on TVA programs.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Research Project on CO2 Geological Storage and Groundwater Resources: Water Quality Effects Caused by CO2 Intrusion into Shallow Groundwater  

SciTech Connect

One promising approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is injecting CO{sub 2} into suitable geologic formations, typically depleted oil/gas reservoirs or saline formations at depth larger than 800 m. Proper site selection and management of CO{sub 2} storage projects will ensure that the risks to human health and the environment are low. However, a risk remains that CO{sub 2} could migrate from a deep storage formation, e.g. via local high-permeability pathways such as permeable faults or degraded wells, and arrive in shallow groundwater resources. The ingress of CO{sub 2} is by itself not typically a concern to the water quality of an underground source of drinking water (USDW), but it will change the geochemical conditions in the aquifer and will cause secondary effects mainly induced by changes in pH, in particular the mobilization of hazardous inorganic constituents present in the aquifer minerals. Identification and assessment of these potential effects is necessary to analyze risks associated with geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. This report describes a systematic evaluation of the possible water quality changes in response to CO{sub 2} intrusion into aquifers currently used as sources of potable water in the United States. Our goal was to develop a general understanding of the potential vulnerability of United States potable groundwater resources in the event of CO{sub 2} leakage. This goal was achieved in two main tasks, the first to develop a comprehensive geochemical model representing typical conditions in many freshwater aquifers (Section 3), the second to conduct a systematic reactive-transport modeling study to quantify the effect of CO{sub 2} intrusion into shallow aquifers (Section 4). Via reactive-transport modeling, the amount of hazardous constituents potentially mobilized by the ingress of CO{sub 2} was determined, the fate and migration of these constituents in the groundwater was predicted, and the likelihood that drinking water standards might be exceeded was evaluated. A variety of scenarios and aquifer conditions was considered in a sensitivity evaluation. The scenarios and conditions simulated in Section 4, in particular those describing the geochemistry and mineralogy of potable aquifers, were selected based on the comprehensive geochemical model developed in Section 3.

Birkholzer, Jens; Apps, John; Zheng, Liange; Zhang, Yingqi; Xu, Tianfu; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

United Cool Air  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

While our process may start with a "basic model" it is seldom that we fabricate more than a few units that are identical.  Therefore, the definition of "basic model" has a large impact on the...

359

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

the 2009 Poverty Guidelines for families published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 3Use of heating equipment for another housing unit also includes the use...

360

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

"- .-A*" (MQ) EfG (07-W) United States Government rrla.g-a Department of Energy memorandum DATE: tlEC 1 F: l??? REPLYTo EM-421 (W. A. W illiams , 903-8149) AJTN OF: SUBJECT:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than...

362

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950...

363

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry"...

364

Energy and water development appropriations for fiscal year 1993. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, United States Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session on H.R. 5373  

SciTech Connect

The hearings on H.R. 5373, an act making appropriations for Energy and Water development for the Fiscal Year ending September 30, 1993. The hearing covered appropriations for: Bonneville Power Administration; Department of Energy; Department of Army - Corps of Engineers - Civil; and the Tennessee Valley Authority. Statements of witnesses in regarding to the committee questions are included, along with documents submitted for the record by officials of the agencies involved in supporting the appropriations requested.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

365

Wind Resource Mapping for United States Offshore Areas: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is producing validated wind resource maps for priority offshore regions of the United States. This report describes the methodology used to validate the maps and to build a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) database to classify the offshore wind resource by state, water depth, distance from shore, and administrative unit.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Minimum Stream Flow and Water Sale Contracts (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The commission may provide certain minimum quantities of stream flow or sell water on a unit pricing basis for water supply purposes from the water supply storage in reservoir impoundments or parts...

367

The effects of an intermittent piped water network and storage practices on household water quality in Tamale, Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United Nations Millennium Development Goals include a target to halve the number of people without access to "improved" water sources, which include piped water supply. However, an "improved" source of water does not ...

Vacs Renwick, Deborah Alexandra

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

"Table HC11.8 Water Heating Characteristics by Northeast Census...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division"...

369

CONVERT 15 WELLS TO BORS PUMPING UNITS AND TEST/COMPARE TO CONVENTIONAL UNITS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new type of fluid lifting equipment called Balanced Oil Recovery System (trade named BORS Lift{trademark}) was installed on several idle oil wells to demonstrate the operating efficiency of this innovative equipment technology. The BORS Lift system is designed to bring oil to the surface without the accompanying formation water. The BORS Lift system uses an innovative strap mechanism that takes oil from the top of the downhole oilwater column and lifts it to the surface, eliminating production of the formation water. Eliminating salt water production could potentially increase oil production, reduce operational costs, benefit the environment, and cut salt water disposal costs. Although the BORS Lift units did not function as intended, lessons learned during the course of the field demonstration project resulted in improvements in the technology and redesign of subsequent generation BORS Lift units which are reported to have significantly improved their performance characteristics. BORS Lift units were installed on 15 temporarily abandoned wells which had been shut down due to low oil production, high water production, and uneconomic operating conditions. The wells had been producing with artificial lift at a high watercut from a shallow (850-900 feet), pressure depleted oil sand reservoir prior to being shut down. The electrical motor driven BORS Lift units provided a possible approach for economically returning the shallow, low-volume oil wells to production. The BORS Lift units used in this field demonstration were designed to recover up to roughly 22 barrels of fluid per day from depths ranging to 1,700 feet, ideal for many marginal stripper well operations. The BORS units were first-production-model test units, operated under oil field conditions for the first time, and were naturally expected to experience some design problems. From the onset, the operator experienced mechanical, design, and operational problems with the BORS Lift units and was unable to maintain un-interrupted production operations. The inventor provided considerable on-site technical support in an ongoing effort to correct the problems with the units and the inventor worked extensively with the operator to make design and manufacturing changes to the units to try to improve their reliability and performance. The operational problems were mostly related to the durability of the various components under oil field operating conditions such as inadequate mechanical, electrical, and electronic design for rough service, extended operation, and severe weather conditions. During the course of the demonstration project, it further appeared that the producing formation lacked sufficient reservoir energy and/or favorable oil properties to mobilize and displace oil from the formation into the well bore in order to recharge the oil column in the well. The BORS Lift units were then moved to a second lease which appeared to have more favorable WTI quality oil properties. Eight of these units were reported to have been installed and placed in operation on the second lease, however, operational difficulties continued. It was determined that the units were inadequately designed and would need to be replace by improved second generation units. Due to the lack of success with the first generation units and the extra cost to replace them with the redesigned units, the operators decided not to continue with the project and the project was terminated at that point.

Walter B. North

2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

370

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 9 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,,,,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Water Heating",,,,"IL","MI","WI","IN, OH",,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,0.4,0.3,"Q","Q","Q","Q",0.1,"Q","Q","Q"

371

Efficiency United (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency United (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program Efficiency United (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program Efficiency United (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Other Ventilation Manufacturing Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Weatherization Measures: 50% of the cost Windows: $150 Water Heaters/Clothes Washers: 1 Pipe Wrap: Limit of 10 linear ft. Faucet Aerators: 2 High Efficiency Shower Head: 2 Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Boiler: $200 Furnace: $100 - $200

372

Determination of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether and tert-Butyl Alcohol in Water by Solid-Phase Microextraction/Head Space Analysis in Comparison to EPA Method 5030/8260B  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is now one of the most common groundwater contaminants in the United States. Groundwater contaminated with MTBE is also likely to be contaminated with tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), because TBA is a component of commercial grade MTBE, TBA can also be used as a fuel oxygenate, and TBA is a biodegradation product of MTBE. In California, MTBE is subject to reporting at concentrations greater than 3 {micro}g/L. TBA is classified as a ''contaminant of current interest'' and has a drinking water action level of 12 {micro}g/L. In this paper, we describe the development and optimization of a simple, automated solid phase microextraction (SPME) method for the analysis of MTBE and TBA in water and demonstrate the applicability of this method for monitoring MTBE and TBA contamination in groundwater, drinking water, and surface water. In this method, the headspace (HS) of a water sample is extracted with a carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane SPME fiber, the MTBE and TBA are desorbed into a gas chromatograph (GC), and detected using mass spectrometry (MS). The method is optimized for the routine analysis of MTBE and TBA with a level of quantitation of 0.3 {micro}g/L and 4 {micro}g/L, respectively, in water. MTBE quantitation was linear for over two orders of concentration (0.3 {micro}g/L -80 {micro}g/L). TBA was found to be linear within the range of 4 {micro}g/L-7,900 {micro}g/L. The lower level of detection for MTBE is 0.03 {micro}g/L using this method. This SPME method using headspace extraction was found to be advantageous over SPME methods requiring immersion of the fiber into the water samples, because it prolonged the life of the fiber by up to 400 sample analyses. This is the first time headspace extraction SPME has been shown to be applicable to the measurement of both MTBE and TBA at concentrations below regulatory action levels. This method was compared with the certified EPA Method 5030/8260B (purge-and-trap/GC/MS) using split samples from laboratory bioreactors treating MTBE contaminated water and applied to environmental samples collected throughout the East Bay area of California. Results from the SPME-HS/GC/MS method were directly comparable to the EPA Method 5030/8260B. This method provides an simple, inexpensive, accurate, and sensitive alternative to EPA Method 5030/8260B for the analysis of MTBE and TBA in water samples.

Oh, Keun-Chan; Stringfellow, William T.

2003-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

373

Defluoridation study for Boise geothermal water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methods of removing fluorides from water are reviewed and recommendations are made for treating geothermal water used by the Boise Geothermal Project, Boise, Idaho. The Boise geothermal water except for its high fluoride content would be high quality, suitable for primary drinking water. Fluoride ranges from about 15 to 25 mg/l in water from various wells in the Boise region where the Project plans to obtain hot water. Four techniques for removing fluorides from water have been studied extensively during the past 15 years or so. Electrodialysis and reverse osmosis are useful in reducing total dissolved solids from brackish water, but are nonspecific and are too expensive for treatment of the Boise geothermal water. Selective precipitation is a widely used technique for treating water, but would also prove expensive for the Boise geothermal water because of the relatively high solubility of fluoride salts and consequently high concentration (and cost) of precipitants required to reduce the fluorides to an acceptable level. Ion-exchange separation using activated alumina as the exchange medium appears to be the most promising technique and we recommend that some laboratory and pilot studies be conducted to establish suitability and operating boundaries.

Rigdon, L.

1980-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

374

Second United Nations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nations Nations . DISCLAIMER This report was prepared a s an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither t h e United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and

375

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

.2/06 WED 17:02 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG .2/06 WED 17:02 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -** HQ . 001 United States Government Department of Energy Department of Energy memorandum DATE: February 9, 2006 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-06-07 REPLY TO ATTN OF; IG-32 (A050R014) SUBJECT: Audit of "The Department's Management of United States Enrichment Corporation Site Services" TO: Manager, Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office INTRODUCTTON AND OBJECTIVE The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), located in western Kentucky, was constructed by the Department of Energy (Department) in the early 1950s to enrich uranium for use in various military and commercial applications. The Department operated the plant until the Energy Policy Act of 1992 created the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) as a Government-owned

376

leaditbe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Not in my drinking water) Unit Description before LInC Summary Scenario Student Pages Rubric Index of Projects Qualitative Analysis Time Frame: Three weeks Objectives: By the...

377

Feasibility evaluation of downhole oil/water separator (DOWS) technology.  

SciTech Connect

The largest volume waste stream associated with oil and gas production is produced water. A survey conducted by the American Petroleum Institute estimated that 20.9 billion barrels of produced water were disposed of in 1985 (Wakim 1987). Of this total, 91% was disposed of through disposal wells or was injected for enhanced oil recovery projects. Treatment and disposal of produced water represents a significant cost for operators. A relatively new technology, downhole oil/water separators (DOWS), has been developed to reduce the cost of handling produced water. DOWS separate oil and gas from produced water at the bottom of the well and reinject some of the produced water into another formation or another horizon within the same formation, while the oil and gas are pumped to the surface. Since much of the produced water is not pumped to the surface, treated, and pumped from the surface back into a deep formation, the cost of handling produced water is greatly reduced. When DOWS are used, additional oil may be recovered as well. In cases where surface processing or disposal capacity is a limiting factor for further production within a field, the use of DOWS to dispose of some of the produced water can allow additional production within that field. Simultaneous injection using DOWS minimizes the opportunity for contamination of underground sources of drinking water (USDWs) through leaks in tubing and casing during the injection process. This report uses the acronym 'DOWS' although the technology may also be referred to as DHOWS or as dual injection and lifting systems (DIALS). Simultaneous injection using DOWS has the potential to profoundly influence the domestic oil industry. The technology has been shown to work in limited oil field applications in the United States and Canada. Several technical papers describing DOWS have been presented at oil and gas industry conferences, but for the most part, the information on the DOWS technology has not been widely transferred to operators, particularly to small or medium-sized independent U.S. companies. One of the missions of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Petroleum Technology Office (NPTO) is to assess the feasibility of promising oil and gas technologies that offer improved operating performance, reduced operating costs, or greater environmental protection. To further this mission, the NPTO provided funding to a partnership of three organizations a DOE national laboratory (Argonne National Laboratory), a private-sector consulting firm (CH2M-Hill), and a state government agency (Nebraska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission) to assess the feasibility of DOWS. The purpose of this report is to provide general information to the industry on DOWS by describing the existing uses of simultaneous injection, summarizing the regulatory implications of simultaneous injection, and assessing the potential future uses of the technology. Chapter 2 provides a more detailed description of the two major types of DOWS. Chapter 3 summarizes the existing U.S. and Canadian installations of DOWS equipment, to the extent that operators have been willing to share their data. Data are provided on the location and geology of existing installations, production information before and after installation of the DOWS, and costs. Chapter 4 provides an overview of DOWS-specific regulatory requirements imposed by some state agencies and discusses the regulatory implications of handling produced water downhole, rather than pumping it to the surface and reinjecting it. Findings and conclusions are presented in Chapter 5 and a list of the references cited in the report is provided in Chapter 6. Appendix A presents detailed data on DOWS installations. This report presents the findings of Phase 1 of the simultaneous injection project, the feasibility assessment. Another activity of the Phase 1 investigation is to design a study plan for Phase 2 of the project, field pilot studies. The Phase 2 study plan is being developed separately and is not included in this report.

Veil, J. A.; Langhus, B. G.; Belieu, S.; Environmental Assessment; CH2M Hill; Nebraska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission

1999-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

378

Wind/Water Nexus  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nobel laureate Richard Smalley cited energy and water as among humanity's top problems for the next 50 years as the world's population increases from 6.3 billion to 9 billion. The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Hydropower Program has initiated an effort to explore wind energy's role as a technical solution to this critically important issue in the United States and the world. This four-page fact sheet outlines five areas in which wind energy can contribute: thermoelectric power plant/water processes, irrigation, municipal water supply, desalination, and wind/hydropower integration.

Not Available

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

C. Uniform Unit Pricing Regulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to permit retail stores that voluntarily provide unit pricing to present prices using various ... with requirements that specify that the unit price is to be ...

2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

380

United Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Name United Biofuels Place York, Pennsylvania Product Waste and animal fats to biofuel producer, switched to animal fats from soy in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Exemplary Units Markup Language usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sample UnitsML tools and usage. ... Its usage is limited to demonstrating capabilities of plain XSLT processing with the data stored in UnitsML. ...

382

United States lubricant demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines United States Lubricant Demand for Automotive and Industrial Lubricants by year from 1978 to 1992 and 1997. Projected total United States Lubricant Demand for 1988 is 2,725 million (or MM) gallons. Automotive oils are expected to account for 1,469MM gallons or (53.9%), greases 59MM gallons (or 2.2%), and Industrial oils will account for the remaining 1,197MM gallons (or 43.9%) in 1988. This proportional relationship between Automotive and Industrial is projected to remain relatively constant until 1992 and out to 1997. Projections for individual years between 1978 to 1992 and 1997 are summarized.

Solomon, L.K.; Pruitt, P.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Water Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

384

Solving Unit Commitment by a Unit Decommitment Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demand, and operating constraints such as spinning reserve requirements, over a short time horizon of power unit i is generating in time period t pmin i pmax i : minimum maximum rated capacity of unit i rmax i : maximum reserve for unit i ripit : reserve available from unit i in time period t minrmax i

385

COOPERATIVE RESEARCH UNITS2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The CRU program expects to continue to work with cooperators in identify- ing high priority hiring actions Cooperators' Coalition (NCC) for the CRU program, which targets efforts in CRU to (i) find new ways to workCOOPERATIVE RESEARCH UNITS2009 Year In Review PROGRAM YEAR IN REVIEW In Fiscal Year (FY) 2009

386

Condensing Hybrid Water Heater Monitoring Field Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the Mascot home, an abandoned property that was extensively renovated. Several efficiency upgrades were integrated into this home, of particular interest, a unique water heater (a Navien CR240-A). Field monitoring was performed to determine the in-use efficiency of the hybrid condensing water heater. The results were compared to the unit's rated efficiency. This unit is Energy Star qualified and one of the most efficient gas water heaters currently available on the market.

Maguire, J.; Earle, L.; Booten, C.; Hancock, C. E.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Essentials of the SI: Base & derived units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Table 1. SI base units. SI base unit. Base quantity, Name, Symbol. length, meter, m. ... Table 2. Examples of SI derived units. SI derived unit. ...

388

Table HC14.8 Water Heating Characteristics by West Census Region ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table HC14.8 Water Heating Characteristics by West Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Water Heating Characteristics Mountain Pacific West Census Region

389

Table WH10. Consumption Intensity by Main Water Heating Fuel Used ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Main Water Heating Fuel Used (physical units/number of household members) Electricity Table WH10. Consumption Intensity by Main Water Heating Fuel Used, 2005

390

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ng ng United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL DATE: APR 18 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A02PR010) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-15 SUBJECT: Audit of the Weatherization Assistance Program TO: Director, Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program, EE-2K The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results of our audit of the Weatherization Assistance Program. INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Weatherization Assistance Program (Program) was established to increase energy efficiency in dwellings owned or occupied by low-income persons to reduce their residential energy expenditures and improve their health and safety. Since its inception in 1976, the Program has reported that approximately 5 million dwelling units owned or occupied by low-income individuals have been weatherized.

391

United States Government Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OE r 1325.0 OE r 1325.0 (01.93) United States Government Department of memorandum DATE: March 23, 2006 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-06-09 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A060R040) SUBJECT: Audit of"The Department of Energy's Management of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve" TO, Deputy Assistant Secrctary for Petroleum Reserves INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Energy Act of 2000 authorized the Secretary of Energy to create a Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (Reserve). The Reserve was established as an "emergency buffer" to supplement commercial supplies should a severe supply disruption occur in the heavily heating oil-dependent northeast United States. The Reserve consists of 2 million barrels of emergency home heating oil, enough to provide Northeast consumers adequate supplies for approximately

392

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States Government United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: July 29, 2005 REPLY TO ATTN TO: IG-34 (A05HQ002) Audit Report No. OAS-L-05-10 SUBJECT: Agreed-Upon Procedures for Federal Payroll TO: Director, Office of Management, Budget, and Evaluation/Chief Financial Officer, ME-1 INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Bulletin No. 01-02, "Audit Requirements for Federal Financial Statement," dated October 16, 2000, requires an annual audit of civilian payroll of executive departments and other Government agencies. Auditors are required to follow the agreed-upon procedures in Appendix I-1 of OMB Bulletin No. 01-02, to assess the reasonableness of life insurance, health benefits, and retirement withholdings and contributions.

393

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Menxmmhmz 9 Menxmmhmz 9 1 / UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT i TO : ThcFFles . mx.f I A. B. Piccct, +3lation section : DATE: .@.eti 16, 1949 SUBJECT: VISIT To HAVY OFfDHAlfCE DEPOT, EARIZ, B.J. FmmlTo ,sYmOL: DH:ARP . . : OnJuly 8,&g the uriterattendedameeting at the Navy Oxdnce Depot at Farle, Ii. J. for the purpose of advising the navy on i-adlatlon hazards involved In the dmping of contadnated AEC wastes at /?ea. " Presint were: J. Cook - Traffic & Transportation, AEC ~J.Moren- Utilifation, AEC ..J. Ccnmigl.io - Chief of Middlesex Operaticns A. PIhot -~Hadiation Section, AEC Captain Blossoin - Navy Captain hall - Navy ThefoSkndngwas agreedupcmby AFC andthe l&v. 1. 2. 3. 4. Contaminatedmaterial dnmied, I (loose in case of large contaminated units) loaded on truck&and lsonltored at'

394

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

uv /uu/u* ±.u.. J.OJ..L rAA , *. . uv /uu/u* ±.u.. J.OJ..L rAA , *. . 'A4 .. ± OO, I U444 flmI I.j102 ' -f- $I)002 EP<.1 (o-.vu) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: January 30, 2004 REP.YTO: IG-35 (A03DN039) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-04-10 SUBJECT: Audit of the Safeguards and Security Program at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site To: Frazer Lockhart, Manager, Rocky Flats Field Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE Because of the terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001, the Department of Energy (Department) instituted additional security requirements beyond those already in place for normal security operations. These "Security Conditions" requirements were established by Department Notice 473.8 (Notice). The requirements are based on

395

United States Environmental Monitoring  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EPA 60014-91/030 EPA 60014-91/030 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory DOE/DP00539-063 Agency P.O. Box 93478 Las Vegas NV 891 93-3478 Research and Development Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: 1 - 3 5 Radiation Monitorina Around * / (- P 7 1 United States ~ u c l g a r Test Areas Calendar Year 1990 This page intentionally left blank EPN60014-90 DOWDP Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1990 Contributors: D.J. Chaloud, B.B. Dicey, D.G. Easterly, C.A. Fontana, R.W. Holloway, A.A. Mullen, V.E. Niemann, W.G. Phillips, D.D. Smith, N.R. Sunderland, D.J. Thome, and Nuclear Radiation Assessment Division Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy under Interagency Agreement Number DE-A108-86-NV10522

396

l UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT lb 15 SUBJECT: THORFJM PROCURENENT PMF'N:TBU Jesse C. Johnson, Gtnager of IRaw Materials Operations3s.Office 3 R. W. Cook, Director of Production ~',LL:::+ I--- DATE: MAR ! 9 1951 The following list of suppliers of thorium and the amounts of materials procured from them by the Mew York Operations Office during calendar year 1950 is being supplied in accordance with Mr. Spelmanls telephone request of March 19. Thorium Lannett Bleachery iinde Air Products Co. Lindsey Light & Chemical Co. lliscellaneous NY0 Liscensing Division Rare Earths, Inc. Wolff-Alport Total - (kilograms) 179 38,2;2 -3 4,210 /vyeoi 4 -q- 2 : i ' \ iti 1 i 0 ;;\I:' --' I F 10 i;;;?/ \ --' L & ;:I :,- :,j( EZi 5 1 :' -I I ri _ I ' R i; .- . )- .i

397

Thermal insulated glazing unit  

SciTech Connect

An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas.

Selkowitz, Stephen E. (Piedmont, CA); Arasteh, Dariush K. (Oakland, CA); Hartmann, John L. (Seattle, WA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Thermal insulated glazing unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas. 2 figs.

Selkowitz, S.E.; Arasteh, D.K.; Hartmann, J.L.

1988-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

399

Laser system preset unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electronic circuit is provided which may be used to preset a digital display unit of a Zeeman-effect layer interferometer system which derives distance measurements by comparing a reference signal to a Doppler signal generated at the output of the interferometer laser head. The circuit presets dimensional offsets in the interferometer digital display by electronically inducing a variation in either the Doppler signal or the reference signal, depending upon the direction of the offset, to achieve the desired display preset.

Goodwin, William L. (Knoxville, TN)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Tankless Demand Water Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Water Heater Basics Demand Water Heater Basics Tankless Demand Water Heater Basics August 19, 2013 - 2:57pm Addthis Illustration of an electric demand water heater. At the top of the image, the heating unit is shown. Cold water flows in one end of a pipe, flows through and around several curved pipes over the heating elements, and out the other end as hot water. Beneath the heating unit, a typical sink setup is shown. The sink has two pipes coming out the bottom, one for the hot water line and one for the cold water line. Both pipes lead to the heating unit, which is installed in close proximity to the area of hot water use, and is connected to a power source (110 or 220 volts). Demand (tankless or instantaneous) water heaters have heating devices that are activated by the flow of water, so they provide hot water only as

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Tankless Demand Water Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tankless Demand Water Heater Basics Tankless Demand Water Heater Basics Tankless Demand Water Heater Basics August 19, 2013 - 2:57pm Addthis Illustration of an electric demand water heater. At the top of the image, the heating unit is shown. Cold water flows in one end of a pipe, flows through and around several curved pipes over the heating elements, and out the other end as hot water. Beneath the heating unit, a typical sink setup is shown. The sink has two pipes coming out the bottom, one for the hot water line and one for the cold water line. Both pipes lead to the heating unit, which is installed in close proximity to the area of hot water use, and is connected to a power source (110 or 220 volts). Demand (tankless or instantaneous) water heaters have heating devices that are activated by the flow of water, so they provide hot water only as

402

Hoechst plans Mexican unit  

SciTech Connect

Hoechst is considering plans to build its first ethoxylates project in Mexico, Mark Sijthoff, head of surfactants and auxiliaries for Hoechst`s specialty chemical business unit, tells CW. The company expects to make a decision on the 30,000-m.t./year project by the end of the year. Sijthoff would not disclose the site or where ethylene oxide (EO) feed would be obtained. The plan may depend on results of the privatization of Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex), which is the only producer of EO in Mexico. Hoechst is part of a consortium bidding on the privatization. Sources say the unit will be built at Quimica Hoechst`s Coatzacoalcos site, close to Pemex`s EO plants at Cangregera and Morelos. A planned EO expansion at Morelos will probably move ahead when the sell-off is completed. Sijthoff says that Hoechst is also looking at improving its US surfactants position, although the company has no plans to expand ethoxylates, as there is {open_quotes}plenty of capacity.{close_quotes} Hoechst started up a 150-million lbs/year plant at Clear Lake, TX last year, ending a tolling agreement with Union Carbide. In addition, Rhone-Poulenc recently started a unit at Marcus Hook, PA, and Condea Vista is doubling its ethoxylation capacity at Lake Charles, LA. Meanwhile, Hoechst is still considering construction of 30,000-m.t./year ethoxylation plant in India or China. A decision is expected later this year.

Wood, A.; Alperowicz, N.

1996-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

403

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

11 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 11 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT, WY",,,,"Total Pacific",,"AK, HI, OR, WA" "Water Heating",,,,,"CO",,,"AZ","NM, NV",,"CA" "Total Homes",113.6,24.8,7.9,3.9,1.9,2,4,2.3,1.7,16.9,12.2,4.7

404

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" "Water Heating",,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX" "Total Homes",113.6,42.1,22.2,3,3.5,7,3.4,5.4,7.1,2.4,4.6,12.8,8.5,4.2

405

Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

The Phase II Frenchman Flat groundwater flow model is a key element in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) corrective action strategy for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Frenchman Flat corrective action unit (CAU). The objective of this integrated process is to provide an estimate of the vertical and horizontal extent of contaminant migration for each CAU to predict contaminant boundaries. A contaminant boundary is the model-predicted perimeter that defines the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater from underground testing above background conditions exceeding the ''Safe Drinking Water Act'' (SDWA) standards. The contaminant boundary will be composed of both a perimeter boundary and a lower hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU) boundary. The computer model will predict the location of this boundary within 1,000 years and must do so at a 95 percent level of confidence. Additional results showing contaminant concentrations and the location of the contaminant boundary at selected times will also be presented. These times may include the verification period, the end of the five-year proof-of-concept period, as well as other times that are of specific interest. This report documents the development and implementation of the groundwater flow model for the Frenchman Flat CAU. Specific objectives of the Phase II Frenchman Flat flow model are to: (1) Incorporate pertinent information and lessons learned from the Phase I Frenchman Flat CAU models. (2) Develop a three-dimensional (3-D), mathematical flow model that incorporates the important physical features of the flow system and honors CAU-specific data and information. (3) Simulate the steady-state groundwater flow system to determine the direction and magnitude of groundwater fluxes based on calibration to Frenchman Flat hydrogeologic data. (4) Quantify the uncertainty in the direction and magnitude of groundwater flow due to uncertainty in parameter values and alternative component conceptual models (e.g., geology, boundary flux, and recharge).

John McCord

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Mathematical structure of unit systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the mathematical structure of unit systems and the relations between them. Looking over the entire set of unit systems, we can find a mathematical structure that is called preorder (or quasi-order). For some pair of unit systems, there exists a relation of preorder such that one unit system is transferable to the other unit system. The transfer (or conversion) is possible only when all of the quantities distinguishable in the latter system are always distinguishable in the former system. By utilizing this structure, we can systematically compare the representations in different unit systems. Especially, the equivalence class of unit systems (EUS) plays an important role because the representations of physical quantities and equations are of the same form in unit systems belonging to an EUS. The dimension of quantities is uniquely defined in each EUS. The EUS's form a partially ordered set. Using these mathematical structures, unit systems and EUS's are systematically classified and organized as a hierarchical tree.

Masao Kitano

2013-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

407

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Water Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,14,7.2,12.2,12,18.4,17.7,16.1,8.8 "2 or More",3.7,0.6,"Q","Q",0.3,0.3,0.7,1.1,0.4 "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,"Q","Q","Q","Q","Q","Q","Q","Q"

408

INTERMITTENT PRESENTATIONS OF ETHANOL SIPPER TUBE INDUCE ETHANOL DRINKING IN RATS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — Aims: Intermittent presentations of the ethanol sipper have been reported to induce more ethanol drinking in rats than when the ethanol sipper was continuously available during the session. This intermittent sipper effect was observed in a social drinking situation, in which subjects experienced intermittent opportunities to interact briefly with a conspecific rat. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the intermittent sipper procedure in situations providing for intermittent presentations of food, and, in addition, in situations that do not provide for intermittent presentations of another rewarding event. Methods: Four groups of male Long-Evans hooded rats, arranged in a 2 · 2 factorial design with two levels of Sipper Procedure (Intermittent vs Continuous) and two levels of Food procedure (Food vs No Food), were trained in drinking chambers. During each daily session, Intermittent Sipper groups received access to the ethanol sipper during each of 25 trials of 10 s each, while Continuous Sipper groups had access to the ethanol sipper during the entire session ( 30 min). During each session, Food groups received 25 presentations of food pellets while No Food groups received no food pellets. Ethanol concentrations in the sipper [3, 4, 6, 8, and 10 % (vol./vol.)] increased across sessions. Results: More rapid escalation of ethanol intake was observed in the Intermittent Sipper groups than in the Continuous Sipper groups, and this effect was observed in both the Food and No Food conditions (P’s ethanol sipper, yet induced more ethanol drinking than Continuous Sipper procedures. The intermittent sipper effect is not dependent on presentations of food. Implications for scheduleinduced polydipsia and Pavlovian autoshaping are discussed.

Arthur Tomie; William C. Miller; Erik Dranoff; Larissa A. Pohorecky

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Measuring and moderating the water resource impact of biofuel production and trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The  United  States'  Biofuel  Policies   and  Compliance  Water  Impacts  of  Biofuel  Extend  Beyond   Irrigation."  for  assessing  sustainable  biofuel  production."  

Fingerman, Kevin Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Turbid water Clear water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: The submersible laser bathymetric (LBath) optical system is capable of simultaneously providing visual images- dynamical wing. This underwater package is pulled through the water by a single towed cable with fiber optic special high energy density optical fibers. A remote Pentium based PC also at the surface is used

Jaffe, Jules

411

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Water Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,10.3,25.2,26.2,23,21.7 "2 or More",3.7,0.4,0.7,0.6,0.9,1.1 "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.3,0.2,0.5,"Q","Q" "Housing Units Served by Main Water Heater" "One Housing Unit",99.7,10.1,22.9,23,22,21.7

412

Water Resource Impacts of Alternative Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Commission also has produced large number of reports on California's water ­ energy relationship. NRDC and other NGOs also have produced reports on similar issues #12;8 Modeling Water Resources within per unit (gallon or mmBtu) of ethanol produced NAS (07), Fingerman (08): Net water changes from

California at Davis, University of

413

Links to on-line unit conversions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Basic physical quantities. General unit, currency, and temperature conversion. ... Many conversions, including unusual and ancient units. ...

414

Water Intoxication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008, May 14). Too much water raises seizure risk in babies.id=4844 9. Schoenly, Lorry. “Water Intoxication and Inmates:article/246650- overview>. 13. Water intoxication alert. (

Lingampalli, Nithya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Cooling Water Issues and Opportunities at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling Water Issues and Opportunities at U.S. Nuclear Power Cooling Water Issues and Opportunities at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants, December 2010 Cooling Water Issues and Opportunities at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants, December 2010 Energy and water are both essential to sustainable development and economic productivity. Ample supplies of water are essential to energy production, and water management is dependent on ample supplies of energy for water treatment and transportation. The critical nexus between energy and water has been recognized in a variety of recent studies, but the policy and regulatory machinery that this nexus depends on is not keeping up with the growing challenges. Population growth and societal demand for improved quality of life will require more clean water for drinking and sanitation, more water for

416

Solar water heaters | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

water heaters water heaters (Redirected from - Solar Hot Water) Jump to: navigation, search (The following text is derived from the United States Department of Energy's description of Solar Water Heating technology.)[1] Solar Water Heater One of the most cost-effective ways to include renewable technologies into a building is by incorporating solar hot water. A typical residential solar water-heating system reduces the need for conventional water heating by about two-thirds. It minimizes the expense of electricity or fossil fuel to heat the water and reduces the associated environmental impacts. Solar Water Heating for Buildings Most solar water-heating systems for buildings have two main parts: (1) a solar collector and (2) a storage tank. The most common collector used in solar hot water systems is the

417

Wind Resource Mapping for United States Offshore Areas: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is producing validated wind resource maps for priority offshore regions of the United States. This report describes the methodology used to validate the maps and to build a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) database to classify the offshore wind resource by state, water depth, distance from shore, and administrative unit.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in...

419

Million U.S. Housing Units Total...............................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Attached 2 to 4 Units Table HC2.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Type of Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)...

420

Pharmaceutical Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Water treatment process for water for injection (WFI)...deionization WFI production Evaporation still or vapor compression...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Water Snakes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WATER SNAKES Contrary to popular belief, the Water Moccasin commonly known as the...

422

Current Name Academic Unit Request  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current Name Academic Unit Request Department/College/School/Institute/Center Names: New or Changes This form is to be used to request new academic units (departments, colleges, schools, institutes, or centers) or to request changes to existing academic units. Complete the following and submit

Hart, Gus

423

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" 3 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,0.5,0.2,0.3,0.3,0.5,0.3,0.3,0.5 1,108.1,13.7,4.9,13,12.8,17.5,16.3,15.6,14.4 "2 or More",2.7,0.3,"Q",0.3,0.2,0.3,0.4,0.5,0.6 "Number of Tankless Water Heaters2" 0,110.4,14,5,13.2,13,17.9,16.6,16,14.9

424

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" 4 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Water Heating",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,0.9,0.8,0.4,0.4,0.3 1,108.1,30.2,33.9,17.3,14.9,11.9 "2 or More",2.7,0.2,1.1,0.4,0.4,0.5 "Number of Tankless Water Heaters2" 0,110.4,30.6,34.8,17.5,15.2,12.3 1,3.1,0.7,1,0.5,0.5,0.4 "2 or More",0.1,"Q","Q","Q","Q","Q"

425

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" 6 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold/","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry/" "Water Heating",,"Cold",,"Hot-Dry","Hot-Humid","Marine" "Total Homes",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,1.3,0.8,0.4,0.4,0.1 1,108.1,36.8,33.9,13.3,18,6 "2 or More",2.7,0.7,0.8,0.4,0.7,0.1 "Number of Tankless Water Heaters3" 0,110.4,37.4,34.6,13.7,18.5,6.1 1,3.1,1.3,0.8,0.4,0.5,0.1 "2 or More",0.1,"Q","Q","Q","Q","N"

426

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" 5 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,23.7,27.5,21.2,14.2,9.3,5.7,12,16.9 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,0.7,0.5,0.3,0.4,0.3,0.2,0.5,0.5 1,108.1,22.9,26.7,20.4,13.4,8.7,5.3,10.6,16.3 "2 or More",2.7,0.1,0.3,0.4,0.4,0.3,0.2,0.9,0.1 "Number of Tankless Water Heaters3"

427

POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY - Final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY August 2005 Revised May 2007 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory DOE Gasification...

428

Consumptive Water Use for U.S. Power Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the analyzed hydroelectric dams. 5 Table 3. United States Water Consumption per kWh of Energy Consumed by State Thermoelectric Hydroelectric 1 Thermoelectric Hydroelectric...

429

ELECTRICAL LOAD MANAGEMENT FOR THE CALIFORNIA WATER SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dam and the Thermalito pumped storage units in the north,This generation pumped storage, and recovery generation, (electricity demand. In a pumped-storage system, water is

Krieg, B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Microsoft Word - S05072_WaterQualityComplStrategy.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Analysis of Uranium Trends in Ground Water, August 2007. Several possible causes were cited for the discrepancy between expected and...

431

United Nations geothermal activities in developing countries  

SciTech Connect

The United Nations implements technical cooperation projects in developing countries through its Department of Technical Cooperation for Development (DTCD). The DTCD is mandated to explore for and develop natural resources (water, minerals, and relevant infrastructure) and energy - both conventional and new and renewable energy sources. To date, the United Nations has been involved in over 30 geothermal exploration projects (completed or underway) in 20 developing countries: 8 in Africa (Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar); 8 in Asia (China, India, Jordan, Philippines, Thailand); 9 in Latin America (Bolivia, Chile, El Salvador, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama) and 6 in Europe (Greece, Romania, Turkey, Yugoslavia). Today, the DTCD has seven UNDP geothermal projects in 6 developing countries. Four of these (Bolivia, China, Honduras, and Kenya) are major exploration projects whose formulation and execution has been possible thanks to the generous contributions under cost-sharing arrangements from the government of Italy. These four projects are summarized.

Beredjick, N.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Verti Jack Pumping Unit evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Verti Jack Pumping Unit was tested primarily to establish the energy comsumption efficiency of the unit as compared with that of conventional pumping unit. Before the unit was field tested, extensive static testing was performed to determine the effect of the counterbalance system throughout the operational cycle. The field test included comparing the performance of the Verti Jack Unit and conventional pump jacks - a Bethlehem 16 and Cabot 25 pumping unit. The Verti Jack unit was operated at four different pumping conditions. The Verti Jack unit peformed satisfactorily during the testing. Only minor problems that could not be attributed to the design or operation of the unit were encountered. Changing the stroke length was difficult in the field, but such operational problems were expected in operating the first phototype and can be corrected on future models. During the higher pumping rate tests of the Verti Jack unit, the well ceased to deliver fluid quantities at rates adequate to the pumping rate. These data are shown in table 8. Therefore, evaluation data are based on theoretical pump performance and are presented in table 9. The data show that the Verti Jack is more efficient than the conventional units tested. The most direct comparison was the Verti Jack test at 36-inch stroke and 12 1/2 strokes per minute versus the Cabot unit at 37-inch stroke and 12 strokes per minute. In the comparison the Verti Jack operated about 24 percent more efficiently than the Cabot unit. Comparing the summation of all Verti Jack tests with that of all conventional unit tests, the Verti Jack operated about 15 percent more efficiently. Compared to the Cabot unit only, the Verti Jack was about 17 percent more energy efficient. 13 figs., 12 tabs.

Porter, R.; Spence, K.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Water-Use Efficiency of the Terrestrial Biosphere: A Model Analysis Focusing on Interactions between the Global Carbon and Water Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon and water cycles are intimately coupled in terrestrial ecosystems, and water-use efficiency (WUE; carbon gain at the expense of unit water loss) is one of the key parameters of ecohydrology and ecosystem management. In this study, the ...

Akihiko Ito; Motoko Inatomi

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Introducing hysteresis in snow depletion curves to improve the water budget of a land surface model in an Alpine catchment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Durance watershed (14 000 km2), located in the French Alps, generates 10% of French hydro-power and provides drinking water to 3 million people. The Catchment Land Surface Model (CLSM), a distributed land surface model (LSM) with a multilayer, ...

Claire Magand; Agnès Ducharne; Nicolas Le Moine; Simon Gascoin

435

,. United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

i. 001 i. 001 DOE F 1325.8 (8-89) EFG (07-90) ,. United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: September 11, 2003 REPLYTO: IG-34 (A03NE045) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-20 SUBJECT: Audit of Procurement Administration at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory TO: Director, Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/Chief Financial Officer, ME-1 The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results of our survey of procurement administration at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Laboratory). This review was initiated in May 2003 and fieldwork was conducted through August 2003. Our review methodology is described in an attachment to this report. INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE In Fiscal Year (FY) 2002, the Department of Energy's (Department) management contractors procured approximately $6.4 billion worth of goods and services from

436

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31/07 THU 18:20 FAX 865 241 3897 OIG --- HQ 31/07 THU 18:20 FAX 865 241 3897 OIG --- HQ 00 DOE F 1325.8 (08&93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: May 31, 2007 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-13 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A07RL048) SUBJECT: Audit of Safety Allegations Related to the Waste Treatment Plant at the Hanford Site TO: Manager, Office of River Protection INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy's (Department) Hanford Site is responsible for treating and preparing 53 million gallons of radioactive and chemically hazardous waste for disposal. Bechtel National, Inc. (Bechtel) is designing, building and commissioning the Waste Treatment Plant (Plant), a category II nuclear facility, which is comprised of a complex of treatment facilities to vitrify and immobilize radioactive waste into a

437

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OEF 1325.8 OEF 1325.8 (U8-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: April 11, 2007 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-I1 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A07DN056) SUSJECT: Audit of the Department of Energy's Community and Regulatory Support Funding at the Richland Operations Office TO: Manager, Richland Operations Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy's (Department) Office of Environmental Management provided $60.1 million in Community and Regulatory Support funding in Fiscal Year (FY) 2005 to a number of Departm- nt sites. The funding is intended to be used for activities indirectly related to nuclear and hazardous waste cleanup, such as agreements with state regulatory agencies and transportation departments. During FY 2005, the Department's Richland

438

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a . a . r-z . "*& ., . .. uoi UA o. --.- flI gj UUX DOE F 1325.8 (08.93) United States Government Department of Ene memorandum DATE: August 19, 2004 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-04-18 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-36 (A03IF009) SUBJECT: Audit of the "Revised Pit 9 Cleanup Project at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory" TO: Paul Golan, Acting Assistant Secretary, Office of Environmental Management INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's (iNEEL) subsurface disposal area was established in 1952 for disposal of solid radioactive waste and now encompasses an area of approximately 88 acres. Wastes from the INEEL and other Department of Energy (Department) sites, rmost notably Rocky Flats, were buried in

439

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

vu & . vu & . ,I / v a L U ; .8 " ',X v &..'*. "o uu V"x Ijo tf J ,*- , , i 4 w i tiJ U U 1 OEF S.a 135 (0B93) United States Government - Department of Energy memorandum DATE: February 27, 2007 REPLY TO Audit Repor Number: OAS-L-07-08 ATTN OF: IG-32 (A06ID015) SUBJECT: Audit of the "Design of the Engineered Barrier System at the Yucca Mountain Site" TO: Principal Deputy Director, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTrVE In accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, the Department of Energy's (Department) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for designing, licensing, constructing, and operating a repository, known as Yucca Mountain, for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level -

440

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

F 1325.8 F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: August 13, 2007 . . Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-18 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A07PR061) SUBJECT: Audit of Executive Compensation at Brookhaven National Laboratory TO: Manager, Brookhaven Site Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE As part of a Department of Energy-wide audit of executive compensation, we reviewed executive compensation at the Office of Science's Brookhaven National La --- _ .r . . tc. av .... n . Ou audit covered executive cuupoci'A ;is in curred and claimed for Fiscal Years 2003, 2004, and 2005. Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, operated Brookhaven under Department of Energy (Department) contract number DE-AC02-98CH10886. The amount of executive compensation that can be reimbursed to Department

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441

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

')/06 MON 14:28 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG ')/06 MON 14:28 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG --- HQ 1o001 ,O " F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: April 10, 2006 Audit Report No.: OAS-L-06-11 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A05ID043) SUBJECT: Audit of "Contract Transition Activities at the Idaho Operations Office" TO: Manager, Idaho Operations Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy's Idaho Operations Office has ongoing missions focused primarily in the areas of nuclear energy and environmental cleanup. From October 1, 1999 to February 1, 2005, Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC (Bechtel) managed facility operations for both of these missions. In Fiscal Year 2005, two separate contracts began in order to add focus and clarity to each respective mission. First, the Idaho National

442

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-93) -93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: July 12, 2007 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-15 REPLY TO ATnN OF: IG-32 (A07ID055) SUBJECr: Audit of the Idaho National Laboratory Facility Footprint Reduction TO: Manager, Idaho Operations Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTTVE On February 1, 2005, Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) assumed responsibility for managing and operating the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the Department of Energy (Department) under a new 10 year contract. ThI m.ion for ,the L s to nntance the Nation's energy security by becoming the preeminent, internationally recognized nuclear energy research, development, and demonstration laboratory.. To accomplish this mission, BEA proposed aggressive infrastructure initiatives

443

United States Government Departmen  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7/05 TUE 07:58 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -** HQ @]002 7/05 TUE 07:58 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -** HQ @]002 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Departmen of Energy memorandum DATE: December 20, 2005 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-06-03 REPLY TO A1TN OF; IG-36 (A05SR025) SUBJECT: Audit of "Defense Waste Processing Facility Operations at the Savannah River Site" TO: Jeffrey M. Allison, Manager, Savannah River Operations Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy's (Department) Savannah River Site stores approximately 36 million gallons of liquid, high-level radioactive waste in 49 underground waste storage tanks. The contents of the waste tanks are broadly characterized as either "sludge waste" or "salt waste". Sludge waste is insoluble and settles to the bottom of a waste tank, beneath a layer of liquid supernate. Salt

444

* United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-- -- DE;$r,e /q f-j * I3 - I * United States Government memorandum MAY 21 I991 DATE: REPLY TO Al-fN OF: 4ih55YhL Department of Energy JT:,i 5, f&A 0 ' - j4.~, ' -/ jl.a' \ A t -3 __..-_-. EM-421 SUBJECT: Elimination of the American Potash and Chemical Site The File TO: I have reviewed the attached site summary and elimination recommendation for the American Potash and Chemical Company Site in West Hanover, Massachusetts. I have determined that there is little likelihood of radioactive contamination at this site. Based on the above, the American Potash and Chemical Company site is hereby eliminated from further consideration under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. W. Alexander Williams, PhD Designation and Certification Manager

445

United States Goveinment  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

,325.B ,325.B jO8.93) United States Goveinment ~~~rntir-andu~rvi Depr?rtnient of Energy \L, IO' " 1' !ATE:' MAY i o 1995 ,' Kzb9. ":cz$ EM-421 (W.,A. Williams, 301-903-8149) SUBJECT: Records for the West Chicago Site .The File TO: After review.of the available r&rds concerning the former 'Lindsay Light and Chemical.Corhpany site in West Chicago, Illinois. I have determined that it is not necessary to transmit Department of Energy (DOE) records to the municipa,llty to inform public officials of the activities at this ~ site. This site has been licgnsed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for many.years, and the nature of the. rare'earth and thorium production at the site, are well known. Remediation of this faci'lity ii~ being addressed by the current owner, 'the NRC, the U.S; Environmental

446

; United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Don F 1328.8 Don F 1328.8 . . .449J ' Em wm ; United States Government , % - memorandum L c*m Al.)G 2 9 a34 yz;; EM-421 (If. A. Willlams, 427-1719) lq,iMAL Department of Energy m5 MA, \i& SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utllized Sites Remedial A&Ion Prograa ' a The File In 1990, with the assistance of Hr. Doug Tonkay and Ms. Htchelle L&is, I reviewed a number of sites that had fomerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald faclllty as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recoarwndations were ude to eliainate thm from further consideratton under Formerly Utilized Sites Reaedial Actlon Progrm (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or revlewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more

447

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

'.... '|le , * f C. '.... '|le , * f C. Office Memorandum · UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT .-- J TO ' Leo Graup, Chief, DATE: September 29, 1958 Property Management Branch rFi0 : M. S. Weinstein Industrial Hygiene Branch, HASL SUBJBT: SURVEY AT HAIST PROPETIY SYMBOL: HSH:MSW. Thisl property was purchased during MED operation and used as a dumping ground for refinery residues generated by Linde Air Products during their period of participation in the refinery operations program. \It 2 consists of 10 acres in addition to a perpetual .ease- ment right to a strip of land, 10 feet wide and 3600 feet long. The area is located in North Tonawanda, New York near the Niagara River. Because of the growth of adjacent industries, this particular piece of property has appreciated in value. During its tenure as responsible property management office, Oak

448

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

OOE F 1325.8 OOE F 1325.8 - EFgzk3) United States Government tiemorandum 0 wt;? -J Department of Energy DATE: SEP 2 5 1992 REPLY TO Al-TN OF: EM-421 (W. A. W illiams, 903-8149) SUBJECT: Authorization for Remedial Action at Diamond Magnesium Site in Painesville, Ohio TO: L. Price, OR The former Diamond Magnesium Company site located at 720 Fairport-Nursery Road in Painesville, Ohio, is designated for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The site is owned by Uniroyal Chemical Company and by Lonza Chemical, Incorporated. This designation is based on the results of a radiological survey and conclusions from an authority review as noted in the attached Designation Summary. Copies of the radiological survey reports and the authority

449

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Z&Et,? y-p . c' Z&Et,? y-p . c' )7q/ I cuq,~ United States Government Department of Energy memoranduin I " . : I ;/ ,I DATE: hufi 2 9 1594 \ ' - y:oTFq M-421 (W. A. Ylllius, 427-1719) ' ii Y - SIJWECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilfzed Sites Remedial Actjon Progru TO The File In 1990, with the assistance of Mr. reviewed a number of sites that had services to the Fernald facility as sites, recommendations were made to ___ _- _ consideration under Formerly Utiltzed Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more formal record of the decision on these sites and to ratify and confirm the prior elimination of each site froa FUSRAP.

450

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DOE F t325.8 DOE F t325.8 (s8s) Dl? l 36-z EFG (07-90) United States Government m e m o randum Department of Energy DATE: LUG 2 ' 3 1394 ",cl,'," EM-421 (W. A. W illiams, 427-1719) SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of M r. Doug Tonkay and Ms. M ichelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of these sites, recoamnendations were aade to eliminate them from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more

451

- United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

8 8 my EFG (07.90) . - United States Government . * Department of. Energy * inemorandum DATE: DEC :! ;j 1993 REPLY TO ATTN OF: EM-421 (W.'A. W illiams, 903-8149) : NY 41 I .' 41 G I? SUBJECT: Elimination of the T itanium Alloy Manufacturing Co., Niagara Falls, New York TO: The F ile I have reviewed the attached site. summary and elimination recommendation for the T itanium Alloy Manufacturing Company. I have determined that the potential for radiological contamination is low because of the lim ited duration of the activities at the site. Further, at least some of the contractual activities at the site were licensed under the Atomic Energy Act, and the licensed activities are thereby disqualified from further consideration under the Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites

452

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I8 891 I8 891 EFG (07.90) United States Government m e m o randum bepartrne% of Energy -P ' ; N. A *I Pi id : DATE: AUG 3, 9 1994 REPLY TO Al-iN OF: EM-421 (W. A. W illiams, 427-1719) r, )' \, ! c ' d, ' t ' 3 ' 2 -L SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of M r. Doug Tonlsay and Ms. M ichelle Landis, I reviewed a nmber of sites that had formerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recommdations were made to eliminate them from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more

453

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

81278 81278 United States Government Department of Energy memorandum - ?71 S.EP 23 F; i: 54 DATE: SEP 1 8 1991 REPLY TO ATTNOF: EM-421 (P. Blom, 3-8148) SUBJECT: Approved Categorical Exclusion for Removal Actions at Elza Gate, Tennessee TO: Lester K. Price, OR Attached is a copy of the approved Categorical Exclusion (CX) for removal of contaminated material at the Elza Gate site in Tennessee. The removal action involves the removal of radioactive contaminated soil and concrete as well as the removal of Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) contaminated soil. This CX was approved by Carol Borgstrom, Office of National Environmental Policy Act Oversight (EH-25), September 9, 1991. Paul F. Blom Off-Site Branch Division of Eastern Area Programs Office of Environmental Restoration

454

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

D;F&g,8 C-r-I 3-3 D;F&g,8 C-r-I 3-3 .*. United States Government . memorandum DATE: JUNZO 1994 -... REPLY TO A?TN OF: EM-421 (W. A. Williams, 903-8149) Authority Determination -- Combustion Engineering Site, Windsor, SUBJECT: Connecticut To' The File The attached review, documents the basis for determining whether the Department of Energy (DOE) has authority for taking remedial action at the Combustion Engineering (CE) Site in Windsor, Connecticut, under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. CE was a prime contractor for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and performed high-enriched uranium fuel fabrication work from 1955 to 1967. The services furnished at the CE site included some experimental work; however, it primarily consisted of fabrication of high-enriched uranium

455

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ooc F r325.8 ooc F r325.8 imo, EFO ,ww United States Government memorandum Department of Energy -fw?w 81ua DATE: FEB 1 5 1991 l+Ks6 sUsJECT: Elimination of the Buflovak Company Site from FUSRAP ho: The File I have reiiewed the attached preliminary site summary and recommendation for the Buflovak Company site in Buffalo, New York. I have determined that there is little likelihood of contamination at this site. Based on the above, the Buflovak Company site is hereby eliminated from further consideration under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. W. Alexander Williams Designation and Certification Manager Off-Site Branch Division of Eastern Area Programs Office of Environmental Restoration Attachment - I . b e e : W e s to n E M - 4 0 ( 3 ) E M - 4 2 ( 2 ) W illiams r

456

United States Government Memorandum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy United States Government Memorandum DATE: March 21, 2008 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-08-08 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-321 (A07LV042) SUBJECT: Audit Report on "Accountability of Sensitive and High Risk Property at the Nevada Site Office" TO: Acting Manager, Nevada Site Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE and control over sensitive and high risk property because of the vulnerability to loss, theft or misuse and its potential impact on national security interests or proliferation concerns. Items such as portable and desktop computers, ammunition. and firearms are examples of sensitive property. In addition, federal regulations require that Departmental organizations and designated contractors account for and control govemroent-owned high risk property, such as body armor and gas masks,

457

United States Government DATE:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

5oE(E;,8 ' 0 H .2+ L-1 5oE(E;,8 ' 0 H .2+ L-1 United States Government DATE: MAR 0 8 1994 REPLY TO AlTN OF: EM-421 (W. A. Williams, 903-8149) SUBJECT: Authority Determination -- Former Herring-Hall-Marvin Safe Co., Hamilton, Ohio TO: The File The attached review documents the basis for determining whether the Department of Energy (DOE) has authority for taking remedial action at the former Herring-Hall-Marvin Safe Co. facility in Hamilton, Ohio, under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The facility was used for the shaping and machining of uranium metal by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) during the Second World War. The following factors are significant in reaching a decision and are discussed in more detail in the attached authority review:

458

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

D;il$;,8 p! A . I I& - ' D;il$;,8 p! A . I I& - ' z United States Government &mtrne&' of Energy DATE: &uG 3, 9 394 REPLY TO AITN OF: EH-421 (W. A. Williams, 427-1719) SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of Mr. Doug Toukay and Ms. Michelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recommdations were made to eliminate them from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more formal record of the decision on these sites and to ratify and confirm the

459

Unite2 States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

+39J +39J t% (3740~ - Unite2 States Government m e m o randuin L3 DATE: AU6 3, 9 %g4 REPLY TO All-N OF: m -421 (U. A. W illiams, 427-1719) -. - >' SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of Hr. Doug Toukay and Ms. M ichelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recouwndations were made to eliminate them from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more formal record of the decision on these sites and to ratify and confirm the

460

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LICE F 137: r.e Electr LICE F 137: r.e Electr onic Form App roved by CllR - 1010fJI2002 i/JI~~I United States Government Department of Energy Bonneville Power Admi istration memorandum DATE : REPLY TO AnN OF : KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum TO: Stephen Duncan Project Manager - TERS-3 Proposed Action: Removal of de-stabilized and downed trees resulting from a December 200 8 wind storm on the de-energized Lyons Ultra High Voltage Test Line NO.1. PP&A Project No.: PP&A 1309 Budget Information: Work Order # 184006 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart 0, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B 1.3 Routine maintenance/custodial services for buildings, structures, infrastructures, equipment. Location: Fee-owned ROW on the de-energized Lyons UHV Te st Line No .1 to the south of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

United States Government Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B.89) B.89) EFO (07-90) United States Government Department of Energ Memorandum SEP 24 20t DATE: REPLY TO: IG-34 (A04TG032) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-04-21 SUBJECT: Evaluation of "The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Cyber Security Program - 2004" TO: Chairman, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results of our annual evaluation of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's unclassified cyber security program. This evaluation was initiated in June 2004 and our field work was conducted through September 2004. The evaluation methodology is described in the attachment to this report. Introduction and Objective The Commission's increasing reliance on information technology (IT) is consistent with satisfying the President's Management Agenda initiative of expanding electronic

462

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

/18/04 THU 11:31 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -- /18/04 THU 11:31 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -- + HQ 1002 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: March 17, 2004 Audit Report No. OAS-L-04-1 1 REPLY TO IG-36 (A04DN003) ATTN OF: SUBJECT; Audit of "Requests for Equitable Adjustment at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site" TO: Frazer R. Lockhart, Manager, Rocky Flats Project Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE Effective February 1, 2000, the Department of Energy's (Department) Rocky Flats Project Office (RFPO) and Kaiser-Hill Co., LLC (Kaiser-Hill), entered into a cost- plus-incentive-fee contract to close the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) by December 15, 2006. Under the contract terms, Kaiser-Hlill's final incentive fee earned will be based on how well it meets established cost targets. For

463

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. . . .... ...... ..... .. . .. . . .. . , . . . . ..- - --. -- -. , . . DOEF 1325,8 (08.93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: August 13, 2007 1 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-21 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A06PR047) SUBJECT: Audit of Executive Compensation at Selected National Nuclear Security Administration Sites TO: Director, Policy and Internal Controls Management, NA-66 INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE As part of a Department of Energy-wide audit of executive compensation, we reviewed fourN* Lti nai-.AL 4 ... :.. ,._*i Amiinistration (NiNSA)SsitCe. Speuiiiu-~l we reviewed executive cormpeisation costs incurred and claimed for Fiscal Years 2003, 2004, and 2005 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Sandia National Laboratories, and the Y-12

464

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

. v-w. . v-w. ' ;H; (07.901 United States Government 0' ; Td 2, <.<~ Department of Energy ' m e m o randum DATE: REPLY TO Al-TN OF: EM-421 (W. A. W illiams, 903-8149) SUBJECT: Authorization for Remedial Action at Alba Craft Laboratory in Oxford, Ohio L. Price, OR TO: The former Alba Craft Laboratory site at lo-14 West Rose Avenue, Oxford, Ohio, is designated for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Dr. and M rs. Gilbert Pacey, of Oxford, Ohio, own the site. This designation is based on the results of a radiological survey and conclusions from an authority review as noted in the attached Designation Summary. Copies of the radiological survey letter report and the authority review are provided for your information.

465

UNITED STATES GOVERKMENT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ojice Memornndz~nz 0 Ojice Memornndz~nz 0 UNITED STATES GOVERKMENT By application dated ;!ay 11, 1959, as a~zen:ii:d Hay 25, 1959, the a--T+- I-r-- cant requests that its license SW-33 be amend,ed to authorizt? proced- ures for t>e CCLl-ect conversion of LT6 to '3$ and by applicaticn datzci June 29, 1959, a.3 n:odifizd July 15, 1059, the shipment of uranium rdioxide pellets. Based on our rexiew of the information finished by the applicant, it is hereby determined that the applicant is qualified, by training and experience, to use special nuclear material for the pwpose requested and that the ap@icant's procedures, facilities and equip- ment are adequate to protect health and minimize danger to life and property. It is, therefore, determined that ~NM-33 may be amended to

466

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ocy F 1325.8 ocy F 1325.8 rcro1 . 6Fo0?-001 w 2 3-q United States Government Department of Energ) ~mc DATE: AUG 3,9 1994 y$Jf EH-421 (W. A. Yllliams, 427-1719) MA. \tQ SUBJECT: _ Elirinrtion of the Sites froa the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program TQ The File In 1990, with the assistance of Hr. Doug Tonkay and Hr. Nlchelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had fomerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recomendations were made to eliminate them from further consideration under Forwrly Utilized Sites Remedial A&Ion Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more formal record of the decision on these sites l hd to ratify and confim the

467

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

:)£ F 13 :)£ F 13 ;' 5 H e Etectroou: Form Approved by CGJR - 01120195 (n·/w! United States Government Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration memorandum DATE: 0 I. 7 20D 9 REPLY TO AnN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum TO : Robert Macy Project Manager - TELF-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Perform routine access road maintenance to the Rockdale Microwave site . Budget Information: Work Order #180709 PP&A Project No.: 1389 Categorical Exclusions Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance activities .. .for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment. .. routine maintenance activities, corrective .... are required to maintain ... infrastructures . ..in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designed purpose.

468

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE:F 1325.8 7 DOE:F 1325.8 7 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: April 10, 2006 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A05AL045) Audit Report Number: OAS-L-06-12 SUBJECT: Audit of Sandia National Laboratories' Safeguards and Security Path Forward Management Plan TO: Associate Administrator for Defense Nuclear Security INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE From 2001 to 2003, approximately 500 security-related findings and observations were identified at Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) by the Department of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA), the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Sandia Site Office (SSO), and Sandia's self assessments. Sandia senior management acknowledged the significance of the numerous findings and, in

469

United States Government Memorandum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy United States Government Memorandum DATE: January 26, 2007 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-05 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A06GT035) SUBJECT: Report on "The Department of Energy's Implementation of Revised OMB Circular No. A-123" TO: Acting Chief Financial Officer, CF-1 INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Office of Management arid Budget's (OMB) revised Circular No. A-123 (Circular) requires Federal agencies to assess the adequacy of their internal controls. Beginning in Fiscal Year (FY) 2006, the Circular requires agencies to strengthen their assessment, documentation and testing of internal controls over financial reporting and prepare an annual assurance statement on the operating effectiveness of those controls. In August 2005, the Department of Energy's

470

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: April 23, 2004 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-04-16 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-35 (A04YT023) SUBJECT: Audit Report on "Modernization Activities at the Y-12 National Security Complex" TO: Richard Speidel, Director, Policy and Internal Controls Management, NA-66 INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE As part of the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) nuclear weapons complex, the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) performs critical roles in strengthening national security and reducing the global threat from weapons of mass destruction. The Y-12 modernization plan (plan) seeks to foster the development of a physical plant that is efficient and effective in serving its national security missions. The

471

. United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

,:n5.5.8 ,:n5.5.8 ,849, EfG pw, . United States Government DATE: AUG 2 i994 y#J;; EM-421 (W. A. Williams, 427-1719) sUBJECT: -Elimination of the Robbins & Myers Site, Springfield, Ohio 11179 I The File TO: I have reviewed the attached elimination recommendation and the original historical records for the Myers & Robbins facility in Springfield, Ohio. I have determined that there is little likelihood of radioactive contamination at these sites. The only record of activity at this site by Department of Energy predecessors is an equipment test of a pump in March 1975. This test involved limited amounts of radioactive materials and there was a serious effort to decontaminate the equipment at the conclusion of the tests. Based on the above, the Myers & Robbins site in Springfield, Ohio, is

472

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DOE F 1325.8 DOE F 1325.8 E&M&& +\A .wz United States Government Department of Energy DATE: RUG 3, 9 %g4 y;;;; EM-421 (W. A. W illiaas, 427-1719) "; :+ 1 SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of M r. Doug Tohkay and Ms. M ichelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recomendations were made to eliminate then from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more formal record of the decision on these sites and to ratify and confirm the

473

Uniter+ States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EFG (07-90) EFG (07-90) Uniter+ States Government ~L.aQ-i; Department of Energy inemorandum DATE: SEP 2 5 1992 REPLY TO Al-fN OF: EM-421 (W. A. W illiams, 903-8149) SUBJECT: Authorization for Remedial Action at the Former Dow Chemical Company Facility in M a d ison, Illinois TO: L. Price, OR The site of the Former Dow Chemical Company in M a d ison, Illinois, which is currently owned and operated by the Spectrulite Consortium, is designated for inclusion in the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). This designation is based upon the results of a preliminary radiological survey and other information described in the attached Designation Summary. The authority determination and preliminary survey report also are attached for information. The site has been assigned a low priority under the FUSRAP protocol, as

474

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

# Xx i' # Xx i' !325 8 I c&egJw, i&l d, 4 -1 United States Government Department of Energy DATE; AUG 3, 9 !gg4 I REPLYTo m-421 (W. A. Williams, 427-1719) sy I AlTN OF: SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of Mr. Doug Tonkay and Ms. Nichelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods a&/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of these sites, recoumendations were made to eliminate them from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more

475

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EFS (07-W EFS (07-W United States Government memorandukn Department of Energy j ; I.-- ' -i;: /J DATE: j.gjG 2 9 1994 REPLY TO En-421 (W. A. Williams, 427-1719) AlTN OF: h p)\;--/ ;,;' J ( SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of Ur. Doug Tonkay and Us. Michelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recoPraendations were made to eliminate them from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more

476

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

nUnited States Government Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration memorandum REPLY TO AnN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum TO: Robert Macy Project Manager - TELF-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Access road improvement and bridge replacement for the Raver-Paul No. transmission line structure 18/1. Budget Information: Work Order # 00220048 PP&A Project No.: 954 Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance activities .. .for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment. .. routine maintenance activities, corrective ....are required to

477

United States Government Memorandum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8/16/07 09:15 FAX 301 903 4656 CAPITAL REGION 8/16/07 09:15 FAX 301 903 4656 CAPITAL REGION * 002 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) Department of Energy United States Government Memorandum DATE: August 15, 2007 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-22 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A06GT006) SUBJECT: Report on "Hazardous Chemicals Inventory Management at the Savannah River Site" TO: Manager, Savannah River Operations Office BACKGROUND The Savannah River Site (Savannah River) maintains large inventories of hazardous chemicals for its scientific, environmental cleanup and production operations. Many of these chemicals are known carcinogens; some are corrosive, while others are highly flammable. As such, these chemicals can pose serious health and safety risks to workers and members of the public, the environment, and to emergency first responders if not properly managed and controlled.

478

United States Attorney General  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

93, 5 U.S. Op. Off. Legal Counsel 1, 1981 WL 30865 (U.S.A.G.) 93, 5 U.S. Op. Off. Legal Counsel 1, 1981 WL 30865 (U.S.A.G.) United States Attorney General ***1 *293 January 16, 1981 **1 The President The White House Washington, D.C. 20500 MY DEAR MR. PRESIDENT: You have asked my opinion concerning the scope of currently existing legal and constitutional authorities for the continuance of government functions during a temporary lapse in appropriations, such as the Government sustained on October 1, 1980. As you know, some initial determination concerning the extent of these authorities had to be made in the waning hours of the last fiscal year in order to avoid extreme administrative confusion that might have arisen from Congress' failure timely to enact 11 of the 13 anticipated regular appropriations bills, FN;B1[FN1]FN;F1 or a

479

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3/02 TUE 08:59 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG *-* HQ 00o2 3/02 TUE 08:59 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG *-* HQ 00o2 DOE F 132,.8 W.I: ((07.9u) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: December 2, 2002 REPLY TO REPLY TO -36 (A02SR013) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-07 ATTN OF: SUBJECT: Audit of Subcontracting Practices at the Savannah River Site TO: Jeffrey M. Allison, Acting Manager, Savannah River Operations Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy (Department) has contracted with Westinghouse Savannah River Company, LLC (Westinghouse) to manage and operate the Savannah River Site (Savannah River) through September 30, 2006. As of August 2, 2002, Westinghouse had 534 open and active service procurements worth $100,000 or more each, with a total value of about $518 million, that it had awarded since October 1996.

480

United States Goverment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6/03 15:37 FAX 301 903 4656 _ CAPITAL REGION * FORS FIVEA 91002/004 6/03 15:37 FAX 301 903 4656 _ CAPITAL REGION * FORS FIVEA 91002/004 DOE-F 1325.8 (68-93) Depament of Energy United States Goverment Department of Energy Memorandum OFFICE OF .NSPECTOR GENERAL DATE: February 26, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A02CG004) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-11 SUBJECT: Audit of the Office of Science Infrastructure Modernization Initiatives TO: Acting Associate Director, Office of Laboratory Operations and Environment, Safety and Health, SC-80 The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results of our audit of the Office of Science's infrastructure modernization initiatives. The audit was performed between May and September 2002 at Departmental Headquarters, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Argonne National Laboratory. The audit methodology is described in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

w w f.b wr w f k--w .^^- - w w f.b wr w f k--w .^^- - - r - T- - * -* p -ldt - f f - - -J -vv- A n JV DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government ------- Department of Energy memorandum DATE: June 15, 2006 REPLY TO Audit Report Number: OAS-L-06-15 ATTN OF: IG-32 (A05SR029) SUBJECT Audit of "Storage Capacity of the Iligh Level Waste Tanks at the Savannah River TO: Manager, Savannah River Operations Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Savannah River Site in South Carolina currently stores about 36 million gallons of waste in 49 active underground storag,* .ks. Twenty-two of these .anks do not meet Environmcntal Protection A&-.y (EPA) requirements ybr full secondary containment and must be emptied and closed by 2022 in accordance with a closure schedule approved by the EPA and the 5oith Carolina Department

482

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0/02 WED 09:58 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG 0/02 WED 09:58 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -.- +-+ HQ ]002 rFG (07-;1) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: October 29, 2002 REPLY TO 1G-36 (A02DN028) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-01 ATTN OF; SUBJECT: Audit of Procurement at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site TO: Eugene Schmitt, Manager, Rocky Flats Field Office ' INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy (Department) and its site contractor, Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC (Kaiser-Hill), contracted in January 2000 to close the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) by a target date of December'15, 2006. As of May 2002, Kaiser-Hill had awarded 784 procurements worth more than $25,000 each, with a total value of about $368.6 million, to support the complex activities required for site closure.

483

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

uV,./ J.r./ i L .. * i. uV,./ J.r./ i L .. * i. 0 r '± J o ,. NL . Jurt -. rur.mO rI[ V Jg, ]VJUU"/UU4 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL DATE: January 10, 2006 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A06GT029) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-06-06 SUBJECT: Review of the Independent Auditor's Report on The Institute for Genomic Research for the Year Ending December 31, 2004 * TO: Manager, Chicago Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Institute for Genomic Research (Institute) in Rockville, Maryland is a not-for- profit center that studies areas such as plant, microbial and mammalian genomics. The Institute receives funding from seven Federal agencies to advance its research and development. As required by the Office of Management and Budget (0MB)

484

Federal Water Use Indices | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Water Use Indices Federal Water Use Indices Federal Water Use Indices FEMP provides water use indices as a guide for Federal agencies. Note that each is a rough estimate of water usage at different types of sites. Your site may vary considerably. The following indices should be used only to assist in determining baseline data when no other information is available on site water usage. Conversion factors for the Federal water use indices are also available. Source: American Water Works Association 1996. Data represents gallons per unit per day. Commercial User Unit Range Typical Airport Passenger 4-5 3 Apartment house Person 100-200 100 Boarding house Person 25-50 40 Hotel Guest 40-60 50 Employee 8-13 10 Lodging house and tourist home Guest 30-50 40 Motel Guest 25-40 35

485

Investigating Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This 3-ring binder contains teaching plans for 12 lessons on topics such as "Water in Our Daily Lives," "The Water Cycle," "Amazing Aquifers," "Water and Soil," "Aquatic Ecosystems," and "Water Wise Use." Accompanying each lesson plan are activity and record sheets for hands-on learning experiences. This curriculum is intended for students in about 4th to 8th grades.

Howard Jr., Ronald A.

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

486

ENERGY DRINK CONSUMPTION (WITH AND WITHOUT ALCOHOL) AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO RISKY BEHAVIOR, RISK AWARENESS, AND BEHAVIORAL INTENTION IN COLLEGE STUDENTS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study was to assess the relationships between energy drink consumption (with and without alcohol) and other risky behaviors; students’ overall awareness… (more)

Buchanan, Julia K

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Solar water heaters | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

heaters heaters Jump to: navigation, search (The following text is derived from the United States Department of Energy's description of Solar Water Heating technology.)[1] Solar Water Heater One of the most cost-effective ways to include renewable technologies into a building is by incorporating solar hot water. A typical residential solar water-heating system reduces the need for conventional water heating by about two-thirds. It minimizes the expense of electricity or fossil fuel to heat the water and reduces the associated environmental impacts. Solar Water Heating for Buildings Most solar water-heating systems for buildings have two main parts: (1) a solar collector and (2) a storage tank. The most common collector used in solar hot water systems is the flat-plate collector. Solar water heaters use the sun to heat either water

488

Assessment of Regional Climate Change and Development of Climate Adaptation Decision Aids in the Southwestern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the next 10–50 years, policy makers in the southwestern United States are faced with complex planning and policy issues associated with increasing water and energy demand as a result of warmer temperatures and reduced availability of water, ...

Kremena Darmenova; Duane Apling; Glenn Higgins; Philip Hayes; Heather Kiley

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Heat Pump Water Heaters—Laboratory Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI conducted laboratory tests of several heat pump water heaters to assess their performance and energy efficiency. Among U.S. heat pump water heaters tested were new products from A. O. Smith, General Electric (GE), and Rheem. These units are designed to be integral, drop-in replacements for standard electric water heaters. Additionally, EPRI tested the Japanese-based Eco-cute heat pump water heater from Daikin, which is a split unit with an outdoor heat pump using CO2 as the refrigerant and an indoor...

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

490

DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF WATER AND SOLUTE FLUXES USING A PASSIVE SURFACE WATER FLUX METER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF WATER AND SOLUTE FLUXES USING A PASSIVE SURFACE WATER FLUX METER J Surface Water Flux Meter (PSFM). Current techniques for estimating contaminant mass inputs to impaired flux meter, MS Thesis, UF. This work was supported by the United States Department of Agriculture

Watson, Craig A.

491

United States Goverment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UO/J±0ou4 TcdJ ± O:S'. Aa. ou* o *.I. I 01j ' . UO/J±0ou4 TcdJ ± O:S'. Aa. ou* o *.I. I 01j ' . - - 00E F 1325,8 (08-93) United States Goverment Department of Energy memorandum DATE: August 13, 2007 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-19 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A07PR059) SUBJECT: Audit of Executive Compensation at Selected Office of Science Sites TO: Chief Operating, Officer, Office of Science INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE As part of a Department of Energy-wide audit of executive compensation, we reviewed seven Office of Science sites. Specifically, we reviewed executive compensation costs incurred ~,r claim~.- fr- F".*l*- Y. rs 2003, 2 , and 2005 at - Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), Brookhaven National Laboratory (Brookhaven), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Princeton Plasma Physics