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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY An ENERGY STAR Resource Guidedrinking water supply industry to reduce energy consumptionenergy is used in the public drinking water supply industry.

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Drinking Water Problems: Arsenic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High levels of arsenic in drinking water can poison and even kill people. This publication explains the symptoms of arsenic poisoning and common treatment methods for removing arsenic from your water supply.

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

3

Drinking Water Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication explains the federal safety standards for drinking water provided by public water supply systems. It discusses the legal requirements for public water supplies, the maximum level allowed for contaminants in the water, and the potential health effects of each contaminant regulated. People who use water from private sources such as wells can also use these standards as a guide in checking whether their water is safe.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

4

Drinking Water Problems: Lead  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lead in drinking water can damage the brain, kidneys, nervous system and red blood cells. This publication explains how lead can enter drinking water, how to have your water tested, and how to eliminate lead from drinking water.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

5

A Ten-year Survey of Giardia Cysts in Drinking Water Supplies of Seoul, the Republic of Korea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: To understand the distribution of Giardia cysts in drinking water supplies in Seoul, Korea, we collected water samples quarterly at 6 intakes in the Han River, its largest stream and 6 conventional water treatment plants (WTPs) serving drinking water, from 2000 to 2009. Giardia cysts in each of 10 L water were confirmed in 35.0 % of intake water samples and the arithmetic mean was 1.65 cysts/10 L (range 0-35 cysts/10 L). The lowest cyst density was observed at Paldang and Kangbuk intakes, and the pollution level was higher at 4 intakes downstream. It seemed that these 4 intakes were under influence of Wangsuk stream at the end of which cysts were found in all samples with the mean of 140 cysts/10 L. The annual mean number of cysts was 0.21-4.21 cysts/10 L, and the cyst level at the second half of the 10 years was about 1/5 of that at first half on average. The cysts were more frequently found in winter, and their mean density was 3.74 cysts/10 L in winter and 0.80-1.08 cysts/10 L in other seasons. All finished water samples collected at 6 WTPs were negative for Giardia in each of 100 L sample for 10 years and cyst removal by physical process was average 2.9-log. It was concluded that conventional water treatment at 6 WTPs of Seoul appears to remove the cysts effectively under the present level of their source water. Domestic wastewater from the urban region could be an important source of Giardia pollution

Mok-young Lee; Eun-joo Cho; Jin-hyo Lee; Sun-hee Han; Yong-sang Park

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Drinking Water Problems: Copper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High levels of copper in drinking water can cause health problems. This publication explains the effects of copper in water and methods of removing it. 4 pp.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

7

Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High levels of nitrates in drinking water can be harmful for very young infants and susceptible adults. This publication explains how people are exposed to nitrates, what health effects are caused by them in drinking water and how to remove them.

Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

8

Decontamination of Biological Threats in Water Supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decontamination of Biological Threats in Water Supplies. ... The availability of safe pure drinking water in the United States is taken for granted. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Drinking Water Problems: Radionuclides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radionuclides in drinking water can cause serious health problems for people. This publication explains what the sources of radionuclides in water are, where high levels have been found in Texas, how they affect health and how to treat water to remove them.

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

10

Brookhaven's Drinking-Water Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Quality Water Quality The Lab's finished drinking water is produced with pride by the staff of BNL's Water Treatment Facility Home Groundwater Consumer Confidence Reports Water Treatment Process Resources Tap Water Recommendations Water Cooler Cleaning Additional Resources Brookhaven Lab Drinking Water Brookhaven produces its own drinking water for all employees, facility-users, guests, residents, and visitors on site at its Water Treatment Facility (WTF). BNL's drinking water is pumped from groundwater by five active wells and processed at the WTF which can handle up to 6 million gallons per day. The "finished" water is sent to the Lab's two storage towers and then distributed around the site via 45 miles of pipeline. To ensure that Brookhaven's water meets all applicable local, state, and

11

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect

As American drinking water agencies face higher production costs, demand, and energy prices, they seek opportunities to reduce costs without negatively affecting the quality of the water they deliver. This guide describes resources for cost-effectively improving the energy efficiency of U.S. public drinking water facilities. The guide (1) describes areas of opportunity for improving energy efficiency in drinking water facilities; (2) provides detailed descriptions of resources to consult for each area of opportunity; (3) offers supplementary suggestions and information for the area; and (4) presents illustrative case studies, including analysis of cost-effectiveness.

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich; Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Brown, Rich

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

12

CLIMATE CHANGE AND WATER SUPPLY SECURITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of developing the infrastructure to produce and deliver recycled water, so it seems logical and fair because unlike recycled water, the water produced is considered to be of drinking water quality or better CLIMATE CHANGE AND WATER SUPPLY SECURITY: Reconfiguring Groundwater Management to Reduce

13

Drinking Water Problems: Radionuclides (Spanish)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radionuclides in drinking water can cause serious health problems for people. This publication explains what the sources of radionuclides in water are, where high levels have been found in Texas, how they affect health and how to treat water to remove them.

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

14

Supplying Water Social Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Handbook of Engaged Learning Projects SUPPLYING OUR WATER NEEDS: Africa Project Summary Scenario Student Pages References Index SubjectContent Area: World CulturesSocial Studies...

15

The Drinking Water Security and Safety Amendments of 2002: Is America's Drinking Water Infrastructure Safer Four Years Later?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Threats to Drinking Water Security . a.The Drinking Water Security and Safety Amendments2002: Is America's Drinking Water Infrastructure Safer Four

Shermer, Steven D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Alternate Water Supply System  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Alternate Water Supply Alternate Water Supply System Flushing Report Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site January 2008 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1570 2008 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1570-2008 Alternate Water Supply System Flushing Report Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site January 2008 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado This page intentionally left blank

17

Hot water supply system  

SciTech Connect

A hot water supply system is described which consists of: a boiler having an exhaust; solar panels; and a frame supporting the solar panels and including a compartment beneath the solar panels, the boiler exhaust termining in the compartment beneath the solar panels, the boiler being within the compartment.

Piper, J.R.

1986-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

18

Safe Drinking Water Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Act Act Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Safe Drinking Water Act Year 1974 Url SDWA.jpg Description The Safe Drinking Water Act was established to protect the quality of drinking water in the U.S. References SDWA of 1974[1] Federal Oil and Gas[2] The Safe Drinking Water Act was established to protect the quality of drinking water in the U.S. This law focuses on all waters actually or potentially designated for drinking use, whether from above ground or underground sources. The Act authorized EPA to establish safe standards of purity and required all owners or operators of public water systems to comply with primary (health-related) standards. State governments, which assume this power from EPA, also encourage attainment of secondary standards (nuisance-related).

19

Arsenic Remediation of Bangladesh Drinking Water using Iron-oxide...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arsenic Remediation of Bangladesh Drinking Water using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash Title Arsenic Remediation of Bangladesh Drinking Water using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash...

20

Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund (New Mexico) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund (New Mexico) Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund (New Mexico) Eligibility Local Government Savings For Other Solar Buying & Making...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Drinking Water Program 1992 annual report  

SciTech Connect

EG&G Idaho, Inc., initiated a monitoring program for drinking water in 1988 for the US Department of Energy at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. EG&G Idaho structured this monitoring program to ensure that they exceeded the minimum regulatory requirements for monitoring drinking water. This program involves tracking the bacteriological, chemical, and radiological parameters that are required for a {open_quotes}community water system{close_quotes} (maximum requirements). This annual report describes the drinking water monitoring activities conducted at the 17 EG&G Idaho operated production wells and 11 distribution systems. It also contains all of the drinking water parameters that were detected and the regulatory limits that were exceeded during 1992. In addition, ground water quality is discussed as it relates to contaminants identified at the wellhead for EG&G Idaho production wells.

Andersen, B.D.; Peterson-Wright, L.J.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010. ) AWWA. 2006. Water Conservation Programs—A PlanningWater Conservation..staff (Caffal, 1995). Water Conservation Beyond optimizing

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

REGIONAL WATER SUPPLY PLANNING AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

accepted standards, which is an important planning aspect for water supply agencies. Yeh et al. (2000CHAPTER 3 REGIONAL WATER SUPPLY PLANNING AND CAPACITY EXPANSION MODELS Messele Z. Ejeta California Department of Water Resources Sacramento, California Larry W. Mays Department of Civil and Environmental

Mays, Larry W.

24

THE EFFECT OF CHLORINE ON CORROSION IN DRINKING WATER SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table of Contents Abstract...................................................................................................................................................... 4 THE EFFECT OF CHLORINE ON CORROSION IN DRINKING WATER SYSTEMS.................................................................................................................................................. 5

F. Cantor; Jae K. Park, Ph.D.; Prasit Vaiyavatjamai

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lists the treatment methods and the percentage of utilitieslists the characteristics of the water sources used by utilities

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPRI. 1997. Quality Energy Efficiency Retrofits for WaterIndustry. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy,Finding Money for Your Energy Efficiency Projects. (A Primer

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rural businesses, for instance for energy audits. In FY2010,Business_Programs/ind ustriallighting_bestpracticessheet.pdf. Water & Wastewater Treatment Energy Use Self-Audit

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

31, 2010. ) U.S. DOE Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (3, 2010. ) Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, ElectricEPRI. 1997. Quality Energy Efficiency Retrofits for Water

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Performance Comparison of Large Diameter Residential Drinking Water Wells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Published scientific work indicates that residential large diameter drinking water wells are at a higher risk of contamination from surface water impacts than drilled wells.… (more)

Javor, Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

DW = Drinking Water NPW = Non-Potable Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Key: Matrices: DW = Drinking Water NPW = Non-Potable Water SCM = Solid and Chemical Materials PA 17322 717-878-2858 Douglas F. Zeigler S BNPW Hunsberger- DW: NPW: SCM: 0374301 GettysburgCarthy- DW: NPW: SCM: 0071501 Knouse Foods Cooperative Inc - Environmental Laboratory 53 East Hanover Street

Colby, Ralph H.

31

Combined heat and power for drinking water production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ABB Kraftwerke AG, of Mannheim, Germany, is presently involved in two huge projects aimed at supplying electric power and drinking water in the Arabian Gulf. To limit fuel consumption as much as possible, electricity and water are produced in CHP plants. These plants are powered either by gas turbines equipped with HRSGs, or by conventional boilers feeding controlled extraction-condensing steam turbines. The selection of one of the two systems depends mainly on the type of fuel available (oil or natural gas), on the power/water loads through the year and other local factors. The gas turbine-based CHP systems can be setup in a shorter time and feature a slightly higher overall efficiency. The steam turbine solution, once the plant is commissioned, needs less maintenance. In the final analysis, operating costs of the two solutions are equivalent.

Chellini, R.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Mineral balances, including in drinking water, estimated for Merced County dairy herds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and daily drinking-water intake, calculated using NRC (2001)they represent total water intake. Feeding certain mineralsand daily drinking water intake, which was calcu- lated

Castillo, Alejandro R Dr.; Santos, Jose Eduardo P.; Tabone, Tom J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Shock Chlorination of Stored Water Supplies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Treatment of drinking water to improve its sanitary or bacteriological quality is referred to as disinfection. Shock chlorination is one disinfection method employed by public suppliers to reduce bacterial contamination of water. This method also can be used by private-water-well owners.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

34

Shock Chlorination of Stored Water Supplies (Spanish)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Treatment of drinking water to improve its sanitary or bacteriological quality is referred to as disinfection. Shock chlorination is one disinfection method employed by public suppliers to reduce bacterial contamination of water. This method also can be used by private-water-well owners.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

35

TO: US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001, which works to improve public water supply and sanitation. Thank you for the opportunity to submit a comment on the viability of bottled water as an alternative compliance option for chronic water contaminants for non-transient noncommunity water systems (NTNCWS), which are regulated under the Safe Water Drinking Act (SDWA) and 40 CFR s.141.101. Currently, bottled water may not be used by public water systems to achieve compliance with a Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL). This has been the policy over the past eight years. However, bottled water may be used on a temporary basis to avoid unreasonable risk to health. NTNCWS are public water systems. To put matters into perspective: According to the “Public Drinking Water Systems: Facts and Figures ” page on the EPA web site, last updated on February 28, 2006, almost 284 million people in the US are served by public water systems. Of these, only 6.9 million, or just under 2.5%, are served by NTNCWS. There are a total of 20,559 NTNCWS in the US. Type of Water Source: ? 821 of these systems rely on surface water, and serve 932,000 people.

Non-transient Non-community; Water Systems; Comment Arthur Cohen; Mph Convenor Of Saniplan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Reassessing Radon in Drinking Water: Searching for Perspective on Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reassessing Radon in Drinking Water: Searching for Perspective on Radiation Reassessing Radon in Drinking Water: Searching for Perspective on Radiation Risks Speaker(s): Richard Sextro Date: October 27, 1998 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3148 Although most of the exposures to radon and its radioactive decay products arise from indoor airborne radon originating in the soil adjacent to buildings, some contact with radon can occur due to its presence in drinking water. The exposures and health risks associated with radon dissolved in drinking water are typically much smaller, although the magnitude of the exposures and risks have been uncertain and the subject of some controversy. The 1996 Amendments to the (U.S.) Safe Drinking Water Act required the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to contract with the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to re-evaluate the risks associated with

37

Student Pages:Supplying Our Water Needs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supplying Our Water Needs H2O Fish Kill Causes Water Emergency in Riverwood U.S. Army Corp of Engineers-Chicago District online Be sure to submit the online sign-off each day....

38

SCADA system for monitoring water supply networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water supply represents a vital problem for people, and this imposes the need to know the information regarding consumptions, resources and production. This implies a continuous supervision of the water supply process in order to allow any problem that ... Keywords: PLCs, SCADA, analysis, control, data acquisition, data transmission, monitoring

Mircea Dobriceanu; Alexandru Bitoleanu; Mihaela Popescu; Sorin Enache; Eugen Subtirelu

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Reliable water supply system design under uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the natural variability and uncertainties in long-term predictions, reliability is a critical design factor for water supply systems. However, the large scale of the problem and the correlated nature of the involved uncertainties result in models ... Keywords: Data uncertainty, Robust optimization, Spatially correlated data, Water supply system

G. Chung; K. Lansey; G. Bayraksan

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

The Disinfection Efficacy of Chlorine on Sulfate-reducing Bacteria and Iron Bacteria in Water Supply Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and iron reducing bacteria (IRB) that widely exist in water supply networks are the main microorganisms leading to metal corrosion in pipelines. Chlorine is widely used in drinking water supply systems for sterilization. ... Keywords: Chlorine, SRB, IRB, disinfection efficacy

Qi Beimenr; Wu Chenguang; Chen Xiaoju; Yuan Yixing

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Taps: The Dangers of Drinking Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of food groups and water intake to colon cancer risk. Cancerexamined both solid food intake and water consumption. Women

Burgess, Michael

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

WATER AND GROWTH: FUTURE WATER SUPPLIES FOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Reclaimed Water As people use water, a wastewater stream is produced. Once cleaned to acceptable standards and is available as reclaimed water. #12;20 New growth in central Arizona will produce significant quantities to return for wastewater treatment51 . Of the reclaimed water produced, 30% is assumed available to meet

Gelt, Joe

43

Taps: The Dangers of Drinking Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

produced this study "as part of a formal petition to the FDA calling on the agency to strengthen national bottled water regulations

Burgess, Michael

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Drinking Water Problems: Iron and Manganese  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iron and manganese can give water an unpleasant taste, odor and color. In this publication you'll learn how to know whether your water contains iron or manganese and how to eliminate these contaminants with various treatment methods such as aeration and chemical oxidation.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

45

Study on radon and radium concentrations in drinking water in west region of Iran  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the most important characterizations of social health is existence the availability of safe drinking water. Since one of the sources of water contamination is nuclear contamination from radon gas, so in this research radon 222 concentration levels in water supplies in the Toyserkan (a region located in the west of Iran) is investigated. For measuring radon gas in water wells and springs Lucas chamber method is used. Review the results of these measurements that taken from 15th place show that, only five sites have radon concentrations above the limit dose. To reduce radon concentration, it is better to keep water in open pools in contact with air before the water is delivered to users.

Forozani, Ghasem

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Residential exposure to drinking water arsenic in Inner Mongolia, China  

SciTech Connect

In the Ba Men region of Inner Mongolia, China, a high prevalence of chronic arsenism has been reported in earlier studies. A survey of the arsenic contamination among wells from groundwater was conducted to better understand the occurrence of arsenic (As) in drinking water. A total of 14,866 wells (30% of all wells in the region) were analyzed for their arsenic-content. Methods used to detect arsenic were Spectrophotometric methods with DCC-Ag (detection limit, 0.5 {mu}g of As/L); Spot method (detection limit, 10 {mu}g of As/L); and air assisted Colorimetry method (detection limit, 20 {mu}g of As/L). Arsenic-concentrations ranged from below limit of detection to 1200 {mu}g of As/L. Elevated concentrations were related to well depth (10 to 29 m), the date the well was built (peaks from 1980-1990), and geographic location (near mountain range). Over 25,900 individuals utilized wells with drinking water arsenic concentrations above 20 {mu}g of As/L (14,500 above 50 {mu}g of As/L-the current China national standard in drinking water and 2198 above 300 {mu}g of As/L). The presented database of arsenic in wells of the Ba Men region provides a useful tool for planning future water explorations when combined with geological information as well as support for designing upcoming epidemiological studies on the effects of arsenic in drinking water for this region.

Ning Zhixiong [Ba Men Anti-Epidemic Station, Lin He, Inner Mongolia (China); Lobdell, Danelle T. [Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch, Human Studies Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA, Chapel Hill (United States); Kwok, Richard K. [RTI International, P.O. Box 12194, 3040 Cornwallis Rd, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2194 (United States)], E-mail: rkwok@rti.org; Liu Zhiyi; Zhang Shiying; Ma Chenglong [Ba Men Anti-Epidemic Station, Lin He, Inner Mongolia (China); Riediker, Michael [Institut Universitaire Romand de Sante au Travail, Lausanne (Switzerland); Mumford, Judy L. [Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch, Human Studies Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA, Chapel Hill (United States)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

2012 Edition of the Drinking Water Standards and Health Advisories (EPA 822-S-12-001)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Edition of the Drinking Edition of the Drinking Water Standards and Health Advisories 2012 Edition of the Drinking Water Standards and Health Advisories EPA 822-S-12-001 Office of Water U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC Spring 2012 Date of update: April, 2012 Recycled/Recyclable Printed on paper that contains at least 50% recycled fiber. Drinking Water Standards and Health Advisories Spring 2012 Page iii of vi iii The Health Advisory (HA) Program, sponsored by the EPA's Office of Water (OW), publishes concentrations of drinking water contaminants at Drinking Water Specific Risk Level Concentration for cancer (10 -4 Cancer Risk) and concentrations of drinking water contaminants at which noncancer adverse health effects are not anticipated to occur over specific exposure

48

Arsenic in drinking water and lung cancer: A systematic review  

SciTech Connect

Exposure to inorganic arsenic via drinking water is a growing public health concern. We conducted a systematic review of the literature examining the association between arsenic in drinking water and the risk of lung cancer in humans. Towards this aim, we searched electronic databases for articles published through April 2006. Nine ecological studies, two case-control studies, and six cohort studies were identified. The majority of the studies were conducted in areas of high arsenic exposure (100 {mu}g/L) such as southwestern Taiwan, the Niigata Prefecture, Japan, and Northern Chile. Most of the studies reported markedly higher risks of lung cancer mortality or incidence in high arsenic areas compared to the general population or a low arsenic exposed reference group. The quality assessment showed that, among the studies identified, only four assessed arsenic exposure at the individual level. Further, only one of the ecological studies presented results adjusted for potential confounders other than age; of the cohort and case-control studies, only one-half adjusted for cigarette smoking status in the analysis. Despite these methodologic limitations, the consistent observation of strong, statistically significant associations from different study designs carried out in different regions provide support for a causal association between ingesting drinking water with high concentrations of arsenic and lung cancer. The lung cancer risk at lower exposure concentrations remains uncertain.

Celik, Ismail [Department of Medical Oncology, Hacettepe University Institute of Oncology, Ankara (Turkey); Gallicchio, Lisa [Prevention and Research Center, Mercy Medical Center (United States); Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Boyd, Kristina; Lam, Tram K.; Matanoski, Genevieve [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Tao Xuguang [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States); Shiels, Meredith; Hammond, Edward [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Chen Liwei [Department of International Health, Center for Human Nutrition, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Robinson, Karen A. [Department of General Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States); Caulfield, Laura E. [Department of International Health, Center for Human Nutrition, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Herman, James G. [Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States); Guallar, Eliseo [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Alberg, Anthony J. [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Hollings Cancer Center, and Department of Biostatistics, Bioinformatics and Epidemiology, Medical University of South Carolina (United States)], E-mail: alberg@musc.edu

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

GRR/Section 6-UT-c - Drinking Water Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6-UT-c - Drinking Water Permit 6-UT-c - Drinking Water Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-UT-c - Drinking Water Permit 06UTCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies R309-100 Administration: Drinking Water Program Utah Water Well Rules R655-4 Safe Drinking Water Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06UTCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Public water systems are responsible for drinking water infastructure,

50

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results & Policy Implications Title Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results & Policy Implications Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2009 Authors Mathieu, Johanna L., Ashok J. Gadgil, Kristin Kowolik, and Susan E. Addy Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract of arsenic from drinking water in Bangladesh. During fieldwork in four sub-districts of the country, ARUBA reduced arsenic levels ranging from 200 to 900 ppb to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. The technology is cost-effective because the substrate-bottom ash from coal fired power plants-is a waste material readily available in South Asia. In comparison to similar technologies, ARUBA uses less media for arsenic removal due to its high surface area to volume ratio. Hence, less waste is produced. A number of experiments were conducted in Bangladesh to determine the effectiveness of various water treatment protocols. It was found that (1) ARUBA removes more thanhalf of the arsenic from water within five minutes of treatment, (2) ARUBA, that has settled at the bottom of a treatment vessel, continues to remove arsenic for 2-3 days, (3) ARUBA's arsenic removal efficiency can be improved through sequential partial dosing (adding a given amount of ARUBA in fractions versus all at once), and (4) allowing water to first stand for two to three days followed by treatment with ARUBA produced final arsenic levels ten times lower than treating water directly out of the well. Our findings imply a number of tradeoffs between ARUBA's effective arsenic removal capacity, treatment system costs, and waste output. These tradeoffs, some a function of arsenic-related policies in Bangladesh (e.g., waste disposal regulations), must be considered when designing anarsenic removal system. We propose that the most attractive option is to use ARUBA in communityscale water treatment centers, installed as public-private partnerships, in Bangladeshi villages

51

Drinking Water Standards Drinking water from a local public supply must  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

leaks; metals like copper, zinc, cadmium, lead, and arsenic from mine wastes and natural sources wastes; l radiological contaminants such as radon or uranium mill wastes from human or 24 #12;To assure

Dyer, Bill

52

A general water supply planning model: Evaluation of decentralized treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing population, diminishing supplies and variable climatic conditions can cause difficulties in meeting water demands; especially in arid regions where water resources are limited. Given the complexity of the system and the interactions among ... Keywords: Decentralized wastewater treatment system, System dynamics, Water conservation, Water supply

G. Chung; K. Lansey; P. Blowers; P. Brooks; W. Ela; S. Stewart; P. Wilson

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Treated bottom ash medium and method of arsenic removal from drinking water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for low-cost arsenic removal from drinking water using chemically prepared bottom ash pre-treated with ferrous sulfate and then sodium hydroxide. Deposits on the surface of particles of bottom ash form of activated iron adsorbent with a high affinity for arsenic. In laboratory tests, a miniscule 5 grams of pre-treated bottom ash was sufficient to remove the arsenic from 2 liters of 2400 ppb (parts per billion) arsenic-laden water to a level below 50 ppb (the present United States Environmental Protection Agency limit). By increasing the amount of pre-treated bottom ash, even lower levels of post-treatment arsenic are expected. It is further expected that this invention supplies a very low-cost solution to arsenic poisoning for large population segments.

Gadgil, Ashok (El Cerrito, CA)

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

54

GRR/Section 6-AK-c - Drinking Water Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6-AK-c - Drinking Water Permit 6-AK-c - Drinking Water Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-AK-c - Drinking Water Permit 06AKCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation Regulations & Policies 18 AAC 80 Drinking Water 40 CFR 141 40 CFR 142 40 CFR 143 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06AKCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Alaska's drinking water program is monitored under the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation. The type of permit required depends on the

55

Drinking water quality standards and standard tests: Worldwide. (Latest citations from Food Science & Technology Abstracts (FSTA)). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the laws, regulations, standards, and testing methods for drinking water from domestic and international sources. Citations discuss quality standardization and control. Topics include safety codes for drinking water systems and installations, contaminated water and toxicity analyses, biological and chemical standards, diseases derived from drinking water, plastic materials for water packaging, and natural mineral drinking water. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Hawaii Department of Health Safe Drinking Water Branch | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Branch Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Health Safe Drinking Water Branch Address 919 Ala Moana Blvd Room 308 Place Honolulu, Hawaii Zip 96814 Coordinates 21.294755°, -157.858979° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.294755,"lon":-157.858979,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

57

Evaluating the energy and carbon footprint of water conveyance system and future water supply options for Las Vegas, Nevada.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Water production requires the use of energy to transport water from distant locations, pump groundwater from deep aquifers and treat water to meet stringent drinking… (more)

Shrestha, Eleeja

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Determining the removal effectiveness of flame retardants from drinking water treatment processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low concentrations of xenobiotic chemicals have recently become a concern in the surface water environment. The concern expands to drinking water treatment processes, and whether or not they remove these chemicals while ...

Lin, Joseph C. (Joseph Chris), 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Atrazine Contamination in a Rural Source-Water Supply: Spa Lake, Lewisburg, Kentucky.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In 1998, Western Kentucky University (WKU) worked in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Drinking Water Protection Division, to investigate methods to improve source-water… (more)

Seadler, Kathryn

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

GRR/Section 6-NV-c - Drinking Water Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 6-NV-c - Drinking Water Permit GRR/Section 6-NV-c - Drinking Water Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-NV-c - Drinking Water Permit 06NVCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Nevada Division of Water Resources Nevada Division of Environmental Protection Public Utilities Commission of Nevada Regulations & Policies NRS 445A Water Controls NAC 445A Water Controls (Regulations) Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06NVCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative According to NRS 445A, the Nevada Division of Water Resources is charged

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Drinking Water as a Source of Indoor Air Pollution: In-Home Formation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drinking Water as a Source of Indoor Air Pollution: In-Home Formation & Cross-Media Transfer Speaker(s): David Olson Date: April 19, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host...

62

Analysis of sustainable water supply options for Kuwait  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis considers several options for improving the sustainability of Kuwait's water supply system. The country currently relies heavily on desalination and brackish groundwater extraction. The options considered for ...

Murtaugh, Katharine A. (Katharine Ann)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6, 2013 6, 2013 Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers Washington, D.C. - In a project supported and managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), researchers at the University of Alaska Fairbanks have demonstrated that the use of artificial barriers-snow fences-can significantly increase the amount of fresh water supplies in Arctic lakes at a fraction of the cost of bringing in water from nearby lakes. The results promise to enhance environmentally sound development of Alaska's natural resources, lowering the costs of building ice roads used for exploring for oil and natural gas in Alaska. They could also be used to help augment fresh water supplies at remote villages. Researcher Joel Bailey measures the density of the snow in this snow pit to determine the amount of snow in the drift and the water equivalent of the snow drift.

64

Project Summary:Supplying Our Water Needs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subject/Content Area: Physical Science, Social Studies, Mathematics, and Subject/Content Area: Physical Science, Social Studies, Mathematics, and Learning Strategies Target Audience: Thornridge is a comprehensive high school serving approximately 2200 ninth through twelfth grade students living southeast of the Chicago city limits. Student backgrounds vary greatly socio-economically (below the poverty line to approximately six figures), ethnically (7% Caucasian, 87% African-American, 6% Hispanic) and culturally. Mobility and unemployment are high. Steel mills, the auto industry, steel processing plants and the construction trades have been the major employers, however, many no longer exist. Student test scores in all areas are below the state mean. Eighty freshmen, identified as performing well below grade-level in all areas, are targeted to use this water unit

65

The Drinking Water Security and Safety Amendments of 2002: Is America's Drinking Water Infrastructure Safer Four Years Later?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pumping station, or water intake could deprive large areasthe pre-treatment and water intake part of the system; and 'around intakes; intruder resis- tant fences enclosing water

Shermer, Steven D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

COST IMPACT OF SAFE DRINKING WATER ACT COMPLIANCE FOR COMMISSION-REGULATED WATER UTILITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(NRRI) with funding provided by participating member commissions of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC). The views and opinions of the authors do not necessarily state or reflect the views, opinions, or policies of the NRRI, the NARUC, or NARUC member commissions. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This study was prepared for state public utility commissioners and their staff in response to the growing concern about the effect of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) on water utilities under their jurisdiction. Compliance with the SDWA is expected to have a significant impact on water utilities and the rates they charge for service. A sensitivity analysis was developed for this report using a hypothetical water company to identify the costs associated with alternative treatment processes. A total of eighteen different treatment processes are considered, from conventional treatment to granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption and reverse osmosis. Capital costs for these processes range from $100,000 to $3.25 million for a water plant with a designed capacity of one million

Patrick C. Mann; Janice A. Beecher

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Removal of beryllium from drinking water by chemical coagulation and lime softening  

SciTech Connect

The effectiveness of conventional drinking water treatment and lime softening was evaluated for beryllium removal from two drinking water sources. Jar test studies were conducted to determine how common coagulants (aluminum sulfate and ferric chloride) and lime softening performed in removing beryllium from spiked waters. Centrifugation was used to simulate filtration. The two source waters used were raw Ohio River water and groundwater from the Great Miami Aquifer. The impact of initial beryllium concentration, coagulant dose, turbidity and pH on beryllium removal was examined and optimum treatment conditions were determined. Jar tests using alum and ferric chloride coagulants were able to achieve 95% and 85% removal of beryllium respectively from surface water. Removal efficiency increased as the pH was increased. Based on the data collected in the study, coprecipitation and precipitation are the two likely mechanisms responsible for beryllium removal.

Lytle, D.A.; Summers, R.S.; Sorg, T.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Living off-grid in an arid environment without a well : can residential and commercial/industrial water harvesting help solve water supply problems?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our family of three lives comfortably off-grid without a well in an arid region ({approx}9 in/yr, average). This year we expect to achieve water sustainability with harvested or grey water supporting all of our needs (including a garden and trees), except drinking water (about 7 gallons/week). We discuss our implementation and the implication that for an investment of a few thousand dollars, many single family homes could supply a large portion of their own water needs, significantly reducing municipal water demand. Generally, harvested water is very low in minerals and pollutants, but may need treatment for microbes in order to be potable. This may be addressed via filters, UV light irradiation or through chemical treatment (bleach). Looking further into the possibility of commercial water harvesting from malls, big box stores and factories, we ask whether water harvesting could supply a significant portion of potable water by looking at two cities with water supply problems. We look at the implications of separate municipal water lines for potable and clean non-potable uses. Implications on changes to future building codes are explored.

Axness, Carl L.; Ferrando, Ana

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Modeling threat assessments of water supply systems using markov latent effects methodology.  

SciTech Connect

Recent amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act emphasize efforts toward safeguarding our nation's water supplies against attack and contamination. Specifically, the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 established requirements for each community water system serving more than 3300 people to conduct an assessment of the vulnerability of its system to a terrorist attack or other intentional acts. Integral to evaluating system vulnerability is the threat assessment, which is the process by which the credibility of a threat is quantified. Unfortunately, full probabilistic assessment is generally not feasible, as there is insufficient experience and/or data to quantify the associated probabilities. For this reason, an alternative approach is proposed based on Markov Latent Effects (MLE) modeling, which provides a framework for quantifying imprecise subjective metrics through possibilistic or fuzzy mathematics. Here, an MLE model for water systems is developed and demonstrated to determine threat assessments for different scenarios identified by the assailant, asset, and means. Scenario assailants include terrorists, insiders, and vandals. Assets include a water treatment plant, water storage tank, node, pipeline, well, and a pump station. Means used in attacks include contamination (onsite chemicals, biological and chemical), explosives and vandalism. Results demonstrated highest threats are vandalism events and least likely events are those performed by a terrorist.

Silva, Consuelo Juanita

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Methane contamination of drinking water accompanying gas-well drilling and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- matically increasing natural-gas extraction. In aquifers overlying the Marcellus and Utica shale formations of drinking water associated with shale- gas extraction. In active gas-extraction areas (one or more gas wells methane sources such as the Marcellus and Utica shales at the active sites and matched gas geochemistry

71

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas Pennsylvania, ex- amining natural gas concentrations and isotopic signatures with proximity to shale gas wells this transformation, with shale gas and other unconventional sources now yielding more than one- half of all US

Jackson, Robert B.

72

Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund (New Mexico) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All...

73

On Managing Texas Rural Water Supply Systems: A Socioeconomic Analysis and Quality Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Objectives The study reported here is aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of nonprofit, rural water supply corporations or water systems (hereafter referred to as RWSs) in Texas from a sociological perspective. Specifically, the study has attempted to: 1. Provide an overview of the organizational structure and functioning of RWSs, identifying their existing as well as emerging needs, problems, and suggested solutions. It explores socioeconomic characteristics and patterns of RWSs in Texas. It outlines a history of state and federal regulations and practices through which these systems are structured and actually function. 2. Evaluate the quality and effectiveness of the management of selected RWSs located in different geographical regions of Texas. The evaluation of effectiveness of systems is accomplished through a systematic set of procedures and techniques. These procedures are tested for reliability and validity through empirical data. In addition, the differential levels of program effectiveness of RWSs are elaborated upon by correlating them with relevant socioeconomic variables. 3. Indicate policy and research implications of data for dealing with the future of rural water systems. Expected Contributions The rural populations in the U.S. started experiencing steady increases during the 1970s and early 1980s (Goodwin et al., 1984). Although the rural population growth at the national level showed a few differential trends during mid to late 1980s (Figures 3 and 4 in Appendix A), the state of Texas registered a population influx in many nonmetropolitan areas during the last decade (U.S.D.A., 1990: 11). Overall, a significant portion of Texas' population still resides in rural areas (Texas Department of Water Resources, 1984: 7). However, it appears that a larger number of studies have focused on water-management related problems and issues for urban areas than those for rural communities in Texas (e.g., Knudson, 1986; Meier and Thorton, 1973; Murdock et al., 1988; Texas Department of Water Resources, 1985; Texas Water Development Board, 1990;1 and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 1989). While rural water problems have been examined carefully in several parts of the country, we could not find a single study in Texas systematically examining water-related needs and issues confronting rural communities. The need to study rural water supply has become even more important now because of the challenge faced by small community systems in complying with the provisions of the 1986 Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). These small systems, with their limited customer and revenue bases, will face formidable expense in installing new water treatment methods (Jensen, 1990; Long and Stukenberg, 1987: 38; Texas Water Development Board, 1990: 14). The present study is a timely probe into the phenomena of rural water supply. The study is aimed at developing and using a methodology to evaluate the program effectiveness of RWSs. In recent years, interest has mounted for employing the research techniques of social sciences in efforts to assess the effectiveness of public programs. The 1970s and 1980s, decades of rapid-paced growth of RWSs in Texas and elsewhere, were marked by the proliferation of public expenditures. The study uses a set of indicators to identify effectiveness and efficiency of rural water projects. Such measures for analysis and appraisal of these projects may contribute to more informed and intelligent planning for the future. The study is also expected to provide a critical probe and insight into an evaluation methodology that may be used in future studies investigating public programs. To this end, the research reported here is exploratory in nature and may set grounds for more critical studies in the area. The study, for example, develops a baseline against which to measure future changes and trend in rural water supplies in Texas as well as in other parts of the country. Organization of the Report The remaining three-section organ

Singh, R.N.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Water Heating: Energy-efficient strategies for supplying hot water in the home (BTS Technology Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet for homeowners and contractors on how to supply hot water in the home while saving energy.

NAHB Research Center; Southface Energy Institute; U.S. Department of Energy' s Oak Ridge Laboratory; U.S. Department of Energy' s National Renewable Energy Laboratory

2001-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

20121114 Riverton drinking wa...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Where Does My Drinking Water Come From? Where Does My Drinking Water Come From? Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site F A C T S H E E T ENERGY Legacy Management U.S. DEPARTMENT OF This fact sheet provides information about the Alternative Water Supply System and domestic wells at the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I processing site at Riverton, Wyoming. The Riverton site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Where Is the Riverton Site? The former Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site is in Fremont County, 2 miles southwest of the town of Riverton and within the boundaries of the Wind River Indian Reservation (Northern Arapaho and Eastern Shoshone). Why Is It a "Site"? A uranium- and vanadium-ore-processing mill operated on the property from 1958 to 1963. Milling operations created

76

Recommendations for at-risk water supplies in Capiz Province, Philippines : using water source and community assessments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The following thesis is part of a larger project which began in response to a request by the Provincial Health Office (PHO) in Capiz Province, Philippines for expert advice to support its drinking water quality testing ...

Patrick, Jessica Molly

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

The Potential of Desalination as an Alternative Water Supply in the United States.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Many parts of the United States are facing water shortages. Planners have to ensure that there will be an adequate water supply to meet the… (more)

Naini, Anjali Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

The effects of wavelength, metals, and reactive oxygen species on the sunlight inactivation of microorganisms: observations and applications to the solar disinfection of drinking water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of batch-process solar disinfectors. Water Research 35(4),Batch process solar disinfection is an efficient means of disinfecting drinking water

Fisher, Michael Benjamin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

GRR/Section 19-CO-f - Substitute Water Supply Plan | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CO-f - Substitute Water Supply Plan CO-f - Substitute Water Supply Plan < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-CO-f - Substitute Water Supply Plan 19COFSubstituteWaterSupplyPlan.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Division of Water Resources Regulations & Policies CRS 37-92-208 Policy 2003-2 Implementation of CRS 37-92-308 Regarding Substitute Water Supply Plans Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19COFSubstituteWaterSupplyPlan.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The state engineer in the Colorado Division of Water Resources oversees the

80

Quality and Membrane Treatability of the Lake Houston Water Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently, sections of Harris and Montgomery counties located North and Northeast of Houston use groundwater almost exclusively. These areas have witnessed substantial population growth and associated increases in water demand. In 1999 approximately 60% of potable water in Houston and its adjoining communities was produced from surface water. The remaining approximately 40% was derived from groundwater. However, the "Subsidence District" which is the authority responsible for granting groundwater permits has mandated that groundwater use needs to be decreased to 20% within the next few years so as to limit subsidence. Pipelines are not available to distribute purified water from the existing surface water treatment plants located in the South and East of Houston to the Northern areas that actually require additional water. Because Lake Houston is located in the geographical area of interest and is a surface water source, the City of Houston is interested in developing it for its future water needs. Additionally, a favorable hydraulic gradient exists from the Lake to the proposed service areas in Harris and Montgomery counties. Federal regulations such as the Stage II of the Disinfectant/Disinfection By-Products Rule (1) and the Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (2) are expected to be promulgated in the near future. These rules are anticipated to introduce more stringent maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for total trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs), possibly introduce new MCLs for individual species of THMs and HAAs, reduce turbidity levels, and enhance inactivation/removal requirements for Cryptosporidium. (Cryptosporidium was the causative protozoan for the more than 400,000 cases of acute gastrointestinal disease in Milwaukee, WI in March 1993.) The treatment processes in the City of Houston's existing water purification plants are not expected to be sufficient in meeting these anticipated regulations. Therefore, both regulatory requirements and engineering considerations point towards Lake Houston as an attractive surface water source for the next water purification plant to supply potable water to the City and its adjoining communities. However, water quality in Lake Houston can be characterized as being poor with high concentrations of turbidity, color, total organic carbon (TOC), nutrients such as phosphorus and nitrogen, etc. (3). Pressure-driven membrane processes can be employed as effective barriers against a wide range of contaminants including particles, turbidity, protozoan cysts and oocysts, bacteria, viruses, color, organic carbon, disinfection by-product (DBP) precursors, and dissolved metals. Additionally, microfiltration (MF) and ultrafiltration (UF) pretreatment may be necessary to reduce fouling rates and increase chemical cleaning intervals during surface water nanofiltration (NF) (4). Therefore, an integrated membrane system employing MF or UF pretreatment to NF is expected to be an important treatment candidate for Lake Houston water. Nanofiltration (NF) membranes typically operate at pressures less than 100 psi and are capable of high rejections of natural organic matter (NOM) and precursors to disinfection by-products (DBP) including trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) (5-8), many of which are suspected carcinogens, mutagens, or teratogens.

Chellam, Shankar; Sharma, Ramesh; Shetty, Grishma; Wei, Ying

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Fisk-based criteria to support validation of detection methods for drinking water and air.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was prepared to support the validation of analytical methods for threat contaminants under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC) program. It is designed to serve as a resource for certain applications of benchmark and fate information for homeland security threat contaminants. The report identifies risk-based criteria from existing health benchmarks for drinking water and air for potential use as validation targets. The focus is on benchmarks for chronic public exposures. The priority sources are standard EPA concentration limits for drinking water and air, along with oral and inhalation toxicity values. Many contaminants identified as homeland security threats to drinking water or air would convert to other chemicals within minutes to hours of being released. For this reason, a fate analysis has been performed to identify potential transformation products and removal half-lives in air and water so appropriate forms can be targeted for detection over time. The risk-based criteria presented in this report to frame method validation are expected to be lower than actual operational targets based on realistic exposures following a release. Note that many target criteria provided in this report are taken from available benchmarks without assessing the underlying toxicological details. That is, although the relevance of the chemical form and analogues are evaluated, the toxicological interpretations and extrapolations conducted by the authoring organizations are not. It is also important to emphasize that such targets in the current analysis are not health-based advisory levels to guide homeland security responses. This integrated evaluation of chronic public benchmarks and contaminant fate has identified more than 200 risk-based criteria as method validation targets across numerous contaminants and fate products in drinking water and air combined. The gap in directly applicable values is considerable across the full set of threat contaminants, so preliminary indicators were developed from other well-documented benchmarks to serve as a starting point for validation efforts. By this approach, at least preliminary context is available for water or air, and sometimes both, for all chemicals on the NHSRC list that was provided for this evaluation. This means that a number of concentrations presented in this report represent indirect measures derived from related benchmarks or surrogate chemicals, as described within the many results tables provided in this report.

MacDonell, M.; Bhattacharyya, M.; Finster, M.; Williams, M.; Picel, K.; Chang, Y.-S.; Peterson, J.; Adeshina, F.; Sonich-Mullin, C.; Environmental Science Division; EPA

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

82

Analyzing water supply in future energy systems using the TIMES Integrated Assessment Model (TIAM-FR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analyzing water supply in future energy systems using the TIMES Integrated Assessment Model (TIAM is required to maintain water supplies while water is essential to produce energy. However, the models and energy generally dealt with them separately, the two resources are highly interconnected. Energy

83

The energy water nexus : increasing water supply by desalination integrated with renewable power and reducing water demand by corporate water footprinting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Growing populations and periodic drought conditions have exacerbated water stress in many areas worldwide. Consequently, it would be valuable to manage both supply and demand… (more)

Clayton, Mary Elizabeth

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

URBAN WATER SUPPLY IN INDIA: STATUS, REFORM OPTIONS AND POSSIBLE LESSONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of water produced that does not reach water board customers. Unaccounted for water results both from for water accounts for 25-40% of water produced by utilities in the main urban areas in India. WhileURBAN WATER SUPPLY IN INDIA: STATUS, REFORM OPTIONS AND POSSIBLE LESSONS David McKenzie Development

Kammen, Daniel M.

85

Biogeochemical Behavior of Dissolved Arsenic and Uranium Concentrations in Public Water Supply Wells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Public water supply (PWS) wells currently contain dissolved uranium concentrations above the federally mandated maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 30 ppb (parts per billion) and… (more)

mcvey, kevin j

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The feasibility of desalination as an alternative means of water supply to Zinkwazi town.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Desalination of seawater is a widely used technology throughout the world, but is not commonly used in South Africa for domestic water supply. The reasons… (more)

Metcalf, Graham James.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Benthic Microbial Fuel Cell Persistent power supply for in-water ...  

Benthic Microbial Fuel Cell Persistent power supply for in-water sensors ... and high-density sensor arrays where the cost of battery replacement is high.

88

Using Remote Sensing Data to Improve Groundwater Supply Estimations in Gujarat, India  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

India is the greatest groundwater consumer in the world, with estimated annual withdrawals exceeding 230 km3. More than 60% of irrigated agriculture, 85% of drinking water supplies, and 50% of urban and industrial water needs are dependent on ...

Pennan Chinnasamy; Jason A. Hubbart; Govindasamy Agoramoorthy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Persistence and decontamination of surrogate radioisotopes in a model drinking water distribution system  

SciTech Connect

Contamination of a model drinking water system with surrogate radioisotopes was examined with respect to persistence on and decontamination of infrastructure surfaces. Cesium and cobalt chloride salts were used as surrogates for cesium-137 and cobalt-60. Studies were conducted in biofilm annular reactors containing heavily corroded iron surfaces formed under shear and constantly submerged in drinking water. Cesium was not detected on the corroded iron surface after equilibration with 10 and 100 mg L{sup -1} solutions of cesium chloride, but cobalt was detected on corroded iron coupons at both initial concentrations. The amount of adhered cobalt decreased over the next six weeks, but was still present when monitoring stopped. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) showed that adhered cobalt was in the III oxidation state. The adsorbed cobalt was strongly resistant to decontamination by various physicochemical methods. Simulated flushing, use of free chlorine and dilute ammonia were found to be ineffective whereas use of aggressive methods like 14.5 M ammonia and 0.36 M sulfuric acid removed 37 and 92% of the sorbed cobalt, respectively.

Szabo, Jeffrey G.; Impellitteri, Christopher A.; Govindaswamy, Shekar; Hall, John S.; (EPA); (Lakeshore)

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

90

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash Title Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2010 Authors Mathieu, Johanna L., Ashok J. Gadgil, Susan E. Addy, and Kristin Kowolik Journal Environmental Science and Health Keywords airflow and pollutant transport group, arsenic, bangladesh, coal bottom ash, drinking water, indoor environment department, water contaminants, water treatment Abstract We describe laboratory and field results of a novel arsenic removal adsorbent called 'Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash' (ARUBA). ARUBA is prepared by coating particles of coal bottom ash, a waste material from coal fired power plants, with iron (hydr)oxide. The coating process is simple and conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Material costs for ARUBA are estimated to be low (~$0.08 per kg) and arsenic remediation with ARUBA has the potential to be affordable to resource-constrained communities. ARUBA is used for removing arsenic via a dispersal-and-removal process, and we envision that ARUBA would be used in community-scale water treatment centers. We show that ARUBA is able to reduce arsenic concentrations in contaminated Bangladesh groundwater to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. Using the Langmuir isotherm (R2 = 0.77) ARUBA's adsorption capacity in treating real groundwater is 2.6×10-6 mol/g (0.20 mg/g). Time-to-90% (defined as the time interval for ARUBA to remove 90% of the total amount of arsenic that is removed at equilibrium) is less than one hour. Reaction rates (pseudo-second-order kinetic model, R2 ≥ 0.99) increase from 2.4×105 to 7.2×105 g mol-1 min-1 as the groundwater arsenic concentration decreases from 560 to 170 ppb. We show that ARUBA's arsenic adsorption density (AAD), defined as the milligrams of arsenic removed at equilibrium per gram of ARUBA added, is linearly dependent on the initial arsenic concentration of the groundwater sample, for initial arsenic concentrations of up to 1600 ppb and an ARUBA dose of 4.0 g/L. This makes it easy to determine the amount of ARUBA required to treat a groundwater source when its arsenic concentration is known and less than 1600 ppb. Storing contaminated groundwater for two to three days before treatment is seen to significantly increase ARUBA's AAD. ARUBA can be separated from treated water by coagulation and clarification, which is expected to be less expensive than filtration of micron-scale particles, further contributing to the affordability of a community-scale water treatment center

91

CONCLUSIONS 1. The complexity, controversy, interdependence, and importance of California's water supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(SWAP) and an elasticity-based urban water demand model, has produced preliminary estimates are produced. The willingness of water users to pay #12;154 for additional water and new facilities also of California's water supply system have grown to require new approaches to their analysis. California's water

Lund, Jay R.

92

Water supply analysis for restoring the Colorado River Delta, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Pay for Additional Transboundary Water Flows from the US.2001). "Improving California Water Management: Optimizingloss functions to value urban water scarcity in California."

Medellin-Azuara, Josue; Lund, Jay R.; Howitt, Richard E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Program on Technology Innovation: Electric Efficiency Through Water Supply Technologies-- A Roadmap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electricity consumption associated with sourcing, treating, and transporting water is expected to increase significantly in the future as a result of a growing population and an increasing need for alternative water supplies. Furthermore, there is a concern that climate change may necessitate an increase in irrigation in some areas of the United States. Consequently, there is a critical need for technologies that can reduce the electricity consumption associated with water supply. This report identifies ...

2009-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

94

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results and Policy Implications  

SciTech Connect

ARUBA (Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash) has proven effective at removing high concentrations of arsenic from drinking water in Bangladesh. During fieldwork in four sub-districts of the country, ARUBA reduced arsenic levels ranging from 200 to 900 ppb to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. The technology is cost-effective because the substrate--bottom ash from coal fired power plants--is a waste material readily available in South Asia. In comparison to similar technologies, ARUBA uses less media for arsenic removal due to its high surface area to volume ratio. Hence, less waste is produced. A number of experiments were conducted in Bangladesh to determine the effectiveness of various water treatment protocols. It was found that (1) ARUBA removes more than half of the arsenic from water within five minutes of treatment, (2) ARUBA, that has settled at the bottom of a treatment vessel, continues to remove arsenic for 2-3 days, (3) ARUBA's arsenic removal efficiency can be improved through sequential partial dosing (adding a given amount of ARUBA in fractions versus all at once), and (4) allowing water to first stand for two to three days followed by treatment with ARUBA produced final arsenic levels ten times lower than treating water directly out of the well. Our findings imply a number of tradeoffs between ARUBA's effective arsenic removal capacity, treatment system costs, and waste output. These tradeoffs, some a function of arsenic-related policies in Bangladesh (e.g., waste disposal regulations), must be considered when designing an arsenic removal system. We propose that the most attractive option is to use ARUBA in communityscale water treatment centers, installed as public-private partnerships, in Bangladeshi villages.

Mathieu, Johanna L.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Kowolik, Kristin; Addy, Susan E.A.

2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

95

Drinking water arsenic exposure and blood pressure in healthy women of reproductive age in Inner Mongolia, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extremely high exposure levels evaluated in prior investigations relating elevated levels of drinking water arsenic and hypertension prevalence make extrapolation to potential vascular effects at lower exposure levels very difficult. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 8790 women who had recently been pregnant in an area of Inner Mongolia, China known to have a gradient of drinking water arsenic exposure. This study observed increased systolic blood pressure levels with increasing drinking water arsenic, at lower exposure levels than previously reported in the literature. As compared to the referent category (below limit of detection to 20 {mu}g of As/L), the overall population mean systolic blood pressure rose 1.29 mm Hg (95% CI 0.82, 1.75), 1.28 mm Hg (95% CI 0.49, 2.07), and 2.22 mm Hg (95% CI 1.46, 2.97) as drinking water arsenic concentration increased from 21 to 50, 51 to 100, and > 100 {mu}g of As/L, respectively. Controlling for age and body weight (n = 3260), the population mean systolic blood pressure rose 1.88 mm Hg (95% CI 1.03, 2.73), 3.90 mm Hg (95% CI 2.52, 5.29), and 6.83 mm Hg (95% CI 5.39, 8.27) as drinking water arsenic concentration increased, respectively. For diastolic blood pressure effect, while statistically significant, was not as pronounced as systolic blood pressure. Mean diastolic blood pressure rose 0.78 mm Hg (95% CI 0.39, 1.16), 1.57 mm Hg (95% CI 0.91, 2.22) and 1.32 mm Hg (95% CI 0.70, 1.95), respectively, for the overall population and rose 2.11 mm Hg (95% CI 1.38, 2.84), 2.74 mm Hg (95% CI 1.55, 3.93), and 3.08 mm Hg (95% CI 1.84, 4.31), respectively, for the adjusted population (n = 3260) at drinking water arsenic concentrations of 21 to 50, 51 to 100, and > 100 {mu}g of As/L. If our study results are confirmed in other populations, the potential burden of cardiovascular disease attributable to drinking water arsenic is significant.

Kwok, Richard K. [RTI International, PO Box 12194, 3040 Cornwallis Rd., Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2194 (United States)], E-mail: rkwok@rti.org; Mendola, Pauline [Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch, Human Studies Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, MD-58, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Liu Zhiyi [Ba Men Anti-Epidemic Station, Lin He, Inner Mongolia (China); Savitz, David A. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1057, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Heiss, Gerardo [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Ling Heling [Ba Men Anti-Epidemic Station, Lin He, Inner Mongolia (China); Xia Yajuan [Inner Mongolia Center for Endemic Disease Control and Research, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia (China); Lobdell, Danelle [Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch, Human Studies Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, MD-58, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Zeng Donglin [Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Thorp, John M. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Creason, John P.; Mumford, Judy L. [Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch, Human Studies Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, MD-58, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Sanitizing Stored Water Supplies R. Craig Runyan1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Publication date: September 2009. This publication is produced by the Southern Regional Water Program, scrubbing the interior tank walls with mild detergent can produce excellent results. Even when water stored quantities. Treatment of stored water using standard household bleach will usually produce good

97

Water Supplies to the Great Lakes—Reconstructed from Tree-Rings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Correlations between the water supplies to each of the Great Lakes and prewhitened tree-ring chronologies from 16 sites around the Great Lakes suggested some strong associations for the summer months, particularly June and July. Some of these ...

W. A. R. Brinkmann

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Planning for an Uncertain Future: Climate Change Sensitivity Assessment towards Adaptation Planning for Public Water Supply  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessing climate change risk to municipal water supplies is often conducted by hydrologic modeling specific to local watersheds and infrastructure to ensure that outputs are compatible with existing planning frameworks and processes. This study ...

Tim Bardsley; Andrew Wood; Mike Hobbins; Tracie Kirkham; Laura Briefer; Jeff Niermeyer; Steven Burian

99

Opportunities for renewable energy technologies in water supply in developing country villages  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) with information on village water supply programs in developing countries. The information is intended to help NREL develop renewable energy technologies for water supply and treatment that can be implemented, operated, and maintained by villagers. The report is also useful to manufacturers and suppliers in the renewable energy community in that it describes a methodology for introducing technologies to rural villages in developing countries.

Niewoehner, J.; Larson, R.; Azrag, E.; Hailu, T.; Horner, J.; VanArsdale, P. [Water for People, Denver, CO (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Determining energy requirement for future water supply and demand alternatives.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Water and energy are two inextricably linked resources. Each has the potential to limit the development of the other. There is a substantial body of… (more)

Larsen, Sara Gaye

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Dry January lowers the Pacific Northwest water supply forecast ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... most recent 2013 projections for April to September—typically the high hydro season—call for normal to below-normal water ...

102

Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers March 6, 2013 - 10:55am Addthis Monitoring equipment and part of the snowfence peek out of the snow drift. Monitoring equipment and part of the snowfence peek out of the snow drift. The aerial view shows the experimental lake at Franklin Bluffs used for the snowfence experiment. The aerial view shows the experimental lake at Franklin Bluffs used for the snowfence experiment. Researcher Joel Bailey measures the density of the snow in this snow pit to determine the amount of snow in the drift and the water equivalent of the snow drift. Researcher Joel Bailey measures the density of the snow in this snow pit to determine the amount of snow in the drift and the water equivalent of the

103

Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers March 6, 2013 - 10:55am Addthis Monitoring equipment and part of the snowfence peek out of the snow drift. Monitoring equipment and part of the snowfence peek out of the snow drift. The aerial view shows the experimental lake at Franklin Bluffs used for the snowfence experiment. The aerial view shows the experimental lake at Franklin Bluffs used for the snowfence experiment. Researcher Joel Bailey measures the density of the snow in this snow pit to determine the amount of snow in the drift and the water equivalent of the snow drift. Researcher Joel Bailey measures the density of the snow in this snow pit to determine the amount of snow in the drift and the water equivalent of the

104

Water and Sustainability (Volume 4): U.S. Electricity Consumption for Water Supply and Treatment -- The Next Half Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fast growing demand for clean, fresh water -- coupled with the need to protect and enhance the environment -- has made many areas of the United States and the rest of the world vulnerable to water shortages for various human uses. As they interact with the electricity industry, these uses encompass agricultural irrigation, thermoelectric generation, municipal water/wastewater treatment and distribution, and industrial processes. The dependency of electricity supply and demand on water availability ca...

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Surface water supply for the Clearlake, California Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is proposed to construct a demonstration Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal plant in the vicinity of the City of Clearlake. An interim evaluation has been made of the availability of surface water to supply the plant. The evaluation has required consideration of the likely water consumption of such a plant. It has also required consideration of population, land, and water uses in the drainage basins adjacent to Clear Lake, where the HDR demonstration project is likely to be located. Five sources were identified that appear to be able to supply water of suitable quality in adequate quantity for initial filling of the reservoir, and on a continuing basis, as makeup for water losses during operation. Those sources are California Cities Water Company, a municipal supplier to the City of Clearlake; Clear Lake, controlled by Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District; Borax Lake, controlled by a local developer; Southeast Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant, controlled by Lake County; and wells, ponds, and streams on private land. The evaluation involved the water uses, water rights, stream flows, precipitation, evaporation, a water balance, and water quality. In spite of California`s prolonged drought, the interim conclusion is that adequate water is available at a reasonable cost to supply the proposed HDR demonstration project.

Jager, A.R.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Policy Office of Drinking Water Title: Two-connection Residential Water System Number: P A.13 – Administration References: WAC 246-291-030(3) Supersedes: P A.13 Two Connection Residential Public Water Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Drinking Water policies are written descriptions of the approach taken by the Office to implement a statute, regulation, court order, or other agency order, and may include the Office’s current practice, procedure, or method of action based on that approach. Any generally applicable directives or criteria that provide the basis for imposing penalties or sanctions, or for granting or denying Office approvals, must either be in statute or established in a rule. PURPOSE The Office of Drinking Water will waive all water system requirements for water systems with only two-residential connections, where each connection is a single family home. NOTE: This policy does not prevent a local health jurisdiction from regulating two-connection residential water systems. DIRECTION When individuals propose a water system with only two residential connections, where each connection is only a single family home, the Office of Drinking Water will provide a copy of this policy and notice which states the Office of Drinking Water has waived the requirements of chapter 246-291 WAC. The Office of Drinking Water will direct individuals to check with their local

Contact Karen Valenzuela; Denise A. Clifford; Office Of Drinking Water

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

High density polyethylene (HDPE) containers as an alternative to polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles for solar disinfection of drinking water in northern region, Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to investigate the technical feasibility of high density polyethylene (HDPE) containers as an alternative to polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles for the solar disinfection of drinking water ...

Yazdani, Iman

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Active space heating and hot water supply with solar energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technical and economic assessments are given of solar water heaters, both circulating, and of air-based and liquid-based solar space heating systems. Both new and retrofit systems are considered. The technical status of flat-plate and evacuated tube collectors and of thermal storage is also covered. Non-technical factors are also briefly discussed, including the participants in the use of solar heat, incentives and deterrents. Policy implications are considered as regards acceleration of solar use, goals for solar use, means for achieving goals, and interaction of governments, suppliers, and users. Government actions are recommended. (LEW)

Karaki, S.; Loef, G. O.G.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

U.S. Water Demand, Supply and Allocation: Trends and Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007-R-3 Water is an essential resource in the U.S. economy. It plays a crucial role in supporting many economic activities and ensuring the quality of human life and the health of ecological systems. Despite this, the value of water may not be widely appreciated because only some water resources and water uses are easily visible or noticed while others are not. Among the Institute for Water Resources (IWR) Future Directions program activities are the identification of emerging water challenges and opportunities and the tactical engagement of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) senior leaders on these issues. Such critical thinking is an essential prerequisite to strategy development and planning. IWR has developed this series of Water Resources Outlook papers, commissioned utilizing outside experts, to identify emerging issues and implications for the Nation. These issues and implications will be presented in the form of “provocation sessions ” with external and internal subject matter experts and stakeholders and will inform the USACE strategic planning process. U.S. Water Demand, Supply and Allocation: Trends and Outlook Given the overall importance of water, the long-term adequacy of water supply is a major national concern. This first in a series of Water Resources Outlook papers reviews future trends

Jack C. Kiefer, Ph.D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Water is Vital--Especially after a Disaster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dehydration can be a serious threat after a disaster, when supplies of clean drinking water may be limited. Learn how you can find and use hidden sources of water in your home and purify water to make it safe for drinking.

Crocker, Andrew

2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

111

Towards the visualization of water supply system components with GPR images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a methodological tool for examining the layout and revealing the concealed characteristics of urban water supply systems (WSS). For this purpose, we use underground images obtained with ground penetrating radar (GPR) as a method that does ... Keywords: Ground penetrating radar, Images processing and analysis, Pipe location, Signal processing

David Ayala-Cabrera; Manuel Herrera; Idel Montalvo; Rafael PéRez-GarcíA

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Agricultural implications of reduced water supplies in the Green and Upper Yellowstone River Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth of the energy sector in the energy-rich but water-restricted Western US has presented a potential conflict with the irrigated agricultural sector. This study measures the direct impacts on farm income and employment resulting from the transfer of water from agriculture to energy in two specific geographical areas - the Green and Upper Yellowstone River Basins. We used a linear programming model to evaluate the impacts of reduced water supplies. Through the use of regional multipliers, we expanded our analysis to include regional impacts. Volume I provides the major analysis of these impacts. Volume II provides further technical data.

Lansford, R. R.; Roach, F.; Gollehon, N. R.; Creel, B. J.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Estimated general population control limits for unitary agents in drinking water, milk, soil, and unprocessed food items  

SciTech Connect

In the event of an unplanned release of chemical agent during any stage of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), the potential exists for contamination of drinking water, forage crops, grains, garden produce, and livestock. Persistent agents such as VX or sulfur mustard pose the greatest human health concern for reentry. This White Paper has been prepared to provide technical bases for these decisions by developing working estimates of agent control limits in selected environmental media considered principal sources of potential human exposure. To date, control limits for public exposure to unitary agents have been established for atmospheric concentrations only. The current analysis builds on previous work to calculate working estimates of control limits for ingestion and dermal exposure to potentially contaminated drinking water, milk, soil, and unprocessed food items such as garden produce. Information characterizing agent desorption from, and detection on or in, contaminated porous media are presently too developed to permit reasonable estimation of dermal exposure from this source. Thus, dermal contact with potentially contaminated porous surfaces is not considered in this document.

Watson, A.P.; Adams, J.D.; Cerar, R.J.; Hess, T.L.; Kistner, S.L.; Leffingwell, S.S.; MacIntosh, R.G.; Ward, J.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Climate Change and Water Resources in California: The Cost of Conservation versus Supply Augmentation for the East Bay Municipal Utility District  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009-2040: aggressive water conservation and the enlargementrationing, recycled water, conservation, and supplementalwhile meetings its costs. Water conservation versus supply

Mourad, Bessma

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Water Rx - The Problem of Pharmaceuticals in Our Nation's Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IN OUR NATION'S WATERS intake via drinking water wastherapeutic dose and intake via drinking water was 150,000

Leitman, Melanie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Current and Long-Term Effects of Delta Water Quality on Drinking Water Treatment Costs from Disinfection Byproduct Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

current Delta water Plant and Intake Location System Size (future water quality conditions at different Delta intakesusing the intake with the better water quality between Old

Chen, Wei-Hsiang; Haunschild, Kristine; Lund, Jay R.; Fleenor, William E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Occurrence and Potential Human-Health Relevance of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water from Domestic Wells in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Laboratory Reporting Level MCL, Maximum Contaminant Level MRL, Maximum Reporting Level MTBE, Methyl tert Figures 3 #12;Abstract BACKGROUND: As the population and demand for safe drinking water from domestic concentrations to U.S. EPA Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) and Health-Based Screening Levels. RESULTS: VOCs

118

A study of the factors affecting the sustainability of community managed rural water supply schemes in Sri Lanka  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disparities in water supply coverage in urban and rural areas are high in developing countries, with rural coverage being much lower. The inability of governments to provide the service because of resource constraints, and ...

Amerasinghe, Nishanthi Manjula

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Meeting the Need for Safe Drinking Water in Rural Mexico through Point-of-Use Treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are boiling and adding chlorine in the form of tablets orto water quality problems. Chlorine pills and bleach requireassociated with boiling, chlorine tablets, and bleach. Two

Lang, Micah; Kaser, Forrest; Reygadas, Fermin; Nelson, Kara; Kammen, Daniel M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Climate change and water supply, management and use: A literature review  

SciTech Connect

There is evidence that atmospheric concentrations Of C0{sub 2}, tropospheric 0{sub 3}, and CH{sub 4}, among other gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect, have increased in recent decades, and that these changes may induce changes in global air temperatures and regional climate features in coming years. A literature review was conducted to sample the literature base on which our understanding of the water resource impacts of climate change rests. Water resource issues likely to be important include hydrologic response to climate change, the resilience of water supply systems to changing climatic and hydrologic conditions, and the effects of climate change on water quality and water uses (such as navigation and energy generation). A computer-assisted search of literature on the effects of climate change on these subjects was conducted. All studies were classified by type of paper (e.g., review, discussion, case study), region, water resource variable studied, and source of climate scenario. The resulting bibliography containing more than 200 references was largely annotated. Case studies of potential hydrologic impacts have been more common than studies of impacts on water management or water use, but this apparent research gap is decreasing. Case studies demonstrating methods of incorporating potential risks of climate change into water project planning and management have been performed. Considerable variability in regional coverage exists; the Great Lakes basin and California receive relatively more attention than such regions as New England and the Missouri River basin. General circulation model-based and hypothetical climate scenarios have been the dominant sources of climate scenarios used in case studies, although a variety of other methods for developing climate scenarios have been developed.

Chang, L.H.; Draves, J.D.; Hunsaker, C.T.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph Bottled Water: United States Consumers and Their Perceptions of Water Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Consumption of bottled water is increasing worldwide. Prior research shows many consumers believe bottled water is convenient and has better taste than tap water, despite reports of a number of water quality incidents with bottled water. The authors explore the demographic and social factors associated with bottled water users in the U.S. and the relationship between bottled water use and perceptions of the quality of local water supply. They find that U.S. consumers are more likely to report bottled water as their primary drinking water source when they perceive that drinking water is not safe. Furthermore, those who give lower ratings to the quality of their ground water are more likely to regularly purchase bottle water for drinking and use bottle water as their primary drinking water source.

Zhihua Hu; Lois Wright Morton; Robert L. Mahler

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

The effects of sulfate fertilization and high levels of sulfate and salt drinking water on the growth and mineral status of ruminants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three experiments were conducted to determine the effects of sulfate (SO?²?) in forage and drinking water on the performance and mineral status of cattle and sheep. In Experiment 1, forty-eight late gestation crossbred cows were grazed on twelve 10-acre oat pastures for 112 days (Jan 6 to Apr 28) to determine the effects of oat forage fertilized with ammonium sulfate ((NH?)?SO?) on serum Ca, Mg and P status of cows. Pastures were assigned to either an (NH?)?SO? (400 kg/ha) or ammonium nitrate (NH?NO?, 247 kg\\ha) fertilizer treatment. The forage sulfur (S) concentrations were higher (P water on the performance and mineral status of growing cattle. Twelve crossbred growing cattle were grazed on twelve 1.4-hectare native pastures for 56 d (from Jun 16 to Aug 11). The cattle were given a single source of water: tap water (n=4), SO?²? water (1139 mg SO?²?/L, n=4) and SO?²?/NaCl water (1546mg SO?²?/L and 3489 mg Na/L, n=4). The average daily gain (ADG) of cattle provided with tap water and SO?²? water was greater than that of cattle drinking SO?²?/NaCl water (Pwater sources (P>.05). There was no difference in serum Ca, P, Mg, K and Cu of the cattle due to source of water (P> .05). ne water intake of cattle with different treatments was associated with climatic factors differently. In Experiment 3, nine growing wethers were randomly assigned to an individual pen in the metallic laboratory to determine mineral balance in sheep provided with tap water, SO?²? watwe or SO?²?/NaCl water. The periods of the feeding and metabolic trial were 28 d and 12 d, respectively. There were no significant differences for ADG and feed efficiency of animals provided the treatments (P>.05). There was no difference for serum Na, Ca, P, Mg and Zn in sheep among the treatments (P> .05). But serum Cu of the sheep drinking tap water was Feater than that of the sheep drinking SO?²?/NaCl water (Pwater and SO?²?/NaCl water did not affect the OM intake, digestibility of OM and NDF, and ADG of sheep during the trial (P>.05).

Xie, Kehe

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Sustainable water supply: rainwater harvesting for multistoried residential apartments in dhaka, bangladesh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rainwater harvesting is a familiar term for Bangladesh. People in areas that lack drinking water, particularly the coastal areas and the rural areas in the country, practice rain water harvesting. The high annual rainfall in the country makes rainwater harvesting a logical solution for the arsenic contamination of ground water in Bangladesh (Rahman et al. 2003). Also, the increasing population in the urban as well as rural areas is putting increased load on underground aquifers which is evident in the fact that the piezometric level in Dhaka has decreased by more than 65 feet in the last decade. The annual rain fall that the city receives may be an effective answer to the recharge of aquifers. Rain water harvesting during the rainy season can reduce the increasing load on groundwater levels. This study aims to provide some guidelines for economic rainwater harvesting system, especially for urban areas for specific user groups. These guidelines were formulated through literature review, analysis of some case studies on rainwater harvesting, and, to a certain extent, practical experience of the researcher. Data from secondary sources have also been used for the purpose. The guidelines have been formulated using existing data on rainwater harvesting systems. Based on these guidelines, a mathematical model has been developed to figure out cistern sizes for collection of rainwater. The solution is applied to a typical plan of an apartment house in Dhaka (multistoried) using programming and visualization so as to demonstrate the scope and benefit of integration of rain water harvesting technique with the architectural design. The harvested rainwater definitely does not meet the basic domestic requirement, but supplements it during the rainy season which, most importantly, is usable for individual household use. Large-scale rainwater harvesting also, hopefully, results in a decrease of seasonal flooding in the urban areas. The products of this research are a) a computer program for sizing cisterns and b) an animation of the proposed rainwater harvesting system that may be used as a tool to demonstrate the benefits of the technique.

Sultana, Farzana

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Using Snow Fences to Augument Fresh Water Supplies in Shallow Arctic Lakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to address environmental research questions specifically related to Alaska?s oil and gas natural resources development. The focus of this project was on the environmental issues associated with allocation of water resources for construction of ice roads and ice pads. Earlier NETL projects showed that oil and gas exploration activities in the U.S. Arctic require large amounts of water for ice road and ice pad construction. Traditionally, lakes have been the source of freshwater for this purpose. The distinctive hydrological regime of northern lakes, caused by the presence of ice cover and permafrost, exerts influence on lake water availability in winter. Lakes are covered with ice from October to June, and there is often no water recharge of lakes until snowmelt in early June. After snowmelt, water volumes in the lakes decrease throughout the summer, when water loss due to evaporation is considerably greater than water gained from rainfall. This balance switches in August, when air temperature drops, evaporation decreases, and rain (or snow) is more likely to occur. Some of the summer surface storage deficit in the active layer and surface water bodies (lakes, ponds, wetlands) is recharged during this time. However, if the surface storage deficit is not replenished (for example, precipitation in the fall is low and near?surface soils are dry), lake recharge is directly affected, and water availability for the following winter is reduced. In this study, we used snow fences to augment fresh water supplies in shallow arctic lakes despite unfavorable natural conditions. We implemented snow?control practices to enhance snowdrift accumulation (greater snow water equivalent), which led to increased meltwater production and an extended melting season that resulted in lake recharge despite low precipitation during the years of the experiment. For three years (2009, 2010, and 2011), we selected and monitored two lakes with similar hydrological regimes. Both lakes are located 30 miles south of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, near Franklin Bluffs. One is an experimental lake, where we installed a snow fence; the other is a control lake, where the natural regime was preserved. The general approach was to compare the hydrologic response of the lake to the snowdrift during the summers of 2010 and 2011 against the ?baseline? conditions in 2009. Highlights of the project included new data on snow transport rates on the Alaska North Slope, an evaluation of the experimental lake?s hydrological response to snowdrift melt, and cost assessment of snowdrift?generated water. High snow transport rates (0.49 kg/s/m) ensured that the snowdrift reached its equilibrium profile by winter's end. Generally, natural snowpack disappeared by the beginning of June in this area. In contrast, snow in the drift lasted through early July, supplying the experimental lake with snowmelt when water in other tundra lakes was decreasing. The experimental lake retained elevated water levels during the entire open?water season. Comparison of lake water volumes during the experiment against the baseline year showed that, by the end of summer, the drift generated by the snow fence had increased lake water volume by at least 21?29%. We estimated water cost at 1.9 cents per gallon during the first year and 0.8 cents per gallon during the second year. This estimate depends on the cost of snow fence construction in remote arctic locations, which we assumed to be at $7.66 per square foot of snow fence frontal area. The snow fence technique was effective in augmenting the supply of lake water during summers 2010 and 2011 despite low rainfall during both summers. Snow fences are a simple, yet an effective, way to replenish tundra lakes with freshwater and increase water availability in winter. This research project was synergetic with the NETL project, "North Slope Decision Support System (NSDSS) for Water Resources Planning and Management." The results

Stuefer, Svetlana

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

Using Snow Fences to Augument Fresh Water Supplies in Shallow Arctic Lakes  

SciTech Connect

This project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to address environmental research questions specifically related to Alaska?s oil and gas natural resources development. The focus of this project was on the environmental issues associated with allocation of water resources for construction of ice roads and ice pads. Earlier NETL projects showed that oil and gas exploration activities in the U.S. Arctic require large amounts of water for ice road and ice pad construction. Traditionally, lakes have been the source of freshwater for this purpose. The distinctive hydrological regime of northern lakes, caused by the presence of ice cover and permafrost, exerts influence on lake water availability in winter. Lakes are covered with ice from October to June, and there is often no water recharge of lakes until snowmelt in early June. After snowmelt, water volumes in the lakes decrease throughout the summer, when water loss due to evaporation is considerably greater than water gained from rainfall. This balance switches in August, when air temperature drops, evaporation decreases, and rain (or snow) is more likely to occur. Some of the summer surface storage deficit in the active layer and surface water bodies (lakes, ponds, wetlands) is recharged during this time. However, if the surface storage deficit is not replenished (for example, precipitation in the fall is low and near?surface soils are dry), lake recharge is directly affected, and water availability for the following winter is reduced. In this study, we used snow fences to augment fresh water supplies in shallow arctic lakes despite unfavorable natural conditions. We implemented snow?control practices to enhance snowdrift accumulation (greater snow water equivalent), which led to increased meltwater production and an extended melting season that resulted in lake recharge despite low precipitation during the years of the experiment. For three years (2009, 2010, and 2011), we selected and monitored two lakes with similar hydrological regimes. Both lakes are located 30 miles south of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, near Franklin Bluffs. One is an experimental lake, where we installed a snow fence; the other is a control lake, where the natural regime was preserved. The general approach was to compare the hydrologic response of the lake to the snowdrift during the summers of 2010 and 2011 against the ?baseline? conditions in 2009. Highlights of the project included new data on snow transport rates on the Alaska North Slope, an evaluation of the experimental lake?s hydrological response to snowdrift melt, and cost assessment of snowdrift?generated water. High snow transport rates (0.49 kg/s/m) ensured that the snowdrift reached its equilibrium profile by winter's end. Generally, natural snowpack disappeared by the beginning of June in this area. In contrast, snow in the drift lasted through early July, supplying the experimental lake with snowmelt when water in other tundra lakes was decreasing. The experimental lake retained elevated water levels during the entire open?water season. Comparison of lake water volumes during the experiment against the baseline year showed that, by the end of summer, the drift generated by the snow fence had increased lake water volume by at least 21?29%. We estimated water cost at 1.9 cents per gallon during the first year and 0.8 cents per gallon during the second year. This estimate depends on the cost of snow fence construction in remote arctic locations, which we assumed to be at $7.66 per square foot of snow fence frontal area. The snow fence technique was effective in augmenting the supply of lake water during summers 2010 and 2011 despite low rainfall during both summers. Snow fences are a simple, yet an effective, way to replenish tundra lakes with freshwater and increase water availability in winter. This research project was synergetic with the NETL project, "North Slope Decision Support System (NSDSS) for Water Resources Planning and Management." The results

Stuefer, Svetlana

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

FACTORS AFFECTING THE SUSTAINABILITY OF RURAL WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS: THE CASE OF MECHA WOREDA, AMHARA REGION, ETHIOPIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in their system. Consideration of the above mentioned factors may help in decreasing the failure rate of newly....................................................33 #12;ix LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS ADF Africa Development Fund BWR Basic Water Requirement CSA Central if they fail after a short time. In order to make the investment in water supplies more effective, failure

127

The Development of Simulation Model for D2O Supply System in Heavy Water Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main purpose of this research is improvement of performance in control system for heavy water supply system of nuclear fuel change machine. Before started design of control system, the model of target system is needed because it is hard to test and ... Keywords: simulation, nuclear, heavy-water, D2O, MATLAB

Sung-Won Choi; Seong-Geun Kwak; Ji-Hyoung Ryu; Kil-To Chong; Chang-Goo Lee

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe laboratory and field results of a novel arsenic removal adsorbent called 'Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash' (ARUBA). ARUBA is prepared by coating particles of coal bottom ash, a waste material from coal fired power plants, with iron (hydr)oxide. The coating process is simple and conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Material costs for ARUBA are estimated to be low (~;;$0.08 per kg) and arsenic remediation with ARUBA has the potential to be affordable to resource-constrained communities. ARUBA is used for removing arsenic via a dispersal-and-removal process, and we envision that ARUBA would be used in community-scale water treatment centers. We show that ARUBA is able to reduce arsenic concentrations in contaminated Bangladesh groundwater to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. Using the Langmuir isotherm (R2 = 0.77) ARUBA's adsorption capacity in treating real groundwater is 2.6x10-6 mol/g (0.20 mg/g). Time-to-90percent (defined as the time interval for ARUBA to remove 90percent of the total amount of arsenic that is removed at equilibrium) is less than one hour. Reaction rates (pseudo-second-order kinetic model, R2>_ 0.99) increase from 2.4x105 to 7.2x105 g mol-1 min-1 as the groundwater arsenic concentration decreases from 560 to 170 ppb. We show that ARUBA's arsenic adsorption density (AAD), defined as the milligrams of arsenic removed at equilibrium per gram of ARUBA added, is linearly dependent on the initial arsenic concentration of the groundwater sample, for initial arsenic concentrations of up to 1600 ppb and an ARUBA dose of 4.0 g/L. This makes it easy to determine the amount of ARUBA required to treat a groundwater source when its arsenic concentration is known and less than 1600 ppb. Storing contaminated groundwater for two to three days before treatment is seen to significantly increase ARUBA's AAD. ARUBA can be separated from treated water by coagulation and clarification, which is expected to be less expensive than filtration of micron-scale particles, further contributing to the affordability of a community-scale water treatment center.

MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.; GADGIL, ASHOK J.; ADDY, SUSAN E.A.; KOWOLIK, KRISTIN

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Summary of resources available to small water systems for meeting the 10 ppb arsenic drinking water limit.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the lowering of the EPA maximum contaminant level of arsenic from 50 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 ppb, many public water systems in the country and in New Mexico in particular, are faced with making decisions about how to bring their system into compliance. This document provides detail on the options available to the water systems and the steps they need to take to achieve compliance with this regulation. Additionally, this document provides extensive resources and reference information for additional outreach support, financing options, vendors for treatment systems, and media pilot project results.

Krumhansl, James Lee; Thomson, Bruce M. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Ziegler, Matt (New Mexico Tech, Albuquerque, NM); Butler, Susan (New Mexico Tech, Albuquerque, NM); Himmelberger, Heather (New Mexico Tech, Albuquerque, NM); Holt, Kathleen Caroline

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Water and Sustainability (Volume 2): An Assessment of Water Demand, Supply, and Quality in the U.S. -- The Next Half Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fast growing demand for clean, fresh water -- coupled with the need to protect and enhance the environment -- has made many areas of the United States and the rest of the world vulnerable to water shortages for various human uses. As they interact with the electricity industry, these uses encompass agricultural irrigation, thermoelectric generation, municipal water/wastewater treatment and distribution, and industrial processes. The dependency of electricity supply and demand on water availability ca...

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

An evaluation of household drinking water treatment systems in Peru : the table filter and the safe water system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) storage, and education. Tests on the SWSs in Peru demonstrated 99.6% E.coli removal and 95% total coliform removal. Only 30% of the SWSs tested contained water at or above the WHO-recommended concentration of free ...

Coulbert, Brittany, 1981-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Improved performance of PSO with self-adaptive parameters for computing the optimal design of Water Supply Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with a new variant of Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) in which no a priori parameter tuning is necessary. PSO, as an efficient and powerful problem-solving technique, has been widely used, but, as in other Evolutionary Algorithms (EA), ... Keywords: Evolutionary Algorithm, Optimal design, Particle Swarm Optimization, Self-adaptive parameters, Water Supply System

Idel Montalvo; Joaquín Izquierdo; Rafael Pérez-García; Manuel Herrera

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

News Release: DOE Announces Riverton Water Sampling Results | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announces Riverton Water Sampling Results Announces Riverton Water Sampling Results News Release: DOE Announces Riverton Water Sampling Results May 11, 2012 - 3:25pm Addthis News Contact: Contractor, Judy Miller, S.M. Stoller Corporation Public Affairs (970) 248-6363 jmiller@lm.doe.gov Laboratory results indicate water from the alternative water supply system is safe for residents to drink The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that residential drinking water testing from an alternative water supply system in Riverton, Wyoming, confirmed the water is safe. Results from ater samples collected on May 3, 2012, show that uranium levels at 0.0001 milligrams per liter, well below the drinking water standard set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. "We take the issue of potential water contamination very seriously and

134

Conserving Our Finite Water Supplies in an Era of Chronic Drought  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Handbook of water use and conservation: Homes, Landscapes,Handbook of Water Use and Conservation: Homes, Landscapes,are now over 100 water conservation "hardware" (fixture,

Vickers, Amy

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Vendors of Supplies and Equipment Used in ReceivingWater Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

low-cost GPS units, other navigation aids, waders, and other general outdoor equipment@aol.com, Internet: holidayjunction.com/aro/ · Aquaculture Supply (culture foods and equipment, airstones, Spirulina

Pitt, Robert E.

136

Colorado river basin and climatic change. The sensitivity of streamflow and water supply to variations in temperature and precipitation  

SciTech Connect

Growing international concern about the greenhouse effect has led to increased interest in the regional implications of changes in temperature and precipitation patterns for a wide range of societal and natural systems, including agriculture, sea level, biodiversity, and water resources. The accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere due to human activities are likely to have significant, though still poorly understood, impacts on water quality and availability. One method developed over the last several years for determining how regional water resources might be affected by climatic change is to develop scenarios of changes in temperature and precipitation and to use hydrologic simulation models to study the impacts of these scenarios on runoff and water supply. In the paper the authors present the results of a multi-year study of the sensitivity of the hydrology and water resources systems in the Colorado River Basin to plausible climatic changes.

Nash, L.L.; Gleick, P.H.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Estimated general population control limits for unitary agents in drinking water, milk, soil, and unprocessed food items. For use in reentry decision-making  

SciTech Connect

In the event of an unplanned release of chemical agent during any stage of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), the potential exists for contamination of drinking water, forage crops, grains, garden produce, and livestock. Persistent agents such as VX or sulfur mustard pose the greatest human health concern for reentry. This White Paper has been prepared to provide technical bases for these decisions by developing working estimates of agent control limits in selected environmental media considered principal sources of potential human exposure. To date, control limits for public exposure to unitary agents have been established for atmospheric concentrations only. The current analysis builds on previous work to calculate working estimates of control limits for ingestion and dermal exposure to potentially contaminated drinking water, milk, soil, and unprocessed food items such as garden produce. Information characterizing agent desorption from, and detection on or in, contaminated porous media are presently too developed to permit reasonable estimation of dermal exposure from this source. Thus, dermal contact with potentially contaminated porous surfaces is not considered in this document.

Watson, A.P.; Adams, J.D.; Cerar, R.J.; Hess, T.L.; Kistner, S.L.; Leffingwell, S.S.; MacIntosh, R.G.; Ward, J.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Evaluation of Natural Radioactivity in Subsurface Air, Water and Soil in Western Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surveys of radon concentrations in western Japan were carried out to estimate the contents not only of waters in the environment but also in soil gas. The maximum concentration measured for drinking water as public supply exceeded the 1991 United States Environmental Protection Agency?recommended limit for drinking water (11? Bq ? L ?1 ) but did not exceed that of several European countries (100? Bq ? L ?1 ). Overall

Masami Fukui

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Water use and supply concerns for utility-scale solar projects in the Southwestern United States.  

SciTech Connect

As large utility-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities are currently being built and planned for locations in the U.S. with the greatest solar resource potential, an understanding of water use for construction and operations is needed as siting tends to target locations with low natural rainfall and where most existing freshwater is already appropriated. Using methods outlined by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine water used in designated solar energy zones (SEZs) for construction and operations&maintenance, an estimate of water used over the lifetime at the solar power plant is determined and applied to each watershed in six Southwestern states. Results indicate that that PV systems overall use little water, though construction usage is high compared to O&M water use over the lifetime of the facility. Also noted is a transition being made from wet cooled to dry cooled CSP facilities that will significantly reduce operational water use at these facilities. Using these water use factors, estimates of future water demand for current and planned solar development was made. In efforts to determine where water could be a limiting factor in solar energy development, water availability, cost, and projected future competing demands were mapped for the six Southwestern states. Ten watersheds, 9 in California, and one in New Mexico were identified as being of particular concern because of limited water availability.

Klise, Geoffrey Taylor; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Reno, Marissa Devan; Moreland, Barbara D.; Zemlick, Katie; Macknick, Jordan [National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, CO

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

New demands, new supplies : a national look at the water balance of carbon dioxide capture and sequestration.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns over rising concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have resulted in serious consideration of policies aimed at reduction of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. If large scale abatement efforts are undertaken, one critical tool will be geologic sequestration of CO2 captured from large point sources, specifically coal and natural gas fired power plants. Current CO2 capture technologies exact a substantial energy penalty on the source power plant, which must be offset with make-up power. Water demands increase at the source plant due to added cooling loads. In addition, new water demand is created by water requirements associated with generation of the make-up power. At the sequestration site however, saline water may be extracted to manage CO2 plum migration and pressure build up in the geologic formation. Thus, while CO2 capture creates new water demands, CO2 sequestration has the potential to create new supplies. Some or all of the added demand may be offset by treatment and use of the saline waters extracted from geologic formations during CO2 sequestration. Sandia National Laboratories, with guidance and support from the National Energy Technology Laboratory, is creating a model to evaluate the potential for a combined approach to saline formations, as a sink for CO2 and a source for saline waters that can be treated and beneficially reused to serve power plant water demands. This presentation will focus on the magnitude of added U.S. power plant water demand under different CO2 emissions reduction scenarios, and the portion of added demand that might be offset by saline waters extracted during the CO2 sequestration process.

Krumhansl, James Lee; McNemar, Andrea (National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Morgantown, WV); Kobos, Peter Holmes; Roach, Jesse Dillon; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Tri-State Synfuels Project Review: Volume 9A. Subcontract information. [Proposed Henderson, Kentucky coal to gasoline plant; water supply and civil engineering subcontracts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume 9A considers subcontract work done at the site involving hydrogeological studies with respect to water supply and geotechnical work with respect to the building foundations necessary based on boreholes drilled and the lithology of the area. (LTN)

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Partnering to Save Water  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partnering Partnering to Save Water Phill Consiglio Southern California Edison What We Are Going to Discuss * A Little Bit About Water * The Energy Cost of Water * Water Technologies * What We Have Done * Where We Are Going A Little Bit About Water *The Earth Has A Finite Supply Of Fresh Water. - Water Is Stored In Aquifers, Surface Waters And The Atmosphere - Sometimes Oceans Are Mistaken For Available Water, But The Amount Of Energy Needed To Convert Saline Water To Potable Water Is Prohibitive Today *This Has Created A Water Crisis Due To: - Inadequate Access To Safe Drinking Water For About 884 Million People - Inadequate Access To Water For Sanitation And Waste Disposal For 2.5 Billion People - Groundwater Overdrafting (Excessive Use) Leading To Diminished Agricultural Yields

143

The energy-efficiency benefits of pumps-scheduling optimization for potable water supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water utilities across the developed world have been installing and operating telemetry and SCADA (supervisory control and data acquisition) facilities for at least three decades. They have amassed substantial quantities of historical operational data ...

S. M. Bunn; L. Reynolds

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Development of Water Supply and Sanitation Facility in The Rural Areas of Nepal: An Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), Water Aid, Save the Children Fund United Kingdom (SCF-UK), Save the Children Fund United States of America (SCF-USA), Redd Barna, World Bank, Asian Development Bank, (RWSS- FUND) FUND Board and numbers of other Community Based Organizations (CBOs) have... of unsafe water, and its methods of prevention, transmission of diseases by fecal oral routes, its negative effects, and its prevention, and importance & urgency of construction, and use of latrine. Fifth day includes construction of latrine (practical...

Prasain, Jiba Nath

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Electricity Use and Management in the Municipal Water Supply and Wastewater Industries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of electricity for water and wastewater treatment is increasing due to demands for expanded service capacity and new regulations for upgraded treatment. Options available to control the electricity costs include technological changes, improved management, and participation in electric utility sponsored energy management programs. Appropriate options for a specific system will vary depending on the system characteristics, availability of electric utility programs to assist the water and ...

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

146

GIS representation and assessment of water distribution system for Mae La Temporary Shelter, Thailand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ArcGIS is used to analyze water access in Mae La, Thailand, home to 45,000 residents living as refugees in a temporary camp. Drinking water for the shelter is supplied at public tap stands while water for hygienic purposes ...

Harding, Mary Pierce

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Application of solar energy to the supply of industrial hot water. Technical report 4  

SciTech Connect

A solar water heating and steam generating system is being designed for a California laundry. Progress reported includes completion of the analysis of the existing process services, determination of collectable solar energy at El Centro, California, selection of water as the heat transfer fluid in the 200/sup 0/F system and further analyses of heat transfer fluids for the 300/sup 0/F system, meetings and discussions with respect to system controls and monitoring and the collector support structure, and a proposal for the waste heat recovery system. (LEW)

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Many-objective de Novo water supply portfolio planning under deep uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes and demonstrates a new interactive framework for sensitivity-informed de Novo planning to confront the deep uncertainty within water management problems. The framework couples global sensitivity analysis using Sobol' variance decomposition ... Keywords: Decision support, Many-objective decision analytics, Multiobjective evolutionary algorithms, Risk, Robust decision making, Sensitivity analysis, Uncertainty

Joseph R. Kasprzyk; Patrick M. Reed; Gregory W. Characklis; Brian R. Kirsch

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Assessing Consumer Values and the Supply-Chain Market for the Integrated Water Heater/Dehumidifier  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a case study of the potential market for the dual-service residential integrated water heater/dehumidifier (WHD). Its principal purpose is to evaluate the extent to which this integrated appliance might penetrate the residential market sector, given current market trends, producer and consumer attributes, and technical parameters. The report's secondary purpose is to gather background information leading to a generic framework for conducting market analyses of technologies. This framework can be used to assess market readiness as well as factor preferred product attributes into the design to drive consumer demand for this product. This study also supports analysis for prototype design. A full market analysis for potential commercialization should be conducted after prototype development. The integrated WHD is essentially a heat-pump water heater (HPWH) with components and controls that allow dedicated dehumidification. Adequate residential humidity control is a growing issue for newly constructed residential homes, which are insulated so well that mechanical ventilation may be necessary to meet fresh air requirements. Leveraging its successful experience with the energy-efficient design improvement for the residential HPWH, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Engineering Science and Technology Division's (ESTD's) Building Equipment Group designed a water-heating appliance that combines HPWH efficiency with dedicated dehumidification. This integrated appliance could be a low-cost solution for dehumidification and efficient electric water heating. ORNL is partnering with Western Carolina University, Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College, American Carolina Stamping Company, and Clemson University to develop this appliance and assess its market potential. For practical purposes, consumers are indifferent to how water is heated but are very interested in product attributes such as initial first cost, operating cost, performance, serviceability, product size, and installation costs. The principal drivers for penetrating markets are demonstrating reliability, leveraging the dehumidification attributes of the integrated WHD, and creating programs that embrace first-cost and life-cycle cost principles.

Ashdown, BG

2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

150

EPA Final Ground Water Rule  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Nuclear Safety and Environment Office of Nuclear Safety and Environment Nuclear Safety and Environment Information Brief HS-20-IB-2007-02 (March 2007) EPA Final Ground Water Rule Safe Drinking Water Act: National Primary Drinking Water Regulations Ground Water Rule - 40 CFR Parts 9, 141 and 142 Final Rule: 71 FR 65574 Effective Date: January 8, 2007 1 RULE SYNOPSIS On November 8, 2006, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a final Ground Water Rule (GWR) to promote increased protection against microbial pathogens that may be present in public water systems (PWSs) that use ground water sources for their supply (these systems are known as ground water systems). This Rule establishes a risk-targeted approach

151

Integration of supply and demand for water in central Illinois urban areas. Research report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water demand functions were estimated using two sets of data for Central Illinois -- community-wide data and household data. The community-wide data consist of total residential consumption for each of four pre-selected medium-sized cities in Central Illinois. The household data consist of residents from five cities who responded to a mail survey. The study investigates comparability of parameter estimates from the two approaches. If the parameter estimates are comparable, it would suggest water demand estimates need not require costly and time-consuming household surveys. Estimates of price elasticity are negative and less than unitary based on the two data sets used. The estimated price elasticity based on community-wide data is -.037, while using household data estimated price elasticities are in the range from -.14 to -.16. The reasons for these differences are not immediately apparent and warrant further investigation.

Miranda, C.S.; Braden, J.B.; Martin, W.E.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Application of solar energy to the supply of industrial hot water. Technical report 3  

SciTech Connect

A solar water heating and steam generating system is being developed for a California laundry. Progress reported includes accumulation of data on process usage and demands for the purpose of collector sizing, studies of insulation for piping and thermal storage tanks, investigation in the selection of the heat transfer fluid, and weather measurements. Further analyses on the supporting structure for the solar collector arrays are reported. A concept review meeting is discussed. (LEW)

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Economic viability of heat pump desuperheaters for supplying domestic hot water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The heat reclaimer is a heat exchange device that removes superheat from the refrigerant gas in a heat pump or central air conditioning unit and uses that extracted energy to heat water for domestic uses. This analysis examines the energy-saving potential and economic benefit of the heat reclaimer. Energy savings were calculated using a modified bin analytical technique. Economic viability was determined using the simple payback criterion. The analysis was performed for 28 cities in the United States to gain an understanding of the relationship between energy savings, economic viability, and climate. The results of the assessment indicate that the heat reclaimer has payback periods greater than seven years when compared with oil- or gas-fired water heating systems. Because of the long payback periods, the heat reclaimer does not appear to be economically feasible for these applications. However, when compared to electric-resistance water heating units, the heat reclaimer is economically viable, especially in areas where the air conditioning load is substantial or where the price of electricity is high.

Olszewski, M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Assessing Consumer Values and the Supply-Chain Market for the Integrated Water Heater/Dehumidifier  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a case study of the potential market for the dual-service residential integrated water heater/dehumidifier (WHD). Its principal purpose is to evaluate the extent to which this integrated appliance might penetrate the residential market sector, given current market trends, producer and consumer attributes, and technical parameters. The report's secondary purpose is to gather background information leading to a generic framework for conducting market analyses of technologies. This framework can be used to assess market readiness as well as factor preferred product attributes into the design to drive consumer demand for this product. This study also supports analysis for prototype design. A full market analysis for potential commercialization should be conducted after prototype development. The integrated WHD is essentially a heat-pump water heater (HPWH) with components and controls that allow dedicated dehumidification. Adequate residential humidity control is a growing issue for newly constructed residential homes, which are insulated so well that mechanical ventilation may be necessary to meet fresh air requirements. Leveraging its successful experience with the energy-efficient design improvement for the residential HPWH, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Engineering Science and Technology Division's (ESTD's) Building Equipment Group designed a water-heating appliance that combines HPWH efficiency with dedicated dehumidification. This integrated appliance could be a low-cost solution for dehumidification and efficient electric water heating. ORNL is partnering with Western Carolina University, Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College, American Carolina Stamping Company, and Clemson University to develop this appliance and assess its market potential. For practical purposes, consumers are indifferent to how water is heated but are very interested in product attributes such as initial first cost, operating cost, performance, serviceability, product size, and installation costs. The principal drivers for penetrating markets are demonstrating reliability, leveraging the dehumidification attributes of the integrated WHD, and creating programs that embrace first-cost and life-cycle cost principles.

Ashdown, BG

2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

155

Mass transfer of volatile organic compounds from drinking water to indoor air: The role of residential dishwashers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contaminated tap water may be a source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in residential indoor air. To better understand the extent and impact of chemical emissions from this source, a two-phase mass balance model was developed based on mass transfer kinetics between each phase. Twenty-nine experiments were completed using a residential dishwasher to determine model parameters. During each experiment, inflow water was spiked with a cocktail of chemical tracers with a wide range of physicochemical properties. In each case, the effects of water temperature, detergent, and dish-loading pattern on chemical stripping efficiencies and mass transfer coefficients were determined. Dishwasher headspace ventilation rates were also measured using an isobutylene tracer gas. Chemical stripping efficiencies for a single cycle ranged from 18% to 55% for acetone, from 96% to 98% for toluene, and from 97% to 98% for ethylbenzene and were consistently 100% for cyclohexane. Experimental results indicate that dishwashers have a relatively low but continuous ventilation rate that results in significant chemical storage within the headspace of the dishwasher. In conjunction with relatively high mass transfer coefficients, low ventilation rates generally lead to emissions that are limited by equilibrium conditions after approximately 1--2 min of dishwasher operation.

Howard-Reed, C.; Corsi, R.L. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Moya, J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Annual fuel usage charts for oil-fired boilers. [Building space heating and hot water supplies  

SciTech Connect

On the basis of laboratory-determined boiler efficiency data, one may calculate the annual fuel usage (AFU) for any oil-fired boiler, serving a structure of a given design heat load, for any specified hourly weather pattern. Further, where data are available regarding the energy recapture rates of the strucutre due to direct gain solar energy (windows), lighting, cooking, electrical appliances, metabolic processes, etc., the annual fuel usage savings due to such (re) capture are straightforwardly determinable. Employing the Brookhaven National Laboratory annual fuel usage formulation, along with efficiency data determined in the BNL Boiler Laboratory, computer-drawn annual fuel usage charts can be generated for any selected boiler for a wide range of operating conditions. For two selected boilers operating in any one of the hour-by-hour weather patterns which characterize each of six cities over a wide range of firing rates, domestic hot water consumption rates, design heat loads, and energy (re) capture rates, annual fuel usages are determined and graphically presented. Figures 1 to 98, inclusive, relate to installations for which energy recapture rates are taken to be zero. Figures 97 to 130, inclusive, apply to a range of cases for which energy recapture rates are nonzero and determinable. In all cases, simple, direct and reliable annual fuel usage values can be determined by use of charts and methods such as those illustrated.

Berlad, A.L.; Yeh, Y.J.; Salzano, F.J.; Hoppe, R.J.; Batey, J.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Application of solar energy to the supply of industrial process hot water. Aerotherm final report, 77-235. [Can washing in Campbell Soup plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the Solar Industrial Process Hot Water Program are to design, test, and evaluate the application of solar energy to the generation and supply of industrial process hot water, and to provide an assessment of the economic and resource benefits to be gained. Other objectives are to stimulate and give impetus to the use of solar energy for supplying significant amounts of industrial process heat requirements. The plant selected for the design of a solar industrial process hot water system was the Campbell Soup facility in Sacramento, California. The total hot water demand for this plant varies between 500 and 800 gpm during regular production shifts, and hits a peak of over 1,000 gpm for approximately one hour during the cleanup shift. Most of the hot water is heated in the boiler room by a combination of waste heat recovery and low pressure (5 psi) steam-water heat exchangers. The hot water emerges from the boiler room at a temperature between 160/sup 0/F and 180/sup 0/F and is transported to the various process areas. Booster heaters in the process areas then use low pressure (5 psi) or medium pressure (20 psi) steam to raise the temperature of the water to the level required for each process. Hot water is used in several processes at the Campbell Soup plant, but the can washing process was selected to demonstrate the feasibility of a solar hot water system. A detailed design and economic analysis of the system is given. (WHK)

None

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Lab Supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

reference materials, bleaching clay, activated bleaching earth and refining cups. Lab Supplies Lab Supplies Lab Supplies Laboratory Services analysis analytical methods aocs certified Certified Reference Materials (CRM) chemist chemists fats lab

159

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utilities use more electricity for distribution (48 millionthe most electricity for distribution. For the utilitiesUse Treatment electricity cost Distribution electricity use

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPA’s Teaming Up to Save Energy (U.S. EPA, 2005), which isStates Department of Energy (U.S. DOE), Energy Efficiencyinstalled: $25,000 US Reduced energy use by 10%, equal to

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Policy Opportunities, 2 nd ed. American Council for an Energy-American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE). Energy-Efficient Motor Systems: A Handbook on Technology, Program, and Policy

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guide described below. ? FEMP Designated Product: Industriallumen.html. ? FEMP Designated Product: Compact Fluorescentfluor_lamp.html. ? FEMP Designated Product: Fluorescent

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

accessed August 31, 2010. ) U.S. DOE Energy Efficiency &Renewable Energy (EERE), Office of Industrial Technologies.2010. ) Alliance to Save Energy, 2002, pp. 96-97. Available

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), Office of IndustrialSeptember 4, 2010. ) U.S. DOE EERE. Industrial Technologies25, 2011. ) U.S. DOE EERE. 2002. United States Industrial

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy usage and energy cost over time using net presentlower energy costs substantially. (5) Real-Time Monitoring:costs: demand = $10 per kW per month (all 12 months of the year); energy consumption = 7 per kWh (all times

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009. Handbook of Energy Audits, Eighth Edition. Associationbent is the Handbook of Energy Audits, Eighth Edition. 2009.Investment Grade Energy Audit. Available at bookstores or:

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Harding, P. Effective Energy Management Guide. 2000; revisedOID=2621. Effective Energy Management Guide. 2000, 2010. P.of 1.3 years. Sources: Energy Efficiency Guide for Colorado

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10   Energy Management Systems andiii Appendix D: Assessing Energy Management Systems for Bestof each system. ? Energy management systems and programs (

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appendix E: Energy Management Assessment Matrix This tool isstarted? Energy Management Assessment Matrix GuidelinesEnergy Management Assessment Matrix ..

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

training and tools for efficiency programs and resource management;management program, but its duties also can include delivering training,management program for buildings. The document discusses management (goals, planning, energy accounting); teamwork (staffing, training,

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Application of solar energy to the supply of industrial hot water. Volume 1. Final design report. [For American Linen Supply laundry in El Centro, California  

SciTech Connect

The conceptual design of a solar system for integration into the process hot water and steam services for the laundry facility, American Linen Sypply, located in El Centro, California is presented. A tracking parabolic collector array and thermal storage tanks will be used. Process analysis, instrumentation for control and data analysis, construction, maintenance and safety, energy reduction analysis, and economic analysis are described. A waste heat reclamation system is included in the design. (WHK)

1977-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

172

Power Supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Figure: ...Fig. 5 Typical medium-frequency induction power supply incorporating (a) a parallel inverter and (b) a series inverter...

173

A Systems-Integration Approach to the Optimal Design and Operation of Macroscopic Water Desalination and Supply Networks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With the escalating levels of water demand, there is a need for expansion in the capacity of water desalination infrastructure and for better management and… (more)

Atilhan, Selma

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydro. International Hydro Power and Dam Construction.suggested) Supply of hydro-electric power * Supply of waterrights ? Supply of hydro-electric power ? Supply of water

Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Smoking, Drinking, and Income  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A growing literature identifies a beneficial effect of moderate and even heavy drinking on wages and a negative effect of smoking on wages. An outstanding issue is whether these results obtain because of a causal effect of substance use on wages or whether the observed correlations reflect the effects of income on consumption or other endogeneity problems. This paper presents full information estimates of the structural parameters of a simultaneous model of drinking and smoking status and income using repeated cross--section data. With all else in the system held constant, both smoking and drinking behaviour still have large effects on income, and the income elasticities of smoking and drinking are shown to be larger in magnitude when controlling for endogeneity. JEL Classification: I12 Keywords: alcohol, tobacco, simultaneous equations, maximum simulated likelihood, multinomial probit, limited dependent variables 1 I thank Cam Donaldson, Herb Emery, David Feeny, Chris Ferrall, Jon ...

Mingshan Lu; James Mackinnon; Ken Mckenzie; Harry Paarsche; Seminar Participants; M. Christopher Auld; M. Christopher Auld

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Supply Implications  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Supply Implications. European export gasoline volumes likely to remain unchanged Uncertainties are weighted towards less availability But the quality of the available ...

177

Heat-pump desuperheaters for supplying domestic hot water - estimation of energy savings and economic viability for residential applications  

SciTech Connect

The heat reclaimer is a double-wall heat exchange system that removes superheat from the heat pump (or central air conditioning) cycle and uses it to heat water for domestic uses. During summer operation, this heat would normally be rejected to the atmosphere without being used. Thus, water heating is accomplished using essentially no primary fuel. In winter, the heat extracted from the cycle would have been used for space heating. However, energy savings are possible above the heat pump balance point because water heating is performed at an enhanced efficiency. Potential energy savings and economic viability of the heat reclaimer were determined for 28 sites throughout the United States. These results indicate that the heat reclaimer is not economically attractive compared with gas- or oil-fired water heating systems. However, it is competitive with electric resistance water heaters. Based on these results, a calculational scheme has been developed that could be integrated into the model audit procedure.

Olszewski, M.; Fontana, E.C.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

NETL: Oil and Natural Gas Supply  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Oil and Natural Gas Supply Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater Additional Information Onsite operations and water quality testing of the...

179

Application of solar energy to the supply of hot water for textile dyeing. Final report, CDRL/PA 10  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design plan for a solar process hot water system for a textile dye beck at Riegel Textile Corporation's LaFrance, South Carolina, facilities is presented. The solar system consists of 396 GE model TC 100 evacuated tube collector modules arranged in a ground mounted array with a total collector area of 6680 square feet. The system includes an 8000-gallon hot water storage tank. Systems analyses, specification sheets, performance data, and an economic evaluation of the proposed system are presented. (WHK)

None

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION Leadership Team Subcommittee: Joan Bradshaw Michael Dukes Pierce Jones Kati Migliaccio #12;Water Conservation - Situation · Florida water supplies;Water Conservation Initiative 2: Enhancing and protecting water quality, quantity, and supply Priority 1

Slatton, Clint

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Ultraviolet Water Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

UV Ray of Hope for Safer Drinking Water. ... It is not, however, too soon for the American Water Works Association to express its appreciation. ...

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

182

Effects of Age on Pavlovian Autoshaping of Ethanol Drinking in Non-Deprived Rats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wa- ter drinking and g/kg water intake were assessed using1. Mean daily g/kg water intake from the sipper CS duringsame sessions g/kg fluid intake in the Water groups did not

Tomie, Arthur; Mohamed, Walaa M.; Pohorecky, Larissa A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix F: Irrigation, Municipal and Industrial/Water Supply.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since the 1930`s, the Columbia River has been harnessed for the benefit of the Northwest and the nation. Federal agencies have built 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries. Dozens of non-Federal projects have been developed as well. The dams provide flood control, irrigation, navigation, hydro-electric power generation, recreation, fish and wildlife, and streamflows for wildlife, anadromous fish, resident fish, and water quality. This is Appendix F of the Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System, focusing on irrigation issues and concerns arrising from the Irrigation and Mitigation of impacts (M&I) working Group of the SOR process. Major subheadings include the following: Scope and process of irrigation/M&I studies; Irrigation/M&I in the Columbia Basin Today including overview, irrigated acreage and water rights, Irrigation and M&I issues basin-wide and at specific locations; and the analysis of impacts and alternative for the Environmental Impact Statement.

Columbia River System Operations Review (U.S.); United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. North Pacific Division; United States. Bureau of Reclamation. Pacific Northwest Region.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Power supply  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A modular, low weight impedance dropping power supply with battery backup is disclosed that can be connected to a high voltage AC source and provide electrical power at a lower voltage. The design can be scaled over a wide range of input voltages and over a wide range of output voltages and delivered power.

Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul (Seminole, FL); Hamilton, Pamela Jane (Seminole, FL); Brubaker, Michael Allen (Loveland, CO)

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

185

Cooling Water Issues and Opportunities at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling Water Issues and Opportunities at U.S. Nuclear Power Cooling Water Issues and Opportunities at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants, December 2010 Cooling Water Issues and Opportunities at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants, December 2010 Energy and water are both essential to sustainable development and economic productivity. Ample supplies of water are essential to energy production, and water management is dependent on ample supplies of energy for water treatment and transportation. The critical nexus between energy and water has been recognized in a variety of recent studies, but the policy and regulatory machinery that this nexus depends on is not keeping up with the growing challenges. Population growth and societal demand for improved quality of life will require more clean water for drinking and sanitation, more water for

186

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford Facilities: Progress report for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989 - Volume 1 - Text  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is Volume 1 of a two-volume document that describes the progress of 14 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989. This volume discusses the projects; Volume 2 provides as-built diagrams, completion/inspection reports, drilling logs, and geophysical logs for wells drilled, completed, or logged during this period. Volume 2 can be found on microfiche in the back pocket of Volume 1. The work described in this document is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the management of Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Concentrations of ground-water constituents are compared to federal drinking water standards throughout this document for reference purposes. All drinking water supplied from the sampled aquifer meets regulatory standards for drinking water quality.

Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Comparison of EC-Kit with Quanti-Tray[tm] : testing, verification, and drinking water quality mapping in Capiz Province, Philippines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis accomplishes three tasks. First, it verifies the EC-Kit under different water source conditions by comparing it to a laboratory standard method, the IDEXX Quanti-Tray[tm]. The EC-Kit is a simple, inexpensive ...

Chuang, Patty

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Power supply  

SciTech Connect

An electric power supply employs a striking means to initiate ferroelectric elements which provide electrical energy output which subsequently initiates an explosive charge which initiates a second ferroelectric current generator to deliver current to the coil of a magnetic field current generator, creating a magnetic field around the coil. Continued detonation effects compression of the magnetic field and subsequent generation and delivery of a large output current to appropriate output loads.

Hart, Edward J. (Albuquerque, NM); Leeman, James E. (Albuquerque, NM); MacDougall, Hugh R. (Albuquerque, NM); Marron, John J. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Calvin C. (Amarillo, TX)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Development of colorimetric solid Phase Extraction (C-SPE) for in-flight Monitoring of spacecraft Water Supplies  

SciTech Connect

Although having recently been extremely successful gathering data on the surface of Mars, robotic missions are not an effective substitute for the insight and knowledge about our solar system that can be gained though first-hand exploration. Earlier this year, President Bush presented a ''new course'' for the U.S. space program that shifts NASA's focus to the development of new manned space vehicles to the return of humans to the moon. Re-establishing the human presence on the moon will eventually lead to humans permanently living and working in space and also serve as a possible launch point for missions into deeper space. There are several obstacles to the realization of these goals, most notably the lack of life support and environmental regeneration and monitoring hardware capable of functioning on long duration spaceflight. In the case of the latter, past experience on the International Space Station (ISS), Mir, and the Space Shuttle has strongly underscored the need to develop broad spectrum in-flight chemical sensors that: (1) meet current environmental monitoring requirements on ISS as well as projected requirements for future missions, and (2) enable the in-situ acquisition and analysis of analytical data in order to further define on-orbit monitoring requirements. Additionally, systems must be designed to account for factors unique to on-orbit deployment such as crew time availability, payload restrictions, material consumption, and effective operation in microgravity. This dissertation focuses on the development, ground testing, and microgravity flight demonstration of Colorimetric Solid Phase Extraction (C-SPE) as a candidate technology to meet the near- and long-term water quality monitoring needs of NASA. The introduction will elaborate further on the operational and design requirements for on-orbit water quality monitoring systems by discussing some of the characteristics of an ''ideal'' system. A description of C-SPE and how the individual components of the platform are combined to satisfy many of these requirements is then presented, along with a literature review on the applications of C-SPE and similar sorption-spectrophotometric techniques. Finally, a brief overview of diffuse reflection spectroscopy and the Kubelka-Munk function, which are used to quantify analytes via C-SPE, is presented.

Daniel Bryan Gazda

2004-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

190

Water Data Report: An Annotated Bibliography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 5: Public supply water withdrawals, 2000. water withdrawals, 2000. water withdrawals, 2000.

Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Melody, Moya

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Water and Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water in swimming pool Water and Energy The water and energy technology research focuses on improving the efficiency of energy and water use in water delivery, supply and...

192

The economic conception of water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

American City: municipal water supply investments. Ph. D.A . (2004). Boosting Water Productivity. In: Worldwatch1975). Issues in Village Water Supply. Washington, D . C ,

Hanemann, W. Michael

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Global Access to Energy and Fresh Water - Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Access to Energy and Fresh Water Global Access to Energy and Fresh Water International Safety Projects Overview Hydrogen as an Energy Carrier Global access to energy and fresh water International cooperation on safety of nuclear plants Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr International Safety Projects Global Access to Energy and Fresh Water Bookmark and Share Water Water shortages, unreliable water supplies, and poor water quality have been considered in recent years to be major obstacles to sustainable development and poverty alleviation that require urgent attention. Over 1 billion people lack access to safe drinking water. In such areas, water shortages are increasingly limiting development options.

194

Scenario: Supplying Our Water Needs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thornridge High School is using an approach to science that integrates Thornridge High School is using an approach to science that integrates learning strategies, math, social studies, and science. Dennis Condon, Gary Fryrear, Bill Meder, and Shelly Peretz share the same 40 students for two 50-minute class periods. This gives the teachers the flexibility to meet with one group of students (20), one class period (50 minutes) every day or two class periods (100 minutes) every other day, within the confines of the traditional school schedule. Each classroom has three ethernet ports which allow teachers to move computers around on the same network. In addition, the network is connected to a router and an ISDN phone line, so the network is connected to the Internet at relatively high speeds. Each classroom also has a telephone.

195

Scenario: Supplying Our Water Needs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Illinois. Handbook of Engaged Learning Projects sponsored by Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Education Office and Friends of Fermilab. Funded by the Midwest Consortium for...

196

Scenario: Supplying Our Water Needs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Illinois Handbook of Engaged Learning Projects sponsored by Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Education Office and Friends of Fermilab. Funded by the Midwest Consortium for...

197

UV Treated Water Dangers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

there are chances of developing cancer or such growth due to radiation on drinking water & it's continuous intake? What are other hazards that may cause problems for human...

198

Why Supply Chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Why supply chain explains the importance of supply chains. It includes an introduction to ERP as designed by SAP.

Datta, Shoumen

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Application of solar energy to the supply of industrial process hot water: preliminary design and performance report. Volume I. Technical report. Aerotherm report TR-76-219. [For can washing at Campbell Soup Plant in Sacramento  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design and performance of a solar hot water system for can washing at the Campbell Soup Plant in Sacramento, California, are presented. The collector field is located on the roof of the finished products warehouse of the Campbell Soup Sacramento plant. Water is supplied from a 3.8 cm (1/sup 1///sub 2/ in.) supply line which is located directly below an existing roof access hatch. A supply pipe will be brought up through that hatch. The water flow will then be split into two manifold lines which supply the dual rows of flat plate collectors. The preheated water from the flat plates is then passed into six sets of parallel connected concentrators. Each set consist of eight 1.83 x 3.05 m (6 x 10 foot) modules connected in series. The water from these units is gathered in a 3.8 cm (1/sup 1///sub 2/ in.) insulated pipe which transports it to the storage tank. This pipe will be attached to an existing pipe run until it reaches the can washing building. From there the pipe will follow the can washing building around to the storage tank. The storage tank is a 75,200 1 (20,000 gal) steel tank which is coated internally with a USDA approved phenolic liner. The outside of the tank is insulated. A 2.2 kw (3 hp) motor is used to pump the stored water for the tank into the can washing line. Detail drawings and descriptions of the collector field, installation, piping, controls, data acquisition equipment, and roof structure are included. Furthermore, a program schedule with equipment and manpower costs for successfully completing Phase II of this contract is included. Also included is an organization chart of the Phase II program personnel. (WHK)

None

1976-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

200

EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL WATERING DEVICE  

SciTech Connect

A device for watering experimental animals confined in a battery of individual plastic enclosures is described. It consists of a rectangular plastic enclosure having a plurality of fluid-tight compartments, each with a drinking hole near the bottom and a filling hole on the top. The enclosure is immersed in water until filled, its drinking holes sealed with a strip of tape, and it is then placed in the battery. The tape sealing prevents the flow of water from the device, but permits animals to drink by licking the drinking holes. (AEC)

Finkel, M.P.

1964-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Hydraulic Fracturing on Drinking Water Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disclaimer Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use.

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Oceanographic Considerations for Desalination Plants in Southern California Coastal Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of product drinking water produced by this plant will begallon of product water produced, the proposed desalinationof the time if product water is produced by the desalination

Jenkins, Scott A; Wasyl, Joseph

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.PDF Table 10. PAD District 4 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition...

204

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 Table 21. PAD District 5 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition...

205

Petroleum Supply Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

TABLE8.PDF Table 8. PAD District 3 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition...

206

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE4.PDF Table 4. PAD District 1 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition...

207

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

May 2013 Table 21. PAD District 5 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, May 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending...

208

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 May 2013 Table 19. PAD District 4 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, May 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition...

209

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 Table 11. PAD District 2 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply...

210

Petroleum Supply Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

TABLE6.PDF Table 6. PAD District 2 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition...

211

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

December 2011 Table 13. PAD District 3 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition...

212

Measuring and moderating the water resource impact of biofuel production and trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on   development  of  biomass  supply  systems  as  a  new  Future  biomass  energy  supply:  The  consumptive  water  

Fingerman, Kevin Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Relationships between {sup 222}Rn dissolved in ground water supplies and indoor {sup 222}Rn concentrations in some Colorado front range houses  

SciTech Connect

Indoor {sup 222}Rn concentrations were measured in 37 houses with alpha track detectors placed in water-use rooms near water sources (bathrooms, laundry rooms, and kitchens) and in non-water-use living rooms, dining rooms, and bedrooms away from water sources. Results show that relative contributions of {sup 222}Rn to indoor air from water use are insignificant when soil-gas concentrations are high but become increasingly important as the ratio of {sup 222}Rn-in-water:{sup 222}Rn-in-soil gas increases. High soil-gas {sup 222}Rn concentrations may mask {sup 222}Rn contributions from water even when waterborne {sup 222}Rn concentrations are as high as 750 kBq m{sup {minus}3}. Ground water in Precambrian Pikes Peak granite averages 340 kBq m{sup {minus}3} {sup 222}Rn, vs. 170 kBq m{sup {minus}3} in Precambrian migmatite, but average {sup 222}Rn concentrations in soil gas are also lower in migmatite. Because the ratio of {sup 222}Rn-in-water:{sup 222}Rn-in-soil gas may be consistently higher for houses in migmatite than in Pikes Peak granite, indoor air in houses built on migmatite have a greater relative contribution from water use even though average {sup 222}Rn concentrations in the water are lower. Continuous monitoring of {sup 222}Rn concentrations in air on 15-min intervals also indicates that additions to indoor concentrations from water use are significant and measurable only when soil-gas concentrations are low and concentrations in water are high. When soil-gas concentrations were mitigated to less than 150 Bq m{sup {minus}3} in one house, water contributed 20-40% of the annual indoor {sup 222}Rn concentration in the laundry room ({sup 222}Rn concentration in water of 670 kBq m{sup {minus}3}). Conversely, when the mitigation system is inactive, diurnal fluctuations and other variations in the soil-gas {sup 222}Rn contribution swamp the variability due to water use in the house. 9 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

Folger, P.F. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)]|[Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Wanty, R.B. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Poeter, E. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Nyberg, P. [Environmental Protection Agency, Denver, CO (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

The Prospects for Social Business in Peri-Urban Water Supply: Employment and Household Welfare Impacts of the Grameen Veolia Venture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as pipes, spigots and jars. Masons are essential toselling water delivered in jars. These alterations to thethe program launched a jar business in peri-urban centers

Pierce, Gregory

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Use of reclaimed water for power plant cooling.  

SciTech Connect

Freshwater demands are steadily increasing throughout the United States. As its population increases, more water is needed for domestic use (drinking, cooking, cleaning, etc.) and to supply power and food. In arid parts of the country, existing freshwater supplies are not able to meet the increasing demands for water. New water users are often forced to look to alternative sources of water to meet their needs. Over the past few years, utilities in many locations, including parts of the country not traditionally water-poor (e.g., Georgia, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, and North Carolina) have needed to reevaluate the availability of water to meet their cooling needs. This trend will only become more extreme with time. Other trends are likely to increase pressure on freshwater supplies, too. For example, as populations increase, they will require more food. This in turn will likely increase demands for water by the agricultural sector. Another example is the recent increased interest in producing biofuels. Additional water will be required to grow more crops to serve as the raw materials for biofuels and to process the raw materials into biofuels. This report provides information about an opportunity to reuse an abundant water source -- treated municipal wastewater, also known as 'reclaimed water' -- for cooling and process water in electric generating facilities. The report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Innovations for Existing Plants research program (Feeley 2005). This program initiated an energy-water research effort in 2003 that includes the availability and use of 'nontraditional sources' of water for use at power plants. This report represents a unique reference for information on the use of reclaimed water for power plant cooling. In particular, the database of reclaimed water user facilities described in Chapter 2 is the first comprehensive national effort to identify and catalog those plants that are using reclaimed water for cooling.

Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

216

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Supply Monthly, October 2011 11 Table 4. U.S. Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum ...

217

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 12. PAD District 2 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-May 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply...

218

Publicly Submitted White Papers - Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Water. Advanced ... Strategies; AQUEOUS PHASE MERCURY REMOVAL: Strategies for a Secure Future Water Supply; ...

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Information Sources for Small Water Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managers of small waters systems must have information about a variety of topics. This publication lists essential printed and electronic resources on disaster preparedness, national drinking water standards, private water well management, water treatment, and many other topics.

Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

2007-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

220

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Freight Flows Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies The Infrastructure Challenge of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Water resources planning under climate change and variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scenario to Climatic Changes. Water Resources Management 19:2006) Quantifying the Urban Water Supply Impacts of Climateto the Shape of Supply? Water Demand Under Heterogeneous

O'Hara, Jeffrey Keith

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laws Envirosearch Institutional Controls NEPA Activities RCRA RQ*Calculator Water HSS Logo Water Laws Overview of water-related legislation affecting DOE sites Clean...

223

Energy Expenditure and Water Flux of Ruppell's Foxes in Saudi Arabia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), sometimes in excess of 50 C, intense solar radiation, desiccating winds, lack of surface water for drinking

Williams, Jos. B.

224

Supply Curves of Conserved Energy  

SciTech Connect

Supply curves of conserved energy provide an accounting framework that expresses the potential for energy conservation. The economic worthiness of a conservation measure is expressed in terms of the cost of conserved energy, and a measure is considered economical when the cost of conserved energy is less than the price of the energy it replaces. A supply curve of conserved energy is independent of energy prices; however, the economical reserves of conserved energy will depend on energy prices. Double-counting of energy savings and error propagation are common problems when estimating conservation potentials, but supply curves minimize these difficulties and make their consequences predictable. The sensitivity of the cost of conserved energy is examined, as are variations in the optimal investment strategy in response to changes in inputs. Guidelines are presented for predicting the consequences of such changes. The conservation supply curve concept can be applied to peak power, water, pollution, and other markets where consumers demand a service rather than a particular good.

Meier, Alan Kevin

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supply Supply Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 11, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million barrels per day. The data is broken down into crude oil, other petroleum supply, other non petroleum supply and liquid fuel consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO disposition EIA liquid fuels Supply Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Liquid Fuels Supply and Disposition- Reference Case (xls, 117 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License

226

Evaluation of the 183-D Water Filtration Facility for Bat Roosts and Development of a Mitigation Strategy, 100-D Area, Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 183-D Water Filtration Facility is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site, north of Richland, Washington. It was used to provide filtered water for cooling the 105-D Reactor and supplying fire-protection and drinking water for all facilities in the 100-D Area. The facility has been inactive since the 1980s and is now scheduled for demolition. Therefore, an evaluation was conducted to determine if any part of the facility was being used as roosting habitat by bats.

Lindsey, C. T.; Gano, K. A.; Lucas, J. G.

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

227

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of...

228

Magnets and Power Supplies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bibliography Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Longitudinal Bibliography Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Longitudinal bunch profile and Magnets and Power Supplies Dipole Magnets and Power Supplies Value Dipole Number 80+1 No. of power supplies 1 Magnetic length 3.06 m Core length 3.00 m Bending radius 38.9611 m Power supply limit 500.0 A Field at 7 GeV 0.599 T Dipole trim coils Number 80+1 No. of power supplies 80 Magnetic length 3.06 m Core length 3.00 m Power supply limit 20.0 A Maximum field 0.04 T Horizontal Correction Dipoles Number 317 No. of power supplies 317 Magnetic length 0.160 m Core length 0.07 m Power supply limit 150.0 A Maximum field 0.16 T Max. deflection at 7 GeV 1.1 mrad Vertical Corrector Dipoles Number 317 No. of power supplies 317

229

Electricity Supply Sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electricity Supply Sector Part 1 of 6 Supporting Documents Sector-Specific Issues and Reporting Methodologies Supporting the General Guidelines for the Voluntary

230

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Supply Monthly, October 2011 49 Table 37. Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by PAD District, ...

231

Power supply apparatus  

SciTech Connect

The outputs of a plurality of modules or generators of electrical energy, such as fuel cells, chemical storage batteries, solar cells, MHD generators and the like, whose outputs are different are consolidated efficiently. The modules supply a power distribution system through an inverter. The efficiency is achieved by interconnecting the modules with an alternating voltage supply and electronic valves so controlled that the alternating-voltage supply absorbs power from modules whose output voltage is greater than the voltage at which the inverter operates and supplies this power as a booster to modules whose output voltage is less than the voltage at which the inverter operates.

Dickey, D. E.

1984-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

232

ICT Supply Chain Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ICT Supply Chain Risk Management Manager's Forum ... ICT Supply Chain Risk Management National Institute of Standards and Technology Page 6. ...

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

233

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Accuracy of published data in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report, the Petroleum Supply Monthly, and the Petroleum Supply Annual.

Tammy G. Heppner

2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

234

Method of arsenic removal from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for low-cost arsenic removal from drinking water using chemically prepared bottom ash pre-treated with ferrous sulfate and then sodium hydroxide. Deposits on the surface of particles of bottom ash form of activated iron adsorbent with a high affinity for arsenic. In laboratory tests, a miniscule 5 grams of pre-treated bottom ash was sufficient to remove the arsenic from 2 liters of 2400 ppb (parts per billion) arsenic-laden water to a level below 50 ppb (the present United States Environmental Protection Agency limit). By increasing the amount of pre-treated bottom ash, even lower levels of post-treatment arsenic are expected. It is further expected that this invention supplies a very low-cost solution to arsenic poisoning for large population segments.

Gadgil, Ashok (El Cerrito, CA)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

235

Copyright Awwa Research Foundation 2006 Advanced Water Treatment Impacts onAdvanced Water Treatment Impacts on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, brackish groundwater, produced water, etc.produced water, etc. Advanced treatmentAdvanced treatment Water and variables affecting VFactors and variables affecting V (volume produced from alternative water supplies)(volume produced from alternative water supplies) ""Supply sideSupply side"" Volume availableVolume available from

Keller, Arturo A.

236

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 19. PAD District 4 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 393 - - - - 330 -111 -46 4 562 0 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 406 0 2 15 -333 - - 0 20 9 61 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 58 0 - - - -33 - - 0 6 9 10 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 348 - - 2 15 -299 - -

237

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 23. PAD District 5 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,197 - - - - 1,186 - -47 -4 2,340 0 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 69 0 14 4 - - - -60 83 20 43 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 32 0 - - - - - - -1 26 2 5 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 37 - - 14 4 - - - -59

238

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 September 2013 Table 20. PAD District 4 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 511 - - - - 289 -169 -49 4 579 0 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 316 0 13 11 -264 - - 2 16 15 44 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 50 0 - - 0 -38 - - 0 6 13 -7 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

239

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 7. PAD District 1 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 24 - - - - 854 -10 42 -28 935 3 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 42 0 27 67 119 - - -30 26 1 259 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 7 0 - - - - - - 0 - 0 7 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 35 - - 27 67 119 - - -30 26

240

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Ending Stocks by PAD District, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels, Except Where Noted) Process PAD Districts U.S. Total 1 2 3 4 5 Total Daily Average Supply Field Production...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Improving supply chain resilience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to the global expansion of Company A's supply chain network, it is becoming more vulnerable to many disruptions. These disruptions often incur additional costs; and require time to respond to and recover from these ...

Leung, Elsa Hiu Man

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

European supply chain study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction: Supply chain management has been defined as, "..a set of approaches utilized to efficiently integrate suppliers, manufacturers, warehouses and stores, so that merchandise is produced and distributed at the ...

Puri, Mohitkumar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6...

244

Ground water and oil field waste sites: a study in Vermilion Parish  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water samples were obtained from 128 private water wells surrounding eight oil field waste sites in Vermilion Parish. The specimens were analyzed for five heavy metals: barium, arsenic, chromium, lead, and cadmium. Half of the specimens were then analyzed for 16 volatile organic compounds. A blood sample was obtained from healthy adults drinking water from the wells tested for volatile organic compounds and this blood sample was also analyzed for volatile organic compounds. None of the water samples had levels of heavy metals or volatile organic compounds that exceeded the National Primary Drinking Water Standards. Barium levels in excess of 250 parts per billion suggested that styrene, toluene, and chloroform might be present. Blood levels of volatile organic compounds were significantly higher than could be accounted for by water consumption with levels in smokers significantly higher than in nonsmokers. These data suggest that as yet there is no contamination of ground water supplies around these sites. Volatile organic accumulation in humans probably occurs from a respiratory rather than from an oral route.

Rainey, J.M.; Groves, F.D.; DeLeon, I.R.; Joubert, P.E. (LSU School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 September 2013 Table 10. PAD District 2 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 366,285 - - - - 501,418 159,175 -109,633 -12,929 918,349 11,825 0 102,610 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 122,918 -4,579 37,556 21,926 4,444 - - 15,132 24,244 34,819 108,070 58,830 Pentanes Plus ..................................................

246

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20 20 September 2013 Table 14. PAD District 3 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................ 1,188,751 - - - - 1,015,091 -112,708 94,064 20,399 2,158,191 6,608 0 882,207 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 440,766 -88 123,986 10,625 46,383 - - 16,960 76,972 72,880 454,860 114,138 Pentanes Plus ..................................................

247

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 Table 2. U.S. Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 2,003,948 - - - - 2,123,490 65,265 6,899 4,157,486 28,318 0 1,067,149 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 686,936 -4,909 195,516 47,812 - - 36,219 127,051 118,364 643,721 189,672 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 92,842 -4,909 - - 10,243 - -

248

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.PDF 1.PDF Table 11. PAD District 5 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 36,593 - - - - 31,429 - 4,534 890 71,666 - 0 55,877 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 2,154 -11 1,013 192 - - - -786 2,587 629 918 3,544 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,013 -11 - - - - - - -35 842 110 85 36 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

249

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE7.PDF TABLE7.PDF Table 7. PAD District 3 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................ 109,919 - - - - 142,073 -20,272 -3,481 6,003 222,236 - 0 858,776 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 43,678 -17 9,648 1,838 7,546 - - -2,299 8,340 4,663 51,989 65,215 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 4,840 -17 - - 1,688 -3,010 - -

250

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 September 2013 Table 8. PAD District 1 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 32 - - - - 843 -1 230 8 1,061 35 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 71 0 45 40 77 - - 1 16 10 205 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 12 0 - - 1 0 - - 0 0 2 9 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

251

Petroleum Supply Monthly Archives  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Supply Monthly Petroleum Supply Monthly Petroleum Supply Monthly Archives With Data for December 2011 | Release Date: February 29, 2012 Changes to Table 26. "Production of Crude Oil by PAD District and State": Current State-level data are now included in Table 26, in addition to current U.S. and PAD District sums. State offshore production for Louisiana, Texas, Alaska, and California, which are included in the State totals, are no longer reported separately in a "State Offshore Production" category. Previously, State-level values lagged 2 months behind the U.S. and PAD District values. Beginning with this publication, they will be on the same cycle. Also included in this publication are two additional pages for Table 26 that provide October and November data. With the release of

252

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 3. U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 5,877 - - - - 8,716 83 -218 14,841 53 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 2,351 -20 372 252 - - -417 566 206 2,600 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 296 -20 - - 78 - - 37 172 71 75 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 2,055 - - 372 174 - - -454 394 135 2,525

253

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 September 2013 Table 22. PAD District 5 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 300,668 - - - - 297,837 - 31,342 -3,713 633,292 267 0 52,719 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 17,739 -73 18,288 1,401 - - - 3,536 17,170 3,791 12,858 8,270 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 7,914

254

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. TABLE1.PDF 1. TABLE1.PDF Table 1. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 190,109 - - - - 264,348 6,359 12,794 445,596 2,425 0 1,039,424 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 73,905 -587 13,044 6,935 - - -11,335 15,883 8,313 80,436 118,039 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 8,824 -587 - - 1,699 - - -805 4,946 2,754 3,041 16,791 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

255

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.PDF 2.PDF Table 12. PAD District 5 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,180 - - - - 1,014 - 146 29 2,312 - 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 69 0 33 6 - - - -25 83 20 30 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 33 0 - - - - - - -1 27 4 3 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 37 - - 33 6 - - - -24 56 17 27 Ethane/Ethylene

256

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 Table 1. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 233,810 - - - - 237,344 8,334 7,688 468,825 2,975 0 1,067,149 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 81,196 -552 19,023 4,020 - - 3,027 16,794 13,937 69,929 189,672 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 11,167 -552 - - 772 - - -700 5,666 2,989 3,432 18,036 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

257

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 1. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 182,188 - - - - 270,188 2,576 -6,767 460,074 1,646 0 1,026,829 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 72,869 -607 11,545 7,801 - - -12,921 17,534 6,391 80,604 128,709 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 9,170 -607 - - 2,421 - - 1,146 5,321 2,200 2,317 17,598 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

258

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 17. PAD District 4 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 12,175 - - - - 10,226 -3,426 -1,436 132 17,407 1 0 15,969 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 12,584 -10 52 460 -10,314 - - -12 611 282 1,891 1,375 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,788 -10 - - - -1,036 - - -15 174 273 310 180 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

259

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 15. PAD District 3 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................ 3,327 - - - - 4,646 -720 39 -191 7,482 - 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 1,380 -1 304 84 227 - - -113 306 108 1,693 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 155 -1 - - 77 -58 - - 35 106 1 31 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

260

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 9. PAD District 2 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 29,019 - - - - 52,699 26,041 2,973 12 109,175 1,544 0 93,189 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 14,079 -560 812 2,541 -423 - - -6,605 4,051 2,114 16,889 48,197 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,354 -560 - - 21 2,843 - - 110 1,049

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 September 2013 Table 16. PAD District 3 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................ 4,354 - - - - 3,718 -413 345 75 7,905 24 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 1,615 0 454 39 170 - - 62 282 267 1,666 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 195 0 - - 36 -65 - - 15 113 4 35 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

262

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE9.PDF TABLE9.PDF Table 9. PAD District 4 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 12,961 - - - - 10,783 -3,879 896 2,868 17,893 0 0 18,695 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 12,770 -9 127 502 -11,116 - - -50 621 280 1,423 1,326 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,484 -9 - - - -1,152 - - 7 122 264 -70 187 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

263

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.PDF .PDF Table 3. PAD District 1 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 734 - - - - 26,368 419 -1,209 627 25,554 130 0 10,529 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 1,314 -6 923 1,606 2,621 - - -1,556 707 53 7,254 6,409 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 213 -6 - - - - - - 3 5 6 193 34 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

264

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE5.PDF TABLE5.PDF Table 5. PAD District 2 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 29,902 - - - - 53,695 23,732 5,619 2,406 108,247 2,295 0 95,547 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 13,989 -544 1,333 2,797 949 - - -6,644 3,628 2,687 18,853 41,545 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,274 -544 - - 11 4,162 - - 233 966

265

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 Table 4. U.S. Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 7,340 - - - - 7,778 239 25 15,229 104 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 2,516 -18 716 175 - - 133 465 434 2,358 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 340 -18 - - 38 - - 20 168 134 38 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 2,176 - - 716

266

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 September 2013 Table 18. PAD District 4 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 139,573 - - - - 79,019 -46,108 -13,333 1,073 158,068 10 0 19,287 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 86,184 -86 3,535 3,052 -71,945 - - 423 4,378 4,054 11,885 1,893 Pentanes Plus ..................................................

267

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

30 30 September 2013 Table 24. PAD District 5 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,101 - - - - 1,091 - 115 -14 2,320 1 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 65 0 67 5 - - - 13 63 14 47 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 29 0 - - - - - - 1 21 4 3 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

268

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 5. PAD District 1 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 751 - - - - 26,471 -300 1,308 -869 28,999 100 0 9,902 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 1,313 -7 839 2,091 3,702 - - -929 816 33 8,018 7,618 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 225 -7 - - - - - - 3 - 11 204 31 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

269

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 Table 6. PAD District 1 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 8,672 - - - - 230,125 -359 62,824 2,069 289,586 9,606 0 10,326 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 19,329 -83 12,151 10,808 21,118 - - 168 4,287 2,821 56,047 6,541 Pentanes Plus ..................................................

270

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.PDF .PDF Table 2. U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 6,133 - - - - 8,527 205 413 14,374 78 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 2,384 -19 421 224 - - -366 512 268 2,595 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 285 -19 - - 55 - - -26 160 89 98 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 2,099 - - 421 169 - - -340 353 179 2,497 Ethane/Ethylene

271

You Are At Risk! Water supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that ignited after the firefighters left.) Place liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) tanks and fuel storage. This will eliminate an ignition source for firebrands, especially during hot, dry weather. Remember, after you have run on batteries, some run on household current and others get their main power source form

272

Supply Chain - Submissions | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Submissions Sustainable Supply Chains Submissions Let's Talk About Sustainable Supply Chain You are here Data.gov Communities Sustainable Supply Chain Sustainable Supply...

273

Power Supplies for Precooler Ring  

SciTech Connect

Eight power supplies will energize the antiproton Precooler ring. there will be two series connected supplies per quadrant. These supplies will power 32 dipole and 19 quadrupole magnets. The resistance and inductance per quadrant is R = 1.4045 Ohms and L = 0.466. Each powr supply will have 12-phase series bridge rectifiers and will be energized from the 480 V 3-phase grid. The total of eight power supplies are numbered IA, IIA, IIIA, IVA, and IB, IIB, IIIB, and IVB. Each quadrant will contain one A and one B supply. A block diagram of the Precooler ring with its power supplies is shown in Figure 1.

Fuja, Raymond; Praeg, Walter

1980-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

274

RAPID DETERMINATION OF {sup 210} PO IN WATER SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect

A new rapid method for the determination of {sup 210}Po in water samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that can be used for emergency response or routine water analyses. If a radiological dispersive device (RDD) event or a radiological attack associated with drinking water supplies occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of water samples, including drinking water, ground water and other water effluents. Current analytical methods for the assay of {sup 210}Po in water samples have typically involved spontaneous auto-deposition of {sup 210}Po onto silver or other metal disks followed by counting by alpha spectrometry. The auto-deposition times range from 90 minutes to 24 hours or more, at times with yields that may be less than desirable. If sample interferences are present, decreased yields and degraded alpha spectrums can occur due to unpredictable thickening in the deposited layer. Separation methods have focused on the use of Sr Resin?, often in combination with 210Pb analysis. A new rapid method for {sup 210}Po in water samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that utilizes a rapid calcium phosphate co-precipitation method, separation using DGA Resin? (N,N,N?,N? tetraoctyldiglycolamide extractant-coated resin, Eichrom Technologies or Triskem-International), followed by rapid microprecipitation of {sup 210}Po using bismuth phosphate for counting by alpha spectrometry. This new method can be performed quickly with excellent removal of interferences, high chemical yields and very good alpha peak resolution, eliminating any potential problems with the alpha source preparation for emergency or routine samples. A rapid sequential separation method to separate {sup 210} Po and actinide isotopes was also developed. This new approach, rapid separation with DGA Resin plus microprecipitation for alpha source preparation, is a significant advance in radiochemistry for the rapid determination of {sup 210}Po.

Maxwell, S.

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

275

Instantaneous gas water heater  

SciTech Connect

Hot water supply temperature is set by a temperature setting device in response to an instantaneous flow rate signal from a water flow rate sensor arranged in a water supply pipe and a feeding water temperature signal from a feeding water temperature sensor which are compared with a predetermined hot water supply temperature and calculated in a control unit. A proportional valve and other devices in a gas supply pipe are controlled in response to the result of the comparison and calculation to define a required volume of gas for ignition and heating. At the same time, a fan damper is controlled by a damper control device so as to adjust the volume of combustion air. A signal representing discharging hot water temperature from a discharging hot water temperature sensor arranged in a hot water feeding pipe is fed back to the control unit and calculated therein, and a valve in the hot water supply pipe is adjusted in response to the result of calculation to attain the desired hot water supply temperature. In order to prevent freezing in the system in winter season, a signal from a thermostat in the water feeding pipe is transmitted to a heater arranged in an air supply chamber so as to heat a heat exchanger pipe and, at the same time, heaters arranged in the water feeding pipe and the hot water supply pipe are also controlled to prevent freezing.

Tsutsui, O.; Kuwahara, H.; Murakami, Sh.; Yasunaga, Sh.

1985-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

276

Santa Clara Water & Sewer- Solar Water Heating Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In 1975, the City of Santa Clara established the nation's first municipal solar utility. Under the Solar Water Heating Program, the Santa Clara Water & Sewer Utilities Department supplies,...

277

2012 BNL Water Quality Consumer Confidence Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

because it comes from one of the two drinking- water wells that produces water naturally low in iron water is produced with pride by the staff of BNL's Water Treatment Facility (WTF) of the Energy & Utilities Division. Producing BNL's finished water are five water- treatment engineers, each having NYSDOH

Ohta, Shigemi

278

America`s energy supply  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gist of the paper is to demonstrate that the economical utilization of the country`s energy supply requires generating electric power wherever hydraulic or fuel energy is available, and collecting the power electrically, just as it is distributed electrically. In the first section a short review of the country`s energy supply in fuel and water power is given, and it is shown that the total potential hydraulic energy of the country is about equal to the total utilized fuel energy. In the second section it is shown that the modern synchronous station is necessary for large hydraulic powers, but the solution of the problem of the economic development of the far more numerous smaller water powers is the adoption of the induction generator. However, the simplicity of the induction generator station results from the relegation of all the functions of excitation, regulation, and control to the main synchronous station. The economic advantage of the induction generator station is that its simplicity permits elimination of most of the hydraulic development by using, instead of one large synchronous station, a number of induction generator stations and collecting their power electrically. The third section considers the characteristics of the induction generator and the induction-generator station, and its method of operation, and discusses the condition of ``dropping out of step of the induction generator`` and its avoidance. In the appendix the corresponding problem is pointed out with reference to fuel power, showing that many millions of kilowatts of potential power are wasted by burning fuel and thereby degrading its energy, that could be recovered by interposing simple steam turbine induction generators between the boiler and the steam heating systems, and collecting their power electrically.

Steinmetz, C.P.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Supply Stores | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supply Stores Supply Stores Supply Stores DOE Self Service Supply Stores at Headquarters Operated by: Paperclips, Etc. and the Winston-Salem Industries for the Blind DOE Self-Service Supply Stores Hours of Operation: 9:00 a.m. through 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday DOE Supply Stores Locations Location Phone Fax Forrestal Room GA-171 (202) 554-1451 (202) 554-1452 (202) 554-7074 Germantown Room R-008 (301) 515-9109 (301) 515-9206 (301) 515-8751 The stores provide an Office Supply Product inventory that is tailored to meet the DOE customer's requirements. Office Supply items that are not carried in the store inventory can be special ordered, see the Catalog Order Form section below. The stores are operated for the Department of Energy, Office of Administration, Office of Logistics and Facility Operations, for the Supply

280

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 119 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Oil and Gas Supply Module The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze crude oil and natural gas exploration and development on a regional basis (Figure 8). The OGSM is organized into 4 submodules: Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule[1], and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2011), (Washington, DC, 2011). The OGSM provides

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Disinfecting Water after a Disaster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication explains how to disinfect water after a flood, as well as where to find water in an emergency when supplies are limited.

Dozier, Monty; Schoessow, Courtney

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

282

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

January 2012 January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 190,109 - - - - 264,348 6,359 12,794 445,596 2,425 0 1,039,424 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 73,905 -587 13,044 6,935 - - -11,335 15,883 8,313 80,436 118,039 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 8,824 -587 - - 1,699 - - -805 4,946 2,754 3,041 16,791 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 65,081 - - 13,044 5,236 - - -10,530 10,937 5,559 77,395 101,248 Ethane/Ethylene

283

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.PDF 3.PDF Table 13. Crude Oil Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks by PAD District, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels, Except Where Noted) Process PAD Districts U.S. Total 1 2 3 4 5 Total Daily Average Supply Field Production .................................................... 734 29,902 109,919 12,961 36,593 190,109 6,133 Alaskan ............................................................. - - - - - - - - - 18,374 593 Lower 48 States ................................................ - - - - - 171,734 5,540 Imports (PAD District of Entry) ............................. 26,368 53,695 142,073 10,783 31,429 264,348 8,527 Commercial ...................................................... 26,368 53,695 142,073 10,783 31,429 264,348 8,527 Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) ................. - - - - - - - Net Receipts .........................................................

284

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2012 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 2,374,021 - - - - 3,120,755 53,567 34,134 5,489,516 24,693 0 1,060,764 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 881,306 -6,534 230,413 62,192 - - 23,894 186,270 115,054 842,159 153,268 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 116,002 -6,534 - - 10,680 - - -4,857 63,596 43,136 18,273 12,739 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 765,304 - - 230,413 51,512 - - 28,751 122,674 71,918

285

Safe river water: A ubiquitous and collaborative water quality monitoring solution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water quality is vital to human life and economy. However, one sixth of the world's population suffers from lack of safe drinking and domestic water. Aiming to improve the capability of predicting and responding to river pollution disasters, this project ...

Bin Hu; Bo Hu; JiZheng Wan; Huilan Nie; Chongzhi Zhai

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Oil and Gas Supply Module The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze crude oil and natural gas exploration and development on a regional basis (Figure 8). The OGSM is organized into 4 submodules: Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule[1], and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2011), (Washington, DC, 2011). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum

287

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data by Tammy G. Heppner and Carol L. French Overview Petroleum supply data collected by the Petroleum Division (PD) in the Office of Oil and Gas (OOG)...

288

Multiple fuel supply system for an internal combustion engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple fuel supply or an internal combustion engine wherein phase separation of components is deliberately induced. The resulting separation permits the use of a single fuel tank to supply components of either or both phases to the engine. Specifically, phase separation of a gasoline/methanol blend is induced by the addition of a minor amount of water sufficient to guarantee separation into an upper gasoline phase and a lower methanol/water phase. A single fuel tank holds the two-phase liquid with separate fuel pickups and separate level indicators for each phase. Either gasoline or methanol, or both, can be supplied to the engine as required by predetermined parameters. A fuel supply system for a phase-separated multiple fuel supply contained in a single fuel tank is described.

Crothers, William T. (Sunol, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Energy and Water Use in Irrigated Agriculture During Drought Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENERGY/WATER USE DURING A DROUGHT YEAR (1977) Water Supply & Demand in 1977 California's agricultural industry

Ritschard, R.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Israel -the " BACK TO THE FUTURE" opportunity for the Global Water Arena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consequences of climate change: Drought and lack of fresh drinking water The aging water infrastructure can with the water arena, involves many players Water Utility Government Regulator Solution Provider Technology

Mark, Pinsky

291

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 February 2012 Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Supply Monthly, ii December 2011 EIA DATA ARE AVAILABLE IN ELECTRONIC FORM All current EIA publications are available on the EIA web site. Users can view and download selected pages or entire reports, search for information, download EIA data and analysis applications, and find out about new EIA information products and services: World Wide Web: http://www.eia.doe.gov FTP: ftp://ftp.eia.doe.gov Customers who do not have access to the Internet may call the National Energy Information Center (NEIC) to request a single print-

292

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

With Data for September 2013 With Data for September 2013 November 2013 Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Supply Monthly, ii September 2013 EIA DATA ARE AVAILABLE IN ELECTRONIC FORM All current EIA publications are available on the EIA web site. Users can view and download selected pages or entire reports, search for information, download EIA data and analysis applications, and find out about new EIA information products and services: World Wide Web: http://www.eia.doe.gov FTP: ftp://ftp.eia.doe.gov Customers who do not have access to the Internet may call the National Energy Information Center (NEIC) to request a single print-

293

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Decemer 2011 Appendix D Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Information on the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve is available from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Petroleum Reserves web site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs/reserves/heatingoil/. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR) inventories now classified as ultra-low sulfur distillate (15 parts per million) are not considered to be in the commercial sector and therefore are excluded from distillate fuel oil supply and disposition statistics in Energy

294

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 September 2013 Appendix D Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Information on the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve is available from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Petroleum Reserves web site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs/reserves/heatingoil/. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR) inventories now classified as ultra-low sulfur distillate (15 parts per million) are not considered to be in the commercial sector and therefore are excluded from distillate fuel oil supply and disposition statistics in Energy

295

Biological denitrification of water  

SciTech Connect

The authors discuss research regarding the denitrification of drinking water. Most work has been done in Europe. As a consequence there may be a gap in the understanding of the international state of the art with regard to drinking-water denitrification. Numerous substrates have been evaluated including methanol, ethanol, acetic acid, methane, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and various sulfur compounds. Various unit processes have been utilized including biofilters, fluidized-bed and packed-bed reactors, packed towers containing cells immobilized in polymer gels, and completely mixed reactors with cells attached to bouyant porous carriers. There are several commercial facilities currently providing drinking water to European communities. Most include post-treatment with flocculation, filtration, and disinfection. A common concern in denitrification operations is the minimization of nitrite accumulation.

Gayle, B.P. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (USA)); Boardman, G.D.; Sherrard, J.H. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Benoit, R.E. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (USA). Dept. of Biology)

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Solving Water Quality Problems in the Home  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If your drinking water comes from a private water well, there are certain procedures you can follow to make sure the water is safe. This publication explains how to get your water tested and, if treatment is necessary, to select the correct treatment equipment. Tables display common water problems and the equipment used to treat them.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

297

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data by Tammy G. Heppner and Carol L. French Overview Petroleum supply data collected by the Petroleum Division (PD) in the Office of Oil and Gas (OOG) of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) showed an improvement in the accuracy of the 2005 data from initial estimates, to interim values, to final values. These data were presented in a series of PD products: the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), This Week in Petroleum (TWIP), the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM), and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Weekly estimates in the WPSR and TWIP were the first values available. Figure FE1 illustrates that as reporting and review time passes from the weekly estimates to the interim monthly values to the final petroleum supply values, the EIA is able to produce more accurate petroleum supply data. For the monthly-from-weekly (MFW) data, respondents

298

Assessing Reliability In Hydrogen Supply Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but increasing portion of natural gas supply – As percentagehighly dependent on natural gas supply infrastructure LNGpercentage of natural gas supply Dependence of other systems

McCarthy, Ryan; Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Assessing reliability in energy supply systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Term Prospects for Natural Gas Supply. Energy Informationin coming decades, natural gas supply will increasingly facefunctional zones of natural gas supply, such as reserves and

McCarthy, Ryan W.; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Assessing Reliability in Energy Supply Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Term Prospects for Natural Gas Supply. Energy Informationin coming decades, natural gas supply will increasingly facefunctional zones of natural gas supply, such as reserves and

McCarthy, Ryan; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Supplemental Gas Supplies  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Supplemental Gas Supplies by State, 1996 (Million Cubic Feet) Table State Synthetic Natural Gas Propane- Air Refinery Gas Biomass Gas Other Total Alabama ...................... 0 18 0 0 0 18 Colorado...................... 0 344 0 0 a 6,443 6,787 Connecticut ................. 0 48 0 0 0 48 Delaware ..................... 0 1 0 0 0 1 Georgia........................ 0 94 0 0 0 94 Hawaii.......................... 2,761 0 0 0 0 2,761 Illinois .......................... 0 488 3,423 0 0 3,912 Indiana......................... 0 539 0 0 b 2,655 3,194 Iowa............................. 0 301 0 0 0 301 Kentucky...................... 0 45 0 0 0 45 Maine........................... 0 61 0 0 0 61 Maryland...................... 0 882 0 0 0 882 Massachusetts ............ 0 426 0 0 0 426 Michigan ...................... 0 0 0 0 c 21,848 21,848 Minnesota.................... 0 709 0 0 0 709 Missouri

302

Switching power supply  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a repratable capacitor charging, switching power supply. A ferrite transformer steps up a dc input. The transformer primary is in a full bridge configuration utilizing power MOSFETs as the bridge switches. The transformer secondary is fed into a high voltage, full wave rectifier whose output is connected directly to the energy storage capacitor. The transformer is designed to provide adequate leakage inductance to limit capacitor current. The MOSFETs are switched to the variable frequency from 20 to 50 kHz to charge a capacitor from 0.6 kV. The peak current in a transformer primary and secondary is controlled by increasing the pulse width as the capacitor charges. A digital ripple counter counts pulses and after a preselected desired number is reached an up-counter is clocked.

Mihalka, A.M.

1984-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

303

Sustainable Biomass Supply Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) aims to displace 30% of the 2004 gasoline use (60 billion gal/yr) with biofuels by 2030 as outlined in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, which will require 700 million tons of biomass to be sustainably delivered to biorefineries annually. Lignocellulosic biomass will make an important contribution towards meeting DOE’s ethanol production goals. For the biofuels industry to be an economically viable enterprise, the feedstock supply system (i.e., moving the biomass from the field to the refinery) cannot contribute more that 30% of the total cost of the biofuel production. The Idaho National Laboratory in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of California, Davis and Kansas State University are developing a set of tools for identifying economical, sustainable feedstocks on a regional basis based on biorefinery siting.

Erin Searcy; Dave Muth; Erin Wilkerson; Shahab Sokansanj; Bryan Jenkins; Peter Titman; Nathan Parker; Quinn Hart; Richard Nelson

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

NNSA TRITIUM SUPPLY CHAIN  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Site plays a critical role in the Tritium Production Supply Chain for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The entire process includes: • Production of Tritium Producing Burnable Absorber Rods (TPBARs) at the Westinghouse WesDyne Nuclear Fuels Plant in Columbia, South Carolina • Production of unobligated Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) at the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) in Portsmouth, Ohio • Irradiation of TPBARs with the LEU at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Watts Bar Reactor • Extraction of tritium from the irradiated TPBARs at the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) at Savannah River Site • Processing the tritium at the Savannah River Site, which includes removal of nonhydrogen species and separation of the hydrogen isotopes of protium, deuterium and tritium.

Wyrick, Steven [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC, USA; Cordaro, Joseph [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC, USA; Founds, Nanette [National Nuclear Security Administration, Albuquerque, NM, USA; Chambellan, Curtis [National Nuclear Security Administration, Albuquerque, NM, USA

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

305

Water quality in the vicinity of Fenton Hill, 1987 and 1988. [Fenton Hill site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water-quality data have been collected since 1974 from established surface- and ground-water stations at, and in the vicinity of, Fenton Hill (site of the Laboratory's Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Project). The site is located on the southwest edge of the Valles Caldera in the Jemez Mountains. To determine the chemical quality of water, data were collected in 1987 and 1988 from 13 surface-water stations and 19 ground-water stations. The classification of the water quality is made on the basis of predominated ions and total dissolved solids. There are four classifications of surface water (sodium and chloride, calcium and bicarbonate, calcium and sulfate, and sodium and bicarbonate) and three classifications of ground water (sodium and chloride, calcium and bicarbonate, and sodium and bicarbonate). Variations in the chemical quality of the surface and ground water in 1987 and 1988 are apparent when data are compared with each other and with previous analyses. These variations are not considered significant, as they are in the range of normal seasonal changes. Cumulative production since 1976 from the supply well at Fenton Hill has been about 63 {times} 10{sup 6} gal, with a decline in the water level of the well of about 14 ft, or about 1.4 ft/yr. The aquifer penetrated by the well is still capable of reliable supply to the site for a number of years, based on past production. The quality of water from the well has deteriorated slightly; however, the water quality is in compliance with drinking water standards. The effects of discharge from the storage ponds into an adjacent canyon have been monitored by trace metal analyses of vegetation and soil. The study indicates minimal effects, which will be undetectable in a few years if there are no further releases of effluents into the canyon. 19 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Purtymun, W.D.; Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Maes, M.N.; Williams, M.C.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Optics Supply Planning System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to specify the design for an initial optics supply planning system for NIF, and to present quality assurance and test plans for the construction of the system as specified. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a large laser facility that is just starting operations. Thousands of specialized optics are required to operate the laser, and must be exchanged over time based on the laser shot plan and predictions of damage. Careful planning and tracking of optic exchanges is necessary because of the tight inventory of spare optics, and the long lead times for optics procurements and production changes. Automated inventory forecasting and production planning tools are required to replace existing manual processes. The optics groups members who are expected to use the supply planning system are the stakeholders for this project, and are divided into three groups. Each of these groups participated in a requirements specification that was used to develop this design. (1) Optics Management--These are the top level stakeholdersk, and the final decision makers. This group is the interface to shot operations, is ultimately responsible for optics supply, and decides which exchanges will be made. (2) Work Center Managers--This group manages the on site optics processing work centers. They schedule the daily work center operations, and are responsible for developing long term processing, equipment, and staffing plans. (3) Component Engineers--This group manages the vendor contracts for the manufacture of new optics and the off site rework of existing optics. They are responsible for sourcing vendors, negotiating contracts, and managing vendor processes. The scope of this analysis is to describe the structure and design details of a system that will meet all requirements that were described by stakeholders and documented in the analysis model for this project. The design specifies the architecture, components, interfaces, and data stores of the system at a level of detail that can be used for construction and deployment. Test and quality assurance plans are also included to insure that the system delivers all requirements when it is built. The design is for an automated forecasting prototype that allocates inventory and processing resources in response to potentially daily changes in the forecasted optics exchanges required to operate NIF. It will automatically calculate future inventory levels and processing rates based on current inventory and projected exchanges, procurements, and capacities. It will include screens that allow users to readily assess the feasibility of the forecast, identify failures to meet the demand, revise input data, and re-run the automated forecast calculation. In addition, the system will automatically retrieve the current exchange demand from an external database. Approved forecasts from the system will automatically update work order plans and procurement plans in the existing inventory and production control database. The timing of optics exchanges affects the forecast of damage and future exchanges, so an approved exchange plan will be fed back to the demand database and be used to calculate the next demand projection. The system will read the demand data and update the forecast and output files daily. This specification has been divided into two parts. This document, Part 1 lays out the major design decisions and specifies the architectural, component, and data structure designs. Part 2 will add interface designs, quality assurance and testing plans, and deployment details.

Gaylord, J

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

307

Reliability Estimates for Power Supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Failure rates for large power supplies at a fusion facility are critical knowledge needed to estimate availability of the facility or to set priorties for repairs and spare components. A study of the "failure to operate on demand" and "failure to continue to operate" failure rates has been performed for the large power supplies at DIII-D, which provide power to the magnet coils, the neutral beam injectors, the electron cyclotron heating systems, and the fast wave systems. When one of the power supplies fails to operate, the research program has to be either temporarily changed or halted. If one of the power supplies for the toroidal or ohmic heating coils fails, the operations have to be suspended or the research is continued at de-rated parameters until a repair is completed. If one of the power supplies used in the auxiliary plasma heating systems fails the research is often temporarily changed until a repair is completed. The power supplies are operated remotely and repairs are only performed when the power supplies are off line, so that failure of a power supply does not cause any risk to personnel. The DIII-D Trouble Report database was used to determine the number of power supply faults (over 1,700 reports), and tokamak annual operations data supplied the number of shots, operating times, and power supply usage for the DIII-D operating campaigns between mid-1987 and 2004. Where possible, these power supply failure rates from DIII-D will be compared to similar work that has been performed for the Joint European Torus equipment. These independent data sets support validation of the fusion-specific failure rate values.

Lee C. Cadwallader; Peter I. Petersen

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Public Health Issues Associated with Small Drinking Water Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the combined efforts of epidemiologists, environmental health specialists, and laboratory personnel from technical assistance to state and local environmental health agencies to enhance laboratory capacity, environmental health services, and epidemiologic expertise. NCEH proposed a number of specific projects

309

Petroleum Supply and Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2/9/2005: Petroleum Supply and Market Outlook. This presentation contains content that your browser may not be able to show properly.

310

School supply drive winding down  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

submit School supply drive winding down The drive is collecting materials for schools throughout Northern New Mexico and will be distributed by the Lab and Self Help, Inc....

311

Motor Systems Efficiency Supply Curves  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

expert opinion and available data from the United States, Canada, the European Union, Thailand, Vietnam, and Brazil, bottom-up energy efficiency supply curve models were...

312

Petroleum Supply and Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum Supply and Market Outlook Briefing for the 7th Annual International Airport Operations/Jet Fuel Conference Orlando, Florida Mike Burdette

313

Crude Oil Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Crude Oil Supply Domestic Production (a) .......................................... 6.22 6.29 6.42 7.02 7.11 7.29 7.61 7.97 8.26 8.45 8.57 8.86 6.49 7.50 8.54 Alaska .................................................................. 0.58 0.53 0.44 0.55 0.54 0.51 0.48 0.52 0.51 0.47 0.42 0.49 0.53 0.51 0.47 Federal Gulf of Mexico (b) .................................... 1.34 1.19 1.18 1.36 1.30 1.22 1.27 1.29 1.34 1.36 1.37 1.45 1.27 1.27 1.38 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ................................ 4.31 4.57 4.80 5.11 5.28 5.56 5.87 6.16 6.41 6.61 6.77 6.91 4.70 5.72 6.68 Crude Oil Net Imports (c) ......................................... 8.55 8.88 8.52 7.89 7.47 7.61 7.94 7.36 6.66 6.78 6.83 6.06 8.46 7.60 6.58 SPR Net Withdrawals ..............................................

314

Property Tax Exemption for Machinery, Equipment, Materials, and Supplies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exemption for Machinery, Equipment, Materials, and Exemption for Machinery, Equipment, Materials, and Supplies (Kansas) Property Tax Exemption for Machinery, Equipment, Materials, and Supplies (Kansas) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Kansas Program Type Property Tax Incentive Provider Revenue The Property Tax Exemption for Machinery, Equipment, Materials, and Supplies exists for low-dollar items of machinery, equipment, materials and supplies used for business purposes, or in activities by an entity not subject to Kansas income tax. A property tax exemption exists for all machinery, equipment, materials and supplies used for business purposes, or

315

Minimum Stream Flow and Water Sale Contracts (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The commission may provide certain minimum quantities of stream flow or sell water on a unit pricing basis for water supply purposes from the water supply storage in reservoir impoundments or parts...

316

Health and water quality monitoring of Pure Home Water's ceramic filter dissemination in the northern region of Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pure Home Water (PHW) is a social enterprise that promotes and disseminates household drinking water technologies in the Northern Region of Ghana. Currently their main product is a pot-shaped Potters for Peace-type ceramic ...

Johnson, Sophie M. (Sophie Marie)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Economic benefits of R and D on gas supply technologies. [Unconventioal natural gas resources which are tight sands, Devonian shale, coal seam gas, and gas co-produced with water  

SciTech Connect

Advanced natural gas supply technologies, if successful, could lower the average cost of gas to consumers by 18% and increase the expected gas demand by 2 quads/year by the year 2000. Advanced production techniques for unconventional gas will have by far the greatest impact on future gas prices, providing economic benefits of between $200 billion and $320 billion. Advanced SNG from coal will provide only a $9 billion benefit if unconventional gas meets all of its performance targets. However, higher demand and failure of unconventional gas R and D could raise the benefits of SNG research to $107 billion. SNG research provides a hedge value that increases the likelihood of receiving a positive payoff from gas supply R and D. Changing the performance goals for SNG research to emphasize cost reduction rather than acceleration of the date of commercialization would greatly increase the potential benefits of the program. 9 references, 8 figures, 5 tables.

Darrow, K.G.; Ashby, A.B.; Nesbitt, D.M.; Marshalla, R.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

The Drinking Water Security and Safety Amendments of 2002: Is America's Drinking Water Infrastructure Safer Four Years Later?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NAT'L STRATEGY FOR HOME- LAND SECURITY, supra note 50, at 9.on Creating the Home- land Security Department, supra noteM. Merriam, Homeland Security Begins At Home: Local Planning

Shermer, Steven D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

The Drinking Water Security and Safety Amendments of 2002: Is America's Drinking Water Infrastructure Safer Four Years Later?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

specific chemicals, including chlorine, as opposed to otherat 927 (". . . [a] strike on a chlorine disinfectant tankof an airborne toxic chlorine cloud which could prove

Shermer, Steven D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Disinfecting Water Wells by Shock Chlorination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If your well has been flooded, it must be shock chlorinated before it can be used as a source of drinking water. This publication explains how to disinfect a well using either dry chlorine or liquid household bleach.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Disinfecting Water Wells by Shock Chlorination (Spanish)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If your well has been flooded, it must be shock chlorinated before it can be used as a source of drinking water. This publication explains how to disinfect a well using either dry chlorine or liquid household bleach.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2007-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

322

Repetitive resonant railgun power supply  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A repetitive resonant railgun power supply provides energy for repetitively propelling projectiles from a pair of parallel rails. The supply comprises an energy storage capacitor, a storage inductor to form a resonant circuit with the energy storage capacitor and a magnetic switch to transfer energy between the resonant circuit and the pair of parallel rails for the propelling of projectiles.

Honig, Emanuel M. (Los Alamos, NM); Nunnally, William C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Repetitive resonant railgun power supply  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A repetitive resonant railgun power supply provides energy for repetitively propelling projectiles from a pair of parallel rails. The supply comprises an energy storage capacitor, a storage inductor to form a resonant circuit with the energy storage capacitor and a magnetic switch to transfer energy between the resonant circuit and the pair of parallel rails for the propelling of projectiles.

Honig, E.M.; Nunnally, W.C.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

324

Petroleum Supply Annual, Volume 1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 With Data for 2012 | Release Date: September 27, 2013 | Next Release Date: August 28, 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 Go Re-release of the Petroleum Supply Annual with data for 2011 Volume 1 - Final annual data for the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. Volume 1 Tables All Tables All Tables Detailed Statistics Tables National Statistics 1 U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products PDF CSV 2 U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products PDF CSV Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 3 PAD District 1 PDF CSV 4 Daily Average PAD District 1 PDF CSV

325

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data by Tammy G. Heppner and Matthew M. Breslin Overview For 2007, 66 petroleum supply data series were analyzed to determine how close the PSM values were to the final PSA values. For these series, 50 out of the 66 PSM values were within 1 percent of the PSA values in terms of mean absolute percent error as compared to 38 out of 66 in 2006. Sixty-two petroleum supply data series were analyzed to see how close the MFW estimates were to the final PSA values. For these 62 series, 22 MFW estimates were within 2 percent of the PSA values in terms of mean absolute percent error and, of those, 9 were within 1 percent, compared to 27 and 10, respectively, for 2006. Petroleum supply data collected by the Petroleum Division

326

electricity supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

supply supply Dataset Summary Description The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) publishes a wide selection of data and statistics on energy power technologies from a variety of sources (e.g. EIA, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, EPRI and AWEA). In 2006, NREL published the 4th edition, presenting, among other things, data on the U.S. electricity supply. Source NREL Date Released March 05th, 2006 (8 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords electricity supply NREL Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Electricity Supply (13 worksheets) (xls, 1.2 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment

327

Safe water storage in Kenya's modified clay pot : standardization, tap design, and cost recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the main components necessary for providing safe drinking water for users who lack piped water in the home is the ability to safely store it in the home. Users in the Nyanza Province of Kenya frequently carry water ...

Young, Suzanne E

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Biosand filtration of high turbidity water : modified filter design and safe filtrate storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unsafe drinking water is a major cause of water-related diseases that predominantly affect people living in developing countries. The most prevalent water-related disease is diarrhea, estimated to kill 1.8 million children ...

Collin, Clair

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Metering Secondary Water in Residential Irrigation Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The use of residential secondary or dual water systems for irrigation purposes is common in the western United States where water supplies are scarce. While… (more)

Richards, Gregory L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Essays on Water Resource Economics and Agricultural Extension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fixed fixed Residential water demand3.2 Residential Water Demand Estimation . . . . . . . . .Value of Supply Reliability in Urban Water Systems 3.1 Loss

Buck, Steven Charles

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Improving supply chain resilience by multi-stage supply chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to the global expansion of Company A's supply chain network, it is becoming more vulnerable to many disruptions. These disruptions often incur additional costs; and require time to respond to and recover from these ...

Yang, Jingxia, M. Eng, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Improve supply chain resilience by multi-stage supply chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to the global expansion of Company A's supply chain network, it is becoming more vulnerable to many disruptions. These disruptions often incur additional costs; and require time to respond to and recover from these ...

Xu, Jie, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Petroleum supply monthly, April 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographical regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the US. The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the US.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Petroleum supply monthly, February 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Petroleum Supply Monthly presents data describing the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the US. The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders; operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. Data are divided into two sections: Summary statistics and Detailed statistics.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Multiple resonant railgun power supply  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple repetitive resonant railgun power supply provides energy for repetitively propelling projectiles from a pair of parallel rails. A plurality of serially connected paired parallel rails are powered by similar power supplies. Each supply comprises an energy storage capacitor, a storage inductor to form a resonant circuit with the energy storage capacitor and a magnetic switch to transfer energy between the resonant circuit and the pair of parallel rails for the propelling of projectiles. The multiple serial operation permits relatively small energy components to deliver overall relatively large amounts of energy to the projectiles being propelled.

Honig, Emanuel M. (Los Alamos, NM); Nunnally, William C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Multiple resonant railgun power supply  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple repetitive resonant railgun power supply provides energy for repetitively propelling projectiles from a pair of parallel rails. A plurality of serially connected paired parallel rails are powered by similar power supplies. Each supply comprises an energy storage capacitor, a storage inductor to form a resonant circuit with the energy storage capacitor and a magnetic switch to transfer energy between the resonant circuit and the pair of parallel rails for the propelling of projectiles. The multiple serial operation permits relatively small energy components to deliver overall relatively large amounts of energy to the projectiles being propelled.

Honig, E.M.; Nunnally, W.C.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

337

coal supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

coal supply coal supply Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 15, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts. The data is broken down into production, net imports, consumption by sector and price. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO coal coal supply disposition. prices EIA Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Coal Supply, Disposition, and Prices- Reference Case (xls, 91.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

338

energy supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

supply supply Dataset Summary Description OECD Factbook 2010: Economic, Environmental and Social Statistics - ISBN 92-64-08356-1 - © OECD 2010. Available directly from the OECD Statistics website (beta version). Source OECD Date Released January 01st, 2010 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords energy supply ISBN 92-64-08356-1 OECD renewable energy world Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon OECD Factbook 2010: Contribution of Renewables to Energy Supply (xls, 38.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1971 - 2008 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment the User can upload up to 1,500 words or 2,000 cells (equivalent to 4 tables or graphs) provided that suitable acknowledgement of OECD as source and copyright owner is given. The User must link to the OECD page where the uploaded material was taken from;

339

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model By Tancred C.M. Lidderdale This article first appeared in the Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1995, Energy Information Administration, DOE/EIA-0202(95) (Washington, DC, July 1995), pp. 33-42, 83-85. The regression results and historical data for production, inventories, and imports have been updated in this presentation. Contents * Introduction o Table 1. Oxygenate production capacity and demand * Oxygenate demand o Table 2. Estimated RFG demand share - mandated RFG areas, January 1998 * Fuel ethanol supply and demand balance o Table 3. Fuel ethanol annual statistics * MTBE supply and demand balance o Table 4. EIA MTBE annual statistics * Refinery balances

340

The 3He Supply Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the main uses for 3He is in gas proportional counters for neutron detection. Radiation portal monitors deployed for homeland security and non-proliferation use such detectors. Other uses of 3He are for research detectors, commercial instruments, well logging detectors, dilution refrigerators, for targets or cooling in nuclear research, and for basic research in condensed matter physics. The US supply of 3He comes almost entirely from the decay of tritium used in nuclear weapons by the US and Russia. A few other countries contribute a small amount to the world’s 3He supply. Due to the large increase in use of 3He for homeland security, the supply has dwindled, and can no longer meet the demand. This white paper reviews the problems of supply, utilization, and alternatives.

Kouzes, Richard T.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Total supply chain cost model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sourcing and outsourcing decisions have taken on increased importance within Teradyne to improve efficiency and competitiveness. This project delivered a conceptual framework and a software tool to analyze supply chain ...

Wu, Claudia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Petroleum Supply and Market Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

A presentation to the 7th Annual International Airport Operations/Jet Fuel Conference, in Orlando, Florida, on February 3, 2005, giving EIA¿s outlook for petroleum supply and prices, with particular attention to jet fuel.

Information Center

2005-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

343

TRANSISTOR HIGH VOLTAGE POWER SUPPLY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High voltage, direct current power supplies are described for use with battery powered nuclear detection equipment. The particular advantages of the power supply described, are increased efficiency and reduced size and welght brought about by the use of transistors in the circuit. An important feature resides tn the employment of a pair of transistors in an alternatefiring oscillator circuit having a coupling transformer and other circuit components which are used for interconnecting the various electrodes of the transistors.

Driver, G.E.

1958-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Dezincification and Brass Lead Leaching in Premise Plumbing Systems: Effects of Alloy, Physical Conditions and Water Chemistry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Brass components are widely used in drinking water distribution systems as valves, faucets and other fixtures. They can be corroded by âdezincification,â which is the… (more)

Zhang, Yaofu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Application of solar energy to the supply of industrial process hot water. Energy reduction and economic analysis report. Aerotherm report TR-76-220. [Can washing at Campbell Soup Company in California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A discussion is provided of the following aspects of the solar process hot water program: criteria and rationale used in process selection, expected fuel savings to be provided by widespread use of the solar energy system in the industry, and economic evaluation of the system. The design, construction, operation, and evaluation of a solar water heating system for application to the can washing process at the Campbell Soup Company's plant located in Sacramento, California are included.

None

1976-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

346

THE UV-TUBE AS AN APPROPRIATE WATER DISINFECTION TECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Tube, as the cost per liter of water produced decreases as water use increases. The water quality is regulatedi THE UV-TUBE AS AN APPROPRIATE WATER DISINFECTION TECHNOLOGY: An Assessment of Technical of contaminated drinking water ­ which causes so many deaths and so much illness ­ should have a simple technical

Kammen, Daniel M.

347

Water pollution diagnosis with a multi-agent approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Providing high quality drinking water with no disruption is the main objective of every municipal water system. The paper presents the application of a multi-agent approach to water pollution diagnosis in a municipal water system. The main benefit of ... Keywords: artificial intelligence, environmental protection, multi-agent system, water pollution diagnosis

Constantin Nichita; Mihaela Oprea

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Water Bugs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bugs Bugs Nature Bulletin No. 221-A March 12, 1966 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WATER BUGS It is fascinating to lie in a boat or on a log at the edge of the water and watch the drama that unfolds among the small water animals. Among the star performers in small streams and ponds are the Water Bugs. These are aquatic members of that large group of insects called the "true bugs", most of which live on land. Moreover, unlike many other types of water insects, they do not have gills but get their oxygen directly from the air. Those that do go beneath the surface usually carry an oxygen supply with them in the form of a shiny glistening sheath of air imprisoned among a covering of fine waterproof hairs. The common water insect known to small boys at the "Whirligig Bug" is not a water bug but a beetle.

349

Petroleum Supply Monthly - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

30 Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Supply Monthly, October 2011 Table 24. PAD District 5 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil ...

350

NREL: Jobs and Economic Competitiveness - Supply Constraints...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supply Constraints Analysis Some of the materials used in solar PV modules, such as tellurium and indium, are rare materials in limited supply. Solar PV technologies have grown...

351

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ous systems absorb large amounts of hydroelectric power.that snow melts and hydroelectric power supply increases andwater supplies from hydroelectric dams or discards renewable

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Environmental decision making: supply-chain considerations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2. It is seen that the “power generation and supply” sectortool manufacturing. The power generation value, however, iskg are caused by the “power generation and supply” sector.

Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Dornfeld, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Designing of a prototype heat-sealer to manufacture solar water sterilization pouches for use in developing nations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water purification proves to be a difficult task in many developing nations. The SODIS (SOlar water DISinfection) process is a method which improves the microbiological quality of water making it safer for drinking and ...

Quinlan, Saundra S

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Petroleum supply monthly, January 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

NONE

1996-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

Petroleum Supply Monthly, August 1990  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) district movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics.

Not Available

1990-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

356

Petroleum supply monthly, September 1991  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administrations for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 states and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics. 65 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

357

Long Term World Oil Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Notes: The following pages summarize a recent EIA presentation on estimates of the world conventional oil resource base and the year when production from it will peak and then begin to decline. A version of this presentation was given by former EIA Administrator Jay Hakes to the April 18, 2000 meeting of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists in New Orleans, Louisiana. Specific information about this presentation may be obtained from John Wood (john.wood@eia.doe.gov), Gary Long (gary.long@eia.doe.gov) or David Morehouse (david.morehouse@eia.doe.gov). Long Term World Oil Supply http://www.eia.doe.gov/pub/oil_gas/petroleum/presentations/2000/long_term_supply/sld001.htm [8/10/2000 4:56:23 PM] Slide 2 of 20 http://www.eia.doe.gov/pub/oil_gas/petroleum/presentations/2000/long_term_supply/sld002.htm [8/10/2000 4:56:24 PM]

358

oil supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

oil supply oil supply Dataset Summary Description CIA: World Factbook assessment of proved reserves of crude oil in barrels (bbl). Proved reserves are those quantities of petroleum which, by analysis of geological and engineering data, can be estimated with a high degree of confidence to be commercially recoverable from a given date forward, from known reservoirs and under current economic conditions. Estimated as of January 1st, 2010. Source CIA Date Released January 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords crude oil energy energy data international oil oil supply Data text/csv icon 2010 Proved Oil Reserves (csv, 4.6 KiB) text/plain icon Original Text Format (txt, 6.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency

359

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

in in the Office of Oil and Gas (OOG) of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) showed an improvement in the accuracy of the 2006 data from initial estimates, to interim values, to final values. These data were presented in a series of PD products: the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), This Week in Petroleum (TWIP), the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM), and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Weekly estimates in the WPSR and TWIP were the first values available. Figure FE1 illustrates that just as there was an improvement in gas mileage over time, there was an improvement in petroleum supply data accuracy with increasing review time. For the monthly-from-weekly (MFW) data, respondents have the shortest reporting time, analysts have the shortest review time, and the data are least accurate. For the PSM data, respondents have a longer reporting time than the weekly, analysts have

360

Petroleum supply monthly, July 1993  

SciTech Connect

Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: Petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

1993-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Petroleum supply monthly, January 1994  

SciTech Connect

Data presented describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States. The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Meet the Challenge - Supply Chain | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meet the Challenge - Supply Chain Sustainable Supply Chains Submissions Let's Talk About Sustainable Supply Chain You are here Data.gov Communities Sustainable Supply Chain...

363

Final Report, Interagency Agreement No. DE-AI03-97ER62461, Elevated CO2 and Limited Water Supply Effects on Carbon Processes and Sequestration in a C4 Grass (Sorghum) Ecosystem  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment (FACE) experiments were conducted at ample and limited levels of soil moisture on sorghum in 1998 and 1999 at the University of Arizona, Maricopa Agricultural Center, Maricopa, AZ. Numerous measurements were taken including biomass production, grain yield, soil carbon sequestration, N{sub 2}O production, stomatal conductance, leaf water potential, canopy temperature, net radiation, and reflectance at many wavelengths. Accomplishments are listed and discussed.

Bruce A. Kimball

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

364

PEP MAGNET POWER SUPPLY SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The bend circuit requires 1858 volts at 1319 amps or 2450 kWtotal at 18 GeV. Four 600 volt supplies will be used, two inlocation vary from 293 to 538 volts at the 18 GeV operation

Jackson, L.T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Sustainable Supply Chain | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainable Supply Chain Sustainable Supply Chain Sustainable Supply Chains Submissions Let's Talk About Sustainable Supply Chain Welcome to the Sustainable Supply Chain Community of Practice Bringing together government, industry, associations, non-profits and academic institutions to achieve more sustainable supply chains. Sustainable Supply Chain - New Updates New Updates View More Be a Champion Be a champion The Sustainable Supply Chain Community of Practice seeks champions from industry, academia and non-profits to lead each of the community market sectors. Do you know or are you a member of a leading edge organization that is implementing sustainable supply chain practices within one of the seven current community market sectors? If yes, nominate the organization as a Champion. Sustainable supply chain practices lead to cost savings,

366

Petroleum supply monthly, June 1993  

SciTech Connect

Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics. The tables and figures ih the Summary Statistics section of the PSM present a time series of selected petroleum data on a US level. Most time series include preliminary estimates for one month based on the Weekly Petroleum Supply Reporting System; statistics based on the most recent data from the Monthly Petroleum Supply Reporting System (MPSRS); and statistics published in prior issues of the PSM and PSA. The Detailed Statistics tables of the PSM present statistics for the most current month available as well as year-to-date. In most cases, the statistics are presented for several geographic areas - - the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia), five PAD Districts, and 12 Refining Districts. At the US and PAD District level, the total volume and the daily rate of activities are presented. The statistics are developed from monthly survey forms submitted by respondents to the EIA and from data provided firom other sources.

Not Available

1993-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

367

Given that water is the sine qua non of life, it is intriguing that animals can live in deserts, environments with little  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in deserts, environments with little drinking water, high ambient temperatures (Ta), intense solar radiation, low humidity and desiccating winds. Because desert birds are typically diurnal, at times

Williams, Jos. B.

368

Energy-Water Nexus  

SciTech Connect

Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) energy and water are interconnected; (2) new energy sources will place increased demands on water supplies; (3) existing energy sources will be subjected to increasing restrictions on their water use; and (4) integrated decision support tools will need to be developed to help policy makers decide which policies and advanced technologies can address these issues.

Horak, W.

2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

369

Ceramic filter manufacturing in Northern Ghana : water storage and quality control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2009, Pure Home Water (PHW), a Ghana based non-profit organization working to provide affordable and safe drinking water to people in the Northern Region of Ghana, began the construction of a ceramic pot filter (CPF) ...

Kleiman, Shanti Lisa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Household water treatment and safe storage options for Northern Region Ghana : consumer preference and relative cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A range of household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) products are available in Northern Region Ghana which have the potential to significantly improve local drinking water quality. However, to date, the region has ...

Green, Vanessa (Vanessa Layton)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Appropriate technology water treatment processes for MaeLa Temporary Shelter, Thailand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis recommends the use of horizontal-flow roughing filters to treat spring water of variable annual quality in MaeLa Temporary Shelter, Thailand. The public drinking water system for 45,000 refugees is overseen by ...

Vater, Katherine Ann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Cross-sectional epidemiological study on water and sanitation practices in the northern region of Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cross-sectional epidemiological study was conducted to obtain baseline data on drinking water and sanitation practices in the Northern Region of Ghana. This study was performed in conjunction with Pure Home Water (PHW) ...

Peletz, Rachel Louise

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

opportunities at U.S. nuclear power plants. U.S. Dep. EnergyAlthough coal and nuclear power plants tend to supply baseis difficult to develop nuclear power plants in water-scarce

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Radiochemical and Chemical Constituents in Water from Selected Wells and Springs from the Southern Boundary of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to the Hagerman Area, Idaho, 1998  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Geological Survey and the Idaho Department of Water Resources, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, sampled 18 sites as part of the fourth round of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to the Hagerman area. The samples were analyzed for selected radiochemical and chemical constituents. The samples were collected from 2 domestic wells, 12 irrigation wells, 2 stock wells, 1 spring, and 1 public supply well. Two quality-assurance samples also were collected and analyzed. None of the reported radiochemical or chemical constituent concentrations exceeded the established maximum contaminant levels for drinking water. Many of the radionuclide- and inorganic-constituent concentrations were greater than the respective reporting levels. Most of the organic-constituent concentrations were less than the reporting levels.

R. C. Bartholomay; B. V. Twining (USGS); L. J. Campbell (Idaho Department of Water Resources)

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Modeling water use at thermoelectric power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The withdrawal and consumption of water at thermoelectric power plants affects regional ecology and supply security of both water and electricity. The existing field data on US power plant water use, however, is of limited ...

Rutberg, Michael J. (Michael Jacob)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Meeting the mandate for clean water : an evaluation of privately managed U.S. water and wastewater systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reliable provision of clean and safe drinking water is critical for public health, economic stability and growth in the United States. Due to a combination of financial, regulatory and operational challenges, however, it ...

Freund, Evan Benjamin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Water is used for many purposes, includ-ing growing crops, producing copper,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WATER USES Water is used for many purposes, includ- ing growing crops, producing copper, generating electricity, watering lawns, keeping clean, drinking and recreation. Bal- ancing the water budget comes down of the water budget. Reducing demand involves re- ducing how much water each person uses, lim- iting the number

378

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale in the United States, or sell U.S. gas to foreign consumers. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes unconventional gas recovery from low permeability formations of sandstone and shale, and coalbeds. Foreign gas transactions may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico) or transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 89 Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Report #:DOE/EIA-0554(2006) Release date: March 2006

379

Petroleum Supply Monthly, July 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 states and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

Not Available

1990-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

380

High voltage DC power supply  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high voltage DC power supply having a first series resistor at the output for limiting current in the event of a short-circuited output, a second series resistor for sensing the magnitude of output current, and a voltage divider circuit for providing a source of feedback voltage for use in voltage regulation is disclosed. The voltage divider circuit is coupled to the second series resistor so as to compensate the feedback voltage for a voltage drop across the first series resistor. The power supply also includes a pulse-width modulated control circuit, having dual clock signals, which is responsive to both the feedback voltage and a command voltage, and also includes voltage and current measuring circuits responsive to the feedback voltage and the voltage developed across the second series resistor respectively. 7 figs.

Droege, T.F.

1989-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

1992 Conversion Resources Supply Document  

SciTech Connect

In recent years conservation of electric power has become an integral part of utility planning. The 1980 Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Northwest Power Act) requires that the region consider conservation potential in planning acquisitions of resources to meet load growth. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) developed its first estimates of conservation potential in 1982. Since that time BPA has updated its conservation supply analyses as a part of its Resource Program and other planning efforts. Major updates were published in 1985 and in January 1990. This 1992 document presents updated supply curves, which are estimates of the savings potential over time (cumulative savings) at different cost levels of energy conservation measures (ECMs). ECMs are devices, pieces of equipment, or actions that increase the efficiency of electricity use and reduce the amount of electricity used by end-use equipment.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Antelope Valley Water Storage, LLC RFP - DEADLINE: March 31,...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-Renewable-Energy.doc REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS RENEWABLE ENERGY SUPPLY FOR ANTELOPE VALLEY WATER BANKING PROJECT ANTELOPE VALLEY WATER STORAGE, LLC. Filing Deadline: March 31, 2008 -...

383

Petroleum Supply Annual 1997, Volume 1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, Volume 1 7, Volume 1 Entire . The entire report as a single file. PDF 1.0MB . . Front Matter . Cover Page, Contacts, Preface, and Table of Contents Page PDF . . Summary Statistics . Summary Statistics Tables S1 Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Overview, 1981-Present PDF S2 Crude Oil Supply and Disposition, 1981-Present PDF S3 Crude Oil and Petroleum Product Imports, 1981-Present PDF S4 Finished Motor Gasoline Supply and Disposition PDF S5 Distillate Fuel Oil Supply and Disposition, 1981-Present PDF S6 Residual Fuel Oil Supply and Disposition, 1981-Present PDF S7 Jet Fuel Supply and Disposition, 1981-Present PDF S8 Propane/Propylene Supply and Disposition, 1981-Present PDF S9 Liquefied Petroleum Gases Supply and Disposition, 1981-Present PDF S10 Other Petroleum Products Supply and Disposition, 1981-Present PDF

384

The impact of assured supply inventory policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A case study is presented of a successful quick serve fast food restaurant chain that uses inventory throughout the supply chain as a buffer against uncertainty in supply and demand. This is a common operational strategy ...

Stanton, Daniel Jonathon

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Supply chains: a manager's guide, First edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

“An excellent summary of the state of supply chain management going into the twenty-first century. Explains the essential concepts clearly and offers practical, down-to-earth advice for making supply chains more efficient and adaptive. Truly a ...

David Taylor,

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

EIA projections of coal supply and demand  

SciTech Connect

Contents of this report include: EIA projections of coal supply and demand which covers forecasted coal supply and transportation, forecasted coal demand by consuming sector, and forecasted coal demand by the electric utility sector; and policy discussion.

Klein, D.E.

1989-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

387

Business Innovation Programs Agribusiness Supply Chain Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Business Innovation Programs Agribusiness Supply Chain Survey Industrial Energy Efficiency Healthy LAFAYETTE, Ind. - An industry's supply chain is only as strong as its weakest link. For the agribusiness Workforce Green Worker Certification Nanotechnology Transfer Energy Systems Network Innovations Link #12

388

Supply chain management in the cement industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditionally supply chain management has played an operational role within cement and mineral extraction commodity companies. Recently, cost reduction projects have brought supply chain management into the limelight. In ...

Agudelo, Isabel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

OIL AND GAS SUPPLY MODULE OIL AND GAS SUPPLY MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Lower 48 Onshore and Shallow Offshore Supply Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Deep Water Offshore Supply Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Alaska Oil and Gas Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Enhanced Oil Recovery Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Foreign Natural Gas Supply Submodule The oil and gas supply module (OGSM) consists of a series of process submodules that project the availability of: Domestic crude oil production and dry natural gas production from onshore, offshore, and Alaskan reservoirs Imported pipeline-quality gas from Mexico and Canada Imported liquefied natural gas. The OGSM regions are shown in Figure 12. The driving assumption of the OGSM is that domestic oil and gas exploration and development are undertaken if the discounted present value of the

390

Petroleum Supply Monthly - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

PAD District; 37: Imports of Crude Oil ... Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve: PDF: Glossary; Petroleum Supply Monthly Definitions of Petroleum ...

391

Intermediate-Term Uranium Supply Curve Estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was undertaken to estimate U.S. natural uranium supply capacities and associated production costs over the period 1979-1990 and to develop the general supply outlook to 2000. Annual supply capacity schedules were estimated on an individual mill and mine family basis. Future production schedules were estimated by balancing estimated supply capacity with DOE's future demand projections; the impact of private-sector inventory levels was accounted for.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Natural Gas Supply Conference - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Supply Conference. William Trapmann Energy Information Administration. American Public Gas Association January 30 & 31, 2001

393

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scale Renewable Energy Integration . . . . . . . . . . .Impacts of Renewable Energy Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.3 Coupling Renewable Energy with Deferrable

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Petroleum supply monthly: December 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data are presented which describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major U.S. geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States. Data are presented in two sections: Summary Statistics, presenting a time series of selected petroleum data on a U.S. level, and Detailed Statistics, presenting statistics for the most current month available as well as year to date.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Water flows, energy demand, and market analysis of the informal water sector in Kisumu, Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis Water flows, energy demand, and market analysis of the informal water sector in Kisumu Available online xxxx Keywords: Informal water sector Water flows Developing countries Water market analysis to cope with popu- lation growth. Informal water businesses fulfill unmet water supply needs, yet little

Elimelech, Menachem

396

Strategic Spot Trading in Supply Chains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a variety of industries ranging from agriculture to electronics and oil, procurement takes place through a combination of bilateral fixed-price contracts and open market trading among supply chain participants, which allows them to improve supply ... Keywords: demand and cost information, fixed-price contracts, procurement and supply chain, spot trading

Haim Mendelson; Tunay I. Tunca

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Power Supply Maintenance and Application Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Instrument power supplies are very reliable; however, there is limited information that ties together operating history, maintenance practices, and data associated with repairing versus replacing power supplies. Also, the issue of equipment obsolescence affects many of the considerations associated with making power supply maintenance decisions.

2001-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

398

BRYAN LOVELL Energy supply, demand and impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BRYAN LOVELL Energy supply, demand and impact Now it is Britain's turn to think harder, says Brian both are true. Most predict that fossil fuels must remain a significant part of our energy supply, Britain has had a comfortable and profitable respite from anxieties about security of energy supply. Now

Cambridge, University of

399

Special Glial Journal Club Seminar "Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Special Glial Journal Club Seminar "Energy Supply to the CNS" Clare Howarth Department Howarth - Energy supply to the CNS I will consider three aspects of the energetic design of the brain: (1 and therapy. (2) How the blood supplies to particular brain regions are matched to the estimated energy

Newman, Eric A.

400

Water footprint of electric power generation : modeling its use and analyzing options for a water-scarce future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interdependency between water and energy, sometimes called the water-energy nexus, is growing in importance as demand for both water and energy increases. Energy is required for water treatment and supply, while virtually ...

Delgado Martín, Anna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Demystifying water treatment  

SciTech Connect

Increasingly accountable for the environmental quality and cost of managing their waste and process water streams, customers require more precise data about the constituents in their water. This has forced suppliers to unlock some of the secrets of water treatment. In the open exchange of information, users are trading in esoteric formulations for products that are more chemical efficient and environmentally benign. Factoring more prominently in the water treatment equation are service and supply. This paper reviews some of these simpler treatments.

Hairston, D.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Fuel cell power supply with oxidant and fuel gas switching  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a fuel cell vehicular power plant. Fuel for the fuel stack is supplied by a hydrocarbon (methanol) catalytic cracking reactor and CO shift reactor. A water electrolysis subsystem is associated with the stack. During low power operation part of the fuel cell power is used to electrolyze water with hydrogen and oxygen electrolysis products being stored in pressure vessels. During peak power intervals, viz, during acceleration or start-up, pure oxygen and pure hydrogen from the pressure vessel are supplied as the reaction gases to the cathodes and anodes in place of air and methanol reformate. This allows the fuel cell stack to be sized for normal low power/air operation but with a peak power capacity several times greater than that for normal operation.

McElroy, James F. (Hamilton, MA); Chludzinski, Paul J. (Swampscott, MA); Dantowitz, Philip (Peabody, MA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Fuel cell power supply with oxidant and fuel gas switching  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a fuel cell vehicular power plant. Fuel for the fuel stack is supplied by a hydrocarbon (methanol) catalytic cracking reactor and CO shift reactor. A water electrolysis subsystem is associated with the stack. During low power operation part of the fuel cell power is used to electrolyze water with hydrogen and oxygen electrolysis products being stored in pressure vessels. During peak power intervals, viz, during acceleration or start-up, pure oxygen and pure hydrogen from the pressure vessel are supplied as the reaction gases to the cathodes and anodes in place of air and methanol reformate. This allows the fuel cell stack to be sized for normal low power/air operation but with a peak power capacity several times greater than that for normal operation. 2 figs.

McElroy, J.F.; Chludzinski, P.J.; Dantowitz, P.

1987-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

404

The AGS main magnet power supply upgrade  

SciTech Connect

The AGS Main Magnet Power Supply consists of a group of thyristor controlled power converters that operate from full rectify to full invert. In order to minimize ripple during the critical periods of injection and extraction 24 pulse converters are used for these portions of the cycle. The maximum voltage available in this mode is nominally 2,000 volts. The converters that are functional during this portion of the cycle are called the flat-top bank or ``F`` bank modules. During acceleration and invert where voltages of up to 12,000 volts are needed and where the ripple requirements are less stringent, groups of twelve pulse converters are operational. These converters are called the Pulsed bank or ``P`` bank modules. The original controlled rectifier system consisted of 96 large mercury filled excitron tubes divided equally between the P bank and F bank converters. These devices were extremely durable and ran successfully for over twenty years. It was, decided to replace the excitron farm with multiple arrangements of three-phase, full-wave, bridge modules that utilize silicon controlled rectifiers (SCR`s or thyristors) as the switching element. In order to match the existing transformer connections and buswork, eight identical modules were required; four for the P bank system and four for the F bank system. In order to reduce noise pickup and provide electrical isolation the high level SCR gate triggers are provided via fiberoptic cable. The status of various parameters such as water flow, auxiliary power supply performance, trigger circuitry failure, over voltage, overcurrent, and loss of phase reference are monitored via a programmable logic controller (PLCs). The PLCs use isolated input and output modules for various voltage levels from TTL to 150 Vdc to 125 Vac. These devices are extremely flexible and have allowed modifications and improvements that have enhanced the performance over any equivalent hard wired system.

Sandberg, J.N.; Casella, R.; Geller, J.; Marneris, I.; Soukas, A.; Schumburg, N.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Natural Gas Supply SBIR Program  

SciTech Connect

The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program was created in 1982 by Public Law 97-219 and reauthorized in 1992 until the year 2000 by Public Law 102-564. The purposes of the new law are to (1) expand and improve the SBIR program, 2) emphasize the program`s goal of increasing private sector commercialization of technology developed through Federal R&D, (3) increase small business participation in Federal R&D, and (4) improve the Federal Government`s dissemination of information concerning the SBIR program. DOE`s SBIR pro-ram has two features that are unique. In the 1995 DOE SBIR solicitation, the DOE Fossil Energy topics were: environmental technology for natural gas, oil, and coal; advanced recovery of oil; natural gas supply; natural gas utilization; advanced coal-based power systems; and advanced fossil fuels research. The subtopics for this solicitation`s Natural Gas Supply topic are (1) drilling, completion, and stimulation; (2) low-permeability Formations; (3) delivery and storage; and (4) natural gas upgrading.

Shoemaker, H.D.; Gwilliam, W.J.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Power supply design for Hadron Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recently, a study investigated the feasibility of building a large 60 GeV, kaon factory accelerator. This paper presents the conceptual design of the magnet power supplies and energy storage system. In this study the following three systems were investigated: (a) power supply using storage generator; (b) power supply using inductive storage device; and (c) resonant power supplies. These systems were analyzed from both technical and economical points of view. It was found that all three systems are feasible and can be built using commercially available components. From a technical point of view, the system using inductive storage is the most advantageous. The resonant power supply is the most economical solution.

Karady, G.; Kansog, J.; Thiessen, H.A.; Schneider, E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Global Modeling of Land Water and Energy Balances. Part II: Land-Characteristic Contributions to Spatial Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land water and energy balances vary around the globe because of variations in amount and temporal distribution of water and energy supplies and because of variations in land characteristics. The former control (water and energy supplies) explains ...

P. C. D. Milly; A. B. Shmakin

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Petroleum Supply Monthly - July 1995 Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data by Tammy G. Heppner and Carol L. French Overview Petroleum supply data collected by the Petroleum Supply Division (PSD) of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) were on the right track in 1994. These data are tracked through a series of PSD publications: the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report (WFR), the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM), and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). For the major petroleum products, weekly estimates in the WPSR and WFR are the first values available. As illustrated in Figure FE1, the PSA data represents the "finish line" or "true" values. The PSM data are closer to the mark; whereas the monthly-from-weekly (MFW) data are close behind in terms of accuracy. For 1994, 59 petroleum supply

409

Supply Chain - Additional Market Sectors View Page | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Additional Market Sectors View Page Sustainable Supply Chains Submissions Let's Talk About Sustainable Supply Chain You are here Data.gov Communities Sustainable Supply Chain...

410

Chapter 8 - Required Sources of Supplies and Services | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 8 - Required Sources of Supplies and Services Chapter 8 - Required Sources of Supplies and Services 8.4FederalSupplySchedules1.pdf More Documents & Publications...

411

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions rate from natural gas supply that occurs upstreamassociated with natural gas supply to the power plant weresuggest natural gas-fired power plants will supply

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ELECTRICITY SUPPLY Hydroelectric Energy Supply Thermal-question. Data on PG&E's hydroelectric resources and Pacific27 Table 28 Table 29 Hydroelectric Supply in California Fuel

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Product Supplied of Normal Butane ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Normal Butane/Butylene Supply and Disposition; Product Supplied for Normal Butane/Butylene ; Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Product Supplied for Crude Oil ...

414

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Demands Using Alternative Water Supplies: Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Demands Using Alternative Water Supplies: Power Demand Options in Regions of Water Stress and Future Carbon Management Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting a regional modeling assessment of non-traditional water sources for use in thermoelectric power plants. The assessment includes the development of a model to characterize water quantity and quality from several sources of non-traditional water, initially focused within the Southeastern United States. The project includes four primary tasks: (1) identify water sources, needs, and treatment options; (2) assess and model non-traditional water quantity and quality; (3) identify and characterize water treatment options including an assessment of cost; and (4) develop a framework of metrics, processes, and modeling aspects that can be applied to other regions of the United States.

415

Uninterruptible power supply (UPS) systems  

SciTech Connect

Use of this purchase specification is not mandatory. User should review the document and determine if it meets the user`s purpose. This document contains a fill-in-the-blanks guide specification for the procurement of uninterruptible power supply (UPS) systems greater than 10 kVA, organized as follows: Parts 1 through 7--technical requirements; Appendix A--technical requirements to be included in the proposal; Appendix B--UPS system data sheets to be completed by each bidder (Seller) and submitted with the proposal; Appendix C--general guidelines giving the specifier parameters for selecting a UPS system; it should be read before preparing an actual specification, and is not attached to the specification; Attachment 1--sketches prepared by the purchaser (Owner); Attachment 2--sample title page.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

identify impacts to water resources has been addressed by assessing the concentrations of radioactive or chemical contaminants against standards for public drinking water supplies...

417

INEEL Source Water Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) covers approximately 890 mi2 and includes 12 public water systems that must be evaluated for Source water protection purposes under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Because of its size and location, six watersheds and five aquifers could potentially affect the INEEL’s drinking water sources. Based on a preliminary evaluation of the available information, it was determined that the Big Lost River, Birch Creek, and Little Lost River Watersheds and the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer needed to be assessed. These watersheds were delineated using the United States Geologic Survey’s Hydrological Unit scheme. Well capture zones were originally estimated using the RESSQC module of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Well Head Protection Area model, and the initial modeling assumptions and results were checked by running several scenarios using Modflow modeling. After a technical review, the resulting capture zones were expanded to account for the uncertainties associated with changing groundwater flow directions, a thick vadose zone, and other data uncertainties. Finally, all well capture zones at a given facility were merged to a single wellhead protection area at each facility. A contaminant source inventory was conducted, and the results were integrated with the well capture zones, watershed and aquifer information, and facility information using geographic information system technology to complete the INEEL’s Source Water Assessment. Of the INEEL’s 12 public water systems, three systems rated as low susceptibility (EBR-I, Main Gate, and Gun Range), and the remainder rated as moderate susceptibility. No INEEL public water system rated as high susceptibility. We are using this information to develop a source water management plan from which we will subsequently implement an INEEL-wide source water management program. The results are a very robust set of wellhead protection areas that will protect the INEEL’s public water systems yet not too conservative to inhibit the INEEL from carrying out its missions.

Sehlke, Gerald

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Water supply analysis for restoring the Colorado River Delta, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Flows in the Colorado River Delta. Figure 7Cost of Minimum Flows in the Colorado River Delta. Figure 8and Ecological Health on the Colorado River Delta region."

Medellin-Azuara, Josue; Lund, Jay R.; Howitt, Richard E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Water supply analysis for restoring the Colorado River Delta, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1091-1109. Banco de México. (2006). "Indices de Precios alColorado River Delta in Mexico." Cohen, M. J. (2006). "TheEstadísticas del Agua en México 2004." Comisión Nacional del

Medellin-Azuara, Josue; Lund, Jay R.; Howitt, Richard E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Advanced Accessory Power Supply Topologies  

SciTech Connect

This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) began December 8, 2000 and ended September 30, 2009. The total funding provided by the Participant (General Motors Advanced Technology Vehicles [GM]) during the course of the CRADA totaled $1.2M enabling the Contractor (UT-Battelle, LLC [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a.k.a. ORNL]) to contribute significantly to the joint project. The initial task was to work with GM on the feasibility of developing their conceptual approach of modifying major components of the existing traction inverter/drive to develop low cost, robust, accessory power. Two alternate methods for implementation were suggested by ORNL and both were proven successful through simulations and then extensive testing of prototypes designed and fabricated during the project. This validated the GM overall concept. Moreover, three joint U.S. patents were issued and subsequently licensed by GM. After successfully fulfilling the initial objective, the direction and duration of the CRADA was modified and GM provided funding for two additional tasks. The first new task was to provide the basic development for implementing a cascaded inverter technology into hybrid vehicles (including plug-in hybrid, fuel cell, and electric). The second new task was to continue the basic development for implementing inverter and converter topologies and new technology assessments for hybrid vehicle applications. Additionally, this task was to address the use of high temperature components in drive systems. Under this CRADA, ORNL conducted further research based on GM’s idea of using the motor magnetic core and windings to produce bidirectional accessory power supply that is nongalvanically coupled to the terminals of the high voltage dc-link battery of hybrid vehicles. In order not to interfere with the motor’s torque, ORNL suggested to use the zero-sequence, highfrequency harmonics carried by the main fundamental motor current for producing the accessory power. Two studies were conducted at ORNL. One was to put an additional winding in the motor slots to magnetically link with the high frequency of the controllable zero-sequence stator currents that do not produce any zero-sequence harmonic torques. The second approach was to utilize the corners of the square stator punching for the high-frequency transformers of the dc/dc inverter. Both approaches were successful. This CRADA validated the feasibility of GM’s desire to use the motor’s magnetic core and windings to produce bidirectional accessory power supply. Three joint U.S. patents with GM were issued to ORNL and GM by the U.S. Patent Office for the research results produced by this CRADA.

Marlino, L.D.

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Advanced Electrostatic Precipitator (ESP) Power Supplies Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Manufacturers of new, high-frequency power supplies for electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) have continued to push the development of this technology steadily forward since the last EPRI report on the subject was published. The capacity of these new power supplies continues to grow and the reliability issues identified in the early applications are being steadily resolved. This report contains a description of the technology behind the new power supplies and an update on recent applications and future pla...

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

422

Petroleum supply annual 1995: Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The {ital Petroleum Supply Annual} contains information on supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. It reflects data collected from the petroleum industry during 1995 through monthly surveys, and it is divided into 2 volumes. This volume contains three sections: summary statistics, detailed statistics, and selected refinery statistics, each with final annual data. (The other volume contains final statistics for each month and replaces data previously published in the {ital Petroleum Supply Monthly}).

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Shock-activated electrochemical power supplies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock-activated electrochemical power supply is provided which is initiated extremely rapidly and which has a long shelf life. Electrochemical power supplies of this invention are initiated much faster than conventional thermal batteries. Power supplies of this invention comprise an inactive electrolyte and means for generating a high-pressure shock wave such that the shock wave is propagated through the electrolytes rendering the electrolyte electrochemically active. 2 figs.

Benedick, W.B.; Graham, R.A.; Morosin, B.

1988-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

424

Shock-activated electrochemical power supplies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock-activated electrochemical power supply is provided which is initiated extremely rapidly and which has a long shelf life. Electrochemical power supplies of this invention are initiated much faster than conventional thermal batteries. Power supplies of this invention comprise an inactive electrolyte and means for generating a high-pressure shock wave such that the shock wave is propagated through the electrolytes rendering the electrolyte electrochemically active.

Benedick, William B. (Albuquerque, NM); Graham, Robert A. (Los Lunas, NM); Morosin, Bruno (Albuquerque, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Shock-activated electrochemical power supplies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock-activated electrochemical power supply is provided which is initiated extremely rapidly and which has a long shelf life. Electrochemical power supplies of this invention are initiated much faster than conventional thermal batteries. Power supplies of this invention comprise an inactive electrolyte and means for generating a high-pressure shock wave such that the shock wave is propagated through the electrolyte rendering the electrolyte electrochemically active. 2 figs.

Benedick, W.B.; Graham, R.A.; Morosin, B.

1987-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

426

EA-267-A Conectiv Energy Supply Inc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7-A Conectiv Energy Supply Inc EA-267-A Conectiv Energy Supply Inc Order authorizing Conectiv Energy Supply Inc to export electric energy to Canada. EA-267-A Conectiv Energy Supply...

427

EA-267 Conectiv Energy Supply Inc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 Conectiv Energy Supply Inc EA-267 Conectiv Energy Supply Inc Order authorizing Conectiv Energy Supply Inc to export electric energy to Canada. EA-267 Conectiv Energy Supply Inc...

428

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.2 Limitations to Large-Scale Renewable EnergyImpacts of Renewable Energy Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.3 Coupling Renewable Energy with Deferrable

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Petroleum Supply Monthly - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA Survey Forms › Facebook Twitter ... Supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products on a national and regional level. The data series describe ...

430

EU Energy Situations and Supply Security.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Energy supply security is a hot topic today. It highly influences energy market, national security and also residents’ daily lives. However, due to different… (more)

Xu, Chen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Power Supply Design for Resistance Spot Welding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

According to a study of Edison Welding Institute, 20% of the welding quality issues are the weld schedule or power supply related. Therefore, the study of ...

432

Petroleum Supply Annual 2005, Volume 1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Final annual data for the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

433

Aluminum Scrap Supply and Environmental Impact Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 2000 ... It has been applied to the USA to forecast sources of aluminum scrap ... good balance between supply and demand on average over the years.

434

Building the supply chain of the future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... supply chains: McKinsey Global Survey results,” mckinseyquarterly ... In response, the company examined its portfolio ... the volatility of demand for each ...

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

435

Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Total Supplemental Supply Synthetic Propane-Air Refinery Gas Biomass Other Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &...

436

A BIBLIOGRAPHY ON RADIOISOTOPE POWER SUPPLIES  

SciTech Connect

A bibliography is presented of reports on the research and development and space and terrestrial applications of radioisotope-fueled power supplies. (C.E.S.)

Axelrod, D.M.; Novarro, J.P.

1963-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Continuous Sustainable Power Supply - Energy Innovation Portal  

Benthic Microbial Fuel Cell The Naval Research Laboratory's benthic microbial fuel cell (BMFC) is a non-depletable power supply for marine-deployed ...

438

The effect of inventory on supply chain.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Supply chain management addresses the management of materials and information across the entire chain from suppliers to producers, distributors, retailers, and customers. In the… (more)

Meng, Yue

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Comparisons of Independent Petroleum Supply Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Supply Monthly, December 1999 PSA API OGJ RPD ... Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products for Local

440

Supply chain practices in the petroleum downstream.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis studies current supply chain practices in the petroleum downstream industry, using ExxonMobil as a case study. Based on the analysis of the literature… (more)

Santos Manzano, Fidel

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Testing What's New PLUGLESS Level 2 EV Charging System by Evatran Group Inc. - August 2013 The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is tasked...

442

ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS: PROCUREMENT, SUPPLY, AND GRANT RECORDS...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

document the acquisition of goods and non-personal services, controlling the volume of stock on hand, reporting procurement needs, and related supply matters which are part of...

443

Protective supplied breathing air garment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A breathing air garment is disclosed for isolating a wearer from hostile environments containing toxins or irritants includes a suit and a separate head protective enclosure or hood engaging a suit collar in sealing attachment. The hood and suit collar are cylindrically shaped and dimensioned to enable the wearer to withdraw his hands from the suit sleeves to perform manual tasks within the hood interior. Breathing air is supplied from an external air line with an air delivery hose attached to the hood interior. The hose feeds air into an annular halo-like fiber-filled plenum having spaced discharge orifices attached to the hood top wall. A plurality of air exhaust/check valves located at the suit extremities cooperate with the hood air delivery system to provide a cooling flow of circulating air from the hood throughout the suit interior. A suit entry seal provided on the suit rear torso panel permits access into the suit and is sealed with an adhesive sealing flap. 17 figs.

Childers, E.L.; Hortenau, E.F. von.

1984-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

444

Protective supplied breathing air garment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A breathing air garment for isolating a wearer from hostile environments containing toxins or irritants includes a suit and a separate head protective enclosure or hood engaging a suit collar in sealing attachment. The hood and suit collar are cylindrically shaped and dimensioned to enable the wearer to withdraw his hands from the suit sleeves to perform manual tasks within the hood interior. Breathing air is supplied from an external air line with an air delivery hose attached to the hood interior. The hose feeds air into an annular halo-like fiber-filled plenum having spaced discharge orifices attached to the hood top wall. A plurality of air exhaust/check valves located at the suit extremities cooperate with the hood air delivery system to provide a cooling flow of circulating air from the hood throughout the suit interior. A suit entry seal provided on the suit rear torso panel permits access into the suit and is sealed with an adhesive sealing flap.

Childers, Edward L. (Lakewood, CO); von Hortenau, Erik F. (Golden, CO)

1984-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

445

Prospects for world oil supply  

SciTech Connect

Surprises lie ahead for world oil supplies, which are expected to increase rapidly throughout the 1990s before leveling off by the end of the century. The extent of this increase could be the major surprise of the decade. Large increases in the capacity in Gulf countries accompanied by smaller increases in the non-Middle East OPEC countries will be augmented by a gradual increase in non-OPEC capacity into the late 1990s. By 2000, declining capacity in the latter two areas will offset continued capacity increases in the Gulf countries. Overall capacity in the non-OPEC countries (excluding China, Eastern Europe, and the Soviet Union), is expected to increase by 1.1 million BOPD from the low point in the early 1990s to a mid 1990s peak. The increase will be led by a large increase in capacity from the United Kingdom and smaller contributions from the non-Middle East OPEC countries and Mexico. In the forecast, emphasis has been placed on a detailed evaluation of recent significant discoveries made in non-OPEC countries and non-Middle East OPEC countries since 1983, which when taken together, are expected to add 8 million BOPD new capacity as soon as 1995. These discoveries have taken place in both existing and evolving exploration hotspots that are expected to receive increasing industry emphasis in the 1990s.

Esser, R.W. (Cambridge Energy Research Associates, MA (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Water by truck in Mexico City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supply of water to urban households by tanker truck in developing and advanced developing countries is often associated with early stages of urbanization or with the private markets on which water vendors serve households ...

Pike, Jill (Jill Susan)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Household ceramic water filter evaluation using three simple low-cost methods : membrane filtration, 3M Petrifilm and hydrogen sulfide bacteria in northern region, Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drinking water continues to be a major source of waterborne diseases and death in the world because many points of water collection remain unsafe. This thesis reports high level of fecal contamination found in rivers and ...

Mattelet, Claire (Claire Eliane H. Y.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Guidelines for Makeup Water Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quality of boiler and heat recovery steam generator HRSG cycle makeup water is central to ensuring the necessary purity of boiler or HRSG water, feedwater, and steam. It plays an important role in ensuring component availability and reliability in fossil and combined cycle plants. This report presents up-to-date guidelines based on proven approaches for producing makeup water from various raw water supplies. Major losses of availability in fossil fuel plants are attributable to water and steam contam...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

449

Transparency in complex dynamic food supply chains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Food supply chains are increasingly complex and dynamic due to (i) increasing product proliferation to serve ever diversifying and globalising markets as a form of mass customisation with resulting global flows of raw materials, ingredients and products, ... Keywords: Consumer and governmental demands, Food supply chain, Governance, Information systems, Quality and safety standards, Transparency

J. H. Trienekens; P. M. Wognum; A. J. M. Beulens; J. G. A. J. van der Vorst

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Biomass Supply and Carbon Accounting for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Supply and Carbon Accounting for Southeastern Forests February 2012 #12;This Biomass Supply and Carbon Accounting for Southeastern Forests study was conducted by the Biomass Energy Resource Center Biomass Energy Resource Center Kamalesh Doshi Biomass Energy Resource Center Hillary Emick Biomass Energy

451

TamingtheCellulosic BiofuelsSupplyChain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TamingtheCellulosic BiofuelsSupplyChain: DistributedBiomassProcessingfor SustainableBiofuelsandAnimalFeeds Supplying adequate cellulosic biomass to biorefineries is emerging as a crucial issue in biofuel systems. We addresss this problem by pretreating cellulosic biomass using the ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) process

Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

452

Ethical Issues in Global Supply Chain Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper addresses the general nature of a supply chain as a human artifact with potential for greatness and for failure like any other. The exact nature of the possible failures and successes are discussed, and the ethical issues identified. The hazards ... Keywords: Competitiveness, Ethics, Globalisation, Supply Chain Management

Andrew M. McCosh

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Using simulation to analyze supply chains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supply Chain management, the management of the flow of goods or services from materials stage to the end user, is a complex process because of the level of uncertainty at each stage of the supply chain. Computer simulation, because it can be applied ...

Daniel Schunk; Beth Plott

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Design of wood biomass supply chains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to propose a mathematical programming approach to minimize the total cost in a biomass supply chain. A company that collects material from forests, transforms it into chipped product, stores and delivers it to its customers ... Keywords: biomass, mixed integer programming, optimization, supply chain

Tiago Costa Gomes; Filipe Pereira e Alvelos; Maria Sameiro Carvalho

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Pilot study of horizontal roughing filtration in northern Ghana as pretreatment for highly turbid dugout water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Northern Region Ghana (NRG), highly turbid rainwater runoff and intermittent streams are collected in earthen dams called dugouts. These dams serve as many communities' main source of drinking and domestic water despite ...

Losleben, Tamar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Water driven : New Orleans City Hall as a sustainable civic center for 21st century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The devastating struck of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans in late summer of 2005 was deadly and immense. The storm destroyed over 170 drinking water facilities and 47 wastewater treatments around the city, and resulted ...

Sangthong, Pholkrit

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Efficacy of gravity-fed chlorination system for community-scale water disinfection in northern Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although chlorine is one of the lowest cost ways of providing disinfection, currently billions of people lack drinking water that has had this simple treatment. Arch Chemical's Pulsar 1 unit is an innovation in chlorine ...

Fitzpatrick, Daniel Cash

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Willamette River Water Treatment Plant - Wilsonville, Oregon [EDRA / Places Awards, 20004 -- Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

per-day drinking-water EDRA/Places Awards 2004 In this issuewe present the EDRA/ Places awards for 2004.These awards, in design, planning and research, highlight

Sensenig, Chris

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Auxiliary power supply with kinetic energy storage  

SciTech Connect

Alternating current is supplied to an auxiliary load on a from a power supply comprised of a dc-energized inverter and a synchronous machine coupled to the inverter. The inverter supplies the alternating current requirements of the load up to the normal steady state load current magnitude. The synchronous machine stores kinetic energy when the load current load does not exceed its normal steady state magnitude, and converts kinetic energy into electrical energy to supply the load current requirements in excess of its normal steady-state load magnitude and to supply load current whenever the dc source inverter connection is interrupted. Frequency and amplitude of load voltage are regulated by operator commands through control apparatus coupled to the inverter and the synchronous machine.

Plunkett, A.B.; Turnbull, F.G.

1982-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

460

Paperclips Supply Store Forms | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paperclips Supply Store Forms Paperclips Supply Store Forms Paperclips Supply Store Forms Catalog Order Form for Non-Stocked or Specialty Items For any non-stocked or special item that needs to be ordered, the Catalog Order Form (pdf) needs to be filled in. All supplies ordered MUST be used for Official Government Business. All catalog orders are subject to full payment or a restocking fee if items ordered are returned to the supplier due to the customer not picking up the item(s) within five days of receipt by the store personnel or the customer deciding to return the item(s). This form is fillable and also saveable with the Acrobat Reader or through your web browser. Request Supply Store Purchasing Authority for a Non-Federal Employee In order for non-federal headquarters personnel to gain access to make

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Petroleum Supply Monthly - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Supply Monthly Petroleum Supply Monthly With Data for September 2013 | Release Date: November 27, 2013 | Next Release Date: December 30, 2013 Previous Issues Month: November 2013 October 2013 September 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 prior issues Go Supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products on a national and regional level. The data series describe production, imports and exports, movements and inventories. PDF and CSV files are released first and Petroleum Data Tables are released later on the same day. Tables All Tables All Tables Detailed Statistics Tables National Statistics 1 U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products PDF CSV 2 U.S. Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products PDF CSV

462

NETL: News Release - DOE's Produced Water Program Yields New...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

15, 2007 DOE's Produced Water Program Yields New Web Tool Cost-Effectively Treating Produced Water Boosts U.S. Energy, Water Supplies Washington, DC - A comprehensive new program...

463

DOE Solar Decathlon: 2005 Contests and Scoring - Hot Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

teams will install systems that can do even more. The Hot Water contest demonstrates that solar hot water heating systems can supply all the hot water we use daily - to bathe and...

464

Homeland Security Challenges Facing Small Water Systems in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes Homeland Security issues that affect Texas and the nation. It includes an overview of some of the key water resource issues associated with preventing intentional contamination of water supplies served by small water systems.

Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

465

Cooperative supply chain re-scheduling: the case of an engine supply chain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the main issues on task planning of the enterprises with several production sites is how they can reassign tasks when a part of the supply chain is stopped. In this case, a good re-schedule, involving parts from supply chains from other sites, ... Keywords: cooperative decision making, cooperative-group-based model, re-scheduling, supply chain

Jaime Lloret; Jose P. Garcia-Sabater; Juan A. Marin-Garcia

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

The effects of an intermittent piped water network and storage practices on household water quality in Tamale, Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United Nations Millennium Development Goals include a target to halve the number of people without access to "improved" water sources, which include piped water supply. However, an "improved" source of water does not ...

Vacs Renwick, Deborah Alexandra

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Supply Reliability. Sacramento, CA, California EnergyWater Resources. Sacramento, CA, California Department ofUse in California. Sacramento, CA, California Department of

Kiparsky, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Autonomous uninterruptible power-supply apparatus  

SciTech Connect

This invention relates broadly to a power supply apparatus, and in particular to an autonomous uninterruptible power supply apparatus. The purpose of an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) is to protect critical electrical loads from transient or steady-stage outages or disturbances in the primary power source. The basic configuration of a typical, commercially available, uninterruptible power supply is comprised at a minimum of a standby battery and a battery charger and may also include an inverter for AC applications. Systems of this type can be found in most computer installations and laboratory systems that cannot tolerate even momentary disturbances of input power. This document describes an autonomous uninterruptible power-supply apparatus utilizing a digital-processor unit as a control and monitor unit to measure and control input and output parameters in the power supply. A battery charger is utilized to maintain the voltage and current levels with the backup battery supply source which powers an inverter unit that converts the DC power to an AC output.

Masson, J.H.

1984-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

469

Laboratory Equipment & Supplies | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Equipment & Supplies Equipment & Supplies John Bargar, SSRL Scientist Equipment is available to serve disciplines from biology to material science. All laboratories contain the following standard laboratory equipment: pH meters with standard buffers, analytical balances, microcentrifuges, vortex mixers, ultrasonic cleaning baths, magnetic stirrers, hot plates, and glassware. Most laboratories offer ice machines and cold rooms. Specialty storage areas for samples include a -80 freezer, argon and nitrogen glove boxes, radiation contamination areas, inert atmosphere chambers, and cold rooms. For specific information please see: Equipment Inventory Checkout Equipment & Supplies To view equipment inventory by laboratory, refer to the following pages: Biology Chemistry & Material Science Laboratory 1 Inventory

470

Petroleum supply annual 1993. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1993 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1993, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Below is a description of each section in Volume 1 of the PSA.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Petroleum supply annual 1994. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1994 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1994, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Below is a description of each section in Volume 1 of the PSA.

NONE

1995-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

472

IRA-WDS: A GIS-based risk analysis tool for water distribution systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the development of a new software tool IRA-WDS. This GIS-based software predicts the risks associated with contaminated water entering water distribution systems from surrounding foul water bodies such as sewers, drains and ditches. ... Keywords: Contaminant intrusion, Developing countries, GIS, Intermittent water supply, Risk assessment, Tight coupling, Water supply

K. Vairavamoorthy; Jimin Yan; Harshal M. Galgale; Sunil D. Gorantiwar

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

USGS Study: Water Quality A Potential Concern in Private Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USGS Study: Water Quality A Potential Concern in Private Wells More than 20 percent of private domestic wells sampled nationwide contain at least one contaminant at levels of potential health concern's population, use private wells, which are not regulated by the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. USGS

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

474

Improved Information Connectivity and Visibility throughout the Global Supply Base  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the literature frequently examines achieving an integrated supply chain and participating in information sharing with supply chain partners, there is little guidance given to firms on how to progress to a state where these goals can become reality. ... Keywords: Global Supply Base, Information Sharing, Information Visibility, Supply Chain Integration, Supply Chain Management

Kevin Duffy; William Wilson

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Conectiv Energy Supply Inc. | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supply Inc. Supply Inc. (Redirected from Conectiv Energy Services Inc) Jump to: navigation, search Name Conectiv Energy Supply Inc. Place Delaware Utility Id 4318 Utility Location Yes Ownership W NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes ISO NY Yes ISO MISO Yes ISO NE Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Conectiv_Energy_Supply_Inc.&oldid=412242"

476

natural gas supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

natural gas supply natural gas supply Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 13, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts. The data is broken down into production, net imports, consumption by sector and price. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO disposition EIA natural gas supply prices Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Natural Gas Supply, Disposition, and Prices - Reference Case (xls, 91.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

477

Volatile coal prices reflect supply, demand uncertainties  

SciTech Connect

Coal mine owners and investors say that supply and demand are now finally in balance. But coal consumers find that both spot tonnage and new contract coal come at a much higher price.

Ryan, M.

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

478

Optimization of surgical supply inventory and kitting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project centered on inventory optimization for operative custom surgical packs and soft good supplies for Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), a 947-bed medical center. Custom surgical packs are used in every surgical ...

Schlanser, Matthew R. (Matthew Ross)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Polynomial policies in supply chain networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis aims to solve the periodic-reviewed inventory control problem in supply chain networks with uncertain demand so as to minimize the overall cost of the system over a fixed planning time horizon. In such problems, ...

He, Liwei

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

An analysis of oil supply disruption scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report brings the results of simulations of some oil supply disruptions on the M.I.T. Energy Laboratory Energy Macro Model. This model has previously been used to study the macroeconomic effects of the 1973-74 and ...

Mork, Knut Anton

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water supplies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Internal Markets for Supply Chain Capacity Allocation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores the possibility of solving supply chain capacity allocation problems using internal markets among employees of the same company. Unlike earlier forms of transfer pricing, IT now makes it easier for such ...

McAdams, David

2005-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

482

Forecasting Resource Supply from Scarcity Rent Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forecasting Resource Supply from Scarcity Rent Data Speaker(s): Larry Dale Date: December 18, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Diana Morris This talk...

483

Petroleum Supply Annual 1997, Volume 1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Tables S1 Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Overview, 1981-Present PDF S2 Crude Oil Supply and Disposition, 1981-Present PDF S3 Crude Oil and Petroleum Product Imports,...

484

Returning Home After a Disaster: Supply List  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When you return home after a disaster, you will want to have sturdy shoes, proper tools, clothes and medications for several days, and a first-aid kit. This publication also includes a list of necessary cleaning supplies.

Norman, Lisa

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

485

Optimal capacity adjustment for supply chain control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research attempts to answer the questions involving the time and size of capacity adjustments for better supply chain management. The objective of this research is to analytically determine simple structures to adjust ...

Budiman, Benny S., 1969-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Assessing Reliability In Hydrogen Supply Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas and petroleum exports Other suppliers pose greater threats (Potential) importsImport terminals – Global LNG tanker fleet – Domestic natural gasgas supply LNG dependence on other systems Essentially 100% imports

McCarthy, Ryan; Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Supply chain practices in the petroleum downstream  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis studies current supply chain practices in the petroleum downstream industry, using ExxonMobil as a case study. Based on the analysis of the literature and the interaction with industry experts, this work describes ...

Santos Manzano, Fidel

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

PLT neutral injection ignitron accelerating supply  

SciTech Connect

A phase-controlled rectifier was designed for the accelerating supply on the PLT Neutral Beam Injection system at PPPL. The rectifier must furnish 70 amperes at up to 50 KV for 300 milliseconds, with a duty cycle of up to 10 percent. Protection of the injectors requires the supply to withstand repeated crowbarring. The rectifying element selected to satisfy these requirements was a commercially-available ignitron, installed in a supporting frame and using firing circuits and controls designed by PPPL. (auth)

Ashcroft, D.L.; Murray, J.G.; Newman, R.A.; Peterson, F.L.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Research into the Characterization of Brackish Water and Disposal of Desalination Reject Water in Saline Aquifers and Depleted Oil and Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brackish groundwater is a valuable “drought-proof” resource that is plentiful in much of Texas. If treated by available desalination technologies, brackish groundwater resources could help many regions of Texas cope with pressing water shortages. If put to non-potable uses such as waterflooding, streamflow augmentation, and landscape irrigation, brackish groundwater could free up substantial amounts of drinking water supplies now dedicated to these uses. In 2007, the Texas Legislature passed landmark legislation that should provide greatly expanded opportunities to beneficially use concentrates from the desalination of brackish groundwater or to streamline the disposal as a waste product. House Bill 2654 (passed in the 80th Legislative session) has the promise of making it substantially easier to manage concentrates that result from the desalination of brackish groundwater. The bill authorizes the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality to issue a general statewide permit that allows disposal of nonhazardous brine from desalination operations into Class I injection wells. The bill also streamlines the process of using the concentrates in Class II injection wells for enhanced oil and gas recovery operations. However, more still needs to be done in two key areas: * Learning more about the chemical traits of brackish groundwater in specific circumstances to ensure that concentrates from desalting these resources are not a hazardous waste, * Continuing to develop and implement technologies and management strategies that make these programs most cost-efficient.

Jensen, R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Source to tap urban water cycle modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The continuous expansion of urban areas is associated with increased water demand, both for domestic and non-domestic uses. To cover this additional demand, centralised infrastructure, such as water supply and distribution networks tend to become more ... Keywords: Metabolism models, Optimisation, Urban water cycle, Water demand management

Evangelos Rozos; Christos Makropoulos

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Water protection in coke-plant design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater generation, water consumption, and water management at coke plants are considered. Measures to create runoff-free water-supply and sewer systems are discussed. Filters for water purification, corrosion inhibitors, and biocides are described. An integrated single-phase technology for the removal of phenols, thiocyanides, and ammoniacal nitrogen is outlined.

G.I. Alekseev [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

492

Power Supply Options for Data Centers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Supply Options for Data Centers Power Supply Options for Data Centers Title Power Supply Options for Data Centers Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-63339 Year of Publication 2007 Authors Tschudi, William F., and Charles H. Williams Call Number LBNL-63339 Abstract For many federal facilities, the fastest growing end-use of electric energy is found in concentrations of computing capacity commonly known as data centers. For these users, the critical importance of information processing to their agency mission will present a serious challenge to meeting the aggressive new energy efficiency goals in Executive Order 13423. Federal energy managers can find a variety of methods for reducing energy intensity, in both design and operations, for these high-technology facilities . This report summarizes a recent demonstration of one such technique ? configuring power supply systems for data centers so that they use DC (direct current) power throughout, eliminating the conventional practice of multiple conversions from utility-supplied AC (alternating current) to DC and back again at every stage of the power supply system. This eliminates both the power loss and heat generated by each such conversion (which drives air conditioning energy use).

493

Updated U.S. Geothermal Supply Curve  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper documents the approach used to update the U.S. geothermal supply curve. The analysis undertaken in this study estimates the supply of electricity generation potential from geothermal resources in the United States and the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE), capital costs, and operating and maintenance costs associated with developing these geothermal resources. Supply curves were developed for four categories of geothermal resources: identified hydrothermal (6.4 GWe), undiscovered hydrothermal (30.0 GWe), near-hydrothermal field enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) (7.0 GWe) and deep EGS (15,900 GWe). Two cases were considered: a base case and a target case. Supply curves were generated for each of the four geothermal resource categories for both cases. For both cases, hydrothermal resources dominate the lower cost range of the combined geothermal supply curve. The supply curves indicate that the reservoir performance improvements assumed in the target case could significantly lower EGS costs and greatly increase EGS deployment over the base case.

Augustine, C.; Young, K. R.; Anderson, A.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Ris Energy Report 4 Supply technologies in the future energy system 10 Supply technologies in the future energy system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risø Energy Report 4 Supply technologies in the future energy system 10 Supply technologies of local and central production and close coupling between supply and end-use. Wind Global wind energy: Energy supply technologies #12;Risø Energy Report 4 Supply technologies in the future energy system4 used

495

California GAMA Special Study: An isotopic and dissolved gas investigation of nitrate source and transport to a public supply well in California's Central Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates nitrate contamination of a deep municipal drinking water production well in Ripon, CA to demonstrate the utility of natural groundwater tracers in constraining the sources and transport of nitrate to deep aquifers in the Central Valley. The goal of the study was to investigate the origin (source) of elevated nitrate and the potential for the deep aquifer to attenuate anthropogenic nitrate. The site is ideal for such an investigation. The production well is screened from 165-325 feet below ground surface and a number of nearby shallow and deep monitoring wells were available for sampling. Furthermore, potential sources of nitrate contamination to the well had been identified, including a fertilizer supply plant located approximately 1000 feet to the east and local almond groves. A variety of natural isotopic and dissolved gas tracers including {sup 3}H-{sup 3}He groundwater age and the isotopic composition of nitrate are applied to identify nitrate sources and to characterize nitrate transport. An advanced method for sampling production wells is employed to help identify contaminant contributions from specific screen intervals. Nitrate transport: Groundwater nitrate at this field site is not being actively denitrified. Groundwater parameters indicate oxic conditions, the dissolved gas data shows no evidence for excess nitrogen as the result of denitrification, and nitrate-N and -O isotope compositions do not display patterns typical of denitrification. Contaminant nitrate source: The ambient nitrate concentration in shallow groundwater at the Ripon site ({approx}12 mg/L as nitrate) is typical of shallow groundwaters affected by recharge from agricultural and urban areas. Nitrate concentrations in Ripon City Well 12 (50-58 mg/L as nitrate) are significantly higher than these ambient concentrations, indicating an additional source of anthropogenic nitrate is affecting groundwater in the capture zone of this municipal drinking water well. This study provides two new pieces of evidence that the Ripon Farm Services Plant is the source of elevated nitrate in Ripon City Well 12. (1) Chemical mass balance calculations using nitrate concentration, nitrate isotopic composition, and initial tritium activity all indicate that that the source water for elevated nitrate to Ripon City Well 12 is a very small component of the water produced by City Well 12 and thus must have extremely high nitrate concentration. The high source water nitrate concentration ({approx}1500 mg/L as nitrate) required by these mass balance calculations precludes common sources of nitrate such as irrigated agriculture, dairy wastewater, and septic discharge. Shallow groundwater under the Ripon Farm Services RFS plant does contain extremely high concentrations of nitrate (>1700 mg/L as nitrate). (2) Nitrogen and oxygen isotope compositions of nitrate indicate that the additional anthropogenic nitrate source to Ripon City Well 12 is significantly enriched in {delta}{sup 18}O-NO{sub 3}, an isotopic signature consistent with synthetic nitrate fertilizer, and not with human or animal wastewater discharge (i.e. dairy operations, septic system discharge, or municipal wastewater discharge), or with organic fertilizer. Monitoring wells on and near the RFS plant also have high {delta}{sup 18}O-NO{sub 3}, and the plant has handled and stored synthetic nitrate fertilizer that will have this isotopic signature. The results described here highlight the complexity of attributing nitrate found in long screened, high capacity wells to specific sources. In this case, the presence of a very high concentration source near the well site combined with sampling using multiple isotopic tracer techniques and specialized depth-specific techniques allowed fingerprinting of the source in the mixed-age samples drawn from the production well.

Singleton, M J; Moran, J E; Esser, B K; Roberts, S K; Hillegonds, D J

2010-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

496

1.85 Water and Wastewater Treatment Engineering, Spring 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theory and design of systems for treating industrial and municipal wastewater and potable water supplies. Methods for characterizing wastewater properties. Physical, chemical, and biological processes, including primary ...

Shanahan, Peter

497

Water: New Technologies for Managing and Ensuring Future ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of water every day for all uses other than energy production. ... for petroleum- based products outstrips supply of sweet crude oil, producers and ...

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

The impacts of technology on global unconventional gas supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As energy supplies from known resources are declining, the development of new energy sources is mandatory. One reasonable source is natural gas from unconventional resources. This study focus on three types of unconventional gas resources: coalbeds, tight sands, and shales. Whereas these resources are abundant, they have largely been overlooked and understudied, especially outside of North America. New technologies, including those needed to unlock unconventional gas (UCG) resources, have been acknowledged to be the most significant factor in increasing natural gas supply in the United States. This study evaluates advances in critical technology that will most likely increase supply the most. Advanced technology is one of the main drivers in increasing unconventional natural gas production, as observed in the United States, Canada, and Australia. 3D seismic, horizontal drilling, multilateral completion, water and gel based fracturing, coiled tubing rig, enhanced recovery, and produced water treatments are current important technologies critical in developing unconventional gas resources. More advanced technologies with significant impacts are expected to be available in the next decades. Fit-to-purpose technology reduces the cost to recover gas from unconventional resources. The better the unconventional gas resources are characterized, the better we can tailor specific technology to recover the gas, and less cost are needed. Analogy assumption is a good start in deciding which critical technology to be transferred to undeveloped unconventional reservoirs. If the key properties of two unconventional gas basins or formations are more or less similar, it is expected that the impact of certain technology applied in one basin or formation will resemble the impact to the other basin or formation.

Yanty, Evi

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

The 'Supply-of-Storage' for Natural Gas in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission. (2002). “Natural Gas Supply and Infrastructure013 “THE ‘SUPPLY-OF-STORAGE’ FOR NATURAL GAS IN CALIFORNIA”THE “SUPPLY-OF-STORAGE” FOR NATURAL GAS IN CALIFORNIA Rocío

Uria, Rocio; Williams, Jeffrey

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

An engineering approach to improving hospital supply chains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores supply chain management practices that have been implemented, and have improved supply chains in industries outside of healthcare. The presented supply chain practices have been selected because they ...

Cheng, Scott Hsiang-Jen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z