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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Drinking Water Problems: Lead  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lead in drinking water can damage the brain, kidneys, nervous system and red blood cells. This publication explains how lead can enter drinking water, how to have your water tested, and how to eliminate lead from drinking water.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

2

Drinking Water Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication explains the federal safety standards for drinking water provided by public water supply systems. It discusses the legal requirements for public water supplies, the maximum level allowed for contaminants in the water, and the potential health effects of each contaminant regulated. People who use water from private sources such as wells can also use these standards as a guide in checking whether their water is safe.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

3

Drinking Water Problems: Copper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High levels of copper in drinking water can cause health problems. This publication explains the effects of copper in water and methods of removing it. 4 pp.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

4

COST IMPACT OF SAFE DRINKING WATER ACT COMPLIANCE FOR COMMISSION-REGULATED WATER UTILITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(NRRI) with funding provided by participating member commissions of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC). The views and opinions of the authors do not necessarily state or reflect the views, opinions, or policies of the NRRI, the NARUC, or NARUC member commissions. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This study was prepared for state public utility commissioners and their staff in response to the growing concern about the effect of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) on water utilities under their jurisdiction. Compliance with the SDWA is expected to have a significant impact on water utilities and the rates they charge for service. A sensitivity analysis was developed for this report using a hypothetical water company to identify the costs associated with alternative treatment processes. A total of eighteen different treatment processes are considered, from conventional treatment to granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption and reverse osmosis. Capital costs for these processes range from $100,000 to $3.25 million for a water plant with a designed capacity of one million

Patrick C. Mann; Janice A. Beecher

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High levels of nitrates in drinking water can be harmful for very young infants and susceptible adults. This publication explains how people are exposed to nitrates, what health effects are caused by them in drinking water and how to remove them.

Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

6

Drinking Water Problems: Arsenic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High levels of arsenic in drinking water can poison and even kill people. This publication explains the symptoms of arsenic poisoning and common treatment methods for removing arsenic from your water supply.

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

7

Drinking Water Problems: Radionuclides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radionuclides in drinking water can cause serious health problems for people. This publication explains what the sources of radionuclides in water are, where high levels have been found in Texas, how they affect health and how to treat water to remove them.

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

8

Brookhaven's Drinking-Water Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Quality Water Quality The Lab's finished drinking water is produced with pride by the staff of BNL's Water Treatment Facility Home Groundwater Consumer Confidence Reports Water Treatment Process Resources Tap Water Recommendations Water Cooler Cleaning Additional Resources Brookhaven Lab Drinking Water Brookhaven produces its own drinking water for all employees, facility-users, guests, residents, and visitors on site at its Water Treatment Facility (WTF). BNL's drinking water is pumped from groundwater by five active wells and processed at the WTF which can handle up to 6 million gallons per day. The "finished" water is sent to the Lab's two storage towers and then distributed around the site via 45 miles of pipeline. To ensure that Brookhaven's water meets all applicable local, state, and

9

Drinking Water Problems: Radionuclides (Spanish)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radionuclides in drinking water can cause serious health problems for people. This publication explains what the sources of radionuclides in water are, where high levels have been found in Texas, how they affect health and how to treat water to remove them.

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

10

The Drinking Water Security and Safety Amendments of 2002: Is America's Drinking Water Infrastructure Safer Four Years Later?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Threats to Drinking Water Security . a.The Drinking Water Security and Safety Amendments2002: Is America's Drinking Water Infrastructure Safer Four

Shermer, Steven D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Safe Drinking Water Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Act Act Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Safe Drinking Water Act Year 1974 Url SDWA.jpg Description The Safe Drinking Water Act was established to protect the quality of drinking water in the U.S. References SDWA of 1974[1] Federal Oil and Gas[2] The Safe Drinking Water Act was established to protect the quality of drinking water in the U.S. This law focuses on all waters actually or potentially designated for drinking use, whether from above ground or underground sources. The Act authorized EPA to establish safe standards of purity and required all owners or operators of public water systems to comply with primary (health-related) standards. State governments, which assume this power from EPA, also encourage attainment of secondary standards (nuisance-related).

12

Arsenic Remediation of Bangladesh Drinking Water using Iron-oxide...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arsenic Remediation of Bangladesh Drinking Water using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash Title Arsenic Remediation of Bangladesh Drinking Water using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash...

13

Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund (New Mexico) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund (New Mexico) Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund (New Mexico) Eligibility Local Government Savings For Other Solar Buying & Making...

14

Drinking Water Program 1992 annual report  

SciTech Connect

EG&G Idaho, Inc., initiated a monitoring program for drinking water in 1988 for the US Department of Energy at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. EG&G Idaho structured this monitoring program to ensure that they exceeded the minimum regulatory requirements for monitoring drinking water. This program involves tracking the bacteriological, chemical, and radiological parameters that are required for a {open_quotes}community water system{close_quotes} (maximum requirements). This annual report describes the drinking water monitoring activities conducted at the 17 EG&G Idaho operated production wells and 11 distribution systems. It also contains all of the drinking water parameters that were detected and the regulatory limits that were exceeded during 1992. In addition, ground water quality is discussed as it relates to contaminants identified at the wellhead for EG&G Idaho production wells.

Andersen, B.D.; Peterson-Wright, L.J.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Drinking water quality standards and standard tests: Worldwide. (Latest citations from Food Science & Technology Abstracts (FSTA)). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the laws, regulations, standards, and testing methods for drinking water from domestic and international sources. Citations discuss quality standardization and control. Topics include safety codes for drinking water systems and installations, contaminated water and toxicity analyses, biological and chemical standards, diseases derived from drinking water, plastic materials for water packaging, and natural mineral drinking water. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

THE EFFECT OF CHLORINE ON CORROSION IN DRINKING WATER SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table of Contents Abstract...................................................................................................................................................... 4 THE EFFECT OF CHLORINE ON CORROSION IN DRINKING WATER SYSTEMS.................................................................................................................................................. 5

F. Cantor; Jae K. Park, Ph.D.; Prasit Vaiyavatjamai

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

GRR/Section 6-UT-c - Drinking Water Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6-UT-c - Drinking Water Permit 6-UT-c - Drinking Water Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-UT-c - Drinking Water Permit 06UTCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies R309-100 Administration: Drinking Water Program Utah Water Well Rules R655-4 Safe Drinking Water Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06UTCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Public water systems are responsible for drinking water infastructure,

18

GRR/Section 6-AK-c - Drinking Water Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6-AK-c - Drinking Water Permit 6-AK-c - Drinking Water Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-AK-c - Drinking Water Permit 06AKCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation Regulations & Policies 18 AAC 80 Drinking Water 40 CFR 141 40 CFR 142 40 CFR 143 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06AKCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Alaska's drinking water program is monitored under the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation. The type of permit required depends on the

19

Performance Comparison of Large Diameter Residential Drinking Water Wells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Published scientific work indicates that residential large diameter drinking water wells are at a higher risk of contamination from surface water impacts than drilled wells.… (more)

Javor, Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Taps: The Dangers of Drinking Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

produced this study "as part of a formal petition to the FDA calling on the agency to strengthen national bottled water regulations

Burgess, Michael

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

DW = Drinking Water NPW = Non-Potable Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Key: Matrices: DW = Drinking Water NPW = Non-Potable Water SCM = Solid and Chemical Materials PA 17322 717-878-2858 Douglas F. Zeigler S BNPW Hunsberger- DW: NPW: SCM: 0374301 GettysburgCarthy- DW: NPW: SCM: 0071501 Knouse Foods Cooperative Inc - Environmental Laboratory 53 East Hanover Street

Colby, Ralph H.

22

GRR/Section 6-NV-c - Drinking Water Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 6-NV-c - Drinking Water Permit GRR/Section 6-NV-c - Drinking Water Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-NV-c - Drinking Water Permit 06NVCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Nevada Division of Water Resources Nevada Division of Environmental Protection Public Utilities Commission of Nevada Regulations & Policies NRS 445A Water Controls NAC 445A Water Controls (Regulations) Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06NVCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative According to NRS 445A, the Nevada Division of Water Resources is charged

23

Mineral balances, including in drinking water, estimated for Merced County dairy herds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and daily drinking-water intake, calculated using NRC (2001)they represent total water intake. Feeding certain mineralsand daily drinking water intake, which was calcu- lated

Castillo, Alejandro R Dr.; Santos, Jose Eduardo P.; Tabone, Tom J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results & Policy Implications Title Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results & Policy Implications Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2009 Authors Mathieu, Johanna L., Ashok J. Gadgil, Kristin Kowolik, and Susan E. Addy Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract of arsenic from drinking water in Bangladesh. During fieldwork in four sub-districts of the country, ARUBA reduced arsenic levels ranging from 200 to 900 ppb to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. The technology is cost-effective because the substrate-bottom ash from coal fired power plants-is a waste material readily available in South Asia. In comparison to similar technologies, ARUBA uses less media for arsenic removal due to its high surface area to volume ratio. Hence, less waste is produced. A number of experiments were conducted in Bangladesh to determine the effectiveness of various water treatment protocols. It was found that (1) ARUBA removes more thanhalf of the arsenic from water within five minutes of treatment, (2) ARUBA, that has settled at the bottom of a treatment vessel, continues to remove arsenic for 2-3 days, (3) ARUBA's arsenic removal efficiency can be improved through sequential partial dosing (adding a given amount of ARUBA in fractions versus all at once), and (4) allowing water to first stand for two to three days followed by treatment with ARUBA produced final arsenic levels ten times lower than treating water directly out of the well. Our findings imply a number of tradeoffs between ARUBA's effective arsenic removal capacity, treatment system costs, and waste output. These tradeoffs, some a function of arsenic-related policies in Bangladesh (e.g., waste disposal regulations), must be considered when designing anarsenic removal system. We propose that the most attractive option is to use ARUBA in communityscale water treatment centers, installed as public-private partnerships, in Bangladeshi villages

25

Reassessing Radon in Drinking Water: Searching for Perspective on Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reassessing Radon in Drinking Water: Searching for Perspective on Radiation Reassessing Radon in Drinking Water: Searching for Perspective on Radiation Risks Speaker(s): Richard Sextro Date: October 27, 1998 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3148 Although most of the exposures to radon and its radioactive decay products arise from indoor airborne radon originating in the soil adjacent to buildings, some contact with radon can occur due to its presence in drinking water. The exposures and health risks associated with radon dissolved in drinking water are typically much smaller, although the magnitude of the exposures and risks have been uncertain and the subject of some controversy. The 1996 Amendments to the (U.S.) Safe Drinking Water Act required the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to contract with the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to re-evaluate the risks associated with

26

TO: US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001, which works to improve public water supply and sanitation. Thank you for the opportunity to submit a comment on the viability of bottled water as an alternative compliance option for chronic water contaminants for non-transient noncommunity water systems (NTNCWS), which are regulated under the Safe Water Drinking Act (SDWA) and 40 CFR s.141.101. Currently, bottled water may not be used by public water systems to achieve compliance with a Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL). This has been the policy over the past eight years. However, bottled water may be used on a temporary basis to avoid unreasonable risk to health. NTNCWS are public water systems. To put matters into perspective: According to the “Public Drinking Water Systems: Facts and Figures ” page on the EPA web site, last updated on February 28, 2006, almost 284 million people in the US are served by public water systems. Of these, only 6.9 million, or just under 2.5%, are served by NTNCWS. There are a total of 20,559 NTNCWS in the US. Type of Water Source: ? 821 of these systems rely on surface water, and serve 932,000 people.

Non-transient Non-community; Water Systems; Comment Arthur Cohen; Mph Convenor Of Saniplan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Taps: The Dangers of Drinking Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of food groups and water intake to colon cancer risk. Cancerexamined both solid food intake and water consumption. Women

Burgess, Michael

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Drinking Water Problems: Iron and Manganese  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iron and manganese can give water an unpleasant taste, odor and color. In this publication you'll learn how to know whether your water contains iron or manganese and how to eliminate these contaminants with various treatment methods such as aeration and chemical oxidation.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

29

Residential exposure to drinking water arsenic in Inner Mongolia, China  

SciTech Connect

In the Ba Men region of Inner Mongolia, China, a high prevalence of chronic arsenism has been reported in earlier studies. A survey of the arsenic contamination among wells from groundwater was conducted to better understand the occurrence of arsenic (As) in drinking water. A total of 14,866 wells (30% of all wells in the region) were analyzed for their arsenic-content. Methods used to detect arsenic were Spectrophotometric methods with DCC-Ag (detection limit, 0.5 {mu}g of As/L); Spot method (detection limit, 10 {mu}g of As/L); and air assisted Colorimetry method (detection limit, 20 {mu}g of As/L). Arsenic-concentrations ranged from below limit of detection to 1200 {mu}g of As/L. Elevated concentrations were related to well depth (10 to 29 m), the date the well was built (peaks from 1980-1990), and geographic location (near mountain range). Over 25,900 individuals utilized wells with drinking water arsenic concentrations above 20 {mu}g of As/L (14,500 above 50 {mu}g of As/L-the current China national standard in drinking water and 2198 above 300 {mu}g of As/L). The presented database of arsenic in wells of the Ba Men region provides a useful tool for planning future water explorations when combined with geological information as well as support for designing upcoming epidemiological studies on the effects of arsenic in drinking water for this region.

Ning Zhixiong [Ba Men Anti-Epidemic Station, Lin He, Inner Mongolia (China); Lobdell, Danelle T. [Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch, Human Studies Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA, Chapel Hill (United States); Kwok, Richard K. [RTI International, P.O. Box 12194, 3040 Cornwallis Rd, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2194 (United States)], E-mail: rkwok@rti.org; Liu Zhiyi; Zhang Shiying; Ma Chenglong [Ba Men Anti-Epidemic Station, Lin He, Inner Mongolia (China); Riediker, Michael [Institut Universitaire Romand de Sante au Travail, Lausanne (Switzerland); Mumford, Judy L. [Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch, Human Studies Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA, Chapel Hill (United States)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

2012 Edition of the Drinking Water Standards and Health Advisories (EPA 822-S-12-001)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Edition of the Drinking Edition of the Drinking Water Standards and Health Advisories 2012 Edition of the Drinking Water Standards and Health Advisories EPA 822-S-12-001 Office of Water U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC Spring 2012 Date of update: April, 2012 Recycled/Recyclable Printed on paper that contains at least 50% recycled fiber. Drinking Water Standards and Health Advisories Spring 2012 Page iii of vi iii The Health Advisory (HA) Program, sponsored by the EPA's Office of Water (OW), publishes concentrations of drinking water contaminants at Drinking Water Specific Risk Level Concentration for cancer (10 -4 Cancer Risk) and concentrations of drinking water contaminants at which noncancer adverse health effects are not anticipated to occur over specific exposure

31

Arsenic in drinking water and lung cancer: A systematic review  

SciTech Connect

Exposure to inorganic arsenic via drinking water is a growing public health concern. We conducted a systematic review of the literature examining the association between arsenic in drinking water and the risk of lung cancer in humans. Towards this aim, we searched electronic databases for articles published through April 2006. Nine ecological studies, two case-control studies, and six cohort studies were identified. The majority of the studies were conducted in areas of high arsenic exposure (100 {mu}g/L) such as southwestern Taiwan, the Niigata Prefecture, Japan, and Northern Chile. Most of the studies reported markedly higher risks of lung cancer mortality or incidence in high arsenic areas compared to the general population or a low arsenic exposed reference group. The quality assessment showed that, among the studies identified, only four assessed arsenic exposure at the individual level. Further, only one of the ecological studies presented results adjusted for potential confounders other than age; of the cohort and case-control studies, only one-half adjusted for cigarette smoking status in the analysis. Despite these methodologic limitations, the consistent observation of strong, statistically significant associations from different study designs carried out in different regions provide support for a causal association between ingesting drinking water with high concentrations of arsenic and lung cancer. The lung cancer risk at lower exposure concentrations remains uncertain.

Celik, Ismail [Department of Medical Oncology, Hacettepe University Institute of Oncology, Ankara (Turkey); Gallicchio, Lisa [Prevention and Research Center, Mercy Medical Center (United States); Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Boyd, Kristina; Lam, Tram K.; Matanoski, Genevieve [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Tao Xuguang [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States); Shiels, Meredith; Hammond, Edward [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Chen Liwei [Department of International Health, Center for Human Nutrition, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Robinson, Karen A. [Department of General Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States); Caulfield, Laura E. [Department of International Health, Center for Human Nutrition, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Herman, James G. [Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States); Guallar, Eliseo [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Alberg, Anthony J. [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Hollings Cancer Center, and Department of Biostatistics, Bioinformatics and Epidemiology, Medical University of South Carolina (United States)], E-mail: alberg@musc.edu

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

Combined heat and power for drinking water production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ABB Kraftwerke AG, of Mannheim, Germany, is presently involved in two huge projects aimed at supplying electric power and drinking water in the Arabian Gulf. To limit fuel consumption as much as possible, electricity and water are produced in CHP plants. These plants are powered either by gas turbines equipped with HRSGs, or by conventional boilers feeding controlled extraction-condensing steam turbines. The selection of one of the two systems depends mainly on the type of fuel available (oil or natural gas), on the power/water loads through the year and other local factors. The gas turbine-based CHP systems can be setup in a shorter time and feature a slightly higher overall efficiency. The steam turbine solution, once the plant is commissioned, needs less maintenance. In the final analysis, operating costs of the two solutions are equivalent.

Chellini, R.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Ground Water Management Regulations (Louisiana) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground Water Management Regulations (Louisiana) Ground Water Management Regulations (Louisiana) Eligibility Agricultural Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial...

34

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY An ENERGY STAR Resource Guidedrinking water supply industry to reduce energy consumptionenergy is used in the public drinking water supply industry.

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Policy Office of Drinking Water Title: Two-connection Residential Water System Number: P A.13 – Administration References: WAC 246-291-030(3) Supersedes: P A.13 Two Connection Residential Public Water Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Drinking Water policies are written descriptions of the approach taken by the Office to implement a statute, regulation, court order, or other agency order, and may include the Office’s current practice, procedure, or method of action based on that approach. Any generally applicable directives or criteria that provide the basis for imposing penalties or sanctions, or for granting or denying Office approvals, must either be in statute or established in a rule. PURPOSE The Office of Drinking Water will waive all water system requirements for water systems with only two-residential connections, where each connection is a single family home. NOTE: This policy does not prevent a local health jurisdiction from regulating two-connection residential water systems. DIRECTION When individuals propose a water system with only two residential connections, where each connection is only a single family home, the Office of Drinking Water will provide a copy of this policy and notice which states the Office of Drinking Water has waived the requirements of chapter 246-291 WAC. The Office of Drinking Water will direct individuals to check with their local

Contact Karen Valenzuela; Denise A. Clifford; Office Of Drinking Water

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Hawaii Department of Health Safe Drinking Water Branch | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Branch Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Health Safe Drinking Water Branch Address 919 Ala Moana Blvd Room 308 Place Honolulu, Hawaii Zip 96814 Coordinates 21.294755°, -157.858979° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.294755,"lon":-157.858979,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

37

Determining the removal effectiveness of flame retardants from drinking water treatment processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low concentrations of xenobiotic chemicals have recently become a concern in the surface water environment. The concern expands to drinking water treatment processes, and whether or not they remove these chemicals while ...

Lin, Joseph C. (Joseph Chris), 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Regulations Establishing Water Quality Standards for Surface...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Establishing Water Quality Standards for Surface Water of the State of Arkansas (Arkansas) Regulations Establishing Water Quality Standards for Surface Water of the State of...

39

Drinking Water as a Source of Indoor Air Pollution: In-Home Formation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drinking Water as a Source of Indoor Air Pollution: In-Home Formation & Cross-Media Transfer Speaker(s): David Olson Date: April 19, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host...

40

Inland Wetlands and Water Courses Regulations (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Regulated activities in or near inland wetlands and water courses include the removal or depositing of material, land or water obstruction or alteration, construction, pollution, or water diversion...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results and Policy Implications  

SciTech Connect

ARUBA (Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash) has proven effective at removing high concentrations of arsenic from drinking water in Bangladesh. During fieldwork in four sub-districts of the country, ARUBA reduced arsenic levels ranging from 200 to 900 ppb to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. The technology is cost-effective because the substrate--bottom ash from coal fired power plants--is a waste material readily available in South Asia. In comparison to similar technologies, ARUBA uses less media for arsenic removal due to its high surface area to volume ratio. Hence, less waste is produced. A number of experiments were conducted in Bangladesh to determine the effectiveness of various water treatment protocols. It was found that (1) ARUBA removes more than half of the arsenic from water within five minutes of treatment, (2) ARUBA, that has settled at the bottom of a treatment vessel, continues to remove arsenic for 2-3 days, (3) ARUBA's arsenic removal efficiency can be improved through sequential partial dosing (adding a given amount of ARUBA in fractions versus all at once), and (4) allowing water to first stand for two to three days followed by treatment with ARUBA produced final arsenic levels ten times lower than treating water directly out of the well. Our findings imply a number of tradeoffs between ARUBA's effective arsenic removal capacity, treatment system costs, and waste output. These tradeoffs, some a function of arsenic-related policies in Bangladesh (e.g., waste disposal regulations), must be considered when designing an arsenic removal system. We propose that the most attractive option is to use ARUBA in communityscale water treatment centers, installed as public-private partnerships, in Bangladeshi villages.

Mathieu, Johanna L.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Kowolik, Kristin; Addy, Susan E.A.

2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

42

The Drinking Water Security and Safety Amendments of 2002: Is America's Drinking Water Infrastructure Safer Four Years Later?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pumping station, or water intake could deprive large areasthe pre-treatment and water intake part of the system; and 'around intakes; intruder resis- tant fences enclosing water

Shermer, Steven D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Removal of beryllium from drinking water by chemical coagulation and lime softening  

SciTech Connect

The effectiveness of conventional drinking water treatment and lime softening was evaluated for beryllium removal from two drinking water sources. Jar test studies were conducted to determine how common coagulants (aluminum sulfate and ferric chloride) and lime softening performed in removing beryllium from spiked waters. Centrifugation was used to simulate filtration. The two source waters used were raw Ohio River water and groundwater from the Great Miami Aquifer. The impact of initial beryllium concentration, coagulant dose, turbidity and pH on beryllium removal was examined and optimum treatment conditions were determined. Jar tests using alum and ferric chloride coagulants were able to achieve 95% and 85% removal of beryllium respectively from surface water. Removal efficiency increased as the pH was increased. Based on the data collected in the study, coprecipitation and precipitation are the two likely mechanisms responsible for beryllium removal.

Lytle, D.A.; Summers, R.S.; Sorg, T.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Methane contamination of drinking water accompanying gas-well drilling and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- matically increasing natural-gas extraction. In aquifers overlying the Marcellus and Utica shale formations of drinking water associated with shale- gas extraction. In active gas-extraction areas (one or more gas wells methane sources such as the Marcellus and Utica shales at the active sites and matched gas geochemistry

45

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas Pennsylvania, ex- amining natural gas concentrations and isotopic signatures with proximity to shale gas wells this transformation, with shale gas and other unconventional sources now yielding more than one- half of all US

Jackson, Robert B.

46

Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund (New Mexico) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All...

47

Water Pollution Control Permit Regulations (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations outline the permits and permitting processes for point discharges to surface waters and outline the monitoring and reporting requirements.

48

The effects of wavelength, metals, and reactive oxygen species on the sunlight inactivation of microorganisms: observations and applications to the solar disinfection of drinking water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of batch-process solar disinfectors. Water Research 35(4),Batch process solar disinfection is an efficient means of disinfecting drinking water

Fisher, Michael Benjamin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Regulations Establishing Water Quality Standards for Surface Water of the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Establishing Water Quality Standards for Surface Water Establishing Water Quality Standards for Surface Water of the State of Arkansas (Arkansas) Regulations Establishing Water Quality Standards for Surface Water of the State of Arkansas (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting

50

Underground Injection Control Regulations (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article prohibits injection of hazardous or radioactive wastes into or above an underground source of drinking water, establishes permit conditions and states regulations for design,...

51

Study on radon and radium concentrations in drinking water in west region of Iran  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the most important characterizations of social health is existence the availability of safe drinking water. Since one of the sources of water contamination is nuclear contamination from radon gas, so in this research radon 222 concentration levels in water supplies in the Toyserkan (a region located in the west of Iran) is investigated. For measuring radon gas in water wells and springs Lucas chamber method is used. Review the results of these measurements that taken from 15th place show that, only five sites have radon concentrations above the limit dose. To reduce radon concentration, it is better to keep water in open pools in contact with air before the water is delivered to users.

Forozani, Ghasem

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Fisk-based criteria to support validation of detection methods for drinking water and air.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was prepared to support the validation of analytical methods for threat contaminants under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC) program. It is designed to serve as a resource for certain applications of benchmark and fate information for homeland security threat contaminants. The report identifies risk-based criteria from existing health benchmarks for drinking water and air for potential use as validation targets. The focus is on benchmarks for chronic public exposures. The priority sources are standard EPA concentration limits for drinking water and air, along with oral and inhalation toxicity values. Many contaminants identified as homeland security threats to drinking water or air would convert to other chemicals within minutes to hours of being released. For this reason, a fate analysis has been performed to identify potential transformation products and removal half-lives in air and water so appropriate forms can be targeted for detection over time. The risk-based criteria presented in this report to frame method validation are expected to be lower than actual operational targets based on realistic exposures following a release. Note that many target criteria provided in this report are taken from available benchmarks without assessing the underlying toxicological details. That is, although the relevance of the chemical form and analogues are evaluated, the toxicological interpretations and extrapolations conducted by the authoring organizations are not. It is also important to emphasize that such targets in the current analysis are not health-based advisory levels to guide homeland security responses. This integrated evaluation of chronic public benchmarks and contaminant fate has identified more than 200 risk-based criteria as method validation targets across numerous contaminants and fate products in drinking water and air combined. The gap in directly applicable values is considerable across the full set of threat contaminants, so preliminary indicators were developed from other well-documented benchmarks to serve as a starting point for validation efforts. By this approach, at least preliminary context is available for water or air, and sometimes both, for all chemicals on the NHSRC list that was provided for this evaluation. This means that a number of concentrations presented in this report represent indirect measures derived from related benchmarks or surrogate chemicals, as described within the many results tables provided in this report.

MacDonell, M.; Bhattacharyya, M.; Finster, M.; Williams, M.; Picel, K.; Chang, Y.-S.; Peterson, J.; Adeshina, F.; Sonich-Mullin, C.; Environmental Science Division; EPA

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

53

Water Quality Regulations (Rhode Island) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulations (Rhode Island) Water Quality Regulations (Rhode Island) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public...

54

Division of Water, Part 675: Great Lakes Water Withdrawal Registration Regulations (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations set forth requirements for the registration of water withdrawals and reporting of water losses from the Great Lakes Basin. The regulations apply to water withdrawals from...

55

Persistence and decontamination of surrogate radioisotopes in a model drinking water distribution system  

SciTech Connect

Contamination of a model drinking water system with surrogate radioisotopes was examined with respect to persistence on and decontamination of infrastructure surfaces. Cesium and cobalt chloride salts were used as surrogates for cesium-137 and cobalt-60. Studies were conducted in biofilm annular reactors containing heavily corroded iron surfaces formed under shear and constantly submerged in drinking water. Cesium was not detected on the corroded iron surface after equilibration with 10 and 100 mg L{sup -1} solutions of cesium chloride, but cobalt was detected on corroded iron coupons at both initial concentrations. The amount of adhered cobalt decreased over the next six weeks, but was still present when monitoring stopped. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) showed that adhered cobalt was in the III oxidation state. The adsorbed cobalt was strongly resistant to decontamination by various physicochemical methods. Simulated flushing, use of free chlorine and dilute ammonia were found to be ineffective whereas use of aggressive methods like 14.5 M ammonia and 0.36 M sulfuric acid removed 37 and 92% of the sorbed cobalt, respectively.

Szabo, Jeffrey G.; Impellitteri, Christopher A.; Govindaswamy, Shekar; Hall, John S.; (EPA); (Lakeshore)

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

56

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash Title Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2010 Authors Mathieu, Johanna L., Ashok J. Gadgil, Susan E. Addy, and Kristin Kowolik Journal Environmental Science and Health Keywords airflow and pollutant transport group, arsenic, bangladesh, coal bottom ash, drinking water, indoor environment department, water contaminants, water treatment Abstract We describe laboratory and field results of a novel arsenic removal adsorbent called 'Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash' (ARUBA). ARUBA is prepared by coating particles of coal bottom ash, a waste material from coal fired power plants, with iron (hydr)oxide. The coating process is simple and conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Material costs for ARUBA are estimated to be low (~$0.08 per kg) and arsenic remediation with ARUBA has the potential to be affordable to resource-constrained communities. ARUBA is used for removing arsenic via a dispersal-and-removal process, and we envision that ARUBA would be used in community-scale water treatment centers. We show that ARUBA is able to reduce arsenic concentrations in contaminated Bangladesh groundwater to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. Using the Langmuir isotherm (R2 = 0.77) ARUBA's adsorption capacity in treating real groundwater is 2.6×10-6 mol/g (0.20 mg/g). Time-to-90% (defined as the time interval for ARUBA to remove 90% of the total amount of arsenic that is removed at equilibrium) is less than one hour. Reaction rates (pseudo-second-order kinetic model, R2 ≥ 0.99) increase from 2.4×105 to 7.2×105 g mol-1 min-1 as the groundwater arsenic concentration decreases from 560 to 170 ppb. We show that ARUBA's arsenic adsorption density (AAD), defined as the milligrams of arsenic removed at equilibrium per gram of ARUBA added, is linearly dependent on the initial arsenic concentration of the groundwater sample, for initial arsenic concentrations of up to 1600 ppb and an ARUBA dose of 4.0 g/L. This makes it easy to determine the amount of ARUBA required to treat a groundwater source when its arsenic concentration is known and less than 1600 ppb. Storing contaminated groundwater for two to three days before treatment is seen to significantly increase ARUBA's AAD. ARUBA can be separated from treated water by coagulation and clarification, which is expected to be less expensive than filtration of micron-scale particles, further contributing to the affordability of a community-scale water treatment center

57

Treated bottom ash medium and method of arsenic removal from drinking water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for low-cost arsenic removal from drinking water using chemically prepared bottom ash pre-treated with ferrous sulfate and then sodium hydroxide. Deposits on the surface of particles of bottom ash form of activated iron adsorbent with a high affinity for arsenic. In laboratory tests, a miniscule 5 grams of pre-treated bottom ash was sufficient to remove the arsenic from 2 liters of 2400 ppb (parts per billion) arsenic-laden water to a level below 50 ppb (the present United States Environmental Protection Agency limit). By increasing the amount of pre-treated bottom ash, even lower levels of post-treatment arsenic are expected. It is further expected that this invention supplies a very low-cost solution to arsenic poisoning for large population segments.

Gadgil, Ashok (El Cerrito, CA)

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

58

Drinking water arsenic exposure and blood pressure in healthy women of reproductive age in Inner Mongolia, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extremely high exposure levels evaluated in prior investigations relating elevated levels of drinking water arsenic and hypertension prevalence make extrapolation to potential vascular effects at lower exposure levels very difficult. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 8790 women who had recently been pregnant in an area of Inner Mongolia, China known to have a gradient of drinking water arsenic exposure. This study observed increased systolic blood pressure levels with increasing drinking water arsenic, at lower exposure levels than previously reported in the literature. As compared to the referent category (below limit of detection to 20 {mu}g of As/L), the overall population mean systolic blood pressure rose 1.29 mm Hg (95% CI 0.82, 1.75), 1.28 mm Hg (95% CI 0.49, 2.07), and 2.22 mm Hg (95% CI 1.46, 2.97) as drinking water arsenic concentration increased from 21 to 50, 51 to 100, and > 100 {mu}g of As/L, respectively. Controlling for age and body weight (n = 3260), the population mean systolic blood pressure rose 1.88 mm Hg (95% CI 1.03, 2.73), 3.90 mm Hg (95% CI 2.52, 5.29), and 6.83 mm Hg (95% CI 5.39, 8.27) as drinking water arsenic concentration increased, respectively. For diastolic blood pressure effect, while statistically significant, was not as pronounced as systolic blood pressure. Mean diastolic blood pressure rose 0.78 mm Hg (95% CI 0.39, 1.16), 1.57 mm Hg (95% CI 0.91, 2.22) and 1.32 mm Hg (95% CI 0.70, 1.95), respectively, for the overall population and rose 2.11 mm Hg (95% CI 1.38, 2.84), 2.74 mm Hg (95% CI 1.55, 3.93), and 3.08 mm Hg (95% CI 1.84, 4.31), respectively, for the adjusted population (n = 3260) at drinking water arsenic concentrations of 21 to 50, 51 to 100, and > 100 {mu}g of As/L. If our study results are confirmed in other populations, the potential burden of cardiovascular disease attributable to drinking water arsenic is significant.

Kwok, Richard K. [RTI International, PO Box 12194, 3040 Cornwallis Rd., Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2194 (United States)], E-mail: rkwok@rti.org; Mendola, Pauline [Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch, Human Studies Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, MD-58, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Liu Zhiyi [Ba Men Anti-Epidemic Station, Lin He, Inner Mongolia (China); Savitz, David A. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1057, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Heiss, Gerardo [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Ling Heling [Ba Men Anti-Epidemic Station, Lin He, Inner Mongolia (China); Xia Yajuan [Inner Mongolia Center for Endemic Disease Control and Research, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia (China); Lobdell, Danelle [Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch, Human Studies Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, MD-58, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Zeng Donglin [Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Thorp, John M. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Creason, John P.; Mumford, Judy L. [Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch, Human Studies Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, MD-58, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect

As American drinking water agencies face higher production costs, demand, and energy prices, they seek opportunities to reduce costs without negatively affecting the quality of the water they deliver. This guide describes resources for cost-effectively improving the energy efficiency of U.S. public drinking water facilities. The guide (1) describes areas of opportunity for improving energy efficiency in drinking water facilities; (2) provides detailed descriptions of resources to consult for each area of opportunity; (3) offers supplementary suggestions and information for the area; and (4) presents illustrative case studies, including analysis of cost-effectiveness.

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich; Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Brown, Rich

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

60

Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Part 605: Applications...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Applications for Diversion or Use of Water for Purposes Other Than Hydro-Electric Power Projects (New York) Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Part 605:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems June 24, 2012 - 1:50pm Addthis Photo Credit: iStockphoto Photo...

62

Summary of resources available to small water systems for meeting the 10 ppb arsenic drinking water limit.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the lowering of the EPA maximum contaminant level of arsenic from 50 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 ppb, many public water systems in the country and in New Mexico in particular, are faced with making decisions about how to bring their system into compliance. This document provides detail on the options available to the water systems and the steps they need to take to achieve compliance with this regulation. Additionally, this document provides extensive resources and reference information for additional outreach support, financing options, vendors for treatment systems, and media pilot project results.

Krumhansl, James Lee; Thomson, Bruce M. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Ziegler, Matt (New Mexico Tech, Albuquerque, NM); Butler, Susan (New Mexico Tech, Albuquerque, NM); Himmelberger, Heather (New Mexico Tech, Albuquerque, NM); Holt, Kathleen Caroline

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

High density polyethylene (HDPE) containers as an alternative to polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles for solar disinfection of drinking water in northern region, Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to investigate the technical feasibility of high density polyethylene (HDPE) containers as an alternative to polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles for the solar disinfection of drinking water ...

Yazdani, Iman

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

A Ten-year Survey of Giardia Cysts in Drinking Water Supplies of Seoul, the Republic of Korea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: To understand the distribution of Giardia cysts in drinking water supplies in Seoul, Korea, we collected water samples quarterly at 6 intakes in the Han River, its largest stream and 6 conventional water treatment plants (WTPs) serving drinking water, from 2000 to 2009. Giardia cysts in each of 10 L water were confirmed in 35.0 % of intake water samples and the arithmetic mean was 1.65 cysts/10 L (range 0-35 cysts/10 L). The lowest cyst density was observed at Paldang and Kangbuk intakes, and the pollution level was higher at 4 intakes downstream. It seemed that these 4 intakes were under influence of Wangsuk stream at the end of which cysts were found in all samples with the mean of 140 cysts/10 L. The annual mean number of cysts was 0.21-4.21 cysts/10 L, and the cyst level at the second half of the 10 years was about 1/5 of that at first half on average. The cysts were more frequently found in winter, and their mean density was 3.74 cysts/10 L in winter and 0.80-1.08 cysts/10 L in other seasons. All finished water samples collected at 6 WTPs were negative for Giardia in each of 100 L sample for 10 years and cyst removal by physical process was average 2.9-log. It was concluded that conventional water treatment at 6 WTPs of Seoul appears to remove the cysts effectively under the present level of their source water. Domestic wastewater from the urban region could be an important source of Giardia pollution

Mok-young Lee; Eun-joo Cho; Jin-hyo Lee; Sun-hee Han; Yong-sang Park

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

State Water Permit Regulation (Arkansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Permit Regulation (Arkansas) Permit Regulation (Arkansas) State Water Permit Regulation (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Fuel Distributor Industrial Utility Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality It is the purpose of this regulation to adopt standards applicable to the storage, discharge, or disposal of any waste which, if unregulated, will cause pollution of waters of the state or result in wastes being placed in a location where it is likely to cause pollution of the waters of the state. These standards are intended to protect public health and the environment, and prevent, control, or abate pollution. The State Water Permit Regulation is implemented to adopt standards applicable to the storage, discharge, or disposal of any waste that, if

66

Water Rx - The Problem of Pharmaceuticals in Our Nation's Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IN OUR NATION'S WATERS intake via drinking water wastherapeutic dose and intake via drinking water was 150,000

Leitman, Melanie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Israel -the " BACK TO THE FUTURE" opportunity for the Global Water Arena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consequences of climate change: Drought and lack of fresh drinking water The aging water infrastructure can with the water arena, involves many players Water Utility Government Regulator Solution Provider Technology

Mark, Pinsky

68

Estimated general population control limits for unitary agents in drinking water, milk, soil, and unprocessed food items  

SciTech Connect

In the event of an unplanned release of chemical agent during any stage of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), the potential exists for contamination of drinking water, forage crops, grains, garden produce, and livestock. Persistent agents such as VX or sulfur mustard pose the greatest human health concern for reentry. This White Paper has been prepared to provide technical bases for these decisions by developing working estimates of agent control limits in selected environmental media considered principal sources of potential human exposure. To date, control limits for public exposure to unitary agents have been established for atmospheric concentrations only. The current analysis builds on previous work to calculate working estimates of control limits for ingestion and dermal exposure to potentially contaminated drinking water, milk, soil, and unprocessed food items such as garden produce. Information characterizing agent desorption from, and detection on or in, contaminated porous media are presently too developed to permit reasonable estimation of dermal exposure from this source. Thus, dermal contact with potentially contaminated porous surfaces is not considered in this document.

Watson, A.P.; Adams, J.D.; Cerar, R.J.; Hess, T.L.; Kistner, S.L.; Leffingwell, S.S.; MacIntosh, R.G.; Ward, J.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Current and Long-Term Effects of Delta Water Quality on Drinking Water Treatment Costs from Disinfection Byproduct Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

current Delta water Plant and Intake Location System Size (future water quality conditions at different Delta intakesusing the intake with the better water quality between Old

Chen, Wei-Hsiang; Haunschild, Kristine; Lund, Jay R.; Fleenor, William E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Regulation of Gas, Electric, and Water Companies (Maryland) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulation of Gas, Electric, and Water Companies (Maryland) Regulation of Gas, Electric, and Water Companies (Maryland) Regulation of Gas, Electric, and Water Companies (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maryland Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Public Service Commission The Public Service Commission is responsible for regulating gas, electric, and water companies in the state. This legislation contains provisions for such companies, addressing planning and siting considerations for electric

71

Regulation of Dams and Bridges Affecting Navigable Waters (Wisconsin) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dams and Bridges Affecting Navigable Waters Dams and Bridges Affecting Navigable Waters (Wisconsin) Regulation of Dams and Bridges Affecting Navigable Waters (Wisconsin) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info Start Date 2007 State Wisconsin Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Natural Resources Chapter 31 of the Wisconsin Statutes lays out the regulations relevant to

72

Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems June 24, 2012 - 1:50pm Addthis Photo Credit: iStockphoto Photo Credit: iStockphoto Before installing a solar water heating system, you should investigate local building codes, zoning ordinances, and subdivision covenants, as well as any special regulations pertaining to the site. You will probably need a building permit to install a solar energy system onto an existing building. Not every community or municipality initially welcomes residential renewable energy installations. Although this is often due to ignorance or the comparative novelty of renewable energy systems, you must comply with existing building and permit procedures to install your system.

73

Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems June 24, 2012 - 1:50pm Addthis Photo Credit: iStockphoto Photo Credit: iStockphoto Before installing a solar water heating system, you should investigate local building codes, zoning ordinances, and subdivision covenants, as well as any special regulations pertaining to the site. You will probably need a building permit to install a solar energy system onto an existing building. Not every community or municipality initially welcomes residential renewable energy installations. Although this is often due to ignorance or the comparative novelty of renewable energy systems, you must comply with existing building and permit procedures to install your system.

74

Occurrence and Potential Human-Health Relevance of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water from Domestic Wells in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Laboratory Reporting Level MCL, Maximum Contaminant Level MRL, Maximum Reporting Level MTBE, Methyl tert Figures 3 #12;Abstract BACKGROUND: As the population and demand for safe drinking water from domestic concentrations to U.S. EPA Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) and Health-Based Screening Levels. RESULTS: VOCs

75

Division of Water, Part 666: Regulation for Administration and Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

66: Regulation for Administration and 66: Regulation for Administration and Management of the Wild, Scenic and Recreational Rivers System in New York State Excepting Private Land in the Adirondack Park (New York) Division of Water, Part 666: Regulation for Administration and Management of the Wild, Scenic and Recreational Rivers System in New York State Excepting Private Land in the Adirondack Park (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water

76

Meeting the Need for Safe Drinking Water in Rural Mexico through Point-of-Use Treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are boiling and adding chlorine in the form of tablets orto water quality problems. Chlorine pills and bleach requireassociated with boiling, chlorine tablets, and bleach. Two

Lang, Micah; Kaser, Forrest; Reygadas, Fermin; Nelson, Kara; Kammen, Daniel M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

The effects of sulfate fertilization and high levels of sulfate and salt drinking water on the growth and mineral status of ruminants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three experiments were conducted to determine the effects of sulfate (SO?²?) in forage and drinking water on the performance and mineral status of cattle and sheep. In Experiment 1, forty-eight late gestation crossbred cows were grazed on twelve 10-acre oat pastures for 112 days (Jan 6 to Apr 28) to determine the effects of oat forage fertilized with ammonium sulfate ((NH?)?SO?) on serum Ca, Mg and P status of cows. Pastures were assigned to either an (NH?)?SO? (400 kg/ha) or ammonium nitrate (NH?NO?, 247 kg\\ha) fertilizer treatment. The forage sulfur (S) concentrations were higher (P water on the performance and mineral status of growing cattle. Twelve crossbred growing cattle were grazed on twelve 1.4-hectare native pastures for 56 d (from Jun 16 to Aug 11). The cattle were given a single source of water: tap water (n=4), SO?²? water (1139 mg SO?²?/L, n=4) and SO?²?/NaCl water (1546mg SO?²?/L and 3489 mg Na/L, n=4). The average daily gain (ADG) of cattle provided with tap water and SO?²? water was greater than that of cattle drinking SO?²?/NaCl water (Pwater sources (P>.05). There was no difference in serum Ca, P, Mg, K and Cu of the cattle due to source of water (P> .05). ne water intake of cattle with different treatments was associated with climatic factors differently. In Experiment 3, nine growing wethers were randomly assigned to an individual pen in the metallic laboratory to determine mineral balance in sheep provided with tap water, SO?²? watwe or SO?²?/NaCl water. The periods of the feeding and metabolic trial were 28 d and 12 d, respectively. There were no significant differences for ADG and feed efficiency of animals provided the treatments (P>.05). There was no difference for serum Na, Ca, P, Mg and Zn in sheep among the treatments (P> .05). But serum Cu of the sheep drinking tap water was Feater than that of the sheep drinking SO?²?/NaCl water (Pwater and SO?²?/NaCl water did not affect the OM intake, digestibility of OM and NDF, and ADG of sheep during the trial (P>.05).

Xie, Kehe

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

An evaluation of household drinking water treatment systems in Peru : the table filter and the safe water system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) storage, and education. Tests on the SWSs in Peru demonstrated 99.6% E.coli removal and 95% total coliform removal. Only 30% of the SWSs tested contained water at or above the WHO-recommended concentration of free ...

Coulbert, Brittany, 1981-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe laboratory and field results of a novel arsenic removal adsorbent called 'Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash' (ARUBA). ARUBA is prepared by coating particles of coal bottom ash, a waste material from coal fired power plants, with iron (hydr)oxide. The coating process is simple and conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Material costs for ARUBA are estimated to be low (~;;$0.08 per kg) and arsenic remediation with ARUBA has the potential to be affordable to resource-constrained communities. ARUBA is used for removing arsenic via a dispersal-and-removal process, and we envision that ARUBA would be used in community-scale water treatment centers. We show that ARUBA is able to reduce arsenic concentrations in contaminated Bangladesh groundwater to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. Using the Langmuir isotherm (R2 = 0.77) ARUBA's adsorption capacity in treating real groundwater is 2.6x10-6 mol/g (0.20 mg/g). Time-to-90percent (defined as the time interval for ARUBA to remove 90percent of the total amount of arsenic that is removed at equilibrium) is less than one hour. Reaction rates (pseudo-second-order kinetic model, R2>_ 0.99) increase from 2.4x105 to 7.2x105 g mol-1 min-1 as the groundwater arsenic concentration decreases from 560 to 170 ppb. We show that ARUBA's arsenic adsorption density (AAD), defined as the milligrams of arsenic removed at equilibrium per gram of ARUBA added, is linearly dependent on the initial arsenic concentration of the groundwater sample, for initial arsenic concentrations of up to 1600 ppb and an ARUBA dose of 4.0 g/L. This makes it easy to determine the amount of ARUBA required to treat a groundwater source when its arsenic concentration is known and less than 1600 ppb. Storing contaminated groundwater for two to three days before treatment is seen to significantly increase ARUBA's AAD. ARUBA can be separated from treated water by coagulation and clarification, which is expected to be less expensive than filtration of micron-scale particles, further contributing to the affordability of a community-scale water treatment center.

MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.; GADGIL, ASHOK J.; ADDY, SUSAN E.A.; KOWOLIK, KRISTIN

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Part 605: Applications for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: 5: Applications for Diversion or Use of Water for Purposes Other Than Hydro-Electric Power Projects (New York) Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Part 605: Applications for Diversion or Use of Water for Purposes Other Than Hydro-Electric Power Projects (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These rules apply to all applications for a license or a permit to take, divert, appropriate or otherwise use the waters of the State, except applications for hydro-electric power projects. Applications are reviewed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

20121114 Riverton drinking wa...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Where Does My Drinking Water Come From? Where Does My Drinking Water Come From? Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site F A C T S H E E T ENERGY Legacy Management U.S. DEPARTMENT OF This fact sheet provides information about the Alternative Water Supply System and domestic wells at the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I processing site at Riverton, Wyoming. The Riverton site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Where Is the Riverton Site? The former Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site is in Fremont County, 2 miles southwest of the town of Riverton and within the boundaries of the Wind River Indian Reservation (Northern Arapaho and Eastern Shoshone). Why Is It a "Site"? A uranium- and vanadium-ore-processing mill operated on the property from 1958 to 1963. Milling operations created

82

Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Part 600: Applications for Licenses and Preliminary Permits Under the Water Power Act (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations provide instructions for applications proposing the construction, repair, or operation of hydropower sources. Applications are reviewed by the Water Power and Control Commission.

83

Estimated general population control limits for unitary agents in drinking water, milk, soil, and unprocessed food items. For use in reentry decision-making  

SciTech Connect

In the event of an unplanned release of chemical agent during any stage of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), the potential exists for contamination of drinking water, forage crops, grains, garden produce, and livestock. Persistent agents such as VX or sulfur mustard pose the greatest human health concern for reentry. This White Paper has been prepared to provide technical bases for these decisions by developing working estimates of agent control limits in selected environmental media considered principal sources of potential human exposure. To date, control limits for public exposure to unitary agents have been established for atmospheric concentrations only. The current analysis builds on previous work to calculate working estimates of control limits for ingestion and dermal exposure to potentially contaminated drinking water, milk, soil, and unprocessed food items such as garden produce. Information characterizing agent desorption from, and detection on or in, contaminated porous media are presently too developed to permit reasonable estimation of dermal exposure from this source. Thus, dermal contact with potentially contaminated porous surfaces is not considered in this document.

Watson, A.P.; Adams, J.D.; Cerar, R.J.; Hess, T.L.; Kistner, S.L.; Leffingwell, S.S.; MacIntosh, R.G.; Ward, J.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Parts 595-599: Hazardous Substances (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations aim to prevent the release of hazardous substances into surface water and groundwater resources. They contain guidance for facilities which store and process hazardous substances,...

85

An Evaluation of the Water Heater Load Potential for Providing Regulation Service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the possibility of providing aggregated regulation services with small loads, such as water heaters or air conditioners. A direct-load control algorithm is presented to aggregate the water heater load for the purpose of regulation. A dual-element electric water heater model is developed, which accounts for both thermal dynamics and users’ water consumptions. A realistic regulation signal was used to evaluate the number of water heaters needed and the operational characteristics of a water heater when providing 2-MW regulation service. Modeling results suggest that approximately 33,333 water heaters are needed to provide a 2-MW regulation service 24 hours a day. However, if water heaters only provide regulation from 6:00 to 24:00, approximately 20,000 will be needed. Because the control algorithm has considered the thermal setting of the water heater, the customer comfort is obstructed little. Therefore, the aggregated regulation service provided by water heater loads can become a major source of revenue for load-service entities when the smart grid enables the direct load control.

Kondoh, Junji; Lu, Ning; Hammerstrom, Donald J.

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

Mass transfer of volatile organic compounds from drinking water to indoor air: The role of residential dishwashers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contaminated tap water may be a source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in residential indoor air. To better understand the extent and impact of chemical emissions from this source, a two-phase mass balance model was developed based on mass transfer kinetics between each phase. Twenty-nine experiments were completed using a residential dishwasher to determine model parameters. During each experiment, inflow water was spiked with a cocktail of chemical tracers with a wide range of physicochemical properties. In each case, the effects of water temperature, detergent, and dish-loading pattern on chemical stripping efficiencies and mass transfer coefficients were determined. Dishwasher headspace ventilation rates were also measured using an isobutylene tracer gas. Chemical stripping efficiencies for a single cycle ranged from 18% to 55% for acetone, from 96% to 98% for toluene, and from 97% to 98% for ethylbenzene and were consistently 100% for cyclohexane. Experimental results indicate that dishwashers have a relatively low but continuous ventilation rate that results in significant chemical storage within the headspace of the dishwasher. In conjunction with relatively high mass transfer coefficients, low ventilation rates generally lead to emissions that are limited by equilibrium conditions after approximately 1--2 min of dishwasher operation.

Howard-Reed, C.; Corsi, R.L. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Moya, J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Collision Regulation Lines in U.S. Waters | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collision Regulation Lines in U.S. Waters Energy Data Apps Maps Challenges Resources Blogs Let's Talk Energy Beta You are here Data.gov Communities Energy Data Collision...

88

SELF-REGULATING BOILING-WATER NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boiling-water reactor was designed which comprises a pressure vessel containing a mass of water, a reactor core submerged within the water, a reflector tank disposed within the reactor, the reflector tank being open at the top to the interior of the pressure vessel, and a surge tank connected to the reflector tank. In operation the reflector level changes as a function of the pressure witoin the reactor so that the reactivity of the reactor is automatically controlled.

Ransohoff, J.A.; Plawchan, J.D.

1960-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

89

Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Part 600: Applications...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

provide instructions for applications proposing the construction, repair, or operation of hydropower sources. Applications are reviewed by the Water Power and Control Commission...

90

EPA Final Ground Water Rule  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Nuclear Safety and Environment Office of Nuclear Safety and Environment Nuclear Safety and Environment Information Brief HS-20-IB-2007-02 (March 2007) EPA Final Ground Water Rule Safe Drinking Water Act: National Primary Drinking Water Regulations Ground Water Rule - 40 CFR Parts 9, 141 and 142 Final Rule: 71 FR 65574 Effective Date: January 8, 2007 1 RULE SYNOPSIS On November 8, 2006, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a final Ground Water Rule (GWR) to promote increased protection against microbial pathogens that may be present in public water systems (PWSs) that use ground water sources for their supply (these systems are known as ground water systems). This Rule establishes a risk-targeted approach

91

Application and numerical simulation on water mist cooling for urban environment regulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fine water mist is a type of sustainable and environment-friendly cooling technology. This paper concerns the use of water mist flow to improve the quality of urban environment in summer. According to the survey and analysis on the potential for ... Keywords: numerical simulation, regulation of microclimate, spray cooling, two-phase flow

Junfeng Wang; Xincheng Tu; Zhentao Wang; Jiwei Huang

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Division of Water, Parts 670-672: Reservoir Releases Regulations (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

70-672: Reservoir Releases Regulations 70-672: Reservoir Releases Regulations (New York) Division of Water, Parts 670-672: Reservoir Releases Regulations (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation Water releases from New York State reservoirs are subject to monitoring and

93

Environmental regulations handbook for enhanced oil recovery. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A guide to environmental laws and regulations which have special significance for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is presented. The Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the Safe Drinking Water Act, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, federal regulations, and state regulations are discussed. This handbook has been designed as a planning tool and a convenient reference source. The 16 states included comprise the major oil-producing states in various regions of the state. The major topics covered are: general guidelines for complying with environmental laws and regulations; air pollution control; water pollution control; protecting drinking water: underground injection control; hazardous waste management; and federal laws affecting siting or operation of EOR facilities. (DMC)

Wilson, T.D.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Division of Water, Part 673: Dam Safety Regulations (New York) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Dam Safety Regulations (New York) 3: Dam Safety Regulations (New York) Division of Water, Part 673: Dam Safety Regulations (New York) < Back Eligibility Fed. Government Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State New York Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations address dam safety, define dam hazard categories and inspection procedures, and apply to any owner of a dam. Dam owners are required to maintain dams in a safe condition at all times and to comply with Department inquiries for information on the status of a given dam

95

USGS Study: Water Quality A Potential Concern in Private Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USGS Study: Water Quality A Potential Concern in Private Wells More than 20 percent of private domestic wells sampled nationwide contain at least one contaminant at levels of potential health concern's population, use private wells, which are not regulated by the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. USGS

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

96

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010. ) AWWA. 2006. Water Conservation Programs—A PlanningWater Conservation..staff (Caffal, 1995). Water Conservation Beyond optimizing

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Impacts of operation of CVP regulating reservoirs on water temperature  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets and transmits electric power throughout 15 western states. Western's Sierra Nevada Customer Service Region (Sierra Nevada Region) markets approximately 1,480 megawatts (MW) of firm power (and 100 MW of seasonal peaking capacity) from the Central Valley Project (CVP) and other sources and markets available nonfirm power from the Washoe Project. Western's mission is to sell and deliver electricity generated from CVP powerplants. The hydroelectric facilities of the CVP are operated by the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation). Reclamation manages and releases water in accordance with the various acts authorizing specific projects and with enabling legislation. Western's capacity and energy sales must be in conformance with the laws that govern its sale of electrical power. Further, Western's hydropower operations at each facility must comply with minimum and maximum flows and other constraints set by Reclamation, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, or other agencies, acting in accord with law or policy.

Vail, L.W.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13- Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this regulation is to limit emissions of particulate matter from fossil fuel fired and wood-fired steam or hot water generating units.

99

Smoking, Drinking, and Income  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A growing literature identifies a beneficial effect of moderate and even heavy drinking on wages and a negative effect of smoking on wages. An outstanding issue is whether these results obtain because of a causal effect of substance use on wages or whether the observed correlations reflect the effects of income on consumption or other endogeneity problems. This paper presents full information estimates of the structural parameters of a simultaneous model of drinking and smoking status and income using repeated cross--section data. With all else in the system held constant, both smoking and drinking behaviour still have large effects on income, and the income elasticities of smoking and drinking are shown to be larger in magnitude when controlling for endogeneity. JEL Classification: I12 Keywords: alcohol, tobacco, simultaneous equations, maximum simulated likelihood, multinomial probit, limited dependent variables 1 I thank Cam Donaldson, Herb Emery, David Feeny, Chris Ferrall, Jon ...

Mingshan Lu; James Mackinnon; Ken Mckenzie; Harry Paarsche; Seminar Participants; M. Christopher Auld; M. Christopher Auld

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Ultraviolet Water Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

UV Ray of Hope for Safer Drinking Water. ... It is not, however, too soon for the American Water Works Association to express its appreciation. ...

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lists the treatment methods and the percentage of utilitieslists the characteristics of the water sources used by utilities

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Effects of Age on Pavlovian Autoshaping of Ethanol Drinking in Non-Deprived Rats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wa- ter drinking and g/kg water intake were assessed using1. Mean daily g/kg water intake from the sipper CS duringsame sessions g/kg fluid intake in the Water groups did not

Tomie, Arthur; Mohamed, Walaa M.; Pohorecky, Larissa A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rural businesses, for instance for energy audits. In FY2010,Business_Programs/ind ustriallighting_bestpracticessheet.pdf. Water & Wastewater Treatment Energy Use Self-Audit

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPRI. 1997. Quality Energy Efficiency Retrofits for WaterIndustry. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy,Finding Money for Your Energy Efficiency Projects. (A Primer

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

31, 2010. ) U.S. DOE Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (3, 2010. ) Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, ElectricEPRI. 1997. Quality Energy Efficiency Retrofits for Water

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Comparison of EC-Kit with Quanti-Tray[tm] : testing, verification, and drinking water quality mapping in Capiz Province, Philippines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis accomplishes three tasks. First, it verifies the EC-Kit under different water source conditions by comparing it to a laboratory standard method, the IDEXX Quanti-Tray[tm]. The EC-Kit is a simple, inexpensive ...

Chuang, Patty

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Passive containment cooling system with drywell pressure regulation for boiling water reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boiling water reactor is described having a regulating valve for placing the wetwell in flow communication with an intake duct of the passive containment cooling system. This subsystem can be adjusted to maintain the drywell pressure at (or slightly below or above) wetwell pressure after the initial reactor blowdown transient is over. This addition to the PCCS design has the benefit of eliminating or minimizing steam leakage from the drywell to the wetwell in the longer-term post-LOCA time period and also minimizes the temperature difference between drywell and wetwell. This in turn reduces the rate of long-term pressure buildup of the containment, thereby extending the time to reach the design pressure limit. 4 figures.

Hill, P.R.

1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

108

Passive containment cooling system with drywell pressure regulation for boiling water reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boiling water reactor having a regulating valve for placing the wetwell in flow communication with an intake duct of the passive containment cooling system. This subsystem can be adjusted to maintain the drywell pressure at (or slightly below or above) wetwell pressure after the initial reactor blowdown transient is over. This addition to the PCCS design has the benefit of eliminating or minimizing steam leakage from the drywell to the wetwell in the longer-term post-LOCA time period and also minimizes the temperature difference between drywell and wetwell. This in turn reduces the rate of long-term pressure buildup of the containment, thereby extending the time to reach the design pressure limit.

Hill, Paul R. (Tucson, AZ)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

UV Treated Water Dangers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

there are chances of developing cancer or such growth due to radiation on drinking water & it's continuous intake? What are other hazards that may cause problems for human...

110

EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL WATERING DEVICE  

SciTech Connect

A device for watering experimental animals confined in a battery of individual plastic enclosures is described. It consists of a rectangular plastic enclosure having a plurality of fluid-tight compartments, each with a drinking hole near the bottom and a filling hole on the top. The enclosure is immersed in water until filled, its drinking holes sealed with a strip of tape, and it is then placed in the battery. The tape sealing prevents the flow of water from the device, but permits animals to drink by licking the drinking holes. (AEC)

Finkel, M.P.

1964-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Oceanographic Considerations for Desalination Plants in Southern California Coastal Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of product drinking water produced by this plant will begallon of product water produced, the proposed desalinationof the time if product water is produced by the desalination

Jenkins, Scott A; Wasyl, Joseph

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Decontamination of Biological Threats in Water Supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decontamination of Biological Threats in Water Supplies. ... The availability of safe pure drinking water in the United States is taken for granted. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Evaluating the energy and carbon footprint of water conveyance system and future water supply options for Las Vegas, Nevada.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Water production requires the use of energy to transport water from distant locations, pump groundwater from deep aquifers and treat water to meet stringent drinking… (more)

Shrestha, Eleeja

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Hydraulic Fracturing on Drinking Water Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disclaimer Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use.

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Water Permits (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Water Permits Division authorizes permits administered under the Water Quality Regulations. Louisiana's Water Quality Regulations require permits for the discharge of pollutants from any point...

116

Rules and Regulations Pertaining to a User Fee System for Point Source Dischargers that Discharge Pollutants into the Waters of the State (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations establish a user fee system for point source dischargers that discharge pollutants into the surface waters of the State. The funds from such fees are used by the Department of...

117

Effects of evaporative cooling on the regulation of body water and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

building, causing air to be drawn through the cooling pads. The study was conducted during two ...... of gut water in living ruminants. Aust J Agric Res 15:

118

Information Sources for Small Water Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managers of small waters systems must have information about a variety of topics. This publication lists essential printed and electronic resources on disaster preparedness, national drinking water standards, private water well management, water treatment, and many other topics.

Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

2007-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

119

Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laws Envirosearch Institutional Controls NEPA Activities RCRA RQ*Calculator Water HSS Logo Water Laws Overview of water-related legislation affecting DOE sites Clean...

120

GRR/Section 14 - Water Resource Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- Water Resource Assessment - Water Resource Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14 - Water Resource Assessment 14 - WaterResourceAssessment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies United States Environmental Protection Agency Bureau of Land Management US Army Corps of Engineers Federal Emergency Management Agency Regulations & Policies Clean Water Act Coastal Zone Management Act Coastal Barrier Resources Act Safe Drinking Water Act Sole Source Aquifer Demonstration Program Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973 NPDES Rules National Flood Insurance Act Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14 - WaterResourceAssessment.pdf

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Energy Expenditure and Water Flux of Ruppell's Foxes in Saudi Arabia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), sometimes in excess of 50 C, intense solar radiation, desiccating winds, lack of surface water for drinking

Williams, Jos. B.

122

Drinking Water Standards Drinking water from a local public supply must  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

leaks; metals like copper, zinc, cadmium, lead, and arsenic from mine wastes and natural sources wastes; l radiological contaminants such as radon or uranium mill wastes from human or 24 #12;To assure

Dyer, Bill

123

Division of Water, Part 675: Great Lakes Water Withdrawal Registration...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

75: Great Lakes Water Withdrawal Registration Regulations (New York) Division of Water, Part 675: Great Lakes Water Withdrawal Registration Regulations (New York) Eligibility...

124

Environmental regulation of carbon isotope composition and crassulacean acid metabolism in three plant communities along a water availability gradient  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

communities along a water availability gradient M. Fernandawith decreasing water availability. Overall, variation inrelated to water and light availability and CAM appeared to

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph Bottled Water: United States Consumers and Their Perceptions of Water Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Consumption of bottled water is increasing worldwide. Prior research shows many consumers believe bottled water is convenient and has better taste than tap water, despite reports of a number of water quality incidents with bottled water. The authors explore the demographic and social factors associated with bottled water users in the U.S. and the relationship between bottled water use and perceptions of the quality of local water supply. They find that U.S. consumers are more likely to report bottled water as their primary drinking water source when they perceive that drinking water is not safe. Furthermore, those who give lower ratings to the quality of their ground water are more likely to regularly purchase bottle water for drinking and use bottle water as their primary drinking water source.

Zhihua Hu; Lois Wright Morton; Robert L. Mahler

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Atrazine Contamination in a Rural Source-Water Supply: Spa Lake, Lewisburg, Kentucky.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In 1998, Western Kentucky University (WKU) worked in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Drinking Water Protection Division, to investigate methods to improve source-water… (more)

Seadler, Kathryn

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Water is Vital--Especially after a Disaster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dehydration can be a serious threat after a disaster, when supplies of clean drinking water may be limited. Learn how you can find and use hidden sources of water in your home and purify water to make it safe for drinking.

Crocker, Andrew

2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

128

2012 BNL Water Quality Consumer Confidence Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

because it comes from one of the two drinking- water wells that produces water naturally low in iron water is produced with pride by the staff of BNL's Water Treatment Facility (WTF) of the Energy & Utilities Division. Producing BNL's finished water are five water- treatment engineers, each having NYSDOH

Ohta, Shigemi

129

Safe river water: A ubiquitous and collaborative water quality monitoring solution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water quality is vital to human life and economy. However, one sixth of the world's population suffers from lack of safe drinking and domestic water. Aiming to improve the capability of predicting and responding to river pollution disasters, this project ...

Bin Hu; Bo Hu; JiZheng Wan; Huilan Nie; Chongzhi Zhai

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Biological denitrification of water  

SciTech Connect

The authors discuss research regarding the denitrification of drinking water. Most work has been done in Europe. As a consequence there may be a gap in the understanding of the international state of the art with regard to drinking-water denitrification. Numerous substrates have been evaluated including methanol, ethanol, acetic acid, methane, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and various sulfur compounds. Various unit processes have been utilized including biofilters, fluidized-bed and packed-bed reactors, packed towers containing cells immobilized in polymer gels, and completely mixed reactors with cells attached to bouyant porous carriers. There are several commercial facilities currently providing drinking water to European communities. Most include post-treatment with flocculation, filtration, and disinfection. A common concern in denitrification operations is the minimization of nitrite accumulation.

Gayle, B.P. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (USA)); Boardman, G.D.; Sherrard, J.H. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Benoit, R.E. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (USA). Dept. of Biology)

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Scientific Considerations Related to Regulation Development for CO2 Sequestration in Brine Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SCIENTIFIC CONSIDERATIONS RELATED TO REGULATION SCIENTIFIC CONSIDERATIONS RELATED TO REGULATION DEVELOPMENT FOR CO 2 SEQUESTRATION IN BRINE FORMATIONS Chin-Fu Tsang (cftsang@lbl.gov; (510) 486-5782) Sally M. Benson (smbenson@lbl.gov; (510) 486-7071) Earth Sciences Division, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Road, MS 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 94720 Bruce Kobelski (kobelski.bruce@epa.gov) Robert Smith (smith.robert-eu@epamail.epa.gov) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Drinking Water and Ground Water, Washington D.C. Introduction Reduction of atmospheric emissions of CO 2 (DOE, 1999a) through injection of CO 2 into in deep brine formations is being actively studied both in the U.S. and internationally. If this technology is to be employed broadly enough to make a significant impact on global

132

The Molecular Basis for Water Taste in Drosophila  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the regulation of water intake are essential for animalsimportance in regulating water intake. Although taste cells

Cameron, Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Solving Water Quality Problems in the Home  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If your drinking water comes from a private water well, there are certain procedures you can follow to make sure the water is safe. This publication explains how to get your water tested and, if treatment is necessary, to select the correct treatment equipment. Tables display common water problems and the equipment used to treat them.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

134

CLIMATE CHANGE AND WATER SUPPLY SECURITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of developing the infrastructure to produce and deliver recycled water, so it seems logical and fair because unlike recycled water, the water produced is considered to be of drinking water quality or better CLIMATE CHANGE AND WATER SUPPLY SECURITY: Reconfiguring Groundwater Management to Reduce

135

Partnering to Save Water  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partnering Partnering to Save Water Phill Consiglio Southern California Edison What We Are Going to Discuss * A Little Bit About Water * The Energy Cost of Water * Water Technologies * What We Have Done * Where We Are Going A Little Bit About Water *The Earth Has A Finite Supply Of Fresh Water. - Water Is Stored In Aquifers, Surface Waters And The Atmosphere - Sometimes Oceans Are Mistaken For Available Water, But The Amount Of Energy Needed To Convert Saline Water To Potable Water Is Prohibitive Today *This Has Created A Water Crisis Due To: - Inadequate Access To Safe Drinking Water For About 884 Million People - Inadequate Access To Water For Sanitation And Waste Disposal For 2.5 Billion People - Groundwater Overdrafting (Excessive Use) Leading To Diminished Agricultural Yields

136

Urea for SCR-based NOx Control Systems and Potential Impacts to Ground Water Resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the key challenges facing manufacturers of diesel engines for light- and heavy-duty vehicles is the development of technologies for controlling emissions of nitrogen oxides, In this regard, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems represent control technology that can potentially achieve the NOx removal efficiencies required to meet new U.S. EPA standards. SCR systems rely on a bleed stream of urea solution into exhaust gases prior to catalytic reduction. While urea's role in this emission control technology is beneficial, in that it supports reduced NOx emissions, it can also be an environmental threat to ground water quality. This would occur if it is accidentally released to soils because once in that environmental medium, urea is subsequently converted to nitrate--which is regulated under the U.S. EPA's primary drinking water standards. Unfortunately, nitrate contamination of ground waters is already a significant problem across the U.S. Historically, the primary sources of nitrate in ground waters have been septic tanks and fertilizer applications. The basic concern over nitrate contamination is the potential health effects associated with drinking water containing elevated levels of nitrate. Specifically, consumption of nitrate-contaminated water can cause a blood disorder in infants known as methemoglobinemia.

Layton, D.

2002-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

137

Health and water quality monitoring of Pure Home Water's ceramic filter dissemination in the northern region of Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pure Home Water (PHW) is a social enterprise that promotes and disseminates household drinking water technologies in the Northern Region of Ghana. Currently their main product is a pot-shaped Potters for Peace-type ceramic ...

Johnson, Sophie M. (Sophie Marie)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Disinfecting Water Wells by Shock Chlorination (Spanish)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If your well has been flooded, it must be shock chlorinated before it can be used as a source of drinking water. This publication explains how to disinfect a well using either dry chlorine or liquid household bleach.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2007-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

139

Disinfecting Water Wells by Shock Chlorination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If your well has been flooded, it must be shock chlorinated before it can be used as a source of drinking water. This publication explains how to disinfect a well using either dry chlorine or liquid household bleach.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

140

Regulation of Hydraulic Fracturing (or lack thereof)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: "subsurface emplacement of fluids by well injection." 42 U.S.C. § 300h(d)(1). #12;UIC Program Requirements, EPA has concluded that the injection of hydraulic fracturing fluids into [coalbed methane] wells poses Water Act The federal Safe Drinking Water Act prohibits "underground injection" that is not authorized

Boufadel, Michel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Safe water storage in Kenya's modified clay pot : standardization, tap design, and cost recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the main components necessary for providing safe drinking water for users who lack piped water in the home is the ability to safely store it in the home. Users in the Nyanza Province of Kenya frequently carry water ...

Young, Suzanne E

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Biosand filtration of high turbidity water : modified filter design and safe filtrate storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unsafe drinking water is a major cause of water-related diseases that predominantly affect people living in developing countries. The most prevalent water-related disease is diarrhea, estimated to kill 1.8 million children ...

Collin, Clair

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Public Health Issues Associated with Small Drinking Water Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the combined efforts of epidemiologists, environmental health specialists, and laboratory personnel from technical assistance to state and local environmental health agencies to enhance laboratory capacity, environmental health services, and epidemiologic expertise. NCEH proposed a number of specific projects

144

ITER's Tokamak Cooling Water System and the the Use of ASME Codes to Comply with French Regulations of Nuclear Pressure Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During inductive plasma operation of ITER, fusion power will reach 500 MW with an energy multiplication factor of 10. The heat will be transferred by the Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) to the environment using the secondary cooling system. Plasma operations are inherently safe even under the most severe postulated accident condition a large, in-vessel break that results in a loss-of-coolant accident. A functioning cooling water system is not required to ensure safe shutdown. Even though ITER is inherently safe, TCWS equipment (e.g., heat exchangers, piping, pressurizers) are classified as safety important components. This is because the water is predicted to contain low-levels of radionuclides (e.g., activated corrosion products, tritium) with activity levels high enough to require the design of components to be in accordance with French regulations for nuclear pressure equipment, i.e., the French Order dated 12 December 2005 (ESPN). ESPN has extended the practical application of the methodology established by the Pressure Equipment Directive (97/23/EC) to nuclear pressure equipment, under French Decree 99-1046 dated 13 December 1999, and Order dated 21 December 1999 (ESP). ASME codes and supplementary analyses (e.g., Failure Modes and Effects Analysis) will be used to demonstrate that the TCWS equipment meets these essential safety requirements. TCWS is being designed to provide not only cooling, with a capacity of approximately 1 GW energy removal, but also elevated temperature baking of first-wall/blanket, vacuum vessel, and divertor. Additional TCWS functions include chemical control of water, draining and drying for maintenance, and facilitation of leak detection/localization. The TCWS interfaces with the majority of ITER systems, including the secondary cooling system. U.S. ITER is responsible for design, engineering, and procurement of the TCWS with industry support from an Engineering Services Organization (ESO) (AREVA Federal Services, with support from Northrop Grumman, and OneCIS). ITER International Organization (ITER-IO) is responsible for design oversight and equipment installation in Cadarache, France. TCWS equipment will be fabricated using ASME design codes with quality assurance and oversight by an Agreed Notified Body (approved by the French regulator) that will ensure regulatory compliance. This paper describes the TCWS design and how U.S. ITER and fabricators will use ASME codes to comply with EU Directives and French Orders and Decrees.

Berry, Jan [ORNL; Ferrada, Juan J [ORNL; Curd, Warren [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France; Dell Orco, Dr. Giovanni [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France; Barabash, Vladimir [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France; Kim, Seokho H [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

this regulation. This effectively exempts natural gas extraction using hydraulic fracturing from the regulation. Importantly, water, gas and other materials injected into a...

146

The Drinking Water Security and Safety Amendments of 2002: Is America's Drinking Water Infrastructure Safer Four Years Later?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

specific chemicals, including chlorine, as opposed to otherat 927 (". . . [a] strike on a chlorine disinfectant tankof an airborne toxic chlorine cloud which could prove

Shermer, Steven D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

The Drinking Water Security and Safety Amendments of 2002: Is America's Drinking Water Infrastructure Safer Four Years Later?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NAT'L STRATEGY FOR HOME- LAND SECURITY, supra note 50, at 9.on Creating the Home- land Security Department, supra noteM. Merriam, Homeland Security Begins At Home: Local Planning

Shermer, Steven D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Alabama State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State Regulations » Alabama State Regulations » Alabama State Regulations: Alabama State of Alabama The State Oil and Gas Board of Alabama, under the direction of the State Geologist and Oil and Gas Supervisor, is responsible for the regulation of oil and gas operations. The Board is divided into two administrative regions-north and south. The Board has broad authority in Alabama's oil and gas conservation statutes to promulgate and enforce rules and regulations to ensure the conservation and proper development of Alabama's petroleum resources. A major duty of the Board is to prevent pollution of fresh water supplies by oil, gas, salt water, or other contaminants resulting from oil and gas operations. The Alabama Department of Environmental Management (ADEM) administers the major federal environmental protection laws through regulations governing air pollution, water quality and supply, solid and hazardous waste management.

149

Dezincification and Brass Lead Leaching in Premise Plumbing Systems: Effects of Alloy, Physical Conditions and Water Chemistry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Brass components are widely used in drinking water distribution systems as valves, faucets and other fixtures. They can be corroded by âdezincification,â which is the… (more)

Zhang, Yaofu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

THE UV-TUBE AS AN APPROPRIATE WATER DISINFECTION TECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Tube, as the cost per liter of water produced decreases as water use increases. The water quality is regulatedi THE UV-TUBE AS AN APPROPRIATE WATER DISINFECTION TECHNOLOGY: An Assessment of Technical of contaminated drinking water ­ which causes so many deaths and so much illness ­ should have a simple technical

Kammen, Daniel M.

151

Water pollution diagnosis with a multi-agent approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Providing high quality drinking water with no disruption is the main objective of every municipal water system. The paper presents the application of a multi-agent approach to water pollution diagnosis in a municipal water system. The main benefit of ... Keywords: artificial intelligence, environmental protection, multi-agent system, water pollution diagnosis

Constantin Nichita; Mihaela Oprea

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

News Release: DOE Announces Riverton Water Sampling Results | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announces Riverton Water Sampling Results Announces Riverton Water Sampling Results News Release: DOE Announces Riverton Water Sampling Results May 11, 2012 - 3:25pm Addthis News Contact: Contractor, Judy Miller, S.M. Stoller Corporation Public Affairs (970) 248-6363 jmiller@lm.doe.gov Laboratory results indicate water from the alternative water supply system is safe for residents to drink The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that residential drinking water testing from an alternative water supply system in Riverton, Wyoming, confirmed the water is safe. Results from ater samples collected on May 3, 2012, show that uranium levels at 0.0001 milligrams per liter, well below the drinking water standard set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. "We take the issue of potential water contamination very seriously and

153

Shock Chlorination of Stored Water Supplies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Treatment of drinking water to improve its sanitary or bacteriological quality is referred to as disinfection. Shock chlorination is one disinfection method employed by public suppliers to reduce bacterial contamination of water. This method also can be used by private-water-well owners.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

154

Shock Chlorination of Stored Water Supplies (Spanish)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Treatment of drinking water to improve its sanitary or bacteriological quality is referred to as disinfection. Shock chlorination is one disinfection method employed by public suppliers to reduce bacterial contamination of water. This method also can be used by private-water-well owners.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

155

Designing of a prototype heat-sealer to manufacture solar water sterilization pouches for use in developing nations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water purification proves to be a difficult task in many developing nations. The SODIS (SOlar water DISinfection) process is a method which improves the microbiological quality of water making it safer for drinking and ...

Quinlan, Saundra S

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Chapter 10 Water Quality Standards (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This administrative regulation establishes procedures to protect the surface waters of the Commonwealth, and thus protect water resources. It states the designated uses of surface water and...

157

Household water treatment and safe storage options for Northern Region Ghana : consumer preference and relative cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A range of household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) products are available in Northern Region Ghana which have the potential to significantly improve local drinking water quality. However, to date, the region has ...

Green, Vanessa (Vanessa Layton)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Appropriate technology water treatment processes for MaeLa Temporary Shelter, Thailand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis recommends the use of horizontal-flow roughing filters to treat spring water of variable annual quality in MaeLa Temporary Shelter, Thailand. The public drinking water system for 45,000 refugees is overseen by ...

Vater, Katherine Ann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Cross-sectional epidemiological study on water and sanitation practices in the northern region of Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cross-sectional epidemiological study was conducted to obtain baseline data on drinking water and sanitation practices in the Northern Region of Ghana. This study was performed in conjunction with Pure Home Water (PHW) ...

Peletz, Rachel Louise

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Ceramic filter manufacturing in Northern Ghana : water storage and quality control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2009, Pure Home Water (PHW), a Ghana based non-profit organization working to provide affordable and safe drinking water to people in the Northern Region of Ghana, began the construction of a ceramic pot filter (CPF) ...

Kleiman, Shanti Lisa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Given that water is the sine qua non of life, it is intriguing that animals can live in deserts, environments with little  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in deserts, environments with little drinking water, high ambient temperatures (Ta), intense solar radiation, low humidity and desiccating winds. Because desert birds are typically diurnal, at times

Williams, Jos. B.

162

Water is used for many purposes, includ-ing growing crops, producing copper,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WATER USES Water is used for many purposes, includ- ing growing crops, producing copper, generating electricity, watering lawns, keeping clean, drinking and recreation. Bal- ancing the water budget comes down of the water budget. Reducing demand involves re- ducing how much water each person uses, lim- iting the number

163

Meeting the mandate for clean water : an evaluation of privately managed U.S. water and wastewater systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reliable provision of clean and safe drinking water is critical for public health, economic stability and growth in the United States. Due to a combination of financial, regulatory and operational challenges, however, it ...

Freund, Evan Benjamin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Recommendations for at-risk water supplies in Capiz Province, Philippines : using water source and community assessments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The following thesis is part of a larger project which began in response to a request by the Provincial Health Office (PHO) in Capiz Province, Philippines for expert advice to support its drinking water quality testing ...

Patrick, Jessica Molly

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

The implications of UIC and NPDES regulations on selection of disposal options for spent geothermal brine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reviews and evaluates the various options for the disposal of geothermal wastewater with respect to the promulgated regulations for the protection of surface and groundwaters. The Clean Water Act of 1977 and the Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments are especially important when designing disposal systems for geothermal fluids. The former promulgates regulations concerning the discharge of wastewater into surface waters, while the latter is concerned with the protection of ground water aquifers through the establishment of underground injection control (UIC) programs. There is a specific category for geothermal fluid discharge if injection is to be used as a method of disposal. Prior to February 1982, the UIC regulations required geothermal power plant to use Class III wells and direct use plants to use Class V wells. More stringent regulatory requirements, including construction specification and monitoring, are imposed on the Class III wells. On February 3, 1982, the classification of geothermal injection wells was changed from a Class III to Class V on the basis that geothermal wells do not inject for the extraction of minerals or energy, but rather they are used to inject brines, from which heat has been extracted, into formations from which they were originally taken. This reclassification implies that a substantial cost reduction will be realized for geothermal fluid injection primarily because well monitoring is no longer mandatory. The Clean Water Act of 1977 provides the legal basis for regulating the discharge of liquid effluent into the nation's surface waters, through a permitting system called the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Discharge quantities, rates, concentrations and temperatures are regulated by the NPDES permits. These permits systems are based upon effluent guidelines developed by EPA on an industry by industry basis. For geothermal energy industry, effluent guidelines have not been formulated and are not currently scheduled. There, are however, water quality standards that control the quantity and quality of wastewaters discharged into surface waters. These standards are established by the states in concert with EPA, and frequently result in NPDES conditions more restrictive than those based on effluent guidelines.

None

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13 - Particulate Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13 - Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13...

167

Evaluation of Natural Radioactivity in Subsurface Air, Water and Soil in Western Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surveys of radon concentrations in western Japan were carried out to estimate the contents not only of waters in the environment but also in soil gas. The maximum concentration measured for drinking water as public supply exceeded the 1991 United States Environmental Protection Agency?recommended limit for drinking water (11? Bq ? L ?1 ) but did not exceed that of several European countries (100? Bq ? L ?1 ). Overall

Masami Fukui

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Environmental Regulators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Reports Brookhaven's Environmental Regulators When it comes to the environment, Brookhaven National Laboratory must comply with the regulations of many local, state and...

169

INEEL Source Water Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) covers approximately 890 mi2 and includes 12 public water systems that must be evaluated for Source water protection purposes under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Because of its size and location, six watersheds and five aquifers could potentially affect the INEEL’s drinking water sources. Based on a preliminary evaluation of the available information, it was determined that the Big Lost River, Birch Creek, and Little Lost River Watersheds and the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer needed to be assessed. These watersheds were delineated using the United States Geologic Survey’s Hydrological Unit scheme. Well capture zones were originally estimated using the RESSQC module of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Well Head Protection Area model, and the initial modeling assumptions and results were checked by running several scenarios using Modflow modeling. After a technical review, the resulting capture zones were expanded to account for the uncertainties associated with changing groundwater flow directions, a thick vadose zone, and other data uncertainties. Finally, all well capture zones at a given facility were merged to a single wellhead protection area at each facility. A contaminant source inventory was conducted, and the results were integrated with the well capture zones, watershed and aquifer information, and facility information using geographic information system technology to complete the INEEL’s Source Water Assessment. Of the INEEL’s 12 public water systems, three systems rated as low susceptibility (EBR-I, Main Gate, and Gun Range), and the remainder rated as moderate susceptibility. No INEEL public water system rated as high susceptibility. We are using this information to develop a source water management plan from which we will subsequently implement an INEEL-wide source water management program. The results are a very robust set of wellhead protection areas that will protect the INEEL’s public water systems yet not too conservative to inhibit the INEEL from carrying out its missions.

Sehlke, Gerald

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut) Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation...

171

Household ceramic water filter evaluation using three simple low-cost methods : membrane filtration, 3M Petrifilm and hydrogen sulfide bacteria in northern region, Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drinking water continues to be a major source of waterborne diseases and death in the world because many points of water collection remain unsafe. This thesis reports high level of fecal contamination found in rivers and ...

Mattelet, Claire (Claire Eliane H. Y.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Rhode Island Pretreatment Regulations (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations set standards for water pretreatment prior to release to Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTWs), and require effluent data including the identity, amount, frequency, concentration...

173

Willamette River Water Treatment Plant - Wilsonville, Oregon [EDRA / Places Awards, 20004 -- Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

per-day drinking-water EDRA/Places Awards 2004 In this issuewe present the EDRA/ Places awards for 2004.These awards, in design, planning and research, highlight

Sensenig, Chris

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Pilot study of horizontal roughing filtration in northern Ghana as pretreatment for highly turbid dugout water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Northern Region Ghana (NRG), highly turbid rainwater runoff and intermittent streams are collected in earthen dams called dugouts. These dams serve as many communities' main source of drinking and domestic water despite ...

Losleben, Tamar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Water driven : New Orleans City Hall as a sustainable civic center for 21st century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The devastating struck of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans in late summer of 2005 was deadly and immense. The storm destroyed over 170 drinking water facilities and 47 wastewater treatments around the city, and resulted ...

Sangthong, Pholkrit

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Efficacy of gravity-fed chlorination system for community-scale water disinfection in northern Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although chlorine is one of the lowest cost ways of providing disinfection, currently billions of people lack drinking water that has had this simple treatment. Arch Chemical's Pulsar 1 unit is an innovation in chlorine ...

Fitzpatrick, Daniel Cash

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Water Rights (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Rights (Texas) Water Rights (Texas) Water Rights (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Texas Water Development Board The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality regulates the water rights for the state of Texas. Water and state water may be appropriated, stored, or diverted in the state of Texas for beneficial uses in reasonable amounts, with certain conditions. The Commission issues permits and regulations for water rights in Texas. Included in beneficial uses are: agricultural and industrial uses;

178

New Mexico State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Mexico New Mexico State Regulations: New Mexico State of New Mexico The Oil Conservation Division (OCD) in the New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department regulates oil and gas and geothermal operations in New Mexico. The OCD has the responsibility to gather oil and gas production data, permit new wells, establish pool rules and oil and gas allowables, issue discharge permits, enforce rules and regulations of the division, monitor underground injection wells and ensure that abandoned wells are properly plugged and the land is responsibly restored. Otherwise, the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) administers the major environmental protection laws. The Water Quality Control Commission (WQCC), which is administratively attached to the NMED, assigns responsibility for administering its regulations to constituent agencies, including the OCD.

179

Virginia State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Virginia Virginia State Regulations: Virginia State of Virginia The Division of Gas and Oil in the Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy (DMME) regulates the effects of gas and oil operations both on and below the surface. The Virginia Gas and Oil Board is to foster, encourage, and promote the safe and efficient exploration for and development, production, and utilization of gas and oil resources. Otherwise, three regulatory citizen boards are responsible for adopting Virginia 's environmental regulations. The Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) staff administers the regulations as approved by the boards. Finally, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 3, through its Water Protection Division, administers Class II underground injection control (UIC) programs in Virginia in direct implementation.

180

Colorado State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Colorado Colorado State Regulations: Colorado State of Colorado The Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC), a division of the Department of Natural Resources (DNR), regulates oil and gas activities in Colorado. The COGCC has broad statutory authority with respect to impacts on any air, water, soil, or biological resources resulting from oil and gas operations. The COGCC implements the state ground water standards and classifications as they relate to oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) activities. The COGCC has jurisdiction for all Class II injection wells except those on Indian lands. The COGCC has jurisdiction for the management of all E&P wastes except at commercial disposal facilities. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) administers the environmental protection laws related to air quality, waste discharge to surface water, and commercial disposal facilities.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

REGULATION OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND WATER USE IN A OZARK FOREST: PROPOSING A NEW STRATEGICALLY LOCATED AMERIFLUX TOWER SITE IN MISSOURI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

by June 14, 2004, the MOFLUX site was fully instrumented and data streams started to flow. A primary accomplished deliverable for the project period was the data streams of CO{sub 2} and water vapor fluxes and numerous meteorological variables (from which prepared datasets have been submitted to the AmeriFlux data archive for 2004-2006, Additionally, measurements of leaf biochemistry and physiology, biomass inventory, tree allometry, successional trends other variables were obtained.

Pallardy, Stephen G

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

182

Technical Comments on the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System — Proposed Regulations to Establish Requirements for Cooling Water Intake Structures at Existing Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI’s) technical comments on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) June 11, 2012 Notice of Data Availability (NODA) Related to Impingement Mortality Control Requirements and its June 12, 2012 NODA Related to EPA’s Stated Preference Survey. These NODAs provide additional information to support EPA’s effort to develop a final Rule that implements the requirements of the Clean Water ...

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

183

Nuclear regulation and safety  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear regulation and safety are discussed from the standpoint of a hypothetical country that is in the process of introducing a nuclear power industry and setting up a regulatory system. The national policy is assumed to be in favor of nuclear power. The regulators will have responsibility for economic, reliable electric production as well as for safety. Reactor safety is divided into three parts: shut it down, keep it covered, take out the afterheat. Emergency plans also have to be provided. Ways of keeping the core covered with water are discussed. (DLC)

Hendrie, J.M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Public Utility Regulation (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Regulation (Iowa) Utility Regulation (Iowa) Public Utility Regulation (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Utilities Board This section applies to any person, partnership, business association, or corporation that owns or operates any facilities for furnishing gas by piped distribution system, electricity, communications services, or water to the public for compensation. Regulations pertaining to these facilities can be found in this section. Some exemptions apply

185

Dam Safety Regulation (Mississippi) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dam Safety Regulation (Mississippi) Dam Safety Regulation (Mississippi) Dam Safety Regulation (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Transportation Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality The purpose of the Dam Safety Regulation is to ensure that all dams constructed in the state of Mississippi are permitted and thus do not potentially harm wildlife, water supplies and property. Any person or entity proposing to construct, enlarge, repair, or alter a dam or reservoir

186

Arizona Water Atlas Volume 3 Duncan Valley Basin References and Supplemental Reading References  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

_____, 2005b, ADEQWWTP: Data file, received August 2005. _____, 2005c, Azurite: Data file, received September 2005. _____, 2005d, Impaired lakes and reaches: GIS cover, received January 2006. _____, 2005e, WWTP and permit files: Miscellaneous working files, received July 2005. _____, 2004a, Water quality exceedences by watershed: Data file, received June 2004. _____, 2004b, Water quality exceedences for drinking water providers in Arizona: Data file,

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

GIS representation and assessment of water distribution system for Mae La Temporary Shelter, Thailand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ArcGIS is used to analyze water access in Mae La, Thailand, home to 45,000 residents living as refugees in a temporary camp. Drinking water for the shelter is supplied at public tap stands while water for hygienic purposes ...

Harding, Mary Pierce

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

California State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

California California State Regulations: California State of California The California Department of Conservation's Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources oversees the drilling, operation, maintenance, and plugging and abandonment of oil, natural gas, and geothermal wells. The regulatory program emphasizes the development of oil, natural gas, and geothermal resources in the state through sound engineering practices that protect the environment, prevent pollution, and ensure public safety. Other agencies that may be involved in the regulation of drilling wastes include the State Water Resources Control Board and appropriate Regional Water Quality Control Boards, the California Integrated Waste Management Board, the California Air Resources Board and appropriate Air Quality Management Districts or Air Pollution Control Districts, and the Department of Toxic Substances Control.

189

Rules and Regulations for the Investigation and Remediation of Hazardous Material Releases (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations establish procedures for the investigation and remediation of contamination resulting from the unpermitted release of hazardous materials. The regulations aim to protect water...

190

Government Regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Interest in the use of so-called voluntary approaches to supplement or replace formal environmental regulation is on the rise, both in Europe and in the United States. These approaches fall into two general ...

Ashford, Nicholas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Improvements of oil-in-water analysis for produced water using membrane filtration.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The accuracy of oil-in-water analysis for produced water is increasingly crucial as the regulations for disposal of this water are getting more stringent world wide.… (more)

Khor, Ee Huey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Alternative Regulation (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Utility regulators, including the Public Service Board, have applied a new type of regulation, often called "alternative regulation" or "incentive regulation." There are many variants of this type...

193

Real-Time Water Quality Monitoring and Habitat Assessment in the San Luis National Wildlife Refuge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interests is implemented, water quality compliance withfor computing crop water requirements. FAO Irrigation andof SEBAL for western US water rights regulation and

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Water Management Act (Massachusetts) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Act (Massachusetts) Management Act (Massachusetts) Water Management Act (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Protection This Act regulates and registers water withdrawals in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to enable effective planning and management of water use and conservation. The Act establishes a Water Resources Management Advisory Committee within the MA Department of Environmental Protection to oversee the development of standards, rules and regulations for water resources

195

Speeding up solar disinfection : effects of hydrogen peroxide, temperature, and copper plus ascorbate on the photoinactivation of E. coli in Charles River water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sunlight efficiently disinfects drinking water in plastic bottles over two days, but simple additives may show promise for reducing this time to several hours. This study found that adding up to 500 [micro]M hydrogen ...

Fisher, Michael Benjamin, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Regulations of Wells (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulations of Wells (Florida) Regulations of Wells (Florida) Regulations of Wells (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Florida Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Department of Environmental Protection The Department of Environmental Protection regulates the construction, repair, and abandonment of wells, as well as the persons and businesses undertaking such practices. Governing boards of water management districts

197

Forest Road Building Regulations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Forest Road Building Regulations Forest Road Building Regulations < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Fuel Distributor Nonprofit Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Start Date 09/2010 State Wisconsin Program Type Environmental Regulations The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has regulations for building a forest road, if development requires one. Regulations include zoning ordinances and permits for stream crossing, grading, stormwater, and

198

Laws and Regulations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laws and Regulations Laws and Regulations Laws and Regulations Federal laws and regulations set multiple energy management requirements for Federal agencies spanning energy efficiency, renewable energy, water conservation, and alternative fuel use. This section outlines Federal energy management authorities through: Requirements by Subject Requirements by Regulation. The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) analyzes energy management authorities and develops rules and guidance to help Federal agencies comply with applicable requirements. Reporting requirements and Federal Government performance reports are also available through: Notices and Rules Facility Reporting Fleet Reporting. EISA 432 Compliance Tracking Track Federal agency progress toward Section 432 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 using FEMP's EISA 432

199

North Dakota State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North Dakota North Dakota State Regulations: North Dakota State of North Dakota The North Dakota Industrial Commission (NDIC), through its Oil and Gas Division (OGD), is the regulatory agency for oil and gas exploration and production activities in North Dakota. The North Dakota Department of Health (NDDH) Environmental Health Section (EHS) has the responsibility to safeguard the quality of North Dakota's air, land, and water resources. Contact North Dakota Industrial Commission Oil and Gas Division 600 East Boulevard Avenue, Dept. 405 Bismarck, ND 58505-0840 (701) 328-8020 (phone) (701) 328-8022 (fax) North Dakota Department of Health Environmental Health Section 1200 Missouri Avenue P.O. Box 5520 Bismarck, ND 58506-5520 (701) 328-5150 (phone) (701) 328-5200 (fax) Disposal Practices and Applicable Regulations

200

Alternative Regulation (Vermont) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulation (Vermont) Regulation (Vermont) Alternative Regulation (Vermont) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Vermont Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Utility regulators, including the Public Service Board, have applied a new type of regulation, often called "alternative regulation" or "incentive regulation." There are many variants of this type of regulation, but the common foundation is that rates are set differently from the traditional cost-of-service approach. Sometimes there is a performance-based aspect to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Water Rights: Surface Water (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Surface Water (Indiana) Surface Water (Indiana) Water Rights: Surface Water (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Indiana Department of Natural Resources The Indiana Department of Natural Resources regulates the use and diversion of surface waters. An entity that creates additional stream volumes by releases from impoundments built and financed by the entity for the entity's purpose may use the increased flowage at all times. Any entity may be required to report the volume of water used. Diversion of water out of

202

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 6 - Continuous Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Type Environmental Regulations Stationary sources, including fossil fuel fired steam or hot water generating units, may be required to install and operate a continuous...

203

Rules and Regulations for the Management and Control of Designated...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Rules and Regulations for the Management and Control of Designated Ground Water Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

204

Water efficiency in buildings: assessment of its impact on energy efficiency and reducing GHG emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nowadays humanity uses about 50% of existing drinking-water, but in the next 15 years this percentage will reach 75%. Consequently, hydric stress risk will rise significantly across the entire planet. Accordingly, several countries will have to apply ... Keywords: GHG emissions, efficient water devices, energy efficiency, hydric efficiency

A. Silva-Afonso; F. Rodrigues; C. Pimentel-Rodrigues

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Management and Storage of Surface Waters (Florida)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Environmental Protection regulates the use and storage of surface waters in the state. A permit from either the Department or the local Water Management District is required for...

206

California Appliance Efficiency Regulations for Manufacturers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Appliance Efficiency Regulations for Manufacturers CEC-400-2012-FS-004-En Updated 3 electricity or water, California law requires that such products comply with the Appliance Efficiency Regulations* in order to be sold or offered for sale in California. Designed to help California reduce energy

207

Water heater control module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced electric water heater control system that interfaces with a high temperature cut-off thermostat and an upper regulating thermostat. The system includes a control module that is electrically connected to the high-temperature cut-off thermostat and the upper regulating thermostat. The control module includes a switch to open or close the high-temperature cut-off thermostat and the upper regulating thermostat. The control module further includes circuitry configured to control said switch in response to a signal selected from the group of an autonomous signal, a communicated signal, and combinations thereof.

Hammerstrom, Donald J

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

208

Water Pollution (Illinois) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Illinois) (Illinois) Water Pollution (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Illinois Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Illinois EPA This article states regulations for water quality standards, effluent standards, monitoring and reporting methods, sewer discharge criteria and information about permits. It is the purpose of these rules and regulations to designate the uses for which the various waters of the State shall be maintained and protected; to prescribe the water quality standards required to sustain the designated uses; to establish effluent standards to limit the contaminants discharged to the waters; and to prescribe additional

209

South Dakota State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Identification Home Federal and State Regulations State Regulations South Dakota State Regulations: South Dakota State of South Dakota The South Dakota...

210

Global Access to Energy and Fresh Water - Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Access to Energy and Fresh Water Global Access to Energy and Fresh Water International Safety Projects Overview Hydrogen as an Energy Carrier Global access to energy and fresh water International cooperation on safety of nuclear plants Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr International Safety Projects Global Access to Energy and Fresh Water Bookmark and Share Water Water shortages, unreliable water supplies, and poor water quality have been considered in recent years to be major obstacles to sustainable development and poverty alleviation that require urgent attention. Over 1 billion people lack access to safe drinking water. In such areas, water shortages are increasingly limiting development options.

211

Disposable Absorbent Material for the Removal of Arsenic from Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soils and groundwater at many substation sites are contaminated with arsenic-containing compounds. Cost effective water treatment technologies are needed to remove arsenic and other trace metals from underlying aquifers, especially now that drinking water standard for arsenic has been lowered to 10 g/L from the previous value of 50 g/L. The current project tested a disposable ferric oxide adsorbent material, Bayoxide E33, which has been reported to have a high capacity for arsenic removal.

2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

212

Performance of Large Diameter Residential Drinking Water Wells - Biofilm Growth: Laboratory and Field Testing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the first phase of this project three enhanced large diameter (> 60 cm) residential wells were constructed at a study site in Lindsay, Ontario.… (more)

Ruiz Salazar, Hector Fabio

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash. In Arsenic Contaminationwater using  iron?oxide coated coal bottom ash  Johanna L.  using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash JOHANNA L. MATHIEU

MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Mineral balances, including in drinking water, estimated for Merced County dairy herds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intake, calculated using NRC (2001) recommended formula.lactation and growth (NRC 2001). ND = not detected. http://J Dairy Sci 88:3721–33. [NRC] National Research Council.

Castillo, Alejandro R Dr.; Santos, Jose Eduardo P.; Tabone, Tom J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

What steps should be taken that will protect the country's valuable groundwater and drinking water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to carry tar sands oil (about 830,000 barrels per day) to Texas refineries unless sufficient objections reserves of conventional oil and gas are enough to take atmospheric CO2 well above 400 ppm. However, if emissions from coal are phased out over the next few decades and if unconventional fossil fuels are left

Peterson, Blake R.

216

Mineral balances, including in drinking water, estimated for Merced County dairy herds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proteins and byproducts Canola meal 50 to 75 25 to 50 Wheatn = 33. cottonseed and canola meal (table 1). Between 50%

Castillo, Alejandro R Dr.; Santos, Jose Eduardo P.; Tabone, Tom J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results and Policy Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bottom ash from coal fired power plants—is a waste materialmaterial from coal-fired power plants, which are common inobtained from a coal fired power plant in Eklahare, Nasik,

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

A RAPID METHOD OF Cs-137 ISOLATION FROM RIVER AND DRINKING WATER  

SciTech Connect

Measurement accuracy demands knowledge of the concentration of the radioactive substances, the inactive ballast separation in the sample, and the individual isotope isolation. Possibilities of using the extraction process for isolating and concentrating radiocesium are determined. (L.N.N.)

Kyrs, M.; Neumann, L.

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an MCL. Table 9. US EPA TCLP Contaminant Regulatory Levels (Hazardous Waste Fact Sheet: TCLP: Toxicity Characteristic2010. http://www.ehso.com/cssepa/TCLP%20fact%20sheet%20from%

MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Water Usage Law, Major Water Users (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Usage Law, Major Water Users (Missouri) Water Usage Law, Major Water Users (Missouri) Water Usage Law, Major Water Users (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Missouri Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Missouri Department of Natural Resources Any water user with the capability to withdraw or divert 100,000 gallons or more per day from any stream, river, lake, well, spring or other water source must register and file for a permit for water withdrawal and diversion from the Department of Natural Resources. Additionally, no major

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Ethanol as Internal Standard for Quantitative Determination of Volatile Compounds in Spirit Drinks by Gas Chromatography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The new methodical approach of using ethanol as internal standard in gas chromatographic analysis of volatile compounds in spirit drinks in daily practice of testing laboratories is proposed. This method provides determination of volatile compounds concentrations in spirit drinks directly expressed in milligrams per liter (mg/L) of absolute alcohol according to official methods without measuring of alcohol strength of analyzed sample. The experimental demonstration of this method for determination of volatile compounds in spirit drinks by gas chromatography is described. Its validation was carried out by comparison with experimental results obtained by internal standard method and external standard method.

Charapitsa, Siarhei V; Kulevich, Nikita V; Makoed, Nicolai M; Mazanik, Arkadzi L; Sytova, Svetlana N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Context: Policy & Regulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Regulation of Halon and Halon Substitutes. ... Disparities in Environmental Regulations and Their Effect ... Impediments and Incentives for Incorporating ...

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

223

Utility Regulation (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulation (Indiana) Regulation (Indiana) Utility Regulation (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial General Public/Consumer Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Indiana Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission The Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission enforces regulations in this legislation that apply to all individuals, corporations, companies, and partnerships that may own, operate, manage, or control any equipment for the production, transmission, delivery, or furnishing of heat, light,

224

Dam Safety Regulations (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Regulations (Connecticut) Safety Regulations (Connecticut) Dam Safety Regulations (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection All dams, except those owned by the U.S., are under the jurisdiction of these regulations. These dams will be classified by hazard rating, and may

225

Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan Regulation Act (Florida) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan Regulation Act (Florida) Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan Regulation Act (Florida) Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan Regulation Act (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Department of Environmental Protection

226

Massachusetts Endangered Species Act Regulations (Massachusetts) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Endangered Species Act Regulations (Massachusetts) Endangered Species Act Regulations (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Endangered Species Act Regulations (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Fish and Game

227

Current and Long-Term Effects of Delta Water Quality on Drinking Water Treatment Costs from Disinfection Byproduct Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of its reactions with chlorine or ozone to form severalirradiation. Ozone can replace chlorine and chloramines fortion, filtration, and chlorine/chloramine application for

Chen, Wei-Hsiang; Haunschild, Kristine; Lund, Jay R.; Fleenor, William E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Rules and Regulations for Governing the Administration and Enforcement of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rules and Regulations for Governing the Administration and Rules and Regulations for Governing the Administration and Enforcement of the Fresh Water Wetlands Act (Rhode Island) Rules and Regulations for Governing the Administration and Enforcement of the Fresh Water Wetlands Act (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Wind Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Managemenet

229

CAPTURE OR CONTRACT?: THE EARLY YEARS OF ELECTRIC UTILITY REGULATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(forthcoming) study the historical origins of governance institutions for natural gas and water, respectivelyCAPTURE OR CONTRACT?: THE EARLY YEARS OF ELECTRIC UTILITY REGULATION Thomas P. Lyon Nathan Wilson prices rose in states that adopted state regulation before 1917, suggesting that regulators were

Lyon, Thomas P.

230

Water Rules (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Rules (Alabama) Water Rules (Alabama) Water Rules (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Residential Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations These rules and regulations shall apply to all water systems subject to the jurisdiction of the Alabama Public Service Commission. They are intended to promote good utility practices, to assure adequate and efficient service to the public at a reasonable cost, and to establish the rights and responsibilities of both the utility and the customer. Applications for certificates must be filed separately for each water system.

231

Water Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

232

Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits, Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permits, State Permits, Water Quality Based Effluent Limitations and Water Quality Certification (Mississippi) Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits, Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permits, State Permits, Water Quality Based Effluent Limitations and Water Quality Certification (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential

233

GRR/Section 19-TX-b - New Water Right Process For Surface Water and Ground  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TX-b - New Water Right Process For Surface Water and Ground TX-b - New Water Right Process For Surface Water and Ground Water < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-TX-b - New Water Right Process For Surface Water and Ground Water 19TXBNewWaterRightProcessForSurfaceWaterAndGroundWater.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Texas Water Development Board Regulations & Policies Tex. Water Code § 11 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19TXBNewWaterRightProcessForSurfaceWaterAndGroundWater.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

234

The Disinfection Efficacy of Chlorine on Sulfate-reducing Bacteria and Iron Bacteria in Water Supply Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and iron reducing bacteria (IRB) that widely exist in water supply networks are the main microorganisms leading to metal corrosion in pipelines. Chlorine is widely used in drinking water supply systems for sterilization. ... Keywords: Chlorine, SRB, IRB, disinfection efficacy

Qi Beimenr; Wu Chenguang; Chen Xiaoju; Yuan Yixing

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

GRR/Section 19-ID-a - Water Access and Water Rights | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

19-ID-a - Water Access and Water Rights 19-ID-a - Water Access and Water Rights < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-ID-a - Water Access and Water Rights 19IDAWaterAccessAndWaterRightsIssues.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Water Resources Regulations & Policies Idaho Code Title 42 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19IDAWaterAccessAndWaterRightsIssues.pdf 19IDAWaterAccessAndWaterRightsIssues.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Idaho Department of Water Resources (IDWR) has the exclusive authority for regulation of appropriation of the public surface and ground waters of

236

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford Facilities: Progress report for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989 - Volume 1 - Text  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is Volume 1 of a two-volume document that describes the progress of 14 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989. This volume discusses the projects; Volume 2 provides as-built diagrams, completion/inspection reports, drilling logs, and geophysical logs for wells drilled, completed, or logged during this period. Volume 2 can be found on microfiche in the back pocket of Volume 1. The work described in this document is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the management of Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Concentrations of ground-water constituents are compared to federal drinking water standards throughout this document for reference purposes. All drinking water supplied from the sampled aquifer meets regulatory standards for drinking water quality.

Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Water treatment by reverse osmosis. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning water purification systems and components using reverse osmosis technology. Patents include purification systems and devices for seawater, waste water, and drinking water. Topics also include complete purification systems, valves and distribution components, membranes, supports, storage units, and monitors. Water purification systems using activated charcoal are referenced in a related bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 146 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Water treatment by reverse osmosis. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning water purification systems and components using reverse osmosis technology. Patents include purification systems and devices for seawater, waste water, and drinking water. Topics also include complete purification systems, valves and distribution components, membranes, supports, storage units, and monitors. Water purification systems using activated charcoal are referenced in a related bibliography. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Defluoridation study for Boise geothermal water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methods of removing fluorides from water are reviewed and recommendations are made for treating geothermal water used by the Boise Geothermal Project, Boise, Idaho. The Boise geothermal water except for its high fluoride content would be high quality, suitable for primary drinking water. Fluoride ranges from about 15 to 25 mg/l in water from various wells in the Boise region where the Project plans to obtain hot water. Four techniques for removing fluorides from water have been studied extensively during the past 15 years or so. Electrodialysis and reverse osmosis are useful in reducing total dissolved solids from brackish water, but are nonspecific and are too expensive for treatment of the Boise geothermal water. Selective precipitation is a widely used technique for treating water, but would also prove expensive for the Boise geothermal water because of the relatively high solubility of fluoride salts and consequently high concentration (and cost) of precipitants required to reduce the fluorides to an acceptable level. Ion-exchange separation using activated alumina as the exchange medium appears to be the most promising technique and we recommend that some laboratory and pilot studies be conducted to establish suitability and operating boundaries.

Rigdon, L.

1980-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

240

Water treatment by reverse osmosis. November 1970-October 1989 (Citations from the US Patent data base). Report for November 1970-October 1989  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning water purification systems and components using reverse-osmosis technology. Patents include systems and devices for sea water, waste water, and drinking water purification. Topics include complete purification systems, valves and distribution components, membranes, supports, storage units, and monitors. Water purification systems using activated charcoal are referenced in a related published bibliography. (Contains 103 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Virginia Electric Utility Regulation Act (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Utility Regulation Act (Virginia) Electric Utility Regulation Act (Virginia) Virginia Electric Utility Regulation Act (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Virginia State Corporation Commission The Virginia Electric Utility Regulation Act constitutes the main legislation in Virginia that pertains to the regulation of the state's electric utilities. The Act directs the State Corporation Commission to construct regulations for electric utilities, and contains information on

242

Alaska State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alaska State Regulations: Alaska State of Alaska The Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (AOGCC) regulates the drilling for and production of oil and gas resources, the...

243

Arizona State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arizona State Regulations: Arizona State of Arizona The Arizona Geological Survey (AZGS) Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (OGCC) regulates the drilling for and production of...

244

Mississippi State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mississippi State Regulations: Mississippi State of Mississippi The Mississippi State Oil and Gas Board (MSOGB), an independent agency, promulgates and enforces rules to regulate...

245

Water Use for Electric Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes how thermoelectric plants use water and the strengths, limitations, and costs of available technologies for increasing water use efficiency (gal/MWh). The report will be of value to power company strategic planners, environmental managers, and generation managers as well as regulators, water resource managers, and environmentalists.

2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

246

Turbid water Clear water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: The submersible laser bathymetric (LBath) optical system is capable of simultaneously providing visual images- dynamical wing. This underwater package is pulled through the water by a single towed cable with fiber optic special high energy density optical fibers. A remote Pentium based PC also at the surface is used

Jaffe, Jules

247

Underground Injection Control Rule (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule regulates injection wells, including wells used by generators of hazardous or radioactive wastes, disposal wells within an underground source of drinking water, recovery of geothermal...

248

GRR/Section 19-OR-a - Water Access & Water Rights Issues | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

19-OR-a - Water Access & Water Rights Issues 19-OR-a - Water Access & Water Rights Issues < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-OR-a - Water Access & Water Rights Issues 19ORAWaterAccessWaterRightsIssues.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Oregon Water Resources Department Regulations & Policies ORS Chapter 537: Appropriation of Water Generally Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19ORAWaterAccessWaterRightsIssues.pdf 19ORAWaterAccessWaterRightsIssues.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative All water is publicly owned under Oregon law. All users must obtain a permit or water right from the Oregon Water Resources Department (WRD) to

249

Water Intoxication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008, May 14). Too much water raises seizure risk in babies.id=4844 9. Schoenly, Lorry. “Water Intoxication and Inmates:article/246650- overview>. 13. Water intoxication alert. (

Lingampalli, Nithya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Water Quality Criteria for Intrastate, Interstate, and Coastal Water  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quality Criteria for Intrastate, Interstate, and Coastal Quality Criteria for Intrastate, Interstate, and Coastal Water (Mississippi) Water Quality Criteria for Intrastate, Interstate, and Coastal Water (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations

251

Federal Energy Management Program: Laws & Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laws and Regulations Laws and Regulations EISA 432 Compliance Tracking Track Federal agency progress toward Section 432 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 using FEMP's EISA 432 Compliance Tracking System. Federal laws and regulations set multiple energy management requirements for Federal agencies spanning energy efficiency, renewable energy, water conservation, and alternative fuel use. This section outlines Federal energy management authorities through: Requirements by Subject: Find regulatory requirements and related guidance by topic area. Requirements by Regulation: Take an in-depth look at individual laws and regulations. The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) analyzes energy management authorities and develops rules and guidance to help Federal agencies comply with applicable requirements. Reporting requirements and Federal Government performance reports are also available through:

252

Pharmaceutical Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Water treatment process for water for injection (WFI)...deionization WFI production Evaporation still or vapor compression...

253

Water Snakes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WATER SNAKES Contrary to popular belief, the Water Moccasin commonly known as the...

254

Regulating the information gatekeepers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns about biased manipulation of search results may require intervention involving government regulation.

Patrick Vogl; Michael Barrett

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Water Outlet Control Mechanism for Fuel Cell System Operation ...  

Self-Regulating Water Separation System for Fuel Cells Innovators at NASA’s Johnson Space ... Solar Thermal; Startup ... The system uses the flow energy of the fuel ...

256

Louisiana Water Control Law (Louisiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Control Law. This law states regulations for water quality control and states the powers and duties of the secretary of environmental quality. It provides information about...

257

Energy Conservation Opportunities in Carbonated Soft Drink Canning/Bottling Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The processes in carbonated soft drink production are discussed with an emphasis on energy consumption, current prevalent practices in the industry are outlined, and potential measures for energy use and cost savings are elaborated. The results from detailed energy audits of a few large soft drink plants in California are presented. Major savings identified are in process modification, lighting, refrigeration, compressed air and most importantly combined heat and power. Although each facility has it own unique features the measures identified can have applications in most plants.

Ganji, A. R.; Hackett, B.; Chow, S.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

WATER-TRAPPED WORLDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although tidally locked habitable planets orbiting nearby M-dwarf stars are among the best astronomical targets to search for extrasolar life, they may also be deficient in volatiles and water. Climate models for this class of planets show atmospheric transport of water from the dayside to the nightside, where it is precipitated as snow and trapped as ice. Since ice only slowly flows back to the dayside upon accumulation, the resulting hydrological cycle can trap a large amount of water in the form of nightside ice. Using ice sheet dynamical and thermodynamical constraints, I illustrate how planets with less than about a quarter the Earth's oceans could trap most of their surface water on the nightside. This would leave their dayside, where habitable conditions are met, potentially dry. The amount and distribution of residual liquid water on the dayside depend on a variety of geophysical factors, including the efficiency of rock weathering at regulating atmospheric CO{sub 2} as dayside ocean basins dry up. Water-trapped worlds with dry daysides may offer similar advantages as land planets for habitability, by contrast with worlds where more abundant water freely flows around the globe.

Menou, Kristen [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Regulating with Carrots, Regulating with Sticks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of necessary brevity. To vehicle manufacturers, inconsistent1997: 461). Motor vehicle manufacturers successfully arguedonly on engine and vehicle manufacturers. 3. Regulating

Thornton, Dorothy; Kagan, Robert; Gunningham, Neil

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

GRR/Section 19-TX-a - Water Access and Water Issues Overview | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9-TX-a - Water Access and Water Issues Overview 9-TX-a - Water Access and Water Issues Overview < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-TX-a - Water Access and Water Issues Overview 19TXAWaterAccessAndWaterRightsIssuesOverview.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Tex. Water Code § 11 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19TXAWaterAccessAndWaterRightsIssuesOverview.pdf 19TXAWaterAccessAndWaterRightsIssuesOverview.pdf 19TXAWaterAccessAndWaterRightsIssuesOverview.pdf 19TXAWaterAccessAndWaterRightsIssuesOverview.pdf Flowchart Narrative In the late 1960's Texas transitioned its water law system, switching

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

GRR/Section 19-NV-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-NV-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues GRR/Section 19-NV-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-NV-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues 19NVAWaterAccessAndWaterRightsIssues.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Nevada Division of Water Resources Nevada Division of Environmental Protection Regulations & Policies Nevada Revised Statutes (NRS) NRS, Chapter 445A - water controls NRS, Chapter 533 - adjudication of vested water rights and appropriation of public waters NRS, Chapter 534 - outlines underground water and well NRS, Chapter 534A - geothermal resources Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) NAC, Chapter 445A - water controls Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

262

On Managing Texas Rural Water Supply Systems: A Socioeconomic Analysis and Quality Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Objectives The study reported here is aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of nonprofit, rural water supply corporations or water systems (hereafter referred to as RWSs) in Texas from a sociological perspective. Specifically, the study has attempted to: 1. Provide an overview of the organizational structure and functioning of RWSs, identifying their existing as well as emerging needs, problems, and suggested solutions. It explores socioeconomic characteristics and patterns of RWSs in Texas. It outlines a history of state and federal regulations and practices through which these systems are structured and actually function. 2. Evaluate the quality and effectiveness of the management of selected RWSs located in different geographical regions of Texas. The evaluation of effectiveness of systems is accomplished through a systematic set of procedures and techniques. These procedures are tested for reliability and validity through empirical data. In addition, the differential levels of program effectiveness of RWSs are elaborated upon by correlating them with relevant socioeconomic variables. 3. Indicate policy and research implications of data for dealing with the future of rural water systems. Expected Contributions The rural populations in the U.S. started experiencing steady increases during the 1970s and early 1980s (Goodwin et al., 1984). Although the rural population growth at the national level showed a few differential trends during mid to late 1980s (Figures 3 and 4 in Appendix A), the state of Texas registered a population influx in many nonmetropolitan areas during the last decade (U.S.D.A., 1990: 11). Overall, a significant portion of Texas' population still resides in rural areas (Texas Department of Water Resources, 1984: 7). However, it appears that a larger number of studies have focused on water-management related problems and issues for urban areas than those for rural communities in Texas (e.g., Knudson, 1986; Meier and Thorton, 1973; Murdock et al., 1988; Texas Department of Water Resources, 1985; Texas Water Development Board, 1990;1 and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 1989). While rural water problems have been examined carefully in several parts of the country, we could not find a single study in Texas systematically examining water-related needs and issues confronting rural communities. The need to study rural water supply has become even more important now because of the challenge faced by small community systems in complying with the provisions of the 1986 Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). These small systems, with their limited customer and revenue bases, will face formidable expense in installing new water treatment methods (Jensen, 1990; Long and Stukenberg, 1987: 38; Texas Water Development Board, 1990: 14). The present study is a timely probe into the phenomena of rural water supply. The study is aimed at developing and using a methodology to evaluate the program effectiveness of RWSs. In recent years, interest has mounted for employing the research techniques of social sciences in efforts to assess the effectiveness of public programs. The 1970s and 1980s, decades of rapid-paced growth of RWSs in Texas and elsewhere, were marked by the proliferation of public expenditures. The study uses a set of indicators to identify effectiveness and efficiency of rural water projects. Such measures for analysis and appraisal of these projects may contribute to more informed and intelligent planning for the future. The study is also expected to provide a critical probe and insight into an evaluation methodology that may be used in future studies investigating public programs. To this end, the research reported here is exploratory in nature and may set grounds for more critical studies in the area. The study, for example, develops a baseline against which to measure future changes and trend in rural water supplies in Texas as well as in other parts of the country. Organization of the Report The remaining three-section organ

Singh, R.N.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Investigating Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This 3-ring binder contains teaching plans for 12 lessons on topics such as "Water in Our Daily Lives," "The Water Cycle," "Amazing Aquifers," "Water and Soil," "Aquatic Ecosystems," and "Water Wise Use." Accompanying each lesson plan are activity and record sheets for hands-on learning experiences. This curriculum is intended for students in about 4th to 8th grades.

Howard Jr., Ronald A.

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

264

Clean Water Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clean Water Act Clean Water Act Year 1972 Url CWA.jpg Description The Clean Water Act was established to restore and maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the nation's waters. References CWA[1] Federal Oil and Gas[2] The Clean Water Act (CWA) (33 U.S.C. § 1251 et seq.) - The Clean Water Act was established to restore and maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the nation's waters. The CWA aims to protect water quality through development of water quality standards, anti-degradation policies, water quality permitting procedures, water body monitoring and assessment programs, and elimination or point and nonpoint pollution sources. The CWA regulates the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permitting process, which establishes, through a permit,

265

Regulations For Electric Companies (Tennessee) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulations For Electric Companies (Tennessee) Regulations For Electric Companies (Tennessee) Regulations For Electric Companies (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Net Metering Provider Tennessee Regulatory Authority The Regulations for Electric Companies are under the Authority of the Tennessee Regulatory Authority, which is the public service branch of the state government. These regulations establish the records electricity providers are required to keep and submit. It requires that all electricity

266

Georgia Water Quality Control Act (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Georgia Water Quality Control Act (Georgia) Georgia Water Quality Control Act (Georgia) Georgia Water Quality Control Act (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Georgia Water Quality Control Act (WQCA) is a set of environmental regulations and permitting requirements that comply with the federal Clean Water Act. The Georgia Water Quality Control Act is enforced by the Georgia

267

Regulations of the Arkansas Operating Air Permit Program (Arkansas) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulations of the Arkansas Operating Air Permit Program (Arkansas) Regulations of the Arkansas Operating Air Permit Program (Arkansas) Regulations of the Arkansas Operating Air Permit Program (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Retail Supplier Utility Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Regulations of the Arkansas Air Operating Program are adopted in accordance with the provisions of Part UU of the Arkansas Water and Air Pollution Control Act, Arkansas Code Annotated 8-4-101, and will be referred to in this description as "program", "regulations" and "regulation No. 26". The regulations are intended to meet the requirements of title of

268

Cooling Water Issues and Opportunities at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling Water Issues and Opportunities at U.S. Nuclear Power Cooling Water Issues and Opportunities at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants, December 2010 Cooling Water Issues and Opportunities at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants, December 2010 Energy and water are both essential to sustainable development and economic productivity. Ample supplies of water are essential to energy production, and water management is dependent on ample supplies of energy for water treatment and transportation. The critical nexus between energy and water has been recognized in a variety of recent studies, but the policy and regulatory machinery that this nexus depends on is not keeping up with the growing challenges. Population growth and societal demand for improved quality of life will require more clean water for drinking and sanitation, more water for

269

Incentive regulation and the regulation of incentives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This thesis explores the regulatory problem of incentives and the question of how to create a regulatory framework that most nearly aligns the firm's private interests with the public good. The main themes are: (1) an efficiency loss is inherent in the regulatory relationship, as long as the regulator knows less about the firm's operations than the firm itself; and (2) regulation itself is an incentive mechanism, so that the regulator can choose how to motivate the firm but now whether to do so. An analytical model is used to show the tradeoff between inducing efficient production and efficient pricing. The thesis surveys and analyzes incentive regulation mechanisms adopted by state utility commissions, using a Washington state plan as a case study. A natural extension of incentive regulation is discussed, in which the firm's reward depends on the total gain in consumer surplus rather than just the reduction in expenditures. The ability of the regulator to commit to future actions is central to incentive regulation, as well as many other aspects of regulation.

Blackmon, B.G. Jr.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other Than State-Owned Marine Waters (Mississippi) Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other Than State-Owned Marine Waters (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Mississippi Development Authority The Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other than State-Owned Marine Waters is applicable to the Natural Gas Sector and the Coal with CCS Sector. This law

271

IEP - Water-Energy Interface: Regulatory Drivers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Drivers Regulatory Drivers Several legislative acts are in place that could potentially impact water quality requirements and water use for fossil energy production as well as electricity generation. These acts regulate pollutant discharge and water intake directly and indirectly. Under regulations established by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), these Acts serve to maintain and improve the Nation's water resources for uses including but not limited to agricultural, industrial, nutritional, and recreational purposes. The Clean Water Act - The Federal Water Pollution Control Act, more commonly known as the Clean Water Act, provides for the regulation of discharges to the nation's surface waters. To address pollution, the act specifies that the discharge of any pollutant by any person is unlawful except when in compliance with applicable permitting requirements. Initial emphasis was placed on "point source" pollutant discharge, but 1987 amendments authorized measures to address "non-point source" discharges, including stormwater runoff from industrial facilities. Permits are issued under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES), which designates the highest level of water pollution or lowest acceptable standards for water discharges. NPDES permits are typically administered by the individual states. With EPA approval, the states may implement standards more stringent than federal water quality standards, but may not be less stringent. Certain sections of the Act are particularly applicable to water issues related to power generation. These include:

272

Proceedings: Second Thermal Ecology and Regulation Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a recent thermal discharge issues workshop that examined recent developments and future trends. Thermal discharge issues are receiving increasing attention from government agencies and electric power companies. The report will be of particular value to power company environmental staff, government regulators, and water resource managers.

2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

273

GRR/Section 19-CA-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-CA-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues GRR/Section 19-CA-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-CA-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues 19CAAWaterAccessWaterRightsIssues.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies California State Water Resources Control Board California Division of Water Rights Regulations & Policies California Water Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19CAAWaterAccessWaterRightsIssues.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative California's water acquisition process is governed by state law and common

274

Regulators, Requirements, Statutes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulators, Requirements, Statutes Regulators, Requirements, Statutes Regulators, Requirements, Statutes The Laboratory must comply with environmental laws and regulations that apply to Laboratory operations. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Environmental laws and regulations LANL complies with more than 30 state and federal regulations and policies designed to protect human health and the environment. Regulators Regulators Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) EPA Homepage EPA - Region VI U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) DOE Homepage DOE Environmental Policy DOE Citizen's Advisory Board U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) Southwest Region 2 New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) NMED Homepage NMED DOE Oversight Office

275

New York State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New York New York State Regulations: New York State of New York The primary responsibility for regulating oil and gas activities within New York resides with the Bureau of Oil and Gas Regulation in the Division of Mineral Resources (Office of Natural Resources) of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC). Other offices and divisions within the NYSDEC administer the major environmental protection laws. Contact New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Division of Mineral Resources Bureau of Oil and Gas Regulation 625 Broadway, 3rd Floor Albany, NY 12233-6500 (518) 402-8056 (phone) (518) 402-8060 (fax) Disposal Practices and Applicable Regulations Environmental conservation rules and regulations are contained in Title 6 of the Official Compilation of Codes, Rules and Regulations of the State of New York (6 NYCRR). The rules and regulations for oil, gas and solution mining are provided in 6 NYCRR Parts 550-559.

276

Protected Water Sources (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protected Water Sources (Iowa) Protected Water Sources (Iowa) Protected Water Sources (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations This chapter designates protected water sources, which are subject to additional special conditions regarding water use. Permit applications for

277

Energy Basics: Water Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Storage Water Heaters Tankless Demand Water Heaters Heat Pump Water Heaters Solar Water Heaters Tankless Coil & Indirect Water Heaters Water Heating A variety of...

278

Computer Use Regulation Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computer Use Regulation #12;Introduction · The following training materials will reference the contents of the Computer Use Regulations, but should not serve as a substitute for reading the actual responsibilities NCSU employees have under the regulations. · North Carolina State University's computer networks

Liu, Paul

279

Ground Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Nature Bulletin No. 408-A February 27, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation GROUND WATER We take...

280

Water Dogs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NA Question: I'd like to know about the water dogs and their life cycle? Replies: Water dog, or mud puppy, is a common name for a type of salamander that never develops lungs, but...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Tennessee State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Tennessee's air, land, and water, and preserves, conserves, and promotes Tennessee's natural and cultural resources. The Tennessee Board of Water Quality, Oil and Gas manages...

282

Designing superior incentive regulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The discussion begun in the February 15 issue pointed out some potential drawbacks to popular incentive drawbacks to popular incentive regulation (IR) plans, as they operate in practice. The principal drawback is that the plans can create strong incentives for recontracting by well-intentioned regulators who face strong pressures to please their constituents. The likelihood of recontracting, in turn, can diminish the incentives for superior performance presented to the regulated firm. The question that remains is whether popular IR plans like price-cap regulation (PCR) can be modified to reduce the likelihood of recontracting, and thereby restore incentives for superior performance by the regulated firm. The answer is yes'.

Sappington, D.E.M.; Weisman, D.L.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Clean Water Act Section 316(a): Past, Present, and Future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal discharge issues are receiving increasing attention from government agencies and electric power companies. This report summarizes the status and future trends regarding thermal discharge research and regulations with respect to Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act (CWA). The report will be of particular value to power company environmental staff, government regulators and water resource managers.

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

284

Water Use Registration and Allocation (North Carolina) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Use Registration and Allocation (North Carolina) Use Registration and Allocation (North Carolina) Water Use Registration and Allocation (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Construction Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environment and Natural Resources This rule states regulations for water withdrawals, permits required for withdrawals and water use during water droughts and emergencies. Self-supplied business and industrial water users subject to the water withdrawal registration shall prepare a written plan, for responding to water shortages that is consistent with industry water efficiency and

285

Introducing hysteresis in snow depletion curves to improve the water budget of a land surface model in an Alpine catchment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Durance watershed (14 000 km2), located in the French Alps, generates 10% of French hydro-power and provides drinking water to 3 million people. The Catchment Land Surface Model (CLSM), a distributed land surface model (LSM) with a multilayer, ...

Claire Magand; Agnès Ducharne; Nicolas Le Moine; Simon Gascoin

286

Ground Water Management Act (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground Water Management Act (Virginia) Ground Water Management Act (Virginia) Ground Water Management Act (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Virginia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia Department of Environmental Quality Under the Ground Water Management Act of 1992, Virginia manages ground water through a program regulating the withdrawals in certain areas called

287

Water Bugs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bugs Bugs Nature Bulletin No. 221-A March 12, 1966 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WATER BUGS It is fascinating to lie in a boat or on a log at the edge of the water and watch the drama that unfolds among the small water animals. Among the star performers in small streams and ponds are the Water Bugs. These are aquatic members of that large group of insects called the "true bugs", most of which live on land. Moreover, unlike many other types of water insects, they do not have gills but get their oxygen directly from the air. Those that do go beneath the surface usually carry an oxygen supply with them in the form of a shiny glistening sheath of air imprisoned among a covering of fine waterproof hairs. The common water insect known to small boys at the "Whirligig Bug" is not a water bug but a beetle.

288

Surface Coal Mining Regulations (Mississippi) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Surface Coal Mining Regulations (Mississippi) Surface Coal Mining Regulations (Mississippi) Surface Coal Mining Regulations (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Utility Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality The Surface Coal Mining Regulations are a combination of permitting requirements and environmental regulations that limit how, where and when coal can be mined. It protects lands that are under special regulation due to their nature, and applies only to state lands. When applied to Coal with Carbon Capture and Storage projects the rules that would apply to a normal coal-mining project still apply. In addition to these measures, a CCS plant would need to adhere to all waste disposal requirements, water usage

289

GRR/Section 19-WA-a - Water Access and Water Rights Overview | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9-WA-a - Water Access and Water Rights Overview 9-WA-a - Water Access and Water Rights Overview < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-WA-a - Water Access and Water Rights Overview 19-WA-a - Water Access and Water Rights Overview.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies Revised Code of Washington Chapter 90.03 Revised Code of Washington Chapter 90.44 RCW 90.44.050 Triggers None specified Similar to many western states, only a small amount of water is available for appropriation in Washington. As a result, Washington has developed a comprehensive regulatory scheme for the distribution of water rights and use of water in the state. Washington employs a prior appropriation or

290

GRR/Section 19-AK-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-AK-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues GRR/Section 19-AK-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-AK-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues 19AKAWaterAccessWaterRights.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Natural Resources Alaska Division of Mining Land and Water Regulations & Policies Alaska Water Use Act Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19AKAWaterAccessWaterRights.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative In Alaska, water is declared a public resource belonging to the people of

291

GRR/Section 19-WA-d - Water Conservancy Board Transfer or Change of Water  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

19-WA-d - Water Conservancy Board Transfer or Change of Water 19-WA-d - Water Conservancy Board Transfer or Change of Water Right < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-WA-d - Water Conservancy Board Transfer or Change of Water Right 19-WA-d - Water Conservancy Board Transfer or Change of Water Right.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies Revised Code of Washington Chapter 90.80 RCW 90.03.380 90.03.390 RCW 90.44.100 Triggers None specified In 1997, the Washington Legislature authorized the creation of water conservancy boards through the enactment of Revised Code of Washington Chapter 90.80 to expedite the administrative process for voluntary water right transfers within individual counties. In counties where a water

292

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Source Water Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) covers approximately 890 square miles and includes 12 public water systems that must be evaluated for Source water protection purposes under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Because of its size and location, six watersheds and five aquifers could potentially affect the INEEL's drinking water sources. Based on a preliminary evaluation of the available information, it was determined that the Big Lost River, Birch Creek, and Little Lost River Watersheds and the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer needed to be assessed. These watersheds were delineated using the United States Geologic Survey's Hydrological Unit scheme. Well capture zones were originally estimated using the RESSQC module of the Environmental Protection Agency's Well Head Protection Area model, and the initial modeling assumptions and results were checked by running several scenarios using Modflow modeling. After a technical review, the resulting capture zones were expanded to account for the uncertainties associated with changing groundwater flow directions, a this vadose zone, and other data uncertainties. Finally, all well capture zones at a given facility were merged to a single wellhead protection area at each facility. A contaminant source inventory was conducted, and the results were integrated with the well capture zones, watershed and aquifer information, and facility information using geographic information system technology to complete the INEEL's Source Water Assessment. Of the INEEL's 12 public water systems, three systems rated as low susceptibility (EBR-1, Main Gate, and Gun Range), and the remainder rated as moderate susceptibility. No INEEL public water system rated as high susceptibility. We are using this information to develop a source water management plan from which we will subsequently implement an INEEL-wide source water management program. The results are a very robust set of wellhead protection areas that will protect the INEEL's public water systems yet not too conservative to inhibit the INEEL from carrying out its missions.

Sehlke, G.

2003-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

293

EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION Leadership Team Subcommittee: Joan Bradshaw Michael Dukes Pierce Jones Kati Migliaccio #12;Water Conservation - Situation · Florida water supplies;Water Conservation Initiative 2: Enhancing and protecting water quality, quantity, and supply Priority 1

Slatton, Clint

294

Page 1 of 5 Narrative Description of Hydraulic Fracturing Draft Regulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. California oil and natural gas is almost always associated with "produced water" ­ that is, brackish water, making separation of the fracturing fluids from the produced water impossible. The fracturing fluid is then co- disposed with the produced water. Current regulations specify the disposal requirements

295

Water Rights: Ground Water (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground Water (Indiana) Ground Water (Indiana) Water Rights: Ground Water (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Indiana Department of Natural Resources It is the policy of the state to provide for the conservation of groundwater resources and limit groundwater waste. The Indiana Department of Natural Resources may designate restricted use areas and limit groundwater withdrawals by existing users in those areas, thus making groundwater use greater than 100,000 gallons per day subject to permitting

296

Method of arsenic removal from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for low-cost arsenic removal from drinking water using chemically prepared bottom ash pre-treated with ferrous sulfate and then sodium hydroxide. Deposits on the surface of particles of bottom ash form of activated iron adsorbent with a high affinity for arsenic. In laboratory tests, a miniscule 5 grams of pre-treated bottom ash was sufficient to remove the arsenic from 2 liters of 2400 ppb (parts per billion) arsenic-laden water to a level below 50 ppb (the present United States Environmental Protection Agency limit). By increasing the amount of pre-treated bottom ash, even lower levels of post-treatment arsenic are expected. It is further expected that this invention supplies a very low-cost solution to arsenic poisoning for large population segments.

Gadgil, Ashok (El Cerrito, CA)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

297

INTERMITTENT PRESENTATIONS OF ETHANOL SIPPER TUBE INDUCE ETHANOL DRINKING IN RATS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — Aims: Intermittent presentations of the ethanol sipper have been reported to induce more ethanol drinking in rats than when the ethanol sipper was continuously available during the session. This intermittent sipper effect was observed in a social drinking situation, in which subjects experienced intermittent opportunities to interact briefly with a conspecific rat. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the intermittent sipper procedure in situations providing for intermittent presentations of food, and, in addition, in situations that do not provide for intermittent presentations of another rewarding event. Methods: Four groups of male Long-Evans hooded rats, arranged in a 2 · 2 factorial design with two levels of Sipper Procedure (Intermittent vs Continuous) and two levels of Food procedure (Food vs No Food), were trained in drinking chambers. During each daily session, Intermittent Sipper groups received access to the ethanol sipper during each of 25 trials of 10 s each, while Continuous Sipper groups had access to the ethanol sipper during the entire session ( 30 min). During each session, Food groups received 25 presentations of food pellets while No Food groups received no food pellets. Ethanol concentrations in the sipper [3, 4, 6, 8, and 10 % (vol./vol.)] increased across sessions. Results: More rapid escalation of ethanol intake was observed in the Intermittent Sipper groups than in the Continuous Sipper groups, and this effect was observed in both the Food and No Food conditions (P’s ethanol sipper, yet induced more ethanol drinking than Continuous Sipper procedures. The intermittent sipper effect is not dependent on presentations of food. Implications for scheduleinduced polydipsia and Pavlovian autoshaping are discussed.

Arthur Tomie; William C. Miller; Erik Dranoff; Larissa A. Pohorecky

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Industry requested exploration/production environmental regulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

California State Review by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission recommends state and regional water boards issue requirements to all pits subject to basin plans and chapter 15. Resources shortfalls have kept production pits from being Water Board priorities. Threat of United States EPA designation of crude oil as hazardous waste and subsequent land use conflicts of buried pits in developing areas have led to the call for full implementation of State regulations. Recommended state improvements include (1) interagency communication, cross training, computer database, and inspections; (2) development of guidance documents and consistency in pit closure policy, permitting, water quality in DOG pit rules, land spreading, road spreading, and minimum construction and operation requirements and; (3) administratively finding additional resources to fully implement requirements, increase records retention time, consider compliance history, revise Water Board/DOG Memorandum of Understanding and adjust DOG financial assurance program to provide incentive for proper and timely well plugging and site reclamation. Industry/Regulatory Agency cooperation can significantly reduce the burden of regulation implementation, Industry willingness to pay appropriate regulatory fees can facilitate regulation execution. Field drilling crew education can minimize regulatory implementation costs. Mud pit Resource Conservation and Recovery Act exemption can be maintained if hazardous substances (e.g., pipe dope and solvents) are kept out of the pit.

Blanck, L. (California Regional Water Quality Control Board, San Luis Obispo, CA (United States))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Reusing Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reusing Water Reusing Water Reusing Water Millions of gallons of industrial wastewater is recycled at LANL by virtue of a long-term strategy to treat wastewater rather than discharging it into the environment. April 12, 2012 Water from cooling the supercomputer is release to maintain a healthy wetland. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email We reuse the same water up to six times before releasing it back into the environment cleaner than when it was pumped. How many times does LANL reuse water? Wastewater is generated from some of the facilities responsible for the Lab's biggest missions, such as the cooling towers of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, one of the Lab's premier science research

300

Pressure reducing regulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure is disclosed. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes. 10 figs.

Whitehead, J.C.; Dilgard, L.W.

1995-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

MIT jar test of the natural polymer chitosan with fresh pond water from the Cambridge Water Department, November-December 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) jar tests of chitosan using CWD (Cambridge Water Department Treatment Plant) water was to demonstrate the effectiveness of chitosan as a coagulant in drinking water applications. The approach was to compare the performance of the natural organic coagulant, chitosan, to the performance of alum and other chemical coagulants in terms of the parameters turbidity, color, pH and alkalinity. Twenty-five jar tests were conducted during November and December, 1992, at Parsons Laboratory, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Murcott, S.; Harleman, D.R.F.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Gas and Electric Utilities Regulation (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas and Electric Utilities Regulation (South Dakota) Gas and Electric Utilities Regulation (South Dakota) Gas and Electric Utilities Regulation (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Retail Supplier Institutional Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider South Dakota Public Utilities Commission This legislation contains provisions for gas and electric utilities. As part of these regulations, electric utilities are required to file with the

303

Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations and Criteria (Mississippi)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations and Criteria Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations and Criteria (Mississippi) Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations and Criteria (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations

304

RAPID DETERMINATION OF {sup 210} PO IN WATER SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect

A new rapid method for the determination of {sup 210}Po in water samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that can be used for emergency response or routine water analyses. If a radiological dispersive device (RDD) event or a radiological attack associated with drinking water supplies occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of water samples, including drinking water, ground water and other water effluents. Current analytical methods for the assay of {sup 210}Po in water samples have typically involved spontaneous auto-deposition of {sup 210}Po onto silver or other metal disks followed by counting by alpha spectrometry. The auto-deposition times range from 90 minutes to 24 hours or more, at times with yields that may be less than desirable. If sample interferences are present, decreased yields and degraded alpha spectrums can occur due to unpredictable thickening in the deposited layer. Separation methods have focused on the use of Sr Resin?, often in combination with 210Pb analysis. A new rapid method for {sup 210}Po in water samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that utilizes a rapid calcium phosphate co-precipitation method, separation using DGA Resin? (N,N,N?,N? tetraoctyldiglycolamide extractant-coated resin, Eichrom Technologies or Triskem-International), followed by rapid microprecipitation of {sup 210}Po using bismuth phosphate for counting by alpha spectrometry. This new method can be performed quickly with excellent removal of interferences, high chemical yields and very good alpha peak resolution, eliminating any potential problems with the alpha source preparation for emergency or routine samples. A rapid sequential separation method to separate {sup 210} Po and actinide isotopes was also developed. This new approach, rapid separation with DGA Resin plus microprecipitation for alpha source preparation, is a significant advance in radiochemistry for the rapid determination of {sup 210}Po.

Maxwell, S.

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

305

Water Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Systems Analyses and Planning EUEC Energy & Environment Conference 2008, EPS,1292008 2 * Water Scarcity Seen Dampening Case...

306

Water Quality Standards (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standards (Ohio) Standards (Ohio) Water Quality Standards (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Retail Supplier Institutional Fuel Distributor Nonprofit Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency outlines the minimum water quality requirements for all surface waters of the state. Water quality standards contain two distinct elements: designated uses; and

307

General Water Quality (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

General Water Quality (Oklahoma) General Water Quality (Oklahoma) General Water Quality (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Environmental Quality The purpose of this water quality rule is to protect, maintain and improve

308

Management of Non-Cooling Water Releases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses the efficacy and cost of water management practices that can be used by power companies to address non-cooling water and stormwater release issues with respect to siting, design, and operation of facilities, including generating stations, substations, and rights-of-way in urban and rural settings. The report will be of value to environmental and generation managers within power companies, as well as regulators, water resource managers, and environmentalists.

2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

309

Regulation of natural monopolies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This chapter provides a comprehensive overview of the theoretical and empirical literature on the regulation of natural monopolies. It covers alternative definitions of natural monopoly, regulatory goals, alternative ...

Joskow, Paul L.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Florida State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to conserve the state's oil and gas resources and minimize environmental impacts from exploration and production operations through regulation and inspection activities. The...

311

Louisiana State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Natural Resources (DNR), Office of Conservation (OC), is tasked with regulating the exploration and production of oil, gas, and other hydrocarbons, as well as protecting...

312

West Virginia State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protection (DEP) is responsible for monitoring and regulating all actions related to the exploration, drilling, storage, and production of oil and natural gas. The DEP, through...

313

Uniform Laws and Regulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Page 2. Uniform Laws and Regulations in the areas of legal metrology and engine fuel quality as adopted by the ...

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

314

Nuclear Regulation (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute establishes a regulatory program for sources of ionizing radiation, to be administered by the Montana Department of Health and Human Services. These regulations address permitting and...

315

Uniform Laws and Regulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Uniform Laws and Regulations in the areas of legal metrology and engine fuel quality as adopted by the 96th National Conference on ...

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

316

Utah State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Disposal). The DEQ administers Utah's environmental rules. Underground Disposal of Drilling Fluids (R649-3-25). The regulation allows injection of reserve pit drilling...

317

WIPP Documents - Federal Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Regulations 40 CFR Part 191 Environmental radiation protection standards for management and disposal of spent nuclear fuel, high-level and transuranic radioactive wastes....

318

Tidal Wetlands Regulations (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Most activities occurring in or near tidal wetlands are regulated, and this section contains information on such activities and required permit applications for proposed activities. Applications...

319

Research on Multistep Electricity Price Model with Bidirectional Regulation for Large Consumers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multistep electricity price model with bidirectional regulation is proposed for large adjustable consumers in the area with abundant hydropower. In order to guide large consumers to regulate electricity consumption manners for resource utilization, ... Keywords: multistep electricity price, bidirectional regulation, large consumers, high and low water period, Monte Carlo simulation, price elasticity of demand

Xia Lei; Dong-xian Yu; Xiao-li Bai

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Externality Regulation in Oil and Gas Encyclopedia of Energy, Natural Resource, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Externality Regulation in Oil and Gas Chapter 56 Encyclopedia of Energy, Natural Resource regulating well spacing, preventing of flaring or venting of natural gas, regulating production from wells oil/gas and oil/water ratios, and no-flaring and venting rules for natural gas. 1 Introduction

Garousi, Vahid

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Water and Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water in swimming pool Water and Energy The water and energy technology research focuses on improving the efficiency of energy and water use in water delivery, supply and...

322

Energy Basics: Water Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

about: Conventional Storage Water Heaters Demand (Tankless or Instantaneous) Water Heaters Heat Pump Water Heaters Solar Water Heaters Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heaters...

323

Regulators warned in adopting incentive regulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Illinois Commerce Commission economist warns that regulators should be cautious about adopting incentive regulations, which are risky to consumers because of the inaccurate cost-efficiency measurement, faulty program design, and difficulties in program evaluation. The biggest problem with existing incentive programs is that they don't always produce lower rates in the long term. Properly designed and implemented, however, the programs can benefit both ratepayers and utilities. Programs which penalize bad performance without rewarding the good can cause problems. The authors outlines common characteristics of the program and recommends several incentive options.

Not Available

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Prediction of the Environmental Mobility of Arsenic: Evaluation of a Mechanistic Approach to Modeling Water-Rock Partitioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arsenic chemistry is important to the drinking water, waste management, and energy industries because of its potential health effects from low levels of exposure, breadth of occurrence, and expense of current treatment and disposal technologies. Since predicting arsenic behavior and mobility in the environment is currently not well developed, this project was undertaken to increase knowledge by testing and evaluating a mechanistic model for arsenic water-mineral partitioning.

2000-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

325

File:06NVCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6NVCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf 6NVCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:06NVCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 45 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 15:59, 15 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 15:59, 15 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (45 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage The following page links to this file: GRR/Section 6-NV-c - Drinking Water Permit Retrieved from

326

File:06ORCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6ORCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf 6ORCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:06ORCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 11 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 12:09, 28 September 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 12:09, 28 September 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (11 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage The following page links to this file: GRR/Section 6-OR-c - Drinking Water Permit Retrieved from

327

File:06IDCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IDCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf IDCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:06IDCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 24 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 08:14, 29 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 08:14, 29 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (24 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage The following page links to this file: GRR/Section 6-ID-c - Drinking Water Permit Retrieved from

328

File:06MTCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MTCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf MTCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:06MTCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 11 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 11:11, 1 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 11:11, 1 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (11 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage The following page links to this file: GRR/Section 6-MT-c - Drinking Water Permit Retrieved from

329

Playful bottle: a mobile social persuasion system to motivate healthy water intake Ubicomp'09  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study of mobile persuasion system explores the use of a mobile phone, when attached to an everyday object used by an everyday behavior, becomes a tool to sense and influence that behavior. This mobile persuasion system, called Playful Bottle system, makes use of a mobile phone attached to an everyday drinking mug and motivates office workers to drink healthy quantities of water. A camera and accelerometer sensors in the phone are used to build a vision/motion-based water intake tracker to detect the amount and regularity of water consumed by the user. Additionally, the phone includes hydration games in which natural drinking actions are used as game input. Two hydration games are developed: a single-user TreeGame with automated computer reminders and a multi-user ForestGame with computer-mediated social reminders from members of the group playing the game. Results from 7-week user study with 16 test subjects suggest that both hydration games are effective for encouraging adequate and regular water intake by users. Additionally, results of this study suggest that adding social reminders to the hydration game is more effective than system reminders alone.

Meng-chieh Chiu; Shih-ping Chang; Yu-chen Chang; Hao-hua Chu; Cheryl Chia-hui Chen; Fei-hsiu Hsiao; Ju-chun Ko

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Solid Waste Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode Island) Solid Waste Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management Facilities which compost putrescible waste and/or leaf and yard waste are subject to these regulations. The regulations establish permitting, registration, and operational requirements for composting facilities. Operational requirements for putrescible waste facilities include siting, distance, and buffer requirements, as well as standards for avoiding harm to endangered species and contamination of air and water sources. Specific

331

Missouri Water Resource Law (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Missouri Water Resource Law (Missouri) Missouri Water Resource Law (Missouri) Missouri Water Resource Law (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Missouri Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Missouri Department of Natural Resources The Department of Natural Resources is responsible for ensuring that the quality and quantity of the water resources of the state are maintained at the highest level practicable to support present and future beneficial uses. The Department maintains an ongoing statewide surface and groundwater monitoring program and is authorized to enact regulations and restrict uses

332

Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut) Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity

333

Use of reclaimed water for power plant cooling.  

SciTech Connect

Freshwater demands are steadily increasing throughout the United States. As its population increases, more water is needed for domestic use (drinking, cooking, cleaning, etc.) and to supply power and food. In arid parts of the country, existing freshwater supplies are not able to meet the increasing demands for water. New water users are often forced to look to alternative sources of water to meet their needs. Over the past few years, utilities in many locations, including parts of the country not traditionally water-poor (e.g., Georgia, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, and North Carolina) have needed to reevaluate the availability of water to meet their cooling needs. This trend will only become more extreme with time. Other trends are likely to increase pressure on freshwater supplies, too. For example, as populations increase, they will require more food. This in turn will likely increase demands for water by the agricultural sector. Another example is the recent increased interest in producing biofuels. Additional water will be required to grow more crops to serve as the raw materials for biofuels and to process the raw materials into biofuels. This report provides information about an opportunity to reuse an abundant water source -- treated municipal wastewater, also known as 'reclaimed water' -- for cooling and process water in electric generating facilities. The report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Innovations for Existing Plants research program (Feeley 2005). This program initiated an energy-water research effort in 2003 that includes the availability and use of 'nontraditional sources' of water for use at power plants. This report represents a unique reference for information on the use of reclaimed water for power plant cooling. In particular, the database of reclaimed water user facilities described in Chapter 2 is the first comprehensive national effort to identify and catalog those plants that are using reclaimed water for cooling.

Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

334

Third Thermal Ecology and Regulation Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a 2011 workshop on thermal discharge issues that examined recent developments and future trends. Thermal discharge issues are receiving increased attention from government agencies and electric power companies; consequently, the report will be of particular value to power company environmental staff, government regulators, water resource managers, and the general public.BackgroundIn October 2011, more than 100 people met at Great River ...

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

335

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Rifle, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ground water project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. This report is a site specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. Currently, no one is using the ground water and therefore, no one is at risk. However, the land will probably be developed in the future and so the possibility of people using the ground water does exist. This report examines the future possibility of health hazards resulting from the ingestion of contaminated drinking water, skin contact, fish ingestion, or contact with surface waters and sediments.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

ENERGY DRINK CONSUMPTION (WITH AND WITHOUT ALCOHOL) AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO RISKY BEHAVIOR, RISK AWARENESS, AND BEHAVIORAL INTENTION IN COLLEGE STUDENTS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study was to assess the relationships between energy drink consumption (with and without alcohol) and other risky behaviors; students’ overall awareness… (more)

Buchanan, Julia K

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Water pollution  

SciTech Connect

Ballast water, which is sea water that is carried in oil tankers to provide stability, can become contaminated with oil. Alyeska Pipeline Service Company runs a water treatment plant at its pipeline terminal at Prot Valdez, Alaska, to treat ballast water before it is discharged into the sea. GAO reviewed EPA's recently reissued National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit for the Port Valdez facility. In this report, GAO compares the effluent limits and other requirements under the reissued permit with those of the old permit, determines the reasons for changes in the reissued permit, and examines Alyeska's initial efforts to comply with the reissued permit's effluent limits and reporting requirements.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Indiana State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indiana Indiana State Regulations: Indiana State of Indiana The Indiana Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Division of Oil and Gas regulates petroleum exploration, production, and site abandonment activities, underground injection control, test hole drilling, and geophysical surveying operations. Otherwise, the Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) administers the major environmental protection laws. Contact Division of Oil and Gas (Indianapolis Central Office) 402 West Washington Street, Room 293 Indianapolis, IN 46204 (317) 232-4055 (phone) (317) 232-1550 (fax) (Division Contacts) Indiana Department of Environmental Management P.O. Box 6015 Indianapolis, IN 46206-6015 (317) 232-8603 (phone) (317) 233-6647 (fax) Disposal Practices and Applicable Regulations

339

North America: Regulation of International Electricity Trade...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North America: Regulation of International Electricity Trade North America: Regulation of International Electricity Trade North America: Regulation of International Electricity...

340

Interviewee Travel Regulations Scope  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3/2012 3/2012 Interviewee Travel Regulations Scope These regulations apply to the reimbursement of round-trip travel expenses incurred by interviewees. These regulations do not apply to applicants who live within a 50-mile radius of Los Alamos based on the Rand McNally Standard Highway Mileage Guide. Reimbursement With the exception of airfare, interviewees will be reimbursed for travel expenses according to Federal travel regulations. For interviewees, airfare reimbursement is limited to the lesser of the standard coach airfare or the actual amount paid. The lowest available airfare should be obtained based on the official business dates and locations. The reimbursement amount will be based on the most direct route available between the interviewee's residence and the laboratory. Costs incurred over the lowest available fare will be the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

GUIDANCE REGARDING NEPA REGULATIONS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

This memorandum was published in the Federal Register and appears at 48 Fed. Reg. 34263 (1983). Ed. Note] This memorandum was published in the Federal Register and appears at 48 Fed. Reg. 34263 (1983). Ed. Note] GUIDANCE REGARDING NEPA REGULATIONS 40 CFR Part 1500 Executive Office of the President Council on Environmental Quality 722 Jackson Place, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20006 July 22, 1983 Memorandum For: Heads of Federal Agencies From: A. Alan Hill, Chairman Re: Guidance Regarding NEPA Regulations The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations implementing the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) were issued on November 29, 1978. These regulations became effective for, and binding upon, most federal agencies on July 30, 1979, and for all remaining federal agencies on November 30, 1979. As part of the Council's NEPA oversight responsibilities it solicited through an August 14,

342

Sulfur Dioxide Regulations (Ohio)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides sulfur dioxide emission limits for every county, as well as regulations for the emission, monitoring and...

343

Montana State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Montana State Regulations: Montana State of Montana The Montana Board of Oil and Gas Conservation (MBOGC) is a quasi-judicial body that is attached to the Department of Natural...

344

Sustainable Water Resources Management, Volume 3: Case Studies on New Water Paradigm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report identifies and evaluates the foundation and requirements for a sustainable water infrastructure at the community and watershed scales. The report will be of value not only to the public water supply, stormwater management, and wastewater treatment sectors, but also the electric power sector, given the strong interdependencies among the four sectors. In addition, the report will of value to government agencies involved in water regulations and policy.

2010-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

345

Safety problems of water-development works designed for land reclamation  

SciTech Connect

A safety declaration is a fundamental document assuring the safety of water-development works, their correspondence to safety criteria, the design, and active technical regulations and rules.

Shchedrin, V. N. [Russian Academy of Agriculture Sciences (Russian Federation); Kosichenko, Yu. M. [FGNU RocNIIPM, Novocherkassk (Russian Federation)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Permits and Easements for Construction and Related Activities on Public Lands and Waters (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These rules establish procedures and regulate the evaluation and issuance of permits for construction or other related activities that alter the physical characteristics of public lands and waters...

347

Issues in federal preemption of state appliance energy efficiency regulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The findings and conclusions of the analysis of the various issues involved in the federal preemption of state regulations for the DOE no standard rule on covered appliances are summarized. The covered products are: refrigerators, refrigerator-freezers, freezers, clothes dryers, kitchen ranges and ovens, water heaters (excluding heat pump water heaters), room air conditioners, central air conditioners (excluding heat pumps), and furnaces. A detailed discussion of the rationale for the positions of groups offering comment for the record is presneted. The pertinent categories of state and local regulations and programs are explained, then detailed analysis is conducted on the covered products and regulations. Issues relating to the timing of preemption of state regulations are discussed, as well as issues relating to burden of proof, contents of petitions for exemptions from preemption, criteria for evaluating petitions, and procedural and other issues. (LEW)

Fang, J.M.; Balistocky, S.; Schaefler, A.M.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Water Pollution Fee (Michigan) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Pollution Fee (Michigan) Water Pollution Fee (Michigan) Water Pollution Fee (Michigan) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Michigan Program Type Fees Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Groundwater Program regulates discharge to groundwater under Part 31, Water Resources Protection, of the Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act, 1994 PA 451 and Part 22 Rules. Groundwater staff review

349

Designing superior incentive regulation  

SciTech Connect

The key to success in designing effective incentive regulation is relatively simple: Anticipate all of the incentives that will ultimately come to bear, and structure regulatory policy in advance to limit any adverse incentives. All is a critical word here. Attention commonly is focused on the incentives a proposed regulatory plan creates for the regulated firm to minimize production costs, diversify into new markets, and so on. While the incentives are important in assessing a regulatory plan, they are only one consideration. It is also critical to analyze the incentives the plan creates for other key players in the regulatory arena, particularly regulators. It is premature to draw any broad conclusions about the success of incentive regulation in the electric power and natural gas industries. While there is reason for optimism, concern remain. Some incentive regulation plans have been abandoned, in part because of: (1) unforeseen exogenous event that could not be administered within the confines of the plan; (2) public opposition to rewarding a utility for the superior performance it should have realized without the promise of financial reward; (3) adverse reaction to utility earnings in excess of those commonly authorized under traditional regulation, and (4) questions about the legality of the plans under state statutes.

Sappington, D.E.M.; Weisman, D.L.

1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

Cat under Food and Water Stress  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Asimikas Asimikas Status: other Grade: other Location: Outside U.S. Country: USA Date: N/A Question: How long can a domestic cat live without food, and drink water only? Replies: Asimikas, If at all possible, attempt to coax food into the cat by mixing wet cat food with water until 'soupy', and use a syringe to inject food into the back of the cat's mouth. The cat probably won't like this, but if you try repeatedly and with gentle firmness, you may successfully get food into the feline. From observing a case as a veterinary assistant, a cat refusing solid food can go several days on water alone. Then, the cat generally begins to refuse water as well and there is a noticeable gauntness about the body shape of the cat. The skin on the back, for example, when gently pinched will not quickly spring back to laying flat as it should --- this indicates serious dehydration on a subcutaneous level, indicating the cat needs an IV to get fluids in quickly before organ failure etc. Again, this is the general series of events I observed in a vet's office when a cat was brought in, having refused food for more than a few days. A vet should definitely be contacted if a feline has refused food for two consecutive days or more.

351

Ground water and oil field waste sites: a study in Vermilion Parish  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water samples were obtained from 128 private water wells surrounding eight oil field waste sites in Vermilion Parish. The specimens were analyzed for five heavy metals: barium, arsenic, chromium, lead, and cadmium. Half of the specimens were then analyzed for 16 volatile organic compounds. A blood sample was obtained from healthy adults drinking water from the wells tested for volatile organic compounds and this blood sample was also analyzed for volatile organic compounds. None of the water samples had levels of heavy metals or volatile organic compounds that exceeded the National Primary Drinking Water Standards. Barium levels in excess of 250 parts per billion suggested that styrene, toluene, and chloroform might be present. Blood levels of volatile organic compounds were significantly higher than could be accounted for by water consumption with levels in smokers significantly higher than in nonsmokers. These data suggest that as yet there is no contamination of ground water supplies around these sites. Volatile organic accumulation in humans probably occurs from a respiratory rather than from an oral route.

Rainey, J.M.; Groves, F.D.; DeLeon, I.R.; Joubert, P.E. (LSU School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Illinois State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Illinois land and water resources and promotes orderly resource development during exploration and production of oil and gas. Otherwise, the Illinois Environmental...

353

Water Boatman  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Boatman Water Boatman Name: Joshua Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am doing a research on water boatman. I go through your web, I only find little information about it. Can you give me its habitat, its appearance, life cycles and communication between themselves and they defenses themselves? Replies: Find a good book in the library on insects, also on pond biology/ecology, as boatmen live in ponds and marshes. It should be easy to find. J.Elliott Try this web site: http://www.dnr.state.il.us/ctap.ctaphome.htm or http://www.dnr.state.il.us/nredu/nredpage.htm this is the state of Illinois Dept. of Natural Resources homepage and somewhere on there is a page called "bugpage". They have pictures and characteristics of aquatic insects there. good luck

354

Observations on a Montana water quality proposal.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In May 2005, a group of petitioners led by the Northern Plains Resource Council (NPRC) submitted a petition to revise water quality requirements to the Montana Board of Environmental Review (BER). Under Montana law, the BER had to consider the petition and either reject it or propose it as a new regulation. In September 2005, the BER announced proposed changes to the Montana water quality regulations. The proposal, which included almost the exact language found in the petition, was directed toward discharges of water from coal bed natural gas (CBNG) production. The key elements of the proposal included: (1) No discharges of CBNG water are allowed to Montana surface waters unless operators can demonstrate that injection to aquifers with the potential for later recovery of the water is not feasible. (2) When operators can demonstrate the injection is not feasible, the CBNG water to be discharged must meet very strict technology-based limits for multiple parameters. (3) The Montana water quality standards for the sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) and electrical conductivity (EC) would be evaluated using the 7Q10 flow (lowest 7-consecutive-day flow in a 10-year period) rather than a monthly flow that is currently used. (4) SAR and EC would be reclassified as ''harmful parameters'', thereby greatly restricting the ability for CBNG discharges to be allowed under Montana's nondegradation regulations. The proposed regulations, if adopted in their current form, are likely to substantially reduce the amount of CBNG production in Montana. The impact also extends to Wyoming CBNG production through much greater restrictions on water quality that must be met at the interstate border.

Veil, J. A.; Puder, M. G.

2006-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

355

Helping in collaborative activity regulation: modeling regulation scenarii  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The regulation was introduced into groupware in order to improve the actors collaboration. In our context, the regulation means the ability given to a group or a person that manages a group. This paper describes an approach of setting up about this regulation ... Keywords: XML, groupware, regulation, scenario

Stéphane Talbot; Philippe Pernelle

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Mechanical Freeze/Thaw and Freeze Concentration of Water and Wastewater Residuals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water and wastewater treatment plants generate water residuals that must be disposed of in accordance with environmental regulations. This report analyzes the use of mechanical freeze/thaw and freeze concentration processes to reduce the volume of these residuals.

2003-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

357

Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas water heaters; and pressure loss calculations for residentialgas water heaters; and pressure loss calculations for residential

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Comment submitted by the Alliance for Water Efficiency (AWE) regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Date: May 9, 2011 To: ESTARVerificationTesting@ee.doe.gov From: Mary Ann Dickinson, President and CEO Re: Comments on DOE Verification Testing in Support of Energy Star (www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/pdfs/estar_verification_process.pdf) The Alliance for Water Efficiency is pleased to provide DOE with comments on the above document. We are a North American non-profit organization, composed of diverse stakeholders with significant experience in water efficiency programs and conservation policies. Our mission is to promote the efficient and sustainable use of water, to promote cost-effective water efficiency measures that will reduce wasteful consumption, reduce the need for additional drinking water and waste water capacity, and provide multiple

359

Mississippi Regulations for the Prevention of Significant Deterioration of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulations for the Prevention of Significant Regulations for the Prevention of Significant Deterioration of Air Quality (Mississippi) Mississippi Regulations for the Prevention of Significant Deterioration of Air Quality (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Mississippi

360

Regulations for Land Disturbing Activities (North Carolina) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulations for Land Disturbing Activities (North Carolina) Regulations for Land Disturbing Activities (North Carolina) Regulations for Land Disturbing Activities (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Siting and Permitting The law requires installation and maintenance of sufficient erosion control

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Wyoming State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wyoming Wyoming State Regulations: Wyoming State of Wyoming The Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (WOGCC) is the state agency authorized to regulate oil and gas exploration and production waste. The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) administers general environmental protection regulations. Contact Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission 2211 King Blvd. Casper, WY 82602 (street address) P.O. Box 2640 Casper, WY 82602 (mailing address) (307) 234-7147 (phone) (307) 234-5306 (fax) Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality 122 West 25th Street, Herscheler Building Cheyenne, WY 82002 (307) 777-7937 (phone) (307) 777-7682 (fax) Disposal Practices and Applicable Regulations Document # 4855, Agency (Oil and Gas Conservation Commission), General Agency, Board or Commission Rules, Chapter 4 (Environmental Rules, Including Underground Injection Control Program Rules for Enhanced Recovery and Disposal Projects), Section 1. Pollution and Surface Damage (Forms 14A and 14B) of the Wyoming Rules and Regulations contains the environmental rules administered by the WOGCC with respect to management options for exploration and production waste.

362

Synthesis of Methods Used in Air-Water Multiphase Pollutant TMDLs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clean Water Act was enacted in 1972 to regulate and protect the surface waters of the United States. This legislation empowered states to develop water quality standards and impose controls for waterbodies not in compliance with the standards. The mechanism to regulate point and nonpoint source loading is the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL). TMDLs start with the end point of water quality to meet a waterbody’s designated uses, and then calculate the permissible loading of pollutants. That ...

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

363

Chapter 10 Water Quality Standards (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 Water Quality Standards (Kentucky) 10 Water Quality Standards (Kentucky) Chapter 10 Water Quality Standards (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department for Environmental Protection This administrative regulation establishes procedures to protect the

364

Michigan State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Michigan Michigan State Regulations: Michigan State of Michigan The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), through the Supervisor of Wells, Geological and Land Management Division (GLM), oversees the regulation of oil and gas activities. DEQ staff monitors the environmental impacts of well drilling operations, oil and gas production facilities, and gas storage wells. Contact Michigan Department of Environmental Quality Geological and Land Management Division P.O. Box 30256 Lansing, MI 48909-7756 (517) 241-1515 (phone) (517) 241-1601 (fax) (Organization Chart) Disposal Practices and Applicable Regulations The rules governing oil and gas operations are contained in Part 615, Rules 324.101-324.1301 (Department of Environmental Quality, Oil and Gas Operations) of the Michigan Administrative Code.

365

Incorporating Anthropogenic Water Regulation Modules into a Land Surface Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anthropogenic activities have been significantly perturbing global freshwater flows and groundwater reserves. Despite numerous advances in the development of land surface models (LSMs) and global terrestrial hydrological models (GHMs), relatively ...

Yadu Pokhrel; Naota Hanasaki; Sujan Koirala; Jaeil Cho; Pat J.-F. Yeh; Hyungjun Kim; Shinjiro Kanae; Taikan Oki

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Tennessee Water Resources Information Act (Tennessee) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tennessee Water Resources Information Act (Tennessee) Tennessee Water Resources Information Act (Tennessee) Tennessee Water Resources Information Act (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Tennessee Department Of Environment and Conservation The Tennessee Water Resources Information Act is designed to prevent the lowering of the ground water table by requiring that adequate information

367

Land and Water Developments (Newfoundland and Labrador) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land and Water Developments (Newfoundland and Labrador) Land and Water Developments (Newfoundland and Labrador) Land and Water Developments (Newfoundland and Labrador) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Newfoundland and Labrador Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Newfoundland and Labrador Department of Environment and Conservation This policy applies to public water supply areas designated by the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. The policy limits development in public water supply areas unless they meet specific conditions, and have the approval of the Minister of the Department of Environment and Conservation.

368

Cooling Towers: Understanding Key Components of Cooling Towers and How to Improve Water Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paul Johnston-Knight Introduction Federal laws and regulations require Federal agencies to reduce water use and improve water efficiency. Namely, Executive Order 13514 Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, requires an annual two percent reduction of water use intensity (water use per square foot of building space) for agency potable water consumption as well as a two percent reduction of water use for industrial, landscaping, and agricultural applica- tions. Cooling towers can be a significant

369

What's Happening to Our Body after Drinking Coke? The Characteristic of the Blood Pressure Wave in Radial Artery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous literature has suggested that psychological state may be changed via drinking coke, however, studies empirically documenting the link between coke and blood pressure wave (BPW) are scant. Therefore, the current article attempts to explore how ... Keywords: Blood pressure wave (BPW), spectrum analysis, Sphygmogram, Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM)

Sheng-Chieh Huang; Yung-Pin Lee; Min-Hua Hsieh; Hui-Min Wang; Mark C. Hou; Shih-Chun Chao; Cheng-Lung Tseng; Wei-Ta Hsiao; Chung-Hung Hong; Kai-Yu Shao; Shi-Han Luo; Wei-Chun Chiu; Wei-Yu Chen

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Emotion Regulation CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in emotion and emotion regulation. 3 This is a chapter excerpt from Guilford Publications. Handbook a fundamental role in the develop- ment of emotion, particularly in infancy and early childhood. Third the interaction of external and intrinsic influences. FUNDAMENTAL QUESTIONS AND DIRECTIONS FOR FUTURE INQUIRY

Gross, James J.

371

Ground and Surface Water Protection (New Mexico) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Surface Water Protection (New Mexico) and Surface Water Protection (New Mexico) Ground and Surface Water Protection (New Mexico) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Program Info State New Mexico Program Type Environmental Regulations Fees Provider New Mexico Environment Department This regulation implements the New Mexico Water Quality Act. Any person intending to make a new water contaminant discharge or to alter the character or location of an existing water contaminant discharge, unless the discharge is being made or will be made into a community sewer system

372

Pennsylvania State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

as a result of precipitation may be discharged to the land surface if drilling muds or drilling fluids are not present in that water. Pit Disposal and Land Application. The...

373

Using economic incentives to regulate toxic substances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the mid- to late 1960s, economists at Resources for the Future and elsewhere have sounded a common theme when discussing environmental regulation. Specifically, they have recommended that, wherever possible, so-called command-and-control regulation (for instance, requirements that manufacturers install specific types of pollution control equipment) be replaced by the use of economic incentives such as the imposition of taxes on pollutant emissions or the introduction of a system of marketable permits limiting the amount of pollution that can be discharged during some specified period of time. In demonstrating the considerable advantages of incentive-based approaches--most importantly, the cost savings they make possible--environmental economists have almost always used as examples air and water pollutants that are discharged from easily identifiable smokestacks or outfall pipes at which continuous monitoring of emissions is at least conceivable if not already currently practiced.

Macauley, M.K.; Bowes, M.D.; Palmer, K.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

GRR/Section 19-UT-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 19-UT-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-UT-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues 19UTAWaterAccessWaterRightsIssues (8).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Division of Water Rights Regulations & Policies Utah Geothermal Resource Conservation Act Utah Code Title 73, Chapter 3 Appropriation Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19UTAWaterAccessWaterRightsIssues (8).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

375

ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS (WALBAUM) IN FRESH WATER AND AFTER SHORT-TERM EXPOSURE TO SEA WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Freshwater Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) smolts were abruptly transferred to sea water in May and over 3 days blood plasma ion concentrations were determined together with atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and plasma renin activity (PRA) using antibodies raised against human ANP and angiotensin I. Blood plasma Na + and Cl ~ levels in smolts increased and, between 24 and 72 h, PRA increased significantly to O.Qngml"^ " 1, while there was a gradual rise in ANP levels to lOpmoll " 1 at 72 h. Similar measurements were made on parr transferred to sea water in September; in these fish Na + and Cl ~ levels increased as in smolts, PRA remained unchanged at about 0.6ngml ~ 1 h ~ 1 and ANP levels increased significantly to about 20pmoir ' at 24 and 72 h. After 2h in sea water parr showed wide variability in ANP levels, in keeping with circulatory stress, hypoxia and increased atrial stretching. Parr transferred to sea water in December showed low drinking rates of 1.95 ml kg " 1 h " 1, even after 20 days, compared to a

Salmon Salmo; Salar L.; Rainbow Trout; N. F. Smith; F. B. Eddyt; A. D. Struthers; C. Talbot

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Living off-grid in an arid environment without a well : can residential and commercial/industrial water harvesting help solve water supply problems?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our family of three lives comfortably off-grid without a well in an arid region ({approx}9 in/yr, average). This year we expect to achieve water sustainability with harvested or grey water supporting all of our needs (including a garden and trees), except drinking water (about 7 gallons/week). We discuss our implementation and the implication that for an investment of a few thousand dollars, many single family homes could supply a large portion of their own water needs, significantly reducing municipal water demand. Generally, harvested water is very low in minerals and pollutants, but may need treatment for microbes in order to be potable. This may be addressed via filters, UV light irradiation or through chemical treatment (bleach). Looking further into the possibility of commercial water harvesting from malls, big box stores and factories, we ask whether water harvesting could supply a significant portion of potable water by looking at two cities with water supply problems. We look at the implications of separate municipal water lines for potable and clean non-potable uses. Implications on changes to future building codes are explored.

Axness, Carl L.; Ferrando, Ana

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Regulations for the Rhode Island Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations aim to protect surface water from pollutant discharges. They describe allowable discharges in the state that are subject to permits, discharges which may be made without permits,...

378

File:Rules and Regulations for the Management and Control of...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

File Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon File:Rules and Regulations for the Management and Control of Designated Ground Water.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File...

379

Activated charcoal filters: Water treatment, pollution control, and industrial applications. (Latest citations from the US Patent Bibliographic File with exemplary claims). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning activated charcoal filters and their applications in water treatment, pollution control, and industrial processes. Filtering methods and equipment for air and water purification, industrial distillation and extraction, and filtration of toxic materials and contaminants are described. Applications are discussed, including drinking water purification, air and water pollution control, manufacture of industrial materials, materials recovery, waste treatment, automotive fuel and exhaust systems, cigarette filters, ventilation systems, medical filtration, and odor absorbing materials. (Contains a minimum of 125 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Activated charcoal filters: Water treatment, pollution control, and industrial applications. (Latest citations from the US Patent Bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning activated charcoal filters and their applications in water treatment, pollution control, and industrial processes. Filtering methods and equipment for air and water purification, industrial distillation and extraction, and filtration of toxic materials and contaminants are described. Applications are discussed, including drinking water purification, air and water pollution control, manufacture of industrial materials, materials recovery, waste treatment, automotive fuel and exhaust systems, cigarette filters, ventilation systems, medical filtration, and odor absorbing materials. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

An integrated modelling framework for regulated river systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Management of regulated water systems has become increasingly complex due to rapid socio-economic growth and environmental changes in river basins over recent decades. This paper introduces the Source Integrated Modelling System (IMS), and describes ... Keywords: Murray-Darling Basin, Rainfall-runoff modelling, River management and operations, River system modelling, Source IMS

Wendy D. Welsh; Jai Vaze; Dushmanta Dutta; David Rassam; Joel M. Rahman; Ian D. Jolly; Peter Wallbrink; Geoffrey M. Podger; Matthew Bethune; Matthew J. Hardy; Jin Teng; Julien Lerat

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect on water and gas usage from cross-flow betweencontrols have on water and gas usage over a large number ofsystems, and their water and gas usage. Hourly schedules for

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Water Resources (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resources (Montana) Resources (Montana) Water Resources (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation The state policy of Montana requires that water resources of the state be put to optimum beneficial use and not wasted. The state must promote the

384

Efficient Water Use & Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainability Goals Water Use Goal 4: Efficient Water Use & Management Aware of the arid climate of northern New Mexico, water reduction and conservation remains a primary...

385

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A white paper describing produced water from production ofCE, Veil JA. 2009. Produced Water Volumes and Managementunderground formations (produced water) are often extracted

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Saving Water Saves Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of California’s Water Conservation Standards for ResidentialCalifornia Urban Water Conservation Council, 2006. http://http://www.nrdc.org/water/conservation/edrain/edrain.pdf

McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Texas Hot Water Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

coil hot water storage tank, a backup instantaneous electric water heater, a hydronic fan coil unit for space heating, and an efficient plumbing manifold for domestic hot water...

388

ELECTRON EMISSION REGULATING MEANS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

>An electronic regulating system is described for controlling the electron emission of a cathode, for example, the cathode in a mass spectrometer. The system incorporates a transformer having a first secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding load by grid controlled vacuum tubes. A portion of the electron current emitted by the cathode is passed through a network which develops a feedback signal. The system arrangement is completed by using the feedback signal to control the vacuum tubes in the second secondary winding through a regulator tube. When a change in cathode emission occurs, the feedback signal acts to correct this change by adjusting the load on the transformer.

Brenholdt, I.R.

1957-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

389

Nevada State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nevada Nevada State Regulations: Nevada State of Nevada The Nevada Division of Minerals (Nevada Commission of Mineral Resources) administers programs and activities to further the responsible development and production of Nevada's mineral resources, including the regulation of oil- and gas-well drilling operations. Otherwise, the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (Nevada Department of Conservation and Mineral Resources) administers the major environmental protection laws. Contact Nevada Division of Minerals (Carson City Office) 400 West King Street, Suite 106 Carson City, NV 89703 (775) 684-7040 (phone) (775) 684-7052 (fax) (Las Vegas Office) 2030 East Flamingo Road, Suite 220 Las Vegas, NV 89119 (702) 486-4343 (phone) (702) 486-4345 (fax) Nevada Division of Environmental Protection

390

Kansas State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kansas Kansas State Regulations: Kansas State of Kansas The Kansas Corporation Commission (KCC) Conservation Division regulates oil and gas operations and protects correlative rights and environmental resources. Otherwise, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) administers the major environmental protection laws. Contact Kansas Corporation Commission (Main Office) 1500 S.W. Arrowhead Road Topeka, KS 66604-2425 (785) 271-3100 (phone) (785) 271-3354 (fax) Conservation Division Finney State Office Building 130 South Market, Room 2078 Wichita, KS 67202-3802 (316) 337-6200 (phone) (316) 337-6211 (fax) Kansas Department of Health and Environment Charles Curtis State Office Building 1000 S.W. Jackson Topeka, KS 66612 (785) 296-1500 (phone) (785) 368-6368 (fax)

391

Oklahoma State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oklahoma Oklahoma State Regulations: Oklahoma State of Oklahoma The Oklahoma Corporation Commission (OCC), through the Oil and Gas Division, assists the domestic oil and gas industry, protects and preserves the environment, and conserves the natural resources. General environmental protection regulations are administered by the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ). Contact Oklahoma Corporation Commission Oil and Gas Division P.O. Box 52000 Oklahoma City, OK 73152-2000 (mailing address) (405) 521-2302 (phone) 2101 North Lincoln Blvd. Oklahoma City, OK 73105 (street address) Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality P.O. Box 1677 Oklahoma City, OK 73101-1677 (mailing address) 707 North Robinson Oklahoma City, OK 73102 (street address) (405) 702-1000 (phone)

392

A regulated magnetron pulser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes and analysis of a 4.5-kV, 500-mA, regulated current pulser used to drive a Hitachi ZM130 magnetron in a particle-accelerator injector. In this application, precise beam from the injector. A high-voltage triode vacuum tube with active feedback is used to control the magnetron current. Current regulation and accuracy is better than 1%. The pulse width may be varied from as little as 5 {mu}m to cw by varying the width of a gate pulse. The current level can be programmed between 10 and 500 mA. Design of the pulser including circuit simulations, power calculations, and high-voltage issues are discussed.

Rose, C.R.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

REGULATING HAWAII'S PETROLEUM INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was prepared in response to House Resolution No. 174, H.D. 2, which was adopted during the Regular Session of 1995. The Resolution requested the Legislative Reference Bureau to conduct a study to obtain the views of selected state agencies and representatives of Hawaii's petroleum industry in order to assist the Legislature in formulating policies that protect the interests of Hawaii's gasoline consumers. The Resolution sought information and the views of survey participants on a broad range of proposals to regulate Hawaii's petroleum industry. This study reviews each of these proposals in terms of their value to consumers, and explores both regulatory policy options and alternatives to regulation available to state lawmakers. The Bureau extends its sincere appreciation to all those whose participation and cooperation made this study possible. A list of contact persons, including the names of survey participants and others who helped to contribute to this study, is contained in Appendix B.

Mark J. Rosen; Wendell K. Kimura

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Regulation of Meiotic Recombination  

SciTech Connect

Meiotic recombination results in the heritable rearrangement of DNA, primarily through reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome or gene conversion. In plants these events are critical for ensuring proper chromosome segregation, facilitating DNA repair and providing a basis for genetic diversity. Understanding this fundamental biological mechanism will directly facilitate trait mapping, conventional plant breeding, and development of genetic engineering techniques that will help support the responsible production and conversion of renewable resources for fuels, chemicals, and the conservation of energy (1-3). Substantial progress has been made in understanding the basal recombination machinery, much of which is conserved in organisms as diverse as yeast, plants and mammals (4, 5). Significantly less is known about the factors that regulate how often and where that basal machinery acts on higher eukaryotic chromosomes. One important mechanism for regulating the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination is crossover interference - or the ability of one recombination event to influence nearby events. The MUS81 gene is thought to play an important role in regulating the influence of interference on crossing over. The immediate goals of this project are to use reverse genetics to identify mutants in two putative MUS81 homologs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, characterize those mutants and initiate a novel forward genetic screen for additional regulators of meiotic recombination. The long-term goal of the project is to understand how meiotic recombination is regulated in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on the molecular basis of crossover interference. The ability to monitor recombination in all four meiotic products (tetrad analysis) has been a powerful tool in the arsenal of yeast geneticists. Previously, the qrt mutant of Arabidopsis, which causes the four pollen products of male meiosis to remain attached, was developed as a facile system for assaying recombination using tetrad analysis in a higher eukaryotic system (6). This system enabled the measurement of the frequency and distribution of recombination events at a genome wide level in wild type Arabidopsis (7), construction of genetic linkage maps which include positions for each centromere (8), and modeling of the strength and pattern of interference (9). This proposal extends the use of tetrad analysis in Arabidopsis by using it as the basis for assessing the phenotypes of mutants in genes important for recombination and the regulation of crossover interference and performing a novel genetic screen. In addition to broadening our knowledge of a classic genetic problem - the regulation of recombination by crossover interference - this proposal also provides broader impact by: generating pedagogical tools for use in hands-on classroom experience with genetics, building interdisciplinary collegial partnerships, and creating a platform for participation by junior scientists from underrepresented groups. There are three specific aims: (1) Isolate mutants in Arabidopsis MUS81 homologs using T-DNA and TILLING (2) Characterize recombination levels and interference in mus81 mutants (3) Execute a novel genetic screen, based on tetrad analysis, for genes that regulate meiotic recombination

Gregory p. Copenhaver

2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

395

Computing Borel's Regulator II.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In our earlier article we described a power series formula for the Borel regulator evaluated on the odd-dimensional homology of the general linear group of a number field and, concentrating on dimension three for simplicity, described a computer algorithm which calculates the value to any chosen degree of accuracy. In this sequel we give an algorithm for the construction of the input homology classes and describe the results of one cyclotomic field computation.

Zacky Choo; Wajid Mannan; Rubén J. Sánchez-García; Victor P. Snaith

396

Improving CS regulations.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

President Carter issued Executive Order 12044 (3/28/78) that required all Federal agencies to distinguish between significant and insignificant regulations, and to determine whether a regulation will result in major impacts. This study gathered information on the impact of the order and the guidelines on the Office of Conservation and Solar Energy (CS) regulatory practices, investigated problems encountered by the CS staff when implementing the order and guidelines, and recommended solutions to resolve these problems. Major tasks accomplished and discussed are: (1) legislation, Executive Orders, and DOE Memoranda concerning Federal administrative procedures relevant to the development and analysis of regulations within CS reviewed; (2) relevant DOE Orders and Memoranda analyzed and key DOE and CS staff interviewed in order to accurately describe the current CS regulatory process; (3) DOE staff from the Office of the General Counsel, the Office of Policy and Evaluation, the Office of the Environment, and the Office of the Secretary interviewed to explore issues and problems encountered with current CS regulatory practices; (4) the regulatory processes at five other Federal agencies reviewed in order to see how other agencies have approached the regulatory process, dealt with specific regulatory problems, and responded to the Executive Order; and (5) based on the results of the preceding four tasks, recommendations for potential solutions to the CS regulatory problems developed. (MCW)

Nesse, R.J.; Scheer, R.M.; Marasco, A.L.; Furey, R.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Federal Regulations: BOEM and BSEE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

development and enforcement of safety and environmental regulations, permitting offshore exploration, development and production, inspections, offshore regulatory programs, oil...

398

An Educational Resource Based on Water and Health as a Teaching Aid in French Primary Schools Part I: Identification of Needs and Content  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: It is a commonplace that water is essential for life, but to what extent is the general public, and children in particular, aware of how water affects health? The aim of this review was to consider the relationship between water and health under three main headings: the importance of hydration for children, dietary intake of water, and water as an essential factor in hygiene contributing to good health. The literature was reviewed to provide a rationale for the implementation of teaching about water and health in French primary schools under three main areas: (i) the importance of hydration for school children and water promotion in primary schools; (ii) the problem of overweight/obesity and the need to adopt healthy drinking habits as defined in French nutritional policy; (iii) the survey of the quality of drinking water in France and its relationship with good hygiene practices. There are currently few educational resources in France on water and health that teachers can use in the classroom. This review gives reasons why a “Water and Health ” learning resource is a useful tool and shows how it can be developed within the constraints imposed by the school syllabus and in accordance with French nutritional and environmental policy. Educ. Sci. 2013, 3 301

Chantal Savanovitch; Marie-pierre Sauvant-rochat

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Design and Application of Solar Water Heater Intelligent Control System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar water heater intelligent control system is made up of four modules which are data acquisition module, single-chip control module, the implementation and regulation module and human- machine interaction module. The problems of automatic detection ... Keywords: Solar Water Heater, Hardware Design, Detection and Control

Yu Gui Yin

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Water Conservation: Use Registration and Reporting (New Hampshire) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Conservation: Use Registration and Reporting (New Hampshire) Water Conservation: Use Registration and Reporting (New Hampshire) Water Conservation: Use Registration and Reporting (New Hampshire) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NH Department of Environmental Services Purpose of the rules is to implement RSA 488 by establishing requirements relative to documenting the identity and location of water uses and collecting accurate water use data to support management of the state's water resources. Rules apply to any person whose cumulative incoming water or outgoing water exceeds an average of 20,000 gallons of water per day in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Federal Requirements for Water Efficiency | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Requirements for Water Requirements for Water Efficiency Federal Requirements for Water Efficiency October 7, 2013 - 2:40pm Addthis The following Federal laws and regulations require Federal agencies to reduce water use and improve water efficiency. Also see Water Efficiency Goal Guidance and Guidance for Developing Baseline and Annual Water Use. Executive Order 13423 Executive Order (E.O.) 13423 requires Federal agencies to reduce water consumption intensity (gallons per square foot) 2% annually through the end of fiscal year (FY) 2015 or 16% by the end of FY 2015 from a 2007 baseline. This requirement is to be achieved incrementally by fiscal year beginning in 2008. Fiscal Year Percentage Reduction 2008 2 2009 4 2010 6 2011 8 2012 10 2013 12 2014 14 2015 16 E.O. 13423 Mandated Facility Water Intensity Reductions by Fiscal Year

402

Policy and Regulations | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policy and Regulations Policy and Regulations In supporting Department of Energy needs, we provide assistance in internal and external policy. DOE Policies Federal Regulations OMB...

403

Water Beetles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beetles Beetles Nature Bulletin No. 639-A April 29, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis Supt. of Conservation WATER BEETLES The world is full of beetles. They live everywhere except in the oceans and in the polar regions. There are more of them than any other kind of insect. A quarter of a million species are known and new ones are being discovered every year. Whether it is a microscopic mushroom beetle a hundredth of an inch long, or a giant six-inch Hercules beetle from South America, it can be recognized by its wings. The upper pair forms a hard shell curving like a shield over the thin folded lower wings and the abdomen. In flight, the upper pair is extended like the wings of an airplane and the lower two become buzzing propellers.

404

Water watch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hydropower Generation Report provides generation figures for the largest hydropower producers in each of six regions in the US. The report compares, for each month, the amount of hydroelectricity generated (in thousands of megawatt-hours) by each producers in the last two years to the ten-year average for that month. This database is used to figure long-term generation averages and percent of averages. The producers regularly provide current generation data to update the database. This issue of [open quotes]Water Watch[close quotes] focuses on winter snow conditions across the US as of mid-January. In addition, the department provides an outlook of spring flood potential. The information presented is based on data from the US Geological Survey, the National Weather Service, and the Soil Conservation Service.

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Water Conservation Tips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gardener Water Conservation Tips fo r t h e UCSC Farm &share some of the water-conservation techniques used at theWinter Squash Water Conservation Mulches will save water,

Brown, Martha

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Water Conservation Tips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gardener Water Conservation Tips fo r t h e UCSC Farm &we share some of the water-conservation techniques used atWinter Squash Water Conservation Mulches will save water,

Brown, Martha

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

State Water Quality (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quality (Virginia) Quality (Virginia) State Water Quality (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Virginia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia Department of Environmental Quality It is the policy of the Commonwealth of Virginia to: (1) protect existing high quality state waters and restore the quality of all other state waters to permit all reasonable public uses and support the propagation and growth of all aquatic life which might reasonably be expected to inhabit them; (2) safeguard the clean waters of the Commonwealth from pollution; (3) prevent

408

Water Use Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Water Use Act (Montana) Water Use Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation Any use of water in the state of Montana is established as a public use, and the waters within the state are established as property of the people

409

NIST: NIF - Water Sensitivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water Sensitivity. Neutrons are extremely sensitive to small amounts of water. To quantify and calibrate this sensitivity we ...

410

Conventional Storage Water Heaters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Conventional storage water heaters remain the most popular type of water heating system for homes and buildings.

411

Combating the Privatization of Life in a Neo-Liberal Regime: The Fight for Water Democracies in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the systems of village management in which maintenance wasmanagement, placing the maintenance of India’s intricate water harvesting systemsand management of the system including the regulation and monitoring of the water supply, the billing, maintenance,

Raders, Gavin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

ARM: Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

Maria Cadeddu

413

WATER AND GROWTH: FUTURE WATER SUPPLIES FOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Reclaimed Water As people use water, a wastewater stream is produced. Once cleaned to acceptable standards and is available as reclaimed water. #12;20 New growth in central Arizona will produce significant quantities to return for wastewater treatment51 . Of the reclaimed water produced, 30% is assumed available to meet

Gelt, Joe

414

Soil and Water Conservation (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Soil and Water Conservation (Florida) Soil and Water Conservation (Florida) Soil and Water Conservation (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Florida's 62 Soil and Water Conservation Districts were established in

415

Water Quality Trading Program (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Trading Program (Ohio) Trading Program (Ohio) Water Quality Trading Program (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Rural Electric Cooperative Retail Supplier Fuel Distributor Nonprofit Transportation Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Program Info State Ohio Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency Water quality trading is a tool for achieving water quality improvements. Under the right circumstances, trading has the potential to yield both environmental and economic benefits, while promoting increased interaction among watershed stakeholders. The water quality trading program is a voluntary program that allows a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit holder

416

Water Quality Control Act (Tennessee) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Water Quality Control Act (Tennessee) Water Quality Control Act (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Tennessee Department Of Environment and Conservation The Water Quality Control Act (WQCA) establishes the water pollution

417

Comprehensive Local Water Management Act (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Water Management Act (Minnesota) Local Water Management Act (Minnesota) Comprehensive Local Water Management Act (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Environmental Regulations Each county is encouraged to develop and implement a local water management

418

Rules Governing Water and Wastewater Operator Certification (Tennessee) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rules Governing Water and Wastewater Operator Certification Rules Governing Water and Wastewater Operator Certification (Tennessee) Rules Governing Water and Wastewater Operator Certification (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Tennessee Department Of Environment and Conservation The Rules Governing Water and Wastewater Operator Certification are

419

Ground Water Protection Act (New Mexico) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Protection Act (New Mexico) Water Protection Act (New Mexico) Ground Water Protection Act (New Mexico) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New Mexico Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider New Mexico Environment Department The purpose of the Ground Water Protection Act is to provide substantive

420

GRR/Section 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting Process  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting Process GRR/Section 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting Process 19COCDesignatedGroundWaterBasinWellPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Division of Water Resources Colorado Ground Water Commission Regulations & Policies CRS 37-90-107 CRS 37-90-108 Ground Water Management District Rules 2 CCR 410-1 - Rules and Regulations for the Management and Control of Designated Ground Water Basins Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19COCDesignatedGroundWaterBasinWellPermit.pdf 19COCDesignatedGroundWaterBasinWellPermit.pdf

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Water Research Center Development -- Conceptual Design (Phase 0)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Impending regulations may place new restrictions on the consumption of water and the quality of wastewater discharges at electric generating units (EGUs). To help EGUs comply with any new water use and discharge limits, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is collaborating with Georgia Power Company (GPC), a subsidiary of Southern Company; Southern Company Services (SCS), Southern Company’s provider of technical services; and Southern Research Institute to collectively form the Water ...

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

422

Texas State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Texas Texas State Regulations: Texas State of Texas The Railroad Commission of Texas (RCC), through the Oil and Gas Division, administers oil and gas exploration, development, and production operations, except for oil and gas leasing, royalty payments, surface damages through oil and gas operations, and operator-landowner contracts. The RCC and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), formerly, the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC), have entered into a Memorandum of Understanding clarifying jurisdiction over oil field wastes generated in connection with oil and gas exploration, development, and production. The RCC Oil and Gas Division operates nine district offices, each staffed with field enforcement and support personnel.

423

Self-regulating valve  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A variable, self-regulating valve having a hydraulic loss coefficient proportional to a positive exponential power of the flow rate. The device includes two objects in a flow channel and structure which assures that the distance between the two objects is an increasing function of the flow rate. The range of spacing between the objects is such that the hydraulic resistance of the valve is an increasing function of the distance between the two objects so that the desired hydraulic loss coefficient as a function of flow rate is obtained without variation in the flow area.

Humphreys, D.A.

1982-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

424

Growth regulation by macrophages  

SciTech Connect

The evidence reviewed here indicates that macrophages, either acting alone or in concert with other cells, influence the proliferation of multiple types of cells. Most of the data indicate that these effects are mediated by soluble macrophage-elaborated products (probably proteins) although the role of direct cell-to-cell contacts cannot be ruled out in all cases. A degree of success has been achieved on the biochemical characterization of these factors, due mainly to their low specific activity in conditioned medium and the lack of rapid, specific assays. Understanding the growth-regulating potential of macrophages is an important and needed area of research.

Wharton, W.; Walker, E.; Stewart, C.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Storm water pollution prevention plan for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published the final storm water regulation on November 16, 1990. The storm water regulation is included in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) regulations. An NPDES permit was issued for the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995, and was effective on July 1, 1995. The permit requires that a Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWP3) be developed by December 28, 1995, and be fully implemented by July 1, 1996; this plan has been developed to fulfill that requirement. The outfalls and monitoring points described in this plan contain storm water discharges associated with industrial activities as defined in the NPDES regulations. For storm water discharges associated with industrial activity, including storm water discharges associated with construction activity, that are not specifically monitored or limited in this permit, Y-12 Plant personnel will meet conditions of the General Storm Water Rule 1200-4-10. This document presents the programs and physical controls that are in place to achieve the following objectives: ensure compliance with Section 1200-4-10-.04(5) of the TDEC Water Quality Control Regulations and Part 4 of the Y-12 Plant NPDES Permit (TN0002968); provide operating personnel with guidance relevant to storm water pollution prevention and control requirements for their facility and/or project; and prevent or reduce pollutant discharge to the environment, in accordance with the Clean Water Act (CWA) and the Tennessee Water Quality Control Act.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Solar heat regulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solar heat regulating device is described for selectively heating with sunlight the air inside a building having a window and shielding and insulating the air inside the building from the heat of sunlight outside the building including: a frame for mounting the solar heat regulating device inside the building and adjacent to the window; a plurality of hollow vanes, each of the vanes having at least one passageway for passing air therethrough; the vanes having a heat absorptive surface on a first side thereof which allows solar radiation impinging on the heat absorptive surface to heat the air contained in the one passageway of the vanes; the vanes having a heat reflective surface on a second side of the vanes which reflects the solar radiation impinging on the second side of the vanes and shields the inside of the building from solar radiation impinging on the vanes; and the vanes having side portions extending between the first and second sides of the vanes, the side portions, and the first and second sides forming the one passageway through each of the vanes, the side portions and the first and second sides of the vanes terminating in top end and bottom end portions.

Boynton, S.L.

1987-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

427

[Regulation of terpene metabolism  

SciTech Connect

During the last grant period, we have completed studies on the key pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism in sage and peppermint, and have, by several lines of evidence, deciphered the rate-limiting step of each pathway. We have at least partially purified and characterized the relevant enzymes of each pathway. We have made a strong case, based on analytical, in vivo, and in vitro studies, that terpene accumulation depends upon the balance between biosynthesis and catabolism, and provided supporting evidence that these processes are developmentally-regulated and very closely associated with senescence of the oil glands. Oil gland ontogeny has been characterized at the ultrastructural level. We have exploited foliar-applied bioregulators to delay gland senescence, and have developed tissue explant and cell culture systems to study several elusive aspects of catabolism. We have isolated pure gland cell clusters and localized monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism within these structures, and have used these preparations as starting materials for the purification to homogeneity of target regulatory'' enzymes. We have thus developed the necessary background knowledge, based on a firm understanding of enzymology, as well as the necessary experimental tools for studying the regulation of monoterpene metabolism at the molecular level. Furthermore, we are now in a position to extend our systematic approach to other terpenoid classes (C[sub 15]-C[sub 30]) produced by oil glands.

Croteau, R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

[Regulation of terpene metabolism  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the last grant period, we have completed studies on the key pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism in sage and peppermint, and have, by several lines of evidence, deciphered the rate-limiting step of each pathway. We have at least partially purified and characterized the relevant enzymes of each pathway. We have made a strong case, based on analytical, in vivo, and in vitro studies, that terpene accumulation depends upon the balance between biosynthesis and catabolism, and provided supporting evidence that these processes are developmentally-regulated and very closely associated with senescence of the oil glands. Oil gland ontogeny has been characterized at the ultrastructural level. We have exploited foliar-applied bioregulators to delay gland senescence, and have developed tissue explant and cell culture systems to study several elusive aspects of catabolism. We have isolated pure gland cell clusters and localized monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism within these structures, and have used these preparations as starting materials for the purification to homogeneity of target regulatory'' enzymes. We have thus developed the necessary background knowledge, based on a firm understanding of enzymology, as well as the necessary experimental tools for studying the regulation of monoterpene metabolism at the molecular level. Furthermore, we are now in a position to extend our systematic approach to other terpenoid classes (C[sub 15]-C[sub 30]) produced by oil glands.

Croteau, R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

San Diego County - Wind Regulations (California) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Regulations (California) San Diego County - Wind Regulations (California) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Wind Buying & Making...

430

Leaching and standing water characteristics of bottom ash and composted manure blends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal burning electrical generating facilities produce roughly 91 million metric tons of ash byproducts annually. Typically, this ash is retained at the power plant sites, adding to the cost of managing wastes at the plants. Another waste material requiring significant management efforts and costs is manure. Repeated application of manure on small parcels of land can contribute to environmental problems such as impaired water quality due to nitrate (NO?) leaching into the groundwater and phosphorus (P) runoff into surface water bodies. Alternative uses of bottom ash (BA) and composted manure (CM) such as a soil amendment for landscapes or potting media need to be explored. Before an alternative is adopted at a large scale, however, it must be evaluated for its effectiveness and environmental integrity. Two column studies were conducted to evaluate three blends of acidic and alkaline BA and CM, namely B1 (95:5%), B2 (90:10%), and B3 (80:20%). Samples from standing water (top) and leachate (bottom) were collected at weekly intervals to evaluate the effects of different blend ratios and time on chemical and physical properties. It was found that higher CM content in acidic and alkaline raw blends (no-de-ionized water added) resulted in significantly higher concentrations of total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), P, and potassium (K). Generally, a higher CM content in acidic and alkaline blends resulted in higher leachate concentrations for total solids (TS), total dissolved solids (TDS), total volatile solids (TVS), total suspended solids (TSS), chemical oxygen demand (COD), TKN, NO?-N, ammonium (NH?-N), P, and K. Concentrations of nearly all chemicals were lower in standing water (top) compared to leachate (bottom) for acidic and alkaline blends. Alkaline blends had higher leachate and standing water TKN, NH?-N, N0?-N, P, and K compared to the acidic blends. After day 28, standing water TDS concentrations for all acidic blends were below the USEPA drinking water standard for TDS. Standing water for alkaline blends remained below the USEPA drinking water standard for TDS for the entire duration of the study. Leachate and standing water concentrations for all blends were below the USEPA drinking water standard for NO?-N for acidic blends. Standing water and leachate for alkaline blends B1 and B2 were below the USEPA drinking water standard for NO?-N while standing water was well below the standard for the entire duration of the study. P concentrations were low in leachate and nonexistent in standing water for both acidic and alkaline blends. Based on these findings, it is concluded that acidic and alkaline B1 (95:5%) and B2 (90:10%) may be considered as a soil amendment substitute.

Mathis, James Gregory

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Plasma Concentrations of/3-Endorphin, Adrenocorticotropic Hormone, and Cortisol in Drinking and Abstinent Chronic Alcoholics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concentrations of l~-endorphin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and cortisol in drinking and abstinent chronic alcoholics. ALCOHOL 12(6) 525-529, 1995.-Previous studies of the relationship between the endogenous opioid system and alcohol consumption have reported contradictory results. To shed light on this connection, we compared plasma concentrations of B-endorphin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and cortisol in 70 alcoholic persons after different periods of abstinence and a group of 80 control subjects. Plasma B-endorphin was decreased in alcoholics (18.61 _+ 1.38 vs. 39.31 + 3.44 pg/ml), even after more than 10 years ' abstinence. This effect may be mediated by the tetrahydroisoquinoline system, and may thus result from chronic alcohol consumption. On the other hand, lowered circulating concentrations of/3-endorphin may be a cause, rather than an effect, of alcoholism. Plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol did not differ in alcoholics and controls (19.29 ± 1.66 vs. 13.27 _+ 1.85 pg/ml for ACTH, 20.37 ~ 0.78 vs. 17.22 _ 0.64 ng/ml for cortisol), and thus appear to have no relation with chronic alcohol consumption. Adrenocorticotropic hormone Alcoholism /3-Endorphins Cortisol Tetrahydroisoquinolines THE RELATIONSHIP between alcohol consumption, abuse, and dependence, and the endogenous opioid system (EOS) has been investigated frequently (7,8,10,24,28,34). Although the findings have been contradictory, it nonetheless appears clear

J. L. Del Arbol; L J. C. Aguirre; J. Raya; J. Rico; M. E. Ruiz-requenat; M. T. Miranda

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Increasing Federal Office Building Water Efficiency, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Fact Sheet)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

requires a two percent annual reduction in water use (compared to requires a two percent annual reduction in water use (compared to a FY 2007 baseline), significantly reducing total Federal water consumption by FY 2020. View Federal water requirements at www.femp.energy.gov/program/waterefficiency_ requirements.html. Increasing Federal Office Building Water Efficiency With less than one percent of Earth's water available for human use, the Federal Government is leading by example with water efficiency and conservation efforts. Federal laws and regulations require agencies to implement water efficiency efforts and reduce water consumption, making water an integral part of every comprehensive resource management program. Water Management Planning A comprehensive water management plan includes clear information on how a Federal facility uses water from

433

Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Regulations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Regulations (Mississippi) Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Regulations (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Mississippi Program Type

434

Rules and Regulations for Dredging and the Management of Dredged Material  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rules and Regulations for Dredging and the Management of Dredged Rules and Regulations for Dredging and the Management of Dredged Material (Rhode Island) Rules and Regulations for Dredging and the Management of Dredged Material (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Wind Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management

435

Survey of environmental regulations applying to geothermal exploration, development, and use.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Federal, State, and local environmental laws and regulations that apply to geothermal energy development are summarized. Most attention is given to those regulations which deal with air pollution, water pollution, solid wastes and impact assessments. Analyses are made of the regulations with respect to resource definition, pollutants currently not controlled, duplicity and overlap in permit and impact assessment requirements, the lack of uniformity of regulations between states, and the probable future approaches to the regulatory problems. This project updates a similar document (EPA/600/7-78-014) dated February 1978.

Beeland, G.V.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Kentucky State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kentucky Kentucky State Regulations: Kentucky State of Kentucky The Division of Oil and Gas (DOG) in the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) fosters conservation of all mineral resources, encourages exploration of such resources, protects the correlative rights of land and mineral owners, prohibits waste and unnecessary surface loss and damage, and encourages the maximum recovery of oil and gas from all deposits. The Energy and Environment Cabinet brings together various Kentucky agencies. It is tasked with protecting and enhancing Kentucky's natural resources. The Department for Environmental Protection (DEP) administers the major environmental protection laws. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 4 administers Class II underground injection control (UIC) programs in Kentucky in direct implementation.

437

Nebraska State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nebraska Nebraska State Regulations: Nebraska State of Nebraska The Nebraska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (NOGCC) seeks to prevent waste, protect correlative rights of all owners, and encourage and authorize secondary recovery, pressure maintenance, cycling, or recycling, in order that the greatest ultimate recovery of oil and gas may be obtained within the state while protecting the environment. Otherwise, the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality (NDEQ) administers the major environmental protection laws. Contact Nebraska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission 922 Illinois Street, P.O. Box 399 Sidney, NE 69162 (308) 254-6919 (phone) (308) 254-6922 (fax) Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality 1200 "N" Street, Suite 400 P.O. Pox 98922 Lincoln, NE 68509

438

Regulation of Terpene Metabolism  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 Research over the last four years has progressed fairly closely along the lines initially proposed, with progress-driven expansion of Objectives 1, 2 and 3. Recent advances have developed from three research thrusts: 1. Random sequencing of an enriched peppermint oil gland cDNA library has given access to a large number of potential pathway and regulatory genes for test of function; 2. The availability of new DNA probes and antibodies has permitted investigation of developmental regulation and organization of terpenoid metabolism; and 3. The development of a transformation system for peppermint by colleagues at Purdue University has allowed direct transgenic testing of gene function and added a biotechnological component to the project. The current status of each of the original research objectives is outlined below.

Rodney Croteau

2004-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

439

[Regulation of terpene metabolism  

SciTech Connect

Terpenoid oils, resins, and waxes from plants are important renewable resources. The objective of this project is to understand the regulation of terpenoid metabolism using the monoterpenes (C[sub 10]) as a model. The pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism have been established, and the relevant enzymes characterized. Developmental studies relating enzyme levels to terpene accumulation within the oil gland sites of synthesis, and work with bioregulators, indicate that monoterpene production is controlled by terpene cyclases, the enzymes catalyzing the first step of the monoterpene pathway. As the leaf oil glands mature, cyclase levels decline and monoterpene biosynthesis ceases. Yield then decreases as the monoterpenes undergo catabolism by a process involving conversion to a glycoside and transport from the leaf glands to the root. At this site, the terpenoid is oxidatively degraded to acetate that is recycled into other lipid metabolites. During the transition from terpene biosynthesis to catabolism, the oil glands undergo dramatic ultrastructural modification. Degradation of the producing cells results in mixing of previously compartmentized monoterpenes with the catabolic enzymes, ultimately leading to yield decline. This regulatory model is being applied to the formation of other terpenoid classes (C[sub 15] C[sub 20], C[sub 30], C[sub 40]) within the oil glands. Preliminary investigations on the formation of sesquiterpenes (C[sub 15]) suggest that the corresponding cyclases may play a lesser role in determining yield of these products, but that compartmentation effects are important. From these studies, a comprehensive scheme for the regulation of terpene metabolism is being constructed. Results from this project wail have important consequences for the yield and composition of terpenoid natural products that can be made available for industrial exploitation.

Croteau, R.

1989-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

440

The Coordinated Control of a Central Air Conditioning System Based on Variable Chilled Water Temperature and Variable Chilled Water Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At present, regulation of water flow by means of pump frequency conversion is one of the major methods for power-saving in central air conditioning systems. In this article, optimization regulation for central air conditioning system on the basis of coordinative optimization control for variable chilled water temperature and variable chilled water flow to obtain better power savings is put forward. According to typical meteorological year data, hourly air conditioning load of whole year for every typical room has been calculated with the transmission function method. In order to guarantee each typical room, the highest cooling load rate is used as an input parameter for optimization calculation. Based on the surface cooler check model, the smallest energy consumption of chiller and chiller water pump was taken as the objective function of the optimization model. The performance characteristics of a chiller, water pump, regulation valve and pipeline are taken into account, and the optimization chilled water temperature and chilled water flow were carried out. The case study for a commercial building in Guangzhou showed that the annual power consumption of the chillers and pumps of the air conditioning system is lower by 17% only with employment of variable water flow regulation by pump frequency conversion. In the case of optimization control with coordinative control of variable chilled water temperature and variable chilled water flow, the annual power consumption of the chillers and pumps of the air conditioning system is reduced by 22% in presence of remarkable power saving effects. Increasing the chilled water temperature will reduce the dehumidified capability of the air cooler, and the indoor relative humidity will increase. The simulation showed that the adjustment optimized process meets the comfort of each typical room. The lower the cooling load rate is, the more obvious the effect of power-saving is. The highest power-saving rate appears in December, which is 36.7%. Meanwhile, the least rate appears in July, which is only 14.5%.

Liu, J.; Mai, Y.; Liu, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Federal Regulations: Environmental Protection Agency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disposal Practices and Applicable Regulations Hazardous Waste Exemption for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Wastes. In 1980, Congress conditionally exempted oil and gas...

442

California Appliance Efficiency Regulation Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Julie Osborn As part of the response to last summer's electricity crisis, the California Energy Commission (CEC) is updating the state's appliance efficiency regulations. On...

443

Export.gov - Regulations / Licenses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Division of the U.S. Census Bureau. The blog has several posts related to the Foreign Trade Regulations and maintaining export compliance. Foreign Standards and Certification...

444

Activated-charcoal filters: water treatment, pollution control, and industrial applications. January 1970-July 1988 (citations from the US Patent data base). Report for January 1970-July 1988  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning activated-charcoal filters and their applications in water treatment, pollution control, and industrial processes. Filtering methods and equipment for air and water purification, industrial distillation and extraction, industrial leaching, and filtration of toxic gases and pollutants are described. Applications include drinking water purification, filtering beverages, production of polymer materials, solvent and metal recovery, swimming pool filtration, waste conversion, automobile fuel and exhaust systems, and footwear deodorizing. (Contains 129 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

Not Available

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Activated charcoal filters: Water treatment, pollution control, and industrial applications. (Latest citations from the Patent Bibliographic database with exemplary claims. ) Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning activated charcoal filters and their applications in water treatment, pollution control, and industrial processes. Filtering methods and equipment for air and water purification, industrial distillation and extraction, industrial leaching, and filtration of toxic materials and contaminants are described. Applications include drinking water purification, filtering beverages, production of polymer materials, solvent and metal recovery, waste conversion, automotive fuel and exhaust systems, swimming pool filtration, tobacco smoke filters, kitchen ventilators, medical filtration treatment, and odor absorbing materials. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Evaluation of the 183-D Water Filtration Facility for Bat Roosts and Development of a Mitigation Strategy, 100-D Area, Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 183-D Water Filtration Facility is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site, north of Richland, Washington. It was used to provide filtered water for cooling the 105-D Reactor and supplying fire-protection and drinking water for all facilities in the 100-D Area. The facility has been inactive since the 1980s and is now scheduled for demolition. Therefore, an evaluation was conducted to determine if any part of the facility was being used as roosting habitat by bats.

Lindsey, C. T.; Gano, K. A.; Lucas, J. G.

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

447

GRR/Section 19-MT-a - Water Access & Water Rights Issues | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-MT-a - Water Access & Water Rights Issues GRR/Section 19-MT-a - Water Access & Water Rights Issues < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-MT-a - Water Access & Water Rights Issues 19MTAWaterAccessWaterRightsIssues (2).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Regulations & Policies MCA Title 85 Water Use MCA 77-4-108 Water Rights in Connection with Geothermal Development MCA 85-2-307 MCA 85-2-308 MCA 85-2-309 MCA 85-2-310 MCA 85-2-311 MCA 85-2-313 MCA 85-2-315 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19MTAWaterAccessWaterRightsIssues (2).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

448

Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Distribution System Recommendations for the 2008 Title- 24 Residential Building Energy Efficiency Standards .. 4 Multi-FamilyWater Distribution System Recommendations for the 2008 Title- 24 Residential Building Energy Efficiency Standards 11 Multi-FamilyWater Distribution System Recommendations for the 2008 Title- 24 Residential Building Energy Efficiency Standards 48 Multi-Family

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Water heater heat reclaimer  

SciTech Connect

This invention relates to the conservation of energy in a domestic gas water heater by utilizing the hot exhaust gases in a gas water heater for the preheating of the incoming unheated water into the water heater. The exhaust gases from a domestic gas water heater carry wasted heat and the present invention provides a mean to reclaim part of the wasted heat for the preheating of the incoming unheated water during hot water usage periods. During non hot water usage periods the heat in the exhaust gases is not reclaimed to prevent overheating of the water and also to prevent the formation of water deposit in the preheating assembly or heat reclaimer. During the non hot water usage periods the heat produced in the water heater is normally needed only to maintain the desired water temperature of the stored water in the water tank of the water heater. Due to the rapid heating or recovery rate, the present invention enables the use of a smaller water heater. The use of a smaller water heater reduces the normal heat loss from the stored hot water thereby further reduces energy consumption.

Wie, C.T.

1983-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

450

Feature - WATER Tool Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Assessment for Transportation Energy Resources (WATER) Tool Released Water Assessment for Transportation Energy Resources (WATER) Tool Released Argonne National Laboratory recently released an open access online tool called WATER (Water Assessment for Transportation Energy Resources), which quantifies water footprint of fuel production stages from feedstock production to conversion process for biofuel with county, state, and regional level spatial resolution. WATER provides analysis on water consumption and its impact on water quality. It contains biofuel pathways for corn grain ethanol, soybean biodiesel, and cellulosic ethanol produced from corn stover and wheat straw. Perennial grass (Switchgrass and Miscanthus) and forest wood residue-based biofuel pathways are currently under development. The WATER tool enables users to conduct pathway comparison, scenario development, and regional specific feedstock analysis in supporting of biofuel industry development and planning. It is available at http://water.es.anl.gov/.

451

Tankless Demand Water Heaters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Demand (tankless or instantaneous) water heaters have heating devices that are activated by the flow of water, so they provide hot water only as needed and without the use of a storage tank. They...

452

Review: Globalization of Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’sAshok K. Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’s140) liters of virtual water (p. 15). This is one of the

Tennant, Matthew Aaron

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Saving Water Saves Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H. , Groves D. California Water 2030: An Efficient Future,Preemption of California’s Water Conservation Standards for2Epdf Biermayer P. Potential Water and Energy Savings from

McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Beneficial Reuse of San Ardo Produced Water  

SciTech Connect

This DOE funded study was performed to evaluate the potential for treatment and beneficial reuse of produced water from the San Ardo oilfield in Monterey County, CA. The potential benefits of a successful full-scale implementation of this project include improvements in oil production efficiency and additional recoverable oil reserves as well as the addition of a new reclaimed water resource. The overall project was conducted in two Phases. Phase I identified and evaluated potential end uses for the treated produced water, established treated water quality objectives, reviewed regulations related to treatment, transport, storage and use of the treated produced water, and investigated various water treatment technology options. Phase II involved the construction and operation of a small-scale water treatment pilot facility to evaluate the process's performance on produced water from the San Ardo oilfield. Cost estimates for a potential full-scale facility were also developed. Potential end uses identified for the treated water include (1) agricultural use near the oilfield, (2) use by Monterey County Water Resources Agency (MCWRA) for the Salinas Valley Water Project or Castroville Seawater Intrusion Project, (3) industrial or power plant use in King City, and (4) use for wetlands creation in the Salinas Basin. All of these uses were found to have major obstacles that prevent full-scale implementation. An additional option for potential reuse of the treated produced water was subsequently identified. That option involves using the treated produced water to recharge groundwater in the vicinity of the oil field. The recharge option may avoid the limitations that the other reuse options face. The water treatment pilot process utilized: (1) warm precipitation softening to remove hardness and silica, (2) evaporative cooling to meet downstream temperature limitations and facilitate removal of ammonia, and (3) reverse osmosis (RO) for removal of dissolved salts, boron, and organics. Pilot study results indicate that produced water from the San Ardo oilfield can be treated to meet project water quality goals. Approximately 600 mg/l of caustic and 100 mg/l magnesium dosing were required to meet the hardness and silica goals in the warm softening unit. Approximately 30% of the ammonia was removed in the cooling tower; additional ammonia could be removed by ion exchange or other methods if necessary. A brackish water reverse osmosis membrane was effective in removing total dissolved solids and organics at all pH levels evaluated; however, the boron treatment objective was only achieved at a pH of 10.5 and above.

Robert A. Liske

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

455

Water, Water Everywhere: How Can We Understand It?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Science Afternoon. Water, Water Everywhere: How Can We Understand It? An exploration of water using physical models and computer simulation. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Increasing Federal Office Building Water Efficiency, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Order 13514 requires a two percent annual reduction in water use (compared to Order 13514 requires a two percent annual reduction in water use (compared to a FY 2007 baseline), significantly reducing total Federal water consumption by FY 2020. View Federal water requirements at www.femp.energy.gov/program/waterefficiency_ requirements.html. Increasing Federal Office Building Water Efficiency With less than one percent of Earth's water available for human use, the Federal Government is leading by example with water efficiency and conservation efforts. Federal laws and regulations require agencies to implement water efficiency efforts and reduce water consumption, making water an integral part of every comprehensive resource management program. Water Management Planning A comprehensive water management plan includes clear information on

457

Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 April, 2013. (4) 2010 Water Use Survey Summary Estimates –State Totals; Texas Water Development Board: Austin, TX,indicators for urban water systems. Urban Water. 2004, 4,

Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

NETL: Water - Energy Interface  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Water - Energy Interface Innovations for Existing Plants Water - Energy Interface Previous Next...

459

Membranes for Clean Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Membranes for Clean Water. Summary: ... Description: Impact. Access to affordable, clean water is vital to the nation's economic growth and security. ...

2013-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

460

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water and wasted embodied energy. While 5% of California'senergy intensive (94). Water- inefficient fixtures and fittings (toilets, showerheads, urinals, faucets) represent both wasted

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Review: Globalization of Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using virtual water (e.g. coffee produced in an environmentis produced in an environment in which it takes less water

Tennant, Matthew Aaron

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Cell cycle-regulated manganese superoxide dismutase activity via reversible  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cycle-regulated manganese superoxide dismutase activity via reversible cycle-regulated manganese superoxide dismutase activity via reversible phosphorylation Demet Candas University of California Davis Abstract The constant stress environment that the cells live in required the development of defense systems against free radical and radiation insults. One of the major antioxidant enzymes responsible for detoxifying free radical species is manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD, Sod2), which is specifically localized into the mitochondria of cells. MnSOD catalyzes the conversion of two molecules of superoxide anion into water and hydrogen peroxide, the latter of which is then further oxidized to water. The significance of the role of MnSOD activity was shown by the studies showing that the loss or deficiency of MnSOD sensitize cells to ionizing

463

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 5 - Fugitive Dust (Rhode Island) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 - Fugitive Dust (Rhode 5 - Fugitive Dust (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 5 - Fugitive Dust (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management These regulations aim to prevent the release of fugitive dust by forbidding

464

Federal Requirements for Sustainable Buildings by Law and Regulation |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Law and Law and Regulation Federal Requirements for Sustainable Buildings by Law and Regulation October 4, 2013 - 4:44pm Addthis For sustainable buildings, Federal agencies are required to comply with the following laws and regulations. Also see Federal Requirements for Sustainable Buildings by Topic and Guiding Principles for Federal Leadership in High-Performance and Sustainable Buildings. Executive Order (E.O.) 13514 Signed on October 5, 2009, E.O. 13514-Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy and Economic Performance-expands on Federal energy reduction and environmental performance requirements set in E.O. 13423, as well as outlines specific management strategies to improve sustainability, including managing existing buildings to reduce energy, water and materials

465

City of Sacramento - Zoning and Subdivision Regulations | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sacramento - Zoning and Subdivision Regulations Sacramento - Zoning and Subdivision Regulations City of Sacramento - Zoning and Subdivision Regulations < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Nonprofit Residential Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Solar Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Program Info State California Program Type Solar/Wind Access Policy Provider City of Sacramento Sacramento City Code, Title 16, Section 16.48.110 ensures that the Director of Parks and Community Services gives consideration to solar access, to the extent feasible, when selecting and planting residential street trees near residential buildings. Sacramento City Code, Title 17, Section 17.220.010 contains a provision requiring the planning commission or zoning administrator to consider

466

Surface Water and Groundwater Use and Protection (Mississippi) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Surface Water and Groundwater Use and Protection (Mississippi) Surface Water and Groundwater Use and Protection (Mississippi) Surface Water and Groundwater Use and Protection (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting

467

South Dakota-Minnesota Boundary Waters Commission (Minnesota) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dakota-Minnesota Boundary Waters Commission (Minnesota) Dakota-Minnesota Boundary Waters Commission (Minnesota) South Dakota-Minnesota Boundary Waters Commission (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Environmental Regulations This section establishes an interstate commission to set standards for

468

Connecticut Water Diversion Policy Act (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Connecticut Water Diversion Policy Act (Connecticut) Connecticut Water Diversion Policy Act (Connecticut) Connecticut Water Diversion Policy Act (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection This section describes regulations and permit requirements for projects or

469

Storm Water Discharge Permits (Wisconsin) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storm Water Discharge Permits (Wisconsin) Storm Water Discharge Permits (Wisconsin) Storm Water Discharge Permits (Wisconsin) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info Start Date 08/2004 State Wisconsin Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Natural Resources Wisconsin's storm water runoff regulations include permitting requirements for construction sites and industrial facilities, including those

470

Florida Water Resources Act (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Water Resources Act (Florida) Florida Water Resources Act (Florida) Florida Water Resources Act (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Florida Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Department of Environmental Protection It is the policy of the state of Florida: (a) To provide for the management

471

Soil and Water Conservation (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Texas) (Texas) Soil and Water Conservation (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Schools Institutional Nonprofit Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board The Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board is established to encourage and oversee soil-conserving land-use practices, and to provide for the conservation of soil and related resources and the control and prevention of soil erosion, and thereby to preserve natural resources,

472

Recreational Lake and Water Quality Districts (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recreational Lake and Water Quality Districts (Iowa) Recreational Lake and Water Quality Districts (Iowa) Recreational Lake and Water Quality Districts (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Territory contiguous to a recreational lake may be incorporated into a

473

Water Control and Improvement Districts (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Control and Improvement Districts (Texas) Water Control and Improvement Districts (Texas) Water Control and Improvement Districts (Texas) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Texas Commission on Environmental Quality The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality is authorized to review and

474

Protected Water Area System (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protected Water Area System (Iowa) Protected Water Area System (Iowa) Protected Water Area System (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources The Natural Resource Commission maintains a state plan for the design and

475

Water Quality Program, Volume 1 (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program, Volume 1 (Alabama) Program, Volume 1 (Alabama) Water Quality Program, Volume 1 (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations This volume of the water quality program mainly deals with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System. National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System" or "(NPDES)" means the national program for issuing, modifying, revoking and reissuing, terminating, monitoring and enforcing permits for the discharge of pollutants into waters of the state. An industrial user, whether or not the user is subject to other categorical

476

Water-heating dehumidifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water-heating dehumidifier includes a refrigerant loop including a compressor, at least one condenser, an expansion device and an evaporator including an evaporator fan. The condenser includes a water inlet and a water outlet for flowing water therethrough or proximate thereto, or is affixed to the tank or immersed into the tank to effect water heating without flowing water. The immersed condenser design includes a self-insulated capillary tube expansion device for simplicity and high efficiency. In a water heating mode air is drawn by the evaporator fan across the evaporator to produce cooled and dehumidified air and heat taken from the air is absorbed by the refrigerant at the evaporator and is pumped to the condenser, where water is heated. When the tank of water heater is full of hot water or a humidistat set point is reached, the water-heating dehumidifier can switch to run as a dehumidifier.

Tomlinson, John J. (Knoxville, TN)

2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

477

Resource Management Services, Part 609: Reclassification of Waters (New  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services, Part 609: Reclassification of Waters Services, Part 609: Reclassification of Waters (New York) Resource Management Services, Part 609: Reclassification of Waters (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations provide procedures to propose a reclassification of State waters for permitting purposes. Requests must address the factual basis for reclassification, including the size, depth, surface area covered, volume, direction and rate of flow, stream gradient and temperature of the water; character of the district bordering said waters and its suitability for

478

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Efficiency Water Efficiency The following Federal laws and regulations require Federal agencies to reduce water use and improve water efficiency. Executive Order 13423 Executive Order (E.O.) 13423 requires Federal agencies to reduce water consumption intensity (gallons per square foot) 2% annually through the end of fiscal year (FY) 2015 or 16% by the end of FY 2015 from a 2007 baseline. This requirement is to be achieved incrementally by fiscal year beginning in 2008. Fiscal Year Percentage Reduction 2008 2 2009 4 2010 6 2011 8 2012 10 2013 12 2014 14 2015 16 E.O. 13423 Mandated Facility Water Intensity Reductions by Fiscal Year E.O. 13423 also directs Federal facilities to conduct annual water audits of at least 10% of facility square footage and to conduct audits at least

479

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Conversion Regulations Conversion Regulations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on AddThis.com... Conversion Regulations All vehicle and engine conversions must meet standards instituted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), and state agencies like the California Air Resources Board (CARB).

480

Research Addressing Power Plant Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Power Plant Water Management to Minimize Water Use while Providing Reliable Electricity Generation Water and Energy 2 Water and Energy are inextricably linked. Because...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "drinking water regulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

LEGAL ISSUES FOR MARKET FINANCING OF CALIFORNIA WATER In part, this study investigates market methods for generating revenues for water resource system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The energy crisis of the 1970's triggered the downfall of natural gas regulation. Regulators and industry from the natural gas and electric industries where de-coupling has taken place, and the last section UTILITIES Similar to the natural gas and electricity industries, California's water supply system can

Lund, Jay R.

482

Ground water protection management program plan  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 requires the establishment of a ground water protection management program to ensure compliance with DOE requirements and applicable federal, state, and local laws and regulations. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office was prepared this Ground Water Protection Management Program Plan (ground water protection plan) whose scope and detail reflect the program`s significance and address the seven activities required in DOE Order 5400.1, Chapter III, for special program planning. This ground water protection plan highlights the methods designed to preserve, protect, and monitor ground water resources at UMTRA Project processing and disposal sites. The plan includes an overview of the remedial action status at the 24 designated processing sites and identifies technical guidance documents and site-specific documents for the UMTRA Project ground water protection management program. In addition, the plan addresses the general information required to develop a water resources protection strategy at the permanent disposal sites. Finally, the plan describes ongoing activities that are in various stages of development at UMTRA Project sites.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Physiology and Regulation of Calcium Channels in Stomatal Guard Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Stomatal pores in the epidermis of leaves regulate the diffusion of CO2 into leaves for photosynthetic carbon fixation and control water loss of plants during drought periods. Guard cells sense CO2, water status, light and other environmental conditions to regulate stomatal apertures for optimization of CO2 intake and plant growth under drought stress. The cytosolic second messenger calcium contributes to stomatal movements by transducing signals and regulating ion channels in guard cells. Studies suggest that both plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels and vacuolar/organellar Ca2+ release channels contribute to ABA-induced Ca2+ elevations in guard cells. Recent research in the P.I.'s laboratory has led to identification of a novel major cation-selective Ca2+-permeable influx channel (Ica) in the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis guard cells. These advances will allow detailed characterization of Ica plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels in guard cells. The long term goal of this research project is to gain a first detailed characterization of these novel plasma membrane Ca2+-permeable channel currents in Arabidopsis guard cells. The proposed research will investigate the hypothesis that Ica represents an important Ca2+ influx pathway for ABA and CO2 signal transduction in Arabidopsis guard cells. These studies will lead to elucidation of key signal transduction mechanisms by which plants balance CO2 influx into leaves and transpirational water loss and may contribute to future strategies for manipulating gas exchange for improved growth of crop plants and for biomass production.

Schroeder, Julian I.

2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

484

GRR/Section 14-CA-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-CA-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification GRR/Section 14-CA-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-CA-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification 14CADSection401WaterQualityCertification (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies California State Water Resources Control Board Regulations & Policies Section 401 Clean Water Act (33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq.) Porter-Cologne Water Quality Control Act Code of Regulations Title 23, Section 3855 et. seq. Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14CADSection401WaterQualityCertification (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

485

Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Legislation & Regulations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

leg_reg.gif (4810 bytes) Climate Change Action Plan Comprehensive Electricity Competition Act Tier 2 Vehicle Emissions and Gasoline Sulfur Standards California Ban of Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether Low-Emission Vehicle Program Introduction Because analyses by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) are required to be policy-neutral, the projections in this Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) are based on Federal, State, and local laws and regulations in effect on July 1, 1999. The potential impacts of pending or proposed legislation, regulations, and standards and sections of existing legislation for which funds have not been appropriated are not reflected in the projections. Federal legislation incorporated in the projections includes the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993, which adds 4.3 cents per gallon to the Federal tax on highway fuels [1]; the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987; the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90); the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT); the Outer Continental Shelf Deep Water Royalty Relief Act of 1995; the Tax Payer Relief Act of 1997; and the Federal Highway Bill of 1998, which includes an extension of the ethanol tax credit. AEO2000 assumes the continuation of the ethanol tax credit through 2020.

486

Lawn Water Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water is a limited resource in Texas. This booklet explains how homeowners can establish a water management program for a home lawn that both maintains a healthy sod and also conserves water. The publication discusses soil types, grass varieties, management practices and watering techniques.

McAfee, James

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

487

WaterSense Program: Methodology for National Water Savings Analysis Model Indoor Residential Water Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fixtures Market Overview: Water Savings Potential forNew Jersey. American Water Works Association ResearchResidential End Uses of Water (REUWS). 1999. American Water

McNeil, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

GRR/Section 6-UT-b - Storm Water Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6-UT-b - Storm Water Permit 6-UT-b - Storm Water Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-UT-b - Storm Water Permit 06UTBStormWaterPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Division of Water Quality Regulations & Policies Utah Water Quality Act Clean Water Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06UTBStormWaterPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The construction storm water permit process is required to prevent storm water pollution. The permits are administered by the Utah Division of Water