Sample records for drinking water regulations

  1. Toxicology 198 (2004) 3944 Arsenic drinking water regulations in developing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Toxicology 198 (2004) 39­44 Arsenic drinking water regulations in developing countries identified 10 g/l as a goal which later became the World Health Organization Guideline for drinking water in 1992. Epidemiological studies have shown that about one in 10 people drinking water containing 500 g

  2. Public Health Issues Associated with Small Drinking Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Public Health Issues Associated with Small Drinking Water Systems Not Regulated by the Safe Drinking Water Act From: Nonfederally Regulated Drinking Water Systems: State and Local Public Health ...........................................................................................5 Priority Environmental Public Health Challenges for Small Drinking Water Systems

  3. Drinking Water Problems: Lead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Lead in drinking water can damage the brain, kidneys, nervous system and red blood cells. This publication explains how lead can enter drinking water, how to have your water tested, and how to eliminate lead from drinking water....

  4. Drinking Water Problems: Copper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    High levels of copper in drinking water can cause health problems. This publication explains the effects of copper in water and methods of removing it. 4 pp....

  5. Potential Effects of Organic Carbon Production on Ecosystems and Drinking Water Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Larry R.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National Primary Drinking Water Regulations, disinfectantsand implications for drinking water quality and the Deltaand control in drinking water. American Chemical Society,

  6. Drinking Water Problems: Benzene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Drinking water in Texas sometimes contains potentially harmful chemicals, including benzene. Well owners can learn how to treat their well water to remove these chemicals. 4 pages, 3 images...

  7. Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    . 7). Nitrate ions are drawn through the membrane pores with elec- trical currents. The nitrate is pulled from the water into a brine waste stream. Ni trate-contaminated water Treated water Nitrate Chloride or hydroxide Exchange resin Figure 6. Ion... and Extension Agricultural Engineer, Texas Cooperative Extension, The Texas A&M University System B-6184 3-08 ' the safe levels of chemicals for U.S. drinking water. The EPA conducts research to determine the level of a contaminant in drinking water...

  8. Drinking Water Problems: MTBE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    . This compound belongs to a chemical family of fuel oxygenates that enhance gaso- line combustion by increasing oxygen available for the process. Added to gasoline, MTBE has reduced carbon monoxide and ozone emissions by promoting more complete burning.... Texas follows the EPA drinking water advisory of 20 to 40 micrograms per liter. How can MTBE be Removed from Well Water? MTBE requires a specific treatment process for removal from water. Well owners can use granular activated carbon or charcoal...

  9. Drinking Water Problems: Corrosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drinking Water Problems: Corrosion Mark L. McFarland, Tony L. Provin, and Diane E. Boellstorff and fail. Corrosion can cause three types of damage: · The entire metal surface gradually thins and red (Fig. 1). · Deep pits appear that can penetrate pipe or tank walls. This type of corrosion may not add

  10. Drinking Water Problems: Radionuclides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    can accumulate to harmful levels in drinking water. As radionuclides decay, they emit radioactive parti- cles such as alpha particles, beta particles and gamma rays. Each type of particle produces different effects on humans. Alpha particles... penetrating, alpha particles cause more damage per unit volume than do beta particles or gamma rays. Beta particles and gamma rays deposit their ener- gy over longer distances. Beta particles can be stopped by a piece of wood or a thin sheet of metal...

  11. Removing Arsenic from Drinking Water

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    See how INL scientists are using nanotechnology to remove arsenic from drinking water. For more INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

  12. Taps: The Dangers of Drinking Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgess, Michael

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    levels in Taiwan's drinking water. Journal of Toxicology andMagnesium and calcium in drinking water and death from acute31-36. Morris RD. Drinking water and cancer. Environmental

  13. Drinking Water Standards Drinking water from a local public supply must

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    Drinking Water Standards Drinking water from a local public supply must meet federal and state standards for safe drink- ing water. Two sets of standards-primary drinking water and secondary drinking water- establish Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) for a variety of contaminants. If the water sup- ply

  14. CARD No. 53 Consideration of Underground Sources of Drinking Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    exposure of individuals and the possible levels of radioactive contamination of ground water due resulting from exposure to radioactive contaminants in underground sources of drinking water (USDWs.34, which implement the general containment requirements of the radioactive waste disposal regulations

  15. Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for crops and water for indus- tries. It is also connected to surface waters, and maintains the flow of rivers and streams and the level of wetlands- tion of those along Lake Michigan, most communi- ties, farms and industries still rely on ground water

  16. Drinking Water Problems: Perchlorate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Porter, Dana; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Perchlorate is a potential contaminate of well water that can have harmful effects on human health. Methods of removing perchlorate from water are described and illustrated. There is information to help well owners select and maintain treatment...

  17. The Drinking Water Security and Safety Amendments of 2002: Is America's Drinking Water Infrastructure Safer Four Years Later?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shermer, Steven D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Threats to Drinking Water Security . a.The Drinking Water Security and Safety Amendmentsof 2002: Is America's Drinking Water Infrastructure Safer

  18. Radioactive isotopes in Danish drinking water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radioactive isotopes in Danish drinking water Sven P. Nielsen Risø National Laboratory Working OF INVESTIGATION 11 3 DESCRIPTION OF INVESTIGATION 12 4 RADIOACTIVITY IN DRINKING WATER 13 5 SAMPLING 15 6 27 #12;4 #12;5 Preface This project for investigation of radioactivity in drinking water shall

  19. Report seeks solutions for nitrate in drinking water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Editors, By

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrate in Californias Drinking Water report http://Clark Report seeks solutions for nitrate in drinking waternitrate contamination of drinking water in high-risk areas

  20. ARSENIC IN DRINKINGARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER: HEALTH EFFECTS ANDWATER: HEALTH EFFECTS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ARSENIC IN DRINKINGARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER: HEALTH EFFECTS ANDWATER: HEALTH EFFECTS AND CURRENT;EPA. National Primary Drinking Water Regulations; Arsenic and Clarification to Compliance and New National Occurrence and Exposure to Arsenic in Public Drinking Water Supplies (Revised Draft). Washington

  1. Safe Drinking Water Act: Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book. Revision 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents information on the Safe Drinking Water Act. Sections are presented on: Legislative history and statute; implementing regulations; and updates.

  2. FOOD AND DRINK REGULATIONS Serving hot food

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    of food poisoning increases as time passes. · Hand contact with unwrapped food should be kept to a minimum1 FOOD AND DRINK REGULATIONS Serving hot food Home made hot food may not be served at events conditions must be adhered to: · The caterer must have HSE Food Hygiene Certification, which

  3. The Sierra Club Guide to Safe Drinking Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Brad

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Club Guide to Safe Drinking Water By Scott Lewis Reviewed byClub Guide to Safe Drinking Water. San Francisco: Sierrawe believed that our public drinking water was healthy and

  4. Storing A Safe Emergency Drinking Water By Sharon Skipton,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Storing A Safe Emergency Drinking Water Supply By Sharon Skipton, UNL Extension Water Quality emergency drinking water supply on hand is a good idea. If you do not have an emergency water supply water supplies are suitable for storage. Private drinking water supplies suitable for drinking

  5. Brookhaven National Laboratory Source Water Assessment for Drinking Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BNL 52608 Brookhaven National Laboratory Source Water Assessment for Drinking Water Supply Wells Under Contract with the United States Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 #12;BNL 52608 Brookhaven National Laboratory Source Water Assessment for Drinking Water Supply Wells December 27, 2000

  6. DRINKING WATER ON EMPTY RINK WATER ON EMPTY STOMACHD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

    DRINKING WATER ON EMPTY STOMACH RINK WATER ON EMPTY STOMACHD It is popular in Japan today to drink water immediately after waking up every morning. Furthermore, scientific tests have proven its value.. We publish below a description of use of water for our readers. For old and serious diseases as well

  7. Most terrestrial vertebrates are able to replace water lost to the environment by drinking water. In amniotes, drinking is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behe, Michael J.

    Most terrestrial vertebrates are able to replace water lost to the environment by drinking water, not drinking, because water, unlike food, is physically uniform (at least between 1 and 99 °C). Modifications the frequent need to regain lost water, drinking is secondary to feeding. Furthermore, if drinking is achieved

  8. Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund provides low cost financial assistance to eligible public water systems to finance the cost of repair and replacement of drinking water infrastructure,...

  9. Providing safe drinking water to 1.2 billion unserved people

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gadgil, Ashok J.; Derby, Elisabeth A.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KEY WORDS Safe drinking water; ultraviolet waterto ensure access of safe drinking water to all of those inrespectively). Safe Drinking Water for Everyone: A Review

  10. Meeting the Need for Safe Drinking Water in Rural Mexico through Point-of-Use Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lang, Micah; Kaser, Forrest; Reygadas, Fermin; Nelson, Kara; Kammen, Daniel M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar disinfection of drinking water and diarrhoea in Maasai2001. Solar disinfection of drinking water protects againstdisinfection of drinking water contained in transparent

  11. Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathieu, Johanna L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Arsenic-Free, Safe Drinking Water in Bangladesh. Worldburden from arsenic in drinking water in Bangladesh. Remediation of Bangladesh Drinking Water using Iron-oxide

  12. Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M. Contamination of drinking-water by arsenic in Bangladesh:Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water, Dhaka, Bangladesh, Maytechnologies for drinking water treatment. Rev. Environ.

  13. Drinking Water Gary S. Silverman, Bowling Green State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drinking Water Gary S. Silverman, Bowling Green State University Key Concepts Preventing water, the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974 has resulted in a comprehensive system of federal and state controls officials. Recent events suggest that although our drinking water usually is safe, serious problems may

  14. Drinking Water Implications of Cyanobacteria on the Kansas River to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1 Drinking Water Implications of Cyanobacteria on the Kansas River to WaterOne and other releases from Milford Lake during same period. Drinking Water Utilities become concerned about potential to partner with USGS to fund testing. Testing included treated drinking water from the three utilities

  15. An Economic Impact Analysis of DC Drinking Water Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    An Economic Impact Analysis of DC Drinking Water Quality Annual Progress Report for FY 2005 In January 2004, District of Columbia residents learned the drinking water supplied by the D.C. Water immediately responded by forming the Interagency Task Force on Lead in Drinking Water (The Task Force

  16. Current and Long-Term Effects of Delta Water Quality on Drinking Water Treatment Costs from Disinfection Byproduct Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wei-Hsiang; Haunschild, Kristine; Lund, Jay R.; Fleenor, William E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for protecting public drinking water (CALFED 2000), are alsobest management options for drinking water sourced from theDelta Authority. 2004. Drinking water quality program multi-

  17. Lung Cancer and Arsenic Concentrations in Drinking Water in Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Lung Cancer and Arsenic Concentrations in Drinking Water in Chile Catterina Ferreccio,1,2 Claudia in northern Chile had arsenic concentrations of 860 g/liter in drinking water in the period 1958­1970. Concen and arsenic in drinking water in northern Chile in a case-control study involving patients diagnosed with lung

  18. Arsenic in drinking water Increases mortality from cardiovascular disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Arsenic in drinking water Increases mortality from cardiovascular disease Allan H Smith professor of inorganic arsenic in drinking water causes cancer of the skin, bladder, lung, liver, and kidney.1 2 Mounting of a link between cardiovascular disease and arsenic in drinking water came in 1980 from Antofagasta, Chile

  19. Regional Drinking Water Security District Level Pilot Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Regional Drinking Water Security District Level Pilot Project Concept Note Milind Sohoni Head that most habitations of several talukas will face drinking water stress for much of the coming year. The central objective of the project will be to ensure regional drinking water security for a district

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Perchlorate in Drinking Water During Pregnancy and Neonatal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Perchlorate in Drinking Water During Pregnancy and Neonatal Thyroid Hormone Levels associations between maternal drinking water per- chlorate exposure during pregnancy and newborn thyroid in the United States may have been drinking water with perchlorate concentrations greater than 4 g/L,4 a level

  1. Looking For Traces of Pharmaceuticals in Drinking Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Looking For Traces of Pharmaceuticals in Drinking Water By Daniel D. Snow, Ph.D. Director traces of drugs in the public drinking water supplies of 24 major U.S. metropolitan areas. This has in drinking water supplies is not new, but the classes of contaminants being tested for are. Pharmaceuticals

  2. Combating An Odorless, Tasteless, Unseen Problem in Nebraska Drinking Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Combating An Odorless, Tasteless, Unseen Problem in Nebraska Drinking Water By Steve Ress You can with the specter of arsenic contamination in their drinking water. For more than 60 years, the maximum allowable limit for arsenic in public drinking water supplies has been 50 parts per billion (ppb) and most public

  3. Mineral balances, including in drinking water, estimated for Merced County dairy herds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castillo, Alejandro R Dr.; Santos, Jose Eduardo P.; Tabone, Tom J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of daily mineral intake, drinking-water mineral contributionND Total daily intake, including minerals in drinking water.mineral contents in drinking water and daily drinking-water

  4. Planning Drinking Water for Airplanes Marco Bijvank, Menno Dobber,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hofstad, Remco van der

    Planning Drinking Water for Airplanes Marco Bijvank, Menno Dobber, Maarten Soomer, Vrije estimation, cubic spline, maximum likelihood 1 Introduction During flights people use drinking water of water on board of all flights to fulfill customer's demand. On the other hand, the surplus of water

  5. USE ONLY WATER THAT HAS BEEN PROPERLY DISINFECTED FOR DRINKING, COOKING, MAKING ANY PREPARED DRINK, OR FOR BRUSHING TEETH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    USE ONLY WATER THAT HAS BEEN PROPERLY DISINFECTED FOR DRINKING, COOKING, MAKING ANY PREPARED DRINK. (U.S. federal agencies and the Red Cross recommend these same four steps to disinfect drinking water OF DRINKING WATER More information about disinfection In times of crisis, follow advice from local officials

  6. Your Actions Can Help Protect Our Drinking Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Janie

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication offers advice on how to protect our drinking water supply by properly selecting, storing, using and disposing of household hazardous products....

  7. Hydrogen Sulfide in Drinking Water: Causes and Treatment Alternatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFarland, Mark L.; Provin, Tony

    1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    If drinking water has a nuisance "rotten egg odor, it contains hydrogen sulfide. This leaflet discusses how hydrogen sulfide is formed and how the problem can be corrected....

  8. From: "Cheryl Beecroft" Subject: Drinking Water Results-ITB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    From: "Cheryl Beecroft" Subject: Drinking Water Results-ITB Date: Fri, 1 Oct samples collected at ITB. The results were below the allowable level of 10ug/L for lead in drinking water 2010 15:54:56 -0400 To: Please see the table below for lead content in water

  9. Long-Term Succession of Structure and Diversity of a Biofilm Formed in a Model Drinking Water Distribution System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martiny, A. C; Jorgensen, T. M; Albrechtsen, H.-J.; Arvin, E.; Molin, S.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    formation in a model drinking water distribution system. J.and activity in drinking water distribution networks underbacterial species from drinking water biofilms and proof of

  10. Detection of Heavy Metal Ions in Drinking Water Using a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wilfred

    Detection of Heavy Metal Ions in Drinking Water Using a High-Resolution Differential Surface-resolution differential surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor for heavy metal ion detection. The sensor surface the sensing surface with peptides NH2- Gly-Gly-His-COOH and NH2-(His)6-COOH. Cu2+ in drinking water was tested

  11. Augmentation of Rural Piped Water Schemes for Supply of drinking water to tanker fed villages.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Augmentation of Rural Piped Water Schemes for Supply of drinking water to tanker fed villages-3000mm and biggest reservoirs like Tansa, Vaitarana and Bhatsa for supplying drinking water to Mumbai city. Many solutions have been explored in the past to provide drinking water security to people

  12. Drinking water treatment and distribution systems must comply with US EPA water quality regula-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Drinking water treatment and distribution systems must comply with US EPA water quality regula trihalomethanes (THMs). Drinking water providers do frequent, costly testing for THMs. Field real-time sensors PROJECT GOALS The goal of this project was to bring a team of experts in drinking water, polymers

  13. SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION OF Fe IN DRINKING WATER Background Reading: Harris, 7th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION OF Fe IN DRINKING WATER Background Reading: Harris, 7th ed., Chap contaminants in drinking water can be determined spectrophotometrically, including iron. Although iron the iron content of drinking water to

  14. Arsenic exposure from drinking water and mortality from cardiovascular disease in Bangladesh: prospective cohort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Geen, Alexander

    RESEARCH Arsenic exposure from drinking water and mortality from cardiovascular disease the association. Design Prospective cohort study with arsenic exposure measured in drinking water from wells was 214.3 per 100 000 person years in people drinking water containing

  15. Application of Artificially Immobilized Microorganisms to Nitrate Removal from Drinking Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Sean X; Hermanowicz, Slawomir W

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Nitrate Removal from Drinking Water By Sean X. Liu andFor biological treatment of drinking water, several crucialalginate gel beads to drinking water treatment has proved to

  16. Aluminum and copper in drinking water enhance inflammatory oroxidative events specifically in the brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bondy, Stephen Bondy C

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T. , 1999. Copper in drinking water, Nebraska, 1994. Int. J.to aluminum in drinking water increases inflammatoryH.E. , Kappel, S. , 1984. Drinking-water-induced copper

  17. Taste and Odor Problems in Clinton Lake Reservoir's Drinking Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Restrepo-Osorio, Dianna L.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Taste and Odor Problems in Clinton Lake Reservoir's Drinking Water Diana L. Restrepo-Osorio (McNair Scholar) Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, INTRODUCTION Water is a requirement for human health and welfare; however..., an exceedingly large number of people around the world lack reliable sources of drinking water 1 . According to the World Health Organization, approximately 3.5 million people die every year, generally in developing countries, from diseases linked to poor...

  18. Making Drinking Water Safer from Bacterial Contamination in Emergency Situations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Avoid water having a dark color, an odor or containing floating materials since such things may indicate or floating matter. 2. Boil the water vigorously for at least 10 minutes. 3. After it cools, the waterMaking Drinking Water Safer from Bacterial Contamination in Emergency Situations Monty C. Dozier

  19. Iodine in Drinking Waters, Vegetables, Cottonseed Meal, and Roughages.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fudge, J. F. (Joseph Franklin); Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1940-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIBRARY, A & M COLLEGE, G. S. FRAPS and J. F. FUDGE Division of Chemistry TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR, College Station, Texas BULLETIN NO. 595 NOVEMBER 1940 -- IODINE IN DRINKING WATERS, VEGETABLES..., COTTONSEED MEAL, AND ROUGEIAGES ! .I rq?,\\?Y - AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS T. 0. WALTON, President A96-1140-7M-LJ.80 5 [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] Iodine was determined in nearly 500 samples of city and rural drinking waters...

  20. Cleaning Membranes with Focused Ultrasound Beams for Drinking Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jian-yu

    Cleaning Membranes with Focused Ultrasound Beams for Drinking Water Treatment Jian-yu Lu1 , Xi Du2: jilu@eng.utoledo.edu Abstract ­ Traditional methods for water treatment are not effective to remove to clean a large membrane area needed for a typical water treatment plant. In this paper, a focused

  1. Filtration plant for drinking water James Tarchala [1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    Filtration plant for drinking water James Tarchala [1] Alexandre Selhorst [2] Cheny Thao [3] 1 2 3 Riley, Wang, Aaron Nolan (Not Pictured) 12/1/2014 #12;Reclaiming waste HEAT TO PRE- HEAT WATER IN a FACTORY HOT WATER SYSTEM Group 5: Joseph Von Arx(1) Aaron McKeown(2) Kyle Swanson(3) Ian Klecka(4) 1 2 3 4

  2. Disinfection Procedure for Water Distribution Pipelines Drinking water contamination can be prevented by hydrostatic testing and disinfection of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Disinfection Procedure for Water Distribution Pipelines Drinking water contamination can pipeline connections to the system, and respond to requests for drinking water assessments. And, any be prevented by hydrostatic testing and disinfection of potable water distribution pipelines before connecting

  3. CHARACTERISATION OF AGED HDPE PIPES FROM DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION: INVESTIGATION OF CRACK DEPTH BY NOL RING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    CHARACTERISATION OF AGED HDPE PIPES FROM DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION: INVESTIGATION OF CRACK DEPTH are used for the transport of drinking water. However, disinfectants in water seem to have a strong impact for the distribution of drinking water. HDPE pipes are exposed to an internal pressure due to water flow. Furthermore

  4. Analysis of drinking water for the detection of trihalomethanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fayad, N.M.; Iqbal S.

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drinking water of the Dammam metropolitan area is a blend of raw well water and desalinated water obtained from the Al-Azizia seawater desalination plant. Chlorination is the only disinfection method applied to the blended water before the water is pumped into the distribution system. Chlorination of water containing organic compounds results in the formation of trihalomethanes. In general, the known carcinogenic and physiological effects of THMs other than chloroform are limited. However, based on their structural similarity to chloroform, these compounds can be considered health hazards. The present study was carried out in order to determine the extent of the occurrence of THMs in finished drinking water in some of the major cities of the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia.

  5. The effects of wavelength, metals, and reactive oxygen species on the sunlight inactivation of microorganisms: observations and applications to the solar disinfection of drinking water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Michael Benjamin

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Disinfection of Drinking Water and Oral Rehydrationof Boiling to Disinfect Drinking Water in Rural Vietnam.Solar disinfection of drinking water and diarrhoea in Maasai

  6. Minerals leached into drinking water from rubber stoppers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, B.W.; Beal, T.S. (Carbohydrate Nutrition Laboratory, Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center, MD (United States))

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drinking water and its delivery system are potential sources of variation in animal research. Concern arose that rubber stoppers used to cork water bottles might be a source of some nutritionally required minerals which could leach into drinking water. Six types of stoppers, each having different compositions, were cleaned with stainless-steel sipper tubes inserted into them and attached to polypropylene bottles filled with either deionized water (pH 4.5) or acidified-deionized water (pH 2.5). After six days of contact, water levels of copper, magnesium, iron, manganese, zinc, chromium, and selenium were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Additionally, three of the stopper types were analyzed for mineral content. Minerals were present in both stoppers and drinking water. Acidified-deionized water generally leached minerals from the stoppers than did deionized water. The black stopper which is commonly used in animal facilities contained and leached measurable levels of some minerals, but it still can be recommended for typical animal husbandry uses, although other types of stoppers would be more suitable for specific nutritional and toxicologic studies.

  7. Contamination levels of human pharmaceutical compounds in French surface and drinking water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -west France. 98 samples were analysed from 63 stations (surface water and drinking water produced from surfaceContamination levels of human pharmaceutical compounds in French surface and drinking water S therapeutic classes was analysed from resource and drinking water in two catchment basins located in north

  8. Risk perception, drinking water source and quality in a low-income Latino community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Risk perception, drinking water source and quality in a low-income Latino community along the U regarding the quality of municipal drinking water supplies The Arizona Republic. 2007. Thirsty Arizona. Vol of bottled and tap water used by residents in Nogales, AZ according to the EPA primary drinking water

  9. ANNUAL DRINKING WATER REPORT FOR 2013 Texas A&M University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL DRINKING WATER REPORT FOR 2013 Texas A&M University (979-862-4606) The Texas Commission system and has determined that our water is safe to drink. As part of their ongoing monitoring of public water systems the TCEQ has requested us to provide you the following report. The Annual Drinking Water

  10. Introduction Global demand for drinking water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    of water quality perceptions, consumption behavior, and demographics, adapted from Decision Center.bridgeandtunnelclub.com/bigmap/outoftown/arizona/phoenix/publicmarket/index.htm The urban social-ecological system contains both drivers and responses to these environmental changes and Bottled Water Consumption Discussion We found that non-whites report lower water quality, which supports

  11. Private Drinking Water Wells as a Source of Exposure to Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) in Communities Surrounding a Fluoropolymer Production Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Kate; Webster, Thomas F; Bartell, Scott M; Weisskopf, Marc G; Fletcher, Tony; Vieira, Veronica M

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PFOA was detected in public drinking water. The settlementPFOA, or C8) into drinking water. Funds were administered byExposure to PFOA via drinking water Previous studies showed

  12. Private drinking water wells as a source of exposure to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in communities surrounding a fluoropolymer production facility.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Kate; Webster, Thomas F; Bartell, Scott M; Weisskopf, Marc G; Fletcher, Tony; Vieira, Vernica M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PFOA was detected in public drinking water. The settlementPFOA, or C8) into drinking water. Funds were administered byExposure to PFOA via drinking water Previous studies showed

  13. The waters of Southeastern Wisconsin are vast but vulnerable. We depend on our waters for drinking water, irrigation, industry, transportation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    The waters of Southeastern Wisconsin are vast but vulnerable. We depend on our waters for drinking for drinking water is rising in the United States and around the world due to population growth. At the same water, irrigation, industry, transportation, power production, recreation and scenic beauty

  14. 1994 Environmental monitoring drinking water and nonradiological effluent programs annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersen, B.D.; Brock, T.A.; Meachum, T.R.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EG&G Idaho, Inc., initiated monitoring programs for drinking water in 1988 and for nonradiological parameters and pollutants in liquid effluents in 1985. These programs were initiated for the facilities operated by EG&G Idaho for the US Department of Energy at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. On October 1, 1994, Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) replaced EG&G Idaho as the prime contractor at the INEL and assumed responsibility for these programs. Section I discusses the general site characteristics, the analytical laboratories, and sampling methodology general to both programs. Section 2, the Drinking Water Program, tracks the bacteriological, chemical, and radiological parameters required by State and Federal regulations. This section describes the drinking water monitoring activities conducted at 17 LITCO-operated production wells and 11 distribution systems. It also contains all of the drinking water parameters detected and the regulatory limits exceeded during calendar year 1994. In addition, groundwater quality is discussed as it relates to contaminants identified at the wellhead for LITCO production wells. Section 3 discusses the nonradiological liquid effluent monitoring results for 27 liquid effluent streams. These streams are presented with emphasis on calendar year 1994 activities. All parameter measurements and concentrations were below the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act toxic characteristics limits.

  15. Modeling Treatment Decisions, Costs, and Risk Implications of Regulations for the US Water Supply Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Modeling Treatment Decisions, Costs, and Risk Implications of Regulations for the US Water Supply, Carnegie Mellon University ABSTRACT Assessments of the impacts of proposed drinking water standards have. In this research, a new modeling framework is described for evaluating the impacts of multiple drinking water

  16. Drinking Water Problems: Iron and Manganese

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    . The chemical must be in the water for at least 20 minutes for oxi- dation to take place, longer if the water contains colloidal iron/manganese. After solid particles have formed they are filtered, often with a sand filter. Adding aluminum sulfate (alum...

  17. ATSDR MEDIA ANNOUNCEMENT Federal Health Agency Completes Analyses of Tarawa Terrace Drinking Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Laurence J.

    1957 through February 1987, received drinking water contaminated with tetrachloroethylene (PCE of 5 micrograms per liter; the maximum concentration of PCE in the Tarawa Terrace drinking water the levels of PCE and PCE degradation by-products in the drinking water serving their homes in Tarawa Terrace

  18. The water concept in the self-sufficient house Drinking rainwater and reusing wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    the chance to do just that. Lack of drinking water hygiene is one of the main sources of disease transmissionThe water concept in the self-sufficient house Drinking rainwater and reusing wastewater Decentralized systems for drinking water processing could make a significant contribution to the Millennium

  19. Associations Between Drinking Water and Urinary Arsenic Levels and Skin Lesions in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Geen, Alexander

    Associations Between Drinking Water and Urinary Arsenic Levels and Skin Lesions in Bangladesh Graziano, PhD The present study examined the associations between drinking water and urinary arsenic levels currently drinking water containing concentrations of arsenic 50 g/L. The risk for skin lesions in relation

  20. Arsenic in Drinking Water and Skin Lesions: Dose-Response Data from West Bengal, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Arsenic in Drinking Water and Skin Lesions: Dose-Response Data from West Bengal, India Reina Haque the dose-re- sponse relation between low arsenic concentrations in drinking water and arsenic-induced skin peak arsenic concentration in drinking water was 325 g/liter for cases and 180 g/liter for controls

  1. June 20, 2001 Characterization of Arsenic Occurrence in US Drinking Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    June 20, 2001 Characterization of Arsenic Occurrence in US Drinking Water Treatment Facility Source The 1996 amendments to the US Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) mandate revision of current maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for various harmful substances in public drinking water supplies. The determination

  2. Bishop's University "Think Global, Drink Local" Bottled Water Free Implementation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop's University "Think Global, Drink Local" Bottled Water Free Implementation Plan 1 Table.......................................................................................Page 8 #12;Bishop's University "Think Global, Drink Local" Bottled Water Free Implementation Plan 2 Introduction: The "Think Global, Drink Local" Bottled Water Free Campaign, a student run initiative, has been

  3. Original Contribution Arsenic Exposure from Drinking Water and Risk of Premalignant Skin Lesions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Geen, Alexander

    Original Contribution Arsenic Exposure from Drinking Water and Risk of Premalignant Skin Lesions, 2006. Millions of persons around the world are exposed to low doses of arsenic through drinking water from drinking water over a significant period of time. The authors evaluated dose-response relations

  4. Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA): A Summary of the Act and Its Major Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA): A Summary of the Act and Its Major Requirements Mary Tiemann c11173008 . #12;Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA): A Summary of the Act and Its Major Requirements Congressional Research Service Summary This report summarizes the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) and its major

  5. Increased Childhood Liver Cancer Mortality and Arsenic in Drinking Water in Northern Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Increased Childhood Liver Cancer Mortality and Arsenic in Drinking Water in Northern Chile Jane, California Environmental Protection Agency, Oakland, California Abstract Arsenic in drinking water of elevated arsenic levels in drinking water, in particular from 1958 to 1970. This unique exposure scenario

  6. Contamination of drinking-water by arsenic in Bangladesh: a public health emergency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Contamination of drinking-water by arsenic in Bangladesh: a public health emergency Allan H. Smith the history of the discovery of arsenic in drinking-water in Bangladesh and recommends intervention strategies in groundwater indicate that 1 in 10 people who drink water containing 500 mg of arsenic per litre may ultimately

  7. Decrements in Lung Function Related to Arsenic in Drinking Water in West Bengal, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Decrements in Lung Function Related to Arsenic in Drinking Water in West Bengal, India Ondine S­2000, the authors investigated relations between lung function, respiratory symptoms, and arsenic in drinking water. Worldwide, populations have been identified that con- sume drinking water with arsenic concentrations above

  8. Multiple regression models: A methodology for evaluating trihalomethane concentrations in drinking water from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arhonditsis, George B.

    September 2001; accepted 28 January 2002 Abstract The presence of trihalomethanes (THMs) in drinking water in finished drinking water, using data from the Menidi Treatment Plant of Athens. A number of routinely Science Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Multiple regression model; Trihalomethanes; Drinking water

  9. Improvement of Drinking Water Quality in Developing Countries: Microbial and Geogenic Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Improvement of Drinking Water Quality in Developing Countries: Microbial and Geogenic Contamination for chemical and micro- biological treatment of drinking water at the household scale. The course will cover in developing and emerging coun- tries, who wish to learn more about household drinking water quality

  10. Aluminium in drinking water and cognitive decline in elderly subjects: the Paquid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Aluminium in drinking water and cognitive decline in elderly subjects: the Paquid cohort.Rondeau@isped.u-bordeaux2.fr Key words: Cognitive decline, aluminium, silica, drinking water Word count : 954 inserm recently reported a significant association between the concentration of aluminium in drinking water

  11. Arsenic in your water?: Economists study perceptions of risks from drinking water high in arsenic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arsenic in water?your tx H2O | pg. 27 Story by Kathy Wythe Economists study perceptions of risks from drinking water high in arsenic In several ?hot spots? across the United States people may be drinking water with high levels of naturally... occurring arsenic without understanding the associated risks, according to agricultural economists. ?Many households in arsenic ?hot spots? are in fact being exposed to harmful doses of arsenic,? said Dr. Douglass Shaw, professor of agricultural...

  12. Identification of Bacteria in Biofilm and Bulk Water Samples from a Nonchlorinated Model Drinking Water Distribution System: Detection of a Large Nitrite-Oxidizing Population Associated with Nitrospira spp.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martiny, A. C; Albrechtsen, H.-J.; Arvin, E.; Molin, S.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    formation in a model drinking water distribution system. J.and activity in drinking water distribution networks underbacterial species from drinking water biofilms and proof of

  13. Reckoning with risk: a rhetorical analysis of the social construction of risk associated with Texas drinking water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedrich, Cynthia Juanita Matthes

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of drinking water at a time when they assert that they are doing a "better job than ever before. " John B. Mannion, Executive Director of American Water Works Association, talks like a man besieged by enemy agents: "On the one hand, we' ve got... an assortment of special interests undermining public confidence in the safety of drinking water. On the other hand, we' ve got the federal government issuing truckloads of regulations ? some of them of dubious merit and all of them accompanied by enormous...

  14. Author's personal copy Reply to the comment ``Bottled drinking water: Water contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filzmoser, Peter

    Author's personal copy Reply Reply to the comment ``Bottled drinking water: Water contamination glass is not a likely physical process to cause the concentra- tion differences found for the same water with the bottle walls or be due to the formation and dissolution of colloids in the water during storage

  15. Structural Changes of Bimetallic PdX/Cu (1-X) Nanocatalysts Developed for Nitrate Reduction of Drinking Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frenkel, Anatoly

    of Drinking Water Huiping Xu1,2 , Ray Twesten3 , Kathryn Guy4 , John Shapley4 , Charles Werth5 , Anatoly alternative for nitrate removal in drinking water [1]. Fundamental understanding how the atomic arrangement for the purification of drinking water. INTRODUCTION Presently nitrate in drinking water is either not removed

  16. Assessing the Risk of Mercury in Drinking Water after UV Lamp Breaks Page 1 Assessing the Risk of Mercury in Drinking Water after UV Lamp Breaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessing the Risk of Mercury in Drinking Water after UV Lamp Breaks Page 1 Assessing the Risk of Mercury in Drinking Water after UV Lamp Breaks Heidi Borchers University of New Hampshire, Environmental Ultraviolet (UV) lamps generate ultraviolet light through the vaporization of elemental mercury, by using

  17. Bottled drinking water: water contamination from bottle materials (glass, hard PET, soft PET), the influence of colour and acidification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filzmoser, Peter

    Bottled drinking water: water contamination from bottle materials (glass, hard PET, soft PET in glass at pH 3.5). None of the leachates approaches the maximum concentrations for drinking water- QMS) in 294 samples of the same bottled water (predominantly mineral water) sold in the European Union

  18. hat water you're drinking --or sprinkling onto your flowers, or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be found in surface Aluminum may cause Reverse osmosis, distillation Household water: 0.05-0.2 ppm, EPA (Al) water from industrial discoloration of water or or electrodialysis. Secondary Drinking Water Standard containing include increased risk of filtration, reverse osmosis, ultra- Drinking Standard. other elements

  19. Chemical compounds and toxicological assessments of drinking water stored in polyethylene terephthalate (PET)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    Chemical compounds and toxicological assessments of drinking water stored in polyethyleneMS, gas chromatographyemass spectrometry; HDPE, high density polyethylene; HULYs, human blood lymphocytes

  20. NATURAL RADIONUCLIDES MEASUREMENTS IN DRINKING WATER BY LIQUID SCINTILLATION COUNTING. METHODS AND RESULTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    procedure, standardized by International Standard Organization.4 On the contrary, total indicative dose in view of a large scale monitoring program. World Health Organization guidelines for drinking water

  1. Aluminum and copper in drinking water enhance inflammatory oroxidative events specifically in the brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bondy, Stephen Bondy C

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    effects of iron and aluminum on stress-related genelopathy syndrome. Possible aluminum intoxication. N. Engl.Chronic exposure to aluminum in drinking water increases

  2. Aluminum and copper in drinking water enhance inflammatory oroxidative events specifically in the brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bondy, Stephen Bondy C

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2000. Characterization of copper interactions with AlzheimerJ. , Flodman, T. , 1999. Copper in drinking water, Nebraska,the oxidative stress of copper-mediated melanin formation.

  3. Integrating Renewable Energy Resources: a microgrid case study of a Dutch drink water treatment plant.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soshinskaya, M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??In the Netherlands 1.2 billion cubic meters of drinking water are produced each year, which uses about 480 GWh of electricity per year as an (more)

  4. Is climate driving safe drinking water availability and access to sanitation facilities? Antarpreet Jutla1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Is climate driving safe drinking water availability and access to sanitation facilities? Antarpreet that safe drinking water and adequate sanitation facilities lead to a considerable reduction in prevalence Spring, MD 2 Water, Sanitation, Hygiene and Health, Department of Public Health and Environment, World

  5. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use at Wisconsins Drinking Water Utilities. AvailableFinancial Assistance for Small Drinking Water Systems. U.S.of Ground Water and Drinking Water. Report 816-K-02-005.

  6. drinking water. On the basis of the volume of ZnS precipitated in the biofilm, we estimate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    drinking water. On the basis of the volume of ZnS precipitated in the biofilm, we estimate, 647 (1964). 6. W. J. Drury, Water Environ. Res. 71, 1244 (1999). 7. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water, Current Drinking Water Standards (2000). 8

  7. Water Quality Regulations (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of these regulations is to establish water quality standards for the state's surface waters. These standards are intended to restore, preserve and enhance the physical, chemical and...

  8. Environmental justice implications of arsenic contamination in Californias San Joaquin Valley: a cross-sectional, cluster-design examining exposure and compliance in community drinking water systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balazs, Carolina L; Morello-Frosch, Rachel; Hubbard, Alan E; Ray, Isha

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Drinking Water and Environmental Management; 2008. 26.of Drinking Water and Environmental Management; 2008. 28.of Drinking Water and Environmental Management, CDPH), Dr.

  9. Environmental justice implications of arsenic contamination in Californias San Joaquin Valley: a cross-sectional, cluster-design examining exposure and compliance in community drinking water systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balazs, Carolina L; Morello-Frosch, Rachel; Hubbard, Alan E; Ray, Isha

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in community drinking water systems. Environmental Healthconcentrations in drinking water in Chile. Epidemiologyand enforcement of the safe drinking water act: The Arizona

  10. Chemical migration in drinking water stored in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles: a source of controversy.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristina Bach A; Xavier Dauchy A; Marie-christine Chagnon C; Serge Etienne B

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to its chemical inertness and physical properties PET is particularly suitable for food packaging applications, especially for drinking water. More bottled water is consumed than other bottled beverages. This article is a survey and toxicological investigation of chemical compounds, which are able to diffuse from PET bottles to water. The exact detailed chemical composition of plastic materials is known only from information provided by manufacturers. A declaration of conformity according to EC regulation no.10/2011 is required to ensure the safety of plastic materials in contact with foodstuffs. This regulation established a positive list of monomers and additives which are authorized for use in plastic materials. Some substances hal-00683918, version 1- 11 May 2012 are subject to restrictions and/or specifications according to their toxicological data. However, Non-Intentionally Added Substances (NIAS) not listed in this regulation such as breakdown products from monomers and additives and/or impurities found in initial polymerization reactants may be present in a PET bottle wall. Also, recycled PET can be a source of unknown chemical compounds found in water. All these substances may potentially migrate from the PET bottle wall to bottled water.

  11. Is Your Well Water Safe to Drink? Family, Home & Garden Education Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Is Your Well Water Safe to Drink? Family, Home & Garden Education Center practical solutions health. According to Bernie Lucey, senior engineer with the state's Drinking Water Protection Program, 56 the state's suggested standard. Up to 15 percent would flunk the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

  12. Climate change versus urban drinking water supply and management: a case analysis on the coastal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Informatics, Brandenburg University of Technology at Cottbus, P.O. Box. 101344, D-03013 Cottbus, GERMANY (E-mail: shafinoor@yahoo.com; ishafin@yahoo.com) Abstract Clean urban drinking water supply is now a crucial problem; management. INTRODUCTION Clean urban drinking water supply is now a global problem, and most of the countries

  13. Lead in Your Drinking Water Lead (Pb) is an extremely toxic heavy metal that unfortunately occurs widely in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maynard, J. Barry

    Lead in Your Drinking Water Lead (Pb) is an extremely toxic heavy metal that unfortunately occurs of metallic lead in the soil (4) Drinking water ­ water as it leaves the treatment plant has no lead plumbing components Your exposure to lead in drinking water is at the faucet, but the lead can come from

  14. For Immediate Release --Monday, March 18, 2013 From Glaciers to drinking water: University of Lethbridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seldin, Jonathan P.

    change and increasing demands due to human population and industrial activity to drinking water: University of Lethbridge Water Resource Experts Available on World gone? - Pipeline oil spills and river systems how fast do

  15. Determining the removal effectiveness of flame retardants from drinking water treatment processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Joseph C. (Joseph Chris), 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low concentrations of xenobiotic chemicals have recently become a concern in the surface water environment. The concern expands to drinking water treatment processes, and whether or not they remove these chemicals while ...

  16. A field-based study of alternative microbial indicator tests for drinking water quality in Northern Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Keefe, Samantha F

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safe drinking water is essential for human survival, yet it is unavailable to over 1 billion of the world's people living in poverty (World Bank, 2009). The current methods used to identify drinking water sources are ...

  17. The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com Analysis of the effect of aluminum in drinking water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of aluminum in drinking water and transferrin C2 allele on Alzheimer's disease. a Virginie Rondeau, b Albert.Rondeau@isped.u-bordeaux2.fr Key words: aluminum, drinking water, transferrin, apolipoprotein E, Alzheimer's disease Word of a link between aluminum in drinking water and Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been supported by several

  18. Brief Original Contribution Case-Control Study of Arsenic in Drinking Water and Kidney Cancer in Uniquely

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Brief Original Contribution Case-Control Study of Arsenic in Drinking Water and Kidney Cancer for publication March 11, 2013. Millions of people worldwide are exposed to arsenic in drinking water of dose-response, we believe there is now sufficient evidence in humans that drinking-water arsenic causes

  19. When preparing for a disaster, it is important to provide for an adequate supply of water for drinking and cook-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    in a household needs about 2 quarts of liquid per day for drinking and cooking. This can come from water for drinking as well as other liquids, such as juices or soft drinks. Additional clean water is neededWhen preparing for a disaster, it is important to provide for an adequate supply of water

  20. 1308 volume 119 | number 9 | September 2011 Environmental Health Perspectives Arsenic in drinking water is a major public

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    in drinking water is a major public health problem in the Bengal delta, affecting millions of people studies have shown that methylation affects the toxicity of ingested InAs. In drinking water, InAs exists effects resulting from exposure to InAs in drinking water. We were also interested in urine creatinine

  1. Am J Epidemiol . Author manuscript Aluminum and silica in drinking water and the risk of Alzheimers disease'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Am J Epidemiol . Author manuscript Page /1 10 Aluminum and silica in drinking water and the risk associations between exposure to aluminum or silica from drinking water and risk of cognitive decline, dementia of dementia, aged' 65 years and over living in 91 civil drinking water areas in Southern France. Two measures

  2. Ground Water Management Regulations (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The rules and regulations apply to the management of the state's ground water resources. In addition, the Commissioner of Conservation has recommended that oil and gas operators with an interest...

  3. State Water Permit Regulation (Arkansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the purpose of this regulation to adopt standards applicable to the storage, discharge, or disposal of any waste which, if unregulated, will cause pollution of waters of the state or result...

  4. Perfluoroalkyl Acids in Drinking Water: Sources, Fate and Removal C. Eschauzier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Rooij, Robert

    for the production of drinking water, if PFAAs are present in the groundwater they will most certainly pass through shown in several papers. The different treatment steps used such as coagulation, pellet softening, sand

  5. A single fermentation tube method for the bacteriological analysis of drinking water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, John Wesley

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A SINGLE FERMENTATION 'ICE METHOD FOR THE BACTERIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF DRINKING WATER A Thesis by JOHN WESLEY WATTS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A lk M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1980 Major Subject: Civil Engineering A SINGLE FERMENTATION IIJBE METHOD FOR THE BACTERIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF DRINKING WATER A Thesis by JOHN WESLEY WATTS Approved as to style and content by: ( Chairman of Committee y...

  6. Inland Wetlands and Water Courses Regulations (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Regulated activities in or near inland wetlands and water courses include the removal or depositing of material, land or water obstruction or alteration, construction, pollution, or water diversion...

  7. September 3, 1999 Characterization of Arsenic Occurrence in US Drinking Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    September 3, 1999 Characterization of Arsenic Occurrence in US Drinking Water Treatment Facility in treatment facility finished water may not be low enough to adequately reduce exposure to the carcinogen occurrence in raw water and the costs and removal efficiencies of various treatment options. J.R. Lockwood

  8. Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results and Policy Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathieu, Johanna L.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Kowolik, Kristin; Addy, Susan E.A.

    2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    ARUBA (Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash) has proven effective at removing high concentrations of arsenic from drinking water in Bangladesh. During fieldwork in four sub-districts of the country, ARUBA reduced arsenic levels ranging from 200 to 900 ppb to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. The technology is cost-effective because the substrate--bottom ash from coal fired power plants--is a waste material readily available in South Asia. In comparison to similar technologies, ARUBA uses less media for arsenic removal due to its high surface area to volume ratio. Hence, less waste is produced. A number of experiments were conducted in Bangladesh to determine the effectiveness of various water treatment protocols. It was found that (1) ARUBA removes more than half of the arsenic from water within five minutes of treatment, (2) ARUBA, that has settled at the bottom of a treatment vessel, continues to remove arsenic for 2-3 days, (3) ARUBA's arsenic removal efficiency can be improved through sequential partial dosing (adding a given amount of ARUBA in fractions versus all at once), and (4) allowing water to first stand for two to three days followed by treatment with ARUBA produced final arsenic levels ten times lower than treating water directly out of the well. Our findings imply a number of tradeoffs between ARUBA's effective arsenic removal capacity, treatment system costs, and waste output. These tradeoffs, some a function of arsenic-related policies in Bangladesh (e.g., waste disposal regulations), must be considered when designing an arsenic removal system. We propose that the most attractive option is to use ARUBA in communityscale water treatment centers, installed as public-private partnerships, in Bangladeshi villages.

  9. Sector reform impact on rural drinking water schemes -A case study from Raigad district in Maharashtra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    of India (GoI) policy and its influence on a subject, viz., water, which falls within the state's purview policy in Maharashtra. We observe that compared to what is reflected in the national rural drinking water unchanged in spite of the changes in policy regimes. We find that poor capacity and expertise of state

  10. University of the District of Columbia District of Columbia Drinking Water Blind Taste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    University of the District of Columbia District of Columbia Drinking Water Blind Taste Testing for Nutrition, Diet and Health Cooperative Extension Service University of the District of Columbia Dawanna University of the District of Columbia Date: May 2005 Prepared for the DC Water Resources Research Institute

  11. Effects of storage temperature and duration on release of antimony and bisphenol A from polyethylene terephthalate drinking water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    polyethylene terephthalate drinking water bottles of China Ying-Ying Fan a , Jian-Lun Zheng a , Jing-Hua Ren Accepted 9 May 2014 Available online xxx Keywords: Polyethylene terephthalate Antimony Bisphenol A Release of antimony (Sb) and bisphenol A (BPA) from 16 brands of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) drinking water

  12. Direct Determination of Trace-Level Haloacetic Acids in Drinking Water by Two-1 Dimensional Ion Chromatography with Suppressed Conductivity2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Direct Determination of Trace-Level Haloacetic Acids in Drinking Water by Two-1 Dimensional Ion thetreatment process of drinking water, disinfectants (chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxide)13 react on water of the nine existing Halo-Acetic Acids (HAA) are commonly found15 in drinking water(Monochloroacetic acid MCAA

  13. Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    fingerprinting | fracking | hydrology and ecology Unconventional sources of gas and oil are transforming energy and horizontal drilling are also growing (4, 5). These concerns include changes in air quality (6), human health the greenhouse gas balance (8, 9). Perhaps the biggest health concern remains the potential for drinking water

  14. Methane contamination of drinking water accompanying gas-well drilling and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Methane contamination of drinking water accompanying gas-well drilling and hydraulic fracturing (received for review January 13, 2011) Directional drilling and hydraulic-fracturing technologies are dra use (1­5). Directional drilling and hydrau- lic-fracturing technologies are allowing expanded natural

  15. Methane contamination of drinking water accompanying gas-well drilling and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Methane contamination of drinking water accompanying gas-well drilling and hydraulic fracturing (received for review January 13, 2011) Directional drilling and hydraulic-fracturing technologies are dra of energy use (1­5). Directional drilling and hydrau- lic-fracturing technologies are allowing expanded

  16. Removing Radium-226 Contamination From Ion Exchange Resins Used in Drinking Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Removing Radium-226 Contamination From Ion Exchange Resins Used in Drinking Water Treatment P r o b of groundwater containing high levels of radium-226 activity (Objective 1) were regenerated with prescribed brine that the concentration of salt in the brine cleaning solution was the most influential factor in the resin regeneration

  17. Chemical migration in drinking water stored in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles: a source of controversy.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    may be present in a PET bottle wall. Also, recycled PET can be a source of unknown chemical compounds1 Chemical migration in drinking water stored in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles: a source;2 Abstract: Due to its chemical inertness and physical properties PET is particularly suitable for food

  18. An environmental sensor network to determine drinking water quality and security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ailamaki, Anastassia

    An environmental sensor network to determine drinking water quality and security Anastassia. Small Civil & Environmental Engineering and Engineering & Public Policy Carnegie Mellon University ms35@andrew.cmu.edu Jeanne VanBriesen Civil and Environmental Engineering and Biomedical Engineering Carnegie

  19. The effect of chilled drinking water on heat-stressed lactating Holstein cows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Christopher Charles

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    20 consumption of non-lactating dairy cows. J. Daizy Scr. 47:382. 20 Dillon, R. D. and R. E. Nichols. 1955. Changes in temperature of reticulo-ruminal content following the drinking of water. Am. J. Vet. Res. 16:69. 21 DuBois, P. R. and D. J...

  20. TEEX tackles toxins: TEEX develops ECLOX protocols to detect toxins in drinking water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Leslie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Specialist Keith McLeroy: The equipment came with minimal instructions and no protocols for establishing baseline data for comparing the ECLOX readings. TCEQ turned to the TEEX Water and Wastewater Program to establish baseline data for 24 public...,? said McLeroy of TEEX?s Infrastructure Training and Safety Institute. ?After many years of looking at every research paper with the word ?ECLOX? in it, we were the first to actually achieve this (developing the protocols) with drinking water...

  1. Social Perceptions of Drinking Water Quality in South Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Victor

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    quality in the Lower Rio Grande Valley were examined, notably trying to assess the gap in social perceptions between key water managers and the colonia residents. A semi-structured interview methodology was used upon the key water managers in order...

  2. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Shifting To Sustainable Drinking Water Consumption At UBC: A Social Marketing Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drinking Water Consumption At UBC: A Social Marketing Plan Rosalind Sadowski, Angela Willock University; SHIFTING TO SUSTAINABLE DRINKING WATER CONSUMPTION AT UBC: A SOCIAL MARKETING PLAN ROSALIND SADOWSKI....................................................................................................... 5 About Us, the Authors Overall Timeline and Project Context Drinking Water at UBC: Who

  3. Detection of Infectious Cryptosporidium in Drinking Water Waterborne transmission of the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium remains a significant threat of disease with severe consequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Detection of Infectious Cryptosporidium in Drinking Water Waterborne transmission of the protozoan with weakened immune systems. New drinking water standards under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USE to minimize the risk of Cryptosporidium on public health. Properly operating drinking water treatment plants

  4. 920 Articles | JNCI Vol. 99, Issue 12 | June 20, 2007 Drinking water in region II of Chile is supplied mainly by rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    920 Articles | JNCI Vol. 99, Issue 12 | June 20, 2007 Drinking water in region II of Chile in the main city of region II, Antofagasta, was approximately 90 µg/L (1), nearly twice the drinking water.permissions@oxfordjournals.org. Fifty-Year Study of Lung and Bladder Cancer Mortality in Chile Related to Arsenic in Drinking Water

  5. Risk perception, drinking water source and quality in a low-income Latino community along the U.S.-Mexico Border.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    1 Risk perception, drinking water source and quality in a low-income Latino community along the U Dental Association (ADA) is concerned that individuals who primarily drink bottled water may, elucidated why Latinos perceive tap water to be unsafe for drinking, and identified whether individuals have

  6. Water Pollution Control Permit Regulations (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations outline the permits and permitting processes for point discharges to surface waters and outline the monitoring and reporting requirements.

  7. The Drinking Water Security and Safety Amendments of 2002: Is America's Drinking Water Infrastructure Safer Four Years Later?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shermer, Steven D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    355 tertiary butyl ether ("MTBE"). 43 8 Amazingly, even "[c]Water: Study Estimates Cost of MTBE Remedia- tion At Up to $

  8. Underground Injection Control Regulations (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This article prohibits injection of hazardous or radioactive wastes into or above an underground source of drinking water, establishes permit conditions and states regulations for design,...

  9. Measurement of methyl-tert-butyl-ether (MTBE) in raw drinking water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davisson, M L; Koester, C J; Moran, J E

    1999-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to assess the pathways for human exposure to methyl-tert-butyl-ether (MTBE) and to understand the extent of MTBE contamination in watersheds, a purge and trap gas chromatographic mass spectrometric method to measure part-per-trillion (ppt) concentrations of MTBE in environmental waters was developed. A variety of California's raw drinking waters were analyzed. No detectable MTBE was found in deep groundwater (>1000 feet). However shallow groundwater ({approx}250 feet) contained MTBE concentrations of non-detect to 1300 ppt. MTBE concentrations measured in rivers and lakes ranged from non-detect to 3500 ppt. East (San Francisco) Bay area rain water contained approximately 80 ppt MTBE.

  10. Providing safe drinking water to 1.2 billion unserved people

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gadgil, Ashok J.; Derby, Elisabeth A.

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite substantial advances in the past 100 years in public health, technology and medicine, 20% of the world population, mostly comprised of the poor population segments in developing countries (DCs), still does not have access to safe drinking water. To reach the United Nations (UN) Millennium Goal of halving the number of people without access to safe water by 2015, the global community will need to provide an additional one billion urban residents and 600 million rural residents with safe water within the next twelve years. This paper examines current water treatment measures and implementation methods for delivery of safe drinking water, and offers suggestions for making progress towards the goal of providing a timely and equitable solution for safe water provision. For water treatment, based on the serious limitations of boiling water and chlorination, we suggest an approach based on filtration coupled with ultraviolet (UV) disinfection, combined with public education. Additionally, owing to the capacity limitations for non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to take on this task primarily on their own, we suggest a strategy based on financially sustainable models that include the private sector as well as NGOs.

  11. Regulated water production to control water coning in oil wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sim?ha, I?s?vara

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REGULATED WATER PRODUCTION TO CONTROL WATER CONING IN OIL WELLS A Thesis by ISHWAR SINGH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1975 Major... Subject: Petroleum Engineering REGULATED WATER PRODUCTION TO CONTROL WATER CONING IN OIL WELLS A Thesis by ISHWAR SINGH Approved as to style and content by (Chairman of Committee) (Membe ) (Head of Departmen lVlemb ) May 1975 ( I ABST RACT...

  12. Remote community drinking water supply : mechanisms of uranium retention and adsorption by ultrafiltration, nanofiltration and reverse osmosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulte-Herbruggen, Helfrid Maria Albertina

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Worldwide, around 884 million people lack access to safe drinking water. To address this, groundwater sources such as boreholes and wells are often installed in remote locations especially in developing countries. However, ...

  13. Study on radon and radium concentrations in drinking water in west region of Iran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forozani, Ghasem

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most important characterizations of social health is existence the availability of safe drinking water. Since one of the sources of water contamination is nuclear contamination from radon gas, so in this research radon 222 concentration levels in water supplies in the Toyserkan (a region located in the west of Iran) is investigated. For measuring radon gas in water wells and springs Lucas chamber method is used. Review the results of these measurements that taken from 15th place show that, only five sites have radon concentrations above the limit dose. To reduce radon concentration, it is better to keep water in open pools in contact with air before the water is delivered to users.

  14. Fisk-based criteria to support validation of detection methods for drinking water and air.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonell, M.; Bhattacharyya, M.; Finster, M.; Williams, M.; Picel, K.; Chang, Y.-S.; Peterson, J.; Adeshina, F.; Sonich-Mullin, C.; Environmental Science Division; EPA

    2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared to support the validation of analytical methods for threat contaminants under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC) program. It is designed to serve as a resource for certain applications of benchmark and fate information for homeland security threat contaminants. The report identifies risk-based criteria from existing health benchmarks for drinking water and air for potential use as validation targets. The focus is on benchmarks for chronic public exposures. The priority sources are standard EPA concentration limits for drinking water and air, along with oral and inhalation toxicity values. Many contaminants identified as homeland security threats to drinking water or air would convert to other chemicals within minutes to hours of being released. For this reason, a fate analysis has been performed to identify potential transformation products and removal half-lives in air and water so appropriate forms can be targeted for detection over time. The risk-based criteria presented in this report to frame method validation are expected to be lower than actual operational targets based on realistic exposures following a release. Note that many target criteria provided in this report are taken from available benchmarks without assessing the underlying toxicological details. That is, although the relevance of the chemical form and analogues are evaluated, the toxicological interpretations and extrapolations conducted by the authoring organizations are not. It is also important to emphasize that such targets in the current analysis are not health-based advisory levels to guide homeland security responses. This integrated evaluation of chronic public benchmarks and contaminant fate has identified more than 200 risk-based criteria as method validation targets across numerous contaminants and fate products in drinking water and air combined. The gap in directly applicable values is considerable across the full set of threat contaminants, so preliminary indicators were developed from other well-documented benchmarks to serve as a starting point for validation efforts. By this approach, at least preliminary context is available for water or air, and sometimes both, for all chemicals on the NHSRC list that was provided for this evaluation. This means that a number of concentrations presented in this report represent indirect measures derived from related benchmarks or surrogate chemicals, as described within the many results tables provided in this report.

  15. Lead in Your Drinking Water Lead (Pb) is an extremely toxic heavy metal that unfortunately occurs widely in our environment. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maynard, J. Barry

    Lead in Your Drinking Water Lead (Pb) is an extremely toxic heavy metal that unfortunately occurs of metallic lead in the soil (4) Drinking water ­ water as it leaves the treatment plant has no lead of connection. (In some cases, the water meter as well as the curb stop is outside the house.) Common metals

  16. Division of Water, Part 675: Great Lakes Water Withdrawal Registration Regulations (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations set forth requirements for the registration of water withdrawals and reporting of water losses from the Great Lakes Basin. The regulations apply to water withdrawals from...

  17. On 1 January 2006, a new U.S. drinking water standard of 10 g arsenic/L will come into effect [U.S. Environmental Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Geen, Alexander

    On 1 January 2006, a new U.S. drinking water standard of 10 µg arsenic/L will come into effect [U limit of As in drinking water from 50 µg/L to 10 µg/L because it promises to reduce the risk of an array states, where drinking water sources are most likely to exceed the 10 µg/L limit, public agencies

  18. Aluminum and silica intake in drinking water and the risk of Alzheimer's disease or cognitive decline: findings of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Aluminum and silica intake in drinking water and the risk of Alzheimer's disease or cognitive,2 , Commenges Daniel1,2 , Helmer Catherine2,3 , Jean-François Dartigues2,3 . Abbreviations: Al, Aluminum; AD, Alzheimer's Disease; MMSE, Mini Mental State Examination; Si, Silica Running head: Aluminum, silica in water

  19. 1.2 What pressure difference must be generated across the length of a 15 cm vertical drinking straw in order to drink a water-like liquid of density 1.0 g cm-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Findley, Gary L.

    in order to drink a water-like liquid of density 1.0 g cm-3 ? 1.6 Charles' law is sometimes expressed1.2 What pressure difference must be generated across the length of a 15 cm vertical drinking straw

  20. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich; Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Brown, Rich

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    As American drinking water agencies face higher production costs, demand, and energy prices, they seek opportunities to reduce costs without negatively affecting the quality of the water they deliver. This guide describes resources for cost-effectively improving the energy efficiency of U.S. public drinking water facilities. The guide (1) describes areas of opportunity for improving energy efficiency in drinking water facilities; (2) provides detailed descriptions of resources to consult for each area of opportunity; (3) offers supplementary suggestions and information for the area; and (4) presents illustrative case studies, including analysis of cost-effectiveness.

  1. Chemical drinking water quality in Ghana: Water costs and scope for advanced treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossiter, Helfrid M.A.; Owusu, Peter A; Awuah, Esi; MacDonald, Alan M; Schfer, Andrea

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To reduce child mortality and improve health in Ghana boreholes and wells are being installed across the country by the private sector, NGOs and the Ghanaian government. Water quality is not generally monitored once a ...

  2. Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MtBE) contamination of the City of Santa Monica drinking water supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, A.; Farrow, J.R.C. [Komex H2O Science, Huntington Beach, CA (United States); Rodriguez, R.A. [City of Santa Monica, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the summer of 1996, the City of Santa Monica ceased pumping groundwater from two Well Fields (Charnock and Arcadia) used for public drinking water supply due to persistent and increasing concentrations of MtBE in all seven municipal water supply wells. This lost production accounted for 50% of the City`s total drinking water supply. In late 1996, the City, in cooperation with State and Federal agencies, initiated an investigation of MtBE contamination at the two well fields. The objectives of the investigation were as follows: (1) Review available data on the production, use, chemical characteristics, fate and transport, toxicology, and remediation of MtBE; (2) Identify locations of potential sources of MtBE groundwater contamination at the well fields; (3) Develop an understanding of the hydrologic pathways from the potential sources to the drinking water wells; and (4) Evaluate alternative treatment technologies for the removal of MtBE from drinking water. In addition to a review of available information about MtBE, the investigation included an extensive review of literature and available data relevant to the well fields, including well field production histories, site and regional hydrogeology, all well logs and production in the groundwater basins, general groundwater quality, and the record of MtBE detection. Based upon the review of background information, conceptual hydrogeologic models were developed. A detailed review of agency files for over 45 potential source sites was conducted. The information from this review was summarized, and source site screening and ranking criteria were developed. A field program was conducted at the major well field (Charnock), including soil gas surveys, CPTs, soil borings and well installations, geophysics, and aquifer testing. The field program provided site data which allowed the conceptual hydrogeologic model to be refitted to actual site conditions.

  3. Review of potential technologies for the treatment of Methyl tertiary butyl Ether (MtBE) in drinking water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, A.; Browne, T.E. [Komex H2O Science, Huntington Beach, CA (United States); Devinny, J.S. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    At present, the state of knowledge on effective treatment technologies for MtBE in drinking water, and groundwater in general, is limited. Research by others is focusing on the remediation of MtBE close to the point of release. The City of Santa Monica, MWD, Komex and USC are currently conducting research into different technologies that could be used to remove MtBE from drinking water supplies. The objectives of the research are to evaluate different treatment technologies to identify cost-effective and technically feasible alternatives for the removal of MtBE from drinking water. The evaluation is considering moderate to high water flow rates (100 to 2,000+ gpm) and low to moderate MtBE concentrations (<2,000 {mu}g/l). The research program includes four phases: (1) Literature Review; (2) Bench Scale Study; (3) Field Scale Pre-pilot Study; and (4) Summary Evaluation. This paper presents some preliminary information and findings from the first phase of this research - the literature review. The review discusses the chemical properties of MtBE and how they affect remediation and thus, an evaluation of alternative treatment technologies. The review of available literature, and the applicability and limitations of the following technologies are presented in detail.

  4. Removal mechanisms of organic and inorganic solutes in raw, upland drinking water by nanofiltration: influence of solute-solute and solute-membrane interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Munari, Annalisa; Munari, Annalisa de

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanofiltration (NF) membranes have been applied successfully for the removal of inorganic and organic pollutants, including micropollutants, from drinking water for the past two decades. However, a complete and quantitative ...

  5. High density polyethylene (HDPE) containers as an alternative to polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles for solar disinfection of drinking water in northern region, Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yazdani, Iman

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the technical feasibility of high density polyethylene (HDPE) containers as an alternative to polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles for the solar disinfection of drinking water ...

  6. Analysis of 129I in Groundwater Samples: Direct and Quantitative Results below the Drinking Water Standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Christopher F.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Lindberg, Michael J.

    2007-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to its long half-life (15.7 million years) and relatively unencumbered migration in subsurface environments, 129I has been recognized as a contaminant of concern at numerous federal, private, and international facilities. In order to understand the long-term risk associated with 129I at these locations, quantitative analysis of groundwater samples must be performed. However, the ability to quantitatively assess the 129I content in groundwater samples requires specialized extraction and sophisticated analytical techniques, which are complicated and not always available to the general scientific community. This paper highlights an analytical method capable of directly quantifying 129I in groundwater samples at concentrations below the MCL without the need for sample pre-concentration. Samples were analyzed on a Perkin Elmer ELAN DRC II ICP-MS after minimal dilution using O2 as the reaction gas. Analysis of continuing calibration verification standards indicated that the DRC mode could be used for quantitative analysis of 129I in samples below the drinking water standard (0.0057 ng/ml or 1 pCi/L). The low analytical detection limit of 129I analysis in the DRC mode coupled with minimal sample dilution (1.02x) resulted in a final sample limit of quantification of 0.0051 ng/ml. Subsequent analysis of three groundwater samples containing 129I resulted in fully quantitative results in the DRC mode, and spike recovery analyses performed on all three samples confirmed that the groundwater matrix did not adversely impact the analysis of 129I in the DRC mode. This analytical approach has been proven to be a cost-effective, high-throughput technique for the direct, quantitative analysis of 129I in groundwater samples at concentrations below the current MCL.

  7. Regulation of Gas, Electric, and Water Companies (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Public Service Commission is responsible for regulating gas, electric, and water companies in the state. This legislation contains provisions for such companies, addressing planning and siting...

  8. Research | Childrens Health Thyroid Function and Perchlorate in Drinking Water: An Evaluation among California Newborns, 1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patricia A. Buffler; Michael A. Kelsh; Edmund C. Lau; Charlotte H. Edinboro; Julie C. Barnard; George W. Rutherford; Jorge J. Daaboul; Lynn Palmer; Fred W. Lorey

    ) has been detected in groundwater sources in numerous communities in California and other parts of the United States, raising concerns about potential impacts on health. For California communities where ClO 4 was tested in 1997 and 1998, we evaluated the prevalence of primary congenital hypothyroidism (PCH) and high thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels among the 342,257 California newborns screened in 1998. We compared thyroid function results among newborns from 24 communities with average ClO 4 concentrations in drinking water> 5 g/L (n = 50,326) to newborns from 287 communities with average concentrations ? 5 g/L (n = 291,931). ClO 4 concentrations obtained from the California Drinking Water Program provided source-specific data for estimating weighted average concentrations in community water. Fifteen cases of PCH from communities with average concentration> 5 g/L were observed, with 20.4 expected [adjusted prevalence odds ratio (POR) = 0.71; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 0.401.19]. Although only 36 % of all California newborns were screened before 24 hr of

  9. Drinking Water Systems, Hydrology, and Childhood GastrointestinalIllnessinCentralandNorthernWisconsin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    water monitoring and surface water treatment. Com- munity municipal water systems without water treatment tend to have higher rates of water- borne disease.4,5 Water treatment refers to multiple methods, pathogens that survive treatment or infiltrate finished water distribution systems cause a sizeable GI

  10. Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance in Terrestrial Plants Water Regulation on LandWater Regulation on Land --PlantsPlants WWipip= W= Wrr + W+ Waa --WWtt --WWss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

    1 Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance in Terrestrial Plants Water Regulation on LandWater waters internal water WWrr =Roots=Roots WWaa = Air= Air WWtt = Transpiration= Transpiration WWss = Secretions= Secretions Water Regulation on Land - Plants Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance

  11. Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the embodied energy in drinking water supply systems: a caselosses to 5% of total drinking water supply for threeResearch Council. Drinking Water Distribution Systems:

  12. Well Owner's Guide To Water Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    's groundwater and guidelines, including national drinking water standards, to test well water to insure safe drinking water in private wells. National drinking water standards and common methods of home water .....................22 Contaminants in Water........................................23 Drinking Water Guidelines

  13. Environmental Regulations, Air and Water Pollution, & Infant Mortality in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenstone, Michael

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the most comprehensive data file ever compiled on air pollution, water pollution, environmental regulations, and infant mortality from a developing country, the paper examines the effectiveness of Indias environmental ...

  14. Regulation of Dams and Bridges Affecting Navigable Waters (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chapter 31 of the Wisconsin Statutes lays out the regulations relevant to dams and bridges on or near navigable waters. This statute establishes that the Department of Natural Resources has...

  15. Regulations Establishing Water Quality Standards for Surface Water of the State of Arkansas (Arkansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Regulations Establishing Water Quality Standards are established pursuant to the provisions of Subchapter 2 of the Arkansas Water and Air Pollution Control Act (Act 472 of the Acts of Arkansas...

  16. Occurrence and Potential Human-Health Relevance of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water from Domestic Wells in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Occurrence and Potential Human-Health Relevance of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water from Domestic Wells in the United States *Barbara L. Rowe1 , Patricia L. Toccalino2 , Michael J. Moran1 , John S. Zogorski1 , Curtis V. Price1 1 United States Geological Survey, Road, Rapid City, SD 57702 USA

  17. The effects of sulfate fertilization and high levels of sulfate and salt drinking water on the growth and mineral status of ruminants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Kehe

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three experiments were conducted to determine the effects of sulfate (SO??) in forage and drinking water on the performance and mineral status of cattle and sheep. In Experiment 1, forty-eight late gestation crossbred cows were grazed on twelve 10...

  18. Current and Long-Term Effects of Delta Water Quality on Drinking Water Treatment Costs from Disinfection Byproduct Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wei-Hsiang; Haunschild, Kristine; Lund, Jay R.; Fleenor, William E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    existing treatment plant. American Water Woks Association Water Quality Technology.plant, representing an existing treatment configuration, to add alternative disinfection and other technologies.

  19. Drinking Water as Route of Exposure to Microcystins in Great Lakes Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    treatment of their water supplies and thus be more susceptible to toxins making it through to the finished processing. This study will tell us whether water treatment plants are effective in removing microcystins into a format that is useful to small water treatment operators, which are one of the target communities. #12

  20. 1 INTRODUCTION Chlorine is a common disinfectant used in drinking water distribution systems to ensure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coello, Carlos A. Coello

    as the water flows from the outlet of the water treatment plant (usual location for post-treatment chlorine to the complex physical, chemical and biological reactions that occur in water as it travels from treatment plant of Chemical Engineering, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Australia G. West Department of Computing

  1. Eau Canada: The Future of Canada's Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laberge, Yves

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water, and especially drinking water, in Canada. The editor,near Quebec City, where drinking water was contaminated over

  2. Whats in Your Water?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polasko, Alexandra

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High Levels of Sulfate in Drinking Water Study. Centers forout that their drinking water wells contained TCE cleanup the towns drinking water, which is still

  3. Nathan Bryant Clean drinking water is a major concern throughout the world. In

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, Sharmila M.

    the bacteria, but it is time consuming and requires thermal energy. Ceramic filters are a cost effective way the water through the ceramic. This pumping also provides a back-flush of purified water to self ­ $8 #12;Ceramic filters in Cambodia http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPvHtj RvWFM #12;High-tech Ceramic

  4. Treatment of drinking water to improve its sanitary or bacteriological quality is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,000 gallons), such an approach can be wasteful, increasing energy costs for the well pump to refill the tank Chlorine Amounts To sanitize water properly, enough chlorine needs to be added to a storage tank to reach bacteria have been properly destroyed by the sanitation process, submit water samples from a faucet served

  5. Naturally-Occurring Radionuclides In Drinking Water From Surface And Groundwater Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carvalho, F. P.; Madruga, M. J.; Oliveira, J. M.; Lopes, I.; Ferrador, G.; Sequeira, M. M. [Nuclear and Technological Institute (ITN) Department of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)

    2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactivity in water for human consumption is under closer scrutiny than ever before and many countries adopted guideline values based on total alpha and total beta activity measurements. Although most waters from surface circulation meet these guidelines, it is frequently found that groundwater exceed guideline values. Results of water analyses by alpha spectrometry clarified that the main radionuclides present are from the uranium decay series, such as uranium isotopes, radium ({sup 226}Ra), radon ({sup 222}Rn), and also {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po. Occasionally, groundwater displayed {sup 226}Ra concentrations higher than 1 Bq L{sup -1} and {sup 222}Rn concentrations above 1000 Bq L{sup -1}. Nevertheless, lack of conformity of these waters with guidelines adopted, generally, is not due to anthropogenic inputs.

  6. Viscosity of interfacial water regulates ice nucleation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Kaiyong; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Qiaolan; Zhang, Yifan [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Key Laboratory of Green Printing, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China) [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Key Laboratory of Green Printing, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xu, Shun; Zhou, Xin [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)] [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Cui, Dapeng; Wang, Jianjun, E-mail: wangj220@iccas.ac.cn; Song, Yanlin [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Key Laboratory of Green Printing, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Key Laboratory of Green Printing, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Ice formation on solid surfaces is an important phenomenon in many fields, such as cloud formation and atmospheric icing, and a key factor for applications in preventing freezing. Here, we report temperature-dependent nucleation rates of ice for hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. The results show that hydrophilic surface presents a lower ice nucleation rate. We develop a strategy to extract the thermodynamic parameters, J{sub 0} and ?, in the context of classical nucleation theory. From the extracted J{sub 0} and ?, we reveal the dominant role played by interfacial water. The results provide an insight into freezing mechanism on solid surfaces.

  7. BUCKS COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH RULES AND REGULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Protection as set forth under the PA Safe Drinking Water Act. Monitoring, test, agricultural, and geothermal wells not used for human consumption do not fall under these rules and regulations. SECTION TWO

  8. Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    , and other things you should know about drinking water. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) have strict standards for all drinking-quality analyses. Every regulated contaminant that was detected in the water, even in the most minute traces

  9. Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    , and other things you should know about drinking water. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) have strict standards for all drinking-quality analyses. Every regulated contaminant that was detected in the water, even the most minute trace, is listed

  10. Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.; GADGIL, ASHOK J.; ADDY, SUSAN E.A.; KOWOLIK, KRISTIN

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe laboratory and field results of a novel arsenic removal adsorbent called 'Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash' (ARUBA). ARUBA is prepared by coating particles of coal bottom ash, a waste material from coal fired power plants, with iron (hydr)oxide. The coating process is simple and conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Material costs for ARUBA are estimated to be low (~;;$0.08 per kg) and arsenic remediation with ARUBA has the potential to be affordable to resource-constrained communities. ARUBA is used for removing arsenic via a dispersal-and-removal process, and we envision that ARUBA would be used in community-scale water treatment centers. We show that ARUBA is able to reduce arsenic concentrations in contaminated Bangladesh groundwater to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. Using the Langmuir isotherm (R2 = 0.77) ARUBA's adsorption capacity in treating real groundwater is 2.6x10-6 mol/g (0.20 mg/g). Time-to-90percent (defined as the time interval for ARUBA to remove 90percent of the total amount of arsenic that is removed at equilibrium) is less than one hour. Reaction rates (pseudo-second-order kinetic model, R2>_ 0.99) increase from 2.4x105 to 7.2x105 g mol-1 min-1 as the groundwater arsenic concentration decreases from 560 to 170 ppb. We show that ARUBA's arsenic adsorption density (AAD), defined as the milligrams of arsenic removed at equilibrium per gram of ARUBA added, is linearly dependent on the initial arsenic concentration of the groundwater sample, for initial arsenic concentrations of up to 1600 ppb and an ARUBA dose of 4.0 g/L. This makes it easy to determine the amount of ARUBA required to treat a groundwater source when its arsenic concentration is known and less than 1600 ppb. Storing contaminated groundwater for two to three days before treatment is seen to significantly increase ARUBA's AAD. ARUBA can be separated from treated water by coagulation and clarification, which is expected to be less expensive than filtration of micron-scale particles, further contributing to the affordability of a community-scale water treatment center.

  11. An evaluation of household drinking water treatment systems in Peru : the table filter and the safe water system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coulbert, Brittany, 1981-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) storage, and education. Tests on the SWSs in Peru demonstrated 99.6% E.coli removal and 95% total coliform removal. Only 30% of the SWSs tested contained water at or above the WHO-recommended concentration of free ...

  12. The environmental chemistry track for Youth Slam 2009 is focused on the World Water Crisis. Did you know that over one billion people currently lack access to clean drinking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    know that over one billion people currently lack access to clean drinking water around the globeThe environmental chemistry track for Youth Slam 2009 is focused on the World Water Crisis. Did you and every 15 minutes a child dies from a water related illness? In fact, for children under age five

  13. Drinking Water Problems: Arsenic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

    2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    , including industrial and commercial facilities; 7 per- cent of these wells were unused. High arsenic con- centrations that are believed to be naturally occurring have been found in the southern High Plains (Ogallala aquifer), in several West Texas counties... treatment system will remove, its maintenance requirements and its costs. Treatment systems certified by an independent agency such as the National Sanitation Foundation (NSF) usually effectively live up to manufacturer?s claims. After well owners install a...

  14. Drinking Water Standards (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    ?s.) Contacte a su proveedor de agua si usted no ha recibido la copia del CCR para su sis- tema de abastecimiento de agua. 3 Si usted usa un pozo privado, ni el gobierno federal ni el estatal regula la calidad de su agua. Como pre- cauci?n m?nima, se recomienda... que analice su agua cada 2 o 3 a?os para detectar si tiene bacterias y nitratos. Tambi?n debe de analizar su agua si un derrame de pesticidas o fertilizantes ocurre cerca de su pozo o si cambia el sabor, olor, claridad o color del agua. Para obtener...

  15. Drinking Water Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Ci/L) minerals that are radioactive and may emit a form of radiation known as alpha radiation IOC Antimony 0.006 Increase in blood cholesterol; decrease Discharge from petroleum refineries; 0.006 in blood sugar fire retardants; ceramics; electronics; solder....003 problems IOC Barium 2 Increase in blood pressure Discharge of drilling wastes; discharge 2 from metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits OC Benzene 0.005 Anemia; decrease in blood platelets; Discharge from factories; leaching from zero increased risk...

  16. The waters of Southeastern Wisconsin are vast but vulnerable. We depend on our waters for drinking water, irrigation, industry, transportation, power production,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    . Understanding our region's water-related issues and future challenges can help us protect clean, abundant water and industry, public health and ecosystem health. Water quality gains more at- tention during summer, when cause illness. The bacteria and other pollutants that affect our water quality come from a variety

  17. Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Part 600: Applications for Licenses and Preliminary Permits Under the Water Power Act (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations provide instructions for applications proposing the construction, repair, or operation of hydropower sources. Applications are reviewed by the Water Power and Control Commission.

  18. Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations establish Soil and Water Conservation Districts throughout the State of Connecticut. Each district has its own Board of Directors; membership and election procedures are defined...

  19. Water Data Report: An Annotated Bibliography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Melody, Moya

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Protection, Water Resource ManagementDrinking WaterEnvironmental Protection, Water Resource ManagementDrinking Waterof Environmental Protection, Water Resource Management,

  20. Environmental Regulations, Air and Water Pollution, and Infant Mortality in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenstone, Michael

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the most comprehensive data file ever compiled on air pollution, water pollution, and environmental regulations from a developing country, the paper examines the effectiveness of Indias environmental regulations. ...

  1. Threshold of trichloroethylene contamination in maternal drinking waters affecting fetal heart development in the rat. Environ Health Perspect 111(3):289?292

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paula D. Johnson; Stanley J. Goldberg; Mary Z. Mays; Brenda V. Dawson

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Halogenated hydrocarbons such as trichloroethylene (TCE) are among the most common water supply contaminants in the United States and abroad. Epidemiologic studies have found an association but not a cause-and-effect relation between halogenated hydrocarbon contamination and increased incidence of congenital cardiac malformations or other defective birth outcomes. Avian and rat studies demonstrated statistically significant increases in the number of congenital cardiac malformations in those treated with high doses of TCE, either via intrauterine pump or in maternal drinking water, compared with controls. This study attempts to determine if there is a threshold dose exposure to TCE above which the developing heart is more likely to be affected. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly placed in test groups and exposed to various concentrations of TCE (2.5 ppb, 250 ppb, 1.5 ppm, 1,100 ppm) in drinking water or distilled water (control group) throughout pregnancy. The percentage of abnormal hearts in the treated groups ranged from 0 to 10.48%, with controls having 2.1 % abnormal hearts, and the number of litters with fetuses with abnormal hearts ranged from 0 to 66.7%, and the control percentage was 16.4%. The data from this study indicate not only that there is a statistically significant probability overall of a dose response to increasing levels of TCE exposure, but also that this trend begins to manifest at relatively low levels of exposure (i.e., < 250 ppb). Maternal rats exposed to more than this level of TCE during pregnancy showed an associated increased incidence of cardiac malformations in their developing rat fetuses. Key words: cardiac malformations, cardiac teratogenicity, environmental contaminants, halogenated hydrocarbon, heart defects, heart development, TCE, trichloroethylene. Environ Health Perspect 111:289292 (2003). doi:10.1289/ehp.5125 available via

  2. Division of Water, Parts 670-672: Reservoir Releases Regulations (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Water releases from New York State reservoirs are subject to monitoring and regulation; these sections establish rules for the Schoharie, Shandaken Tunnel-Esopus Creek, Cannonsville, Pepacton,...

  3. Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Parts 595-599: Hazardous Substances (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations aim to prevent the release of hazardous substances into surface water and groundwater resources. They contain guidance for facilities which store and process hazardous substances,...

  4. Outdoor Laboratory Water System Clemson, SC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    show about it, and other things you should know about drinking water. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control have strict standards for all the results of our water-quality analyses. Every regulated contaminant that was detected in the water, even

  5. Outdoor Laboratory Water System Clemson, SC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    show about it, and other things you should know about drinking water. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control have strict standards for all of our water-quality analyses. Every regulated contaminant that was detected in the water, even

  6. Water is used for various purposes, whether it is for drinking, swimming, fishing, irrigating or any other

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the most common methods for de- veloping plans to restore water quality are 1) a Total Maximum Daily Load bodies, Texas utilizes a variety of methods that result in plans to restore water quality. Two appropriate to restore water quality in an impaired water body. Through the Watershed Action Planning process

  7. DECEMBER 2008 WATER QUALITY AND LAND USE: IMPLICATIONS FOR REGULATION AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    DECEMBER 2008 WATER QUALITY AND LAND USE: IMPLICATIONS FOR REGULATION AND URBAN PLANNING WRRI Technical Completion Report No. 346 Gwendolyn A. Aldrich Janie Chermak Jennifer A. Thacher NEW MEXICO WATER-0001 Telephone (505) 646-4337 FAX (505) 646-6418 email: nmwrri@wrri.nmsu.edu #12;WATER QUALITY AND LAND USE

  8. Sediments can be important in regulating stream water P concentrations, and this has implications for establishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Mark B.

    607 Sediments can be important in regulating stream water P concentrations, and this has and biotic processes to better understand the role of sediments in determining stream water dissolved P concentrations. Sediment and stream water samples were collected during low discharge from 105 streams across

  9. Managing water demand as a regulated open MAS. (Work in progress)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrido, Antonio

    1 Managing water demand as a regulated open MAS. (Work in progress) Vicente Botti1 , Antonio Scientific Research Council, {vbotti,agarridot,agiret}@dsic.upv.es, pablo@iiia.csic.es I. WATER MANAGEMENT management models are based on equa- tional descriptions of aggregate supply and demand in a water basin [2

  10. Managing water demand as a regulated open MAS. (Work in progress)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrido, Antonio

    1 Managing water demand as a regulated open MAS. (Work in progress) Vicente Botti 1 , Antonio Scientific Research Council, {vbotti,agarridot,agiret}@dsic.upv.es, pablo@iiia.csic.es I. WATER MANAGEMENT management models are based on equa­ tional descriptions of aggregate supply and demand in a water basin [2

  11. Environmental Regulations, Air and Water Pollution, and Infant Mortality in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenstone, Michael

    Using the most comprehensive data file ever compiled on air pollution, water pollution, environmental regulations, and infant mortality from a developing country, the paper examines the effectiveness of Indias environmental ...

  12. Division of Water, Part 673: Dam Safety Regulations (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations address dam safety, define dam hazard categories and inspection procedures, and apply to any owner of a dam. Dam owners are required to maintain dams in a safe condition at all...

  13. Environmental regulations handbook for enhanced oil recovery. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, T.D.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A guide to environmental laws and regulations which have special significance for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is presented. The Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the Safe Drinking Water Act, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, federal regulations, and state regulations are discussed. This handbook has been designed as a planning tool and a convenient reference source. The 16 states included comprise the major oil-producing states in various regions of the state. The major topics covered are: general guidelines for complying with environmental laws and regulations; air pollution control; water pollution control; protecting drinking water: underground injection control; hazardous waste management; and federal laws affecting siting or operation of EOR facilities. (DMC)

  14. Review Chlorination Disinfection By-Products in Drinking Water and Congenital Anomalies: Review and Meta-Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark J. Nieuwenhuijsen; David Martinez; James Grellier; James Bennett; Nicky Best; Nina Iszatt; Martine Vrijheid; Mireille B. Toledano

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to review epidemiologic evidence, provide summary risk estimates of the association between exposure to chlorination disinfection by-products (DBPs) and congenital anomalies, and provide recommendations for future studies. Data s o u r c e s a n d extraction: We included all published epidemiologic studies that evaluated a relationship between an index of DBP exposure (treatment, water source, DBP measurements, and both DBP measurements and personal characteristics) and risk of congenital anomalies. When three or more studies examined the same exposure index and congenital anomaly, we conducted a metaanalysis to obtain a summary risk estimate comparing the highest exposure group with the lowest exposure group. When five or more studies examined total trihalomethane (TTHM) exposure and a specific congenital anomaly, we conducted a meta-analysis to obtain exposureresponse risk estimates per 10 g/L TTHM. Data synthesis: For all congenital anomalies combined, the meta-analysis gave a statistically significant excess risk for high versus low exposure to water chlorination or TTHM [17%; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 334] based on a small number of studies. The meta-analysis also suggested a statistically significant excess risk for ventricular septal defects (58%; 95 % CI, 21107), but this was

  15. The effects of wavelength, metals, and reactive oxygen species on the sunlight inactivation of microorganisms: observations and applications to the solar disinfection of drinking water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Michael Benjamin

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cases (Fisher et al. , 2008; Sinton et al. , 2002b; SommerDavies and Evison, 1991; Sinton et al. , 2002b) and drinkingNZ Mumbai, India (Sinton et al. , 2002b) (Sinton et al. ,

  16. C:\\Users\\sesteven\\AppData\\Local\\Temp\\final food_drink policy_2011.doc 2011 W. K. Kellogg Health Sciences Library Food & Drink Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotze, Heike K.

    in capped plastic or glass bottles water bottles Paper or Styrofoam cups with lids Containers and a drinking hole that can be closed Sports bottles with a drinking spout that can be closed Beverages

  17. Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits, Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permits, State Permits, Water Quality Based Effluent Limitations and Water Quality Certification (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits, Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permits, State Permits, Water Quality Based Effluent Limitations...

  18. Environmental assessment for the domestic water supply upgrades and consolidation on the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The domestic water systems on the Savannah River Site (SRS) are currently in need of upgrading to ensure compliance with the Safe Drinking Water Act and South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Drinking Water Regulations. The SRS has 28 separate goundwater-based drinking water systems in use across the site. These aging systems were designed and constructed in the 1950s and are now facing increasing difficulties in meeting cur-rent regulations. Audits of the systems conducted by SCDHEC in 1986, 1988, 1991, and 1993 identified shortfalls in meeting the requirements for secondary maximum containment levels (MCLS) and SCDHEC design standards. Secondary MCLs are those items, such as odor or appearance, that do not pose a direct health impact. SRS has committed to SCDHEC to correct the drinking water discrepancies and construct two new consolidated inter-area drinking water systems. Upgrading the SRS drinking water systems would be necessary to support site activities regardless of the makeup or the mission at SRS. As such, the proposed upgrade and consolidation of SRS domestic water systems is treated as part of the ``No Action`` alternative for the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Reconfiguration of the Nuclear Weapons Complex .

  19. Drinking Water Problems: Copper (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    ?er?a y artefactos de plomer?a con el cobre y sus aleaciones. Aunque estas aplicaciones del cobre a los sistemas de distribuci?n de agua han sido muy beneficiosas para el hombre, el agua puede reaccionar con el cobre y disolver peque?as cantidades de cobre...?cola de Extensi?n, Extensi?n Cooperativa de Texas, El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M L-5472S 1-06 ' no pueden excretar el exceso de cobre. El cobre puede acumularse en estos individuos y llegar a alcanzar niveles peligrosos, y si no se detecta y trata...

  20. Drinking Water Problems: Arsenic (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

    2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    suministros p?blicos de agua. Los pozos de propietarios privados no se regulan, lo que significa que tales propietarios pueden estar con- sumiendo agua con concentraciones de ars?nico que exceden los est?ndares oficiales. Los due?os de pozos privados deben... decidir si hacerle una prueba a su agua de pozo, y despu?s tratarla si es necesario. La prueba de ars?nico cuesta t?picamente cerca de 25 d?lares. Los pozos con niveles altos de ars?nico son agrupados a veces en un ?rea particular, por lo que el Consejo de...

  1. Drinking Water Problems: Radionuclides (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

    2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    materiales, pueden transmitir radion?clidos al agua potable. Con mayor frecuencia se encuentran altos niveles de radion?clidos en el agua subterr?nea (por exemplo, de agua de pozos) que en el agua superficial (tales como lagos y arroyos). Muchos aparatos y... de agua potable, ?ste puede dar una idea de cu?l debe ser el nivel apropiado de un contaminante en los pozos priva- dos para aquellos que utilizan dichas fuentes. Actualmente no existe un MCL para el rad?n. Sin embargo, la EPA est? proponiendo dos...

  2. Drinking Water Problems: Lead (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    agua hay pocas causas para preocuparse porque la ley requiere que los sis- temas p?blicos eliminen cualquier fuente de conta- minaci?n de plomo. Pero si su agua proviene de un pozo privado, quiz?s contenga el plomo suficiente como para justificar una...-04 los pozos privados, la mayor?a de los fabricantes de componentes para pozos cumplen voluntariamente con el l?mite del 8 por ciento. Sin embargo, hay razones para que los due?os de pozos privados se preocupen por la contaminaci?n con plomo. Primero, los...

  3. Drinking Water Problems: Perchlorate (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Porter, Dana; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    usan a gran escala como un componente de los infladores de bolsas de aire para autom?viles. El perclorato fue descubierto en varios sitios de produc- ci?n y en fuentes de agua de pozo y de agua potable en abril, 1997 gracias al desarrollo de un m... Asociada e Ingeniera Agr?cola de Extensi?n, Bruce J. Lesikar, Profesor e Ingeniero Agr?cola de Extensi?n, Extensi?n Cooperativa de Texas, El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M L-5468S 8/07 Figura 1. Distribuci?n de las detecciones de perclorato en pozos de...

  4. Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2006-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    . Todos los suministros p?blicos de agua deben respetar estos reglamentos. Aunque a los pozos de agua privados no se les requiere cumplir con los Est?ndares Nacionales para el Agua Potable, los propietarios de pozos privados Problemas del del agua potable...- dad de su agua. Al igual que no se les permite a los proveedores p?blicos de agua suministrar agua que exceda el MCL al p?blico, los propietarios de pozos pri- vados no deben utilizar agua que exceda el MCL para el consumo humano. ?C?mo se exponen...

  5. Mouse inbred strain differences in ethanol drinking to intoxication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garland Jr., Theodore

    Mouse inbred strain differences in ethanol drinking to intoxication J. S. Rhodes*, , M. M. Ford , C described a simple procedure, Drinking in the Dark (DID), in which C57BL/6J mice self-administer ethanol to a blood ethanol concentration (BEC) above 1 mg/ml. The test consists of replacing the water with 20

  6. Effects of water chemistry on NF/RO membrane structure and performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mo, Yibing

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1.1. Drinking water. . 1.1.2.concern (CECs) in drinking water 2.1.1. Classes ofOther Nitrosamines - Drinking Water Issues, in, 2011. [4

  7. Water Wizdom Marsha M. Wright1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in their drinking water. Go to 6 3 What contaminant in drinking water affects mostly babies less than one year old. Lead can be a hazard in drinking water, but #12;does not become airborne if it is present in water. GoSR-IWM-5 Water Wizdom By Marsha M. Wright1 R. Craig Runyan2 1 Soil & Water Conservation Specialist

  8. Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in assessing the susceptibility of surface water supplies to pollution from current and future activities, Hydrology, Models Descriptors: Drinking Water, Source Water, Pollution Sources, Watershed Management Supply Descriptors: Drinking water, source water, pollution sources, watershed management Primary PI

  9. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building Energy Use Unaccounted-for Water Demand Managementdetermine whether its unaccounted-for losses exceed typicalof distribution zones Unaccounted-for treated water Units

  10. Rules and Regulations for Governing the Administration and Enforcement of the Fresh Water Wetlands Act (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations assert the Department of Environmental Management's authority to administer and enforce the Fresh Water Wetlands Act (R.I. Gen. Laws, ch. 2-1-18 through 2-1-25), and describe...

  11. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Island Water Resources Center supported one research project; MTBE Drinking Water Contamination Aquifer. The MTBE contamination problem in Pascoag, which contaminated the only public drinking water well allowed researchers from URI to investigate the MTBE bedrock contamination and suggest remediation

  12. Arsenic and chromium in drinking water promote tumorigenesis in a mouse colitis-associated colorectal cancer model and the potential mechanism is ROS-mediated Wnt/?-catenin signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xin; Mandal, Ardhendu K. [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)] [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Saito, Hiroshi [Department of Surgery and Physiology, Lucille P. Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)] [Department of Surgery and Physiology, Lucille P. Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Pulliam, Joseph F.; Lee, Eun Y. [Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)] [Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Ke, Zun-Ji; Lu, Jian; Ding, Songze [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)] [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Li, Li [Department of Family Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)] [Department of Family Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Shelton, Brent J.; Tucker, Thomas [Markey Cancer Control Program, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40504 (United States)] [Markey Cancer Control Program, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40504 (United States); Evers, B. Mark [Department of Surgery and Physiology, Lucille P. Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)] [Department of Surgery and Physiology, Lucille P. Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Zhang, Zhuo [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)] [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Shi, Xianglin, E-mail: xshi5@uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)] [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure to carcinogenic metals, such as trivalent arsenic [As(III)] and hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], through drinking water is a major global public health problem and is associated with various cancers. However, the mechanism of their carcinogenicity remains unclear. In this study, we used azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate (AOM/DSS)-induced mouse colitis-associated colorectal cancer model to investigate their tumorigenesis. Our results demonstrate that exposure to As(III) or Cr(VI), alone or in combination, together with AOM/DSS pretreatment has a promotion effect, increasing the colorectal tumor incidence, multiplicity, size, and grade, as well as cell inflammatory response. Two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry revealed that As(III) or Cr(VI) treatment alone significantly changed the density of proteins. The expression of ?-catenin and phospho-GSK was increased by treatment of carcinogenic metals alone. Concomitantly, the expression of NADPH oxidase1 (NOX1) and the level of 8-OHdG were also increased by treatment of carcinogenic metals alone. Antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, were decreased. Similarly, in an in vitro system, exposure of CRL-1807 to carcinogenic metals increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, the expression of ?-catenin, phospho-GSK, and NOX1. Inhibition of ROS generation by addition of SOD or catalase inhibited ?-catenin expression and activity. Our study provides a new animal model to study the carcinogenicity of As(III) and Cr(VI) and suggests that As(III) and Cr(VI) promote colorectal cancer tumorigenesis, at least partly, through ROS-mediated Wnt/?-catenin signaling pathway. -- Highlights: ? Carcinogenic metals in drinking water promote colorectal tumor formation in vivo. ? Carcinogenic metals induce ?-catenin activation in vivo and in vitro. ? ROS generation induced by carcinogenic metals mediated ?-catenin activation.

  13. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    31, 2010. ) U.S. DOE Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (3, 2010. ) Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, ElectricEPRI. 1997. Quality Energy Efficiency Retrofits for Water

  14. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.pdf. (Last accessed September 2, 2010. ) EPRI. 1997.Retrofits for Water Systems. EPRI with the California EnergyFoundation Project # 298. EPRI report CR-107838. Palo Alto,

  15. Identification of Bacteria in Biofilm and Bulk Water Samples from a Nonchlorinated Model Drinking Water Distribution System: Detection of a Large Nitrite-Oxidizing Population Associated with Nitrospira spp.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martiny, A. C; Albrechtsen, H.-J.; Arvin, E.; Molin, S.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Identification of Bacteria in Biofilm and Bulk Water SamplesNo. 12 Identification of Bacteria in Biofilm and Bulk Water

  16. Comparison of EC-Kit with Quanti-Tray[tm] : testing, verification, and drinking water quality mapping in Capiz Province, Philippines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuang, Patty

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis accomplishes three tasks. First, it verifies the EC-Kit under different water source conditions by comparing it to a laboratory standard method, the IDEXX Quanti-Tray[tm]. The EC-Kit is a simple, inexpensive ...

  17. Passive containment cooling system with drywell pressure regulation for boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, P.R.

    1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A boiling water reactor is described having a regulating valve for placing the wetwell in flow communication with an intake duct of the passive containment cooling system. This subsystem can be adjusted to maintain the drywell pressure at (or slightly below or above) wetwell pressure after the initial reactor blowdown transient is over. This addition to the PCCS design has the benefit of eliminating or minimizing steam leakage from the drywell to the wetwell in the longer-term post-LOCA time period and also minimizes the temperature difference between drywell and wetwell. This in turn reduces the rate of long-term pressure buildup of the containment, thereby extending the time to reach the design pressure limit. 4 figures.

  18. Improved temperature regulation of process water systems for the APS storage ring.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Putnam, C.; Dortwegt, R.

    2002-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Beam stability and operational reliability of critical mechanical systems are key performance issues for synchrotron accelerators such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Stability is influenced by temperature fluctuations of the process water (PW) used for cooling and/or temperature conditioning storage ring (SR) components such as vacuum chambers, magnets, absorbers, etc. Operational reliability is crucial in maintaining facility beam operations and remaining within downtime ''budgets.'' Water systems for the APS storage ring were originally provided with a distributive control system (DCS) capable of regulation to {+-}1.0 F, as specified by facility design requirements. After several years of operation, a particular mode of component mortality indicated a need for upgrade of the temperature control system. The upgrade that was implemented was chosen for both improved component reliability and temperature stability (now on the order of {+-}0.2 F for copper components and {+-}0.05 F for aluminum components). The design employs a network of programmable logic controllers (PLCs) for temperature control that functions under supervision of the existing DCS. The human-machine interface (HMI) of the PLC system employs RSView32 software. The PLC system also interfaces with the EPICS accelerator control system to provide monitoring of temperature control parameters. Eventual supervision of the PLC system by EPICS is possible with this design.

  19. CommunityOrganizedHouseholdWaterIncreasesNot Only Rural incomes, but AlsoMensWork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corw, Ben; Swallow, Brent; Asamba, Isabella

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    worldwide lack access to safe drinking water. In rurallack of access to basic infrastructure services such as water

  20. Will Federal Environmental Regulation be Permitted to Infringe on State Vested Water Rights?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorrity, Kristen

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Irrigation Dist. v. State Water Resources Control Bd. , 27516. See United States v. State Water Resources Control Bd. ,by the 8 deference to state water law. 372 U.S. 627, 630-

  1. Effects of Regulated Water Flows on Regen-eration of Fremont Cottonwood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -long dam and reservoir system designed to provide water and hydroelectric power to the greater Phoenix

  2. Drinking Water Problems: Iron and Manganese (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    el agua para remover las impurezas. Usted quiz? pueda abrir un nuevo pozo en un lugar diferente o completar el pozo existente en una formaci?n diferente de agua. P?dale a un perforador de pozos consejo acerca de estas opciones. Si decide tratar el.... La inyec- ci?n debe ocurrir antes del tanque de presi?n y tan cerca al punto de descarga del pozo como sea posi- ble. El tratamiento por compuestos de fosfato es relati- vamente barato, pero pueden haber desventajas al rato, el hierro y/o manganeso...

  3. Safe Drinking Water Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant ofRichardton Abbey Wind Farm(CTI PFAN)STIL2SWIRMonasterySaf

  4. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Eco- nomics of Drinking Water Quality, evaluatesthe impacts of drinking water regulations in rural India andbacterial contaminants in drinking water supplies, motivates

  5. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction The Rhode Island Water Resources Center has supported one information transfer project, "Clean Drinking Water in Rhode Island" and one research project "Enhancing Drinking Water

  6. Rules and Regulations Pertaining to a User Fee System for Point Source Dischargers that Discharge Pollutants into the Waters of the State (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations establish a user fee system for point source dischargers that discharge pollutants into the surface waters of the State. The funds from such fees are used by the Department of...

  7. Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other Than State-Owned Marine Waters (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other than State-Owned Marine Waters is applicable to the Natural Gas Sector and the Coal...

  8. Water Permits (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Water Permits Division authorizes permits administered under the Water Quality Regulations. Louisiana's Water Quality Regulations require permits for the discharge of pollutants from any point...

  9. Cleaner, Safer Water through Water Safety Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CS232615A Cleaner, Safer Water through Water Safety Plans National Center for Environmental Health). Water Safety Plans A Water Safety Plan (WSP) is a preventive management approach used to manage threats to a drinking water system--from catchment to consumer. It helps in the · Management of activities

  10. Abi Williams Drink and be merry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Stephen

    on a platter from John Lewis, cinnamon infused bread sauce and incongruous prosecco drink! to Christmas! and

  11. Information Sources for Small Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

    2007-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Managers of small waters systems must have information about a variety of topics. This publication lists essential printed and electronic resources on disaster preparedness, national drinking water standards, private water well management, water...

  12. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the Treatment of Different Sources of Drinking Water." Dr. Craver went on to publish a rigorous assessment of the success of nanosilver used in ceramic water filters for point-of-use treatment for drinking water in a previously funded project in addition to applying the results of this research to water treatment

  13. Environmental regulations and technology: use and disposal of municipal waste-water sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The document describes the five major sludge use/disposal options currently available--land application, distribution and marketing of sludge products, land-filling, incineration, and ocean disposal--and factors influencing their selection and implementation. It also provides an initial framework for evaluating sludge use/disposal alternatives, and describes accepted and proven use/disposal technologies and Federal regulations pertinent to sludge management.

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural drainage water Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    water runoff, unsewered... of representatives from agriculture, drinking water and wastewater utilities, environmental organizations... -326-1616 (cell) FUNDS AVAILABLE FOR WATER...

  15. Gas Well Drilling and Water Resources Regulated by the Pennsylvania Oil and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    used in drilling and fracking · Recent increase in permit fee to fund new DEP enforcement · Permit fluids ­ return fluids from fracking ­ mixture of water, sand and chemicals Production fluids ­ fluids, manganese, barium, arsenic, etc.) Surfactants/detergents Total suspended solids Oil/Grease Fracking

  16. Conditioning of aggressive water in Suriname:.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salmin, A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??In Suriname groundwater is mostly used for drinking water production. Depending on the ground layers from which groundwater is extracted, groundwater is characterized as aggressive (more)

  17. Water Quality Guide for Livestock and Poultry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication discusses some of the most common contaminants in the drinking water of livestock and poultry. A table lists the Maximum Contaminant Level of some harmful substances....

  18. An Ecopartnership Project Promoting Sustainable Water Resource Management in Qinghai Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    technology in small rural communities. Details describing the inexpensive drinking water treatment project are as follows. Inexpensive drinking water treatment technology for small rural communities In many rural faces the challenge of managing drinking water and wastewater in its rapidly expanding cities and many

  19. Evaluation of health risks associated with proposed ground water standards at selected inactive uranium mill-tailings sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Medeiros, W.H.; Meinhold, A.; Morris, S.C.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Nagy, J.; Lackey, K.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed ground water standards applicable to all inactive uranium mill-tailings sites. The proposed standards include maximum concentration limits (MCL) for currently regulated drinking water contaminants, as well as the addition of standards for molybdenum, uranium, nitrate, and radium-226 plus radium-228. The proposed standards define the point of compliance to be everywhere downgradient of the tailings pile, and require ground water remediation to drinking water standards if MCLs are exceeded. This document presents a preliminary description of the Phase 2 efforts. The potential risks and hazards at Gunnison, Colorado and Lakeview, Oregon were estimated to demonstrate the need for a risk assessment and the usefulness of a cost-benefit approach in setting supplemental standards and determining the need for and level of restoration at UMTRA sites. 8 refs., 12 tabs.

  20. Borders and Discharges: Regulation of Tribal Activities under the Clean Water Act in States with NPDES Program Authority

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, Robin Kundis

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    finds a particular need. State water quality standards wouldpreempt ap- plication of state water quality laws pursuantwith a down- stream state's water quality standards. Clean

  1. University of Wisconsin Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    modeling studies and applications designed to preserve or improve groundwater quality. The following reportUniversity of Wisconsin Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction: groundwater, surface water, groundwater/surface water interactions, and drinking water initiatives. Faculty

  2. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into Sustainable Water Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    demand of plastic bottled water, additional unsustainable resources are required to support this demand drinking water solutions. Three methods will be compared; plastic bottled water, WaterFillz units method of delivering drinking water to students showed that plastic bottled water is not a solution

  3. Asian Journal of Chemistry Vol. 21, No. 6 (2009), 4805-4811 Fluoride Concentration Modelling in Konya City Drinking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    in Konya City Drinking Water Wells via Geographical Information System SUKRU DURSUN*, S. SAVAS DURDURAN and FATMA KUNT Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Selcuk University, 42003 Konya, Turkey Fax: (90 for human health, water samples were collected from 50 different water wells in Konya city centre

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - auxiliary water systems Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    including drinking water distribution systems (esp. in small rural communities... ), wastewater treatment, storm runoff, irrigation systems, dams, levees, and canals. 9. Water...

  5. Water Regulation I. Osmoregulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dever, Jennifer A.

    /use of glands a. Decreased permeability of skin in some sp. b. Secretion of lipids (wax) from skin glands c

  6. Water Regulation I. Osmoregulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dever, Jennifer A.

    = ectothermy Homeothermy = endothermy lTemperature appears as the main limiting factor in the distribution. Herps found in extremely dry environments · Ctenophorus ornatus ­ "ant eater" #12;6 Body temperature of ECTOTHERMY: SUN ­ ultimate heat source... Conduction & Convection ­ indirect heat source. Poikilothermy

  7. Water Regulation I. Osmoregulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dever, Jennifer A.

    = ectothermy Homeothermy = endothermy lTemperature appears as the main limiting factor in the distribution in extremely dry environments · Ctenophorus ornatus ­ "ant eater" Body temperature & thermoregulation I of ECTOTHERMY: SUN ­ ultimate heat source... Conduction & Convection ­ indirect heat source. Poikilothermy

  8. Water Management Act (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act regulates and registers water withdrawals in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to enable effective planning and management of water use and conservation. The Act establishes a Water...

  9. Development of Water Supply and Sanitation Facility in The Rural Areas of Nepal: An Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasain, Jiba Nath

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for irrigation and drinking water were separated and the Department of Water Supply and Sewerage (DWSS) was created. At that time, the Ministry of Panchayat and Local Development (MPLD) had been given the responsibility for small-scale village level water supply... . The notion of people's participation in drinking water supply was initiated by MPLD, which had taken responsibility of the construction of small-scale drinking water supply projects like others such as roads, suspension bridges, and foot-trials. However...

  10. Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    , and other things you should know about drinking water. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control have strict standards for all drinking water contaminant that was detected in the water, even in the most minute traces, is listed here. The table contains

  11. Fant's Grove Water System System No, SC390112

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    , and other things you should know about drinking water. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control have strict standards for all drinking water contaminant that was detected in the water, even in the most minute traces, is listed here. The table contains

  12. Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    things you should know about drinking water. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) have strict standards for all drinking water contaminant that was detected in the water, even the most minute trace, is listed here. The table contains

  13. Water is Vital--Especially after a Disaster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crocker, Andrew

    2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Dehydration can be a serious threat after a disaster, when supplies of clean drinking water may be limited. Learn how you can find and use hidden sources of water in your home and purify water to make it safe for drinking....

  14. Water Filtration Using Plant Xylem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutilier, Michael Stephen Ha

    Effective point-of-use devices for providing safe drinking water are urgently needed to reduce the global burden of waterborne disease. Here we show that plant xylem from the sapwood of coniferous trees a readily available, ...

  15. Factors controlling tungsten concentrations in ground water, Carson Desert, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Factors controlling tungsten concentrations in ground water, Carson Desert, Nevada Ralph L. Seiler sources. Tungsten concentrations in 100 ground water samples from all aquifers used as drinking water indicates that W exhibits Tungsten con- centrations are strongly and positively correlated

  16. Regulations of Wells (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Environmental Protection regulates the construction, repair, and abandonment of wells, as well as the persons and businesses undertaking such practices. Governing boards of water...

  17. Modeling of trihalomethane (THM) formation via chlorination of the water from Dongjiang River (source water for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumder, Asit

    , Guangzhou, 510275, PR China c Water and Aquatic Sciences Research Program, University of Victoria, Victoria online 22 August 2007 Abstract The Dongjiang River is the major source of drinking water supply for Hong

  18. Interlayer Water Regulates the Bio-nano Interface of a \\b{eta}-sheet Protein stacking on Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenping Lv; Guiju Xu; Hongyan Zhang; Xin Li; Shengju Liu; Huan Niu; Dongsheng Xu; Renan Wu

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated an integrated bio-nano interface consisting of a \\b{eta}-sheet protein stacked onto graphene. We found that the stacking assembly of the model protein on graphene could be controlled by water molecules. The interlayer water filled within interstices of the bio-nano interface could suppress the molecular vibration of surface groups on protein, and could impair the CH...{\\pi} interaction driving the attraction of the protein and graphene. The intermolecular coupling of interlayer water would be relaxed by the relative motion of protein upon graphene due to the interaction between water and protein surface. This effect reduced the hindrance of the interlayer water against the assembly of protein on graphene, resulting an appropriate adsorption status of protein on graphene with a deep free energy trap. Thereby, the confinement and the relative sliding between protein and graphene, the coupling of protein and water, and the interaction between graphene and water all have involved in the modulation of behaviors of water molecules within the bio-nano interface, governing the hindrance of interlayer water against the protein assembly on hydrophobic graphene. These results provide a deep insight into the fundamental mechanism of protein adsorption onto graphene surface in water.

  19. The habitat range of sirenians extends from strictly fresh water (Amazonian manatee, Trichechus inunguis) to strictly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Rudy M.

    in salt water and fed lettuce, which is consistent with a lack of mariposia. Manatees in fresh water drankThe habitat range of sirenians extends from strictly fresh water (Amazonian manatee, Trichechus. This flexibility suggests that drinking both fresh and salt water may be common in this species. However, drinking

  20. Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Part 605: Applications for Diversion or Use of Water for Purposes Other Than Hydro-Electric Power Projects (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These rules apply to all applications for a license or a permit to take, divert, appropriate or otherwise use the waters of the State, except applications for hydro-electric power projects....

  1. Library Regulations Library Regulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    Library Regulations 2012-13 Library Regulations UNIVERSITY OF BIRMINGHAM REGULATIONS LIBRARY REGULATIONS Preamble: The Library Regulations apply to all users of library facilities managed on behalf of the University by Library Services, and thus there are sections that apply also to non- members of the University

  2. Federal, State, and Local Water Quality Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemond, Amy Daum

    and non-point pollution is causing many water bodies to fail state water quality standards. Since in many cases these polluted water bodies are vital to communi- ties as both a source of drinking water-5-23.1. These two laws are intended to protect water bodies from excessive point and non-point pollution

  3. Elements of an environmental decision support system for seasonal wetland salt management in a river basin subjected to water quality regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin on the west-side of California's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratory wildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during the annual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetlands contain salt which, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdown period, can negatively impact water quality and cause concern to downstream agricultural riparian water diverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinity to the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-point sources, now also targets return flows from seasonally managed wetlands. Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means of continuously matching salt loads discharged from agricultural, wetland and municipal operations to the assimilative capacity of the San Joaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring and decision support systems (EDSS's) to implement this concept have enjoyed limited success for reasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed in the context of more general challenges facing the successful implementation of a comprehensive environmental monitoring, modelling and decision support system for the San Joaquin River Basin.

  4. Water.unl.edu Gateway to All Things Water A new Web site from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln provides access to a wide variety of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    management, irrigation, drinking water, wastewater treatment, crop production, livestock, watershed or rural resident, for example ­ and go immediately to content specific to their interest. There are links

  5. Ground Water Management Act (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under the Ground Water Management Act of 1992, Virginia manages ground water through a program regulating the withdrawals in certain areas called Ground Water Management Areas (GWMA). Currently,...

  6. 8/13/12 Futurity.org What the world can learn from China's water crisis 1/5www.futurity.org/earth-environment/what-the-world-can-learn-from-china's-water-crisis/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of nutrients--and about 300 million rural residents lack access to safe drinking water. (Credit: Federico lack access to safe drinking water. Water can unleash fury. Recent floods in Beijing overwhelmed8/13/12 Futurity.org What the world can learn from China's water crisis 1/5www.futurity.org/earth

  7. Water Use Registration and Allocation (North Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule states regulations for water withdrawals, permits required for withdrawals and water use during water droughts and emergencies. Self-supplied business and industrial water users subject...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - abb-ce light water Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supplier Beginning in 1999... , community water supply systems must provide an annual report describ- ing the quality of their drinking Source: Fernndez-Juricic, Esteban -...

  9. South Dakota Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with mining, extraction, and processing of uranium (U) for nuclear fuel and weapons have generated substantial quality, drinking water quality, bio treatment for the removal of uranium from water, vegetative treatment

  10. Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    drinking water treatment plants. Occurrence of Pharmaceuticals, Hormones, and other Organic Wastewater Resources Board. Decision Support System for Long Term Planning of Rural and Urban Water Supply Systems Cost

  11. Health and water quality monitoring of Pure Home Water's ceramic filter dissemination in the northern region of Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Sophie M. (Sophie Marie)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pure Home Water (PHW) is a social enterprise that promotes and disseminates household drinking water technologies in the Northern Region of Ghana. Currently their main product is a pot-shaped Potters for Peace-type ceramic ...

  12. 2012 BNL Water Quality Consumer Confidence Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    includes five wells dedicated to pumping drinking water and the Water Treatment Facility in Bldg. 624 (see-step process to remove iron at the Water Treatment Facil- ity (see photo essay on page 4). While being2012 BNL Water Quality Consumer Confidence Report This special edition of the Brookhaven Bulletin

  13. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , more widespread use of best management practices (BMPs) by private businesses, and improved storm waterWater Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction Delaware Water Resources Center the federal Clean Water Act's rating system of protected "designated uses" for purposes of drinking, swimming

  14. Hurricane/Disaster Checklist Stockpile Water!!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    with water, including heavy contractor garbage bags o Purchase bottled water for drinking o Fill the (clean1 Hurricane/Disaster Checklist · Stockpile Water!! o Fill up as many containers as possible) bath tubs and sinks with fresh water · Get $cash, enough for food and flights out of Oahu, etc. · Gas

  15. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water in Houston and its adjoining communities was produced from surface water. The remainingTexas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction The 2000 research, the evaluation of membrane technologies to treat drinking water, and the use of well nests to monitor recharge

  16. Solving Water Quality Problems in the Home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    If your drinking water comes from a private water well, there are certain procedures you can follow to make sure the water is safe. This publication explains how to get your water tested and, if treatment is necessary, to select the correct...

  17. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for overall water quality and quantity research and implementation in Delaware include: enhanced management the federal Clean Water Act's rating system of designated uses (such as drinking water supply, swimming, fishing, etc.). Delaware has promulgated surface water quality standards which are designed to protect

  18. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for overall water quality and quantity research and implementation in Delaware include: enhanced management that have been classified using the federal Clean Water Act's rating system of designated uses (such as drinking water supply, swimming, fishing, etc.). Delaware has promulgated surface water quality standards

  19. 2.1 What Does Life Water on Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

    1 2.1 What Does Life Require? Water Water on Earth Can exist in all 3 physical states Liquid Solid Gas Not all animals must drink liquid water. Can get water from food. Can get water through metabolism of glucose. Water on Earth Source % of Supply Oceans 97.08 Ice Sheets and Glaciers 1.99 Ground

  20. Disinfecting Water Wells by Shock Chlorination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    If your well has been flooded, it must be shock chlorinated before it can be used as a source of drinking water. This publication explains how to disinfect a well using either dry chlorine or liquid household bleach....

  1. Evaluation of household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) alternatives in Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, TengKe

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ghana's water quality and sanitation condition are very poor. Pure Home Water (PHW), a local non-profit organization has been successfully improving the supply of safe drinking water in the northern region by producing and ...

  2. Biosand filtration of high turbidity water : modified filter design and safe filtrate storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collin, Clair

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unsafe drinking water is a major cause of water-related diseases that predominantly affect people living in developing countries. The most prevalent water-related disease is diarrhea, estimated to kill 1.8 million children ...

  3. Safe water storage in Kenya's modified clay pot : standardization, tap design, and cost recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Suzanne E

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the main components necessary for providing safe drinking water for users who lack piped water in the home is the ability to safely store it in the home. Users in the Nyanza Province of Kenya frequently carry water ...

  4. Modeling Urban Storm-Water Quality Treatment: Model Development and Application to a Surface Sand Filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water impacts has led us to the develop- ment of different storm-water treatment strategies. Previous knowledge regarding traditional water treatment systems drink- ing and wastewater and the evaluation

  5. Assessment of a low-cost, point-of-use, ultraviolet water disinfection technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    INTRODUCTION Waterborne illnesses associated with contaminated water sources, inadequate sanitation, and poor, Portland, OR, USA Rachel L. Peletz Centre for Affordable Water and Sanitation Technology, Calgary, Canada are largely preventable through adequate hygiene, sanitation and safe drinking water; thus, one

  6. Arsenic in Drinking Water: Regulatory Developments and Issues

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Developments and Issues Mary Tiemann Specialist in Environmental Policy Resources, Science, and Industry Division Summary In 2001, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)...

  7. "Improving drinking water quality via identification and removal of certain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    as biomass feedstocks that are more sustainable than terrestrial fuel crops. Focus on algae-derived energy

  8. Your Actions Can Help Protect Our Drinking Water (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Judith L.

    2004-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Para la Protecci?n Ambiental, el Estado de Texas y los sistemas locales de agua. Pero si el agua que usted recibe proviene de un pozo o de otra fuente privada, es su responsabilidad asegurarse que su agua potable es saludable. La protecci?n de nuestra... secos y herm?ticamente cerrados. a71 Guarde los productos a un m?nimo 150 pies (45m) de distancia de un pozo o una corriente de agua. a71 Mantenga los productos en un ?rea bien ventilada y lejos de cosas inflamables. a71 Almacene las bater?as y los...

  9. Arsenic in Drinking Water: Regulatory Developments and Issues

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICEACME | NationalTbilisi |Arizona

  10. Section 53: Consideration of Underground Sources of Drinking Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) SrEvaluating the Seasonal Variations of9Comparisonv ' B ' M

  11. Hawaii Department of Health Safe Drinking Water Branch | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:Greer CountyCorridor | Open EnergySection Webpage

  12. The Karjat Drinking Water Project GISE (CSE)-CTARA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    / 11 #12;Analysis Project- since 2008 Rs. 1500 crores in watershed development. Planning of small hydro

  13. "The integrity of the water" --that strangely poetic phrase buried in the legalese of the Clean Water Act --is what's really at stake for all those charged with monitoring, regulating and preventing aquatic pollution. But "integrity" is not an easy goal t

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bottomline "The integrity of the water" -- that strangely poetic phrase buried in the legalese of the Clean Water Act -- is what's really at stake for all those charged with monitoring, regulating and preventing aquatic pollution. But "integrity" is not an easy goal to attain, at last in the realm of San

  14. FEBRUARY 2013 WATER technical features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    produced and distributed drinking water while sewers collected wastewater for treatment at remote plants, solutions to wastewater infrastructure need to be effective in protecting public health and preserving water the potential to achieve these goals in rural areas, peri- urban developments, small towns and urban centres

  15. The Drinking Water Security and Safety Amendments of 2002: Is America's Drinking Water Infrastructure Safer Four Years Later?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shermer, Steven D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    utility operators at the highest risk system); see also http://cfpub.epa.gov/safewater/watersecurity/outreach.cfm (listing

  16. Water Conservation Tips When washing dishes by hand, don't let the water run while rinsing. Fill one sink with wash water and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Conservation Tips When washing dishes by hand, don't let the water run while rinsing. Fill one sink with wash water and the other with rinse water. Run your washing machine and dishwasher only instead and save gallons every time. For cold drinks keep a pitcher of water in the refrigerator instead

  17. UpStream: Motivating Water Conservation with Low-Cost Water Flow Sensing and Persuasive Displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulos, Eric

    in the world does not have access to safe drinking water (1.1 billion people), over 2.5 billion lack adequateUpStream: Motivating Water Conservation with Low-Cost Water Flow Sensing and Persuasive Displays, Pittsburgh, PA, USA {stace, paulos}@cs.cmu.edu ABSTRACT Water is our most precious and most rapidly declining

  18. Water quality analysis of the piped water supply in Tamale, Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Allison Jean

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United Nation's Millennium Development Goal Target 7.C is to "halve, by 2015, the proportion of the population without sustainable access to safe drinking water". While the UN claimed to have met this goal, studies ...

  19. Water Rights (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality regulates the water rights for the state of Texas. Water and state water may be appropriated, stored, or diverted in the state of Texas for beneficial...

  20. Nanomaterial Composites for Next Generation Water Filters: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-06-197

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginley, D.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under this CRADA, the Parties will produce and test a composite filter element that will remove particles, bacteria and viruses to produce safe drinking water.

  1. Determining the Viability of a Hybrid Experiential and Distance Learning Educational Model for Water Treatment Plant Operators in Kentucky.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fattic, Jana R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Drinking water and wastewater industries are facing a nationwide workforce shortfall of qualified treatment plant operators due to factors including the en masse retirement (more)

  2. Cross-connection control of the potable water lines at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, R.M.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 1991 independent U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) audit of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) identified the need for establishing a cross-connection control program for the potable and nonpotable water systems at the facility. An informal cross-connection policy had been in place for some time, but the formal implementation of a cross-connection program brought together individuals from the Quality Engineering and Inspection Section of the Office of Quality Programs and Inspection, Industrial Hygiene, Health Physics, Plant and Equipment Division, and the Atomic Trade and Labor Council. In January 1994 a Cross-Connection Control Committee was established at ORNL to identify potential and actual cross connections between potable and nonpotable water systems. Potable water is safe to drink, and nonpotable or process water (e.g., sewage, laboratory wastewater, cooling water, and tower water) is not intended for human consumption, washing of the body, or food preparation. The program is intended to conform with the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act Amendment of 1986 and with state and local regulations. Although the Occupational Safety and Health Administration addresses cross-connection functions, it does not define specific program requirements. The program at ORNL is designed to ensure that necessary recommendations are implemented to safeguard all internal and external potable water distribution lines. Program responsibilities include a thorough engineering assessment to (1) identify the potable water lines, (2) identify any existing or potential cross connections, and (3) inspect the integrity of the water lines. If any cross-connection deficiencies are found, corrective actions are initiated according to industry standards.

  3. Dam Safety Regulation (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Dam Safety Regulation is to ensure that all dams constructed in the state of Mississippi are permitted and thus do not potentially harm wildlife, water supplies and property. ...

  4. STEP 8. The wet well stores filtered water before it is pumped into the air-stripping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    , to produce an annual report on the quality of its drinking water. In addition to reminding consumers into the Upper Glacial aquifer (see page 3), the Lab's "finished" drinking water is produced with pride by the staff of BNL's Water Treatment Facility (WTF) of the Energy & Utilities Division. Producing BNL

  5. When you turn on your faucet and fill a glass with water, you expect it to be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . However, drinking water can contain gases, minerals, bacteria, metals or chemicals that can affect your water that does not meet those stan- dards. Drinking Water Standards The U.S. Environmental Protection of harmful pollutants: · pathogens, which are disease-causing organ- isms such as bacteria, fungi or viruses

  6. Water Rights: Surface Water (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Indiana Department of Natural Resources regulates the use and diversion of surface waters. An entity that creates additional stream volumes by releases from impoundments built and financed by...

  7. Regulation of Hydraulic Fracturing in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    APRIL 2013 Regulation of Hydraulic Fracturing in California: A WAsteWAteR And WAteR QuAlity Pe | Regulation of Hydraulic Fracturing in California Wheeler Institute for Water Law & Policy Center for Law #12;Regulation of Hydraulic Fracturing in California | 3Berkeley law | wheeler InstItute for water law

  8. Water Quality for Livestock Max Irsik DVM, MAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Water Quality for Livestock Max Irsik DVM, MAB Beef Cattle Extension Veterinarian University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine Water is an essential nutrient for humans and livestock and drinking water is the primary source of water for most cattle. The most important aspect of water

  9. Harnessing science for environmental regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, J.D. (ed.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An introductory chapter by Graham frames the issues to be discussed; then the following three chapters describe the formation and character of three organizations. These chapters are written by authors who have each had an active management role in the organization they are writing about: Terry F. Yosie, now at the American Petroleum Institute, who staffed the SAB (Science Advisory Board) while he was at EPA; Robert A. Neal, who headed CIIT (Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology) before leaving for a position at Vanderbilt University; and Thomas P. Grumbly, former executive director of HEI (Health Effects Institute) now president of Clean Sites, Inc. While these chapters are well written and make a vital contribution to the overall development of the book's themes, the most valuable and enjoyable parts of the book are the succeeding five chapters, which present case studies dealing with EPA's regulatory efforts on unleaded gasoline, perchloroethylene, formaldehyde, nitrates in drinking water, and carbon monoxide. Each of these case studies, nominally historical accounts of how one or more of these (three) organizations participated in the regulatory controversy, offer insight into the broader issues of dealing with, and incorporating into regulations scientific information that has high uncertainty. One of the richest aspects of the five case studies is the extensive use of referenced interviews with identified participants from all aspects of the regulatory process. This material illuminates the motivation, emotions, and goals of the different players, helping the reader to understand their positions and other issues, such as why industry pursues, and EPA and the environmental movement appear to resist, good science; what underlies EPA's preferences for one regulatory option over another; and why scientists are histant to give yes-or-no answers in accord with the real time needs of the regulatory agency.

  10. Water Resources Policy & Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Water Resources Policy & Economics FOR 4984 Selected Course Topics · Appropriative and riparian water institutions · Incentives for conservation · Water rights for in-stream environmental use · Surface water-groundwater management · Water quality regulations · Water markets · Economic and policy

  11. Designing of a prototype heat-sealer to manufacture solar water sterilization pouches for use in developing nations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinlan, Saundra S

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water purification proves to be a difficult task in many developing nations. The SODIS (SOlar water DISinfection) process is a method which improves the microbiological quality of water making it safer for drinking and ...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - alcohol drinking frequency Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Costs of the Problem >20% of Americans drink at levels that exceed... billion annually in lost productivity, absenteeism 12;What Are Alcoholism and Problem Drinking? Alcoholic......

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - alcohol drinking study Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Costs of the Problem >20% of Americans drink at levels that exceed... billion annually in lost productivity, absenteeism 12;What Are Alcoholism and Problem Drinking? Alcoholic......

  14. Alcohol Mixed with Caffeinated Energy Drinks: Consumption Patterns and Trends Among Canadian Youth & Young Adults.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCrory, Cassondra

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Use of caffeinated energy drinks (CEDs) and alcohol mixed with energy drinks (AmEDs) is a growing trend worldwide, and in Canada, youth and young adults (more)

  15. Water Pollution Control and Abatement (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of the Environment is responsible for protecting the water quality of the state and enacting regulations to prevent and mitigate water pollution. The Water Management Administration ...

  16. Chapter 10 Water Quality Standards (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This administrative regulation establishes procedures to protect the surface waters of the Commonwealth, and thus protect water resources. It states the designated uses of surface water and...

  17. Surface Water Quality Standards (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality, contain surface water quality standards, stream classifications, discussion of lakes and impounded basins, and water...

  18. Reducing booster-pump-induced contaminant intrusion in Indian water systems with a self-actuated, back-pressure regulating valve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, David Donald James

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intermittently-operated water systems struggle to equitably and effectively distribute clean water to customers. One common customer response to intermittency is to supplement the water system's pressure by using a household, ...

  19. Effective water treatment for rural communities in Suriname : a comparison of point-of-use ceramic filters and centralized treatment with sand filters.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Ashlee K.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? For countless communities around the world, acquiring access to safe drinking water is a daily challenge which many organizations endeavor to meet. The villages (more)

  20. Appropriate technology water treatment processes for MaeLa Temporary Shelter, Thailand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vater, Katherine Ann

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis recommends the use of horizontal-flow roughing filters to treat spring water of variable annual quality in MaeLa Temporary Shelter, Thailand. The public drinking water system for 45,000 refugees is overseen by ...

  1. Ceramic filter manufacturing in Northern Ghana : water storage and quality control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleiman, Shanti Lisa

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2009, Pure Home Water (PHW), a Ghana based non-profit organization working to provide affordable and safe drinking water to people in the Northern Region of Ghana, began the construction of a ceramic pot filter (CPF) ...

  2. Household water treatment and safe storage options for Northern Region Ghana : consumer preference and relative cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Vanessa (Vanessa Layton)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A range of household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) products are available in Northern Region Ghana which have the potential to significantly improve local drinking water quality. However, to date, the region has ...

  3. Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scown, Corinne Donahue

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drinking Water: Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE).http://www.epa.gov/mtbe/water.htm (11/30/10), Chiu, Y. W. ;LCFS LCI LP LPG MED MRO MSF MTBE MWD MWDOC NAICS NERC NETL

  4. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Univ. of Michigan Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Special Seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Univ. of Michigan Environmental and Water Resources for arsenic remediation in rural South Asian drinking water Abstract: Over 60 million people in Bangladesh

  5. MSC Publication 102.2008 | Arkansas Water Resources Center ARKANSAS WATER RESOURCES CENTER ANNUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soerens, Thomas

    as affected by poultry litter application rate; 2) Source of Geosmin and MIB in drinking water: Identifying by the Water Resources Research Act of 1964. The AWRC in cooperation with the US Geological Survey and pollution, water quality, and ecosystems. AWRC acts as a liaison between funding groups and the scientists

  6. Recent Action-Research and future course in Water Sector.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Block 380 Thakar people. 200 animals. 40 households. And an acute shortage of water for 5 monthsRecent Action-Research and future course in Water Sector. Milind Sohoni, CTARA, IIT-soil, water, energy end-user defined or demand-driven-drinking water. Towards change-deliver technology

  7. Source waters Several factors influence the selection of source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    less damage to marine life. However, if the geology Desalination Methods for Producing Drinking Water of water are produced: · Treated fresh water that has low concentra- tions of salts and minerals day (mgd) using a long vertical tube distil- lation (LVT) process to produce water for the City

  8. Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in assessing the susceptibility of surface water supplies to pollution from current and future activities, Hydrology, Models Descriptors: drinking water, source water, pollution sources, watershed management, source water, pollution sources, watershed management Primary PI: Darwin L. Sorensen Other PIs David G

  9. DHV water pumping optimization Simon van Mourik1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rottschäfer, Vivi

    Chapter 6 DHV water pumping optimization Simon van Mourik1 Joris Bierkens2 Hans Stigter1 Martijn for optimizing a drinking water network over a horizon of 48 hours, given variable water demands, energy prices and constraints on the pumping strategy and water levels in the reservoirs. Both the dynamic model and goal

  10. Charles J. Vrsmarty & the UNH Water Systems Analysis Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    and environmental flows? Pollution? Poor governance? #12;Provision of Clean Water and Sanitation: A Millennium #12;Food security Global Water Resource Challenges "Engineered" water Sanitation and access to clean.1 billion people lack clean drinking water 2.6 billion people lack basic sanitation

  11. Community water systems recovering from the drought: Lessons learned; plans made

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    #26;exibility in expediting drought- related actions. #31;e Texas Legislature also gave TCEQ more #26;exibility in managing water rights. State agencies pulled together to provide technical assistance and help communities through the drought. TCEQ... , the Texas Department of Emergency Management (TDEM) and the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB) formed the Emergency Drinking Water Task Force to work with other state partners to develop the Emergency Drinking Water Contingency Annex. #31;is annex...

  12. Recommendations for at-risk water supplies in Capiz Province, Philippines : using water source and community assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick, Jessica Molly

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following thesis is part of a larger project which began in response to a request by the Provincial Health Office (PHO) in Capiz Province, Philippines for expert advice to support its drinking water quality testing ...

  13. Meeting the mandate for clean water : an evaluation of privately managed U.S. water and wastewater systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freund, Evan Benjamin

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliable provision of clean and safe drinking water is critical for public health, economic stability and growth in the United States. Due to a combination of financial, regulatory and operational challenges, however, it ...

  14. Water Pollution Fee (Michigan)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Groundwater Program regulates discharge to groundwater under Part 31, Water Resources Protection, of the Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act, 1994 PA 451 and Part 22 Rules....

  15. Water Pollution (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This article states regulations for water quality standards, effluent standards, monitoring and reporting methods, sewer discharge criteria and information about permits. It is the purpose of...

  16. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the quality of Missouri drinking water and how it can be protected. With the large agricultural activity mine areas, hazardous waste disposal, acid precipitation, anthropogenic effects on aquatic ecosystems. Because of the 1987-1989 drought years, and the flood of '93 and '95, water quantity has become a major

  17. Surface Water Quality Standards (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act states regulations for the quality of surface water in the state. It also states designated uses of classified surface waters, surface water quality criteria and an antidegradation policy...

  18. Arsenic removal from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Robert C. (Edgewood, NM); Anderson, D. Richard (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for removing arsenic from water by addition of inexpensive and commonly available magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium oxide, or calcium hydroxide to the water. The hydroxide has a strong chemical affinity for arsenic and rapidly adsorbs arsenic, even in the presence of carbonate in the water. Simple and commercially available mechanical methods for removal of magnesium hydroxide particles with adsorbed arsenic from drinking water can be used, including filtration, dissolved air flotation, vortex separation, or centrifugal separation. A method for continuous removal of arsenic from water is provided. Also provided is a method for concentrating arsenic in a water sample to facilitate quantification of arsenic, by means of magnesium or calcium hydroxide adsorption.

  19. Introduction Welcome to the third volume of The World's Water. What started as an effort to explore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    drinking water. Nearly two and a half billion people lack access to improved sanitation. Thousands still-Brief section of this book.) Such statements do not provide water to poor people or save ecosystems, but they do

  20. Effects of a modified through-mask drinking system (MDS) on fluid intake during exercise in chemical protective gear. Report for January-May 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szlyk, P.C.; Sils, I.V.; Tharion, W.J.; Francesconi, R.P.; Mahnke, R.B.

    1989-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of a modified through-mask drinking system (MDS) on voluntary fluid consumption. Eighteen male volunteers walked on a treadmill (4.02 km/hr, 0 deg. grade, 50 min/hr for 6 hr) in a climatic chamber (dry bulb=32.6 deg C, wet bulb=17.5 deg C, 20.4% relative humidity, and windspeed=8.05 km/hr, producing a WBGT of 22.1 deg C). Subjects wore chemical protective gear (trousers, jacket, boots, gloves, and M17A1 protective mask) and were randomly assigned one of two through-mask and were randomly assigned one of two through-mask drinking systems: CS (n=9), the current gravity fed system or MDS (n=9), a prototype hand-pump drinking system. Because decontamination of the mask and drinking connections was performed prior to drinking, the overall use of the CS was rated significantly more difficult during both work and rest than the MDS. Failure to decontaminate connections prior to drinking was noted early in the trial in 2 soldiers using the CS suggesting an increase risk of accidental contamination associated with this system. Drinking with the MDS had no measurable adverse effect on hydration status of the test subjects: water intake rate, 0.36 L/hr (CS) and 0.42 L/hr (MDS); sweat rate, 0.63 L/hr (CS) and 0.67 L/hr (MDS); body weight loss, 0.32 %/hr (CS) and 0.31 %/hr (MDS).

  1. Review of technical documents supporting proposed revisions to EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) regulations for the disposal/reuse of sewage sludge under Section 405(D) of the Clean Water Act. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In August 1985 the Environmental Engineering Committee of the Science Advisory Board was asked by the Office of Water Regulations and Standards (OWRS) to review technical documents supporting development of EPA regulations for the disposal/reuse of sewage sludge under Section 405(d) of the Clean Water Act. The Committee was also asked by the Office of Marine and Estuarine Protection (OMEP) to review technical documents supporting revisions of the EPA ocean dumping regulations. The Committee chose to review the two sets of documents together, since they both dealt with a common subject, and since they shared, in some respects, a common methodology. The report, however, covers only the review of the OWRS documents, which consist of a set of risk-assessment methodologies (1,2,3,4) for four sludge disposal/reuse options (landfilling, land application/distribution and marketing, incineration, and ocean disposal). The reviews of the OMEP documents are covered in separate Committee reports. The Committee's principal findings are outlined.

  2. MONITORING A TOXIC CYANOBACTERIA BLOOM IN LAKE BOURGET (FRANCE) AND ITS CONSEQUENCES FOR WATER QUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacquet, Stéphan

    the turbidity of the water in treatment units providing drinking water. These central supplies obtain their lake of Feuillade et al. [3]. The samples were taken in the water treatment units, before (water intake in treatment unit) and at the end of the treatment steps (in water reaching the consumers). Intracellular

  3. Integrated Water Management Options in the Nebraska Ground Water Management &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    ag chemical best management practices 7. soil testing 8. voluntary or mandatory educational programs regulate ground water development (well spacing regulations, well drilling prohibitions) and ground water by implementing the above GMA regulations, well drilling may be halted or conditioned. NRD permits are required

  4. Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supply Focus Category #2 Water Quality Focus Category #3 Treatment Lead Institution University of Kansas reservoirs, as well as the effectiveness of drinking water treatment processes when extremely high levels managers of water supply reservoirs, treatment plant superintendents, and others to control geosmin

  5. Seymour Aquifer Water Quality Improvement Project Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sij, J.; Morgan, C.; Belew, M.; Jones, D.; Wagner, K.

    , Wilbarger, and Fisher counties exceeded the federal safe drinking water standard (10 mg/L NO3-N). This high concentration is a concern because although 90% of the water pumped from the aquifer is used for irrigation, it is also used as a municipal water...

  6. SUBMITTED TO: THE D.C. WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    chemicals and heavy metals such as lead'. Several published reports have suggested that D.C. public waterMARCH 1996 SUBMITTED TO: THE D.C. WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH CENTER UNIVERSITY OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008 SUBMITTED BY: DR. KWAMENA OCRAN LEAD IN RESIDENTIAL DRINKING WATER: RISK

  7. OurStory: Life on the Water Maritime Munchies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    or in the water, with a powerful light that gives a signal to guide seafarers maritime: of, relating to, or bordering a body of water seafarer: a person who operates or assists in operating a ship swanky: (historical definition) a drink from the 1800s that ended thirst and provided energy to workers on land or on the water

  8. DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR MANAGEMENT OF WATER SOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohanec, Marko

    DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR MANAGEMENT OF WATER SOURCES Nejc Trdin1, 2 , Marko Bohanec1 , Mitja.bohanec}@ijs.si, mitja.janza@geo-zs.si ABSTRACT Meeting the quality criteria for drinking water is one of the areas which of data collected while monitoring water adequacy, an expert carries a large burden and also his decisions

  9. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's drinking water and how it can be protected. With the large agricultural activity in the state, non, hazardous waste disposal acid precipitation, anthropogenic effects on aquatic ecosystems and wetlands. Water of the 1987-89 drought years and the floods of 1993 and 1995, water quantity has become a major topic

  10. Physico-chemical water quality in Ghana: Prospects for water supply technology implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schfer, Andrea; Rossiter, H.M.A.; Owusu, P.A.; Richards, B.S.; Awuah, E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S/cm and turbidity from 0 to >542 NTU. Many water samples analysed breached the drinking water quality guidelines. High levels of heavy metals were found and also locations high in sulphate and nitrate. In some regions chemical contaminants such as fluoride occur...

  11. Afghanistan water constraints overview analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Afghanistan's already severe water supply problems are expected to intensify as Afghan refugees resettle in former conflictive zones. The report examines the technical, economic, cultural, and institutional facets of the country's water supply and suggests steps to mitigate existing and anticipated water supply problems. Chapter 2 presents information on Afghanistan's water resources, covering the country's climate, precipitation, glaciers/snow packs, and watersheds; the principal patterns of water flow and distribution; and comprehensive estimates. Chapter 3 examines water resource development in the country from 1945 to 1979, including projects involving irrigation and hydroelectric power and strategies for improving the drinking water supply.

  12. Rhode Island Pretreatment Regulations (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations set standards for water pretreatment prior to release to Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTWs), and require effluent data including the identity, amount, frequency, concentration...

  13. Water Rights and Appropriation (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All uses of water in South Dakota, with the exception of domestic water uses, require a Water Right Permit. The Board of Water and Natural Resources has the authority to regulate and control the...

  14. Hardness of water.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahul Oza

    This project is helpful to those people who live in the coastal based and they are suffering every year with problem of safe drinking water and not available throughout the year. It has given ideas, technology and economical way of solution for water crisis and its also solving problem of scare by use of different methods to development evelopment new water source in water scare area of Saurashtra and Kutch in Gujarat. Saurashtra land is containing of different types of minerals specially bauxite, calcite, fluoride so many mineral based industries are developed here and those who continuous nuous need this as raw materials and they used many mines and processes units. These minerals are creating problem to polluted ground water some are melting and increasing TDS more than 6000 mg/l and

  15. Voltage-Regulated Water Flux through Aquaporin Channels In Silico Jochen S. Hub,6* Camilo Aponte-Santamaria,6 Helmut Grubmuller, and Bert L. de Groot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Groot, Bert

    -Santamari´a,6 Helmut Grubmu¨ller, and Bert L. de Groot Department for Cell and Molecular Biology, Uppsala flux, whereas a negative potential favors a down-state, which reduces the single-channel water was embedded in a lipid membrane, and 150 mM sodium chloride was added to each of the two water compart- ments

  16. please recycle. Is it safe to drink?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    to toxic compounds, in our air and water, in the products we use and the byproducts of the industries in environmental science, molecular biology, medicine and environmental policy to elucidate how pollutants affect pollution to solution. That's why the Nicholas School of the Environment and the Duke University Medical

  17. Universities CoUnCil on Water resoUrCes JoUrnal of Contemporary Water researCh & edUCation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Aaron

    than one billion people already lack access to safe drinking water (Gleick 1999; Loftus 2009) and more than 2.4 billion lack access to sanitation worldwide (World Health Organization 2000). Globally, waterUniversities CoUnCil on Water resoUrCes JoUrnal of Contemporary Water researCh & edUCation iss

  18. INEEL Source Water Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sehlke, Gerald

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) covers approximately 890 mi2 and includes 12 public water systems that must be evaluated for Source water protection purposes under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Because of its size and location, six watersheds and five aquifers could potentially affect the INEELs drinking water sources. Based on a preliminary evaluation of the available information, it was determined that the Big Lost River, Birch Creek, and Little Lost River Watersheds and the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer needed to be assessed. These watersheds were delineated using the United States Geologic Surveys Hydrological Unit scheme. Well capture zones were originally estimated using the RESSQC module of the Environmental Protection Agencys Well Head Protection Area model, and the initial modeling assumptions and results were checked by running several scenarios using Modflow modeling. After a technical review, the resulting capture zones were expanded to account for the uncertainties associated with changing groundwater flow directions, a thick vadose zone, and other data uncertainties. Finally, all well capture zones at a given facility were merged to a single wellhead protection area at each facility. A contaminant source inventory was conducted, and the results were integrated with the well capture zones, watershed and aquifer information, and facility information using geographic information system technology to complete the INEELs Source Water Assessment. Of the INEELs 12 public water systems, three systems rated as low susceptibility (EBR-I, Main Gate, and Gun Range), and the remainder rated as moderate susceptibility. No INEEL public water system rated as high susceptibility. We are using this information to develop a source water management plan from which we will subsequently implement an INEEL-wide source water management program. The results are a very robust set of wellhead protection areas that will protect the INEELs public water systems yet not too conservative to inhibit the INEEL from carrying out its missions.

  19. Permitting of Consumptive Uses of Water (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Local water management districts are required to establish programs and regulations to provide for the permitting of consumptive uses of water. Such permitting programs are subject to the...

  20. Water, Power, and Development in Twenty-First Century China: The Case of the South-North Water Transfer Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow-Miller, Brittany Leigh

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    over basic water management and environmental concerns.to environmental regulation and water pollution managementfiguring into water management is the parallel environmental

  1. Water, Power, and Development in Twenty-First Century China: The Case of the South-North Water Transfer Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow-Miller, Brittany Leigh

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to environmental regulation and water pollution managementover basic water management and environmental concerns.figuring into water management is the parallel environmental

  2. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report for the period October 1 to December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E. (eds.)

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is Volume 1 of a two-volume document that describes the progress of 15 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period October 1 to December 31, 1989. This volume discusses the projects. The work described in this document is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the management of Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Concentrations of ground-water constituents are compared to federal drinking water standards throughout this document for reference purposes. All drinking water supplied from the samples aquifer meets regulatory standards for drinking water quality. 51 refs., 35 figs., 86 tabs.

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - alcohol risk drinking Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center, University of Missouri-Rolla Collection: Engineering 2 StraightTalk A guide for parents on teenage drinking Summary: to use alcohol? 14 Why do teenagers drink? 15 What...

  4. Water Resource Uses and Issues in Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeely, John G.; Lacewell, Ronald D.

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency was petitioned to designate the Edwards Aquifer as a sole-source aquifer under the provisions of the Safe Drinking Water Act. About 90 percent of the recharge of the Edwards Underground Reservoir is from... Water Resource Uses and Issues in Texas The Texas A&M University System The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station Neville P. Clarke. Director, College Station, Texas Acknowledgments This study of the Texas water situation completes a series...

  5. 33 CFR 2.36: Navigable Waters of the United States, navigable...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigable waters, and territorial watersLegal Abstract This regulation provides the definition for "navigable waters of the United States, navigable waters, and territorial...

  6. Effect of temperature on the release of intentionally and non-intentionally added substances from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles into water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles into water: Chemical analysis and potential toxicity Cristina Bach a used for the bottling of drinking water is polyethylene terephthalate (PET). Since migra- tion can

  7. Household ceramic water filter evaluation using three simple low-cost methods : membrane filtration, 3M Petrifilm and hydrogen sulfide bacteria in northern region, Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mattelet, Claire (Claire Eliane H. Y.)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drinking water continues to be a major source of waterborne diseases and death in the world because many points of water collection remain unsafe. This thesis reports high level of fecal contamination found in rivers and ...

  8. When alcohol-dependent people try to stop drink-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    some form of treatment. If you or someone you care about may have an alcohol problem, help is available--so they may drink some more, and it becomes a vicious cycle. "Addiction has 3 major problems: You lose your researcher studying new alcoholism treatments. "People develop an alcohol disorder National Institutes

  9. Israel -the " BACK TO THE FUTURE" opportunity for the Global Water Arena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einat, Aharonov

    Consequences of climate change: Drought and lack of fresh drinking water The aging water infrastructure canIsrael - the " BACK TO THE FUTURE" opportunity for the Global Water Arena Booky Oren Chairman't cope with the growing quantity and quality needs Water - Growing Quantity and Quality Demands

  10. ANALYSING THE DIVERSITY OF WATER PRICING STRUCTURES: THE CASE OF FRANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    .montginoul@cemagref.fr ; Fax : (33) 4 67 63 57 95 Paper published in : Water Resour Manage (2007) 21:861­871 Author-produced resources. Simultaneously, the cost of producing drinking water rises, as water has to be transported over1 ANALYSING THE DIVERSITY OF WATER PRICING STRUCTURES: THE CASE OF FRANCE Marielle Montginoul

  11. Pilot study of horizontal roughing filtration in northern Ghana as pretreatment for highly turbid dugout water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Losleben, Tamar

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Northern Region Ghana (NRG), highly turbid rainwater runoff and intermittent streams are collected in earthen dams called dugouts. These dams serve as many communities' main source of drinking and domestic water despite ...

  12. Water driven : New Orleans City Hall as a sustainable civic center for 21st century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sangthong, Pholkrit

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The devastating struck of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans in late summer of 2005 was deadly and immense. The storm destroyed over 170 drinking water facilities and 47 wastewater treatments around the city, and resulted ...

  13. Mark L. McFarland, Associate Professor and Extension Water Resources Specialist;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    septic systems or wastewater treatment plants, and pesticides or fertilizer applied to cropland certified in Texas to analyze drinking water samples. The list is on the Web at http://www.tceq.state.tx.us

  14. Efficacy of gravity-fed chlorination system for community-scale water disinfection in northern Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzpatrick, Daniel Cash

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although chlorine is one of the lowest cost ways of providing disinfection, currently billions of people lack drinking water that has had this simple treatment. Arch Chemical's Pulsar 1 unit is an innovation in chlorine ...

  15. Risk Analysis and Adaptive Response Planning for Water Distribution Systems Contamination Emergency Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasekh, Amin

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    are investigated. Pressure-driven hydraulic analysis is performed to simulate the complicated system hydraulics under pressure-deficit conditions. Performance of a novel preventive response action ? injection of food-grade dye directly into drinking water...

  16. Water Quality Standards Implementation (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality regulates Oklahoma's Water Quality Standards. The law states the requirements and standards for point source discharges. It also establishes...

  17. Storm Water Discharge Permits (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wisconsin's storm water runoff regulations include permitting requirements for construction sites and industrial facilities, including those processing or extracting coal or gas. The purpose of the...

  18. Louisiana Water Control Law (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality administers the proper protection and maintenance of the state's waters, and regulate the discharges of waste materials, pollutants, and other...

  19. Water for Texas: Applicant Capacity Assessment Tool for the Economically Distressed Areas Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Jason; Dascaliuc, Svetlana; Grossman, Nick; Hunt, Michael; Kenesson, Laura; Madden, Tara; McWilliams, Austin; Scott, Whitney; Stubbs, Megan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    leadership strategy that plans for the future. Management is crucial to the success of drinking water and wastewater projects as inadequate leadership, mismanagement, and/or lack of planning can stall a project. Some smaller, more rural applicants may... and treatment system) ADDITIONAL INDICATORS Does the Project Include Wastewater Construction? TWDB provides financial assistance to facilitate two types of EDAP projects: drinking water and wastewater. The data analysis conducted for this report shows...

  20. Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is the common source of drinking water in rural areas. The use of farmland for landspreading organic wastes is a needed option for biosolids management. Biosolids are sludges that have been processed to be used as soil is needed. For the past 3 years, over 90 per cent of the sewage sludge generated in Maine has been utilized

  1. Montana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    drinking water supplies, a Prairie County sugar beet grower contemplating the possible impacts of coal-bed, drying streams and falling reservoir levels were the norm throughout Montana in FY 2003. But drought methane brines on soil and water, or a Madison County fishing guide coping with the effects of whirling

  2. Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Wednesday, January 15, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    CEE 880 Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Wednesday, January 15, 2012 2315 GG treatment evaluating disposal options in the U. S. and Bangladesh" Arsenic contamination of drinking water threatens the health of millions of people around the world, most acutely in Bangladesh, where a massive

  3. New program investigates health and water link

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 24 New program investigates public health and water link Thousands of cases of waterborne and water-related diseases worldwide are related to drinking water. A new program in the Texas A&M Health Science... Center?s School of Rural Public Health is working to understand this link between diseases and water and educate the public about this connection. The Program in Public Health and Water Research was established in October 2008 within the rural...

  4. Rules and Regulations for the Investigation and Remediation of Hazardous Material Releases (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations establish procedures for the investigation and remediation of contamination resulting from the unpermitted release of hazardous materials. The regulations aim to protect water...

  5. Rules and Regulations for Dredging and the Management of Dredged Material (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations apply to dredging conducted in a marine environment. The regulations aim to ensure that dredging does not unduly impact groundwater and surface water quality while streamlining...

  6. Rules and Regulations for Underground Storage Facilities Used for Petroleum Products and Hazardous Materials (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations apply to underground storage facilities for petroleum and hazardous waste, and seek to protect water resources from contamination. The regulations establish procedures for the...

  7. Water Quality Control (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The policy of the state of Texas is to promote the quality of the state's water by regulating existing industries, taking into consideration the economic development of the state, and by...

  8. Water Rules (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These rules and regulations shall apply to all water systems subject to the jurisdiction of the Alabama Public Service Commission. They are intended to promote good utility practices, to assure...

  9. Georgia Water Quality Control Act (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Georgia Water Quality Control Act (WQCA) is a set of environmental regulations and permitting requirements that comply with the federal Clean Water Act. The Georgia Water Quality Control Act...

  10. Ground and Surface Water Protection (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This regulation implements the New Mexico Water Quality Act. Any person intending to make a new water contaminant discharge or to alter the character or location of an existing water contaminant...

  11. Alternative Regulation (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Utility regulators, including the Public Service Board, have applied a new type of regulation, often called "alternative regulation" or "incentive regulation." There are many variants of this type...

  12. A solid phase extraction procedure for determination of triazine herbicides and polar metabolites in natural waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, M.S. [Waters Corp., Milford, MA (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atrazine and related triazine herbicides are used in great quantities throughout the world for pre-emergence weed control. In the central United States, for example, millions of kilograms of triazines are applied each year. In areas of heavy usage, surface water supplies are often affected by runoff of these substances and their transformation products. Therefore, a number of these compounds are routinely monitored in drinking water in the United States, particularly in agricultural areas such as the Mississippi river valley. There is also significant interest regarding the fate and transport of the triazine herbicides in the natural environment. In Europe, where groundwater is utilized for a high proportion of drinking water supplies, the EC has established more stringent limits than has the US EPA. Currently, the US limit is 3 {mu}g/L for atrazine; the European limit is 0.1 {mu}g/L for atrazine or any individual regulated pesticide, and 0.5 {mu}g/L for the sum of all pesticides. Because groundwater levels in agricultural areas were consistently above this limit, Germany banned the use of Atrazine in 1991, and has recommended banning the use of this herbicide throughout the European Community (EC). Clearly, a rugged method for determination of the triazine herbicides is desirable with detection limits in the part per trillion range. Because direct determination at these levels is not usually possible, sample enrichment techniques, such as solid phase extraction (SPE), must be employed. In this study, Porapak RDX Sep-Pak{reg_sign} cartridges were used for trace enrichment of triazines and metabolites.

  13. Government Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashford, Nicholas

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract. Interest in the use of so-called voluntary approaches to supplement or replace formal environmental regulation is on the rise, both in Europe and in the United States. These approaches fall into two general ...

  14. 8/10/12 Bureaucracy fuels China's safe water problems | Eco-Business.com 1/2www.eco-business.com/news/bureaucracy-fuels-chinas-safe-water-problems/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    300 million rural residents lack access to safe drinking water, the researchers reported. The authors8/10/12 Bureaucracy fuels China's safe water problems | Eco-Business.com 1/2www.eco-business.com/news/bureaucracy-fuels-chinas-safe-water-problems/ Policy & Finance Energy Green Buildings Transport Manufacturing Waste Eco-Cities Food & Agriculture Water

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - astatine 206 Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    APPENDIX A STANDARDS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS Summary: regulations contained in 40 CFR 141 (EPA 1989b) and New Mexico Drinking Water Regulations, Sections 206 Source: Los...

  16. A shallow water model for the numerical simulation of overland flow on surfaces with ridges and furrows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    induces problems at watershed scale for soil conservation (decrease of soil thickness by erosion, nutrient (drinking water) and sustainability of aquatic ecosystems (chemical pollution). These troubles can be prevented by watershed management. Improving watershed management in relationships with overland flow

  17. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainable Water Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of water consumption: drinking from the tap. The reasoning behind this is a lack of awareness and promotionUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainable Water Water Consumption This report outlines how Sustainability Marketing practices can be used to reduce

  18. Distribution of trace elements in waters and sediments of the Seversky Donets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    are affected by the extensive multiple water uses (iron ore-mining processes, heavy and light manufacturing, power, industrial and drinking water supply infrastructures, agriculture, aquaculture) and urban inputsDistribution of trace elements in waters and sediments of the Seversky Donets transboundary

  19. Love That Dirty Water (It Can Power Your Home) by Susan Kruglinski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to produce electricity and clean water in undeveloped areas, Logan notes that sanitizing wastewater usuallyLove That Dirty Water (It Can Power Your Home) by Susan Kruglinski published online September 30, 2004 A quarter of the people in the world still drink filthy water and live miles from electrical power

  20. Alternative Water Supply Options for Nitrate Contamination in California's Tulare and Salinas Groundwater Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, Jay R.

    Fresno Council of Governments Paul Collins CDPH Division of Drinking Water and Environmental Management Water and Environmental Management Leslie Cotham Golden Living Center ­ Country View Jeannie Darby UCD County Department of Environmental Health ­ Water Program Anthony Chavarria City of Firebaugh Kathy Chung

  1. The Project The Southern Region Water Quality Regional Coordination Project is designed to promote regional collaboration,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    issues: · Drinking Water and Human Health · Environmental Restoration · Waste Management · Nutrient to protect and restore water resources. Effective approaches for watershed management, pollution prevention and Pesticide Management · Pollution Assessment and Prevention · Watershed Management · Water Quantity

  2. Water Qual. Res. J. Canada, 2004 Volume 39, No. 3, 213222 Copyright 2004, CAWQ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumder, Asit

    by algae are geosmin and MIB (2- methylisoborneol). In Canada, geosmin and MIB have been detected in Lake Ontario, the St. Lawrence River, and treatment plants that draw water from Lake Erie and from the Niagara for the analysis of lake and reservoir water samples from several coastal British Columbia drinking water sources

  3. Gone are the days of awkwardly angling your tall plastic water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baskaran, Mark

    Gone are the days of awkwardly angling your tall plastic water bottle under the rushing arc of the number of plastic water bottles saved from landfills.As of Oct.31, the station in the RFC alone has with Facilities Planning and Management, retrofitted six standard drinking fountains with new EZH2O water bottle

  4. 2-3. Generic Approaches Towards Water Quality Monitoring Based on Paleolimnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    phosphorus analysis of Lake St-Charles, the principal drinking water supply for Québec City, #12;62 R environmental records for lake and river ecosystems provide a valuable generic tool for water quality management by way of water quality research on three ecosystems in Québec, Canada. Lake St-Augustin is a small lake

  5. Table Of Contents Section: Page

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    with federal, state, and local drinking water standards. b. When drinking water is obtained from an on Act, 40 CFR 141-143, and any state, or local drinking water regulations. c. If water is not available with the services provided by a licensed potable water contractor. d. Outside the Continental Unites States (OCONUS

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - act fqpa drinking Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and heart prob lems, Joe drinks to fill his days. His Source: Collection: Renewable Energy 58 Department of Entomology Strategic Plan 2002 2007 (revised May 2004) Summary:...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - alcohol drinking Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collection: Mathematics ; Engineering 10 brainfunction How Much Alcohol Summary: alcohol level can continue to rise after the person has stopped drinking, she should be...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - alcohol drinking individuals Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    higher blood alcohol levels than heavier individuals, and are at higher risk... alcohol level can continue to rise after the person has stopped drinking, she should be...

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - alcohol drinking behaviors Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collection: Physics ; Materials Science 3 brainfunction How Much Alcohol Summary: alcohol level can continue to rise after the person has stopped drinking, she should be...

  10. Improvements of oil-in-water analysis for produced water using membrane filtration.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khor, Ee Huey

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The accuracy of oil-in-water analysis for produced water is increasingly crucial as the regulations for disposal of this water are getting more stringent world wide. (more)

  11. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soerens, Thomas

    officials on the new Phase II Storm Water NPDES regulations and Best Management Practices available requirements. In addition, they are typically unaware of Best Management Practices (BMPs) that are availableArkansas Water Resources Center STORMWATER POLLUTION PREVENTION BMP WORKSHOP, DEMONSTRATION

  12. 2 C.C.R. 410 - Rules and Regulations for the Management and Control...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Regulations for the Management and Control of Designated Ground Water Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: 2...

  13. Cogeneration and its regulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casten, T.R.; Ross, H.E.

    1981-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In the near term, regulators, utility managements, and legislators will grapple with numerous issues surrounding the development of cogeneration projects as sources of electric power. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission predicts that 12,000 MW of new cogeneration plants will be constructed during the 1980s, and all 50 states are in the process of implementing new regulations pursuant to the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act. The US utility system's overall fuel efficiency of 29% offers rich opportunities to conserve fuel, reduce costs, and decrease pollution via cogeneration. Policymakers should stop viewing utilities simply as efficiency tax collectors on the one hand and opponents of innovation on the other. In addition to mothballing inefficient central utility stations, the US must rapidly deploy district heating with cogenerated heat; policymakers should look beyond the obsolete stream systems and encourage development of the high-temperature hot-water systems so successful in Europe.

  14. Nutrient Management Module No. 12 Water Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Nutrient Management Module No. 12 Water Quality Considerations and Regulations by Susan Mc Management Competency Area II: Nutrient movement in soil and water. Objectives After completing this module issues 3.Become familiar with federal and state water quality regulations 4.Identify Best Management

  15. Regulation of above-ground oil and waste containers. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Transportation, Tourism, and Hazardous Materials of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, Second Session, January 26, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Representatives from the petroleum industry, US EPA, National Bureau of Standards and Congress were among those testifying at a hearing to discuss one of the worst inland environmental disasters in this Nation's history. The January 2 collapse of the Ashland Oil Co.'s storage tank in Floreffe, Pennsylvania resulted in the release of some 4 million gallons of diesel fuel. Approximately a million gallons escaped the containment structures and spilled over into the Monongahela River. This spill has contaminated the drinking water sources for millions of people downstream, from Pittsburgh to Cincinnati to Louisville, and beyond. Attention is focused on the causes of this tank's collapse, the response measures taken by Ashland Oil, the Coast Guard, the EPA, and the need for tighter federal regulations of above-ground tanks used for the storage of petroleum and hazardous substances.

  16. Regulation 28: Library REGULATION 28: LIBRARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Regulation 28: Library 180 REGULATION 28: LIBRARY The purpose of this Regulation is to safeguard the common interests of all Library users. All persons are admitted on the understanding that they have read and agreed to observe the Library Regulations. Breach of this Regulation could result in membership being

  17. Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan Regulation Act (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act enacts the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan, which is a joint state and federal effort to provide for the conservation of the Everglades region. The plan regulates land and water...

  18. George Best I spent 90% of my money on women, drink, and fast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halligan, Daniel

    are listed below. The ethanol per drink shows the relative strength of typical servings of drinks. A natural definition for a unit of alcohol is 15 ml ethanol, which is the amount of ethanol contained in one-sixth of a bottle (a typical glass) of wine. A shot of spirits contains slightly more ethanol, 17 ml. A bottle

  19. Rev. 2/15/13 Instructional Technology Services ITS Food and Drink Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daescu, Dacian N.

    Rev. 2/15/13­ Instructional Technology Services ITS Food and Drink Policy OIT Computer Classrooms, Library 1st floor Learning Ground, BHB 225/6 IDSC). ITS (Instructional Technology Services) facilitates not have the time or ability to clean food/drink spills in computer classrooms or labs while also

  20. Arsenic in public water supplies and cardiovascular mortality in Spain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medrano, Ma Jose, E-mail: pmedrano@isciii.es [Centro Nacional de Epidemiologia, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Sinesio Delgado 6, 28029 Madrid (Spain); Boix, Raquel; Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto [Centro Nacional de Epidemiologia, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Sinesio Delgado 6, 28029 Madrid (Spain)] [Centro Nacional de Epidemiologia, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Sinesio Delgado 6, 28029 Madrid (Spain); Palau, Margarita [Subdireccion General de Sanidad Ambiental y Salud Laboral, Direccion General de Salud Publica y Sanidad Exterior, Ministerio de Sanidad y Politica Social, Madrid (Spain)] [Subdireccion General de Sanidad Ambiental y Salud Laboral, Direccion General de Salud Publica y Sanidad Exterior, Ministerio de Sanidad y Politica Social, Madrid (Spain); Damian, Javier [Centro Nacional de Epidemiologia, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Sinesio Delgado 6, 28029 Madrid (Spain)] [Centro Nacional de Epidemiologia, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Sinesio Delgado 6, 28029 Madrid (Spain); Ramis, Rebeca [Centro Nacional de Epidemiologia, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Sinesio Delgado 6, 28029 Madrid (Spain) [Centro Nacional de Epidemiologia, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Sinesio Delgado 6, 28029 Madrid (Spain); CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP), Madrid (Spain); Barrio, Jose Luis del [Departamento de Salud Publica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid (Spain)] [Departamento de Salud Publica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid (Spain); Navas-Acien, Ana [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States) [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Department of Epidemiology, Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: High-chronic arsenic exposure in drinking water is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. At low-chronic levels, as those present in Spain, evidence is scarce. In this ecological study, we evaluated the association of municipal drinking water arsenic concentrations during the period 1998-2002 with cardiovascular mortality in the population of Spain. Methods: Arsenic concentrations in drinking water were available for 1721 municipalities, covering 24.8 million people. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for cardiovascular (361,750 deaths), coronary (113,000 deaths), and cerebrovascular (103,590 deaths) disease were analyzed for the period 1999-2003. Two-level hierarchical Poisson models were used to evaluate the association of municipal drinking water arsenic concentrations with mortality adjusting for social determinants, cardiovascular risk factors, diet, and water characteristics at municipal or provincial level in 651 municipalities (200,376 cardiovascular deaths) with complete covariate information. Results: Mean municipal drinking water arsenic concentrations ranged from <1 to 118 {mu}g/L. Compared to the overall Spanish population, sex- and age-adjusted mortality rates for cardiovascular (SMR 1.10), coronary (SMR 1.18), and cerebrovascular (SMR 1.04) disease were increased in municipalities with arsenic concentrations in drinking water >10 {mu}g/L. Compared to municipalities with arsenic concentrations <1 {mu}g/L, fully adjusted cardiovascular mortality rates were increased by 2.2% (-0.9% to 5.5%) and 2.6% (-2.0% to 7.5%) in municipalities with arsenic concentrations between 1-10 and>10 {mu}g/L, respectively (P-value for trend 0.032). The corresponding figures were 5.2% (0.8% to 9.8%) and 1.5% (-4.5% to 7.9%) for coronary heart disease mortality, and 0.3% (-4.1% to 4.9%) and 1.7% (-4.9% to 8.8%) for cerebrovascular disease mortality. Conclusions: In this ecological study, elevated low-to-moderate arsenic concentrations in drinking water were associated with increased cardiovascular mortality at the municipal level. Prospective cohort studies with individual measures of arsenic exposure, standardized cardiovascular outcomes, and adequate adjustment for confounders are needed to confirm these ecological findings. Our study, however, reinforces the need to implement arsenic remediation treatments in water supply systems above the World Health Organization safety standard of 10 {mu}g/L.

  1. 8/9/12 Global water sustainability flows through natural and human challenges 1/2www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120809141621.htm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    lack access to safe drinking water. Water can unleash fury. Floods in Beijing on July 21 overwhelmed8/9/12 Global water sustainability flows through natural and human challenges 1/2www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120809141621.htm TweetTweet 14 1 1 Share This: See Also: Earth & Climate Water Drought Research

  2. Speeding up solar disinfection : effects of hydrogen peroxide, temperature, and copper plus ascorbate on the photoinactivation of E. coli in Charles River water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Michael Benjamin, 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sunlight efficiently disinfects drinking water in plastic bottles over two days, but simple additives may show promise for reducing this time to several hours. This study found that adding up to 500 [micro]M hydrogen ...

  3. 2012 APPLIANCE EFFICIENCY REGULATIONS Edmund G. Brown Jr., Governor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Appliance Efficiency Regulations, appliance standards, refrigerators, air conditioners, space heaters, water heaters, pool heaters, pool pumps, electric spas, pool pump motors, plumbing fittings, plumbing fixtures, showerheads, spray valves, faucets, tub spout diverters, water closets, urinals, ceiling fans, ceiling fan

  4. Nitrate contamination of domestic potable water supplies: a social problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, T.; Jensen, E.L.; Conway, J.B.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrate contamination of potable water supplies is a recognized health hazard. Potentially, the contamination of private drinking water supplies could be a problem in the rural Palouse area of Idaho and Washington. Studies have shown that 12% of the rural population of Whitman County, Washington, may be drinking water containing nitrates in excess of the national standard. Yet there is no organized concern about this potential health hazard among local citizens. After reviewing the literature on nitrate contamination of ground water and discussing nitrate contamination of private potable water supplies in the Palouse, we use a social movement theory of social problems to explain why this situation has not been defined as a public health problem.

  5. Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

  6. Water Conservation is a critical priority in Texas. To

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://fcs.tamu.edu/housing/healthy_homes/indo or_air_quality/biological_pollutants/index.php Healthy Homes Some of the most serious health problems risks. Parents can examine risks from lead-based paint, indoor air pollution, and drinking water risks, and control measures related to common residential indoor air problems and to help consumers

  7. Regulators, Requirements, Statutes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Statutes Regulators, Requirements, Statutes The Laboratory must comply with environmental laws and regulations that apply to Laboratory operations. Contact Environmental...

  8. Management and Storage of Surface Waters (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Environmental Protection regulates the use and storage of surface waters in the state. A permit from either the Department or the local Water Management District is required for...

  9. Global impacts of conversions from natural to agricultural ecosystems on water resources: Quantity versus quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlon, Bridget R.

    for $90% of global freshwater consumption. Irrigation based on surface water reduced streamflow and raised is a critical issue because 1.1 billion of the world's 6 billion people lack access to safe drinking water [World Health Organization, 2003]. Agricultural food pro- duction accounted for an average of $90

  10. Ethanol as Internal Standard for Quantitative Determination of Volatile Compounds in Spirit Drinks by Gas Chromatography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charapitsa, Siarhei V; Kulevich, Nikita V; Makoed, Nicolai M; Mazanik, Arkadzi L; Sytova, Svetlana N

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new methodical approach of using ethanol as internal standard in gas chromatographic analysis of volatile compounds in spirit drinks in daily practice of testing laboratories is proposed. This method provides determination of volatile compounds concentrations in spirit drinks directly expressed in milligrams per liter (mg/L) of absolute alcohol according to official methods without measuring of alcohol strength of analyzed sample. The experimental demonstration of this method for determination of volatile compounds in spirit drinks by gas chromatography is described. Its validation was carried out by comparison with experimental results obtained by internal standard method and external standard method.

  11. Division of Water, Part 666: Regulation for Administration and Management of the Wild, Scenic and Recreational Rivers System in New York State Excepting Private Land in the Adirondack Park (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act establishes statewide regulations for the management, protection, enhancement and control of land use and development in river areas on all designated wild, scenic and recreational rivers...

  12. Water heater control module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammerstrom, Donald J

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced electric water heater control system that interfaces with a high temperature cut-off thermostat and an upper regulating thermostat. The system includes a control module that is electrically connected to the high-temperature cut-off thermostat and the upper regulating thermostat. The control module includes a switch to open or close the high-temperature cut-off thermostat and the upper regulating thermostat. The control module further includes circuitry configured to control said switch in response to a signal selected from the group of an autonomous signal, a communicated signal, and combinations thereof.

  13. Criteria and Conditions for Authorizing Withdrawal, Diversion, and Storage of Water (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations describe the criteria for the issuance of water withdrawal, diversion, and storage permits for irrigation, industrial use, and power generation, among other uses. The regulations...

  14. Environmental assessment of ground-water compliance activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses the environmental impacts of the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Spook, Wyoming on ground water. DOE previously characterized the site and monitoring data were collected during the surface remediation. The ground water compliance strategy is to perform no further remediation at the site since the ground water in the aquifer is neither a current nor potential source of drinking water. Under the no-action alternative, certain regulatory requirements would not be met.

  15. Water Quality Act (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act establishes the Water Quality Control Commission and states the powers and duties of the commission. Rules are stated for adoption of regulations and standards and information is provided...

  16. Noble gases identify the mechanisms of fugitive gas contamination in drinking-water wells overlying the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    12, 2014 (received for review November 27, 2013) Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have triggered by horizontal drilling or hydraulic fracturing. noble gas geochemistry | groundwater contamination and hydraulic fracturing have substantially increased hydrocarbon recovery from black shales and other

  17. Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    liter PETE or HDPE plastic bottles. The time between watera plastic funnel positioned over a clean 250 mL bottle. The

  18. Meeting the Need for Safe Drinking Water in Rural Mexico through Point-of-Use Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lang, Micah; Kaser, Forrest; Reygadas, Fermin; Nelson, Kara; Kammen, Daniel M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    contained in transparent plastic bottles: Characterizing thechlorine) solution and plastic bottles with measuring caps.then distributed in plastic bottles to individual households

  19. Drinking Water Treatment Chemicals- Health Effects NOT FOR DISTRIBUTION OR SALE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NSF International, an independent, not-for-profit, non-governmental organization, is dedicated to being the leading global provider of public health and safety-based risk management solutions while serving the interests of all stakeholders. This Standard is subject to revision. Contact NSF to confirm this revision is current. Users of this Standard may request clarifications and

  20. REAL TIME ASSESSMENT OF DRINKING WATER SYSTEMS USING A DYNAMIC BAYESIAN NETWORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir, Eyal

    . S. Minsker2 and E. Amir3 1 Graduate Research Asst., Dept of Civil & Environmental Engineering Professor, Dept of Civil & Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois-Urbana, 205. N. Mathews Ave processes that may disguise the presence of a contaminant. Current sensor technology relies on surrogate

  1. Risk Perception and Willingness to Pay for Removing Arsenic in Drinking Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sihong

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    of the error term ? is given by G?. S(t) indicates the WTP survival function Pr (WTP ? t), and we suppose that WTP is distributed in the range of 0 to B. Formally the mean WTP is estimated by E(WTP) = ?S(t)dt. Since Pr (yes|t) = Pr (WTP ? t) = S(t), we can...

  2. Mineral balances, including in drinking water, estimated for Merced County dairy herds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castillo, Alejandro R Dr.; Santos, Jose Eduardo P.; Tabone, Tom J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proteins and byproducts Canola meal 50 to 75 25 to 50 Wheatn = 33. cottonseed and canola meal (table 1). Between 50%

  3. Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash. In Arsenic Contaminationwaterusing iron?oxidecoatedcoalbottomash JohannaL. using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash JOHANNA L. MATHIEU

  4. Trace metals in tap water from Tehran, Iran

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shariatpanahi, M.; Anderson, A.C.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A total of 272 tap water samples were collected from 68 homes throughout the city of Tehran. Analysis for cadmium, zinc, lead, copper, arsenic, iron and manganese showed some accumulation of these metals in household piping overnight. However, the concentration of all metals was in the parts per billion (ug/l) range and well below international standards. Heavy metals in Tehran's drinking water therefore, do not pose a significant acute health hazard. 19 references, 2 tables.

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - addressing high-risk drinking Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on high-risk drinking and alcohol-related injuries... .D. AND FAULKNER, K.K. Behavioral strategies for alcohol abuse prevention with high-risk college males. J. Alcohol... .E.,...

  6. Alcohol Consumption in University Students: The Relationship Between Personality and Metacognition in Relation to Drinking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Ailsa

    2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    There are growing concerns over the heavy drinking found in university students in the UK. Metacognitions; the cognitive processes that oversee, monitor and control, cognition, have been related to alcohol use. The personality ...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - alcohol drinking patterns Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 98 arXiv:1010.1410v1stat.AP7Oct2010 The Annals of Applied Statistics Summary: to the patterns of drinking...

  8. Energy Conservation Opportunities in Carbonated Soft Drink Canning/Bottling Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganji, A. R.; Hackett, B.; Chow, S.

    The processes in carbonated soft drink production are discussed with an emphasis on energy consumption, current prevalent practices in the industry are outlined, and potential measures for energy use and cost savings are elaborated. The results from...

  9. The Effect of the 18-Year Old Drinking Age on Auto Accidents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cucchiaro, Stephen

    The effect of Massachusetts' reduced drinking age on auto accidents is examined by employing an interrupted time series analysis of monthly accident data covering the period January, 1969, through September 1973. The data ...

  10. WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM OPERATION: APPLICATION OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mays, Larry W.

    CHAPTER 5 WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM OPERATION: APPLICATION OF SIMULATED ANNEALING Fred E. Goldman Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 5.1 INTRODUCTION The operation of water distribution systems affects the water quality in these systems. EPA regulations require that water quality be maintained

  11. Water Supply Challenges in Cities as a Result of Urbanization: Analyzing the Hurdles of Achieving Universal Water Access in Kampala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felter, Greg

    2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    in Kampala and untreated sewage flows back into Lake Victoria, which is also the raw water source. This requires more extensive and energy intensive treatment to produce drinking water, indicating the interrelationship between sanitation facilities... to access physical distribution points, which is affected by several items. 4.1. Urbanization Immigrants come to Kampala across all income levels from both rural areas and other cities (UN-Habitat, 2010). Of 60 individuals asked, 75% were born outside...

  12. The Essentials for GA Water Planning The Relationship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemond, Amy Daum

    " FL Water Law Regulated Riparianism "Heavy" Admin Water Law ? #12;Comprehensive Water Resource Study Supply a. Water Allocation ­ Withdrawal Permit Program b. Water Storage & Delivery c. Interbasin TransferThe Essentials for GA Water Planning The Relationship Between the Proposed GA State Comprehensive

  13. Current and Long-Term Effects of Delta Water Quality on Drinking Water Treatment Costs from Disinfection Byproduct Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wei-Hsiang; Haunschild, Kristine; Lund, Jay R.; Fleenor, William E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    p. Mount J. 2007. Sea level rise and Delta planning memo [lower sensitivity to sea level rise and perma- nent island1 ft SLR: 1 foot sea level rise; 3 ft SLR: 3 feet sea level

  14. Public Versus Private: Does It Matter for Water Conservation? Insights from California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kallis, Giorgos; Ray, Isha; Fulton, Julian; McMahon, James E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    driver of water management was the environmental regulatorsEnvironmental and Resource Economics Marvin S, Guy S (1997) Consuming water: evolving strategies of water managements Urban Water Sector. Environmental Management 41(6):863877

  15. Forest Road Building Regulations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has regulations for building a forest road, if development requires one. Regulations include zoning ordinances and permits for stream crossing, grading...

  16. What is Nonpoint Source Pollution? Nonpoint Source Pollution, or people pollution, is a contamination of our ground water,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainforth, Emma C.

    , recreational water activities, the fishing industry, tourism and our precious drinking water resources, humans and fish. Do not dump used motor oil down storm drains or on the ground. Recycle all used motor such as fertilizing the lawn, walking pets, changing motor oil and littering. With each rainfall, pollutants generated

  17. Access to water in a Nairobi slum: womens work and institutional learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben D; Odaba, Edmond

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Company and the water vendors could . . . discuss [concernswent into the Kibera water vendors association, Maji Boraan association of vendors to promote self-regulation,

  18. Montana's Water very person who lives in or visits Montana participates in water manage-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Managing Montana's Water E very person who lives in or visits Montana participates in water manage management involves people who allocate water sup- plies, issue permits, regulate the resource according to state and federal laws, and enforce laws when violations occur. Without water management, more human

  19. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Slick Rock, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two UMTRA (Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action) Project sites are near Slick Rock, Colorado: the North Continent site and the Union Carbide site. Currently, no one uses the contaminated ground water at either site for domestic or agricultural purposes. However, there may be future land development. This risk assessment evaluates possible future health problems associated with exposure to contaminated ground water. Since some health problems could occur, it is recommended that the contaminated ground water not be used as drinking water.

  20. Workshop in Regulation &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    Electric Institute, "Regulatory Issues" Michael A. Crew, Rutgers University, "Incentive Regulation" Howard

  1. Underground Injection Control Rule (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule regulates injection wells, including wells used by generators of hazardous or radioactive wastes, disposal wells within an underground source of drinking water, recovery of geothermal...

  2. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

  3. The Coordinated Control of a Central Air Conditioning System Based on Variable Chilled Water Temperature and Variable Chilled Water Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, J.; Mai, Y.; Liu, X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At present, regulation of water flow by means of pump frequency conversion is one of the major methods for power-saving in central air conditioning systems. In this article, optimization regulation for central air conditioning system on the basis...

  4. Results of a baseflow tritium survey of surface water in Georgia across from the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, R.L.

    1993-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In October 1991 the Georgia Department of Natural Resources (GDNR) issued a press release notifying the public that tritium had been measured in elevated levels (1,200 - 1,500 pCi/1) in water samples collected from drinking water wells in Georgia across from the Savannah River Site in Aiken Co. South Carolina. None of the elevated results were above the Primary Drinking Water Standard for tritium of 20,000 pCi/l. The GDNR initiated 2 surveys to determine the source and extent of elevated tritium: (1) baseflow survey of surface water quality, and (2) well evaluation program. Results from the 2 surveys indicate that the tritium measured in groundwater wells in Georgia is not the result of a groundwater flow from South Carolina under the Savannah River and into Georgia. Atmospheric transport and consequent rainout and infiltration has resulted in an increase of tritium in the water-table aquifer in the vicinity. Water samples collected from drinking water wells believed to have been installed in the aquifer beneath the water-table aquifer were actually from the shallower water-table aquifer. Water samples collected from the wells contain the amount of tritium expected for the water-table aquifer in the sample area. The measured tritium levels in the well samples and baseflow samples do not exceed Primary Drinking Water Standards. Tritium levels in the water-table in Georgia will decline as the atmospheric releases from SRS decline, tritium undergoes natural decay, and infiltration water with less tritium flushes through the subsurface.

  5. Resource Management Services, Part 609: Reclassification of Waters (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations provide procedures to propose a reclassification of State waters for permitting purposes. Requests must address the factual basis for reclassification, including the size, depth,...

  6. Regulations For State Administration Of The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (Arkansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Regulations For State Administration Of The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) is created Pursuant to the provisions of the Arkansas Water and Air Pollution Control Act,...

  7. Regulations of the Arkansas Operating Air Permit Program (Arkansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Regulations of the Arkansas Air Operating Program are adopted in accordance with the provisions of Part UU of the Arkansas Water and Air Pollution Control Act, Arkansas Code Annotated 8-4-101,...

  8. A Daily Time Series Analysis of Stream Water Phosphorus Concentrations Along an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brett, Michael T.

    , and coastal area eutrophication in the United States (NRC 1992; USEPA 1996; Carpenter and others 1998 eutrophication (Vollenweider 1976; Schindler 1977; Edmondson 1994). Increased nutrient inputs can stimulate with eutrophication, can also cause taste and odor problems in drinking water supplies (Falconer 1999), and toxins

  9. Water Qual. Res. J. Canada, 2004 Volume 39, No. 3, 183189 Copyright 2004, CAWQ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    of strategies to remediate toxic heavy metal contamination in effluents and drinking waters. This work focusses heavy metals due to the increased activities of metal min- ing and metal processing industries has and the heavy metals recovered. The use of nat- ural biomass as a substrate for metal-ion chelation has been

  10. Governing Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carchidi, Victoria

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Protocol, which led to the phasing out of CFCs, and the Basel Convention, which regulates hazardous waste

  11. RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING PUBLIC USE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    .12 Restrictions. 327.13 Explosives, firearms, other weapons and fireworks. 327.14 Public property. 327 of Engineers. ALL OTHER FEDERAL, STATE AND LOCAL LAWS AND REGULATIONS REMAIN IN FULL FORCE AND EFFECT WHERE force and effect on project lands or waters which are outgranted by the District Commander by lease

  12. Natural Gas Regulations (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kentucky Administrative Regulation title 805 promulgates the rules and regulations pertaining to natural gas production in Kentucky. In addition to KAR title 405, chapter 30, which pertains to any...

  13. Centre for the study of Regulated Industries PUBLICATIONS &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    , National Audit Office · Social issues in energy and water ~ Professor Cosmo Graham, University of Leicester Norton of Louth, University of Hull · The National Audit Office's audit programme ~ Ed Humpherson Nisbet & Alan Greig, QCA · Energy regulation ~ Maxine Frerk, Ofgem · Food standards regulation ~ Dame

  14. NOTICE OF PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT Date: August 18, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    , Deputy Director of Florida Solar Energy Center COMMENTS CONCERNING THE PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT in the solar hearing industry and to refer to updated standards prepared by the Florida Solar Energy Center TEXT OF THE PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT: 6C7-8.005 SolarThermal and Photovoltaic Domestic Water

  15. The impact of binge drinking on the young growing female rat skeleton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallagher, Sharon Lee

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , on the actively growing skeleton. The objective of this study was to determine whether or not binge drinking impacts the normal growth process of the young growing female rat skeleton. Twelve, four-week-old, female rats were paired to form an ethanol group and a...

  16. The Factors of Chronic Kidney Disease: Diabetes, Hypertension, Smoking, Drinking, Betelnut Chewing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chaur-Chin

    The Factors of Chronic Kidney Disease: Diabetes, Hypertension, Smoking, Drinking, Betelnut Chewing CKD 75 CKD Abstract The risk factors of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), including diabetes risk factors in a population-based cohort. Compared with single risk factors, diabetes (odds ratio 1

  17. Sustainable diets for Scotland A food and drink industry briefing note

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    Sustainable diets for Scotland A food and drink industry briefing note Rowett InstituteAlanRowe Topical issues: The concept of a `sustainable diet' highlights the environmentally unsustainable nature of current consumption patterns in affluent societies. In theory, a sustainable diet is one that minimises

  18. 3 Library Regulations Definitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    3 Library Regulations Definitions In Regulation 3: 'Library' means the University Library as defined in Regulation 3.1; 'Library staff' means the staff of the University Library; 'Librarian' means the University Librarian and Head of Information Resources Directorate or nominee; `Library Committee' means

  19. Computer Use Regulation Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Paul

    Computer Use Regulation #12;Introduction · The following training materials will reference the contents of the Computer Use Regulations, but should not serve as a substitute for reading the actual responsibilities NCSU employees have under the regulations. · North Carolina State University's computer networks

  20. Bull World Health Organ 2012;90:228235A |doi:10.2471/BLT.11.094284 Accounting for water quality in monitoring access to safe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    access to safe drinking-water and basic sanitation".1 The World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation.2 However, the functioning of the Joint Monitoring Programme-, middle- and high- income countries. Moreover, data comparability between countries was poor since