Sample records for drinking water branch

  1. Drinking Water Problems: Copper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    High levels of copper in drinking water can cause health problems. This publication explains the effects of copper in water and methods of removing it. 4 pp....

  2. Drinking Water Problems: Copper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    High levels of copper in drinking water can cause health problems. This publication explains the effects of copper in water and methods of removing it. 4 pp....

  3. Drinking Water Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication explains the federal safety standards for drinking water provided by public water supply systems. It discusses the legal requirements for public water supplies, the maximum level allowed for contaminants in the water...

  4. Drinking Water Problems: Radionuclides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Radionuclides in drinking water can cause serious health problems for people. This publication explains what the sources of radionuclides in water are, where high levels have been found in Texas, how they affect health and how to treat water...

  5. Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    High levels of nitrates in drinking water can be harmful for very young infants and susceptible adults. This publication explains how people are exposed to nitrates, what health effects are caused by them in drinking water and how to remove them....

  6. Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    High levels of nitrates in drinking water can be harmful for very young infants and susceptible adults. This publication explains how people are exposed to nitrates, what health effects are caused by them in drinking water and how to remove them....

  7. Drinking Water Problems: Arsenic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

    2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    High levels of arsenic in drinking water can poison and even kill people. This publication explains the symptoms of arsenic poisoning and common treatment methods for removing arsenic from your water supply....

  8. Drinking Water Problems: Benzene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Drinking water in Texas sometimes contains potentially harmful chemicals, including benzene. Well owners can learn how to treat their well water to remove these chemicals. 4 pages, 3 images...

  9. Drinking Water Problems: Corrosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drinking Water Problems: Corrosion Mark L. McFarland, Tony L. Provin, and Diane E. Boellstorff and fail. Corrosion can cause three types of damage: · The entire metal surface gradually thins and red (Fig. 1). · Deep pits appear that can penetrate pipe or tank walls. This type of corrosion may not add

  10. Drinking Water Problems: Radionuclides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    can accumulate to harmful levels in drinking water. As radionuclides decay, they emit radioactive parti- cles such as alpha particles, beta particles and gamma rays. Each type of particle produces different effects on humans. Alpha particles... penetrating, alpha particles cause more damage per unit volume than do beta particles or gamma rays. Beta particles and gamma rays deposit their ener- gy over longer distances. Beta particles can be stopped by a piece of wood or a thin sheet of metal...

  11. Drinking Water Problems: Lead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A lmost everyone knows that lead-based paint caused serious health problems (especially in children) before it was banned. But not everyone is aware that people can ingest lead from other sources such as contaminat- ed food and drinking water... sources of lead con- tamination. But if your water comes from a private well, it might contain enough lead to warrant action. How does lead affect health? Lead can be absorbed through the digestive tract, the lungs and the skin. It accumulates in the body...

  12. Removing Arsenic from Drinking Water

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    See how INL scientists are using nanotechnology to remove arsenic from drinking water. For more INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

  13. Drinking Water Standards Drinking water from a local public supply must

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    Drinking Water Standards Drinking water from a local public supply must meet federal and state standards for safe drink- ing water. Two sets of standards-primary drinking water and secondary drinking water- establish Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) for a variety of contaminants. If the water sup- ply

  14. Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for crops and water for indus- tries. It is also connected to surface waters, and maintains the flow of rivers and streams and the level of wetlands- tion of those along Lake Michigan, most communi- ties, farms and industries still rely on ground water

  15. Drinking Water Problems: Perchlorate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Porter, Dana; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Perchlorate is a potential contaminate of well water that can have harmful effects on human health. Methods of removing perchlorate from water are described and illustrated. There is information to help well owners select and maintain treatment...

  16. The Drinking Water Security and Safety Amendments of 2002: Is America's Drinking Water Infrastructure Safer Four Years Later?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shermer, Steven D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Threats to Drinking Water Security . a.The Drinking Water Security and Safety Amendments2002: Is America's Drinking Water Infrastructure Safer Four

  17. Drinking Water Problems: MTBE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Methyl tertiary-butyl ether, a gasoline additive commonly known as MTBE, can contaminate ground water and cause health problems for those exposed to it for a long time. However, filtering devices can remove this and other additives from well water...

  18. Radioactive isotopes in Danish drinking water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radioactive isotopes in Danish drinking water Sven P. Nielsen Ris National Laboratory Working OF INVESTIGATION 11 3 DESCRIPTION OF INVESTIGATION 12 4 RADIOACTIVITY IN DRINKING WATER 13 5 SAMPLING 15 6 27 #12;4 #12;5 Preface This project for investigation of radioactivity in drinking water shall

  19. Drinking Water Problems: Benzene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    on their property, live within a half-mile of a gasoline station or petroleum storage or refining facility, or notice a sweet, chemical smell in their water should have their water wells tested for benzene. Benzene attacks the central nervous system; acute ex... of red and white blood cells and platelets. Breathing high levels of benzene for a long time can cause leukemia and/or disruptions of the bone marrow. Long-term exposures also can damage chromosomes, depress the immune system, reduce the size...

  20. DRINKING WATER ON EMPTY RINK WATER ON EMPTY STOMACHD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

    DRINKING WATER ON EMPTY STOMACH RINK WATER ON EMPTY STOMACHD It is popular in Japan today to drink water immediately after waking up every morning. Furthermore, scientific tests have proven its value.. We publish below a description of use of water for our readers. For old and serious diseases as well

  1. Addressing Nitrate in California's Drinking Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    for the California State Water Resources Control Board With a Focus on Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley #12;Addressing Nitrate in California's Drinking Water With a Focus on Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Lake Basin and Salinas Valley Groundwater. Report for the State Water Resources Control Board Report

  2. Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund provides low cost financial assistance to eligible public water systems to finance the cost of repair and replacement of drinking water infrastructure,...

  3. The Karjat Drinking Water Project GISE (CSE)-CTARA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    2000-3000mm rainfall, frequent and severe drinking water shortage in many wadis. This year, about 25The Karjat Drinking Water Project GISE (CSE)-CTARA Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni () May% literacy. 175 hamlets, 49 gram-panchayats, 3 towns. () May 24, 2010 2 / 11 #12;Drinking water Though about

  4. Your Actions Can Help Protect Our Drinking Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Janie

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication offers advice on how to protect our drinking water supply by properly selecting, storing, using and disposing of household hazardous products....

  5. Arsenic in Drinking Water: Regulatory Developments and Issues

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Order Code RS20672 Updated May 1, 2007 Arsenic in Drinking Water: Regulatory Developments and Issues Mary Tiemann Specialist in Environmental Policy Resources, Science, and...

  6. Hydrogen Sulfide in Drinking Water: Causes and Treatment Alternatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFarland, Mark L.; Provin, Tony

    1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    If drinking water has a nuisance "rotten egg odor, it contains hydrogen sulfide. This leaflet discusses how hydrogen sulfide is formed and how the problem can be corrected....

  7. Addressing Nitrate in California's Drinking Water California Nitrate Project,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    Control Board Report to the Legislature With a Focus on Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley Groundwater Addressing Nitrate in California's Drinking Water With a Focus on Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley: Addressing Nitrate in California's Drinking Water with a Focus on Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley

  8. Lung Cancer and Arsenic Concentrations in Drinking Water in Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Lung Cancer and Arsenic Concentrations in Drinking Water in Chile Catterina Ferreccio,1,2 Claudia- trations have since been reduced to 40 g/liter. We investi- gated the relation between lung cancer and arsenic in drinking water in northern Chile in a case-control study involving patients diagnosed with lung

  9. Storing A Safe Emergency Drinking Water By Sharon Skipton,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    . These water supplies may contain enough residual disinfectant to deactivate pathogens that might be introducedStoring A Safe Emergency Drinking Water Supply By Sharon Skipton, UNL Extension Water Quality and other property, loss of power, and in some cases an interruption in water supplies. Having a safe

  10. Making Drinking Water Safer from Bacterial Contamination in Emergency Situations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Avoid water having a dark color, an odor or containing floating materials since such things may indicate or floating matter. 2. Boil the water vigorously for at least 10 minutes. 3. After it cools, the waterMaking Drinking Water Safer from Bacterial Contamination in Emergency Situations Monty C. Dozier

  11. Reducing Disinfection By-Products in Small Drinking Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    not decrease the residual TOC by 0.3 mg/L. #12;Guidelines: Coagulant dosages for water supplies where NOMReducing Disinfection By-Products in Small Drinking Water Systems by M. Robin Collins, James P. Malley, Jr, & Ethan Brooke Water Treatment Technology Assistance Center Department of Civil Engineering

  12. Assessing the Risk of Mercury in Drinking Water after UV Lamp Breaks Page 1 Assessing the Risk of Mercury in Drinking Water after UV Lamp Breaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy through temperature and pressure to drive the mercury into a vapor phase. Mercury is a heavy metal, and is regulated in drinking water by the EPA through the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). If an on-line lamp break historically the U.S. has been skeptical to implement UV into drinking water systems, many areas of Europe

  13. Addressing Nitrate in California's Drinking Water California Nitrate Project,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    Control Board Report to the Legislature With a Focus on Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley Groundwater and Salinas Valley Groundwater Report for the State Water Resources Control Board Report to the Legislature in California's Drinking Water with A Focus on Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley Groundwater. Report

  14. Addressing Nitrate in California's Drinking Water California Nitrate Project,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    Control Board Report to the Legislature With a Focus on Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley Groundwater Report 6 Addressing Nitrate in California's Drinking Water With a Focus on Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas and Salinas Valley Groundwater. Report for the State Water Resources Control Board Report to the Legislature

  15. Introduction Global demand for drinking water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    of water quality perceptions, consumption behavior, and demographics, adapted from Decision Center.bridgeandtunnelclub.com/bigmap/outoftown/arizona/phoenix/publicmarket/index.htm The urban social-ecological system contains both drivers and responses to these environmental changes and Bottled Water Consumption Discussion We found that non-whites report lower water quality, which supports

  16. Drinking Water Problems: Iron and Manganese

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    . The chemical must be in the water for at least 20 minutes for oxi- dation to take place, longer if the water contains colloidal iron/manganese. After solid particles have formed they are filtered, often with a sand filter. Adding aluminum sulfate (alum...

  17. The water concept in the self-sufficient house Drinking rainwater and reusing wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    the chance to do just that. Lack of drinking water hygiene is one of the main sources of disease transmissionThe water concept in the self-sufficient house Drinking rainwater and reusing wastewater Decentralized systems for drinking water processing could make a significant contribution to the Millennium

  18. Hawaii Department of Health Safe Drinking Water Branch | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| OpenInformationHartsville,NewOpenInformation Clean

  19. Arsenic in your water?: Economists study perceptions of risks from drinking water high in arsenic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arsenic in water?your tx H2O | pg. 27 Story by Kathy Wythe Economists study perceptions of risks from drinking water high in arsenic In several ?hot spots? across the United States people may be drinking water with high levels of naturally... occurring arsenic without understanding the associated risks, according to agricultural economists. ?Many households in arsenic ?hot spots? are in fact being exposed to harmful doses of arsenic,? said Dr. Douglass Shaw, professor of agricultural...

  20. Delta Drinking Water Quality and TreatmentDelta Drinking Water Quality and Treatment WeiWei--Hsiang ChenHsiang Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    ozonation use, ()- Under construction SOURCE: CALFED (2005) and MWDSC (http://www.mwdh2o.com/index.htm ) #1211 Delta Drinking Water Quality and TreatmentDelta Drinking Water Quality and Treatment CostsCosts Treatments for Delta water quality conditions to minimize cost within technology limits. Results using

  1. Contamination levels of human pharmaceutical compounds in French surface and drinking water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    -west France. 98 samples were analysed from 63 stations (surface water and drinking water produced from surface. The removal rate of human pharmaceutical compounds at 11 water treatment units was also determined. Only caffeine proved to be resistant to drinking water treatment processes (with a minimum rate of 5%). Other

  2. Safe Drinking Water Act: Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book. Revision 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents information on the Safe Drinking Water Act. Sections are presented on: Legislative history and statute; implementing regulations; and updates.

  3. Mineral balances, including in drinking water, estimated for Merced County dairy herds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castillo, Alejandro R Dr.; Santos, Jose Eduardo P.; Tabone, Tom J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    et al. (1994). TABLE 3. Estimates of daily mineral intake,drinking-water mineral contributionand net mineral excretion in lactating cows on Merced County

  4. NATURAL RADIONUCLIDES MEASUREMENTS IN DRINKING WATER BY LIQUID SCINTILLATION COUNTING. METHODS AND RESULTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    procedure, standardized by International Standard Organization.4 On the contrary, total indicative dose in view of a large scale monitoring program. World Health Organization guidelines for drinking water

  5. Aluminum and copper in drinking water enhance inflammatory oroxidative events specifically in the brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bondy, Stephen Bondy C

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    effects of iron and aluminum on stress-related genelopathy syndrome. Possible aluminum intoxication. N. Engl.Chronic exposure to aluminum in drinking water increases

  6. STANDARD ADDITION METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF1 PHARMACEUTICAL RESIDUES IN DRINKING WATER BY SPE-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    STANDARD ADDITION METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF1 PHARMACEUTICAL RESIDUES IN DRINKING WATER BY SPE-MS/MS is a powerful23 analytical tool often used to determine pharmaceutical residues at trace level in water.24 compounds in drinking or waste22 water processes has become very popular in recent years. LC

  7. Decrements in Lung Function Related to Arsenic in Drinking Water in West Bengal, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Decrements in Lung Function Related to Arsenic in Drinking Water in West Bengal, India Ondine S2000, the authors investigated relations between lung function, respiratory symptoms, and arsenic in drinking water, consumption of arsenic-contaminated water was associated with respiratory symptoms and reduced lung function

  8. drinking water. On the basis of the volume of ZnS precipitated in the biofilm, we estimate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    drinking water. On the basis of the volume of ZnS precipitated in the biofilm, we estimate, 647 (1964). 6. W. J. Drury, Water Environ. Res. 71, 1244 (1999). 7. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water, Current Drinking Water Standards (2000). 8

  9. Disinfection Procedure for Water Distribution Pipelines Drinking water contamination can be prevented by hydrostatic testing and disinfection of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Disinfection Procedure for Water Distribution Pipelines Drinking water contamination can be prevented by hydrostatic testing and disinfection of potable water distribution pipelines before connecting-921 3. Assess residual chlorine concentrations 4. Confirm that residual chlorine concentrations do

  10. Is Your Well Water Safe to Drink? Family, Home & Garden Education Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Is Your Well Water Safe to Drink? Family, Home & Garden Education Center practical solutions health. According to Bernie Lucey, senior engineer with the state's Drinking Water Protection Program, 56 the state's suggested standard. Up to 15 percent would flunk the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

  11. Determining the removal effectiveness of flame retardants from drinking water treatment processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Joseph C. (Joseph Chris), 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low concentrations of xenobiotic chemicals have recently become a concern in the surface water environment. The concern expands to drinking water treatment processes, and whether or not they remove these chemicals while ...

  12. For Immediate Release --Monday, March 18, 2013 From Glaciers to drinking water: University of Lethbridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seldin, Jonathan P.

    change and increasing demands due to human population and industrial activity to drinking water: University of Lethbridge Water Resource Experts Available on World gone? - Pipeline oil spills and river systems how fast do

  13. A field-based study of alternative microbial indicator tests for drinking water quality in Northern Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Keefe, Samantha F

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safe drinking water is essential for human survival, yet it is unavailable to over 1 billion of the world's people living in poverty (World Bank, 2009). The current methods used to identify drinking water sources are ...

  14. Effects of drinking water temperature on water consumption, respiration rates, and body temperatures of lactating Holstein cows in summer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanham, Jeffrey Kent

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF DRINKING WATER TEMPERATURE ON WATER CONSUMPTION, RESPIRATION RATES, AND BODY TEMPERATURES OF LACTATING HOLSTEIN COWS IN SUMMER A Thesis by JEFFREY KENT LANHAM Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1985 Major Subject: Nutrition EFFECTS OF DRINKING WATER TEMPERATURE ON WATER CONSUMPTION, RESPIRATION RATES, AND BODY TEMPERATURES OF LACTATING HOLSTEIN COWS IN SUMMER A Thesis...

  15. Perfluoroalkyl Acids in Drinking Water: Sources, Fate and Removal C. Eschauzier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Rooij, Robert

    for the production of drinking water, if PFAAs are present in the groundwater they will most certainly pass through shown in several papers. The different treatment steps used such as coagulation, pellet softening, sand

  16. A single fermentation tube method for the bacteriological analysis of drinking water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, John Wesley

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A SINGLE FERMENTATION 'ICE METHOD FOR THE BACTERIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF DRINKING WATER A Thesis by JOHN WESLEY WATTS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A lk M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1980 Major Subject: Civil Engineering A SINGLE FERMENTATION IIJBE METHOD FOR THE BACTERIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF DRINKING WATER A Thesis by JOHN WESLEY WATTS Approved as to style and content by: ( Chairman of Committee y...

  17. The effect of chilled drinking water on heat-stressed lactating Holstein cows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Christopher Charles

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECT OF CHILLED DRINKING WATER ON HEAT-STRESSED LACTATING HOLSTEIN COWS A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER CHARLES BAKER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A 5 M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1987 Major Subject: Nutrition THE EFFECT OF CHILLED DRINKING WATER ON HEAT-STRESSED LACTATING HOLSTEIN COWS A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER CHARLES BAKER Approved as to style and content: Carl E. Coppock (Chair of Committee...

  18. Addressing Nitrate in California's Drinking Water Report for the State Water Resources Control Board Report to the Legislature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    for the California State Water Resources Control Board With a Focus on Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley's Drinking Water With a Focus on Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley Groundwater Report for the State Water and Salinas Valley Groundwater. Report for the State Water Resources Control Board Report to the Legislature

  19. Addressing Nitrate in California's Drinking Water Report for the State Water Resources Control Board Report to the Legislature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    for the California State Water Resources Control Board With a Focus on Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley in California's Drinking Water With a Focus on Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley Groundwater Report Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley Pilot Studies Prepared for: California State Water Resources Control

  20. Bottled drinking water: Water contamination from bottle materials (glass, hard PET, soft PET), the influence of colour and acidification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    Bottled drinking water: Water contamination from bottle materials (glass, hard PET, soft PET in glass and PET bottles demonstrates significant (Wilcoxon rank sum test, a = 0.05) differences in median. 0.016 lg/L). Glass contaminates the water with Ce (19 higher than in PET bottles), Pb (14), Al (7

  1. Bottled drinking water: water contamination from bottle materials (glass, hard PET, soft PET), the influence of colour and acidification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filzmoser, Peter

    Bottled drinking water: water contamination from bottle materials (glass, hard PET, soft PET in glass and PET bottles demonstrates significant (Wilcoxon rank sum test, =0.05) differences in median. 0.016 g/L). Glass contaminates the water with Ce (19x higher than in PET bottles), Pb (14 x), Al (7

  2. Sector reform impact on rural drinking water schemes -A case study from Raigad district in Maharashtra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    of India (GoI) policy and its influence on a subject, viz., water, which falls within the state's purview policy in Maharashtra. We observe that compared to what is reflected in the national rural drinking water unchanged in spite of the changes in policy regimes. We find that poor capacity and expertise of state

  3. University of the District of Columbia District of Columbia Drinking Water Blind Taste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    University of the District of Columbia District of Columbia Drinking Water Blind Taste Testing for Nutrition, Diet and Health Cooperative Extension Service University of the District of Columbia Dawanna University of the District of Columbia Date: May 2005 Prepared for the DC Water Resources Research Institute

  4. The effect of chilled drinking water on heat-stressed lactating Holstein cows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Christopher Charles

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    20 consumption of non-lactating dairy cows. J. Daizy Scr. 47:382. 20 Dillon, R. D. and R. E. Nichols. 1955. Changes in temperature of reticulo-ruminal content following the drinking of water. Am. J. Vet. Res. 16:69. 21 DuBois, P. R. and D. J...

  5. Contamination of drinking-water by arsenic in Bangladesh: a public health emergency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Contamination of drinking-water by arsenic in Bangladesh: a public health emergency Allan H. Smith,1 Elena O. Lingas,2 & Mahfuzar Rahman3 The contamination of groundwater by arsenic in Bangladesh contamination. Studies in other countries where the population has had long-term exposure to arsenic

  6. Methane contamination of drinking water accompanying gas-well drilling and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Methane contamination of drinking water accompanying gas-well drilling and hydraulic fracturing (received for review January 13, 2011) Directional drilling and hydraulic-fracturing technologies are dra use (1­5). Directional drilling and hydrau- lic-fracturing technologies are allowing expanded natural

  7. Methane contamination of drinking water accompanying gas-well drilling and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Methane contamination of drinking water accompanying gas-well drilling and hydraulic fracturing (received for review January 13, 2011) Directional drilling and hydraulic-fracturing technologies are dra of energy use (1­5). Directional drilling and hydrau- lic-fracturing technologies are allowing expanded

  8. Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas Pennsylvania, ex- amining natural gas concentrations and isotopic signatures with proximity to shale gas wells this transformation, with shale gas and other unconventional sources now yielding more than one- half of all US

  9. An environmental sensor network to determine drinking water quality and security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ailamaki, Anastassia

    . Small Civil & Environmental Engineering and Engineering & Public Policy Carnegie Mellon University ms35@andrew.cmu.edu Jeanne VanBriesen Civil and Environmental Engineering and Biomedical Engineering CarnegieAn environmental sensor network to determine drinking water quality and security Anastassia

  10. TEEX tackles toxins: TEEX develops ECLOX protocols to detect toxins in drinking water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Leslie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Specialist Keith McLeroy: The equipment came with minimal instructions and no protocols for establishing baseline data for comparing the ECLOX readings. TCEQ turned to the TEEX Water and Wastewater Program to establish baseline data for 24 public...,? said McLeroy of TEEX?s Infrastructure Training and Safety Institute. ?After many years of looking at every research paper with the word ?ECLOX? in it, we were the first to actually achieve this (developing the protocols) with drinking water...

  11. The Drinking Water Security and Safety Amendments of 2002: Is America's Drinking Water Infrastructure Safer Four Years Later?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shermer, Steven D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    355 tertiary butyl ether ("MTBE"). 43 8 Amazingly, even "[c]Water: Study Estimates Cost of MTBE Remedia- tion At Up to $

  12. The Drinking Water Security and Safety Amendments of 2002: Is America's Drinking Water Infrastructure Safer Four Years Later?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shermer, Steven D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    332. See Pat Phibbs, Decontamination, Water Protectionanalysis; treatment, decontamination, and disposal; contin-the detection and decontamination of chemical warfare agents

  13. Taste and Odor Problems in Clinton Lake Reservoir's Drinking Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Restrepo-Osorio, Dianna L.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of geosmin and the costs of dredging the reservoir as it fills with sediment from erosion 8 4 1 1 4 1 4 . The actual situation is often undetected due to inadequate methodologies used at the time of sampling. Weather conditions are often disregarded... to hu9ans and pets fro9 a variety of blue-green algae species bloo9ing in the reservoir, lethality to water dwelling organis9s such as fish due because of decreased dissolved oxygen, higher water treat9ent costs to di9inish the effects 59...

  14. Drinking Water Implications of Cyanobacteria on the Kansas River to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the presence of Blue Green Algae By-products in the river. The data is stimulating further discussion,000 service connections Directly supply 16 cities Treatment capacity of 180 mgd #12;Page 3 Other Utilities products were being transported from Milford Lake to their intakes. Utilities and Kansas Water Office agree

  15. Social Perceptions of Drinking Water Quality in South Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Victor

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) of Texas is one of the poorest regions with the largest population lacking suitable water supply in the entire United States. The region is characterized by low-income, rural and peri-urban communities called...

  16. Measurement of methyl-tert-butyl-ether (MTBE) in raw drinking water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davisson, M L; Koester, C J; Moran, J E

    1999-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to assess the pathways for human exposure to methyl-tert-butyl-ether (MTBE) and to understand the extent of MTBE contamination in watersheds, a purge and trap gas chromatographic mass spectrometric method to measure part-per-trillion (ppt) concentrations of MTBE in environmental waters was developed. A variety of California's raw drinking waters were analyzed. No detectable MTBE was found in deep groundwater (>1000 feet). However shallow groundwater ({approx}250 feet) contained MTBE concentrations of non-detect to 1300 ppt. MTBE concentrations measured in rivers and lakes ranged from non-detect to 3500 ppt. East (San Francisco) Bay area rain water contained approximately 80 ppt MTBE.

  17. Remote community drinking water supply : mechanisms of uranium retention and adsorption by ultrafiltration, nanofiltration and reverse osmosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulte-Herbruggen, Helfrid Maria Albertina

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Worldwide, around 884 million people lack access to safe drinking water. To address this, groundwater sources such as boreholes and wells are often installed in remote locations especially in developing countries. However, ...

  18. Study on radon and radium concentrations in drinking water in west region of Iran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forozani, Ghasem

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most important characterizations of social health is existence the availability of safe drinking water. Since one of the sources of water contamination is nuclear contamination from radon gas, so in this research radon 222 concentration levels in water supplies in the Toyserkan (a region located in the west of Iran) is investigated. For measuring radon gas in water wells and springs Lucas chamber method is used. Review the results of these measurements that taken from 15th place show that, only five sites have radon concentrations above the limit dose. To reduce radon concentration, it is better to keep water in open pools in contact with air before the water is delivered to users.

  19. A review and rationale for studying the cardiovascular effects of drinking water arsenic in women of reproductive age

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwok, Richard K., E-mail: rkwok@rti.org

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drinking water arsenic has been shown to be associated with a host of adverse health outcomes at exposure levels > 300 {mu}g of As/L. However, the results are not consistent at exposures below this level. We have reviewed selected articles that examine the effects of drinking water arsenic on cardiovascular outcomes and present a rationale for studying these effects on women of reproductive age, and also over the course of pregnancy when they would potentially be more susceptible to adverse cardiovascular and reproductive outcomes. It is only recently that reproductive effects have been linked to drinking water arsenic. However, there is a paucity of information about the cardiovascular effects of drinking water arsenic on women of reproductive age. Under the cardiovascular challenge of pregnancy, we hypothesize that women with a slightly elevated exposure to drinking water arsenic may exhibit adverse cardiovascular outcomes at higher rates than in the general population. Studying sensitive clinical and sub-clinical indicators of disease in susceptible sub-populations may yield important information about the potentially enormous burden of disease related to low-level drinking water arsenic exposure.

  20. Fisk-based criteria to support validation of detection methods for drinking water and air.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonell, M.; Bhattacharyya, M.; Finster, M.; Williams, M.; Picel, K.; Chang, Y.-S.; Peterson, J.; Adeshina, F.; Sonich-Mullin, C.; Environmental Science Division; EPA

    2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared to support the validation of analytical methods for threat contaminants under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC) program. It is designed to serve as a resource for certain applications of benchmark and fate information for homeland security threat contaminants. The report identifies risk-based criteria from existing health benchmarks for drinking water and air for potential use as validation targets. The focus is on benchmarks for chronic public exposures. The priority sources are standard EPA concentration limits for drinking water and air, along with oral and inhalation toxicity values. Many contaminants identified as homeland security threats to drinking water or air would convert to other chemicals within minutes to hours of being released. For this reason, a fate analysis has been performed to identify potential transformation products and removal half-lives in air and water so appropriate forms can be targeted for detection over time. The risk-based criteria presented in this report to frame method validation are expected to be lower than actual operational targets based on realistic exposures following a release. Note that many target criteria provided in this report are taken from available benchmarks without assessing the underlying toxicological details. That is, although the relevance of the chemical form and analogues are evaluated, the toxicological interpretations and extrapolations conducted by the authoring organizations are not. It is also important to emphasize that such targets in the current analysis are not health-based advisory levels to guide homeland security responses. This integrated evaluation of chronic public benchmarks and contaminant fate has identified more than 200 risk-based criteria as method validation targets across numerous contaminants and fate products in drinking water and air combined. The gap in directly applicable values is considerable across the full set of threat contaminants, so preliminary indicators were developed from other well-documented benchmarks to serve as a starting point for validation efforts. By this approach, at least preliminary context is available for water or air, and sometimes both, for all chemicals on the NHSRC list that was provided for this evaluation. This means that a number of concentrations presented in this report represent indirect measures derived from related benchmarks or surrogate chemicals, as described within the many results tables provided in this report.

  1. Risk Perception and Willingness to Pay for Removing Arsenic in Drinking Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sihong

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    , THMs, radon as Ill as PCBs, are similar. First, they can cause many diseases (the effects on the probability of mortality and morbidity are confounded) and the latency of diseases is long (this suggests a discount rate should be elicited). Second... of uncer- tainty in risk assessment. They got the results based on a multiplicative model for cancer risk from ingestion of radon in drinking water, where the risk R was the product of n risk 16 factors. These risk factors were assumed to follow a...

  2. Reckoning with risk: a rhetorical analysis of the social construction of risk associated with Texas drinking water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedrich, Cynthia Juanita Matthes

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of drinking water at a time when they assert that they are doing a "better job than ever before. " John B. Mannion, Executive Director of American Water Works Association, talks like a man besieged by enemy agents: "On the one hand, we' ve got... an assortment of special interests undermining public confidence in the safety of drinking water. On the other hand, we' ve got the federal government issuing truckloads of regulations ? some of them of dubious merit and all of them accompanied by enormous...

  3. Aluminum and silica intake in drinking water and the risk of Alzheimer's disease or cognitive decline: findings of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Aluminum and silica intake in drinking water and the risk of Alzheimer's disease or cognitive,2 , Commenges Daniel1,2 , Helmer Catherine2,3 , Jean-Franois Dartigues2,3 . Abbreviations: Al, Aluminum; AD, Alzheimer's Disease; MMSE, Mini Mental State Examination; Si, Silica Running head: Aluminum, silica in water

  4. Persistence and decontamination of surrogate radioisotopes in a model drinking water distribution system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szabo, Jeffrey G.; Impellitteri, Christopher A.; Govindaswamy, Shekar; Hall, John S.; (EPA); (Lakeshore)

    2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Contamination of a model drinking water system with surrogate radioisotopes was examined with respect to persistence on and decontamination of infrastructure surfaces. Cesium and cobalt chloride salts were used as surrogates for cesium-137 and cobalt-60. Studies were conducted in biofilm annular reactors containing heavily corroded iron surfaces formed under shear and constantly submerged in drinking water. Cesium was not detected on the corroded iron surface after equilibration with 10 and 100 mg L{sup -1} solutions of cesium chloride, but cobalt was detected on corroded iron coupons at both initial concentrations. The amount of adhered cobalt decreased over the next six weeks, but was still present when monitoring stopped. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) showed that adhered cobalt was in the III oxidation state. The adsorbed cobalt was strongly resistant to decontamination by various physicochemical methods. Simulated flushing, use of free chlorine and dilute ammonia were found to be ineffective whereas use of aggressive methods like 14.5 M ammonia and 0.36 M sulfuric acid removed 37 and 92% of the sorbed cobalt, respectively.

  5. Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results and Policy Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathieu, Johanna L.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Kowolik, Kristin; Addy, Susan E.A.

    2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    ARUBA (Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash) has proven effective at removing high concentrations of arsenic from drinking water in Bangladesh. During fieldwork in four sub-districts of the country, ARUBA reduced arsenic levels ranging from 200 to 900 ppb to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. The technology is cost-effective because the substrate--bottom ash from coal fired power plants--is a waste material readily available in South Asia. In comparison to similar technologies, ARUBA uses less media for arsenic removal due to its high surface area to volume ratio. Hence, less waste is produced. A number of experiments were conducted in Bangladesh to determine the effectiveness of various water treatment protocols. It was found that (1) ARUBA removes more than half of the arsenic from water within five minutes of treatment, (2) ARUBA, that has settled at the bottom of a treatment vessel, continues to remove arsenic for 2-3 days, (3) ARUBA's arsenic removal efficiency can be improved through sequential partial dosing (adding a given amount of ARUBA in fractions versus all at once), and (4) allowing water to first stand for two to three days followed by treatment with ARUBA produced final arsenic levels ten times lower than treating water directly out of the well. Our findings imply a number of tradeoffs between ARUBA's effective arsenic removal capacity, treatment system costs, and waste output. These tradeoffs, some a function of arsenic-related policies in Bangladesh (e.g., waste disposal regulations), must be considered when designing an arsenic removal system. We propose that the most attractive option is to use ARUBA in communityscale water treatment centers, installed as public-private partnerships, in Bangladeshi villages.

  6. Study of temporal variation of radon concentrations in public drinking water supplies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    York, E.L. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed a Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for radon-222 in public drinking water supplies of 300 pCi/L. Proposed monitoring requirements include collecting quarterly grab samples for the first year, then annual samples for the remainder of the compliance cycle provided first year quarterly samples average below the MCL. The focus of this research was to study the temporal variation of groundwater radon concentrations to investigate how reliably one can predict an annual average radon concentration based on the results of grab samples. Using a {open_quotes}slow-flow{close_quotes} collection method and liquid scintillation analysis, biweekly water samples were taken from ten public water supply wells in North Carolina (6 month - 11 month sampling periods). Based on study results, temporal variations exist in groundwater radon concentrations. Statistical analysis performed on the data indicates that grab samples taken from each of the ten wells during the study period would exhibit groundwater radon concentrations within 30% of their average radon concentration.

  7. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melody, Moya; Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Brown, Richard

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    As American drinking water agencies face higher production costs, demand, and energy prices, they seek opportunities to reduce costs without negatively affecting the quality of the water they deliver. This guide describes resources for cost-effectively improving the energy efficiency of U.S. public drinking water facilities. The guide (1) describes areas of opportunity for improving energy efficiency in drinking water facilities; (2) provides detailed descriptions of resources to consult for each area of opportunity; (3) offers supplementary suggestions and information for the area; and (4) presents illustrative case studies, including analysis of cost-effectiveness.

  8. Chemical drinking water quality in Ghana: Water costs and scope for advanced treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossiter, Helfrid M.A.; Owusu, Peter A; Awuah, Esi; MacDonald, Alan M; Schfer, Andrea

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To reduce child mortality and improve health in Ghana boreholes and wells are being installed across the country by the private sector, NGOs and the Ghanaian government. Water quality is not generally monitored once a ...

  9. Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MtBE) contamination of the City of Santa Monica drinking water supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, A.; Farrow, J.R.C. [Komex H2O Science, Huntington Beach, CA (United States); Rodriguez, R.A. [City of Santa Monica, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the summer of 1996, the City of Santa Monica ceased pumping groundwater from two Well Fields (Charnock and Arcadia) used for public drinking water supply due to persistent and increasing concentrations of MtBE in all seven municipal water supply wells. This lost production accounted for 50% of the City`s total drinking water supply. In late 1996, the City, in cooperation with State and Federal agencies, initiated an investigation of MtBE contamination at the two well fields. The objectives of the investigation were as follows: (1) Review available data on the production, use, chemical characteristics, fate and transport, toxicology, and remediation of MtBE; (2) Identify locations of potential sources of MtBE groundwater contamination at the well fields; (3) Develop an understanding of the hydrologic pathways from the potential sources to the drinking water wells; and (4) Evaluate alternative treatment technologies for the removal of MtBE from drinking water. In addition to a review of available information about MtBE, the investigation included an extensive review of literature and available data relevant to the well fields, including well field production histories, site and regional hydrogeology, all well logs and production in the groundwater basins, general groundwater quality, and the record of MtBE detection. Based upon the review of background information, conceptual hydrogeologic models were developed. A detailed review of agency files for over 45 potential source sites was conducted. The information from this review was summarized, and source site screening and ranking criteria were developed. A field program was conducted at the major well field (Charnock), including soil gas surveys, CPTs, soil borings and well installations, geophysics, and aquifer testing. The field program provided site data which allowed the conceptual hydrogeologic model to be refitted to actual site conditions.

  10. UIC permitting process for class IID and Class III wells: Protection of drinking water in New York State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillenbrand, C.J. [EPA, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region II, Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program regulates injection wells in the State of New York to protect drinking water; UIC regulations can be found under Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations Parts 124, 144, 146 and 147. Operators of solution mining injection wells (UIC Class IIIG) and produced fluid disposal wells (UIC Class IID) are required to obtain an UIC permit for authorization to inject. The permitting process requires submittal of drinking water, geologic and proposed operational data in order to assure that pressure build-up within the injection zone will not compromise confining layers and allow vertical migration of fluid into Underground Sources of Drinking Water (USDW). Additional data is required within an Area of Review (AOR), defined as an area determined by the intersection of the adjusted potentiometric surface produced by injection and a depth 50 feet below the base of the lowermost USDW, or a radius of 1/4 mile around the injection well, whichever is greater. Locations of all wells in the AOR must be identified, and completion reports and plugging reports must be submitted. Requirements are set for maximum injection pressure and flow rates, monitoring of brine properties of the injection well and monitoring of water supply wells in the AOR for possible contamination. Any noncompliance with permit requirements constitutes a violation of the Safe Drinking Water Act and is grounds for enforcement action, including possible revocation of permit. Presently four Class IID wells are authorized under permit in New York State. The Queenston sandstone, Medina sandstone, Salina B, Akron dolomite and Oriskany sandstone have been used for brine disposal; the lower Ordovician-Cambrian section is currently being considered as an injection zone. Over one hundred Class IIIG wells are authorized under permit in New York State and all have been utilized for solution mining of the Syracuse salt.

  11. Review of potential technologies for the treatment of Methyl tertiary butyl Ether (MtBE) in drinking water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, A.; Browne, T.E. [Komex H2O Science, Huntington Beach, CA (United States); Devinny, J.S. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    At present, the state of knowledge on effective treatment technologies for MtBE in drinking water, and groundwater in general, is limited. Research by others is focusing on the remediation of MtBE close to the point of release. The City of Santa Monica, MWD, Komex and USC are currently conducting research into different technologies that could be used to remove MtBE from drinking water supplies. The objectives of the research are to evaluate different treatment technologies to identify cost-effective and technically feasible alternatives for the removal of MtBE from drinking water. The evaluation is considering moderate to high water flow rates (100 to 2,000+ gpm) and low to moderate MtBE concentrations (<2,000 {mu}g/l). The research program includes four phases: (1) Literature Review; (2) Bench Scale Study; (3) Field Scale Pre-pilot Study; and (4) Summary Evaluation. This paper presents some preliminary information and findings from the first phase of this research - the literature review. The review discusses the chemical properties of MtBE and how they affect remediation and thus, an evaluation of alternative treatment technologies. The review of available literature, and the applicability and limitations of the following technologies are presented in detail.

  12. Author's personal copy Reply to the comment ``Bottled drinking water: Water contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filzmoser, Peter

    from bottle materials (glass, hard PET, soft PET), the influence of colour and acidification" by Hayo bottled in PET and in glass containers for elements like Pb. According to Mller-Simon (2010) these values to both, glass (and PET) producers as well as the bottled water industry in order to provide the consumers

  13. Removal mechanisms of organic and inorganic solutes in raw, upland drinking water by nanofiltration: influence of solute-solute and solute-membrane interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Munari, Annalisa; Munari, Annalisa de

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanofiltration (NF) membranes have been applied successfully for the removal of inorganic and organic pollutants, including micropollutants, from drinking water for the past two decades. However, a complete and quantitative ...

  14. High density polyethylene (HDPE) containers as an alternative to polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles for solar disinfection of drinking water in northern region, Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yazdani, Iman

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the technical feasibility of high density polyethylene (HDPE) containers as an alternative to polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles for the solar disinfection of drinking water ...

  15. Effects of drinking water temperature on respiration rates, body temperatures, dry matter intake, and milk production in lactating Holstein cows in summer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milam, Kyle Zohn

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF DRINKING WATER TEMPERATURE ON RESPIRATION RATES, BODY TEMPERATURES, DRY MATTER INTAKE, AND MILK PRODUCTION IN LACTATING HOLSTEIN COWS IN SUMMER A Thesis by KYLE ZOHN MILAM Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1985 Major Subject: Nutrition EFFECTS OF DRINKING WATER TEMPERATURE ON RESPIRATION RATES, BODY TEMPERATURES, DRY MATTER INTAKE, AND MILK PRODUCTION IN LACTATING HOLSTEIN...

  16. Research | Childrens Health Thyroid Function and Perchlorate in Drinking Water: An Evaluation among California Newborns, 1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patricia A. Buffler; Michael A. Kelsh; Edmund C. Lau; Charlotte H. Edinboro; Julie C. Barnard; George W. Rutherford; Jorge J. Daaboul; Lynn Palmer; Fred W. Lorey

    ) has been detected in groundwater sources in numerous communities in California and other parts of the United States, raising concerns about potential impacts on health. For California communities where ClO 4 was tested in 1997 and 1998, we evaluated the prevalence of primary congenital hypothyroidism (PCH) and high thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels among the 342,257 California newborns screened in 1998. We compared thyroid function results among newborns from 24 communities with average ClO 4 concentrations in drinking water> 5 g/L (n = 50,326) to newborns from 287 communities with average concentrations ? 5 g/L (n = 291,931). ClO 4 concentrations obtained from the California Drinking Water Program provided source-specific data for estimating weighted average concentrations in community water. Fifteen cases of PCH from communities with average concentration> 5 g/L were observed, with 20.4 expected [adjusted prevalence odds ratio (POR) = 0.71; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 0.401.19]. Although only 36 % of all California newborns were screened before 24 hr of

  17. Lead in Your Drinking Water Lead (Pb) is an extremely toxic heavy metal that unfortunately occurs widely in our environment. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maynard, J. Barry

    Lead in Your Drinking Water Lead (Pb) is an extremely toxic heavy metal that unfortunately occurs widely in our environment. The chief sources of exposure are from (1) Lead paint commonly present in house interiors (2) Leaded gasoline soils along major roadways are strongly enriched in lead

  18. The effects of sulfate fertilization and high levels of sulfate and salt drinking water on the growth and mineral status of ruminants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Kehe

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the serum mineral concentrations of cows grazing oat pastures. Experiment 2 was conducted to determine the effects of high levels of calcium sulfate (CaSO??) and sodium chloride (NaCl) in drinking water on the performance and mineral status of growing...

  19. 1 INTRODUCTION Chlorine is a common disinfectant used in drinking water distribution systems to ensure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coello, Carlos A. Coello

    as the water flows from the outlet of the water treatment plant (usual location for post-treatment chlorine to the complex physical, chemical and biological reactions that occur in water as it travels from treatment plant of Chemical Engineering, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Australia G. West Department of Computing

  20. Current and Long-Term Effects of Delta Water Quality on Drinking Water Treatment Costs from Disinfection Byproduct Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wei-Hsiang; Haunschild, Kristine; Lund, Jay R.; Fleenor, William E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    existing treatment plant. American Water Woks Association Water Quality Technology.plant, representing an existing treatment configuration, to add alternative disinfection and other technologies.

  1. Addressing Nitrate in California's Drinking Water Report for the State Water Resources Control Board Report to the Legislature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    for the California State Water Resources Control Board With a Focus on Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley Water With a Focus on Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley Groundwater Report for the State Water X2 1 Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley Pilot Studies Prepared for: California State Water

  2. Chemical migration in drinking water stored in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles: a source of controversy.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    container, cap sealing resins, background contamination, water processing steps, NIAS, etc). Overall: Butylated hydroxytoluene BPA: Bisphenol A Ce: Cesium Cd: Cadmium Co: Cobalt Cr: Chromium Cu: Copper DBP

  3. Addressing Nitrate in California's Drinking Water Report for the State Water Resources Control Board Report to the Legislature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    for the California State Water Resources Control Board With a Focus on Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley and Salinas Valley Groundwater Report for the State Water Resources Control Board Report to the Legislature X2 1 Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley Pilot Studies Prepared for: California State Water

  4. alcohol drinking study: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12; Drinking Water Distribution Systems Hydraulics, Leakage, and Water Quality Issues Life Cycle Assessment for Different Piping Materials Water Demand Analysis due to Water...

  5. alcohol risk drinking: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12; Drinking Water Distribution Systems Hydraulics, Leakage, and Water Quality Issues Life Cycle Assessment for Different Piping Materials Water Demand Analysis due to Water...

  6. alcohol binge drinking: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12; Drinking Water Distribution Systems Hydraulics, Leakage, and Water Quality Issues Life Cycle Assessment for Different Piping Materials Water Demand Analysis due to Water...

  7. alcohol drinking individuals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12; Drinking Water Distribution Systems Hydraulics, Leakage, and Water Quality Issues Life Cycle Assessment for Different Piping Materials Water Demand Analysis due to Water...

  8. alcohol drinking: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12; Drinking Water Distribution Systems Hydraulics, Leakage, and Water Quality Issues Life Cycle Assessment for Different Piping Materials Water Demand Analysis due to Water...

  9. alcohol drinking frequency: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12; Drinking Water Distribution Systems Hydraulics, Leakage, and Water Quality Issues Life Cycle Assessment for Different Piping Materials Water Demand Analysis due to Water...

  10. alcohol drinking cigarette: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12; Drinking Water Distribution Systems Hydraulics, Leakage, and Water Quality Issues Life Cycle Assessment for Different Piping Materials Water Demand Analysis due to Water...

  11. alcohol drinking behaviors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12; Drinking Water Distribution Systems Hydraulics, Leakage, and Water Quality Issues Life Cycle Assessment for Different Piping Materials Water Demand Analysis due to Water...

  12. Chemical compounds and toxicological assessments of drinking water stored in polyethylene terephthalate (PET)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    terephthalate (PET) bottles: A source of controversy reviewed Cristina Bach a,b, *, Xavier Dauchy a , Marie to restrictions and/or specifications according to their toxicological data. Despite this, the analysis of PET and additives. Genotoxic and estrogenic activities in PET-bottled water have been reported. Chemical mixtures

  13. Addressing Nitrate in California's Drinking Water Report for the State Water Resources Control Board Report to the Legislature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    for the California State Water Resources Control Board With a Focus on Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley Basin and Salinas Valley Groundwater Report for the State Water Resources Control Board Report Project, Implementation of Senate Bill X2 1 Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley Pilot Studies Prepared

  14. Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.; GADGIL, ASHOK J.; ADDY, SUSAN E.A.; KOWOLIK, KRISTIN

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe laboratory and field results of a novel arsenic removal adsorbent called 'Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash' (ARUBA). ARUBA is prepared by coating particles of coal bottom ash, a waste material from coal fired power plants, with iron (hydr)oxide. The coating process is simple and conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Material costs for ARUBA are estimated to be low (~;;$0.08 per kg) and arsenic remediation with ARUBA has the potential to be affordable to resource-constrained communities. ARUBA is used for removing arsenic via a dispersal-and-removal process, and we envision that ARUBA would be used in community-scale water treatment centers. We show that ARUBA is able to reduce arsenic concentrations in contaminated Bangladesh groundwater to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. Using the Langmuir isotherm (R2 = 0.77) ARUBA's adsorption capacity in treating real groundwater is 2.6x10-6 mol/g (0.20 mg/g). Time-to-90percent (defined as the time interval for ARUBA to remove 90percent of the total amount of arsenic that is removed at equilibrium) is less than one hour. Reaction rates (pseudo-second-order kinetic model, R2>_ 0.99) increase from 2.4x105 to 7.2x105 g mol-1 min-1 as the groundwater arsenic concentration decreases from 560 to 170 ppb. We show that ARUBA's arsenic adsorption density (AAD), defined as the milligrams of arsenic removed at equilibrium per gram of ARUBA added, is linearly dependent on the initial arsenic concentration of the groundwater sample, for initial arsenic concentrations of up to 1600 ppb and an ARUBA dose of 4.0 g/L. This makes it easy to determine the amount of ARUBA required to treat a groundwater source when its arsenic concentration is known and less than 1600 ppb. Storing contaminated groundwater for two to three days before treatment is seen to significantly increase ARUBA's AAD. ARUBA can be separated from treated water by coagulation and clarification, which is expected to be less expensive than filtration of micron-scale particles, further contributing to the affordability of a community-scale water treatment center.

  15. Summary of resources available to small water systems for meeting the 10 ppb arsenic drinking water limit.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krumhansl, James Lee; Thomson, Bruce M. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Ziegler, Matt (New Mexico Tech, Albuquerque, NM); Butler, Susan (New Mexico Tech, Albuquerque, NM); Himmelberger, Heather (New Mexico Tech, Albuquerque, NM); Holt, Kathleen Caroline

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the lowering of the EPA maximum contaminant level of arsenic from 50 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 ppb, many public water systems in the country and in New Mexico in particular, are faced with making decisions about how to bring their system into compliance. This document provides detail on the options available to the water systems and the steps they need to take to achieve compliance with this regulation. Additionally, this document provides extensive resources and reference information for additional outreach support, financing options, vendors for treatment systems, and media pilot project results.

  16. An evaluation of household drinking water treatment systems in Peru : the table filter and the safe water system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coulbert, Brittany, 1981-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) storage, and education. Tests on the SWSs in Peru demonstrated 99.6% E.coli removal and 95% total coliform removal. Only 30% of the SWSs tested contained water at or above the WHO-recommended concentration of free ...

  17. Effects of drinking water temperature on respiration rates, body temperatures, dry matter intake, and milk production in lactating Holstein cows in summer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milam, Kyle Zohn

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 1, and 1. 4X potassium respectively, with CR 2 fed during the barn adjustment and SP. Cows were fed ad libitum in individual tie-stalls twice daily from 0600 to 0900 h and from 1800 to 2100 h with access to barn water temperature (ca 28 C...EFFECTS OF DRINKING WATER TEMPERATURE ON RESPIRATION RATES, BODY TEMPERATURES, DRY MATTER INTAKE, AND MILK PRODUCTION IN LACTATING HOLSTEIN COWS IN SUMMER A Thesis by KYLE ZOHN MILAM Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University...

  18. Orbital Branching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 15, 2006 ... allowing a flexible branching rule. ..... flexibility in the choice of branching entity. ..... Column generation for solving huge integer programs.

  19. Drinking Water Standards (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    como sea posible a la meta del nivel de por vida. Sin embargo, cuando se establece el est?ndar para un NMC, las entidades reg- uladoras consideran, adem?s de los efectos de salud, la factibilidad y los costos combinados de analizar el agua para detectar... un contaminante, y el costo del tratamiento del agua para remover el contaminate. Por lo tanto, el NMC (el nivel m?ximo permisible en una muestra de agua) es menos estricto que la MNMC (el nivel m?ximo de consumo durante el per?odo de vida de una...

  20. Drinking Water Standards (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    proveedores de agua dan mantenimiento a los sistemas de distribuci?n de agua, conducen las pruebas de rutina, tratan el agua y facilitan los reportes de calidad de agua a la TCEQ. A trav?s de este procedimiento de pruebas y tratamientos, los proveedores p...?blicos de agua se esfuerzan por proveer agua segura y de alta calidad a los clientes a quienes prestan sus servicios. Cuando el agua est? contaminada Algunas veces, un sistema puede violar los est?n- dares del agua potable para un contaminante o una serie...

  1. Role of Specific Cations and Water Entropy on the Stability of Branched DNA Motif Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    energy barrier is dominated by entropic effects that result from the decreased surface area, Bangalore, India 560012 Division of Immunology, Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope, Duarte computer simulations in explicit water and salt on a model TWJ and use free energy calculations to quantify

  2. Threshold of trichloroethylene contamination in maternal drinking waters affecting fetal heart development in the rat. Environ Health Perspect 111(3):289?292

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paula D. Johnson; Stanley J. Goldberg; Mary Z. Mays; Brenda V. Dawson

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Halogenated hydrocarbons such as trichloroethylene (TCE) are among the most common water supply contaminants in the United States and abroad. Epidemiologic studies have found an association but not a cause-and-effect relation between halogenated hydrocarbon contamination and increased incidence of congenital cardiac malformations or other defective birth outcomes. Avian and rat studies demonstrated statistically significant increases in the number of congenital cardiac malformations in those treated with high doses of TCE, either via intrauterine pump or in maternal drinking water, compared with controls. This study attempts to determine if there is a threshold dose exposure to TCE above which the developing heart is more likely to be affected. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly placed in test groups and exposed to various concentrations of TCE (2.5 ppb, 250 ppb, 1.5 ppm, 1,100 ppm) in drinking water or distilled water (control group) throughout pregnancy. The percentage of abnormal hearts in the treated groups ranged from 0 to 10.48%, with controls having 2.1 % abnormal hearts, and the number of litters with fetuses with abnormal hearts ranged from 0 to 66.7%, and the control percentage was 16.4%. The data from this study indicate not only that there is a statistically significant probability overall of a dose response to increasing levels of TCE exposure, but also that this trend begins to manifest at relatively low levels of exposure (i.e., < 250 ppb). Maternal rats exposed to more than this level of TCE during pregnancy showed an associated increased incidence of cardiac malformations in their developing rat fetuses. Key words: cardiac malformations, cardiac teratogenicity, environmental contaminants, halogenated hydrocarbon, heart defects, heart development, TCE, trichloroethylene. Environ Health Perspect 111:289292 (2003). doi:10.1289/ehp.5125 available via

  3. Water is used for various purposes, whether it is for drinking, swimming, fishing, irrigating or any other

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the most common methods for de- veloping plans to restore water quality are 1) a Total Maximum Daily Load bodies, Texas utilizes a variety of methods that result in plans to restore water quality. Two appropriate to restore water quality in an impaired water body. Through the Watershed Action Planning process

  4. addressing high-risk drinking: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12; Drinking Water Distribution Systems Hydraulics, Leakage, and Water Quality Issues Life Cycle Assessment for Different Piping Materials Water Demand Analysis due to Water...

  5. Interdiction Branching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 29, 2011 ... of partitioning the search space, referred to as the branching scheme. .... standard branch-and-bound both in terms of size of the enumeration tree and ...... of the fractional variable to be selected to enter at each iteration of the.

  6. Long-Term Data Reveal Patterns and Controls on Stream Water Chemistry in a Forested Stream: Walker Branch, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, Brian D [Duke University; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Bernhardt, Emily [Duke University

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present 20 years of weekly stream water chemistry, hydrology, and climate data for the Walker Branch watershed in eastern Tennessee, USA. Since 1989, the watershed has experienced a similar to 1.08 degrees C increase in mean annual temperature, a similar to 20% decline in precipitation, and a similar to 30% increase in forest evapotranspiration rates. As a result, stream runoff has declined by similar to 34%. We evaluate long-term trends in stream water concentrations and fluxes for nine solutes and use wet deposition data to calculate approximate watershed input-output budgets. Dissolved constituents were classified as geochemical solutes (Ca2+, Mg2+, and SO42-) or nutrients (NH4+, NO3-, soluble reactive phosphorus [SRP], total soluble nitrogen [TSN], total soluble phosphorus [TSP], and dissolved organic carbon [DOC]). Geochemical solutes are predominantly controlled by discharge, and the long-term changes in catchment hydrology have led to significant trends in the concentrations and fluxes of these solutes. Further, the trends in geochemical solute concentrations indicate shifting soil flowpath contributions to streamflow generation through time, with deep groundwater having a greater proportional contribution in recent years. Despite dramatic changes in watershed runoff, there were no trends in inorganic nutrient concentrations (NH4+, NO3-, and SRP). While most nutrients entering the watershed are retained, stream fluxes of nutrient solutes have declined significantly as a result of decreasing runoff. Nutrient concentrations in the stream exhibit large seasonality controlled by in-stream biological uptake. Stream benthic communities are sensitive to hydrologic disturbance, and changes in the frequency or intensity of storm events through time can affect nutrient fluxes. Stream NO3- concentrations are also sensitive to drought, with concentrations decreasing (increasing) if conditions during the three years prior to the time of sampling were drier (wetter) than the long-term mean. Future changes in the incidence of storm events, as well as the number and duration of droughts, have the potential to significantly alter watershed nutrient losses. Our analysis indicates that changing climates can differentially affect watershed element cycles either through changes in biogeochemical process rates or through changes in catchment hydrology. Furthermore, climate change can include both long-term trending in mean climate variables, as well as changes in the frequency and intensity of storms and droughts, with each of these types of change having distinct effects on the biological and geochemical processes governing different solutes.

  7. Branched Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard Kenyon; Peter Winkler

    2007-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Building on and from the work of Brydges and Imbrie, we give an elementary calculation of the volume of the space of branched polymers of order $n$ in the plane and in 3-space. Our development reveals some more general identities, and allows exact random sampling. In particular we show that a random 3-dimensional branched polymer of order $n$ has diameter of order $\\sqrt{n}$.

  8. Review Chlorination Disinfection By-Products in Drinking Water and Congenital Anomalies: Review and Meta-Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark J. Nieuwenhuijsen; David Martinez; James Grellier; James Bennett; Nicky Best; Nina Iszatt; Martine Vrijheid; Mireille B. Toledano

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to review epidemiologic evidence, provide summary risk estimates of the association between exposure to chlorination disinfection by-products (DBPs) and congenital anomalies, and provide recommendations for future studies. Data s o u r c e s a n d extraction: We included all published epidemiologic studies that evaluated a relationship between an index of DBP exposure (treatment, water source, DBP measurements, and both DBP measurements and personal characteristics) and risk of congenital anomalies. When three or more studies examined the same exposure index and congenital anomaly, we conducted a metaanalysis to obtain a summary risk estimate comparing the highest exposure group with the lowest exposure group. When five or more studies examined total trihalomethane (TTHM) exposure and a specific congenital anomaly, we conducted a meta-analysis to obtain exposureresponse risk estimates per 10 g/L TTHM. Data synthesis: For all congenital anomalies combined, the meta-analysis gave a statistically significant excess risk for high versus low exposure to water chlorination or TTHM [17%; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 334] based on a small number of studies. The meta-analysis also suggested a statistically significant excess risk for ventricular septal defects (58%; 95 % CI, 21107), but this was

  9. C:\\Users\\sesteven\\AppData\\Local\\Temp\\final food_drink policy_2011.doc 2011 W. K. Kellogg Health Sciences Library Food & Drink Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotze, Heike K.

    in capped plastic or glass bottles water bottles Paper or Styrofoam cups with lids Containers and a drinking hole that can be closed Sports bottles with a drinking spout that can be closed Beverages

  10. Drinking Water Problems: Perchlorate (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Porter, Dana; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    olores, sabores y cloro. ? Una membrana semipermeable por la cual pasa el agua bajo presi?n. ? Un tanque para almacenar el agua tratada. ? Una conexi?n de desag?e para desechar el agua residual. 3 tema, y bas?ndose en una vida ?til de 10 a?os, el costo de... la producci?n de agua var?a entre $0.05 y $0.10 por gal?n, sin contar los costos del agua gas- tada o los costos de tratar el agua rechazada, si acaso existen. Intercambio de iones El intercambio de iones (?tomos cargados) remueve el perclorato de un...

  11. Drinking Water Problems: Radionuclides (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

    2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    agua, otro m?todo de tratamiento podr?a ser una mejor opci?n, tal como el intercambio de iones. Costos Los aparatos para el sistema de OI normalmente cuestan entre $300 y $1,000. La instalaci?n de la unidad toma de 30 a 60 minutos, asumiendo que no se... requiere realizar modificaciones significativas a la tuber?a. La membrana de la unidad OI deber? ser reemplaza- da de acuerdo al calendario recomendado por el fab- ricante. Las membranas nuevas tienen un costo cerca de $150. Dependiendo del sistema y bas...

  12. Drinking Water Problems: Arsenic (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

    2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    sistemas de tratamiento de agua debido a las implicaciones toxicol?gicas, econ?micas y de infraestructura. Mientras que el cumplimiento disminuir? la exposici?n de los consumi- dores al ars?nico, sus costos de agua aumentar?n. Los MCL aplican s?lo a... costos. Los sis- temas de tratamiento certificados por una agencia independiente tal como la Fundaci?n Nacional del Sanidad (NSF) generalmente respaldan efectivamente lo que el fabricante ofrece. Despu?s de que los due?os de pozos instalan un sistema de...

  13. Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2006-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    ?picamente produce de 5 a 15 galones por d?a. Costo Las unidades de OI t?picamente cuestan entre 200 y 1,000 d?lares. La instalaci?n de la unidad toma de 30 a 60 minutos, asumiendo que no se deben realizar modificaciones significativas a la plomer?a. La membrana de... bas?ndose en un promedio de 10 a?os de vida ?til del sistema, el costo de la pro- ducci?n de agua var?a entre 5 y 10 centavos por gal?n. Estas cifras no incluyen los costos del agua utilizada o los costos de tratar el agua residual, si acaso existen...

  14. Drinking Water Problems: Lead (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    como alimentos y agua potable cont- aminados. Los alimentos importados en latas de plomo soldadas y los alimentos servidos en platos de cer?mica barnizada con plomo o cristal con plomo pueden contener plomo. Si su agua proviene de un sistema p?blico de..., el plomo puede da?ar el cerebro, los ri?ones, el sistema nervioso y los gl?bulos rojos. Algunos efectos del envenenamiento por plomo pueden disminuir si se quita la fuente de la exposi- ci?n, pero cierto da?o es permanente. Los s?ntomas del...

  15. Drinking Water Problems: Perchlorate (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Porter, Dana; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    y perju- dicar la calidad del agua tratada. El agua que sale de las unidades de tratamiento debe de ser examinada regularmente para verificar el funcionamiento apropiado del sistema. 4 Fuentes Burge, S., and Halde, R. 1999. Nitrate and Perchlorate...E l perclorato es un compuesto qu?mico que se compone de un ?tomo de cloro y cuatro ?to- mos de ox?geno. El perclorato que se encuentra en sistemas de agua puede ocurrir natural- mente o ser el producto de la actividad humana. El perclorato se mueve...

  16. Drinking Water Problems: Arsenic (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

    2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    en un cierto per?odo de tiem- po de la que el sistema est? dise?ado para tratar, puede bajar la efectividad del tratamiento y tener un impacto adverso en la calidad del agua tratada. El agua que sale de las unidades de tratamiento debe de ser... Agr?cola de Extensi?n, Extensi?n Cooperativa de Texas, Rebecca H. Melton, Asistente de Extensi?n, Extensi?n Cooperativa de Texas, El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M Michael F. Hare, Especialista Principal en Recursos Naturales, Divisi?n de...

  17. Drinking Water Problems: Radionuclides (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

    2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    efectividad de la mayor?a de los sistemas de tratamiento de agua potable depende de la calidad del agua de la fuente, as? como del tama?o del sistema de agua. Osmosis inversa Un tratamiento disponible para una amplia gama de radion?clidos es la osmosis... Figura 5. Proceso de intercambio de iones (adaptado de Robillard et al., 2001b). Los sistemas de intercambio de aniones pueden elim- inar efectivamente del 85 al 95 por ciento de los emisores alfa, dependiendo de la calidad del agua de la fuente y el tipo...

  18. Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2006-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    tratar, el tratamiento quiz?s no vaya a ser efectivo y se reduzca la calidad del agua tratada. El agua tratada debe de ser examinada regularmente para verificar que el sistema est? funcionando ade- cuadamente. Las mejores ?pocas del a?o para medir la...: Los nitratos Monty C. Dozier, Profesor Asistente y Especialista de Extensi?n, Rebecca H. Melton, Asistente de Extensi?n, Extensi?n Cooperativa de Texas, El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M Michael F. Hare, Especialista Principal en Recursos Naturales...

  19. Drinking Water Problems: Copper (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    ?er?a y artefactos de plomer?a con el cobre y sus aleaciones. Aunque estas aplicaciones del cobre a los sistemas de distribuci?n de agua han sido muy beneficiosas para el hombre, el agua puede reaccionar con el cobre y disolver peque?as cantidades de cobre...?cola de Extensi?n, Extensi?n Cooperativa de Texas, El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M L-5472S 1-06 ' no pueden excretar el exceso de cobre. El cobre puede acumularse en estos individuos y llegar a alcanzar niveles peligrosos, y si no se detecta y trata...

  20. Drinking Water Problems: Copper (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    de las siguientes caracter?sticas: pH bajo, contenido alto de salinidad, contenido alto de ox?geno disuelto y/o corrientes el?ctricas pasando a trav?s de la misma. Hacer pruebas adecuadas del agua y obtener un diagn?stico de la causa de las...

  1. Drinking Water Problems: Lead (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    irritables y desorientados. Interesantemente, la mayor?a de los ni?os con enve- nenamiento por plomo no muestran ning?n s?n- toma visible, aunque los ni?os peque?os, los infantes y los fetos absorben el plomo m?s r?pida- mente que los adultos y son... muestra inmediata- mente. Esta se llama una muestra de primera toma o primera descarga. Debido a que el plomo se disuelve continuamente en el agua con el tiempo, el agua recolectada despu?s que el sistema no se ha utilizado por alg?n tiempo va a contener...

  2. Mouse inbred strain differences in ethanol drinking to intoxication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garland Jr., Theodore

    Mouse inbred strain differences in ethanol drinking to intoxication J. S. Rhodes*, , M. M. Ford , C described a simple procedure, Drinking in the Dark (DID), in which C57BL/6J mice self-administer ethanol to a blood ethanol concentration (BEC) above 1 mg/ml. The test consists of replacing the water with 20

  3. arsenical livestock drinking: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SONG. "Whoe'er would search the starry sky, Physics Websites Summary: want To drink his bottle a day, sir 1 12;"Cold water makes no lucky hits; On mysteries the head runsTHE...

  4. Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in assessing the susceptibility of surface water supplies to pollution from current and future activities, Hydrology, Models Descriptors: Drinking Water, Source Water, Pollution Sources, Watershed Management Supply Descriptors: Drinking water, source water, pollution sources, watershed management Primary PI

  5. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building Energy Use Unaccounted-for Water Demand Managementdetermine whether its unaccounted-for losses exceed typicalof distribution zones Unaccounted-for treated water Units

  6. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Island Water Resources Center supported one research project; MTBE Drinking Water Contamination Aquifer. The MTBE contamination problem in Pascoag, which contaminated the only public drinking water well allowed researchers from URI to investigate the MTBE bedrock contamination and suggest remediation

  7. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    31, 2010. ) U.S. DOE Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (3, 2010. ) Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, ElectricEPRI. 1997. Quality Energy Efficiency Retrofits for Water

  8. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.pdf. (Last accessed September 2, 2010. ) EPRI. 1997.Retrofits for Water Systems. EPRI with the California EnergyFoundation Project # 298. EPRI report CR-107838. Palo Alto,

  9. Comparison of EC-Kit with Quanti-Tray[tm] : testing, verification, and drinking water quality mapping in Capiz Province, Philippines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuang, Patty

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis accomplishes three tasks. First, it verifies the EC-Kit under different water source conditions by comparing it to a laboratory standard method, the IDEXX Quanti-Tray[tm]. The EC-Kit is a simple, inexpensive ...

  10. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MGD)Weighted Average Total Use Treatment electricity costelectricity cost Units kWh kW kWh kW Source Water (by MGD)Weighted Averagecosts are for electricity (EPRI, 2002). ? Groundwater systems use an average

  11. A Fresh Perspective for Managing Water in California: Insights from Applying the European Water Framework Directive to the Russian River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grantham, Ted; Christian-Smith, Juliet; Kondolf, G. Mathias; Scheuer, Stefan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    drinking water supply; water extraction does not exceed theresulting from water diversions and extraction, as well asand effects of extraction water tables is generally not

  12. Water Data Report: An Annotated Bibliography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Melody, Moya

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Protection: Harrisburg, PA. PADEP2. DrinkingWater Management: Harrisburg, PA. USGS21. Low, D.J. , and

  13. Melons are branched polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Razvan Gurau; James P. Ryan

    2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Melonic graphs constitute the family of graphs arising at leading order in the 1/N expansion of tensor models. They were shown to lead to a continuum phase, reminiscent of branched polymers. We show here that they are in fact precisely branched polymers, that is, they possess Hausdorff dimension 2 and spectral dimension 4/3.

  14. CommunityOrganizedHouseholdWaterIncreasesNot Only Rural incomes, but AlsoMensWork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corw, Ben; Swallow, Brent; Asamba, Isabella

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    worldwide lack access to safe drinking water. In rurallack of access to basic infrastructure services such as water

  15. College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Map of Arizona. Source: Arizona Water Map Poster, 2002, Water Resources Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cushing, Jim. M.

    of common minerals and contaminants found in Arizona water sources. A description of drinking water of Water...............................................15 2. Properties of Water 2.1 Minerals in Water...............................................23 2.2 Contaminants in Water ......................................27 3. Water Quality

  16. Well Owner's Guide To Water Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    the quantity and quality of aquifer water resources in our state. Common contaminants found in Arizona Highlands Region ...................................18 3. Water Quality Common Minerals Found in Water .....................22 Contaminants in Water........................................23 Drinking Water Guidelines

  17. Drinking Water Problems: Iron and Manganese (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    tapa- dos y para calentar agua si los rodos de los calenta- dores est?n cubiertos con dep?sitos minerales. Esto aumenta los costos de la energ?a y el agua. El agua contaminada con hierro y manganeso usual- mente contiene bacterias de hierro o manganeso...

  18. Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The program offers principal forgiveness starting at 25% of project costs. Depending on determinations to be made by the New Mexico Financing Authority, additional principal forgiveness for up to...

  19. Drinking Water Problems: Iron and Manganese (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    . Estas bacterias se alimentan de los minerales que hay en el agua. No causan problemas de salud, pero s? forman una baba rojiza-caf? (hierro) o caf?- negra (manganeso) en los tanques de los inodoros y pueden tapar los sistemas de agua. ?C?mo entran el.... Las part?culas se forman debido a que el ox?geno en el sistema de plomer?a est? oxidando y precipitando el hierro y el manganeso. Si el agua est? clara cuando sale del grifo, pero las part?culas se forman y se acumulan despu?s de que el agua ha estado...

  20. Safe Drinking Water Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY) JumpLandSRT JumpSMUD JumpHeartSaf

  1. Responses of lactating Holstein cows to chilled drinking in the summer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noel, Deborah Lee

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RESPONSES OF LACTATING HOLSTEIN COWS TO CHILLED DRINKING WATER IN THE SUMMER A Thesis by DEBORAH LEE NOEL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8 M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May l988 Major Subject: Nutrition RESPONSES OF LACTATING HOLSTEIN COWS TO CHILLED DRINKING WATER IN THE SUMMER A Thesis by DEBORAH LEE NOEL Approved as to style and content by: Carl E. Coppock (Chair of Committee) Thomas H. Welsh Jr...

  2. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction The Rhode Island Water Resources Center has supported one information transfer project, "Clean Drinking Water in Rhode Island" and one research project "Enhancing Drinking Water

  3. Radioiodinated branched carbohydrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN); Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

  4. Water Scarcity, Climate Change, and Water Quality: Three Economic Essays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Yongxia

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    essay examines water scarcity under climate change scenarios in Texas. The third essay discusses arsenic-related water quality issues in the drinking water. An integrated economic, hydrological, and environmental model is developed for the first two...

  5. Abi Williams Drink and be merry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Stephen

    on a platter from John Lewis, cinnamon infused bread sauce and incongruous prosecco drink! to Christmas! and

  6. Untilrecently,thepointofusewatertreatmentindustry focused on improving the aesthetic quality of drinking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    place? Questions to Ask When Purchasing Water Treatment Equipment www.ext.vt.edu Produced of drinking water. The industry has lately been thrust into the fore front of treatment of contaminated. The following are questions the consumer should ask a water treatment professional to determine the system

  7. Branched Polymers and Hyperplane Arrangements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Postnikov, Alexander

    We generalize the construction of connected branched polymers and the notion of the volume of the space of connected branched polymers studied by Brydges and Imbrie (Ann Math, 158:10191039, 2003), and Kenyon and Winkler ...

  8. Holographic Coulomb branch vevs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostas Skenderis; Marika Taylor

    2008-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute holographically the vevs of all chiral primary operators for supergravity solutions corresponding to the Coulomb branch of N=4 SYM and find exact agreement with the corresponding field theory computation. Using the dictionary between 10d geometries and field theory developed to extract these vevs, we propose a gravity dual of a half supersymmetric deformation of N=4 SYM by certain irrelevant operators.

  9. BRANCHED POLYMERS AND HYPERPLANE ARRANGEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Postnikov, Alexander

    BRANCHED POLYMERS AND HYPERPLANE ARRANGEMENTS KAROLA M´ESZ´AROS ALEXANDER POSTNIKOV Abstract. We of connected branched polymers studied by Brydges and Imbrie [BI], and Kenyon and Winkler [KW] to any hyperplane arrangement A. The volume of the resulting configuration space of connected branched polymers

  10. Information Sources for Small Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

    2007-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Managers of small waters systems must have information about a variety of topics. This publication lists essential printed and electronic resources on disaster preparedness, national drinking water standards, private water well management, water...

  11. forreading. COLLABORATIVE MODELING TO EVALUATE WATER MANAGEMENT SCENARIOS IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    ; and Manager (Pati~no-Gomez), Integrated Water Resources Management Branch, Instituto Mexicano de Tecnologia

  12. Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level1 Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006 Clemson, SC 2008 Annual Water-Quality Report and reliable supply of high-quality drinking water. We test our water using sophisticated equipment

  13. Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level1 Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006 Clemson, SC 2004 Annual Water-Quality Report with a safe and reliable supply of high-quality drinking water. We test our water using sophisticated

  14. Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level1 Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006 Clemson, SC 2005 Annual Water-Quality Report with a safe and reliable supply of high-quality drinking water. We test our water using sophisticated

  15. Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    of microbial contaminants. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal or (MRDLG): The level of drinking water1 Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006 Clemson, SC 2007 Annual Water-Quality Report with a safe and reliable supply of high-quality drinking water. We test our water using sophisticated

  16. Fant's Grove Water System System No, SC390112

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level1 Fant's Grove Water System System No, SC390112 Clemson, SC 2003 Annual Water-Quality Report with a safe and reliable supply of high-quality drinking water. We test our water using sophisticated

  17. Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    of microbial contaminants. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal or (MRDLG): The level of drinking water1 Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006 Clemson, SC 2006 Annual Water-Quality Report with a safe and reliable supply of high-quality drinking water. We test our water using sophisticated

  18. Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level1 Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006 Clemson, SC 2003 Annual Water-Quality Report with a safe and reliable supply of high-quality drinking water. We test our water using sophisticated

  19. Fant's Grove Water System System No, SC390112

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level1 Fant's Grove Water System System No, SC390112 Clemson, SC 2004 Annual Water-Quality Report with a safe and reliable supply of high-quality drinking water. We test our water using sophisticated

  20. act fqpa drinking: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    furfural in alcoholic drink Alexandrion goes to the conclusion that the rate of distilled wine used to obtain this drink is very low. Simona Dobrinas; Gabriela Stanciu; Alina...

  1. University of Wisconsin Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    modeling studies and applications designed to preserve or improve groundwater quality. The following reportUniversity of Wisconsin Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction: groundwater, surface water, groundwater/surface water interactions, and drinking water initiatives. Faculty

  2. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into Sustainable Water Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    demand of plastic bottled water, additional unsustainable resources are required to support this demand drinking water solutions. Three methods will be compared; plastic bottled water, WaterFillz units method of delivering drinking water to students showed that plastic bottled water is not a solution

  3. Environmental justice implications of arsenic contamination in Californias San Joaquin Valley: a cross-sectional, cluster-design examining exposure and compliance in community drinking water systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balazs, Carolina L; Morello-Frosch, Rachel; Hubbard, Alan E; Ray, Isha

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    implications of arsenic contamination in Californias SanHealth Impacts. In Water contamination and health. Edited byimplications of arsenic contamination in Californias San

  4. energy company opens American branch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    in clean-energy investment and delivering unique projects and innovative products and servicesenergy company opens American branch in West Sacramento Substainible energy for sustainable energy supply. Ecostream markets such things as solar roof panel installations and other long

  5. Effects of water chemistry on NF/RO membrane structure and performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mo, Yibing

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    regulated some PAHs in the drinking water, but only Benzo-a-water of7 ppb, 700 ppb, 1ppm, 10 ppm, respectively [45]. PAHs

  6. Comprehensive Sampling of Fourmile Branch and Its Seeplines in the F and H Area of SRS: June 1996 and March 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, J.

    1998-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In June 1996, and March 1997 water samples were collected from Fourmile Branch (FMB) and its seeplines in the vicinity of the F- and H-Area Seepage basins. These sampling events represent a continuation of a series of semi-annual sampling events, which are now conducted annually and are aimed at characterizing the shallow groundwater outcropping into FMB and its wetlands. In the past, this groundwater has been shown to contain contaminants migrating from the F- and H-Area Seepage basins. The samples were analyzed for metals listed in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 264, Appendix IX, various radionuclides, and selected inorganic constituents and parameters. Volatile organic compounds were not analyzed for in this sampling event since in previous events they were below detection limits, (ref. Dixon 1993, Dixon and Koch 1995).Results from both sampling events indicate that the seeplines of F and H Areas and FMB continue to be influenced by contaminants in groundwater originating from the capped seepage basins, but to a lesser degree than in the past. This suggests that the most concentrated portion of the contaminant plume may have flushed from the system.Contaminant concentrations measured during these two sampling events were compared to background samples collected during these two events and compared to primary drinking water standard (PDWS), secondary drinking water standards (SDWS), and maximum contaminant levels (MCL) enforceable in 1997. Results were also compared to the 1989 baseline measurements at corresponding locations.Using two separate statistical tests, the concentrations of analytes were compared to background samples. The purpose of the tests was to determine if concentrations of contaminants along the F- and H-Area seeplines were greater than background concentrations.

  7. Optimization of Chilled Water Flow and Its Distribution in Central Cooling System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maheshwari, G. P.; Hajiah, A. E.; ElSherbini, A. I.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    inefficiency included improper distribution of chilled water in the main branches, and bypassing return water through non-operation chillers....

  8. Shock Chlorination of Stored Water Supplies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Treatment of drinking water to improve its sanitary or bacteriological quality is referred to as disinfection. Shock chlorination is one disinfection method employed by public suppliers to reduce bacterial contamination of water. This method also...

  9. NEW YORK STATE WATER RESOURCES INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Z. Jane

    ://wri.eas.cornell.edu Email: nyswri@cornell.edu Private Water Well Testing in Areas Impacted by Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling of Marcellus Shale gas development on drinking water supplies. It is intended for landowners and private

  10. Water is Vital--Especially after a Disaster (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crocker, Andrew

    2007-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Dehydration can be a serious threat after a disaster, when supplies of clean drinking water may be limited. Learn how you can find and use hidden sources of water in your home and purify water to make it safe for drinking....

  11. Water is Vital--Especially after a Disaster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crocker, Andrew

    2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Dehydration can be a serious threat after a disaster, when supplies of clean drinking water may be limited. Learn how you can find and use hidden sources of water in your home and purify water to make it safe for drinking....

  12. Water is Vital--Especially after a Disaster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crocker, Andrew

    2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Dehydration can be a serious threat after a disaster, when supplies of clean drinking water may be limited. Learn how you can find and use hidden sources of water in your home and purify water to make it safe for drinking....

  13. Underage Drinking Underage drinking is a serious public health problem in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    poses enormous health and safety risks. The consequences of underage drinking can affect everyone alcohol By age 15, more than 50 percent of teens have had at least 1 drink.1 By age 18, more than 70 on Drug Use and Health: Volume I. Summary of National Findings (Office of Applied Studies, NSDUH Series H

  14. South Dakota Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    nutrients and bacteria in feedlot runoff, arsenic removal from drinking water, study of pharmaceuticals in surface water and uranium detoxification in ground water using bacteria. These projects were scheduled

  15. Factors controlling tungsten concentrations in ground water, Carson Desert, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Factors controlling tungsten concentrations in ground water, Carson Desert, Nevada Ralph L. Seiler sources. Tungsten concentrations in 100 ground water samples from all aquifers used as drinking water indicates that W exhibits Tungsten con- centrations are strongly and positively correlated

  16. Water Filtration Using Plant Xylem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutilier, Michael Stephen Ha

    Effective point-of-use devices for providing safe drinking water are urgently needed to reduce the global burden of waterborne disease. Here we show that plant xylem from the sapwood of coniferous trees a readily available, ...

  17. Modeling of trihalomethane (THM) formation via chlorination of the water from Dongjiang River (source water for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumder, Asit

    , Guangzhou, 510275, PR China c Water and Aquatic Sciences Research Program, University of Victoria, Victoria online 22 August 2007 Abstract The Dongjiang River is the major source of drinking water supply for Hong

  18. Design and Evaluation of a Low-Cost Point-of-Use Ultraviolet Water Disinfection Device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    receive chlorinated water while another receives contaminated water with no residual level of chlorineDesign and Evaluation of a Low-Cost Point-of-Use Ultraviolet Water Disinfection Device Alicia Cohn around the world to supply safe drinking water. We have developed a device for disinfecting drinking

  19. The habitat range of sirenians extends from strictly fresh water (Amazonian manatee, Trichechus inunguis) to strictly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Rudy M.

    in salt water and fed lettuce, which is consistent with a lack of mariposia. Manatees in fresh water drankThe habitat range of sirenians extends from strictly fresh water (Amazonian manatee, Trichechus. This flexibility suggests that drinking both fresh and salt water may be common in this species. However, drinking

  20. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Maize Starch Branching Isoforms: Modulation of Starch Branching Enzyme Isoform Activities in Maize to Produce Starch with Novel Branching Architecture and Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guiltinan, Mark J.; Thompson, Donald

    2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Modulation of Starch Branching enzyme Isoform Activities in Maize to Produce Starch with Novel Branching Architecture and Properties.

  1. Water Quality When you pour a glass of water, you expect it to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    . However, absolutely pure water rarely exists in nature. Water absorbs minerals, organic materials- tivities. Taste and odor are not always indicators of water quality. Contaminated water can taste and smell a good supply of safe drink- ing water. Public water systems regularly test for over 80 contaminants

  2. BRANCHED ALKANES FROM BLUE-GREEN ALGAE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jerry; Calvin, Melvin.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ BRANCHED ALKANES FROM BLUE-GREEN ALGAE RECEIV r - LAWREWBranched Alkanes From Blue-Green Algae by Jerry Han and Oep~Branched alkanes from blue-green algae were separated on a

  3. Branched Silver Nanowires as Controllable Plasmon Routers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei Hua

    Branched Silver Nanowires as Controllable Plasmon Routers Yurui Fang, Zhipeng Li, Yingzhou Huang scattering spectroscopy, we investigate plasmon propagation on branched silver nanowires. By controlling the polarization of the incident laser light, the wire plasmons can be routed into different wire branches

  4. The branching programme of mouse lung development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Ophir

    ARTICLES The branching programme of mouse lung development Ross J. Metzger1 {, Ophir D. Klein2 {, Gail R. Martin2 & Mark A. Krasnow1 Mammalian lungs are branched networks containing thousands by three geometrically simple local modes of branching used in three different orders throughout the lung

  5. Federal, State, and Local Water Quality Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemond, Amy Daum

    and non-point pollution is causing many water bodies to fail state water quality standards. Since in many cases these polluted water bodies are vital to communi- ties as both a source of drinking water-5-23.1. These two laws are intended to protect water bodies from excessive point and non-point pollution

  6. Walker Branch Watershed Ecosystems Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    These projects have all contributed to a more complete understanding of how forest watersheds function and have provided insights into the solution of energy-related problems associated with air pollution, contaminant transport, and forest nutrient dynamics. This is one of a few sites in the world characterized by long-term, intensive environmental studies. The Walker Branch Watershed website at http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ provides maps, photographs, and data on climate, precipitation, atmospheric deposition, stream discharge and runoff, stream chemistry, and vegetation. [Taken from http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ABOUTAAA.HTM

  7. 8/13/12 Futurity.org What the world can learn from China's water crisis 1/5www.futurity.org/earth-environment/what-the-world-can-learn-from-china's-water-crisis/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of nutrients--and about 300 million rural residents lack access to safe drinking water. (Credit: Federico lack access to safe drinking water. Water can unleash fury. Recent floods in Beijing overwhelmed8/13/12 Futurity.org What the world can learn from China's water crisis 1/5www.futurity.org/earth

  8. Health and water quality monitoring of Pure Home Water's ceramic filter dissemination in the northern region of Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Sophie M. (Sophie Marie)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pure Home Water (PHW) is a social enterprise that promotes and disseminates household drinking water technologies in the Northern Region of Ghana. Currently their main product is a pot-shaped Potters for Peace-type ceramic ...

  9. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inactivation of Microorganisms in Drinking Water using Ultraviolet (UV) Radiation and Residual Chlorine. DrWater Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction This is a report on the projects of the Rhode Island Water Resources

  10. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , more widespread use of best management practices (BMPs) by private businesses, and improved storm waterWater Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction Delaware Water Resources Center the federal Clean Water Act's rating system of protected "designated uses" for purposes of drinking, swimming

  11. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for overall water quality and quantity research and implementation in Delaware include: enhanced management the federal Clean Water Act's rating system of designated uses (such as drinking water supply, swimming, fishing, etc.). Delaware has promulgated surface water quality standards which are designed to protect

  12. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for overall water quality and quantity research and implementation in Delaware include: enhanced management that have been classified using the federal Clean Water Act's rating system of designated uses (such as drinking water supply, swimming, fishing, etc.). Delaware has promulgated surface water quality standards

  13. Dynamic coupling drives conformational evolution of branched...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Characterization Dynamic coupling drives conformational evolution of branched polymers in solutions March 06, 2015 Inter-particle collision time (filled circles) and...

  14. Safe water storage in Kenya's modified clay pot : standardization, tap design, and cost recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Suzanne E

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the main components necessary for providing safe drinking water for users who lack piped water in the home is the ability to safely store it in the home. Users in the Nyanza Province of Kenya frequently carry water ...

  15. Biosand filtration of high turbidity water : modified filter design and safe filtrate storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collin, Clair

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unsafe drinking water is a major cause of water-related diseases that predominantly affect people living in developing countries. The most prevalent water-related disease is diarrhea, estimated to kill 1.8 million children ...

  16. Your Actions Can Help Protect Our Drinking Water (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Judith L.

    2004-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    original con sus instrucciones. a71 Comparta cualquier producto que le sobre con su vecino o con una organizaci?n local. a71 Averig?e si un producto puede ser reciclado y c?mo lo puede reciclar en su comunidad. Si se puede, recicle los productos sobrantes...

  17. Report seeks solutions for nitrate in drinking water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Editors, By

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    yr) in Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley, 2005. The leftin the Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley, areas thatLake rural areas. Basin and Salinas Valley. This report

  18. Your Actions Can Help Protect Our Drinking Water (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Judith L.

    2004-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    -800-764-7661). Compre solamente la cantidad de producto que usted necesita para hacer el trabajo en su casa. Despu?s utilice el producto siguiendo las instrucciones prove?das en la etiqueta por el fabricante. Almacenamiento seguro Las etiquetas tambi?n proveen...

  19. "Improving drinking water quality via identification and removal of certain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    as biomass feedstocks that are more sustainable than terrestrial fuel crops. Focus on algae-derived energy

  20. Arsenic in Drinking Water: Regulatory Developments and Issues

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby/%2AO 474.2 Chg 1KANSASVisit2

  1. Section 53: Consideration of Underground Sources of Drinking Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz is Taking OverEvaluating ' M M t . F(2, p, p s ) .

  2. Disinfecting Water Wells by Shock Chlorination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    If your well has been flooded, it must be shock chlorinated before it can be used as a source of drinking water. This publication explains how to disinfect a well using either dry chlorine or liquid household bleach....

  3. alcohol drinking patterns: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Brief Intervention and Referral Treatment ( 2013-01-01 20 Symposium: Drink and the Life Cycle Mathematics Websites Summary: and Alcohol in Ancient Rome." Ruth Cherrington...

  4. The Drinking Water Security and Safety Amendments of 2002: Is America's Drinking Water Infrastructure Safer Four Years Later?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shermer, Steven D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Data Acquisition ("SCADA") systems for managing keyprominent vulnerability. 137 "SCADA systems allow utilitywww.securityfocus.com/news/319. SCADA systems are used in

  5. The Drinking Water Security and Safety Amendments of 2002: Is America's Drinking Water Infrastructure Safer Four Years Later?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shermer, Steven D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of critical infrastructures: electric power, oil and gas,infrastructures, the most important being the electric power

  6. Regulation of Branching by Phytochrome and Phytohormones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnareddy, Srirama R.

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ratios (R:FR) perceived by phytochromes serve as a warning signal about impending competition for light resources and lead to shade avoidance responses (SARs), including reduced branching. The R:FR regulates branching in both a bud autonomous and non...

  7. Updated 7-11 Elliott B. Branch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corporation, and the Departments of Defense, Energy, Justice and State. #12;Updated 7-11 Prior to that, heUpdated 7-11 Elliott B. Branch Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Acquisition and Procurement activity in approximately 75 agencies. Mr. Branch spent time in the private sector, where he specialized

  8. Water Conservation Tips When washing dishes by hand, don't let the water run while rinsing. Fill one sink with wash water and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Conservation Tips When washing dishes by hand, don't let the water run while rinsing. Fill one sink with wash water and the other with rinse water. Run your washing machine and dishwasher only instead and save gallons every time. For cold drinks keep a pitcher of water in the refrigerator instead

  9. pre-acts -6th annual international conference of Territorial Intelligence -caENTI October 2008 1 SUSTAINABLE WATER MANAGEMENT METHODS IN HUNGARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    extraction protocols; more sophisticated water treatment methods, drilling deeper wells result in additional a useful sustainable water management model based on the rainwater harvesting practices. Key words: Rainwater, sustainable water management, drinking water, rainwater harvesting, cistern, precipitation

  10. Nanomaterial Composites for Next Generation Water Filters: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-06-197

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginley, D.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under this CRADA, the Parties will produce and test a composite filter element that will remove particles, bacteria and viruses to produce safe drinking water.

  11. Water quality analysis of the piped water supply in Tamale, Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Allison Jean

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United Nation's Millennium Development Goal Target 7.C is to "halve, by 2015, the proportion of the population without sustainable access to safe drinking water". While the UN claimed to have met this goal, studies ...

  12. Ecological effects of contaminants in McCoy Branch, 1989-1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryon, M.G. [ed.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1984 Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) required assessment of all current and former solid waste management units. Such a RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) was required of the Y-12 Plant for their Filled Coal Ash Pond on McCoy Branch. Because the disposal of coal ash in the ash pond, McCoy Branch, and Rogers Quarry was not consistent with the Tennessee Water Quality Act, several remediation steps were implemented or planned for McCoy Branch to address disposal problems. The McCoy Branch RFI plan included provisions for biological monitoring of the McCoy Branch watershed. The objectives of the biological monitoring were to: (1) document changes in biological quality of McCoy Branch after completion of a pipeline and after termination of all discharges to Rogers Quarry, (2) provide guidance on the need for additional remediation, and (3) evaluate the effectiveness of implemented remedial actions. The data from the biological monitoring program will also determine if the classified uses, as identified by the State of Tennessee, of McCoy Branch are being protected and maintained. This report discusses results from toxicity monitoring of snails fish community assessment, and a Benthic macroinvertebrate community assessment.

  13. Water Quality for Livestock Max Irsik DVM, MAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Water Quality for Livestock Max Irsik DVM, MAB Beef Cattle Extension Veterinarian University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine Water is an essential nutrient for humans and livestock and drinking water is the primary source of water for most cattle. The most important aspect of water

  14. Designing of a prototype heat-sealer to manufacture solar water sterilization pouches for use in developing nations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinlan, Saundra S

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water purification proves to be a difficult task in many developing nations. The SODIS (SOlar water DISinfection) process is a method which improves the microbiological quality of water making it safer for drinking and ...

  15. FY 1990 Applied Sciences Branch annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyes, B.M.; Dippo, P.C. [eds.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Applied Sciences Branch actively supports the advancement of DOE/SERI goals for the development and implementation of the solar photovoltaic technology. The primary focus of the laboratories is to provide state-of-the-art analytical capabilities for materials and device characterization and fabrication. The branch houses a comprehensive facility which is capable of providing information on the full range of photovoltaic components. A major objective of the branch is to aggressively pursue collaborative research with other government laboratories, universities, and industrial firms for the advancement of photovoltaic technologies. Members of the branch disseminate research findings to the technical community in publications and presentations. This report contains information on surface and interface analysis, materials characterization, development, electro-optical characterization module testing and performance, surface interactions and FTIR spectroscopy.

  16. MOMENT ASYMPTOTICS FOR MULTITYPE BRANCHING RANDOM WALKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    König, Wolfgang

    of Montenegro 29 October, 2013 Abstract. We study a discrete time multitype branching random walk on a finite of Montenegro, Cetinjska 2, 81 000 Podgorica, Montenegro, ozrens@t-com.me AMS 2010 Subject Classification: 60J80

  17. MOMENT ASYMPTOTICS FOR MULTITYPE BRANCHING RANDOM WALKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    König, Wolfgang

    of Montenegro 29 October, 2013 Abstract. We study a discrete time multitype branching random walk on a #28;nite of Montenegro, Cetinjska 2, 81 000 Podgorica, Montenegro, ozrens@t-com.me AMS 2010 Subject Classi#28;cation: 60J

  18. Microbial production of wax esters from highly branched alkanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bogan, William W.; Sullivan, Wendy R.; Paterek, James R.

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microbial culture and method for producing wax esters using highly branched alkanes. In accordance with one embodiment, the highly branched alkane is squalane.

  19. Electrochemical Branched-DNA Assay for Polymerase Chain Reaction...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Branched-DNA Assay for Polymerase Chain Reaction-Free Detection and Quantification of Oncogenes in Messenger RNA Electrochemical Branched-DNA Assay for Polymerase Chain...

  20. artery branch rupture: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Key words: Computational complexity; Branching programs; Time versus space; Lower bounds; Expander graphs; Ramanujan graphs 1 Jukna, Stasys 406 Branching, Capping, and Severing in...

  1. The Effect of Sedimentation on Plutonium Transport in Fourmile Branch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, K.F.

    2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The major mechanisms of radioactive material transport and fate in surface water are sources, dilution, advection and dispersion of radionuclides by flow and surface waves, radionuclide decay, and interaction between sediment and radionuclides. STREAM II, an aqueous transport module of the Savannah River Site emergency response WIND system, accounts for the source term, and the effects of dilution, advection and dispersion. Although the model has the capability to account for nuclear decay, due to the short time interval of interest for emergency response, the effect of nuclear decay is very small and so it is not employed. The interactions between the sediment and radionuclides are controlled by the flow conditions and physical and chemical characteristics of the radionuclides and the sediment constituents. The STREAM II version used in emergency response must provide results relatively quickly; it therefore does not model the effects of sediment deposition/resuspension. This study estimates the effects of sediment deposition/resuspension on aqueous plutonium transport in Fourmile Branch. There are no measured data on plutonium transport through surface water available for direct model calibration. Therefore, a literature search was conducted to find the range of plutonium partition coefficients based on laboratory experiments and field measurements. A sensitivity study of the calculated plutonium peak concentrations as a function of the input parameter of partition coefficient was then performed. Finally, an estimation of the plutonium partition coefficient was made for the Fourmile Branch.

  2. Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scown, Corinne Donahue

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drinking Water: Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE).http://www.epa.gov/mtbe/water.htm (11/30/10), Chiu, Y. W. ;LCFS LCI LP LPG MED MRO MSF MTBE MWD MWDOC NAICS NERC NETL

  3. Ozone (o3) efficacy on reduction of phytophthora capsici in recirculated horticultural irrigation water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Garry Vernon

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Microorganisms that cause plant disease have been isolated in recirculated irrigation water and increase the risks of disease incidence in horticultural operations. Ozone is an effective oxidizer used to disinfect drinking water supplies and treat...

  4. Bioanalytical tools for the evaluation of organic micropollutants during sewage treatment, water recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, Robin L.

    Micropollutants Toxicity Water recycling Indirect potable reuse a b s t r a c t A bioanalytical test battery recycling and drinking water generation Miroslava Macova a , Simon Toze b,d , Leonie Hodgers b , Jochen F

  5. Appropriate technology water treatment processes for MaeLa Temporary Shelter, Thailand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vater, Katherine Ann

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis recommends the use of horizontal-flow roughing filters to treat spring water of variable annual quality in MaeLa Temporary Shelter, Thailand. The public drinking water system for 45,000 refugees is overseen by ...

  6. Ceramic filter manufacturing in Northern Ghana : water storage and quality control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleiman, Shanti Lisa

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2009, Pure Home Water (PHW), a Ghana based non-profit organization working to provide affordable and safe drinking water to people in the Northern Region of Ghana, began the construction of a ceramic pot filter (CPF) ...

  7. Household water treatment and safe storage options for Northern Region Ghana : consumer preference and relative cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Vanessa (Vanessa Layton)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A range of household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) products are available in Northern Region Ghana which have the potential to significantly improve local drinking water quality. However, to date, the region has ...

  8. Analysis of the HVAC System at the Willow Branch Intermediate School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, G.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was built in 1983. It was recently expanded in 1994 and renamed the Willow Branch Intermediate School. It now has a total floor area of 88,617 square feet. The system under investigation is a water-loop heat pump system which provides the HVAC needs...

  9. Hawaii Department of Health Clean Water Branch | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJumpEnergyStrategy |Hatchet Ridge Wind Farm

  10. Hawaii Clean Water Branch Forms Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| OpenInformationHartsville,NewOpen EnergyWebpage Jump to:

  11. North Branch Water & Light Comm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: Energy Resources JumpOklahoma:

  12. Journal of Engineering Mathematics Optimal discharging in a branched estuary Optimal discharging in a branched estuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that returns to the discharge site is less polluted than would 1 #12;Journal of Engineering Mathematics OptimalJournal of Engineering Mathematics Optimal discharging in a branched estuary Optimal discharging the proximity of the discharge site to the branching and upon how the rate of discharge is adjusted. Explicit

  13. DHV water pumping optimization Simon van Mourik1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rottschfer, Vivi

    Chapter 6 DHV water pumping optimization Simon van Mourik1 Joris Bierkens2 Hans Stigter1 Martijn for optimizing a drinking water network over a horizon of 48 hours, given variable water demands, energy prices and constraints on the pumping strategy and water levels in the reservoirs. Both the dynamic model and goal

  14. Charles J. Vrsmarty & the UNH Water Systems Analysis Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    .1 billion people lack clean drinking water 2.6 billion people lack basic sanitationCharles J. Vrsmarty & the UNH Water Systems Analysis Group Fall Water Institute Seminar Series Corridor #12;Goals for This Discussion Describe chief forces shaping the contemporary and future water

  15. Recent Action-Research and future course in Water Sector.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Block 380 Thakar people. 200 animals. 40 households. And an acute shortage of water for 5 monthsRecent Action-Research and future course in Water Sector. Milind Sohoni, CTARA, IIT-soil, water, energy end-user defined or demand-driven-drinking water. Towards change-deliver technology

  16. Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in assessing the susceptibility of surface water supplies to pollution from current and future activities, Hydrology, Models Descriptors: drinking water, source water, pollution sources, watershed management, source water, pollution sources, watershed management Primary PI: Darwin L. Sorensen Other PIs David G

  17. 2011 Site environmental report5-1 Water Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , or inorganic contaminants. Monitoring, pollution prevention, and vigilant operation of treatment facilities of the drinking water standard. Analysis of the STP effluent continued to show no detection of cesium-137

  18. ambient water quality: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    you and your family Your water should be safe to drink and acceptable for all other household uses. In addition to illness, a variety of less serious problems such as taste,...

  19. Recommendations for at-risk water supplies in Capiz Province, Philippines : using water source and community assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick, Jessica Molly

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following thesis is part of a larger project which began in response to a request by the Provincial Health Office (PHO) in Capiz Province, Philippines for expert advice to support its drinking water quality testing ...

  20. Meeting the mandate for clean water : an evaluation of privately managed U.S. water and wastewater systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freund, Evan Benjamin

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliable provision of clean and safe drinking water is critical for public health, economic stability and growth in the United States. Due to a combination of financial, regulatory and operational challenges, however, it ...

  1. -delayed proton emission branches in 43Cr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomorski, M. [University of Warsaw; Miernik, K. [University of Warsaw; Dominik, W. [University of Warsaw; Janas, Z. [University of Warsaw; Pfutzner, M. [University of Warsaw; Bingham, C. R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Czyrkowski, H. [University of Warsaw; Cwiok, Mikolaj [Warsaw University; Darby, Iain [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Dabrowski, Ryszard [Warsaw University; Ginter, T. N. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz [ORNL; Karny, M. [University of Warsaw; Korgul, A. [University of Warsaw; Kusmierz, W. [University of Warsaw; Liddick, Sean [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rajabali, M. M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Stolz, A. [Michigan State University, East Lansing

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The + decay of very neutron-deficient 43Cr was studied by means of an imaging time projection chamber that allowed recording tracks of charged particles. Events of -delayed emission of one, two, and three protons were clearly identified. The absolute branching ratios for these channels were determined to be (81 4)%, (7.1 0.4)%, and (0.08 0.03)%, respectively. 43Cr is thus established as the second case in which the -3p decay occurs. Although the feeding to the proton-bound states in 43V is expected to be negligible, the large branching ratio of (12 4)% for decays without proton emission is found.

  2. Assessment of Pen Branch delta and corridor vegetation changes using multispectral scanner data 1992--1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne multispectral scanner data were used to monitor natural succession of wetland vegetation species over a three-year period from 1992 through 1994 for Pen Branch on the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Image processing techniques were used to identify and measure wetland vegetation communities in the lower portion of the Pen Branch corridor and delta. The study provided a reliable means for monitoring medium- and large-scale changes in a diverse environment. Findings from the study will be used to support decisions regarding remediation efforts following the cessation of cooling water discharge from K reactor at the Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site in South Carolina.

  3. Regional water planning Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    : generally private and near demand point, electricity/diesel Policy: State priorities- drinking demand for resources water, energy, firewood etc. Need to meet demand with supply Logistics of matching demand/supply Transaction mechanism public good, market, co- ops etc. Normative concerns

  4. PARALLEL ALGORITHM DESIGN FOR BRANCH AND BOUND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bader, David A.

    Chapter 5 PARALLEL ALGORITHM DESIGN FOR BRANCH AND BOUND David A. Bader Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico dbader@ece.unm.edu William E. Hart Discrete Mathematics communication net- work enables synchronous inter-processor communication. Grid com- pute platforms exemplify

  5. Improved strategies for branching on general disjunctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 21, 2008 ... [1] used basis reduction to find good branching directions for certain classes of difficult integer ..... first, the size of the linear systems may become unmanageable in practice, and second, if we add up too many ...... Management Science 51(11), 17201732 (2005) ... ILOG: ILOG CPLEX 11.0 User's Manual.

  6. FOOD AND DRINK REGULATIONS Serving hot food

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    . No other sources of heating water may be used. Serving cold food Food should be refrigerated prior in `batches' should the service time required extend beyond two hours. No refrigeration should be used

  7. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the quality of Missouri drinking water and how it can be protected. With the large agricultural activity mine areas, hazardous waste disposal, acid precipitation, anthropogenic effects on aquatic ecosystems. Because of the 1987-1989 drought years, and the flood of '93 and '95, water quantity has become a major

  8. Ohio Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the area of physical, chemical, and biological treatment processes for water and wastewater. The mission and wastewater treatment processes. The Center continues to be administered through the College of Engineering, Isabel Escobar progressed in developing new membranes for drinking water treatment and will continue her

  9. Influence of branch content on the microstructure of blends of linear and octene-branched polyethylene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hussein, Ibnelwaleed A.

    experimental densities of the two polymer melts. Initially, chains of LLDPE and HDPE were completely mixed POLYMER JOURNAL #12;short chain branching (SCB) [26]. Few studies have made use of m-LLDPE in blend

  10. Arsenic removal from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Robert C. (Edgewood, NM); Anderson, D. Richard (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for removing arsenic from water by addition of inexpensive and commonly available magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium oxide, or calcium hydroxide to the water. The hydroxide has a strong chemical affinity for arsenic and rapidly adsorbs arsenic, even in the presence of carbonate in the water. Simple and commercially available mechanical methods for removal of magnesium hydroxide particles with adsorbed arsenic from drinking water can be used, including filtration, dissolved air flotation, vortex separation, or centrifugal separation. A method for continuous removal of arsenic from water is provided. Also provided is a method for concentrating arsenic in a water sample to facilitate quantification of arsenic, by means of magnesium or calcium hydroxide adsorption.

  11. annual fourmile branch: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    space, referred to as the branching scheme. .... standard branch-and-bound both in terms of size of the enumeration tree and ...... of the fractional variable to be selected...

  12. abnormal branching pattern: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    space, referred to as the branching scheme. .... standard branch-and-bound both in terms of size of the enumeration tree and ...... of the fractional variable to be selected...

  13. Stochastic and deterministic causes of streamer branching in liquid dielectrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jadidian, Jouya

    Streamer branching in liquid dielectrics is driven by stochastic and deterministic factors. The presence of stochastic causes of streamer branching such as inhomogeneities inherited from noisy initial states, impurities, ...

  14. please recycle. Is it safe to drink?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    to toxic compounds, in our air and water, in the products we use and the byproducts of the industries in environmental science, molecular biology, medicine and environmental policy to elucidate how pollutants affect pollution to solution. That's why the Nicholas School of the Environment and the Duke University Medical

  15. Technology and Consumer Products Branch: program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the Technology and Consumer Products Branch (TCP) is to encourage the development and commercialization of energy-efficient technologies and equipment used in buildings and purchased by consumers. The TCP program conducts technical research, development, and demonstration efforts jointly funded with private industry, educational institutions, utilities, and other Federal and state agencies as appropriate. All contracts, grants, or interagency agreements have the major thrust of developing products and disseminating information that will accelerate commercial availability of energy-efficient, low-cost, reliable technologies, techniques, and products suitable for use by consumers and design professionals in the residential and commercial building sectors. Specifically, the technologies pursued by the branch include heating and cooling systems, consumer appliances, lighting design, and systems. Projects for each of these areas are summarized briefly, and publications resulting from the activities are listed.

  16. OurStory: Life on the Water Maritime Munchies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    or in the water, with a powerful light that gives a signal to guide seafarers maritime: of, relating to, or bordering a body of water seafarer: a person who operates or assists in operating a ship swanky: (historical definition) a drink from the 1800s that ended thirst and provided energy to workers on land or on the water

  17. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's drinking water and how it can be protected. With the large agricultural activity in the state, non, hazardous waste disposal acid precipitation, anthropogenic effects on aquatic ecosystems and wetlands. Water of the 1987-89 drought years and the floods of 1993 and 1995, water quantity has become a major topic

  18. Molecular Design of Branched and Binary Molecules at Ordered Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirsten Larson Genson

    2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examined five different branched molecular architectures to discern the effect of design on the ability of molecules to form ordered structures at interfaces. Photochromic monodendrons formed kinked packing structures at the air-water interface due to the cross-sectional area mismatch created by varying number of alkyl tails and the hydrophilic polar head group. The lower generations formed orthorhombic unit cell with long range ordering despite the alkyl tails tilted to a large degree. Favorable interactions between liquid crystalline terminal groups and the underlying substrate were observed to compel a flexible carbosilane dendrimer core to form a compressed elliptical conformation which packed stagger within lamellae domains with limited short range ordering. A twelve arm binary star polymer was observed to form two dimensional micelles at the air-water interface attributed to the higher polystyrene block composition. Linear rod-coil molecules formed a multitude of packing structures at the air-water interface due to the varying composition. Tree-like rod-coil molecules demonstrated the ability to form one-dimensional structures at the air-water interface and at the air-solvent interface caused by the preferential ordering of the rigid rod cores. The role of molecular architecture and composition was examined and the influence chemically competing fragments was shown to exert on the packing structure. The amphiphilic balance of the different molecular series exhibited control on the ordering behavior at the air-water interface and within bulk structures. The shell nature and tail type was determined to dictate the preferential ordering structure and molecular reorganization at interfaces with the core nature effect secondary.

  19. Afghanistan water constraints overview analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Afghanistan's already severe water supply problems are expected to intensify as Afghan refugees resettle in former conflictive zones. The report examines the technical, economic, cultural, and institutional facets of the country's water supply and suggests steps to mitigate existing and anticipated water supply problems. Chapter 2 presents information on Afghanistan's water resources, covering the country's climate, precipitation, glaciers/snow packs, and watersheds; the principal patterns of water flow and distribution; and comprehensive estimates. Chapter 3 examines water resource development in the country from 1945 to 1979, including projects involving irrigation and hydroelectric power and strategies for improving the drinking water supply.

  20. Hardness of water.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahul Oza

    This project is helpful to those people who live in the coastal based and they are suffering every year with problem of safe drinking water and not available throughout the year. It has given ideas, technology and economical way of solution for water crisis and its also solving problem of scare by use of different methods to development evelopment new water source in water scare area of Saurashtra and Kutch in Gujarat. Saurashtra land is containing of different types of minerals specially bauxite, calcite, fluoride so many mineral based industries are developed here and those who continuous nuous need this as raw materials and they used many mines and processes units. These minerals are creating problem to polluted ground water some are melting and increasing TDS more than 6000 mg/l and

  1. Universities CoUnCil on Water resoUrCes JoUrnal of Contemporary Water researCh & edUCation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Aaron

    than one billion people already lack access to safe drinking water (Gleick 1999; Loftus 2009) and more than 2.4 billion lack access to sanitation worldwide (World Health Organization 2000). Globally, waterUniversities CoUnCil on Water resoUrCes JoUrnal of Contemporary Water researCh & edUCation iss

  2. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report for the period October 1 to December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E. (eds.)

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is Volume 1 of a two-volume document that describes the progress of 15 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period October 1 to December 31, 1989. This volume discusses the projects. The work described in this document is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the management of Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Concentrations of ground-water constituents are compared to federal drinking water standards throughout this document for reference purposes. All drinking water supplied from the samples aquifer meets regulatory standards for drinking water quality. 51 refs., 35 figs., 86 tabs.

  3. When alcohol-dependent people try to stop drink-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    some form of treatment. If you or someone you care about may have an alcohol problem, help is available--so they may drink some more, and it becomes a vicious cycle. "Addiction has 3 major problems: You lose your researcher studying new alcoholism treatments. "People develop an alcohol disorder National Institutes

  4. INEEL Source Water Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sehlke, Gerald

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) covers approximately 890 mi2 and includes 12 public water systems that must be evaluated for Source water protection purposes under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Because of its size and location, six watersheds and five aquifers could potentially affect the INEELs drinking water sources. Based on a preliminary evaluation of the available information, it was determined that the Big Lost River, Birch Creek, and Little Lost River Watersheds and the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer needed to be assessed. These watersheds were delineated using the United States Geologic Surveys Hydrological Unit scheme. Well capture zones were originally estimated using the RESSQC module of the Environmental Protection Agencys Well Head Protection Area model, and the initial modeling assumptions and results were checked by running several scenarios using Modflow modeling. After a technical review, the resulting capture zones were expanded to account for the uncertainties associated with changing groundwater flow directions, a thick vadose zone, and other data uncertainties. Finally, all well capture zones at a given facility were merged to a single wellhead protection area at each facility. A contaminant source inventory was conducted, and the results were integrated with the well capture zones, watershed and aquifer information, and facility information using geographic information system technology to complete the INEELs Source Water Assessment. Of the INEELs 12 public water systems, three systems rated as low susceptibility (EBR-I, Main Gate, and Gun Range), and the remainder rated as moderate susceptibility. No INEEL public water system rated as high susceptibility. We are using this information to develop a source water management plan from which we will subsequently implement an INEEL-wide source water management program. The results are a very robust set of wellhead protection areas that will protect the INEELs public water systems yet not too conservative to inhibit the INEEL from carrying out its missions.

  5. Annual report, Basic Sciences Branch, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the progress of the Basic Sciences Branch of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) from October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. Seven technical sections of the report cover these main areas of NREL's in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, Solid-State Spectroscopy, and Superconductivity. Each section explains the purpose and major accomplishments of the work in the context of the US Department of Energy's National Photovoltaic Research Program plans.

  6. Radiative Levitation in Hot Horizontal Branch Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Landsman

    1999-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    There is now considerable evidence that horizontal branch (HB) stars hotter than about 11,500 K experience an enormous enhancement of their photospheric iron abundance due to radiative levitation. In globular clusters, the photospheric iron abundance can reach values of [Fe/H] ~ +0.3, or up to two orders of magnitude higher than the cluster iron abundance. Model atmospheres which take into account the iron overabundance are needed for understanding the appearance of the HB in globular cluster color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), for the derivation of accurate luminosities, gravities and masses, and for the ultraviolet spectral synthesis of old, metal-poor stellar populations.

  7. Annual report, Materials Science Branch, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padilla, S. [ed.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the progress of the Materials Science Branch of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. Six technical sections of the report cover these main areas of NREL`s in-house research: Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid State Theory, Solid State Spectroscopy, and Program Management. Each section explains the purpose and major accomplishments of the work in the context of the US Department of Energy`s National Photovoltaic Research Program plans.

  8. Hawaii Wastewater Branch Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG|Information OpenEI ReferenceNoiseInformation StateBranch

  9. Household ceramic water filter evaluation using three simple low-cost methods : membrane filtration, 3M Petrifilm and hydrogen sulfide bacteria in northern region, Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mattelet, Claire (Claire Eliane H. Y.)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drinking water continues to be a major source of waterborne diseases and death in the world because many points of water collection remain unsafe. This thesis reports high level of fecal contamination found in rivers and ...

  10. GUIDELINES FOR EATING & DRINKING 1. After vomiting, do not eat or drink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    , baked or grilled (not fried) Plain or Vanilla Yogurt Cottage cheese Cooked Carrots or Green beans butter), cheerios, pretzels, saltine crackers. Dilute juices (1/2 water:1/2 juice) Plain baked potato. Examples: Oatmeal or Cream of Wheat (instant microwavable or regular made with water, not milk) Dry

  11. The branch with the furthest reach Z. Wei, S. Mandre and L. Mahadevan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahadevan, L.

    sunlight. However, in the presence of gravity, branches droop: the droop is small for short stubby branches

  12. DESIGN OF A RURAL WATER PROVISION SYSTEM TO DECREASE ARSENIC EXPOSURE IN BANGLADESH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    in fractions versus all at once); (3) allowing water to first stand for two to three days followed by treatment with ARUBA produced final arsenic concentrations ten times lower than treating water directly out of the well-scale water treatment system that uses ARUBA to remove arsenic from drinking water. We have constructed

  13. Israel -the " BACK TO THE FUTURE" opportunity for the Global Water Arena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einat, Aharonov

    Consequences of climate change: Drought and lack of fresh drinking water The aging water infrastructure canIsrael - the " BACK TO THE FUTURE" opportunity for the Global Water Arena Booky Oren Chairman't cope with the growing quantity and quality needs Water - Growing Quantity and Quality Demands

  14. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Livestock Manure Storage and Treatment Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    , accumulating manure in a con- centrated area can be risky to the environment and to human and animal health unless done properly. Federal and state drinking water standards state that nitrate levels in drinking water should not exceed 10 milligrams per liter... (equivalent to parts per million for water mea- sure). Nitrate nitrogen levels higher than this can pose health problems for infants under 6 months of age, including the condition known as methemoglobinemia (blue baby syndrome). Nitrate also can affect adults...

  15. Efficacy of gravity-fed chlorination system for community-scale water disinfection in northern Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzpatrick, Daniel Cash

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although chlorine is one of the lowest cost ways of providing disinfection, currently billions of people lack drinking water that has had this simple treatment. Arch Chemical's Pulsar 1 unit is an innovation in chlorine ...

  16. Water Adsorption in Porous Metal-Organic Frameworks and Related Hiroyasu Furukawa,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    is important for many applications such as dehumidification, thermal batteries, and delivery of drinking water-driven heat exchangers3 for use as air-conditioning units in vehicles (heating and cooling are respectively batteries),4 w

  17. Water driven : New Orleans City Hall as a sustainable civic center for 21st century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sangthong, Pholkrit

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The devastating struck of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans in late summer of 2005 was deadly and immense. The storm destroyed over 170 drinking water facilities and 47 wastewater treatments around the city, and resulted ...

  18. Pilot study of horizontal roughing filtration in northern Ghana as pretreatment for highly turbid dugout water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Losleben, Tamar

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Northern Region Ghana (NRG), highly turbid rainwater runoff and intermittent streams are collected in earthen dams called dugouts. These dams serve as many communities' main source of drinking and domestic water despite ...

  19. Risk Analysis and Adaptive Response Planning for Water Distribution Systems Contamination Emergency Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasekh, Amin

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    are investigated. Pressure-driven hydraulic analysis is performed to simulate the complicated system hydraulics under pressure-deficit conditions. Performance of a novel preventive response action ? injection of food-grade dye directly into drinking water...

  20. Information-Based Branching Schemes for Binary Linear Mixed ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    For example, the first branching policy 0-0-0 performs ... We expected poor performance of this policy as it weights each active clause .... Hyderabad, India.

  1. Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    111989 Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory Commission Region I 475 Allendale Road King of Prussia. Pennsylvania 19406 Dear Mr. Kinneman: -;' .-. 'W...

  2. age horizontal branch: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stars as an Age Indicator Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: Surface temperature distribution of horizontal-branch (HB) stars is very sensitive to age in old stellar systems,...

  3. Optimization Online - A branch and bound algorithm for the global ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaroslav Fowkes

    2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 5, 2011 ... A branch and bound algorithm for the global optimization of Hessian ... with a Lipschitz continuous Hessian over a compact, convex set.

  4. Fresh look at randomly branched polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hans-Karl Janssen; Olaf Stenull

    2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a new, dynamical field theory of isotropic randomly branched polymers, and we use this model in conjunction with the renormalization group (RG) to study several prominent problems in the physics of these polymers. Our model provides an alternative vantage point to understand the swollen phase via dimensional reduction. We reveal a hidden Becchi-Rouet-Stora (BRS) symmetry of the model that describes the collapse ($\\theta$-)transition to compact polymer-conformations, and calculate the critical exponents to 2-loop order. It turns out that the long-standing 1-loop results for these exponents are not entirely correct. A runaway of the RG flow indicates that the so-called $\\theta^\\prime$-transition could be a fluctuation induced first order transition.

  5. Multiple Criteria Analysis and Water Resources Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    risk Quality of life Health Noncancer risk Costs Cost Technology availability Health risk Testing Management factors Environmental quality Treatment Chemical performance Fairness Cost of technology & Management 48:6, 2005 Evaluation of drinking water treatment technology: An entropy-based fuzzy application

  6. Montana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    drinking water supplies, a Prairie County sugar beet grower contemplating the possible impacts of coal-bed, drying streams and falling reservoir levels were the norm throughout Montana in FY 2003. But drought methane brines on soil and water, or a Madison County fishing guide coping with the effects of whirling

  7. New program investigates health and water link

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 24 New program investigates public health and water link Thousands of cases of waterborne and water-related diseases worldwide are related to drinking water. A new program in the Texas A&M Health Science... Center?s School of Rural Public Health is working to understand this link between diseases and water and educate the public about this connection. The Program in Public Health and Water Research was established in October 2008 within the rural...

  8. Information-theoretic Approaches to Branching in Search Andrew Gilpin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandholm, Tuomas W.

    constraints over sets of variables. 1 Introduction Search is a fundamental technique for problem solving in AIInformation-theoretic Approaches to Branching in Search Andrew Gilpin Computer Science Department of search algorithms. We introduce the information-theoretic paradigm for branching question selection

  9. INTRODUCTION Branched tubular epithelial structures are found in most

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasnow, Mark A.

    (respiratory) system, a branched tubular epithelium, is similarly amenable to cellular and genetic analysis to define the mechanisms of branching morphogenesis in vivo. The tracheal system delivers oxygen directly The Company of Biologists Limited 1996 DEV7471 The tracheal (respiratory) system of Drosophila melanogaster

  10. PowerAware Branch Prediction: Characterization and Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skadron, Kevin

    , pipeline gating yields little or no energy savings. Keywords Lowpower design, energyaware systemspoint benchmarks to explore the role of branch predictor organization in power/energy/performance tradeoffs, to reduce overall energy consumption in the processor it is worthwhile to spend more power in the branch

  11. Power-Aware Branch Prediction: Characterization and Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skadron, Kevin

    , pipeline gating yields little or no energy savings. Keywords Low-power design, energy-aware systems-point benchmarks to explore the role of branch predictor organization in power/energy/performance tradeoffs, to reduce overall energy consumption in the processor it is worthwhile to spend more power in the branch

  12. Radiolabeled dimethyl branched long chain fatty acid for heart imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN); Kirsch, Gilbert (Woippy, FR)

    1988-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiolabeled long chain fatty acid for heart imaging that has dimethyl branching at one of the carbons of the chain which inhibits the extent to which oxidation can occur. The closer to the carboxyl the branching is positioned, the more limited the oxidation, thereby resulting in prolonged retention of the radiolabeled compound in the heart.

  13. Solving A Stochastic Generalized Assignment Problem with Branch and Price

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morton, David

    tree, it was found that the linear programming relaxation of the master problem associated with column words: stochastic integer programming, generalized assignment problem, branch and price #12Solving A Stochastic Generalized Assignment Problem with Branch and Price David P. Morton Graduate

  14. Coupling a branching process to an infinite dimensional epidemic process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbour, Andrew

    Coupling a branching process to an infinite dimensional epidemic process A. D. Barbour Universit¨at Z¨urich To Cindy Greenwood, for her 70th. Abstract Branching process approximation to the initial stages of an epi- demic process has been used since the 1950's as a technique for pro- viding stochastic

  15. 8/10/12 Bureaucracy fuels China's safe water problems | Eco-Business.com 1/2www.eco-business.com/news/bureaucracy-fuels-chinas-safe-water-problems/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    300 million rural residents lack access to safe drinking water, the researchers reported. The authors8/10/12 Bureaucracy fuels China's safe water problems | Eco-Business.com 1/2www.eco-business.com/news/bureaucracy-fuels-chinas-safe-water-problems/ Policy & Finance Energy Green Buildings Transport Manufacturing Waste Eco-Cities Food & Agriculture Water

  16. Introduction Welcome to the third volume of The World's Water. What started as an effort to explore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    drinking water. Nearly two and a half billion people lack access to improved sanitation. Thousands stillIntroduction xvii Welcome to the third volume of The World's Water. What started as an effort to explore a variety of critical water issues and to disseminate water data and information has now expanded

  17. Optimal branching asymmetry of hydrodynamic pulsatile trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florens, Magali; Filoche, Marcel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of the studies on optimal transport are done for steady state regime conditions. Yet, there exists numerous examples in living systems where supply tree networks have to deliver products in a limited time due to the pulsatile character of the flow. This is the case for mammals respiration for which air has to reach the gas exchange units before the start of expiration. We report here that introducing a systematic branching asymmetry allows to reduce the average delivery time of the products. It simultaneously increases its robustness against the unevitable variability of sizes related to morphogenesis. We then apply this approach to the human tracheobronchial tree. We show that in this case all extremities are supplied with fresh air, provided that the asymmetry is smaller than a critical threshold which happens to fit with the asymmetry measured in the human lung. This could indicate that the structure is adjusted at the maximum asymmetry level that allows to feed all terminal units with fresh air.

  18. Using EPR To Compare PEG-branch-nitroxide "Bivalent-Brush Polymers" and Traditional PEG Bottle-Brush Polymers: Branching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turro, Nicholas J.

    Using EPR To Compare PEG-branch-nitroxide "Bivalent-Brush Polymers" and Traditional PEG Bottle-Brush Polymers: Branching Makes a Difference Alan O. Burts, Yongjun Li, Aleksandr V. Zhukhovitskiy, Paresma R-brush random and block copolymers. Our results demonstrate that bivalent bottle-brush polymers have greater

  19. BASIC INSTRUCTIONS How to make normal coffee drinks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    Lower the coffee spouts to avoid spilling Rotate the dial for desired amount of water: 1oz to 8 oz the tip of the frother in to the milk and turn the Steam/Water selector to the Steam symbol. Place a cup underneath the frother and turn the stream/water selector to the water symbol. Let water

  20. GIS representation and assessment of water distribution system for Mae La Temporary Shelter, Thailand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harding, Mary Pierce

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ArcGIS is used to analyze water access in Mae La, Thailand, home to 45,000 residents living as refugees in a temporary camp. Drinking water for the shelter is supplied at public tap stands while water for hygienic purposes ...

  1. Bacterial Water Contamination: Associated Risk Factors and Beliefs in a Rural Community in Northern Evan Torline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Bacterial Water Contamination: Associated Risk Factors and Beliefs in a Rural Community in Northern of its residents are living without access to clean drinking water. This simple issue causes terrible community of Mol, Haiti before the implementation of a chlorine water filtration system in it. A handful

  2. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainable Water Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of water consumption: drinking from the tap. The reasoning behind this is a lack of awareness and promotionUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainable Water Water Consumption This report outlines how Sustainability Marketing practices can be used to reduce

  3. Assessment of a low-cost, point-of-use, ultraviolet water disinfection technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    lack access to safe drinking water and an accelerated effort is required if the MDG is to be met (WHOAssessment of a low-cost, point-of-use, ultraviolet water disinfection technology Sarah A. Brownell, Portland, OR, USA Rachel L. Peletz Centre for Affordable Water and Sanitation Technology, Calgary, Canada

  4. Gone are the days of awkwardly angling your tall plastic water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baskaran, Mark

    Gone are the days of awkwardly angling your tall plastic water bottle under the rushing arc of the number of plastic water bottles saved from landfills.As of Oct.31, the station in the RFC alone has with Facilities Planning and Management, retrofitted six standard drinking fountains with new EZH2O water bottle

  5. Adsorption of annealed branched polymers on curved surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Jef; Zandi, Roya

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of annealed branched polymers near adsorbing surfaces plays a fundamental role in many biological and industrial processes. Most importantly single stranded RNA in solution tends to fold up and self-bind to form a highly branched structure. Using a mean field theory, we both perturbatively and numerically examine the adsorption of branched polymers on surfaces of several different geometries in a good solvent. Independent of the geometry of the wall, we observe that as branching density increases, surface tension decreases. However, we find a coupling between the branching density and curvature in that a further lowering of surface tension occurs when the wall curves towards the polymer, but the amount of lowering of surface tension decreases when the wall curves away from the polymer. We find that for branched polymers confined into spherical cavities, most of branch-points are located in the vicinity of the interior wall and the surface tension is minimized for a critical cavity radius. For bra...

  6. Establishment report: Reforestation of the Pen Branch corridor and delta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, E.A.; Dulohery, N.J.; Bunton, C.S.; Trettin, C.C.; McKee, W.H. Jr.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the role of the USDA Forest Service in the reforestation of the Pen Branch floodplain and delta. The report focuses upon the reforestation activities and monitoring to characterize the sites.

  7. Upper limit on branching ratio the decay B. Bassalleck,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Laboratory (BNL). The decay forbidden angular momentum conservation neutrinos purely massless left## # cosmological constraints neutrino masses imply more stringent limits. branching 0 ## case massive Majorana Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New 11973, USA TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia

  8. George Best I spent 90% of my money on women, drink, and fast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halligan, Daniel

    are listed below. The ethanol per drink shows the relative strength of typical servings of drinks. A natural definition for a unit of alcohol is 15 ml ethanol, which is the amount of ethanol contained in one-sixth of a bottle (a typical glass) of wine. A shot of spirits contains slightly more ethanol, 17 ml. A bottle

  9. 8/9/12 Global water sustainability flows through natural and human challenges 1/2www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120809141621.htm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    lack access to safe drinking water. Water can unleash fury. Floods in Beijing on July 21 overwhelmed8/9/12 Global water sustainability flows through natural and human challenges 1/2www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120809141621.htm TweetTweet 14 1 1 Share This: See Also: Earth & Climate Water Drought Research

  10. Habitability of Super-Earth Planets around Other Suns: Models including Red Giant Branch Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. von Bloh; M. Cuntz; K. -P. Schroeder; C. Bounama; S. Franck

    2008-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The unexpected diversity of exoplanets includes a growing number of super- Earth planets, i.e., exoplanets with masses of up to several Earth masses and a similar chemical and mineralogical composition as Earth. We present a thermal evolution model for a 10 Earth mass planet orbiting a star like the Sun. Our model is based on the integrated system approach, which describes the photosynthetic biomass production taking into account a variety of climatological, biogeochemical, and geodynamical processes. This allows us to identify a so-called photosynthesis-sustaining habitable zone (pHZ) determined by the limits of biological productivity on the planetary surface. Our model considers the solar evolution during the main-sequence stage and along the Red Giant Branch as described by the most recent solar model. We obtain a large set of solutions consistent with the principal possibility of life. The highest likelihood of habitability is found for "water worlds". Only mass-rich water worlds are able to realize pHZ-type habitability beyond the stellar main-sequence on the Red Giant Branch.

  11. Speeding up solar disinfection : effects of hydrogen peroxide, temperature, and copper plus ascorbate on the photoinactivation of E. coli in Charles River water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Michael Benjamin, 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sunlight efficiently disinfects drinking water in plastic bottles over two days, but simple additives may show promise for reducing this time to several hours. This study found that adding up to 500 [micro]M hydrogen ...

  12. Nitrate contamination of domestic potable water supplies: a social problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, T.; Jensen, E.L.; Conway, J.B.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrate contamination of potable water supplies is a recognized health hazard. Potentially, the contamination of private drinking water supplies could be a problem in the rural Palouse area of Idaho and Washington. Studies have shown that 12% of the rural population of Whitman County, Washington, may be drinking water containing nitrates in excess of the national standard. Yet there is no organized concern about this potential health hazard among local citizens. After reviewing the literature on nitrate contamination of ground water and discussing nitrate contamination of private potable water supplies in the Palouse, we use a social movement theory of social problems to explain why this situation has not been defined as a public health problem.

  13. When you turn on your faucet and fill a glass with water, you expect it to be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    health and the quali- ty of your water. Some of these contaminants occur naturally, such as minerals. However, drinking water can contain gases, minerals, bacteria, metals or chemicals that can affect your of certain contaminants that can be pres- ent in public water supplies. These limits, or stan- dards, were

  14. Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

  15. Quantum vs. Classical Read-once Branching Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Sauerhoff

    2005-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents the first nontrivial upper and lower bounds for (non-oblivious) quantum read-once branching programs. It is shown that the computational power of quantum and classical read-once branching programs is incomparable in the following sense: (i) A simple, explicit boolean function on 2n input bits is presented that is computable by error-free quantum read-once branching programs of size O(n^3), while each classical randomized read-once branching program and each quantum OBDD for this function with bounded two-sided error requires size 2^{\\Omega(n)}. (ii) Quantum branching programs reading each input variable exactly once are shown to require size 2^{\\Omega(n)} for computing the set-disjointness function DISJ_n from communication complexity theory with two-sided error bounded by a constant smaller than 1/2-2\\sqrt{3}/7. This function is trivially computable even by deterministic OBDDs of linear size. The technically most involved part is the proof of the lower bound in (ii). For this, a new model of quantum multi-partition communication protocols is introduced and a suitable extension of the information cost technique of Jain, Radhakrishnan, and Sen (2003) to this model is presented.

  16. FY 1991 Measurements and Characterization Branch annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osterwald, C.R.; Dippo, P.C. [eds.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Measurements and Characterization Branch of the National Renewable Laboratory (NREL) provides comprehensive photovoltaic (PV) materials, devices, characterization, measurement, fabrication, modeling research, and support for the international PV research community, in the context of the US Department of Energy`s Photovoltaic Research Program goals. This report summarizes the progress of the Branch from 31 January 1991 through 31 January 1992. The eight technical sections present a succinct overview of the capabilities and accomplishments of each group in the Branch. The Branch is comprised of the following groups: Surface and interface Analysis; Materials Characterization; Device Development; Electro-optical Characterization; Advanced PV module Performance and Reliability Research; Cell Performance Characterization; Surface Interactions, Modification, and Stability; and FTIR Spectroscopic Research. The including measurements and tests of PV materials, cells, submodules, and modules. The report contains a comprehensive bibliography of 77 branch originated journal and conference publications, which were authored in collaboration with, or in support of, approximately 135 university, industrial, government, and in-house research groups.

  17. FY 1991 Measurements and Characterization Branch annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osterwald, C.R.; Dippo, P.C. (eds.)

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Measurements and Characterization Branch of the National Renewable Laboratory (NREL) provides comprehensive photovoltaic (PV) materials, devices, characterization, measurement, fabrication, modeling research, and support for the international PV research community, in the context of the US Department of Energy's Photovoltaic Research Program goals. This report summarizes the progress of the Branch from 31 January 1991 through 31 January 1992. The eight technical sections present a succinct overview of the capabilities and accomplishments of each group in the Branch. The Branch is comprised of the following groups: Surface and interface Analysis; Materials Characterization; Device Development; Electro-optical Characterization; Advanced PV module Performance and Reliability Research; Cell Performance Characterization; Surface Interactions, Modification, and Stability; and FTIR Spectroscopic Research. The including measurements and tests of PV materials, cells, submodules, and modules. The report contains a comprehensive bibliography of 77 branch originated journal and conference publications, which were authored in collaboration with, or in support of, approximately 135 university, industrial, government, and in-house research groups.

  18. Ethanol as Internal Standard for Quantitative Determination of Volatile Compounds in Spirit Drinks by Gas Chromatography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charapitsa, Siarhei V; Kulevich, Nikita V; Makoed, Nicolai M; Mazanik, Arkadzi L; Sytova, Svetlana N

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new methodical approach of using ethanol as internal standard in gas chromatographic analysis of volatile compounds in spirit drinks in daily practice of testing laboratories is proposed. This method provides determination of volatile compounds concentrations in spirit drinks directly expressed in milligrams per liter (mg/L) of absolute alcohol according to official methods without measuring of alcohol strength of analyzed sample. The experimental demonstration of this method for determination of volatile compounds in spirit drinks by gas chromatography is described. Its validation was carried out by comparison with experimental results obtained by internal standard method and external standard method.

  19. Coulomb Branch and The Moduli Space of Instantons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Cremonesi; Giulia Ferlito; Amihay Hanany; Noppadol Mekareeya

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The moduli space of instantons on C^2 for any simple gauge group is studied using the Coulomb branch of N=4 gauge theories in three dimensions. For a given simple group G, the Hilbert series of such an instanton moduli space is computed from the Coulomb branch of the quiver given by the over-extended Dynkin diagram of G. The computation includes the cases of non-simply-laced gauge groups G, complementing the ADHM constructions which are not available for exceptional gauge groups. Even though the Lagrangian description for non-simply laced Dynkin diagrams is not currently known, the prescription for computing the Coulomb branch Hilbert series of such diagrams is very simple. For instanton numbers one and two, the results are in agreement with previous works. New results and general features for the moduli spaces of three and higher instanton numbers are reported and discussed in detail.

  20. Coulomb Branch and The Moduli Space of Instantons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cremonesi, Stefano; Hanany, Amihay; Mekareeya, Noppadol

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The moduli space of instantons on C^2 for any simple gauge group is studied using the Coulomb branch of N=4 gauge theories in three dimensions. For a given simple group G, the Hilbert series of such an instanton moduli space is computed from the Coulomb branch of the quiver given by the over-extended Dynkin diagram of G. The computation includes the cases of non-simply-laced gauge groups G, complementing the ADHM constructions which are not available for exceptional gauge groups. Even though the Lagrangian description for non-simply laced Dynkin diagrams is not currently known, the prescription for computing the Coulomb branch Hilbert series of such diagrams is very simple. For instanton numbers one and two, the results are in agreement with previous works. New results and general features for the moduli spaces of three and higher instanton numbers are reported and discussed in detail.

  1. Beta-decay branching ratios of 62Ga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bey; B. Blank; G. Canchel; C. Dossat; J. Giovinazzo; I. Matea; V. Elomaa; T. Eronen; U. Hager; M. Hakala; A. Jokinen; A. Kankainen; I. Moore; H. Penttila; S. Rinta-Antila; A. Saastamoinen; T. Sonoda; J. Aysto; N. Adimi; G. De France; J. C. Thomas; G. Voltolini; T. Chaventr

    2008-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Beta-decay branching ratios of 62Ga have been measured at the IGISOL facility of the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyvaskyla. 62Ga is one of the heavier Tz = 0, 0+ -> 0+ beta-emitting nuclides used to determine the vector coupling constant of the weak interaction and the Vud quark-mixing matrix element. For part of the experimental studies presented here, the JYFLTRAP facility has been employed to prepare isotopically pure beams of 62Ga. The branching ratio obtained, BR= 99.893(24)%, for the super-allowed branch is in agreement with previous measurements and allows to determine the ft value and the universal Ft value for the super-allowed beta decay of 62Ga.

  2. Measurement of Prominent {eta}-Decay Branching Fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez, J. [University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00681 (Puerto Rico); Ge, J. Y.; Miller, D. H.; Sanghi, B.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Xin, B. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Adams, G. S.; Anderson, M.; Cummings, J. P.; Danko, I.; Hu, D.; Moziak, B.; Napolitano, J. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); He, Q.; Insler, J.; Muramatsu, H.; Park, C. S. [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)] (and others)

    2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The decay {psi}(2S){yields}{eta}J/{psi} is used to measure, for the first time, all prominent {eta}-meson branching fractions with the same experiment in the same dataset, thereby providing a consistent treatment of systematics across branching fractions. We present results for {eta} decays to {gamma}{gamma}, {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, 3{pi}{sup 0}, {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma} and e{sup +}e{sup -}{gamma}, accounting for 99.9% of all {eta} decays. The precision of several of the branching fractions and their ratios is improved. Two channels, {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma} and e{sup +}e{sup -}{gamma}, show results that differ at the level of three standard deviations from those previously determined.

  3. Renormalized field theory of collapsing directed randomly branched polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hans-Karl Janssen; Frank Wevelsiep; Olaf Stenull

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a dynamical field theory for directed randomly branched polymers and in particular their collapse transition. We develop a phenomenological model in the form of a stochastic response functional that allows us to address several interesting problems such as the scaling behavior of the swollen phase and the collapse transition. For the swollen phase, we find that by choosing model parameters appropriately, our stochastic functional reduces to the one describing the relaxation dynamics near the Yang-Lee singularity edge. This corroborates that the scaling behavior of swollen branched polymers is governed by the Yang-Lee universality class as has been known for a long time. The main focus of our paper lies on the collapse transition of directed branched polymers. We show to arbitrary order in renormalized perturbation theory with $\\varepsilon$-expansion that this transition belongs to the same universality class as directed percolation.

  4. BENEFITS OF IMPROVING WATER QUALITY IN THE ABBOTSFORD AQUIFER: AN APPLICATION OF CONTINGENT VALUATION METHODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    concentration limit set out by the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality 1978. The water nitrate.81-$1.79 million. Questions concerning the appropriateness of willingness to pay as a measure of benefits(Knetsch 1993) suggest that the latter estimates may be a more appropriate measure of benefits. Hence

  5. he U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Water-Quality Assess-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and provide water for house- hold uses, including drinking, food prepa- ration, watering lawns and gardens, bathing, and washing clothes. The sam- ples from these wells were analyzed for 55 volatile organic. Gasoline oxygenates, refriger- ants, gasoline hydrocarbons, fumigants, and chemicals used in organic

  6. Higgs branch localization of 3d N=2 theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masashi Fujitsuka; Masazumi Honda; Yutaka Yoshida

    2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We study N=2 supersymmetric gauge theories on squashed 3-sphere and S^1xS^2. Recent studies have shown that the partition functions in a class of N=2 theories have factorized forms in terms of vortex and anti-vortex partition functions by explicitly evaluating matrix integrals obtained from Coulomb branch localization. We directly derive this structure by performing Higgs branch localization. It turns out that more general N=2 theories have this factorization property. We also discuss the factorization of supersymmetric Wilson loop.

  7. Environmental assessment of ground-water compliance activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses the environmental impacts of the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Spook, Wyoming on ground water. DOE previously characterized the site and monitoring data were collected during the surface remediation. The ground water compliance strategy is to perform no further remediation at the site since the ground water in the aquifer is neither a current nor potential source of drinking water. Under the no-action alternative, certain regulatory requirements would not be met.

  8. Energy Conservation Opportunities in Carbonated Soft Drink Canning/Bottling Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganji, A. R.; Hackett, B.; Chow, S.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    detailed energy audits of a few large soft drink plants in California are presented. Major savings identified are in process modification, lighting, refrigeration, compressed air and most importantly combined heat and power. Although each facility has...

  9. Alcohol Consumption in University Students: The Relationship Between Personality and Metacognition in Relation to Drinking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Ailsa

    2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    There are growing concerns over the heavy drinking found in university students in the UK. Metacognitions; the cognitive processes that oversee, monitor and control, cognition, have been related to alcohol use. The personality ...

  10. The Effect of the 18-Year Old Drinking Age on Auto Accidents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cucchiaro, Stephen

    The effect of Massachusetts' reduced drinking age on auto accidents is examined by employing an interrupted time series analysis of monthly accident data covering the period January, 1969, through September 1973. The data ...

  11. Energy Conservation Opportunities in Carbonated Soft Drink Canning/Bottling Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganji, A. R.; Hackett, B.; Chow, S.

    The processes in carbonated soft drink production are discussed with an emphasis on energy consumption, current prevalent practices in the industry are outlined, and potential measures for energy use and cost savings are elaborated. The results from...

  12. Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash. In Arsenic Contaminationwaterusing iron?oxidecoatedcoalbottomash JohannaL. using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash JOHANNA L. MATHIEU

  13. Arsenic exposure from drinking water and mortality from cardiovascular disease in Bangladesh: prospective cohort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Geen, Alexander

    13 million residents in the United States.1 Although the International Agency for Research on Cancer Death from cardiovascular disease. Results 198 people died from diseases of circulatory system, accounting for 43% of total mortality in the population. The mortality rate for cardiovascular disease

  14. Noble gases identify the mechanisms of fugitive gas contamination in drinking-water wells overlying the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    , Rochester, NY 14627 Edited by Thure E. Cerling, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, and approved August 12, 2014 (received for review November 27, 2013) Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have? Against a backdrop of naturally occur- ring salt- and gas-rich groundwater, we identified eight discrete

  15. CHARACTERISATION OF AGED HDPE PIPES FROM DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION: INVESTIGATION OF CRACK DEPTH BY NOL RING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    BY NOL RING TESTS UNDER CREEP LOADING C. Devilliers 1), 2), 3) , L. Laiarinandrasana 1) , B. Fayolle 2. KEYWORDS HDPE pipes, Nol Ring creep test, ageing effects, fracture mechanism, crack depth ratio, aged layer loading than a monotonic tensile loading. It is to be noticed that the Nol Ring test subjected to a creep

  16. TEEX tackles toxins: TEEX develops ECLOX protocols to detect toxins in drinking water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Leslie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    custom- ized, one-day ECLOX training workshop for the city of Fort Worth, after it acquired nine ECLOX units in 2008. The ECLOX unit was originally designed by Dr. Gary Thorpe of the University of Birmingham, U.K., to measure contaminants...

  17. Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    liter PETE or HDPE plastic bottles. The time between watera plastic funnel positioned over a clean 250 mL bottle. The

  18. Meeting the Need for Safe Drinking Water in Rural Mexico through Point-of-Use Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lang, Micah; Kaser, Forrest; Reygadas, Fermin; Nelson, Kara; Kammen, Daniel M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    contained in transparent plastic bottles: Characterizing thechlorine) solution and plastic bottles with measuring caps.then distributed in plastic bottles to individual households

  19. Methylation Study of a Population Environmentally Exposed to Arsenic in Drinking Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    of ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~suseI~~~~~~~~....s.. ..... ofMMA DMA, which~~~~~~~~Awa oetan1 ie gerti teepsd r

  20. RADIONUCLIDE INVENTORY AND DISTRIBUTION: FOURMILE BRANCH, PEN BRANCH, AND STEEL CREEK IOUS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiergesell, R.; Phifer, M.

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    As a condition to the Department of Energy (DOE) Low Level Waste Disposal Federal Facility Review Group (LFRG) review team approving the Savannah River Site (SRS) Composite Analysis (CA), SRS agreed to follow up on a secondary issue, which consisted of the consolidation of several observations that the team concluded, when evaluated collectively, could potentially impact the integration of the CA results. This report addresses secondary issue observations 4 and 21, which identify the need to improve the CA sensitivity and uncertainty analysis specifically by improving the CA inventory and the estimate of its uncertainty. The purpose of the work described herein was to be responsive to these secondary issue observations by re-examining the radionuclide inventories of the Integrator Operable Units (IOUs), as documented in ERD 2001 and Hiergesell, et. al. 2008. The LFRG concern has been partially addressed already for the Lower Three Runs (LTR) IOU (Hiergesell and Phifer, 2012). The work described in this investigation is a continuation of the effort to address the LFRG concerns by re-examining the radionuclide inventories associated with Fourmile Branch (FMB) IOU, Pen Branch (PB) IOU and Steel Creek (SC) IOU. The overall approach to computing radionuclide inventories for each of the IOUs involved the following components: Defining contaminated reaches of sediments along the IOU waterways Identifying separate segments within each IOU waterway to evaluate individually Computing the volume and mass of contaminated soil associated with each segment, or compartment Obtaining the available and appropriate Sediment and Sediment/Soil analytical results associated with each IOU Standardizing all radionuclide activity by decay-correcting all sample analytical results from sample date to the current point in time, Computing representative concentrations for all radionuclides associated with each compartment in each of the IOUs Computing the radionuclide inventory of each DOE-added radionuclide for the compartments of each IOU by applying the representative, central value concentration to the mass of contaminated soil Totaling the inventory for all compartments associated with each of the IOUs Using this approach the 2013 radionuclide inventories for each sub-compartment associated with each of the three IOUs were computed, by radionuclide. The inventories from all IOU compartments were then rolled-up into a total inventory for each IOU. To put the computed estimate of radionuclide activities within FMB, PB, and SC IOUs into context, attention was drawn to Cs-137, which was the radionuclide with the largest contributor to the calculated dose to a member of the public at the perimeter of SRS within the 2010 SRS CA (SRNL 2010). The total Cs-137 activity in each of the IOUs was calculated to be 9.13, 1.5, and 17.4 Ci for FMB, PB, and SC IOUs, respectively. Another objective of this investigation was to address the degree of uncertainty associated with the estimated residual radionuclide activity that is calculated for the FMB, PB, and SC IOUs. Two primary contributing factors to overall uncertainty of inventory estimates were identified and evaluated. The first related to the computation of the mass of contaminated material in a particular IOU compartment and the second to the uncertainty associated with analytical counting errors. The error ranges for the mass of contaminated material in each IOU compartment were all calculated to be approximately +/- 9.6%, or a nominal +/-10%. This nominal value was added to the uncertainty associated with the analytical counting errors that were associated with each radionuclide, individually. This total uncertainty was then used to calculate a maximum and minimum estimated radionuclide inventories for each IOU.

  1. System for removal of arsenic from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Robert C.; Anderson, D. Richard

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems for removing arsenic from water by addition of inexpensive and commonly available magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium oxide, or calcium hydroxide to the water. The hydroxide has a strong chemical affinity for arsenic and rapidly adsorbs arsenic, even in the presence of carbonate in the water. Simple and commercially available mechanical systems for removal of magnesium hydroxide particles with adsorbed arsenic from drinking water can be used, including filtration, dissolved air flotation, vortex separation, or centrifugal separation. A system for continuous removal of arsenic from water is provided. Also provided is a system for concentrating arsenic in a water sample to facilitate quantification of arsenic, by means of magnesium or calcium hydroxide adsorption.

  2. TRIBAND BRANCH LINE COUPLER USING DOUBLE-LORENTZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nam, Sangwook

    TRIBAND BRANCH LINE COUPLER USING DOUBLE-LORENTZ TRANSMISSION LINES Hanseung Lee and Sangwook Nam) transmission lines (TL) provides two additional degrees of freedom in realizing triband microwave devices-Lorentz; transmission lines; triband; directional couplers 1. INTRODUCTION The concept of artificial TLs having

  3. Continuum Cascade Model: Branching Random Walk for Traveling Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoshiaki Itoh

    2015-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The food web is a directed graph in which nodes label species and directed links represent the predation between species. Cascade models generate random food webs. The recursion to obtain the probability distribution of the longest chain length has the solution with traveling wave. We consider a branching random walk to study the asymptotic probability on the wave front.

  4. The Polymerase Chain Reaction and Branching Processes Fengzhu Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Fengzhu - Sun, Fengzhu

    The Polymerase Chain Reaction and Branching Processes Fengzhu Sun Department of Mathematics, DRB is studied. We also study the distribution of the Hamming distance between two randomly chosen sequences long. The double-stranded DNA molecules are heated to near boiling temperature so that the double

  5. Power-Aware Branch Prediction: Characterization and Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skadron, Kevin

    or no energy savings. Index Terms--Low-power design, energy-aware systems, processor architecture, branch organization in power/energy/performance trade offs for processor design. Even though the direction predictor, the PPD reduces local predictor power and energy dissipation by about 31 percent and overall processor

  6. A BRANCH-AND-PRICE ALGORITHM AND NEW TEST PROBLEMS ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Next, we describe several branching strategies, their effect on the pricing problem, and then ..... Sun Blade 2000 with 8.0 GB of memory and 2 Sun UltraSPARC-III+ CPUs running at 900 MHz ..... In Proceedings of IJCAI-99, Stockholm, Sweden,.

  7. Extending the Cell SPE with Energy Efficient Branch Prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanov, Georgi

    Extending the Cell SPE with Energy Efficient Branch Prediction Martijn Briejer1 , Cor Meenderinck1 , and Ben Juurlink2 1 Delft University of Technology, Delft, the Netherlands cor@ce.et.tudelft.nl 2 Technische Universit¨at Berlin, Berlin, Germany juurlink@cs.tu-berlin.de Abstract. Energy-efficient dynamic

  8. More Branch-and-Bound Experiments in Convex Nonlinear Integer ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pierre

    Sep 29, 2011 ... Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Sciences, Northwestern University,. Evanston, IL 60208 ... chooses the best one as the actual branching variable. Reliability .... mean that all selection strategies perform similarly in practice. Indeed ...... User manual for filterSQP, 1998. University of...

  9. How important are branching decisions: fooling MIP solvers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 21, 2014 ... building Gk by adding one P1 and k ? 1 P2's in a disconnected fashion. ... row permutations (to reduce the impact of performance variability [11]). ... cost branching is a history-based rule that tries to predict the score that strong.

  10. Gas compressor with side branch absorber for pulsation control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Ralph E. (San Antonio, TX); Scrivner, Christine M. (San Antonio, TX); Broerman, III, Eugene L. (San Antonio, TX)

    2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for reducing pulsation in lateral piping associated with a gas compressor system. A tunable side branch absorber (TSBA) is installed on the lateral piping. A pulsation sensor is placed in the lateral piping, to measure pulsation within the piping. The sensor output signals are delivered to a controller, which controls actuators that change the acoustic dimensions of the SBA.

  11. Electrical Transport through a Single Nanoscale Semiconductor Branch Point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    such as light- emitting diodes10-12 and solar cells.13,14 Already, the incor- poration of branched nanostructures has yielded significant improvements in nanorod/polymer solar cells, where the specific pathways) while keeping the third arm floating are presented in the main panel of Figure 1. The I-V curves show

  12. Convergence in gradient systems with branching of equilibria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galaktionov, V A [University of Bath (United Kingdom); Pohozaev, Stanislav I [Steklov Mathematical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation); Shishkov, A E [Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Donetsk (Ukraine)

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The basic model is a semilinear elliptic equation with coercive C{sup 1} non-linearity: {delta}{psi}+f({psi})=0 in {omega}, {psi}=0 on {partial_derivative}{omega}, where {omega} subset of R{sup N} is a bounded smooth domain. The main hypothesis (H{sub R}) about resonance branching is as follows: if a branching of equilibria occurs at a point {psi} with k-dimensional kernel of the linearized operator {delta}+f'({psi})I, then the branching subset S{sub k} at {psi} is a locally smooth k-dimensional manifold. For N=1 the first result on the stabilization to a single equilibrium is due to Zelenyak (1968). It is shown that Zelenyak's approach, which is based on the analysis of Lyapunov functions, can be extended to general gradient systems in Hilbert spaces with smooth resonance branching. The case of asymptotically small non-autonomous perturbations of such systems is also considered. The approach developed here represents an alternative to Hale's stabilization method (1992) and other similar techniques in the theory of gradient systems. Bibliography: 32 titles.

  13. QER- Comment of American Water

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dear QER Team; Thank you for the opportunity to provide comments to the Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force to discuss the water and energy nexus, advances in water innovative technologies, and the impact of climate change on water issues. On behalf of American Water, I wish to submit the following White Papers which we have prepared on these critical issues: Innovations in Energy Use Sustainability and Resiliency Planning for Water Utilities One Water Water/Energy Correlation The Value of Water Challenges in the Water Industry: Climate Change Challenges in the Water Industry: Meeting Demand in the West Innovation Solutions Within the Water Industry: Desalination Innovation Solutions Within the Water Industry: Going Green Innovation Solutions Within the Water Industry: Water Reuse Bridging the Water Innovation Gap. Founded in 1886, American Water is the largest publicly traded U.S. water and wastewater utility company. With headquarters in Voorhees, NJ, the company employs approximately 6,600 dedicated professionals who provide drinking water, wastewater and other related services to an estimated 14 million people in more than 40 states. Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions or if there is any way American Water can be helpful to your mission. Respectfully Yours, Martin (See attached file: White Papers.pdf) Martin D. Kerckhoff Vice President and Divisional General Counsel Central Division American Water CONFIDENTIAL & PRIVILEGED COMMUNICATION This email and any attachments hereto constitute a legally confidential communication from the Legal Department of American Water. The information contained herein is subject to attorney-client privilege and is for the sole use of the intended original addressee. If you are not the intended original addressee, you are hereby notified that any reading, disclosure, copying, distribution, use, or taking of any action in reliance on the contents contained herein is strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please immediately notify us at 314.966.2241 and delete this message from your system. WARNING: Although American Water has taken reasonable precautions to ensure that no viruses are present in this email, it is the responsibility of the recipient to ensure that it is virus free. No responsibility is accepted by American Water for any loss or damage arising in any way from the receipt and/or use of this email.

  14. Branched aliphatic alkanes with quaternary substituted carbon atoms in modern and ancient geologic samples.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenig, F.; Simons, D.-J. H.; Crich, D.; Cowen, J. P.; Ventura, G. T.; Rehbein-Khalily, T.; Brown, T. C.; Anderson, K. B.; Chemistry; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago; Univ. of Hawaii

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pseudohomologous series of branched aliphatic alkanes with a quaternary substituted carbon atom (BAQCs, specifically 2,2-di-methylalkanes and 3,3- and 5,5-diethylalkanes) were identified in warm (65{sup o}C) deep-sea hydrothermal waters and Late Cretaceous black shales. 5,5-Diethylalkanes were also observed in modern and Holocene marine shelf sediments and in shales spanning the last 800 million years of the geological record. The carbon number distribution of BAQCs indicates a biological origin. These compounds were observed but not identified in previous studies of 2.0 billion- to 2.2 billion-year-old metasediments and were commonly misidentified in other sediment samples, indicating that BAQCs are widespread in the geological record. The source organisms of BAQCs are unknown, but their paleobiogeographic distribution suggests that they have an affinity for sulfides and might be nonphotosynthetic sulfide oxidizers.

  15. A New Analysis of X-Ray Adsorption Branching Ratios: Use ofRussell...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of X-Ray Adsorption Branching Ratios: Use of Russell-Saunders Coupling . A New Analysis of X-Ray Adsorption Branching Ratios: Use of Russell-Saunders Coupling . Abstract:...

  16. aureobasidium-derived soluble branched: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    space, referred to as the branching scheme. .... standard branch-and-bound both in terms of size of the enumeration tree and ...... of the fractional variable to be selected...

  17. Characterization of sparsely long chain branched polycarbonate by a combination of solution, rheology and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keunings, Roland

    Characterization of sparsely long chain branched polycarbonate by a combination of solution branched polycarbonate and fractions thereof by a combination of solution and rheological techniques the model is calibrated for polydisperse linear polycarbonate, discrepancies between the predicted

  18. Relevance of complex branch points for partial wave analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ceci, S.; Svarc, A. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Doering, M. [HISKP (Theorie), Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 14-16, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Hanhart, C.; Krewald, S. [Institut fuer Kernphysik and Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Institute for Advanced Simulation, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Meissner, U.-G. [HISKP (Theorie), Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 14-16, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik and Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Institute for Advanced Simulation, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A central issue in hadron spectroscopy is to deduce--and interpret--resonance parameters, namely, pole positions and residues, from experimental data, for those are the quantities to be compared to lattice QCD or model calculations. However, not every structure in the observables derives from a resonance pole: the origin might as well be branch points, either located on the real axis (when a new channel composed of stable particles opens) or in the complex plane (when at least one of the intermediate particles is unstable). In this paper we demonstrate first the existence of such branch points in the complex plane and then show on the example of the {pi}N P{sub 11} partial wave that it is not possible to distinguish the structures induced by the latter from a true pole signal based on elastic data alone.

  19. Branching Fraction Measurement of B to omega l nu decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Palano, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R.Y.; /British Columbia U.; Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Blinov, V.E.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U.; /more authors..

    2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu} branching fraction based on a sample of 467 million B{bar B} pairs recorded by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. We observe 1041 {+-} 133 signal decays, corresponding to a branching fraction of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (1.15 {+-} 0.15 {+-} 0.12) x 10{sup -4}, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The dependence of the decay rate on q{sup 2}, the momentum transfer squared to the lepton system, is compared to QCD predictions of the form factors based on a quark model and light-cone sum rules.

  20. Measurement of the branching fractions of ?(+)(c)?pKn(?)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW D 1 APRIL 1998VOLUME 57, NUMBER 7Measurement of the branching fractions of Lc1?pK n?p? M. S. Alam,1 S. B. Athar,1 Z. Ling,1 A. H. Mahmood,1 H. Severini,1 S. Timm,1 F. Wappler,1 A. Anastassov,2 J. E. Duboscq,2 D. Fujino,2,* K. K. Gan...6 le Physics, Canada , Quebec, Canada H3A 2T8 le Physics, Canada a, New York 14850 wrence, Kansas 66045 neapolis, Minnesota 55455 ublished 18 February 1998! SR, we report new measurements of the branching into pK2p1p0, pK 0, pK 0p1p2, and pK 0p0...

  1. The genealogy of branching Brownian motion with absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien Berestycki; Nathanal Berestycki; Jason Schweinsberg

    2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a system of particles which perform branching Brownian motion with negative drift and are killed upon reaching zero, in the near-critical regime where the total population stays roughly constant with approximately N particles. We show that the characteristic time scale for the evolution of this population is of order $(\\log N)^3$, in the sense that when time is measured in these units, the scaled number of particles converges to a variant of Neveu's continuous-state branching process. Furthermore, the genealogy of the particles is then governed by a coalescent process known as the Bolthausen-Sznitman coalescent. This validates the nonrigorous predictions by Brunet, Derrida, Muller and Munier for a closely related model.

  2. The genealogy of extremal particles of Branching Brownian Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arguin, Louis-Pierre; Kistler, Nicola

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Branching Brownian Motion describes a system of particles which diffuse in space and split into offsprings according to a certain random mechanism. In virtue of the groundbreaking work by M. Bramson on the convergence of solutions of the Fisher-KPP equation to traveling waves, the law of the rightmost particle in the limit of large times is rather well understood. In this work, we address the full statistics of the extremal particles (first-, second-, third- etc. largest). In particular, we prove that in the large $t-$limit, such particles descend with overwhelming probability from ancestors having split either within a distance of order one from time $0$, or within a distance of order one from time $t$. The approach relies on characterizing, up to a certain level of precision, the paths of the extremal particles. As a byproduct, a heuristic picture of Branching Brownian Motion ``at the edge'' emerges, which sheds light on the still unknown limiting extremal process.

  3. The genealogy of branching Brownian motion with absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berestycki, Julien; Schweinsberg, Jason

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a system of particles which perform branching Brownian motion with negative drift and are killed upon reaching zero, in the near-critical regime where the total population stays roughly constant with approximately N particles. We show that the characteristic time scale for the evolution of this population is of order (log N)^3, in the sense that when time is measured in these units, the scaled number of particles converges to a variant of Neveu's continuous-state branching process. Furthermore, the genealogy of the particles is then governed by a coalescent process known as the Bolthausen-Sznitman coalescent. This validates the non-rigorous predictions by Brunet, Derrida, Muller, and Munier for a closely related model.

  4. Branch dependence in the "consistent histories" approach to quantum mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Mller

    2006-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In the consistent histories formalism one specifies a family of histories as an exhaustive set of pairwise exclusive descriptions of the dynamics of a quantum system. We define branching families of histories, which strike a middle ground between the two available mathematically precise definitions of families of histories, viz., product families and Isham's history projector operator formalism. The former are too narrow for applications, and the latter's generality comes at a certain cost, barring an intuitive reading of the ``histories''. Branching families retain the intuitiveness of product families, they allow for the interpretation of a history's weight as a probability, and they allow one to distinguish two kinds of coarse-graining, leading to reconsidering the motivation for the consistency condition.

  5. ? b ? ? ? + ? ? form factors and differential branching fraction from lattice QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Detmold, William; Lin, C.-J. David; Meinel, Stefan; Wingate, Matthew

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first lattice QCD determination of the ?b?? transition form factors that govern the rare baryonic decays ?b??l?l? at leading order in heavy-quark effective theory. Our calculations are performed with 2+1 flavors of domain-wall fermions, at two lattice spacings and with pion masses down to 227 MeV. Three-point functions with a wide range of source-sink separations are used to extract the ground-state contributions. The form factors are extrapolated to the physical values of the light-quark masses and to the continuum limit. We use our results to calculate the differential branching fractions for ?b??l?l? with l=e, ?, ? within the standard model. We find agreement with a recent CDF measurement of the ?b?????? differential branching fraction.

  6. Central Limit Theorem for Branching Random Walks in Random Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nobuo Yoshida

    2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider branching random walks in $d$-dimensional integer lattice with time-space i.i.d. offspring distributions. When $d \\ge 3$ and the fluctuation of the environment is well moderated by the random walk, we prove a central limit theorem for the density of the population, together with upper bounds for the density of the most populated site and the replica overlap. We also discuss the phase transition of this model in connection with directed polymers in random environment.

  7. What is Nonpoint Source Pollution? Nonpoint Source Pollution, or people pollution, is a contamination of our ground water,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainforth, Emma C.

    , recreational water activities, the fishing industry, tourism and our precious drinking water resources, humans and fish. Do not dump used motor oil down storm drains or on the ground. Recycle all used motor such as fertilizing the lawn, walking pets, changing motor oil and littering. With each rainfall, pollutants generated

  8. The genealogy of branching Brownian motion with absorption by Julien Berestycki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berestycki, Julien

    The genealogy of branching Brownian motion with absorption by Julien Berestycki , Nathana-state branching process. Furthermore, the genealogy of the particles is then governed by a coalescent process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 7.2 Flows describing the genealogy of branching Brownian motion . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 7

  9. Interior-Branch and Bootstrap Tests of Phylogenetic Trees Tatyana Sitnikova, Andrey Rzhetsky, and Masatoshi Nei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nei, Masatoshi

    Interior-Branch and Bootstrap Tests of Phylogenetic Trees Tatyana Sitnikova, Andrey Rzhetsky University We have compared statistical properties of the interior-branch and bootstrap tests of phylogenetic of a predetermined topology, the interior- branch and bootstrap tests provide the confidence values, PC and PB

  10. A BreakEven Formulation for Evaluating Branch Predictor Energy Efficiency #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Co, Michele

    demonstrated that a better branch pre dictor can increase the energyefficiency of the system, even if the new a simple, effective metric for eval uating the tradeoff between processor energyefficiency and branch and an energyefficiency target, we are able to evaluate the energyefficiency of several existing branch

  11. Dimensional Reduction and Crossover to Mean-Field Behavior for Branched Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimensional Reduction and Crossover to Mean-Field Behavior for Branched Polymers John Z. Imbrie will review recent results on dimensional reduction for branched polymers, and discuss implications for critical phenomena. Parisi and Sourlas argued in [PS81] that branched polymers fall into the universal- ity

  12. REU PROJECT ON BRANCH POLYMERS SARA BILLEY, TOM BOOTHBY, MORGAN EICHWALD, AND CHRIS FOX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billey, Sara

    REU PROJECT ON BRANCH POLYMERS SARA BILLEY, TOM BOOTHBY, MORGAN EICHWALD, AND CHRIS FOX 1. A branched polymer of order n in R2 is obtained by plac- ing these disks in the plane in any configuration so at the origin. Branched polymers have been studied in con- nection with molecular chemistry, statistical physics

  13. SURVIVAL PROBABILITY OF THE BRANCHING RANDOM WALK KILLED BELOW A LINEAR BOUNDARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    SURVIVAL PROBABILITY OF THE BRANCHING RANDOM WALK KILLED BELOW A LINEAR BOUNDARY JEAN BERARD, JEAN on the asymptotic behavior of the survival probability of the branching random walk killed below a linear boundary- Derrida theory of stochastic fronts are discussed. 1. Introduction Consider a real-valued branching random

  14. Branching morphogenesis of the lung: new molecular insights into an old

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuang, Pao-Tien

    Branching morphogenesis of the lung: new molecular insights into an old problem Pao-Tien Chuang1 It has been known for decades that branching morpho- genesis of the lung is mediated through reciprocal between major signaling path- ways during branching morphogenesis of the lung in mice. It has been known

  15. A Conceptual Restoration Plan and Tidal Hydrology Assessment for Reconnecting Spring Branch Creek to Suisun Marsh, Solano County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Jessica J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Reconnecting Spring Branch Creek to Suisun Marsh, SolanoFramework CHAPTER 2. SPRING BRANCH CREEK SITE ASSESSMENT 2.1Model for Spring Branch Creek Following Reconnection CHAPTER

  16. A Tidal Hydrology Assessment for Reconnecting Spring Branch Creek to Suisun Marsh, Solano County CA: Predicting the Impact to the Federally Listed Plant Soft Bird's Beak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Jessica J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    population in Spring Branch Creek has experienced decline inand up the Spring Branch Creek gradient on its own. Withor up the Spring Branch Creek gradient is necessary. 12

  17. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Slick Rock, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two UMTRA (Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action) Project sites are near Slick Rock, Colorado: the North Continent site and the Union Carbide site. Currently, no one uses the contaminated ground water at either site for domestic or agricultural purposes. However, there may be future land development. This risk assessment evaluates possible future health problems associated with exposure to contaminated ground water. Since some health problems could occur, it is recommended that the contaminated ground water not be used as drinking water.

  18. The Use of Subsurface Barriers to Support Treatment of Metals and Reduce the Flux of Tritium to Fourmile Branch at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina - 13358

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blount, Gerald; Thibault, Jeffrey; Wells, Leslie [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC, 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC, 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Prater, Phillip [Department of Energy, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Department of Energy, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) produced tritium, plutonium, and special nuclear materials for national defense, medicine, and the space programs. Acidic groundwater plumes containing metals, metallic radionuclides, non-metallic radionuclides and tritium sourced from the F and H Area Seepage Basins have impacted the surface water of Fourmile Branch on SRS. Tritium releases from Fourmile Branch have impacted the water quality within areas of the Savannah River adjacent to the SRS, and this circumstance has been an ongoing regulatory concern. The F and H Area Seepage Basins operated until 1988 for the disposition of deionized acidic waste water from the F and H Separations Facilities. The waste water contained dilute nitric acid and low concentrations of non-radioactive metals, and radionuclides, with the major isotopes being Cs-137, Sr-90, U-235, U-238, Pu-239, Tc-99, I-129, and tritium. The tritium concentration in the waste water was relatively elevated because there is not a practicable removal method in water. The acid content of the waste water during the operational period of the basins was equal to 12 billion liters of nitric acid. The seepage basins were closed in 1988 and backfilled and capped by 1991. The plumes associated with the F and H basins cover an area of nearly 2.4 square kilometers (600 acres) and discharge along ?2,600 meters of Fourmile Branch. The acidic nature of the plumes and their overall discharge extent along the branch represent a large challenge with respect to reducing contaminant flux to Fourmile Branch. The introduction of nitric acid into the groundwater over a long time effectively reduced the retardation of metal migration from the basins to the groundwater and in the groundwater to Fourmile Branch, because most negatively charged surfaces on the aquifer materials were filled with hydrogen ion. Two large pump and treat systems were constructed in 1997 and operated until 2003 in an attempt to capture and control the releases to Fourmile Branch. The operating cost, including waste disposal, for the two systems was ?$1.3 M/month. Both systems employed reinjection of tritiated water up gradient of the extraction, and produced large quantities of waste from non-tritium isotopes and metals removal prior to reinjection. Both systems were determined to be ineffective and potentially detrimental with respect to limiting the flux of contaminants to Fourmile Branch. After it became apparent that there was very little benefit to continued operation of the systems, and the staggering cost of operations was recognized by the SRS and regulators, a new remedy was developed. The new system uses vertical subsurface barriers to redirect groundwater flow to limit the transport of contaminants to the stream. The barriers were constructed of acid resistant grout using deep soil mixing techniques. The grout mixture used low swelling clay, fly ash, and sodium hydroxide to form a pozzolana material with low permeability and low strength. The SRS and regulators agreed to a series of remedial goals, with the first goal to reduce tritium flux to the stream by 70% and bring constituents other than tritium to groundwater protection standards. (authors)

  19. Low-mass evolution from HE ignition to beyond the horizontal branch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Despain, K.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The evolution of an 0.6 M/sub solar mass/ stellar model during core helium burning is presented. Following the off-center ignition of helium in the core flash, the star remains on the red giant branch for > 10/sup 6/ years, undergoing twelve additional flashes. After leaving the giant branch, the star evolves on the horizontal branch for 8.15 x 10/sup 7/ years before returning to the giant branch and undergoing strong helium-shell flashes. The implications for horizontal branch and RR Lyrae stars are discussed.

  20. Operational restoration of the Pen Branch bottomland hardwood and swamp wetlands - the research setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, E.A.

    2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Swamp is a 3020 Ha forested wetland on the floodplain of the Savannah River and is located on the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC. Historically the swamp consisted of approximately 50 percent bald cypress-water tupelo stands, 40 percent mixed bottomland hardwood stands, and 10 percent shrub, marsh, and open water. Creek corridors were typical of Southeastern bottomland hardwood forests. The hydrology was controlled by flooding of the Savannah River and by flow from four creeks that drain into the swamp prior to flow into the Savannah River. Upstream dams have caused some alteration of the water levels and timing of flooding within the floodplain. Major impacts to the swamp hydrology occurred with the completion of the production reactors and one coal-fired powerhouse at the SRS in the early 1950's. Water was pumped from the Savannah River, through secondary heat exchangers of the reactors, and discharged into three of the tributary streams that flow into the swamp. Flow in one of the tributaries, Pen Branch, was typically 0.3 m3 s-1 (10-20) cfs prior to reactor pumping and 11.0 m3 s-1 (400 cfs) during pumping. This continued from 1954 to 1988 at various levels. The sustained increases in water volume resulted in overflow of the original stream banks and the creation of additional floodplains. Accompanying this was considerable erosion of the original stream corridor and deposition of a deep silt layer on the newly formed delta. Heated water was discharged directly into Pen Branch and water temperature in the stream often exceeded 65 degrees C. The nearly continuous flooding of the swamp, the thermal load of the water, and the heavy silting resulted in complete mortality of the original vegetation in large areas of the floodplain. In the years since pumping was reduced, early succession has begun in some affected areas. Most of this has been herbs, grasses, and shrubs. Areas that have seedlings are generally willow thickets that support a lower diversity of wildlife. No volunteer seedlings of heavy-seeded hardwoods or cypress have been found in the corridor areas. Research was conducted to determine methods to reintroduce tree species characteristic of more mature forested wetlands. Three restoration strategies were formulated to deal with the differing conditions of the Upper Corridor, the Lower Corridor, and the Delta regions of the impacted area. Site preparation and planting of each area with mixtures of tree species were carried out to speed the restoration of the ecosystem. Species composition and selection were altered based on the current and expected hydrological regimes that the reforestation areas will be experiencing. Because of the operational design of the restoration project, a research program naturally followed to document the success. Many of those efforts are detailed here.

  1. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

  2. HARBOR BRANCH OCEANOGRAPHIC INSTITUTE AT FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    with an automated forced air ventilation system for heat control during summer and propane fired heaters meter, a gas tensionometer, YSI multiprobe meter, nine YSI 5200 water quality monitor and control, water baths, analytical balances, pH meters, and distilled R/O water · Analytical equipment includes

  3. Field studies of streamflow generation using natural and injected tracers on Bickford and Walker Branch Watersheds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genereux, D.; Hemond, H. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Mulholland, P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field studies of streamflow generation were undertaken on two forested watersheds, the West Road subcatchment of Bickford Watershed in central Massachusetts and the West Fork of Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee. A major component of the research was development of a two-stage methodology for the use of naturally-occurring {sup 222}Rn as a tracer. The first of the two stages was solving a mass-balance equation for {sup 222}Rn around a stream reach of interest in order to calculate Rn{sub q}, the {sup 222}Rn content of the lateral inflow to the reach; a conservative tracer (chloride) and a volatile tracer (propane) were injected into the study stream to account for lateral inflow to, and volatilization from, the study reach. The second stage involved quantitative comparison of Rn{sub q} to the measured {sup 222}Rn concentrations of different subsurface waters in order to assess how important these waters were in contributing lateral inflow to the stream reach.

  4. An algorithm for solving branching, multi-stage optimization systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Jack Patton

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    August 1972 ABSTRACT An Algor1thm For Solv1ng Branching, Multistage Optimization Systems. (August, 1972) Jack Patton Burns, B. S. , University of Arizona; B. S. , Texas A&M Un1versity Directed by: Dr. Wilbur L. Meier In recent years, the concern... or continuous and the stage returns and transition functions can be linear or nonlinear. For cont1nuous systems, the algorithm uses a Fibonacc1 search routine. A cho1ce of three optional outputs 1s available depending on the information des1red by the user...

  5. Farmers Branch, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania: EnergyExolisFairway, Kansas:Maine:FarinelloBranch, Texas:

  6. Hawaii Department of Health Clean Air Branch Webpage | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| OpenInformationHartsville,NewOpenInformation Clean Air Branch

  7. Results of a baseflow tritium survey of surface water in Georgia across from the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, R.L.

    1993-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In October 1991 the Georgia Department of Natural Resources (GDNR) issued a press release notifying the public that tritium had been measured in elevated levels (1,200 - 1,500 pCi/1) in water samples collected from drinking water wells in Georgia across from the Savannah River Site in Aiken Co. South Carolina. None of the elevated results were above the Primary Drinking Water Standard for tritium of 20,000 pCi/l. The GDNR initiated 2 surveys to determine the source and extent of elevated tritium: (1) baseflow survey of surface water quality, and (2) well evaluation program. Results from the 2 surveys indicate that the tritium measured in groundwater wells in Georgia is not the result of a groundwater flow from South Carolina under the Savannah River and into Georgia. Atmospheric transport and consequent rainout and infiltration has resulted in an increase of tritium in the water-table aquifer in the vicinity. Water samples collected from drinking water wells believed to have been installed in the aquifer beneath the water-table aquifer were actually from the shallower water-table aquifer. Water samples collected from the wells contain the amount of tritium expected for the water-table aquifer in the sample area. The measured tritium levels in the well samples and baseflow samples do not exceed Primary Drinking Water Standards. Tritium levels in the water-table in Georgia will decline as the atmospheric releases from SRS decline, tritium undergoes natural decay, and infiltration water with less tritium flushes through the subsurface.

  8. North Branch Municipal Water and Light- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency ([http://www.smmpa.com SMMPA]) is a joint-action agency which generates and sells reliable electricity at wholesale to its eighteen non-profit, municipally...

  9. Surface branch of the hydrologic cycle affecting Texas for water year 1959

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gargiulo, Alphonse, Jr

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to that of precipitation, the assumptions do not materially affect, balance computations. Approxi- mately 28 per cent of the average annual precipitation recorded for the United States is carried to the oceans by streams (25). Eva oration and Eva otrans iration... stations. Eva otrans iration. Since the size of Texas and the period of concern are considered to meet the criteria stated by Benton (1), values of evapotranspiration were determined from the values of (E-P), obtained from McKay (11) from L2j...

  10. North Branch Municipal Water and Light- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency ([http://www.smmpa.com SMMPA]) is a joint-action agency which generates and sells reliable electricity at wholesale to its eighteen non-profit,...

  11. The Factors of Chronic Kidney Disease: Diabetes, Hypertension, Smoking, Drinking, Betelnut Chewing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chaur-Chin

    The Factors of Chronic Kidney Disease: Diabetes, Hypertension, Smoking, Drinking, Betelnut Chewing CKD 75 CKD Abstract The risk factors of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), including diabetes risk factors in a population-based cohort. Compared with single risk factors, diabetes (odds ratio 1

  12. THE ASTRONOMER'S DRINKING SONG. "Whoe'er would search the starry sky,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrington, J. Patrick

    , Should take his glass | I mean, should try A glass or two of wine, sir! True virtue lies in golden mean, And man must wet his clay, sir, Join these two maxims, and 'tis seen He should drink his bottle a day, sir he our modern secret known, And drank a bottle a day, sir! "When Ptolemy, now long ago, Believed

  13. Advanced Branching Control and Characterization of Inorganic Semiconducting Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Steven Michael

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to finely tune the size and shape of inorganic semiconducting nanocrystals is an area of great interest, as the more control one has, the more applications will be possible for their use. The first two basic shapes develped in nanocrystals were the sphere and the anistropic nanorod. the II_VI materials being used such as Cadmium Selenide (CdSe) and Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), exhibit polytypism, which allows them to form in either the hexagonally packed wurtzite or cubically packed zinc blende crystalline phase. The nanorods are wurtzite with the length of the rod growing along the c-axis. As this grows, stacking faults may form, which are layers of zinc blende in the otherwise wurtzite crystal. Using this polytypism, though, the first generation of branched crystals were developed in the form of the CdTe tetrapod. This is a nanocrystal that nucleates in the zincblend form, creating a tetrahedral core, on which four wurtzite arms are grown. This structure opened up the possibility of even more complex shapes and applications. This disseration investigates the advancement of branching control and further understanding the materials polytypism in the form of the stacking faults in nanorods.

  14. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  15. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  16. Arcing fault in sub-distribution branch circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parise, G.; Grasseli, U.; Luozzo, V. Di (Univ. di Roma, Rome (Italy). Dept. di Ingegneria Elettrica)

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It's well known the importance of short-circuit current evaluation for the design of any power system. Every system is subject to faults, moreover short-circuits and ground faults can be expected in any point. Even if the maximum and minimum values are generally defined with reference at a bolted-fault, bolted short-circuits are rare and the fault usually involves arcing and burning; particularly the limit value of minimum short-circuit depends really on arcing-fault. In earlier experimental investigations into the functional simulation of insulation loss, in branch circuit conductors, the authors chose to normalize the arcing-fault simulation to be used in laboratory tests. This conventional simulation allows characterization of this intrinsically random phenomenon by means of a probabilistic approach, in order to define in statistical terms the expected short circuit value. The authors examine more closely the arcing-fault in the design of sub distribution branch-circuits as weak points of the installation. In fact, what they propose are straightforward criteria, whether in the structure of the system or in the coordination of protection, which afford a more rational control on arcing-fault.

  17. TERZAN 5: AN ALTERNATIVE INTERPRETATION FOR THE SPLIT HORIZONTAL BRANCH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Antona, F.; Ventura, P.; Carini, R.; Di Criscienzo, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio (Italy); Caloi, V. [INAF-IASF-Roma, via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); D'Ercole, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Vesperini, E. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the horizontal branch (HB) of the globular cluster Terzan 5, recently shown to be split into two parts, the fainter one ({delta}M{sub K} {approx} 0.3 mag) having a lower metallicity than the more luminous. Both features show that it contains at least two stellar populations. The separation in magnitude has been ascribed to an age difference of {approx}6 Gyr and interpreted as the result of an atypical evolutionary history for this cluster. We show that the observed HB morphology is also consistent with a model in which the bright HB is composed of second generation stars that are metal enriched and with a helium mass fraction larger (by {delta}Y {approx} 0.07) than that of first generation stars populating the fainter part of the HB. Terzan 5 would therefore be anomalous, compared to most 'normal' clusters hosting multiple populations, only because its second generation is strongly contaminated by supernova ejecta; the previously proposed prolonged period of star formation, however, is not required. The iron enrichment of the bright HB can be ascribed either to contamination from Type Ia supernova ejecta of the low-iron, helium-rich, ejecta of the massive asymptotic giant branch stars of the cluster, or to its mixing with gas, accreting on the cluster from the environment, that has been subject to fast metal enrichment due to its proximity with the galactic bulge. The model proposed here requires only a small age difference of {approx}100 Myr.

  18. A Daily Time Series Analysis of Stream Water Phosphorus Concentrations Along an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brett, Michael T.

    , and coastal area eutrophication in the United States (NRC 1992; USEPA 1996; Carpenter and others 1998 eutrophication (Vollenweider 1976; Schindler 1977; Edmondson 1994). Increased nutrient inputs can stimulate with eutrophication, can also cause taste and odor problems in drinking water supplies (Falconer 1999), and toxins

  19. Temperature-dependent leaching of chemical elements from mineral water bottle materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    t It is well established that minute amounts of chemical elements will leach from bottle materials (glass leach- ing increases with storage temperature. For glass bottles this is clearly the case for a long, Sb, Se, Sn, Sr, Ti, U, V, W and Zr. However, for glass bottles drinking water maximum admissible

  20. Reduced pressure and temperature reclamation of water using the GE Integrated Water-waste Management System for potential space flight application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chowdhury, Hasan Imtiaz

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of reclaiming high quality drinking water and maintaining it in a, sterile condition without the use of bactericide. The prototype hardware has been shown to be applicable for water reclamation. The primary objective of this investigation was to optimize..., development of regenerative life support system (RLSS) technology for space applications was in progress. Following the Apollo Program, NASA priorities shifted to the Shuttle Program and much of the research and development on RLSS technology was curtailed...

  1. Branching Restrictions, Financial Market Integration, and Firm Growth: Evidence from U.S. Banking Deregulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamurthy, Prasad

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calomiris, Charles, U.S. Banking Deregulation in HistoricalEvidence From Bank Branch Deregulation," Quarterly JournalStrahan, \\What Drives Deregulation: Economics and Politics

  2. A Branch and Price Approach to the k-Clustering Minimum Biclique ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    aDipartimento di Matematica, Universit`a degli Studi di Pavia, Via Ferrata 1, 27100, ... work by developing a Branch and Price algorithm that embeds a new...

  3. Electrodeposition of InSb branched nanowires: Controlled growth with structurally tailored properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Suprem R.; Mohammad, Asaduzzaman; Janes, David B., E-mail: janes@ecn.purdue.edu [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Akatay, Cem [School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Khan, Mohammad Ryyan; Alam, Muhammad A. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Maeda, Kosuke [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsutacho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Advanced Device Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Deacon, Russell S.; Ishibashi, Koji [Advanced Device Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Chen, Yong P. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Sands, Timothy D. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, electrodeposition method is used to demonstrate growth of InSb nanowire (NW) arrays with hierarchical branched structures and complex morphology at room temperature using an all-solution, catalyst-free technique. A gold coated, porous anodic alumina membrane provided the template for the branched NWs. The NWs have a hierarchical branched structure, with three nominal regions: a trunk (average diameter of 150?nm), large branches (average diameter of 100?nm), and small branches (average diameter of sub-10?nm to sub-20?nm). The structural properties of the branched NWs were studied using scanning transmission electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. In the as-grown state, the small branches of InSb NWs were crystalline, but the trunk regions were mostly nanocrystalline with an amorphous boundary. Post-annealing of NWs at 420?C in argon produced single crystalline structures along ?311? directions for the branches and along ?111? for the trunks. Based on the high crystallinity and tailored structure in this branched NW array, the effective refractive index allows us to achieve excellent antireflection properties signifying its technological usefulness for photon management and energy harvesting.

  4. Localization for Branching Random Walks in Random Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yueyun Hu; Nobuo Yoshida

    2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider branching random walks in $d$-dimensional integer lattice with time-space i.i.d. offspring distributions. This model is known to exhibit a phase transition: If $d \\ge 3$ and the environment is "not too random", then, the total population grows as fast as its expectation with strictly positive probability. If,on the other hand, $d \\le 2$, or the environment is ``random enough", then the total population grows strictly slower than its expectation almost surely. We show the equivalence between the slow population growth and a natural localization property in terms of "replica overlap". We also prove a certain stronger localization property, whenever the total population grows strictly slower than its expectation almost surely.

  5. Oscillating side-branch enhancements of thermoacoustic heat exchangers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swift, Gregory W.

    2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A regenerator-based engine or refrigerator has a regenerator with two ends at two different temperatures, through which a gas oscillates at a first oscillating volumetric flow rate in the direction between the two ends and in which the pressure of the gas oscillates, and first and second heat exchangers, each of which is at one of the two different temperatures. A dead-end side branch into which the gas oscillates has compliance and is connected adjacent to one of the ends of the regenerator to form a second oscillating gas flow rate additive with the first oscillating volumetric flow rate, the compliance having a volume effective to provide a selected total oscillating gas volumetric flow rate through the first heat exchanger. This configuration enables the first heat exchanger to be configured and located to better enhance the performance of the heat exchanger rather than being confined to the location and configuration of the regenerator.

  6. Q-branch Raman scattering and modern kinetic thoery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monchick, L. [The Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The program is an extension of previous APL work whose general aim was to calculate line shapes of nearly resonant isolated line transitions with solutions of a popular quantum kinetic equation-the Waldmann-Snider equation-using well known advanced solution techniques developed for the classical Boltzmann equation. The advanced techniques explored have been a BGK type approximation, which is termed the Generalized Hess Method (GHM), and conversion of the collision operator to a block diagonal matrix of symmetric collision kernels which then can be approximated by discrete ordinate methods. The latter method, which is termed the Collision Kernel method (CC), is capable of the highest accuracy and has been used quite successfully for Q-branch Raman scattering. The GHM method, not quite as accurate, is applicable over a wider range of pressures and has proven quite useful.

  7. Pen Branch stream corridor and Delta Wetlands change assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blohm, J.D.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne multispectral scanner data from 1987 to 1991 covering the Pen Branch corridor and delta at SRS were utilized to provide a detailed change detection analysis. The multispectral data were geo-referenced to a Universal Transverse Mercator projection using finite element registration. Each year was then classified into eleven different landcover categories, and the yearly changes in each landcover category were analyzed. The decrease in operations of K Reactor in 1988 has resulted in drying of the corridor and delta. This has led to the decline of nonpersistent vegetation and the increase of persistent vegetation. Cattails, willow, and bottomland hardwoods, in particular, have grown to dominate the corridor and most of the delta.

  8. Turbid water Clear water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaffe, Jules

    : The submersible laser bathymetric (LBath) optical system is capable of simultaneously providing visual images- dynamical wing. This underwater package is pulled through the water by a single towed cable with fiber optic special high energy density optical fibers. A remote Pentium based PC also at the surface is used

  9. Water Intoxication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lingampalli, Nithya

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008, May 14). Too much water raises seizure risk in babies.id=4844 9. Schoenly, Lorry. Water Intoxication and Inmates:article/246650- overview>. 13. Water intoxication alert. (

  10. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of desalination research. The primary technological method of generating additional water supplies is through desalination and enhanced water reuse and recycling technologies....

  11. Water Efficiency

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water Efficiency Hosted by: FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR November 5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral, Florida WATER EFFICIENCY Federal Utility Partnership Working Group...

  12. New antineutrino energy spectra predictions from the summation of beta decay branches of the fission products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Fallot; S. Cormon; M. Estienne; A. Algora; V. M. Bui; A. Cucoanes; M. Elnimr; L. Giot; D. Jordan; J. Martino; A. Onillon; A. Porta; G. Pronost; A. Remoto; J. L. Tan; F. Yermia; A. -A. Zakari-Issoufou

    2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we study the impact of the inclusion of the recently measured beta decay properties of the $^{102;104;105;106;107}$Tc, $^{105}$Mo, and $^{101}$Nb nuclei in an updated calculation of the antineutrino energy spectra of the four fissible isotopes $^{235, 238}$U, and $^{239,241}$Pu. These actinides are the main contributors to the fission processes in Pressurized Water Reactors. The beta feeding probabilities of the above-mentioned Tc, Mo and Nb isotopes have been found to play a major role in the $\\gamma$ component of the decay heat of $^{239}$Pu, solving a large part of the $\\gamma$ discrepancy in the 4 to 3000\\,s range. They have been measured using the Total Absorption Technique (TAS), avoiding the Pandemonium effect. The calculations are performed using the information available nowadays in the nuclear databases, summing all the contributions of the beta decay branches of the fission products. Our results provide a new prediction of the antineutrino energy spectra of $^{235}$U, $^{239,241}$Pu and in particular of $^{238}$U for which no measurement has been published yet. We conclude that new TAS measurements are mandatory to improve the reliability of the predicted spectra.

  13. Addresses and business hours of Rabobank Eindhoven-Veldhoven Branch Witte Dame (Emmasingel 4), Eindhoven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franssen, Michael

    Addresses and business hours of Rabobank Eindhoven-Veldhoven Branch Witte Dame (Emmasingel 4), Eindhoven Monday: 12.00 17.00 hrs Tuesday till Thursday: 09.30 17.00 hrs Friday: 09.30 18.00 hrs Saturday 10.00 13.00 hrs Branch Winkelcentrum Woensel 400, Eindhoven Monday: 12.00 17.00 hrs Tuesday

  14. Predicting Extinction or Explosion in a Galton-Watson Branching Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    sizes of an endangered species whose survival is deemed essential. Case 2. Extinction is undesirablePredicting Extinction or Explosion in a Galton-Watson Branching Process Peter Guttorp and Michael D generations of a discrete- parameter Galton-Watson branching process, one wishes to predict whether extinction

  15. Div ision of T echnology, Industry & Economics Energy Branch Deploying renewable energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Lonie

    Div ision of T echnology, Industry & Economics Energy Branch Deploying renewable energy, Industry & Economics Energy Branch 1. Policy landscape 2. Helping transition to Renewable Energy 3 governments are promoting renewable energy. Renewable energy Policy Landscape #12;Div ision of T echnology

  16. Recovery of Free Energy Branches in Single Molecule Experiments Ivan Junier,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritort, Felix

    Recovery of Free Energy Branches in Single Molecule Experiments Ivan Junier,1 Alessandro Mossa,2 19 February 2009) We present a method for determining the free energy of coexisting states from use optical tweezers to determine the free energy branches of the native and unfolded states of a two

  17. A Branch and Bound Algorithm for the Protein Folding Problem in the HP Lattice Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Istrail, Sorin

    Article A Branch and Bound Algorithm for the Protein Folding Problem in the HP Lattice Model Mao tool for the protein folding problem. Key words: protein folding, HP model, branch and bound, lattice Introduction The protein folding problem, or the protein struc- ture prediction problem, is one of the most

  18. Eciency of the Incomplete Enumeration algorithm for Monte-Carlo simulation of linear and branched polymers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhar, Deepak

    polymers. Sumedha #3; and Deepak Dhar y Department Of Theoretical Physics Tata Institute Of Fundamental algorithm for linear and branched polymers. There is a qualitative di#11;erence in the eciency in these two for linear polymers, but as exp(cn #11; ) for branched (undirected and directed) polymers, where 0

  19. Applying Decay Strategies to Branch Predictors for Leakage Energy Savings Zhigang Hu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martonosi, Margaret

    Applying Decay Strategies to Branch Predictors for Leakage Energy Savings Zhigang HuÝ Philo Juang@cs.virginia.edu doug@cs.princeton.edu Abstract With technology advancing toward deep submicron, leak- age energy--already shown to reduce leakage energy for caches--to branch-prediction structures. Due to the structural

  20. M. Shepherd et al.Branch architecture QTL for pine hybrids Original article

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    M. Shepherd et al.Branch architecture QTL for pine hybrids Original article Branch architecture QTL Crossa , Mark J. Dietersb and Robert Henrya a Cooperative Research Centre for Sustainable Production, Australia b Cooperative Research Centre for Sustainable Production Forestry, Queensland Forestry Research

  1. A NEW VALUE BASED BRANCH PREDICTOR FOR SMT PROCESSORS LIQIANG HE and ZHIYONG LIU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vintan, Lucian N.

    A NEW VALUE BASED BRANCH PREDICTOR FOR SMT PROCESSORS LIQIANG HE and ZHIYONG LIU Institute@ict.ac.cn and zliu@nsfc.gov.cn ABSTRACT Simultaneous Multithreaded (SMT) processors improve the instruction important role in improving the performance of an SMT processor. Although the existing branch predictors

  2. Process Switches and Branch Prediction Accuracy David Chen, Bennett Lau, Jeffrey Shafer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rixner, Scott

    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Rice University Abstract There were several hypotheses to "repair" the destructive aliasing in the branch history table after a process switch, both combine by [9], is central to this research project. Analogous to memory caches, aliasing in branch prediction

  3. Fluid transport in branched structures with temporary closures: A model for quasistatic lung inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alencar, Adriano Mesquita

    Fluid transport in branched structures with temporary closures: A model for quasistatic lung a model system relevant to the inflation of a mammalian lung, an asymmetric bifurcating structure description of the underlying branching structure of the lung, by analyzing experimental pressure-volume data

  4. Sox9 plays multiple roles in the lung epithelium during branching morphogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sander, Maike

    Sox9 plays multiple roles in the lung epithelium during branching morphogenesis Briana E. Rockicha, Durham, NC, and approved October 2, 2013 (received for review June 21, 2013) Lung branching morphogenesis lung. Intricate regulation of signaling pathways, tran- scription factors, and epithelial

  5. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the temperature of the residual water encountered by theof hot water and the residual water might occur: (1) thehot water might drive the residual water through the piping

  6. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation Water Heaters and Hot Water DistributionLaboratory). 2008. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distributionfor instantaneous gas water heaters; and pressure loss

  7. Forest Irrigation of Tritiated Water: A Proven Tritiated Water Management Tool - 13357

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prater, Phil; Blount, Gerald; Kmetz, Thomas; Vangelas, Karen [Savannah River National Laboratory, Bldg. 773-42A, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Bldg. 773-42A, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tritium releases from the Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground (ORWBG) at the SRS in South Carolina has impacted groundwater and surface water. Tritiated groundwater plumes discharge into Fourmile Branch which is a small tributary of the Savannah River, a regional water resource. Taking advantage of the groundwater flow paths and the local topography a water collection and irrigation system was constructed and has been used at the SRS for over a decade to reduce these tritiated water releases to Fourmile Branch. The tritiated water is transferred to the atmosphere by evaporation from the pond surface, and after irrigation, wetted surface evaporation and evapotranspiration through the forest vegetation. Over the last decade SRS has irrigated over 120,000,000 gallons of tritiated water, which diverted over 6000 curies away from Fourmile Branch and the Savannah River. The system has been effective in reducing the flux of tritiated groundwater by approximately 70%. Mass balance studies of tritium in the forest soils before operations and over the last decade indicate that approximately 90% of the tritiated water that is irrigated is transferred to the atmosphere. Dose studies indicate that exposure to site workers and offsite maximally exposed individual is very low, approximately 6 mrem/year and 0.004 mrem/year, respectively. To consistently meet the flux reduction goal of tritium into Fourmile Branch optimization activities are proposed. These efforts will increase irrigation capacity and area. An additional 17 acres are proposed for an expansion of the area to be irrigated and a planting of approximately 40 acres of pine forest plantations is underway to expand irrigation capacity. Co-mingled with the tritiated groundwater are low concentrations of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (cVOCs), and 1,4-dioxane. Research studies and SRS field data indicate the forest irrigation system may have an added benefit of reducing the mass of these co-contaminants via degradation. This semi-passive system makes use of natural processes of hydrology and evapotranspiration to manage tritium-contaminated water by reducing its entrance into site streams and the Savannah River, as well as treating low levels of co-mingled VOCs. SRS expects to operate the system until the tritium decays to levels that represent a minimal impact to Fourmile Branch and the Savannah River, and meets the stakeholder expectations. (authors)

  8. Forest Irrigation Of Tritiated Water: A Proven Tritiated Water Management Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vangelas, Karen; Blount, Gerald; Kmetz, Thomas; Prater, Phil

    2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Tritium releases from the Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground (ORWBG) at the SRS in South Carolina has impacted groundwater and surface water. Tritiated groundwater plumes discharge into Fourmile Branch which is a small tributary of the Savannah River, a regional water resource. Taking advantage of the groundwater flow paths and the local topography a water collection and irrigation system was constructed and has been used at the SRS for over a decade to reduce these tritiated water releases to Fourmile Branch. The tritiated water is transferred to the atmosphere by evaporation from the pond surface, and after irrigation, wetted surface evaporation and evapotranspiration through the forest vegetation. Over the last decade SRS has irrigated over 120,000,000 gallons of tritiated water, which diverted over 6000 curies away from Fourmile Branch and the Savannah River. The system has been effective in reducing the flux of tritiated groundwater by approximately 70%. Mass balance studies of tritium in the forest soils before operations and over the last decade indicate that approximately 90% of the tritiated water that is irrigated is transferred to the atmosphere. Dose studies indicate that exposure to site workers and offsite maximally exposed individual is very low, approximately 6 mrem/year and 0.004 mrem/year, respectively. To consistently meet the flux reduction goal of tritium into Fourmile Branch optimization activities are proposed. These efforts will increase irrigation capacity and area. An additional 17 acres are proposed for an expansion of the area to be irrigated and a planting of approximately 40 acres of pine forest plantations is underway to expand irrigation capacity. Co-mingled with the tritiated groundwater are low concentrations of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (cVOCs), and 1,4-dioxane. Research studies and SRS field data indicate the forest irrigation system may have an added benefit of reducing the mass of these co-contaminants via degradation. This semi-passive system makes use of natural processes of hydrology and evapotranspiration to manage tritium-contaminated water by reducing its entrance into site streams and the Savannah River, as well as treating low levels of co-mingled VOCs. SRS expects to operate the system until the tritium decays to levels that represent a minimal impact to Fourmile Branch and the Savannah River, and meets the stakeholder expectations.

  9. Defining the Termination of the Asymptotic Giant Branch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noam Soker

    2007-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    I suggest a theoretical quantitative definition for the termination of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase and the beginning of the post-AGB phase. I suggest that the transition will be taken to occur when the ratio of the dynamical time scale to the the envelope thermal time scale, Q, reaches its maximum value. Time average values are used for the different quantities, as the criterion does not refer to the short time-scale variations occurring on the AGB and post-AGB, e.g., thermal pulses (helium shell flashes) and magnetic activity. Along the entire AGB the value of Q increases, even when the star starts to contract. Only when a rapid contraction starts does the value of Q start to decrease. This criterion captures the essence of the transition from the AGB to the post AGB phase, because Q is connected to the stellar effective temperature, reaching its maximum value at T~4000-6000 K, it is related to the mass loss properties, and it reaches its maximum value when rapid contraction starts and envelope mass is very low.

  10. VOL. 32, No.4 UNL WATER CENTER AUGUST 2000 New Method For Detecting Trace Amounts of MTBE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    of MTBE and Ethanol at Heart ofUNL Contamination Research with ethanol, which also reduces harmful vehicle "Although ethanol is the same alcohol consumed in contaminate the water we drink. But they can be diffi have cern that ethanol could negatively impact the ability of developed a method for detecting minute

  11. Pathways of inflow and dispersion of warm waters in the Nordic seas T. Rossby,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; these regions have a distinct east-west organization with cold Arctic waters all along the east coast and spreading of warm North Atlantic waters entering the Norwegian Sea between Iceland and the Faroes the Iceland-Faroe Front, but rather than continue north with the outer branch of the Norwegian Atlantic

  12. Water quality effects of tire chip fills placed above the groundwater table

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humphrey, D.N.; Katz, L.E. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Blumenthal, M. [Scrap Tire Management Council, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Two field trials were constructed to investigate the effect on water quality of tire chip fills placed above the groundwater table. Control wells were used to distinguish the substances naturally present in groundwater from those that leached from tire chips. There was no evidence that tire chips increased the level of substances that have a primary drinking water standard. In addition, there was no evidence that tire chips increased the levels of aluminum, zinc, chloride or sulfate which have secondary (aesthetic) drinking water standards. Under some conditions iron levels may exceed their secondary standard. It is likely that manganese levels will exceed their secondary standard, however, manganese is naturally present in groundwater in many areas. Two sets of samples were tested for organics. Results were below the method detection limit for all compounds.

  13. Distribution and origin of ethyl-branched alkanes in a Cenomanian transgressive shale of the Western Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenig, Fabien

    Note Distribution and origin of ethyl-branched alkanes in a Cenomanian transgressive shale hydrocarbon fraction of the basal Graneros Shale (Cenomanian, Western Interior Seaway, USA). On the basis rights reserved. Keywords: Monoethylalkanes; Branched alkanes; Black shales; Cenomanian; Graneros Shale

  14. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Source Water Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sehlke, G.

    2003-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) covers approximately 890 square miles and includes 12 public water systems that must be evaluated for Source water protection purposes under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Because of its size and location, six watersheds and five aquifers could potentially affect the INEEL's drinking water sources. Based on a preliminary evaluation of the available information, it was determined that the Big Lost River, Birch Creek, and Little Lost River Watersheds and the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer needed to be assessed. These watersheds were delineated using the United States Geologic Survey's Hydrological Unit scheme. Well capture zones were originally estimated using the RESSQC module of the Environmental Protection Agency's Well Head Protection Area model, and the initial modeling assumptions and results were checked by running several scenarios using Modflow modeling. After a technical review, the resulting capture zones were expanded to account for the uncertainties associated with changing groundwater flow directions, a this vadose zone, and other data uncertainties. Finally, all well capture zones at a given facility were merged to a single wellhead protection area at each facility. A contaminant source inventory was conducted, and the results were integrated with the well capture zones, watershed and aquifer information, and facility information using geographic information system technology to complete the INEEL's Source Water Assessment. Of the INEEL's 12 public water systems, three systems rated as low susceptibility (EBR-1, Main Gate, and Gun Range), and the remainder rated as moderate susceptibility. No INEEL public water system rated as high susceptibility. We are using this information to develop a source water management plan from which we will subsequently implement an INEEL-wide source water management program. The results are a very robust set of wellhead protection areas that will protect the INEEL's public water systems yet not too conservative to inhibit the INEEL from carrying out its missions.

  15. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Shiprock, New Mexico. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment at the former uranium mill tailings site near Shiprock, New Mexico, evaluates the potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an on-site disposal cell in 1986 through the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. There are no domestic or drinking water wells in the contaminated ground water of the two distinct ground water units: the contaminated ground water in the San Juan River floodplain alluvium below the site and the contaminated ground water in the terrace alluvium area where the disposal cell is located. Because no one is drinking the affected ground water, there are currently no health or environmental risks directly associated with the contaminated ground water. However, there is a potential for humans, domestic animals, and wildlife to the exposed to surface expressions of ground water in the seeps and pools in the area of the San Juan River floodplain below the site. For these reasons, this risk assessment evaluates potential exposure to contaminated surface water and seeps as well as potential future use of contaminated ground water.

  16. Proposal for the award of a contract for the provision of maintenance services for CERN's telephone branch exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal for the award of a contract for the provision of maintenance services for CERN's telephone branch exchange

  17. Chemoembolization Via Branches from the Splenic Artery in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Jin Woo; Kim, Hyo-Cheol, E-mail: angiointervention@gmail.com; Chung, Jin Wook; Kim, Ji Dae; Kim, Gyoung Min; Lee, In Joon; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the radiologic findings and imaging response of chemoembolization via branches of the splenic artery in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods: From January 2001 to July 2010, we observed tumor staining supplied by branches of the splenic artery in 34 (0.6%) of 5,413 patients with HCC. Computed tomography (CT) scans and digital subtraction angiograms of these patients were retrospectively reviewed in consensus by two investigators. Results: A total of 39 tumor feeding-vessels in 34 patients were identified: omental branches from the left gastroepiploic artery (n = 5), branches from the short gastric artery (n = 9), and omental branches directly from the splenic artery (n = 25). Branches of the splenic artery that supplied tumors were revealed on the celiac angiogram in 29 (85%) of 34 patients and were detected on pre-procedure CT images in 27 (79%) of 34 patients. Selective chemoembolization was achieved in 38 of 39 tumor-feeding vessels. Complete or partial response of the tumor fed by branches of the splenic artery, as depicted on follow-up CT scans, was achieved in 21 (62%) patients. No patient developed severe complications directly related to chemoembolization via branches of the splenic artery. Conclusions: Omental branches directly from the splenic artery are common tumor-feeding vessels of the splenic artery in cases of advanced HCC with multiple previous chemoembolizations. Tumor-feeding vessels of the splenic artery are usually visualized on the celiac angiogram or CT scan, and chemoembolization through them can be safely performed in most patients.

  18. Method of arsenic removal from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gadgil, Ashok (El Cerrito, CA)

    2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for low-cost arsenic removal from drinking water using chemically prepared bottom ash pre-treated with ferrous sulfate and then sodium hydroxide. Deposits on the surface of particles of bottom ash form of activated iron adsorbent with a high affinity for arsenic. In laboratory tests, a miniscule 5 grams of pre-treated bottom ash was sufficient to remove the arsenic from 2 liters of 2400 ppb (parts per billion) arsenic-laden water to a level below 50 ppb (the present United States Environmental Protection Agency limit). By increasing the amount of pre-treated bottom ash, even lower levels of post-treatment arsenic are expected. It is further expected that this invention supplies a very low-cost solution to arsenic poisoning for large population segments.

  19. Disappearance of criticality in a branched-chain thermal explosion with heat loss

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okoya, S.S. [Department of Mathematics, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, 220005 (Nigeria)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Branched-chain thermal explosions involving simplified initiation, branching, and termination of chains, as well as heat exchange with the surroundings, are considered, but it is assumed that consumption of fuel is negligible for combustion in a mixture of H{sub 2}+O{sub 2} that covers nth Arrhenius kinetics for the chain-branching step. In particular, the effect of heat loss on the problem is considered, Mostly analytical investigations of the simplified model are presented using standard Semenov's techniques. The analytical method provides expressions for criticality and the transition points. Also, the different qualitative effects of varying the dimensionless parameters are investigated.

  20. A Break-Even Formulation for Evaluating Branch Predictor Energy Michele Co, Dee A.B. Weikle, and Kevin Skadron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Co, Michele

    demonstrated that a better branch pre- dictor can increase the energy-efficiency of the system, even if the new a simple, effective metric for eval- uating the tradeoff between processor energy-efficiency and branch and an energy-efficiency target, we are able to evaluate the energy-efficiency of several existing branch

  1. Evaluation of health risks associated with proposed ground water standards at selected inactive uranium mill-tailings sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Medeiros, W.H.; Meinhold, A.; Morris, S.C.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Nagy, J.; Lackey, K.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed ground water standards applicable to all inactive uranium mill-tailings sites. The proposed standards include maximum concentration limits (MCL) for currently regulated drinking water contaminants, as well as the addition of standards for molybdenum, uranium, nitrate, and radium-226 plus radium-228. The proposed standards define the point of compliance to be everywhere downgradient of the tailings pile, and require ground water remediation to drinking water standards if MCLs are exceeded. This document presents a preliminary description of the Phase 2 efforts. The potential risks and hazards at Gunnison, Colorado and Lakeview, Oregon were estimated to demonstrate the need for a risk assessment and the usefulness of a cost-benefit approach in setting supplemental standards and determining the need for and level of restoration at UMTRA sites. 8 refs., 12 tabs.

  2. Marketing water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 16 W ith rapid population growth and the memory of the worst drought in 50 years, cities and groups are promoting programs that educate their constituents about water quality, water conservation, and landscape management. Many... ] Many cities are promoting landscape management and water conservation practices with their citizens. This garden demonstrates the EARTH- KIND principles of environmentally tolerant, low water use ornamentals. tx H2O | pg. 18 and no adverse runoff...

  3. RAPID DETERMINATION OF {sup 210} PO IN WATER SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.

    2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A new rapid method for the determination of {sup 210}Po in water samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that can be used for emergency response or routine water analyses. If a radiological dispersive device (RDD) event or a radiological attack associated with drinking water supplies occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of water samples, including drinking water, ground water and other water effluents. Current analytical methods for the assay of {sup 210}Po in water samples have typically involved spontaneous auto-deposition of {sup 210}Po onto silver or other metal disks followed by counting by alpha spectrometry. The auto-deposition times range from 90 minutes to 24 hours or more, at times with yields that may be less than desirable. If sample interferences are present, decreased yields and degraded alpha spectrums can occur due to unpredictable thickening in the deposited layer. Separation methods have focused on the use of Sr Resin?, often in combination with 210Pb analysis. A new rapid method for {sup 210}Po in water samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that utilizes a rapid calcium phosphate co-precipitation method, separation using DGA Resin? (N,N,N?,N? tetraoctyldiglycolamide extractant-coated resin, Eichrom Technologies or Triskem-International), followed by rapid microprecipitation of {sup 210}Po using bismuth phosphate for counting by alpha spectrometry. This new method can be performed quickly with excellent removal of interferences, high chemical yields and very good alpha peak resolution, eliminating any potential problems with the alpha source preparation for emergency or routine samples. A rapid sequential separation method to separate {sup 210} Po and actinide isotopes was also developed. This new approach, rapid separation with DGA Resin plus microprecipitation for alpha source preparation, is a significant advance in radiochemistry for the rapid determination of {sup 210}Po.

  4. Do Coupled Climate Models Correctly SImulate the Upward Branch of the Deept Ocean Global Conveyor?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarmiento, Jorge L; Downes, Stephanie; Bianchi, Daniele

    2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The large-scale meridional overturning circulation (MOC) connects the deep ocean, a major reservoir of carbon, to the other components of the climate system and must therefore be accurately represented in Earth System Models. Our project aims to address the specific question of the pathways and mechanisms controlling the upwelling branch of the MOC, a subject of significant disagreement between models and observational syntheses, and among general circulation models. Observations of these pathways are limited, particularly in regions of complex hydrography such as the Southern Ocean. As such, we rely on models to examine theories of the overturning circulation, both physically and biogeochemically. This grant focused on a particular aspect of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC) where there is currently significant disagreement between models and observationally based analyses of the MOC, and amongst general circulation models. In particular, the research focused on addressing the following questions: 1. Where does the deep water that sinks in the polar regions rise to the surface? 2. What processes are responsible for this rise? 3. Do state-of-the-art coupled GCMs capture these processes? Our research had three key components: observational synthesis, model development and model analysis. In this final report we outline the key results from these areas of research for the 2007 to 2012 grant period. The research described here was carried out primarily by graduate student, Daniele Bianchi (now a Postdoc at McGill University, Canada), and Postdoc Stephanie Downes (now a Research Fellow at The Australian national University, Australia). Additional support was provided for programmers Jennifer Simeon as well as Rick Slater.

  5. Modeling the Effect of Sedimentation on Cesium Transport in Fourmile Branch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, K.F.

    2001-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The major mechanisms of radioactive material transport and fate in surface water are (1) sources, (2) dilution, advection and dispersion of radionuclides by flow and surface waves, (3) radionuclide decay, and (4) interaction between sediment and radionuclides. STREAM II, an aqueous transport module of the Savannah River Site emergency response WIND system, accounts for the source term, and the effects of dilution, advection and dispersion. Although the model has the capability to account for nuclear decay, due to the short time interval of interest for emergency response, the effect of nuclear decay is very small and so it is not employed. The interactions between the sediment and radionuclides are controlled by the flow conditions and physical and chemical characteristics of the radionuclides and the sediment constituents. The STREAM II version used in emergency response does not model the effects of sediment deposition/resuspension to minimize computing time. This study estimates the effects of sediment deposition/resuspension on radionuclide aqueous transport. For radionuclides that adsorb onto suspended sediment, the omission of deposition/resuspension effects overestimates the downstream radionuclide peak concentration and is therefore conservative. For the case of cesium transport in the Fourmile Branch, the calculated reduction in peak concentration as the cesium is transported downstream is greater with sediment deposition modeled than without. For example, including the effects of sediment deposition/resuspension in the STREAM II calculation results in a 72 percent reduction in the downstream (5075 meters downstream from H-Area) peak cesium concentration. It is important to note that the high partition coefficient appropriate for cesium enhances the importance of sediment deposition/resuspension; the reduction in the calculated peak concentration would be less for radioisotopes with lower partition coefficients.

  6. A Framework to Model Branch Prediction for Worst Case Execution Time Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roychoudhury, Abhik

    execution history. This allows the program execution to proceed by speculating the control flow. Branch with an external environment in a timely fashion. Many embedded systems are safety critical, e.g., automobiles

  7. A branch and bound algorithm for the global optimization of Hessian ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 1, 2011 ... Heuristic Algorithm 2.1 (LH) 5s. 485s. 210?2 110?1. Table 3: Run times of the different convex constrained branch and bound algorithms...

  8. Measurement of the inclusive semileptonic branching fraction B(B?s?X-l+?l) at Belle

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Oswald, C.; Urquijo, P.; Dingfelder, J.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Belous, K.; et al

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a measurement of the inclusive semileptonic B0s branching fraction in a 121 fb? data sample collected near the ?(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric energy e?e? collider. Events containing B?(*)sB?(*)s pairs are selected by reconstructing a tag side D?s and identifying a signal side lepton l? (l=e, ?) that is required to have the same-sign charge to ensure that both originate from different B?s mesons. The B?s?X?l??l branching fraction is extracted from the ratio of the measured yields of D?s mesons and D?sl? pairs and the known production and branching fractions. The inclusive semileptonicmorebranching fraction is measured to be [10.60.5(stat)0.7(syst)]%.less

  9. Branched peptide amphiphiles, related epitope compounds and self assembled structures thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stupp, Samuel I. (Chicago, IL); Guler, Mustafa O. (Evanston, IL)

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Branched peptide amphiphilic compounds incorporating one or residues providing a pendant amino group for coupling one or more epitope sequences thereto, such compounds and related compositions for enhanced epitope presentation.

  10. Epicormic branching on Central Appalachian hardwoods 10 years after deferment cutting. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, G.W.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Epicormic branching as monitored over a 10-year period following deferment cutting in four central Appalachian hardwood stands in West Virginia. Data from 545 codominant residual trees indicated that the average number of epicormic branches on the butt and second 16-food log sections increased significantly for the first 2 years after treatment. For upper log sections of basswood, northern red oak, and black cherry, significant increases continued from the second to the tenth year. The net effect on quality was that 11 percent of residual trees exhibited a reduction in butt-log grade due to epicormic branching. Of the few grade reductions observed, white oak, northern red oak, and black cherry were the most susceptible. Less than 1 percent of yellow-poplar trees had lower grades due to epicormic branching.

  11. Branch-and-Cut for Linear Programs with Overlapping SOS1 ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobias Fischer and Marc E. Pfetsch

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 1, 2015 ... also investigate ways to strengthen the resulting subproblems by adding .... the left and the right branching node are not necessarily disjoint, ...... A multi-hop wireless network consists of a set N of transmission nodes that may.

  12. Determination of the deuterium-tritium branching ratio based on inertial confinement fusion implosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Michael Jonathan

    The deuterium-tritium (D-T) ?-to-neutron branching ratio [[superscript 3]H(d,?)[superscript 5]He/[superscript 3]H(d,n)[superscript 4]He] was determined under inertial confinement fusion (ICF) conditions, where the ...

  13. Glucagon-Induced Vasospasm of Hepatic Artery Branches During Visceral Angiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dziedzic, T. Scott; Smith, Tony P., E-mail: smith146@mc.duke.ed [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Glucagon is often used in radiology to decrease bowel motility for enhanced imaging, including visceral digital subtraction angiography. We present a case in which branch hepatic artery vasospasm followed the intravenous administration of glucagon during visceral angiography.

  14. Measurement of the inclusive semileptonic branching fraction B(Bs0?X-?+??) at Belle

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Oswald, C.; Urquijo, P.; Dingfelder, J.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Belous, K.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bra?ko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, P.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Doleal, Z.; Drsal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Esen, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, S.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kah, D. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Klucar, J.; Ko, B. R.; Korpar, S.; Kouzes, R. T.; Krian, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kronenbitter, B.; Kuhr, T.; Kumita, T.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Libby, J.; Liu, C.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z. Q.; Liventsev, D.; Louvot, R.; Lutz, O.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Muramatsu, N.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nedelkovska, E.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Nozaki, T.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Ostrowicz, W.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petri?, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Prim, M.; Prothmann, K.; Ritter, M.; Rhrken, M.; Rozanska, M.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, H.; Saito, T.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stari?, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamashita, Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a measurement of the inclusive semileptonic B0s branching fraction in a 121 fb? data sample collected near the ?(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric energy e?e? collider. Events containing B?(*)sB?(*)s pairs are selected by reconstructing a tag side D?s and identifying a signal side lepton ?? (?=e, ?) that is required to have the same-sign charge to ensure that both originate from different B?s mesons. The B?s?X????? branching fraction is extracted from the ratio of the measured yields of D?s mesons and D?s?? pairs and the known production and branching fractions. The inclusive semileptonic branching fraction is measured to be [10.60.5(stat)0.7(syst)]%.

  15. Blood Flow At Arterial Branches: Complexities To Resolve For The Angioplasty Suite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laidlaw, David

    in the 1970s [1, 2] led to a large increase of interest in the possible role of fluid dynamics Tubes Branched tubes were fabricated by machining - drilling, reaming, and chloroform- polishing - of 3

  16. UNL WATER CENTER WATER CURRENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    ................ Sidney Area Deals with Drought 6................ Water and Electricity Are Inseparable 10's East Campus. "Consolidating administration,faculty and staff and facilities is costeffectiveandper or commercial products constitute endorsement by the U.S. Government. WATER CURRENT Water Center University

  17. Water Conservation and Water Use Efficiency (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wisconsin has several statutes that promote water conservation and controlled water use, and this legislation establishes mandatory and voluntary programs in water conservation and water use...

  18. Arnold Schwarzenegger WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS: Lutz J.D. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory). 2008. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution

  19. Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Bear Snow Vegetation RhinoWater Vegetation Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Rhino Water Rhino Water Ground Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Vegetation Rhino Vegetation Ground Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky

  20. The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com Analysis of the effect of aluminum in drinking water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Iron, c Luc Letenneur, a Daniel Commenges, b François Duchêne, b Benoit Arveiler, d Jean of apolipoprotein E gene (ApoE). Logistic regression analysis showed that neither Tf C2 itself nor its interaction with aluminum or with the 4 allele of the ApoE were significantly associated with the risk of AD. inserm

  1. Lead in Your Drinking Water Lead (Pb) is an extremely toxic heavy metal that unfortunately occurs widely in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maynard, J. Barry

    the potential for accelerated galvanic corrosion, as illustrated below. Build up of excess scale at the junction, Cu sulfate dominates. #12;Corrosion Scale Minerals The corrosion products that build up often have a heavy build-up of iron oxides, mostly goethite and magnetite with some lepidocrocite. Lead

  2. Incorporating Perceived Mortality Risks from Arsenic into Models of Drinking Water Behavior and Valuation of Arsenic Risk Reductions: Preliminary Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, W. Douglass

    and estimating values for arsenic reduction risks. Several studies have been undertaken to examine the costs of compliance with the new standard, mainly in the form of capital cost for improved or new public system of Economics Texas A&M University Mark Walker, Associate Professor Dept. of Natural Resource and Environmental

  3. Taurine in drinking water recovers learning and memory in the adult APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hye Yun

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a lethal progressive neurological disorder affecting the memory. Recently, US Food and Drug Administration mitigated the standard for drug approval, allowing symptomatic drugs that only improve ...

  4. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Rifle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ground water project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. This report is a site specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. Currently, no one is using the ground water and therefore, no one is at risk. However, the land will probably be developed in the future and so the possibility of people using the ground water does exist. This report examines the future possibility of health hazards resulting from the ingestion of contaminated drinking water, skin contact, fish ingestion, or contact with surface waters and sediments.

  5. Computerized Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - ing 2002?2005 and documented in TWRI?s Technical Report 284 released in January 2006, include: ? Capabilities for short-term reliability analyses based on current storage conditions (Or what is the likelihood of meeting water needs in the near... System Reference Manual. TWRI Technical Report 255, Second Edition, April 2005. ? Water Rights Analysis Package Modeling System Users Manual. TWRI Technical Report 256, Second Edition, April 2005. ? Fundamentals of Water Availability Modeling...

  6. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    which can lead to public health problems. * MtBE (Methyl tert Butyl Ether), a gasoline additive, has begun to contaminate ground water supplies. * Similarly, perchlorate has...

  7. Prepared in cooperation with the National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Reclamation, Nevada Department of Wildlife, Southern Nevada Water Authority,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    --the Federal source for science about the Earth, its natural and living resources, natural hazards drinking water and the hydropower to provide electricity for major cities including Las Vegas, Phoenix, Los to the importance of Lake Mead, multiple agencies are actively involved in its monitoring and research

  8. Center for Watershed Sciences | groundwaternitrate.ucdavis.edu | University of California, Davis Maximum reported raw-level nitrate concentration in community public water systems and state-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    and Salinas Valley aquifers. Most nitrate in drinking water wells today was applied to the surface decades ago. This study focuses on the four-county Tulare Lake Basin and the Monterey County portion of the Salinas Valley 254,000 people in California's Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley who are currently at risk

  9. Dopamine D2R DNA transfer in dopamine D2 receptor-deficient mice: Effects on ethanol drinking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Dopamine D2R DNA transfer in dopamine D2 receptor-deficient mice: Effects on ethanol drinking), and receptor-deficient mice (Drd2?/?). Ethanol intake and preference were then determined using the two attenuated (58 %) their ethanol intake as well as reduced preference. Drd2+/? and mutant mice showed

  10. Search for the decay Bs0 ? ?? and a measurement of the branching fraction for Bs0 ? ??

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, Deepanwita; Bhuyan, Bipul; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, David M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Aziz, T.; Bahinipati, S.; Bakich, A. M.; Bansal, Vikas; Bhardwaj, V.; Bobrov, A.; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Bracko, Marko; Browder, Thomas E.; Cervenkov, D.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, David A.; Dalseno, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, James E.; Frost, O.; Gaur, Vipin; Ganguly, Sudeshna; Garmash, Alexey; Getzkow, D.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Hou, W. S.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, Igal; Joffe, D.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kodys, P.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, P.; Krokovny, Pavel; Kuhr, Thomas; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, I. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, Dmitri; Matvienko, D.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Nayak, Minakshi; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, Galina; Pedlar, Todd K.; Pestotnik, Rok; Petric, Marko; Piilonen, Leo E.; Ribezl, Eva; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, Saurabh; Santelj, Luka; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, Vladimir; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Semmler, D.; Shebalin, V.; Shibata, T. A.; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y. S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Staric, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Unno, Yuji; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vossen, Anslem G.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; Wehle, S.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamaoka, J.; Yashchenko, S.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We search for the decay B0s??? and measure the branching fraction for B0s??? using 121.4~fb-1 of data collected at the ?(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. The B0s??? branching fraction is measured to be (3.60.5(stat.)0.3(syst.)0.6(fs))10-5, where fs is the fraction of Bs(*)Bs(*) in bb events. Our result is in good agreement with the theoretical predictions as well as with a recent measurement from LHCb. We observe no statistically significant signal for the decay B0s??? and set a 90% confidence-level upper limit on its branching fraction at 3.110-6. This constitutes a significant improvement over the previous result.

  11. Water Resources Policy & Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Water Resources Policy & Economics FOR 4984 Selected Course Topics Appropriative and riparian water institutions Incentives for conservation Water rights for in-stream environmental use Surface water-groundwater management Water quality regulations Water markets Economic and policy

  12. Measurement of Lambda(C) Branching Fractions of Cabibbo-Suppressed Decay Modes in the BABAR Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saleem, Muhammad; /SUNY, Albany

    2006-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation reports on a study of the relative branching fraction measurement of the charmed baryon {Lambda}{sub c} decaying to the Cabibbo-suppressed modes.

  13. A Conceptual Restoration Plan and Tidal Hydrology Assessment for Reconnecting Spring Branch Creek to Suisun Marsh, Solano County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Jessica J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EDAW 2007. Potrero Hills Landfill FEIR Volume 1. Solanothe headwaters at Potrero Hills Landfill is the headwatersBranch Creek, Potrero Hills Landfill and a private rancher

  14. Data acquisition with a VAX 11/780 and MBD branch driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, S.E. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC); Lau, Y.C.; Gould, C.R.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have designed and implemented a general purpose data acquisition system, XSYS, for the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory VAX-11/780. The interface is a CAMAC Branch Highway connected to a Microprogrammed Branch Driver (MBD-11). A single general reentrant MBD program handles CAMAC operations and data transfers to and from the VAX using a DMA transfer. Each of the eight MBD channels is controlled by an independent subprocess in the VAX which communicates with the MBD via the UNIBUS. Data are double buffered and are sorted by VAX user written EVAL codes after the MBD wakes a hibernating subprocess image. Scalar operations and control of external devices are also supported.

  15. Delayed-neutron branching ratios of precursors in the fission product region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudstam, G.; Aleklett, K.; Sihver, L. (Studsvik Neutron Research Lab., Nykoeping (Sweden))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Delayed-neutron branching ratios in the fission product region have been tabulated, and average values have been determined. In order to provide data complementary to published values an experiment covering the mass range 79-150 has been carried out at the OSIRIS isotope-separator on-line facility at Studsvik. This experiment has resulted in branching ratios for some precursors ([sup 84]Ge, [sup 133]Sn, and [sup 150]La) for which such data have not been reported before. In several other cases the new results are accurate than older determinations. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Measurement of branching fractions and rate asymmetries in the rare decays B?K(*)l?l?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bnger, C.; Grnberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schrder, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Vavra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a sample of 47110? BB events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e?e? collider we study the rare decays B?K(*)l?l?, where l?l? is either e?e? or ????. We report results on partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries in seven bins of dilepton mass-squared. We further present CP and lepton-flavor asymmetries for dilepton masses below and above the J/? resonance. We find no evidence for CP or lepton-flavor violation. The partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries are consistent with the Standard Model predictions and with results from other experiments.

  17. Water Privatisation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zlls, Elisa

    2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation deals with the policy issues of large-scale, urban water privatisation projects in the face of uncertainty and variability. The main objective is to evaluate whether a single policy approach, namely privatisation associated...

  18. EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER QUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Andrew S.

    EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER QUALITY Leadership Team Subcommittee: Mark Clark Karl Havens BJ Jarvis Kelly Morgan Ramesh Reddy #12;Water Quality Situation (resources) Florida has extensive

  19. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efficient gas water heating appliance to market; a plan toefficient gas water heating appliance to market; and to planefficient gas water heating appliance to market; and 3) to

  20. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    24 Figure 7. Comparison of Daily Water Heater28 Figure 8. Monitored Field Efficiency of Tankless Water28 Figure 9. Monitored Lab Efficiency of Tankless Water