Sample records for dredging waste energy

  1. Dredging up old wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phipps, L. (CH2M Hill, Denver, CO (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1986, Portland General Electric (PGE) donated a parcel of prime riverfront land to the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) in Portland, OR, for OMSI's new facility. The site had PCB-Contaminated sediments, which had to be removed before construction could begin. In the face of tight deadlines and public concerns, the remediation project was completed in record time while using a unique combination of treatment methods, including low-volume dredging and capping. Conventional dredging would have resuspended the fine sediments containing PCBs and sent them downriver. Low-volume dredging used a diver-operated suction hose to remove sediment with minimal disturbance. Similar to equipment used for underwater archaeological excavations, the diver vacuums from the river bottom fine sediments, which are then discharged to a treatment facility. The water and sediment mixture was initially discharged to Bakr tanks for primary settling. The water was then pumped through a multimedia filter-system, a bag filter system, and a granular activated carbon system before discharge back into the river. The remaining contaminated sediments were air-dried in a lined containment area, stabilized, and transported to a hazardous waste landfill. PCB Concentrations were reduced to less than 6 mg/L. Although elements of this remedial action have been used before, it is believed that this is the first combined use of low-dredging and this particular water-treatment system in the US.

  2. Siting of dredged material islands in bays and estuaries along low-energy coastlines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathewson, C.C.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bays, estuaries, and lagoons along low-energy coastlines are protected shallow water environments, which make them suitable sites for intracoastal transportation routes. Dredging operations often construct disposal islands, which are cost effective and provide protected sites for shore birds. Channel maintenance is often required because sediments are transported from the island to the channel. Studies of dredge material island changes along the Texas coast have shown that the reworking and transport of island sediments is influenced by a number of geologic, geotechnical, biological, and climatic factors. Significant factors are: wind; waves; tides, both astronomic and wind generated; currents produced by wind, fluvial, and tidal processes; physical characteristics of the dredged material; climate, including both prevailing and storm conditions; basin physiography, island design, shape, height, and location within the basin; biology, both flora and fauna; and the activities of man, ship wake, subsidence, etc. Selection of the most effective island location can be based on a process model that incorporates a recognition of the influence and interaction of the physical factors that erode and transport island sediments and those that stabilize the island. This model can be applied early in the site selection process with corresponding improvements in the design and permitting of the dredging program.

  3. Fast Track Dredged Material Decontamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Fast Track Dredged Material Decontamination Demonstration for the Port of New York and New Jersey Department of Energy Brookhaven National Laboratory Fast Track Dredged Material Decontamination Demonstration .............................................................................. 3 3.3 Relation to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-New York District Dredged Material Management

  4. Idaho Dredge and Fill Permits Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty, Texas:ITC TransmissionIdaho DEQ Storage TanksPermits

  5. Montana Suction Dredge General Permit Application Information | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana:Northeast AsiaAir| OpenUseSupplyProtection

  6. EPA - Section 404 Dredge and Fill Permitting webpage | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision| Open Jump to: navigation,

  7. DREDGED MATERIAL EVALUATION AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DREDGED MATERIAL EVALUATION AND DISPOSAL PROCEDURES (USERS' MANUAL) Dredged Material Management 2009) Prepared by: Dredged Material Management Office US Army Corps of Engineers Seattle District #12........................................................................................2-1 2.2 The Dredged Material Evaluation Process

  8. Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities July 24, 2014 9:00AM to 3:30PM EDT U.S....

  9. Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste Read more overleaf Introduction Energy from waste provides us with an opportunity for a waste solution and a local source of energy rolled,itcan onlyaddressaportionofthewastestream andisnotsufficientonitsown. Energy obtained from the combustion of residual waste (Energy from

  10. Why do we dredge? What is beneficial use?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Why do we dredge? What is beneficial use? Why do we need it? What about contamination? Can my community become involved? Why do we dredge? What is beneficial use? Why do we need it? What about contamination? Can my community become involved? Waste to Resource: Beneficial Use of Great Lakes Dredged

  11. Waste to Energy Time Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SEMINAR Waste to Energy Time Activities 9:30-9:40 Brief introduction of participants 9:40-10:10 Presentation of Dr. Kalogirou, "Waste to Energy: An Integral Part of Worldwide Sustainable Waste Management" 10. Sofia Bethanis, "Production of synthetic aggregates for use in structural concrete from waste to energy

  12. Dredging and dewatering sediment containing hazardous and toxic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Askin, R.C. [Hydrometrics, Inc., Helena, MT (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Dredging is a common method of remediating ponds containing contaminated wastes. However, dewatering of the dredged solids is usually not well integrated with the dredging phase. As a result, overall project efficiency can be poor. Specifically, since dredges deliver material in a widely varying slurry form and since dewatering presses require the delivered material to be uniform, union of the two systems often results in inconsistent operation of the overall process. In an effort to enhance overall dredging and dewatering process production rates as well as minimize the return of suspended solids in the decant water, a new process was developed to provide a consistent dredged sludge for delivery to the press. This paper discusses modifications made to a conventional dredging and dewatering process to improve production rates and dewatering capabilities. These modifications are applicable to any project where efficient solids dewatering is required and where returning decant water must be visually free of suspended solids. 4 figs.

  13. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    geo-thermal energy, ocean thermal energy, wasted heat ingeothermal energy, ocean thermal energy, wasted heat inthermal energy, geo/ocean-thermal energy, wasted heat in

  14. Waste Management | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cleanup Waste Management Waste Management July 15, 2014 Energy Expos Students work in groups to create hands-on exhibits about the energy sources that power the nation, ways to...

  15. Hydraulic waste energy recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lederer, C.C.; Thomas, A.H.; McGuire, J.L. (Detroit Buildings and Safety Engineering Dept., MI (USA))

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water distribution systems are typically a municipality's largest consumer of energy and greatest expense. The water distribution network has varying pressure requirements due to the age of the pipeline and topographical differences. Certain circumstances require installation of pressure reducing devices in the pipeline to lower the water pressure in the system. The consequence of this action is that the hydraulic energy supplied by the high lift or booster pumps is wasted in the process of reducing the pressure. A possible solution to capture the waste hydraulic energy is to install an in-line electricity generating turbine. Energy recovery using in-line turbine systems is an emerging technology. Due to the lack of technical and other relevant information on in-line turbine system installations, questions of constructability and legal issues over the power service contract have yet to be answered. This study seeks to resolve these questions and document the findings so that other communities may utilize this information. 10 figs.

  16. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy, geo-thermal energy, ocean thermal energy, wastedenergy, geothermal energy, ocean thermal energy, wasted heatthermal energy, geo/ocean-thermal energy, wasted heat in

  17. Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in SingaporeStatus in Singapore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    ;20031970 The Solid Waste Challenge Waste Explosion 1,200 t/d1,200 t/d 6,900 t/d6,900 t/d #12;Waste ManagementWaste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in Singapore #12;Singapore's Waste Management · In 2003, 6877 tonnes/day (2.51 M tonnes/year) of MSW collected

  18. Lake restoration by dredging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorini, R.F.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a summary overview of the $17 million Vancouver Lake Restoration Project, the largest project of its type ever undertaken through the Federal Clean Lakes Program. It was funded jointly by the US Environmental Protection Agency, the Washington State Department of Ecology, and the Port of Vancouver. Although the project was conceived in 1965, a nationwide program to help fund such projects did not exist until 1976. Then, final approval was not received until 1981, after many volumes of studies and reviews. Construction was completed in June 1983, after 30 months--6 months ahead of schedule and underbudget. A great deal of time, money, and energy was expended to demonstrate to Federal and state environmental agencies that dredging was a key tool in effecting this lake's restoration.

  19. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Recycling of Wasted Energy : ThermalOF THE DISSERTATION Recycling of Wasted Energy : Thermal to

  20. Surgical dredging controls turbidity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seagren, E.H. [Ellicott Machine Corp. International, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need to remove contaminated and uncontaminated sediments located under a column of water is increasing. Small hydraulic dredges offer flexibility in the removal of sediments in industrial lagoons, wetlands, drinking water ponds, and environmentally sensitive areas.

  1. Declining metal levels at Foundry Cove (Hudson River, New York): Response to localized dredging of contaminated sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinton, Jeffrey

    Declining metal levels at Foundry Cove (Hudson River, New York): Response to localized dredging 31 August 2006; received in revised form 11 January 2007; accepted 11 January 2007 Dredging freshwater marsh was polluted with battery-factory wastes (1953e1979) and dredged in 1994e1995. Eight years

  2. EnergyEfficiency Energy:Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    EnergyEfficiency­ Energy:Waste Copyright © 2012 by Taylor & Francis. All rights reserved equivalence; the c is the speed of light in a vacuum); thus, mass and energy are interrelated. Mass and energy cars and trains, and boats and planes. It bakes food and keeps it frozen for storage. Energy lights our

  3. EnvironmentalEffects of Dredging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #~ EnvironmentalEffects of Dredging VOL D-91-2 INFORMATION EXCHANGE BULLETIN OCT 1991 Craney Island Experiment Station Fine-grained dredged material usual- ly enters a confined disposal area in a slurry of the soil matrix. The excess pore-water pressures are induced by the weight of overlying dredged material

  4. Commercializationof Dredged-Material Decontamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Commercializationof Dredged- Material Decontamination Technologies Keitb U?Jones isa senior Keith375,000 mdmmnentalm@m*ng m3 of dredged material per year. The need to develop public-priuate p r o g r assessmentsand dredged materialmanagemart. He istbe tecbnfcalprogram managerfor tbe WRM NXm Harbor Sediment

  5. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solar radiation, and the geothermal energy. [16] Fig. 1.1.thermal energy, geothermal energy, wasted heat from athermal energy, geothermal energy, ocean thermal energy,

  6. California Energy Commission GUIDANCE ON WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Energy Commission GUIDANCE GUIDANCE ON WASTE MANAGEMENT PLANS FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY) obtain waste management plans for each proposed project receiving funding under the Energy Efficiency of waste. The Energy Commission is providing the following guidance to assist recipients of EECBG Program

  7. A Dredging Knowledge-Base Expert System for Pipeline Dredges with Comparison to Field Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Derek Alan

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 42 Dredge C and D parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 43 Dredge C pump parameters for Atchafalaya River on Project 5. . . . 130 44 Dredge D pump parameters for Atchafalaya River on Project 6. . . . 131 45 Savannah and New.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 45 Residual analysis between actual dredge production and theoreti- cal dredge production for Dredge A on Project 1. . . . . . . . . . . . 101 46 Pump 1 curves for Dredge A in Savannah River on Project 2. . . . . . 103 47 Pump 2 curves for Dredge A...

  8. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    biological thermal energy, geothermal energy, wasted heatpower plants, solar thermal energy, geothermal energy, oceansolar radiation, and the geothermal energy. [16] Fig. 1.1.

  9. AUSTRIA SHOWCASE WASTE-to-ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    &P #12;7 Waste Prevention: The Danube begins here ... © EbS, Austria #12;8 Treatment of Municipal Solid1 AUSTRIA SHOWCASE WASTE-to-ENERGY in AUSTRIA AECC Aberdeen Exhibition & Conference Center (M.I.T.) #12;2 Table of Content · Development of waste management in Austria · Status-Quo of waste

  10. Evaluating dredged material placement alternatives 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wooters, Kelly Lynne

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , but are required in some environmentally sensitive areas. An example of an innovative disposal alternative is the application of oil spill clean-up technology to dredging sites in the form of interim storage. 1. 3 Related Research The environmental impacts... of alternatives, sociopolitical implication, and environmental impact. Specific procedural guidelines are presented for marsh, upland, and island development. Gupta et al. (1978) establish the appropriate agricultural use for the dredged materiaL Dredged...

  11. Forces on laboratory model dredge cutterhead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Dustin Ray

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Dredge cutting forces produced by the movement of the cutterhead through the sediment have been measured with the laboratory dredge carriage located at the Haynes Coastal Engineering Laboratory. The sediment bed that was used for the dredging test...

  12. Energy and solid/hazardous waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the past and potential future solid and hazardous waste impacts from energy development, and summarizes the major environmental, legislation applicable to solid and hazardous waste generation and disposal. A glossary of terms and acronyms used to describe and measure solid waste impacts of energy development is included. (PSB)

  13. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Waste Treatment Baseline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirk Gombert; William Ebert; James Marra; Robert Jubin; John Vienna

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership program (GNEP) is designed to demonstrate a proliferation-resistant and sustainable integrated nuclear fuel cycle that can be commercialized and used internationally. Alternative stabilization concepts for byproducts and waste streams generated by fuel recycling processes were evaluated and a baseline of waste forms was recommended for the safe disposition of waste streams. Waste forms are recommended based on the demonstrated or expected commercial practicability and technical maturity of the processes needed to make the waste forms, and performance of the waste form materials when disposed. Significant issues remain in developing technologies to process some of the wastes into the recommended waste forms, and a detailed analysis of technology readiness and availability may lead to the choice of a different waste form than what is recommended herein. Evolving regulations could also affect the selection of waste forms.

  14. Environmental effects of dredging. Engineer manual series on dredging and dredged material disposal. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palermo, M.R.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note describes a series of Engineer Manuals (EMs) on dredging and dredged material disposal being published by the Office, Chief of Engineers, US Army. The note describes the purpose of the manual series, intended audience, major topics covered, availability of published manuals, and the status of future manuals.

  15. Zero Waste Energy Development | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapers HomeXuanenYongzhouYunnan DiqingZ GroupZelekZero Waste Energy

  16. Waste to Energy Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation, search Name: Waste-to-Energyto Energy

  17. Waste2Energy Holdings | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation, search Name:Waste2Energy Holdings Place:

  18. Study of national dredging issues: public meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The nation's needs for dredging in the near to mid-term future were assessed. The prospects for alternatives to dredging and the capability for achieving needed dredging were examined. The most efficient and effective ways of handling dredging, both in terms of economics and environmental protection, were identified. (ACR)

  19. Solid Waste as an Energy Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erlandsson, K. I.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at industrial plants, where using the solid waste as a fuel also alleviates a waste disposal problem. This paper describes presently available and operating equipment, which can convert solid waste into energy in usable forms, such as hot water or steam...

  20. Laboratory modeling of hydraulic dredges and design of dredge carriage for laboratory facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glover, Gordon Jason

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of hydraulic dredge equipment have proven useful for obtaining qualitative results. The new Coastal Engineering Laboratory at Texas A&M University is equipped with model dredge testing facilities ideal for performing such experiments. The tow/dredge carriage...

  1. A Dredging Knowledge-Base Expert System for Pipeline Dredges with Comparison to Field Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Derek Alan

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A Pipeline Analytical Program and Dredging Knowledge{Base Expert{System (DKBES) determines a pipeline dredge's production and resulting cost and schedule. Pipeline dredge engineering presents a complex and dynamic process necessary to maintain...

  2. Waste-to-Energy Workshop Agenda

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) at the Department of Energy aims to identify and address key technical barriers to the commercial deployment of liquid transportation fuels from waste feedstocks. As a part of this effort, BETO is organizing a Waste-to-Energy Roadmapping workshop. Workshop participants will join facilitated breakout sessions to discuss anaerobic digestion, hydrothermal liquefaction, and other processes that make productive use of wastewater residuals, biosolids, foodstuffs, and organic municipal solid waste. These discussions will be synthesized and used in developing a waste-to-energy technology roadmap.

  3. Rules and Regulations for Dredging and the Management of Dredged Material (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations apply to dredging conducted in a marine environment. The regulations aim to ensure that dredging does not unduly impact groundwater and surface water quality while streamlining...

  4. Evaluating dredged material placement alternatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wooters, Kelly Lynne

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) devised an economic methodology to determine land value and associated benefits from dredged material containment. This methodology is designed to provide guidance for a project, not to select appropriate disposal alternatives. The New York District.... , Aurand, D. , Schultz, D. , and Holman, R. (1980). Disposal of Dredged Material Within the New York District, Volume II. MITRE Tech. Report MTR- 7808. News Release II27 (1989). District Engineer Warns of Dangers to State from Interruption to GIWW...

  5. Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for the Food ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for the Food & Beverage Industry - Presentation by GE Global Research, June 2011 Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for...

  6. Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage Industry - Fact Sheet, 2014 Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage...

  7. Method and apparatus for conserving waste energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eldifrawi, A.A.

    1981-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for conserving waste energy by transferring waste heat from an internal combustion engine, solar energy or from any other source of waste heat energy of a temperature of 200/sup 0/F or above, to a carrier liquid includes conveying the heated carrier liquid to a heat exchanger, pressurizing a refrigerant by heating the refrigerant with heat energy extracted from the heated carrier liquid and performing work with the pressurized refrigerant. The preferred embodiments include a modified Rankine-Sterling cycle engine and a dual absorption generator system.

  8. Dredging the Depths of Maths -Mathematics of Dredging By Prof. Onno Bokhove, School of Mathematics, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Dredging the Depths of Maths -Mathematics of Dredging By Prof. Onno navigation channels are maintained by dredging sand and slurries off sea and river removal by dredging. Some progress has already been made, both at Leeds

  9. Dredging/dredged material management risk assessment. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note explains the use of risk assessment to facilitate dredged material management decision-making in navigable waterways by US Army Corps of Engineer (USACE) project managers and field operations personnel. The document does not promote risk assessment as a tool for use in every dredged material management decision. It is likely to be most useful, and most used, in those cases that constitute the exception rather than the rule. The use of risk assessment is intended to supplement the analytical options currently available to dredged material managers by building on the existing technical framework (US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)/USACE 1992) and the existing tiered approaches (USEPA/USACE 1991, 1998).

  10. ReprintedfromDredging and Management of Dredged Material Proceedingsof 3 sessionsheld in conjunction with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    BNL- 64400 ReprintedfromDredging and Management of Dredged Material Proceedingsof 3 sessionsheld Processing of NY/NJ Harbor Estuarine Dredged Material K. W. Jones', E. A. Stern', K. Donato3, N. L. Clesceri of the United States. One attractive solution to processing the dredged material is to remove or stabilize

  11. Forces on laboratory model dredge cutterhead 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Dustin Ray

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Dredge cutting forces produced by the movement of the cutterhead through the sediment have been measured with the laboratory dredge carriage located at the Haynes Coastal Engineering Laboratory. The sediment bed that was ...

  12. Development of solidification technique for dredged sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamasaki, Shoichi [Aoki Marine Co., Ltd., Fukushima, Osaka (Japan); Yasui, Hiroshi [San O Co., Ltd., Kyoto (Japan); Fukue, Masaharu [Tokai Univ., Shimizu (Japan). Marine Science and Technology

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The sediments deposited on the bottoms of seas, lakes, and rivers can be contaminated with hazardous and toxic substances as a result of the discharge of human activities. Therefore, since the natural remediation process cannot be expected, contaminated or polluted as well as highly organic sediments must be treated as waste and be properly disposed for human health and environmental protection. One method of disposal may be to remove the sediments by dredging and to treat them with a proper technique. The main problems in the dredging method are as follows: (1) since sediments usually have very high water content, it is necessary to decrease the volume and solidify them for the next procedure, e.g., landfill; (2) the leachates from the sediments should be treated also. It is required that the water to be discharged be kept at a quality satisfying the level of standards. This paper describes an experimental study using a solidification system performed for the cleanup of the bottom of a river. To promote the solidification of the system, several agents, such as lime, cement, polymer, resin, etc., were used. The results show that these agents strongly influence the solidification characteristics of the sediments and the quality of the leachate from the sediments.

  13. Fossil energy waste management. Technology status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bossart, S.J.; Newman, D.A.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the current status and recent accomplishments of the Fossil Energy Waste Management (FE WM) projects sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The primary goal of the Waste Management Program is to identify and develop optimal strategies to manage solid by-products from advanced coal technologies for the purpose of ensuring the competitiveness of advanced coal technologies as a future energy source. The projects in the Fossil Energy Waste Management Program are divided into three types of activities: Waste Characterization, Disposal Technologies, and Utilization Technologies. This technology status report includes a discussion on barriers to increased use of coal by-products. Also, the major technical and nontechnical challenges currently being addressed by the FE WM program are discussed. A bibliography of 96 citations and a list of project contacts is included if the reader is interested in obtaining additional information about the FE WM program.

  14. Energy aspects of solid waste management: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Eighteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference entitled ``Energy Aspects of Solid Waste Management`` was held in Chicago, Illinois on October 29--30, 1990. The conference program was developed by a planning committee that drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. Within this framework, the committee identified a number of key topic areas surrounding solid waste management in Illinois which were the focus of the conference. These issues included: review of the main components of the solid waste cycle in the Midwest and what the relative impact of waste reduction, recycling, incineration and land disposal might be on Illinois` and the Midwest`s solid waste management program. Investigation of special programs in the Midwest dealing with sewage sludge, combustion residuals and medical/infectious wastes. Review of the status of existing landfills in Illinois and the Midwest and an examination of the current plans for siting of new land disposal systems. Review of the status of incinerators and waste-to-energy systems in Illinois and the Midwest, as well as an update on activities to maximize methane production from landfills in the Midwest.

  15. Energy aspects of solid waste management: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Eighteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference entitled Energy Aspects of Solid Waste Management'' was held in Chicago, Illinois on October 29--30, 1990. The conference program was developed by a planning committee that drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. Within this framework, the committee identified a number of key topic areas surrounding solid waste management in Illinois which were the focus of the conference. These issues included: review of the main components of the solid waste cycle in the Midwest and what the relative impact of waste reduction, recycling, incineration and land disposal might be on Illinois' and the Midwest's solid waste management program. Investigation of special programs in the Midwest dealing with sewage sludge, combustion residuals and medical/infectious wastes. Review of the status of existing landfills in Illinois and the Midwest and an examination of the current plans for siting of new land disposal systems. Review of the status of incinerators and waste-to-energy systems in Illinois and the Midwest, as well as an update on activities to maximize methane production from landfills in the Midwest.

  16. Radiological assessment of dredging application for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radiological assessment of dredging application for Oldbury power station (2009) Cefas Environment 14 /2009 RADIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF DREDGING APPLICATION FOR OLDBURY POWER STATION (2009) The Centre material disposal ­ Part II FEPA #12;2 RADIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF DREDGING APPLICATION FOR OLDBURY POWER

  17. Radiological assessment of dredging application for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radiological assessment of dredging application for the port of Lancaster (2008) Cefas Environment 21/2008 RADIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF DREDGING APPLICATION FOR THE PORT OF LANCASTER (2008) The Centre Marine material disposal ­ Part II FEPA #12;2 RADIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF DREDGING APPLICATION

  18. Superfund Dredging Restoration Results in Widespread Regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinton, Jeffrey

    Superfund Dredging Restoration Results in Widespread Regional Reduction in Cadmium in Blue Crabs J connected to the Hudson River estuary. A major Superfund dredging cleanup in 1994-1995 removed most ofcadmiumsedimentconcentrationswithinthecovefollowing the cleanup. This unique study demonstrates the efficacy of a major dredging cleanup

  19. COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF A WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT FOR MONTEVIDEO; AND WASTE TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,000 hours per year), that is, a total of 640,000 tons of solid wastes per year. Montevideo, in 20101 COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF A WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT FOR MONTEVIDEO; AND WASTE TO ENERGY IN SMALL-benefit analysis by the author of a waste to energy (WTE) plant in Montevideo, Uruguay; the second part

  20. Puget Sound Dredged Disposal Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urabeck, F.J.; Phillips, K.E.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future disposal of dredged material in the Puget Sound estuary of the State of Washington is of major interest to Federal, state, and local governmental regulatory agencies, as well as those responsible for maintaining existing waterways and harbors. Elevated levels of toxic chemicals exist in bottom sediments of all the urban bays, with tumors and other biological abnormalities found in bottom fish associated with these water bodies. Public awareness of this situation has been heightened by extensive media coverage of recent government investigations of environmental conditions in Puget Sound. These investigations and public concerns have led to three ongoing regional planning efforts, all of which deal with Puget Sound water quality and marine bottom sediments. This paper reports on the Puget Sound Dredged Disposal Analysis (PSDDA), a 3-year joint Federal-state study primarily focusing on unconfined, open-water disposal of material dredged from Federal and non-Federal navigation projects. Study objectives include (a) selection of unconfined, open-water disposal sites; (b) development of sampling, testing, and test interpretation procedures to be used in evaluating the suitability of dredged material for disposal in Puget Sound waters; and (c) formulation of disposal site management plans. Preliminary findings for each of these objectives are discussed for central Puget Sound, which includes the ports of Seattle, Tacoma, and Everett.

  1. Energy Recovery from Municipal Solid WasteEnergy Recovery from Municipal Solid Waste WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT AT VIJAYAWADAWASTE TO ENERGY PLANT AT VIJAYAWADA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    TO ENERGY PLANT AT VIJAYAWADAWASTE TO ENERGY PLANT AT VIJAYAWADA #12;UNIQUE PROCESSUNIQUE PROCESS DEVELOPED BY TIFAC ,Govt of IndiaDEVELOPED BY TIFAC ,Govt of India M S W SOLAR DRYING SCREENING AIR CLASSI - FICATION WASTES #12;ENERGY FROM SOLID WASTESENERGY FROM SOLID WASTES VIJAYAWADA PLANTVIJAYAWADA PLANT #12;Pusher

  2. Transuranic (TRU) Waste | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act as "waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting...

  3. The 2010 ERC Directory of Waste-to-Energy Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    . Several communities are also in the process of developing greenfield waste-to-energy facilities. The development of new capac- ity reflects the desire of local governments to exercise control of solid waste de- creased waste-to-energy capacity. In fact, policymakers are looking at the development of waste

  4. Energy Recovery from Solid Waste for Small Cities - Has the Time Really Come?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winn, W. T., Jr.; Paxton, W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to consider energy recovery from solid waste using modular, two stage incinerations with waste heat recovery....

  5. Identifying Energy Waste through Dense Power Sensing and Utilization Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Identifying Energy Waste through Dense Power Sensing and Utilization Monitoring Maria Kazandjieva the efficiency of such a computing system requires detailed data of both en- ergy consumption and energy waste to differentiate energy used well from energy waste. This is an important difference from pre- vious work [8, 14

  6. NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Hydro-dynamic Dredge Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Hydro-dynamic Dredge Surveys: Surf Clams and Ocean Quahogs December 19..................................................................................................................................... 1 NOAA Fisheries Hydro-dynamic Clam Dredge Survey Protocols........................................................................... 5 Clam Dredge Construction and Repair

  7. ERDCTR-11-2 Dredging Operations and Environmental Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ERDCTR-11-2 Dredging Operations and Environmental Research Program and Louisiana Coastal Area Science and Technology Office Application of Long Distance Conveyance (LDC) of Dredged Sediments 2011 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Dredging Operations and Environmental

  8. NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Sea Scallop Dredge Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Sea Scallop Dredge Surveys January 7, 2004 Prepared by: Members..................................................................................................................................... 5 NOAA Fisheries Sea Scallop Dredge Survey Protocols............................................................................................................................. 10 Changes to Regional Scallop Dredge Protocols

  9. Environmental effects of dredging: Predicting and monitoring dredge-induced dissolved oxygen reduction. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houston, L.; LaSalle, M.W.; Lunz, J.D.

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This note summarizes the results of research into the potential for dissolved oxygen (DO) reduction associated with dredging operations. Efforts toward development of a simple computational model for predicting the degree of dredge-induced DO reduction are described along with results of a monitoring program around a bucket dredge operation.

  10. Risk-based budgeting for maintenance dredging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, M.R.; Moser, D.A. [Army Corps of Engineers, Ft. Belvoir, VA (United States). Inst. for Water Resources

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Corps of Engineers must estimate the budget required to conduct maintenance dredging at hundreds of sites across the country. The amount of funds needed to do the maintenance dredging is highly uncertain and there are risks associated with overestimates and underestimates. A risk-based approach to the budgeting process for maintenance dredging can help identify the uncertainty and assess and manage the associated risk. A concept and preliminary plan for a risk-based approach for developing budgets for maintenance dredging is presented.

  11. Energy from Waste: Preparing Today for Tomorrow's Energy Needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krueger, R. P.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses the question of why Hooker Chemical Company, a subsidiary of Occidental Petroleum Corporation, would turn to solid waste as an energy alternative. It presents the considerations in the company's decision to construct a $70...

  12. Cost and production estimation for a cutter suction dredge 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miertschin, Michael Wayne

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AND RECOMMENDATIONS . . 55 REFERENCES . . 58 APPENDIX A. . 60 VITA . . 101 LIST OF FIGURES Page Figure 1. Diagram of a Cutter Head Dredge Figure 2, Sediment distribution in a pipeline. Figure 3. Velocity at limit of stationary deposition Figure 4... especially for maintenance dredging in more shallow channels, the cutter head dredge transports the dredged material via pipeline to the disposal site. Fundamentals of the Cutter Head Dredge A diagram of a cutter suction dredge is displayed for reference...

  13. Turning waste into energy beats landfilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Turning waste into energy beats landfilling By Christopher Hume The Hamilton Spectator (Nov 16, the fact remains that dumping garbage in a landfill site is far more environmentally destructive, damaging wrong with that picture: it describes landfill, where spontaneous combustion occurs regularly

  14. Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment of Energy MicrosoftVOLUMEWORKFORCENovember 5, 2014 9:00AM

  15. Zero Waste, Renewable Energy & Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    incinerator has a high potential for energy recovery. Its primary or boiler efficiency exceeds 80 %, the power efficiency amounts to 20 ­ 25 % and in modern plant

  16. Feasibility Study on Solid Waste to Energy Technological Aspects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    Feasibility Study on Solid Waste to Energy Technological Aspects Yuzhong Tan College of Engineering seeks to compare and evaluate each technology by reviewing waste to energy reports and seeking.funginstitute.berkeley.edu #12; Feasibility Study on Solid Waste to Energy Technological

  17. Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell Director ofDepartmentDRAFT

  18. Waste Management | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sureReportsofDepartmentSeries |Attacks |VisualizingWarm Weather

  19. Treatment of dredged sludge by mechanical dehydration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maekawa, T.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sludge deposits in the water area damage the ecosystems and environments; their elimination has always been an urgent task for human communities. Generally, sludge deposits are dredged out of the bottom of the water area, transported to, and discharged at a large disposal area on land. Recently, however, it has become increasingly difficult to secure disposal areas and routes of speedy transportation for disposal of dredged sludge. Accordingly, there is an urgent need to reduce both the volume of dredged sludge and the size of the disposal area. This mechanical method is different from the conventional engineering dehydration by loading, consolidation, and drainage in that the dredged sludge is separated into sludge cakes and clean water that can be returned to the water area through mechanical centrifugal dehydration. Sludge deposits are distributed thin and wide on the bottom of the water area, and a pump dredge has been proved effective in many cases for dredging the upper layers of sludge deposits accurately and without creating turbidity in water. This mechanical sludge treatment technique can be most efficient when used in combination with a pump dredge. This method offers the following advantages: (a) It requires smaller space for treatment and disposal of dredged sludge than the conventional method. (b) Facilities and costs for transportation can be reduced. (c) Various systems can be adopted for transportation of sludge cakes. (d) This system is transportable and compact and can be constructed anywhere either on land or on water.

  20. Waste Disposal | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystems AnalysisVOLUME I A HISTORY OF8, 2010Local Economy,

  1. Waste Management | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystems AnalysisVOLUME I A HISTORY OF8, 2010Local Economy,Reports and

  2. Waste Processing | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystems AnalysisVOLUME I A HISTORY OF8, 2010Local Economy,Reports

  3. Waste2Tricity | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation, search Name:Waste2Energy Holdings

  4. Energy utilization: municipal waste incineration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaBeck, M.F.

    1981-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment is made of the technical and economical feasibility of converting municipal waste into useful and useable energy. The concept presented involves retrofitting an existing municipal incinerator with the systems and equipment necessary to produce process steam and electric power. The concept is economically attractive since the cost of necessary waste heat recovery equipment is usually a comparatively small percentage of the cost of the original incinerator installation. Technical data obtained from presently operating incinerators designed specifically for generating energy, documents the technical feasibility and stipulates certain design constraints. The investigation includes a cost summary; description of process and facilities; conceptual design; economic analysis; derivation of costs; itemized estimated costs; design and construction schedule; and some drawings.

  5. renewable energy from waste 1730 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE, NW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    greenhouse gas emissions Waste-to-energy achieves the reduction of greenhouse gas emission through three separate mechanisms: 1) by generating electrical power or steam, waste-to-energy avoids carbon dioxide (CO2 mechanisms provide a true accounting of the greenhouse gas emission reduction potential of waste

  6. The Performance and Environmental Effects of a Hydraulic Clam Dredge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Performance and Environmental Effects of a Hydraulic Clam Dredge THOMAS L MEYER, RICHARD A to Nantucket, Mass. Hydraulic clam dredges with 0.76 m and 1.2 m (30 and 48 inch) wide blades were used during these surveys (Serchuk et aI., 1979). The efficiency of these dredges and the general effect of dredging

  7. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell Director ofDepartmentDRAFT -Waste Isolation Pilot

  8. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell Director ofDepartmentDRAFT -Waste Isolation

  9. Waste to Energy | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation, search Name: Waste-to-Energyto

  10. Wastes Hazardous or Solid | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation, search Contents 1Wastes Hazardous or Solid

  11. Transuranic (TRU) Waste | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystems Analysis Success| Department ofServices »Transuranic (TRU) Waste

  12. Idaho Solid Waste Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty, Texas:ITCSolid Waste Webpage Abstract This webpage

  13. Solid Waste Program Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, NewSingapore JumpSolarezoSolicore Inc Jump to:Solid Waste

  14. Sandia Energy - Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementing Nonlinear757KelleyEffectsonSandia'sEvent VideoWaste Isolation

  15. COMPARATIVE DISTRIBUTION OF MOLLUSKS IN DREDGED AND UN-DREDGED PORTIONS OF AN ESTUARY, WITH A SYSTEMATIC LIST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMPARATIVE DISTRIBUTION OF MOLLUSKS IN DREDGED AND UN- DREDGED PORTIONS OF AN ESTUARY in dredged canals than In the predominantly sand and shell sediments In undredged This report compares the numbers and vari~ eties of mollusks in fine sediments of dredged canals with those found in undisturbed

  16. Environmental effects of dredging: Guide to selecting a dredge for minimizing resuspension of sediment. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, D.F.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note contains assessments of conventional and special-purpose dredges in removing sediment with minimal sediment resuspension. If sediment resuspension is a critical factor in dredging areas of contaminated material, the following guidance will aid in specifying the dredge and operating conditions. Investigations were conducted as part of the Corps of Engineers Improvement of Operations and Maintenance Techniques (IOMT) Research Program to evaluate the resuspension of sediment into the water column due to dredging operations. Laboratory, field, and literature studies have been used to define the sediment resuspension characteristics of most conventional and several special-purpose dredges. The natural hydrophobic tendency of most organic contaminants and the high sediment-sorptive capacity for inorganic contaminants limits release to the soluble forms and makes the simple measure of sediment resuspension during dredging a relative measure of the potential for contaminant release.

  17. Puget Sound Dredged Disposal Analysis: Management plan assessment report. Dredged Material Management Year 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Puget Sound Dredged Disposal Analysis (PSDDA) is an interagency program for the management of unconfined, open-water disposal of dredged material into Puget Sound, Washington. The Management Plans for the PSDDA program identify disposal sites, describe dredged material evaluation procedures, and establish site monitoring and management practices. The plans also commit the involved agencies to a cooperative annual review process which evaluates disposal site use and conditions, dredged material testing results, and new scientific information, in order to determine if changes to the evaluation procedures and/or disposal site management practices are needed. Sampling was conducted to determine any chemical/biological contamination.

  18. Waste-to-Energy | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell Director ofDepartmentDRAFT -WasteinThisThis

  19. Camargo Waste to Energy Power Plant Hamed Zamenian1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    are discarded in landfills. The Camargo Waste to Energy (WTE) power station is an opportunity to continue pyrolysis technology to convert organic-based wastes into valuable products like pyro-gas, pyro products. This facility provides a nearly zero-landfill carbon neutral solution to the waste management

  20. (www.wtert.gr) Waste-to-Energy Research &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S.A. (cooperating with Professor N. Themelis) , in the scientific fields: energy recovery from solid wastes, potable that owns intellectual property in the production of synthetic construction aggregates from solid waste technologies for the treatment of various waste materials, conduct additional academic research as required

  1. Dredged and Fill Material Disposal (North Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter provides regulations for the disposal of dredged and fill material. Any entity desiring to dispose of such material must first obtain a permit, and the State Engineer has the...

  2. DECONTAMINATION AND BENEFICIAL USE OF DREDGED MATERIALS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STERN, E.A.; LODGE, J.; JONES, K.W.; CLESCERI, N.L.; FENG, H.; DOUGLAS, W.S.

    2000-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Our group is leading a large-sale demonstration of dredged material decontamination technologies for the New York/New Jersey Harbor. The goal of the project is to assemble a complete system for economic transformation of contaminated dredged material into an environmentally-benign material used in the manufacture of a variety of beneficial use products. This requires the integration of scientific, engineering, business, and policy issues on matters that include basic knowledge of sediment properties, contaminant distribution visualization, sediment toxicity, dredging and dewatering techniques, decontamination technologies, and product manufacturing technologies and marketing. A summary of the present status of the system demonstrations including the use of both existing and new manufacturing facilities is given here. These decontamination systems should serve as a model for use in dredged material management plans of regions other than NY/NJ Harbor, such as Long Island Sound, where new approaches to the handling of contaminated sediments are desirable.

  3. Paducah Waste Disposal | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732onMakeEducationRemediation » Paducah Waste Disposal Paducah

  4. Buffalo river dredging demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Averett, D.E.; Zappi, P.A.; Tatem, H.E.; Gibson, A.C.; Tominey, E.A.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Corps of Engineers Buffalo District conducted a demonstration of equipment for dredging contaminated sediments. Several thousand cubic yards of sediment were removed from outside the Buffalo River Federal navigation channel limits using three dredge types: (1) open bucket, (2) enclosed bucket, and (3) submersible pump. The effectiveness of a silt screen deployed downstream of the dredge to reduce suspended sediment transport was also evaluated. Extensive sediment and water column monitoring and sampling were conducted during the 2-week demonstration as part of the effort to determine sediment resuspension rates and contaminant releases associated with the dredging operations. Water column samples were analyzed for total suspended solids, total organic carbon, PCBs, PAHs, metals, ammonia, and pH. A water column bioassay test using Daphnia magna was also performed to assess toxicity effects of the dredging operation. Results of this study were used to assess and refine techniques and laboratory tests that have been previously developed by the Corps of Engineers to predict sediment resuspension rates and contaminant releases. In another phase of the study, the Bureau of Mines demonstrated the use of polyelectrolytes for rapid removal of suspended solids from a dilute dredged material slurry.

  5. Energy Secretary Bodman Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Mike Waldron, 202586-4940 Addthis Related Articles Agreement on New Commitments for Hanford Tank Waste Cleanup Sent to Federal Judge Energy Secretary Chu, EPA Administrator...

  6. ISWA Study Tour WASTE-TO-ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .30 pm ­ 2.00 pm Development of Municipal Solid Waste Management and Treatment Facilities in Vienna, Treatment, and Intermediate Storage - without any disposal of untreated wastes exceeding 5 % TOC and public acceptance of hazardous waste treatment and waste incineration plants (typical "lulu" projects

  7. Waste Minimization: A Hidden Energy Savings?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Good, R. L.; Hunt, K. E.

    vation and Recovery Act (RCRA), serve to regulate waste handling, storage, and disposal. However, these and other governmental laws and regulations have a common purpose: ultimate waste management is not producing waste at all. The common terms...-examination of waste generation within the petro chemical industry. In today's political/regulatory arena, industrial waste, both hazardous and non hazardous, has become an extreme potential liability in handling, storing, and disposal. Traditional methods...

  8. Residue disposal from waste-to-energy facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, P.; O'Leary, P.; Cross, F.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When considering a waste-to-energy project, some local officials believe that waste-to-energy is a complete alternative to landfilling. While these projects can reduce waste volume substantially, the process will still produce residues that must be properly handled in order to protect the environment. All systems produce fly ash and bottom ash, and some systems also produce wastewater. This article discusses alternative methods for addressing these residue control problems.

  9. Waste to Energy Developers WTED | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation, search Name: Waste-to-Energy Developers

  10. The renewable energy contribution from waste across Europe.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Incineration with Energy Recovery Mixed residual waste WtE Steam -> Electr. & Heat Av 50 Range 47-80 Landfill Biomass Energy Plants incineration,gasification Collected & sorted waste wood BEP Steam -> Electr. & Heat in total 11 #12;Anaerobic Digestion underlying assumptions units 2006 2010 2020Real 2020 Pot Volume

  11. Energy from Waste: Preparing Today for Tomorrow's Energy Needs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krueger, R. P.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    velocity air blows through the refuse, lifting the lighter particles upward. Heavier materials, affected by gravity and vibration, tend to fall down the inclined surface toward the discharge area. A final blast of air entrains most of the remain ing light... Conversion of Refuse Advanced by Application of Basic Combustion Principles," AIChE Symposium on Solid Waste Disposal, 1971. 8. Klaus S. Feindler, "Refuse Power Plant Technology - State of the Art Review," The Energy Bureau, Inc., December 1976, p. 7...

  12. Problems associated with solid wastes from energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, S.Y.; Fradkin, L.; Barisas, S.; Surles, T.; Morris, S.; Crowther, A.; DeCarlo, V.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste streams from many energy-related technologies including coal, oil shale, tar sands, geothermal, oil and gas extraction, and nuclear power generation are reviewed with an emphasis on waste streams from coal and oil shale technologies. This study has two objectives. The first objective is to outline the available information on energy-related solid wastes. Data on chemical composition and hazardous biological characteristics are included, supplemented by regulatory reviews and data on legally designated hazardous waste streams. The second objective is to provide disposal and utilization options. Solid waste disposal and recovery requirements specified under the RCRA are emphasized. Information presented herein should be useful for policy, environmental control, and research and development decision making regarding solid and hazardous wastes from energy production.

  13. Energy from Waste: A good practice guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    including central and local Government, the public and professional waste managers. Since the publication of a more sustainable approach to waste management, involving public participation, greater levels new to municipal waste management, and drawing on good practice from the UK and overseas, I am sure

  14. Dredging elutriate test (DRET) development. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiGiano, F.A.; Miller, C.T.; Yoon, J.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The removal of contaminated sediments from waterways by dredging generates concern about the release of contaminants to the water column. The ability to predict the magnitude of these potential releases during the project planning process will improve decision making in regard to water quality impacts and controls or mitigation measures for the dredging project. This report describes the development of a simple laboratory test, the dredging elutriate test (DRET), to predict the concentration of contaminants in the water column at the point of dredging. The DRET is procedurally similar to the modified elutriate test developed by the Corps of Engineers to predict the contaminant concentrations in effluent from a confined disposal facility. The test involves mixing sediment and site water, allowing the heavier solid particles to settle, sampling and supernatant, and analyzing for dissolved and particulate bound contaminants. Results of the laboratory test compared well with field data collected while dredging New Bedford Harbor sediment, which was contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls. Most of the contaminated loading was associated with the suspended particles.

  15. Cost Estimation and Production Evaluation for Hopper Dredges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollinberger, Thomas E.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Dredging projects are expensive government funded projects that are contracted out and competitively bid upon. When planning a trailing suction hopper dredge project or bidding on the request for proposal for such a project, having an accurate cost...

  16. Cost and production estimation for a cutter suction dredge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miertschin, Michael Wayne

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for accurate cost estimates is well recognized in the dredging industry. In order for a dredging contractor to efficiently execute a project from its conception to its completion, an accurate estimate of the final cost is imperative...

  17. Estimating production and cost for clamshell mechanical dredges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adair, Robert Fletcher

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    methodology for production and cost estimation for clamshell dredge projects. There are current methods of predicting clamshell dredge production which rely on production curves and constant cycle times. This thesis calculates production estimation...

  18. Cost estimating projects for large cutter and hopper dredges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belesimo, Francesco John

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimating the cost of a dredging project is the most important part of a project's life cycle. A precise account of the costs associated with performing dredging work begins with the production estimate and ends with the cost estimate...

  19. Waste-to-energy permitting sourcebook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longwell, D.; Wegrecki, A.; Williams, D. (Bechtel Group, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States))

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental issues, regulatory processes and approvals important in obtaining a permit to construct and/or operate a waste-to-energy (WTE) facility are identified and discussed. Environmental issues include: (1) air emission levels, their control and potential impacts, (2) ash leachability, treatment, and disposal, (3) potential health risks from emissions, and (4) other issues such as need/benefit and public perception of WTE. Laws, regulations and approvals that can affect project development are identified and listed, and potential regulatory trends are discussed. A general permit acquisition plan is also presented. An analysis of environmental and regulatory data obtained from the literature, regulatory agencies, and specific projects is presented. California and Massachusetts, both with regulations generally more stringent than federal regulations and considered environmentally conservative, were selected for detailed state regulatory review. Two project case histories (Commerce Refuse-to-Energy (RTE) Project in California and SEMASS WTE Project in Massachusetts) were selected to illustrate: (1) how regulations are actually applied to a project, (2) project-specific permit and operating conditions, and (3) project-specific environmental issues. Modern WTE plots employ state-of-the-art air emission control technologies and strategies to reduce air emission is to levels below regulatory requirements and to reduce estimated health risks to within EPA's acceptable risk range. WTE ash leachate can exhibit hazardous waste characteristics, primarily lead and cadmium. However, modern landfills utilize liners and leachate collection systems to prevent infiltration of leachate into the groundwater supply. Modern WTE plants employ dry systems and have zero process wastewater discharge.

  20. Laboratory Assessment of Potential Impacts to Dungeness Crabs from Disposal of Dredged Material from the Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vavrinec, John; Pearson, Walter H.; Kohn, Nancy P.; Skalski, J. R.; Lee, Cheegwan; Hall, Kathleen D.; Romano, Brett A.; Miller, Martin C.; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.

    2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Dredging of the Columbia River navigation channel has raised concerns about dredging-related impacts on Dungeness crabs (Cancer magister) in the estuary, mouth of the estuary, and nearshore ocean areas adjacent to the Columbia River. The Portland District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers engaged the Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to review the state of knowledge and conduct studies concerning impacts on Dungeness crabs resulting from disposal during the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project and annual maintenance dredging in the mouth of the Columbia River. The present study concerns potential effects on Dungeness crabs from dredged material disposal specific to the mouth of the Columbia River.

  1. Ris-R-Report Energy Systems Analysis of Waste to Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-Report Energy Systems Analysis of Waste to Energy Technologies by use of EnergyPLAN Marie Münster Risø-R-1667(EN) April 2009 #12;Author: Marie Münster Title: Energy Systems Analysis of Waste to Energy Technologies by use of EnergyPLAN Division: Systems Analysis Division Risø-R-1667(EN) April 2009

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - Tribal Leader Forum Waste to Energy Introductio...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    LLC Tribal Leader Forum: Waste-to-Energy Introduction July 24, 2014 Randy Hunsberger Waste-to-energy Introduction Feedstocks Recycling Conversion Products and Pathways Major...

  3. Hydraulic dredging, a sediment removal technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spotts, J.W.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sediment was successfully removed from a Peabody Coal Company pond near Macon, Missouri, by a Mud Cat Model SP-810 hydraulic dredge. Previous attempts using land-based equipment had been unsatisfactory. The hydraulic-powered auger and submerged pump easily removed 882 m/sup 3/ (1154 yd/sup 3/) and pumped the slurry a distance of 305 m (1000 ft) to a disposal area. The hydraulic dredge was more effective and cheaper to operate than land-based equipment. The dredge cost was $1.31/m/sup 3/ ($1.00/yd/sup 3/), the dragline cost was $6.54/m/sup 3/ ($5.00/yd/sup 3/) and the front-end loader cost was $15.70/m/sup 3/ ($12.00/yd/sup 3/), under optimum conditions.

  4. Dredging, Bioinvasions and Andrew Cohen and Paul Crozier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dredging, Bioinvasions and Sturgeon Andrew Cohen and Paul Crozier Center for Research on Aquatic & Carlton 1998 #12;Sturgeon Introduction or Establishment of Exotic Organisms Dredging #12;Introduction or Establishment of Exotic Organisms Dredging #12;· Altering ship traffic · Altering ballast practices · Altering

  5. Predicting effects of dredging on a crab population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Predicting effects of dredging on a crab population: An equivalent adult loss approach Thomas C! a University of Washington. seattle. Washington 98 J95 Abstract.-The effect of benthic dredging on coastal entrainment on fishery stocks. Several important dif· ferences between power plant and dredge operations

  6. EVALUATING THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMAPCT OF DREDGING BURNABY LAKE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;EVALUATING THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMAPCT OF DREDGING BURNABY LAKE FINAL REPORT DOE FRAP 1997 the environmental impacts of dredging Burnaby Lake. The purpose of this study is to assess the potential environmental implications of dredging the lake for environmental rejuvenation in order to assist decision

  7. DREDGED MATERIAL DISPOSAL ECONOMICS By Jay R. Lund,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    DREDGED MATERIAL DISPOSAL ECONOMICS By Jay R. Lund,1 Associate Member, ASCE ABSTRACT: Recent difficulties in siting dredged material disposal facilities are increasing interests in alternative disposal or reuse of dredged material and the possible adverse consequences of any increases in the generation

  8. SOME EFFECTS OF DREDGING ON POPULATIONS OF MACROBENTHIC ORGANISMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOME EFFECTS OF DREDGING ON POPULATIONS OF MACROBENTHIC ORGANISMS EUGENE H. KAPLAN,' J. R. WELKER after a navigation channel was dredged through a small, shallow lagoon. A new sampler which penetrated of certain particulate and dissolved nutrients changed after dredging, but no correlation was observed

  9. Stratified random dredge surveys have been conducted in Chesapeake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    410 Stratified random dredge surveys have been conducted in Chesapeake Bay yearly since 1989 during large. Nevertheless, catch per unit of effort (CPUE) from the annual dredge surveys gene- rally provides. A method for estimating dredge catching efficiency for blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, in Chesapeake Bay

  10. Experiments to assess the relative dredging performances of research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Experiments to assess the relative dredging performances of research and commercial vessels RESEARCH FISHERIES RESEARCH TECHNICAL REPORT NUMBER 96 Experiments to assess the relative dredging ............................................................................................................................................. 9 #12;1. INTRODUCTION 4.44I Dredge surveys to assessthe spatial distributionand abundance of scallop

  11. INCREASING STORAGE CAPAPCITY OF DREDGED MATERIAL MANAGEMENT AREAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INCREASING STORAGE CAPAPCITY OF DREDGED MATERIAL MANAGEMENT AREAS Timothy D. Stark, Ph.D., P 39180 Paper Published in the Proceedings of: 15th Annual Meeting of Western Dredging Association (WEDA XV) San Diego, CA May 1994 #12;2 INCREASING STORAGE CAPAPCITY OF DREDGED MAERIAL MANAGEMENT AREAS

  12. Example of latest techniques for bottom-sludge dredging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamasuna, J.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently in Japan, the biggest problems of the bottom sludge dredging are lack of enough room for dumping areas and preventing water contamination during dredging in terms of environmental aspects. The new dredging system introduced at this time has been developed for the above purposes.

  13. Waste-To-Energy Feasibility Analysis: A Simulation Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    -4337 | www.funginstitute.berkeley.edu #12;Abstract: The search for renewable and clean energies is one to lack of credits for renewable energy sources and improper incineration technologies with high CO2 in renewable energies, with very low CO2 emis- sions, making waste- to- energy a clean source of energy

  14. Dredging, remediation, and containment of contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demars, K.R.; Richardson, G.N.; Yong, R.N.; Chaney, R.C. [eds.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This conference was held June 23--24, 1994 in Montreal, Canada. One purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on identifying tests, methods, procedures, and materials, used in support of dredging, treatment, and containment of contaminated sediments that are in need of standardization. Another objective was to provide a forum for discussion of past dredging practices and future directions, including the effects of sediment properties and behavior, equipment requirements, and the impact of regulations. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  15. Reclamation of abandoned mined lands along th Upper Illinois Waterway using dredged material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Luik, A; Harrison, W

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sediments were sampled and characterized from 28 actual or proposed maintenance-dredging locations in the Upper Illinois Waterway, that is, the Calumet-Sag Channel, the Des Plaines River downstream of its confluence with the Calumet-Sag Channel, and the Illinois River from the confluence of the Kankakee and Des Plaines rivers to Havana, Illinois. Sufficient data on chemical constituents and physical sediments were obtained to allow the classification of these sediments by currently applicable criteria of the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency for the identification of hazardous, persistent, and potentially hazardous wastes. By these criteria, the potential dredged materials studied were not hazardous, persistent, or potentially hazardous; they are a suitable topsoil/ reclamation medium. A study of problem abandoned surface-mined land sites (problem lands are defined as being acidic and/or sparsely vegetated) along the Illinois River showed that three sites were particularly well suited to the needs of the Corps of Engineers (COE) for a dredged material disposal/reclamation site. Thes sites were a pair of municipally owned sites in Morris, Illinois, and a small corporately owned site east of Ottawa, Illinois, and adjacent to the Illinois River. Other sites were also ranked as to suitability for COE involvement in their reclamation. Reclamation disposal was found to be an economically competitive alternative to near-source confined disposal for Upper Illinois Waterway dredged material.

  16. Framework for real-time decision making: New Bedford Harbor pilot dredging study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, W.G.

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New Bedford Harbor is located along Buzzards Bay between the cities of New Bedford and Fairhaven, Mass. Since the 1940s, electronics and manufacturing companies in the area have discharged effluents containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) into the Acushnet River and the harbor. Over the past 15 years, nearly 18,000 acres of PCB- and heavy metals-contaminated sediment have been identified, with PCB concentrations as high as 100,000 parts per million (ppm) in some areas of the upper harbor. In 1982, the site was added to the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) National Priorities List of hazardous waste sites slated for cleanup under the Superfund Act. A feasibility study conducted by EPA in 1984 proposed several alternatives for the remediation of NBH including dredging contaminated sediments out of the harbor. Federal, State, and local officials, as well as the public, expressed concern over dredging. Many believed that sediments resuspended during dredging would cause the release of contaminants that would affect biota inhabiting both the harbor and Buzzards Bay. Others cited potential pollution problems from contaminated water (leachate) leaking from the proposed disposal site. In order to address these concerns, the EPA decided to pre-test dredging and possible disposal options.

  17. The Conversion of Waste to Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, T.; Cheek, L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    quent slagging of cyclones and boilers. (3) Large fan power requirements. The gasification of solid wastes may be advantageous especially when converting equipment designed to burn oil or gas. Fixed bed gasifiers have been found to be a problem... costing $78,000 and saving $33,000/year. Fluidized beds are used for a variety of combustion applications including wood and agricultural wastes, waste treatment sludge, and chemical incineration. A fluidized bed can be used to recover non...

  18. Pretreatment options for waste-to-energy facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz, L.F.; Savage, G.M. [CalRecovery, Inc., Hercules, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes various options available for processing MSW before the material is introduced to waste-to-energy facilities. Specifically, the paper reviews the type of equipment currently available for the recovery of resources from the waste stream. In addition, the paper discusses other matters which in many cases are ignored but are extremely important for the design of the processes. Some of these matters include the use of reliable waste characterization data during conceptual design and definition of the properties and specifications of the recovered materials and/or energy forms (e.g., RDF). Finally, the paper discusses other factors that have a critical impact on the facility such as potential environmental consequences of pretreatment of the waste prior to its combustion in waste-to-energy facilities.

  19. Energy Management by Recycling of Vehicle Waste Oil in Pakistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassan Ali Durrani

    Abstract: Pakistan has been suffering from an energy crisis for about half a decade now. The power crisis is proving to be unbearable, so importing huge amount of hydrocarbons from abroad to meet its energy needs. This study therefore focuses on the analysis of energy and environmental benefits for vehicle waste lubricant oil pertaining to its reuse by means of: (i) regain the heating value of used oils in a combustion process and (ii) recycling of waste oil to make fresh oil products. The waste oil samples were tested by ICP method and the test results were compared with standard requirements. It was found that the matter could effectively be solved by means of waste oil management practices together with collection centers, transports and processors by encouraging and financial help for the recycling industry. The importance and worth of this work concludes minor levels of hazardous elements when regained the heating value from the waste lubricating oil.

  20. Environmental effects of dredging. Implementation approach for thalweg disposal of dredged material. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olin, T.J.; Miller, A.C.; Palermo, M.R.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note introduces the concept of thalweg disposal and associated considerations for implementation, including disposal site selection, environmental and regulatory considerations, and suitable dredging methods and equipment. Monitoring procedures are also outlined.

  1. Automated dredging and disposal alternatives management system (ADDAMS). Environmental effects of dredging. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note describes the current capabilities and availability of the Automated Dredging and Disposal Alternatives Management System (ADDAMS). The technical note replaces the earlier Technical Note EEDP-06-12, which should be discarded. Planning, design, and management of dredging and dredged material disposal projects often require complex or tedious calculations or involve complex decision-making criteria. In addition, the evaluations often must be done for several disposal alternatives or disposal sites. ADDAMS is a personal computer (PC)-based system developed to assist in making such evaluations in a timely manner. ADDAMS contains a collection of computer programs (applications) designed to assist in managing dredging projects. This technical note describes the system, currently available applications, mechanisms for acquiring and running the system, and provisions for revision and expansion.

  2. Management of dredged material at Toledo, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.R.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Toledo Harbor, at the mouth of the Maumee River in northwest Ohio, is the second most active port and largest single dredging project on the Great Lakes. Over 770,000 cub. m is dredged each year. material has been confined since 1955. Most of this half of the harbor was declared suitable In 1983, over water disposal. Monitoring of the open-water disposal has not shown any adverse impact on water quality. Studies of the release or bioavailability of phosphorus (P) bound to the sediments indicate that P is released from the sediments at a rate of from 10 to 30 percent per day. On an annual basis, dredging and disposal account for 0.4 to 0.6 percent of the total external loading of P to Lake Erie. High-resolution visible data from the French satellite SPOT were used to demonstrate the total extent of the dredging plume. Efforts will be made in the future to use the satellite for routine monitoring.

  3. Energy Conservation and Waste Reduction in the Metal Fabrication Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirk, M. C. Jr.; Looby, G. P.

    Reductions of energy use and waste generation can help manufacturers to be more profitable and more environmentally acceptable. Industrial Assessment Centers located at universities throughout the United States, funded by the U.S. Department...

  4. Next-Generation Power Electronics: Reducing Energy Waste and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to pay for. In fact, a typical laptop loses a quarter of the energy that goes into it as waste heat. But there's a new technology that could change the game: it's called wide...

  5. Recovery of Energy and Chrome from Leather Waste 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muralidhara, H. S.; Maggin, B.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .S. tanning industry may be met through an active conservation program. This program would be directed at the recovery of the energy available in the leather waste; the raw and finished tanned leather trimmings and cuttings resulting from tannery operations...

  6. New Bedford Harbor Superfund Project, Acushnet River estuary engineering feasibility study of dredging and dredged-material disposal alternatives. Report 1. Study overview. Technical report, August 1985-March 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francingues, N.R.; Averett, D.E.; Otis, M.J.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sediments in the New Bedford Harbor and Acushnet River Estuary have been contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyl compounds and heavy metals. The high levels of contamination have resulted in the New Bedford Harbor being placed on the National Priorities List of the Nation's worst hazardous waste sites. Efforts are under way to develop and implement remedial actions for protection of the environment under the Federal Superfund Program. This report is an introduction to and an overview of a series of reports describing the results of the EFS. It presents the overall study objectives and scope of work, describes the objectives and scope of the 10 EFS tasks, and presents a brief synopsis of the other 11 reports in the series. The EFS technical approach used field data-collection activities, literature reviews, laboratory (bench-scale) studies, and analytical and numerical modeling techniques to assess engineering feasibility and develop conceptual alternatives for dredging and dredged-material disposal. Technical and engineering issues addressed by the EFS included baseline mapping, geotechnical investigations, hydrodynamics, sediment resuspension and transport, contaminant releases to surface and ground water, dredged material settling properties, dredging equipment and controls, effluent treatment, solidification/stabilization of dredged material, confined-disposal-facility design, contained aquatic-disposal-facility design, and cost estimates for the alternatives evaluated.

  7. Environmental effects of dredging. Interim guidance for predicting quality of effluent discharged from confined dredged material disposal areas--data analysis. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palermo, M.R.; Engler, R.M.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following series of technical notes described the functions necessary for predicting the quality of effluent discharged from confined dredged material disposal areas during dredging operations.

  8. Dow's Energy/WRAP Contest- A 12-Yr Energy and Waste Reduction Success Story

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, K. E.

    DOW'S ENERGY/WRAP CONTEST A 12-YR ENERGY AND WASTE REDUCTION SUCCESS STORY Kenneth E. Nelson, Manager, Energy Conservation, Dow U.S.A. ABSTRACT Keeping employees interested in saving energy and reducing waste is a constant challenge. Ideally... conservation program in 1981. It took the form of an annual Contest. In 1983, the Contest scope was expanded to included yield improvement, and in 1987, Dow's WRAP (Waste Reduction Always Pays) program was added. The Contest has been enormously successful...

  9. Energy Policy 33 (2005) 16911702 Paradise recovered: energy production and waste management in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Policy 33 (2005) 1691­1702 Paradise recovered: energy production and waste management in the earlier study and the island is currently seeking to modernize its energy production and waste management, high-energy production costs, and limited availability of suitable landfill sites render WTE facilities

  10. Advanced Sediment Washing for Decontamination of New York/New Jersey Harbor Dredged Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    .S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) ­ New York District, with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE1 Advanced Sediment Washing for Decontamination of New York/New Jersey Harbor Dredged Materials Focus: New York / New Jersey Harbor Region In the New York / New Jersey Harbor Region, the effect

  11. Haiti: Feasibility of Waste-to-Energy Options at the Trutier Waste Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrad, M. D.; Hunsberger, R.; Ness, J. E.; Harris, T.; Raibley, T.; Ursillo, P.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides further analysis of the feasibility of a waste-to-energy (WTE) facility in the area near Port-au-Prince, Haiti. NREL's previous analysis and reports identified anaerobic digestion (AD) as the optimal WTE technology at the facility. Building on the prior analyses, this report evaluates the conceptual financial and technical viability of implementing a combined waste management and electrical power production strategy by constructing a WTE facility at the existing Trutier waste site north of Port-au-Prince.

  12. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform isEnergyMeeting | Department of EnergyConversion, and

  13. Energy implications of integrated solid waste management systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Little, R.E.; McClain, G.; Becker, M.; Ligon, P.; Shapiro, K.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study develops estimates of energy use and recovery from managing municipal solid waste (MSW) under various collection, processing, and disposal scenarios. We estimate use and recovery -- or energy balance -- resulting from MSW management activities such as waste collection, transport, processing, and disposal, as well as indirect use and recovery linked to secondary materials manufacturing using recycled materials. In our analysis, secondary materials manufacturing displaces virgin materials manufacturing for 13 representative products. Energy implications are expressed as coefficients that measure the net energy saving (or use) of displacing products made from virgin versus recycled materials. Using data developed for the 1992 New York City Master Plan as a starting point, we apply our method to an analysis of various collection systems and 30 types of facilities to illustrate bow energy balances shift as management systems are modified. In sum, all four scenarios show a positive energy balance indicating the energy and advantage of integrated systems versus reliance on one or few technology options. That is, energy produced or saved exceeds the energy used to operate the solid waste system. The largest energy use impacts are attributable to processing, including materials separation and composting. Collection and transportation energy are relatively minor contributors. The largest two contributors to net energy savings are waste combustion and energy saved by processing recycled versus virgin materials. An accompanying spatial analysis methodology allocates energy use and recovery to New York City, New York State outside the city, the U.S., and outside the U.S. Our analytical approach is embodied in a spreadsheet model that can be used by energy and solid waste analysts to estimate impacts of management scenarios at the state and substate level.

  14. WASTE-TO-ENERGY RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL www.wtert.gr PRESS RELEASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WASTE-TO-ENERGY RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL www.wtert.gr 1 PRESS RELEASE INTERNATIONAL INTENSIVE event focus on state of the art technologies for sustainable waste management, entitled "Waste to Energy Industrial Park). About WTERT Greece (SYNERGIA): The Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council

  15. Environmental effects of dredging: Sediment resuspension by selected dredges. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Havis, R.N.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The size and concentration of sediment plumes measured in field studies of selected dredging equipment are described. This information is useful when sediment resuspension must be minimized because of adverse environmental impacts which may include the release of sediment-associated chemical contaminants. The information presented here is intended to supplement and update information given in a previous technical note on the same topic (Hayes 1986a). Dredging operations may be required to comply with in-stream State water quality standards based on maximum allowable concentrations of inorganic and organic compounds. Although the majority of materials requiring maintenance dredging in the United States is uncontaminated, the removal of contaminated sediments (estimated to be less than 10 percent of maintenance materials) poses a serious problem. Hence, a project to study the potential for contaminant release during dredging has been initiated through a field studies program. The field studies described here were conducted by the Waterways Experiment Station under the Improvement of Operations and Maintenance Techniques (IOMT) research program and in cooperation with other US Army Engineer Districts to evaluate the sediment resuspension characteristics of selected dredges (McLellan et al., in preparation).

  16. Environmental effects of dredging: Building, developing, and managing dredged material islands for bird habitat. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landin, M.C.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This note describes the environmental considerations and techniques that have been developed and tested for building, developing, and managing dredged material islands for use by birds for nesting and other life requirements. The text of this note was taken from lectures presented from 1979 to 1986 at the Dredging Short Courses held each year by the Texas AM University Center for Dredging Studies and from information compiled for Engineer Manual EM 1110-2-5026 entitled `Beneficial Uses of Dredged Material.` One hundred years of dredging and open-water disposal operations by the Corps of Engineers (CE), state agencies, and private enterprise has resulted in the creation of over 2000 man-made islands throughout US coastal waters, riverine waterways, and the Great Lakes. The CE continues to maintain an interest in developing such islands because of its responsibility in using environmentally acceptable disposal methods and sites, the increasing shortage of upland disposal sites, the need for wildlife habitats in waterway areas, and the islands` recreational potential.

  17. Energy Recovery Council (ERC) Wast to Energy (WTE) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJump to:Emminol Jump to:EnergEnergyEnergy PlusInformation

  18. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. Achieving the objective of modeling the performance of a disposal scenario requires describing processes involved in waste form degradation and radionuclide release at the subcontinuum scale, beginning with mechanistic descriptions of chemical reactions and chemical kinetics at the atomic scale, and upscaling into effective, validated constitutive models for input to high-fidelity continuum scale codes for coupled multiphysics simulations of release and transport. Verification and validation (V&V) is required throughout the system to establish evidence-based metrics for the level of confidence in M&S codes and capabilities, including at the subcontiunuum scale and the constitutive models they inform or generate. This Report outlines the nature of the V&V challenge at the subcontinuum scale, an approach to incorporate V&V concepts into subcontinuum scale modeling and simulation (M&S), and a plan to incrementally incorporate effective V&V into subcontinuum scale M&S destined for use in the NEAMS Waste IPSC work flow to meet requirements of quantitative confidence in the constitutive models informed by subcontinuum scale phenomena.

  19. Tank Waste and Waste Processing | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy:Whether you're a home builder or remodeling professional, aYourTank

  20. Tank Waste and Waste Processing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment ofEnergy State7/109T.M.TRUPACT-III Quickon ScaryServices

  1. Development of dredged ash disposal area, Paradise fossil plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paradise Steam-Electric Plant coal-fired facility in Muhlenberg County, Kentucky. This project is to construct a dredge pond near the Jacobs Creek ash pond capable of storing fly ash dredged from the ash pond. This will provide approximately 10 years of additional fly ash storage in the fly ash pond. Effluent from the dredge pond will be returned to the Jacobs Creek ash pond for discharge to Jacobs Creek. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Waste-to-Energy Design Proposal for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    and the amount of waste exported out of New York City by truck, train or barge to out-of-state landfills would be reduced by 15%. The installation of state-of-the-art emission control technologies at the facility would reduce gaseous emissions well below standards established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

  3. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS ON HARD CLAMS OF HAND RAKING AND POWER DREDGING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS ON HARD CLAMS OF HAND RAKING AND POWER DREDGING Marine Biobgical Laboratory DEC7 ........ Bullraking operations ............. Dredging operations .............. Underwater photography in relation to available population for bullraking and dredging (Figure 7) · · 32 Appendix "C

  4. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Recovery Plan | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong, Smart, andThomasWaste Heat Waste Heat - - to to

  5. Energy implications of the thermal recovery of biodegradable municipal waste materials in the United Kingdom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnley, Stephen, E-mail: s.j.burnley@open.ac.uk [Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Phillips, Rhiannon, E-mail: rhiannon.jones@environment-agency.gov.uk [Strategy Unit, Welsh Assembly Government, Ty Cambria, 29 Newport Road, Cardiff CF24 0TP (United Kingdom); Coleman, Terry, E-mail: terry.coleman@erm.com [Environmental Resources Management Ltd, Eaton House, Wallbrook Court, North Hinksey Lane, Oxford OX2 0QS (United Kingdom); Rampling, Terence, E-mail: twa.rampling@hotmail.com [7 Thurlow Close, Old Town Stevenage, Herts SG1 4SD (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: > Energy balances were calculated for the thermal treatment of biodegradable wastes. > For wood and RDF, combustion in dedicated facilities was the best option. > For paper, garden and food wastes and mixed waste incineration was the best option. > For low moisture paper, gasification provided the optimum solution. - Abstract: Waste management policies and legislation in many developed countries call for a reduction in the quantity of biodegradable waste landfilled. Anaerobic digestion, combustion and gasification are options for managing biodegradable waste while generating renewable energy. However, very little research has been carried to establish the overall energy balance of the collection, preparation and energy recovery processes for different types of wastes. Without this information, it is impossible to determine the optimum method for managing a particular waste to recover renewable energy. In this study, energy balances were carried out for the thermal processing of food waste, garden waste, wood, waste paper and the non-recyclable fraction of municipal waste. For all of these wastes, combustion in dedicated facilities or incineration with the municipal waste stream was the most energy-advantageous option. However, we identified a lack of reliable information on the energy consumed in collecting individual wastes and preparing the wastes for thermal processing. There was also little reliable information on the performance and efficiency of anaerobic digestion and gasification facilities for waste.

  6. Waste Energy Analysis Recovery for a Typical Food Processing Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, P. H.; Mann, L., Jr.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An energy analysis made for the Joan of Arc Food Processing Plant in St. Francisville, Louisiana indicated that a significant quantity of waste heat energy was being released to the atmosphere in the forms of low quality steam and hot flue gases...

  7. Waste Management Improvement Initiatives at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited - 13091

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Nicholas; Adams, Lynne; Wong, Pierre [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) has been in operation for over 60 years. Radioactive, mixed, hazardous and non-hazardous wastes have been and continue to be generated at CRL as a result of research and development, radioisotope production, reactor operation and facility decommissioning activities. AECL has implemented several improvement initiatives at CRL to simplify the interface between waste generators and waste receivers: - Introduction of trained Waste Officers representing their facilities or activities at CRL; - Establishment of a Waste Management Customer Support Service as a Single-Point of Contact to provide guidance to waste generators for all waste management processes; and - Implementation of a streamlined approach for waste identification with emphasis on early identification of waste types and potential disposition paths. As a result of implementing these improvement initiatives, improvements in waste management and waste transfer efficiencies have been realized at CRL. These included: 1) waste generators contacting the Customer Support Service for information or guidance instead of various waste receivers; 2) more clear and consistent guidance provided to waste generators for waste management through the Customer Support Service; 3) more consistent and correct waste information provided to waste receivers through Waste Officers, resulting in reduced time and resources required for waste management (i.e., overall cost); 4) improved waste minimization and segregation approaches, as identified by in-house Waste Officers; and 5) enhanced communication between waste generators and waste management groups. (authors)

  8. An overview of renewable energy utilization from municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration in Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    An overview of renewable energy utilization from municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration in Taiwan by imported fuels. In this regard, renewable energy like waste-to-energy is become attractive. The objective to promote the use of MSW-to-energy. q 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Waste-to-energy

  9. A study of offshore benthic communities in natural areas and in areas affected by dredging and dredged material disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry, Clyde Allan

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A STUDY QF OFFSHORE BENTHIC COMMUNITIES IN NATURAL AREAS AND IN AREAS AFFECTED BY DREDGING AND DREDGED MATERIAL DISPOSAL A Thesis by CLYDE ALLAN HENRY e Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major Subject: Biology A STCDY OF 0-FSHOBE BENTHIC COMKTNITIES IN NATURAL AREAS AND IN AREAS AFFECTED BY DREDGING AND DREDCFD NATERIAL DISPOSAL A Thesis by CLYDE ALLAN HENRY Approved...

  10. Environmental effects of dredging. Risk-based testing of dredged material for aquatic disposal evaluations. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillon, T.M.; Engler, R.M.; Patin, T.R.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note describes a risk-based framework for testing and evaluating dredged material scheduled for open-water disposal.

  11. Waste-to-Energy 25 Years Later: Technology with a Past, Present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    solution Quite a Ride: UpsQuite a Ride: Ups MacArthur Resource Recovery Facility Islip, New York #12; Waste-to-energy Falls, New York #12; European Union: waste-to- energy preferable to landfills European Union directives and Consulting Federation of New York Solid Waste Associations Solid Waste/Recycling Conference Federation of New

  12. Ris DTU 09-06-08 Waste-to-energy technologies in TIMES models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (focusing on Denmark) Long tradition for waste incineration for district heating · How to model waste that supply base-load district heating. #12;Risø DTU 09-06-08 13 Modelling new Waste for Energy Technologies-to-energy technologies in the Pan-European NEEDS- TIMES model Waste incineration for electricity and heat, landfill gas

  13. Capturing Waste Gas: Saves Energy, Lower Costs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuilding RemovalCSS Letter -SeptemberWorkshop |Capturing Waste Gas:

  14. Vitrification development plan for US Department of Energy mixed wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Lucerna, J. [EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States); Plodinec, M.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a general plan for conducting vitrification development for application to mixed wastes owned by the US Department of Energy. The emphasis is a description and discussion of the data needs to proceed through various stages of development. These stages are (1) screening at a waste site to determine which streams should be vitrified, (2) waste characterization and analysis, (3) waste form development and treatability studies, (4) process engineering development, (5) flowsheet and technical specifications for treatment processes, and (6) integrated pilot-scale demonstration. Appendices provide sample test plans for various stages of the vitrification development process. This plan is directed at thermal treatments which produce waste glass. However, the study is still applicable to the broader realm of thermal treatment since it deals with issues such as off-gas characterization and waste characterization that are not necessarily specific to vitrification. The purpose is to provide those exploring or considering vitrification with information concerning the kinds of data that are needed, the way the data are obtained, and the way the data are used. This will provide guidance to those who need to prioritize data needs to fit schedules and budgets. Knowledge of data needs also permits managers and planners to estimate resource requirements for vitrification development.

  15. Seasonal restrictions on dredging operations in freshwater systems. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, L.; Killgore, J.

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This note summarizes the status of seasonal restrictions on dredging operations in freshwater navigable waterways. The information presented is based on replies received from a questionnaire sent to all US Army Corps of Engineers (CE) District and Division offices that conduct OM dredging operations in freshwater systems.

  16. Innovative technologies for dredging contaminated sediments. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zappi, P.A.; Hayes, D.F.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contaminated marine sediments exist in many US waterways. Dredging is often a convenient and economical method of safely removing these sediments. However, significant concern exists over the potential environmental effects resulting from the localized sediment resuspension and contaminant release that may occur during the removal operation. This report synopsizes hydraulic equipment, pneumatic equipment, and mechanical components used for dredging and innovative modifications to their dredgeheads. It also examines previously tested dredging equipment designed to remove fine-grained sediments with a minimum amount of sediment resuspension. Major features of equipment innovations, along with available field testing information, are discussed. From these findings, the most promising innovations and research needs are identified. Since this report focuses on the dredging operations, only dredge sizes and sediment resuspension quantities are reported.

  17. New Bedford Harbor Superfund Project Acushnet River estuary engineering feasibility study of dredging and dredged-material disposal alternatives. Report 10. Evaluation of dredging and dredging control technologies. Technical report, August 1985-March 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palermo, M.R.; Pankow, V.R.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of dredging equipment and techniques for removal of highly contaminated sediments from the upper estuary of the Acushnet River, a portion of the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Project. Site conditions as related to dredge selection and operation, factors considered in selection of equipment, various dredge types considered for use, and operational procedures and controls for sediment resuspension during dredging are described. Each of the dredge types is ranked according to the following criteria: compatibility for full-scale cleanup, availability, safety, potential for sediment resuspension, maneuverability, cleanup precision, cost and production flexibility, required water depth for operation, ability to access the site, and compatibility with disposal options.

  18. Nanjing Green Waste Recovery Engineering Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: Energy ResourcesOcean EnergyEnergyNance County,Waste Recovery

  19. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview: 2011 Waste-to-Energy Using...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview: 2011 Waste-to-Energy Using Fuel Cells Workshop DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview: 2011 Waste-to-Energy Using Fuel Cells Workshop Presentation...

  20. Report of the DOD-DOE Workshop on Converting Waste to Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOD-DOE Workshop on Converting Waste to Energy Using Fuel Cells: Workshop Summary and Action Plan Report of the DOD-DOE Workshop on Converting Waste to Energy Using Fuel Cells:...

  1. Operation and maintenance considerations for waste-to-energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cross, F.; O'Leary, P.; Walsh, P.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, the author discusses environmental and safety issues surrounding waste-to-energy systems. A facility can be safe and compatible with the surrounding community if management has an ethic to provide for the disposal of refuse in an economic, safe, and environmentally sound manner and the operator is trained in the proper procedures for facility operation, maintenance, troubleshooting and repair.

  2. Environmental effects of dredging. Technical considerations for application of leach tests to sediments and dredged material. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, T.E.; Brannon, J.M.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This note summarizes the characteristics of and differences among laboratory leach tests used for preproject evaluation of leachate quality in confined disposal facilities (CDFs) for dredged material. The guidance provided in this note is based on ongoing research conducted under the Long-Term Effects of Dredging Operations (LEDO) Program.

  3. Environmental effects of dredging: A preliminary evaluation of contaminant release at the point of dredging. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Havis, R.N.; Amande, R.A.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this technical note is to present a preliminary evaluation of the standard elutriate test as a predictor of contaminant release (dissolved form) to the water column at the point of dredging. This note is meant to extend previous notes (Hayes 1987, Havis 1987) which dealt with resuspension of sediments due to dredging and the release of adsorbed chemicals which could enter the water phase at the point of dredging. Data collected under the Dredged Material Research Program (DMRP) showed that the standard elutriate test (Keeley and Engler 1974, US Environmental Protection Agency and US Army Corps of Engineers 1977, Environmental Effects Laboratory 1976) predicted, within an order of magnitude, dissolved chemical concentrations in water at dredged material disposal sites (Jones and Lee 1978). The potential for contaminant release also exists, however, at the point of dredging. This source of contaminant release during dredging was investigated by McLellan et al. (in preparation) under the Improvement of Operations and Maintenance Techniques (IOMT) program. Because of the success of the standard elutriate test for simulating dissolved contaminant release at the disposal site it was investigated as a tool for predicting contaminant release at the point of dredging.

  4. T:\\013.ffentlichkeitsarbeit\\05.Vortrge\\32.NAWTEC 11 Florida 2003\\A_Ways to Improve the Efficiency of Waste to Energy Plants.doc Ways to Improve the Efficiency of Waste to Energy Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    of Waste to Energy Plants.doc Ways to Improve the Efficiency of Waste to Energy Plants for the Production@mvr-hh.de Abstract Up to now the emissions of waste-to-energy plants have been of major concern for the operators of waste incineration plants and the public. In Germany the emission standards for waste incineration

  5. DOE Completes TRU Waste Cleanup at Bettis | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPM |TRU Waste Cleanup at Bettis DOE Completes TRU Waste

  6. Environmental effects of dredging. Corps of Engineers` procedures and policies on dredging and dredged material disposal (the federal standard). Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engler, R.M.; Wright, T.; Lee, C.R.; Dillon, T.M.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This note describes the Federal Standard pursuant to Corps` technical considerations and policies with regard to the disposal of dredged material in accordance with the Clean Water Act (CWA), which provides for selecting the least costly dredged or fill material disposal alternative consistent with sound engineering practices and appropriate environmental quality standards. This approach also generally applies to assessments conducted in accordance with the Ocean Dumping Act, even though the discussion centers on the CWA.

  7. NRS 459 Hazardous Waste | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: Energy ResourcesOcean Energy Thermal Conversion8 - Legal2

  8. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Correspondence with the Department of Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    85 Appendix E Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Correspondence with the Department of Energy #12;#12;Appendix E 87 Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Correspondence with the Department of Energy I n of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The letters typically provide

  9. THE INSIDE-OUT APPROACH FOR IDENTIFYING INDUSTRIAL ENERGY AND WASTE REDUCTION OPPORTUNITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kissock, Kelly

    THE INSIDE-OUT APPROACH FOR IDENTIFYING INDUSTRIAL ENERGY AND WASTE REDUCTION OPPORTUNITIES Kelly Traditional approaches for reducing energy and waste in industrial processes typically focus on improving and more apparent to us. In our experience, this approach for reducing energy use and waste generation

  10. Presentation 2.6: Wood waste for energy: lessons learnt from tropical regions Paul Vantomme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presentation 2.6: Wood waste for energy: lessons learnt from tropical regions Paul Vantomme of forest products with more value adding, and promoting the use of wood waste to increase energy efficiency to promote the use of wood waste for energy production. Not only the financial viability of the process needs

  11. Press Release Von Roll Inova to build the UK's largest energy-from-waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    , and regenerative heat recovery is used to boost the plant's overall energy efficiency. The majority of the waste and commercial waste per year in average and generate 72 MW of electrical energy. Riverside Resource Recovery LtdPress Release Von Roll Inova to build the UK's largest energy-from-waste plant Zürich, September, 1

  12. Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: U.S. Virgin Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.; Hasse, S.; Warren, A.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This NREL technical report evaluates the environmental impact and fundamental economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) technology based on available data from commercially operating WTE facilities in the United States. In particular, it considers life-cycle impacts of WTE as compared to landfill disposal and various forms of electrical generation, as well as WTE impacts on source reduction or recycling programs. In addition, it evaluates the economics and potential environmental impact of WTE in the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) based on existing USVI waste stream characterization data, recycling challenges unique to the USVI, and the results of cost and environmental modeling of four municipal solid waste (MSW) management options, including landfill, refuse-derived fuel (RDF) production, recycling, and gassification plus RDF.

  13. ACCEPTANCE OF CONTRIBUTED FUNDS (33 U.S.C. 701h) FOR O&M DREDGING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    MODEL MOA ACCEPTANCE OF CONTRIBUTED FUNDS (33 U.S.C. 701h) FOR O&M DREDGING WHERE SUCH DREDGING&M dredging that is a Federal expense; there are no Federal funds available; and the Contributor provides ALL funds needed to perform the dredging and related activities (engineering and design work, environmental

  14. Comparison of Experimental and Theoretical Forces on a Model Dredge Cutterhead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Permenter, Rusty

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Dredging is a critical part of maintaining the nation’s ports and harbors that play a major role in international trade. The design of dredge equipment requires knowledge of the forces expected on an average dredge. For a cutter suction dredge one...

  15. ERDC/ELTR-13-3 Bayou Segnette Waterway Dredged Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ERDC/ELTR-13-3 Bayou Segnette Waterway Dredged Material Placement Study Preliminary Assessment-13-3 March 2013 Bayou Segnette Waterway Dredged Material Placement Study Preliminary Assessment requires periodic dredging to maintain its navigability. However, traditional dredged material placement

  16. The effect of dredging off Great Yarmouth on the wave conditions and erosion of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    The effect of dredging off Great Yarmouth on the wave conditions and erosion of the North Norfolk Paper 97 #12;The effect of dredging off Great Yarmouth on the wave conditions and erosion of the North and seabed lowering due to dredging off Great Yarmouth. A scenario of extreme dredging was defined and used

  17. SOME EFFECTS OF HYDRAULIC DREDGING AND COASTAL DEVELOPMENT IN BOCA CIEGA BAY, FLORIDA 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOME EFFECTS OF HYDRAULIC DREDGING AND COASTAL DEVELOPMENT IN BOCA CIEGA BAY, FLORIDA 1 BY JOHN L. PETERSBURG BEACH, FLA. 33706 ABSTRACT Filling of 1,400 hectares (3,500 acres) of bay by hy- draulic dredging in dredged ItreltS wit.h those in relatively undisturbed ttreas. Hydl'ltulic dredging becmue. ltll ltccepted

  18. Modeling transport of disposed dredged material from placement sites in Grays Harbor, WA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Modeling transport of disposed dredged material from placement sites in Grays Harbor, WA E- to mid- term dredge material management strategies for the Federal Navigation Project at Grays Harbor dredging quantities. However, the most heavily used dredged material placement sites lie in proximity

  19. ACCEPTANCE OF CONTRIBUTED FUNDS (33 U.S.C. 701h) FOR O&M DREDGING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    i MODEL MOA ACCEPTANCE OF CONTRIBUTED FUNDS (33 U.S.C. 701h) FOR O&M DREDGING WHERE SUCH DREDGING be used for O&M dredging that is a Federal expense; there is enough Federal funds for Corps to award a reasonable dredging contract; and the Contributor provides a specified amount to allow additional O

  20. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heat source can be solar thermal energy, biological thermaland concentrated solar thermal energy farms. They demandsources include solar thermal energy, geo-thermal energy,

  1. Mixed Waste Focus Area: Department of Energy complex needs report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, J.A.

    1995-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) at the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a new approach in August of 1993 to environmental research and technology development. A key feature of this new approach included establishment of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (MWFA). The mission of the MWFA is to identify, develop, and implement needed technologies such that the major environmental management problems related to meeting DOE`s commitments for treatment of mixed wastes under the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCA), and in accordance with the Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), can be addressed, while cost-effectively expending the funding resources. To define the deficiencies or needs of the EM customers, the MWFA analyzed Proposed Site Treatment Plans (PSTPs), as well as other applicable documents, and conducted site visits throughout the summer of 1995. Representatives from the Office of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60) at each site visited were requested to consult with the Focus Area to collaboratively define their technology needs. This report documents the needs, deficiencies, technology gaps, and opportunities for expedited treatment activities that were identified during the site visit process. The defined deficiencies and needs are categorized by waste type, namely Wastewaters, Combustible Organics, Sludges/Soils, Debris/Solids, and Unique Wastes, and will be prioritized based on the relative affect the deficiency has on the DOE Complex.

  2. 2014 Waste Management Conference | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment ofCBFO-13-3322(EE)Department ofNow inEnergy Two|Department.

  3. World Waste Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Project JumpWisconsin:WorldWorld EnergyDiego, California

  4. Howard Waste Recycling Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel Jump to:Pennsylvania:County, Wyoming:Iowa: Energy

  5. Transuranic Waste Tabletop | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergyTransportation Work Package Reports

  6. Hanford Waste Services Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | Open Energy Information Hanergy Holdings Group Company LtdHanford

  7. Waste-to-Energy Cogeneration Project, Centennial Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Clay; Mandon, Jim; DeGiulio, Thomas; Baker, Ryan

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste-to-Energy Cogeneration Project at Centennial Park has allowed methane from the closed Centennial landfill to export excess power into the the local utility’s electric grid for resale. This project is part of a greater brownfield reclamation project to the benefit of the residents of Munster and the general public. Installation of a gas-to-electric generator and waste-heat conversion unit take methane byproduct and convert it into electricity at the rate of about 103,500 Mwh/year for resale to the local utility. The sale of the electricity will be used to reduce operating budgets by covering the expenses for streetlights and utility bills. The benefits of such a project are not simply financial. Munster’s Waste-to Energy Cogeneration Project at Centennial Park will reduce the community’s carbon footprint in an amount equivalent to removing 1,100 cars from our roads, conserving enough electricity to power 720 homes, planting 1,200 acres of trees, or recycling 2,000 tons of waste instead of sending it to a landfill.

  8. Nuclear Waste Policy Act | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of Energy NorthBDepartment of83-2007Science(QAPD)

  9. Zero Waste Plc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Projectsource History ViewZAP JumpZenergyZeppini GroupPlc

  10. Sandia Energy - Defense Waste Management Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesInApplied &ClimateContact Us HomeDefense

  11. Tank Waste Corporate Board | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystems Analysis Success Stories Systems AnalysisTESTIMONYTTWGSteps

  12. Municipal Solid Waste | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasoleTremor(Question) | OpenGA References: SGIC[1] ThisTODO:

  13. Dredging: Technology and environmental aspects. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology and environmental impacts of dredging. Equipment, including semi-submersible cutter platforms, is described. Other topics include sediment movement, factors affecting sediment movement, the disposal of dredged material, and computer models predicting the fate of the dredged materials. The environmental impacts of the dredged areas and the effects of ocean dumping of dredged material are also discussed. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  14. Dredging: Technology and environmental aspects. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology and environmental impacts of dredging. Equipment, including semi-submersible cutter platforms, is described. Other topics include sediment movement, factors affecting sediment movement, the disposal of dredged material, and computer models predicting the fate of the dredged materials. The environmental impacts of the dredged areas and the effects of ocean dumping of dredged material are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  15. Future waste treatment and energy systems – examples of joint scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Münster, M., E-mail: maem@dtu.dk [System Analysis Division, DTU Management Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Finnveden, G. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and the Built Environment, Department of Planning and Environment, Division of Environmental Strategies Research – fms, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Wenzel, H. [Institute of Chemical Engineering, Biotechnology and Environmental Technology, University of Southern Denmark, Niels Bohrs Allé 1, 5230 Odense M (Denmark)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Approach for use of scenarios dealing with both waste management and energy issues. • Overall scenarios for the common project and sub-scenarios in parts of the project. • Combining different types of scenarios to the tools of different disciplines. • Use of explorative external scenarios based on marginals for consequential LCA. - Abstract: Development and use of scenarios for large interdisciplinary projects is a complicated task. This article provides practical examples of how it has been carried out in two projects addressing waste management and energy issues respectively. Based on experiences from the two projects, recommendations are made for an approach concerning development of scenarios in projects dealing with both waste management and energy issues. Recommendations are given to develop and use overall scenarios for the project and leave room for sub-scenarios in parts of the project. Combining different types of scenarios is recommended, too, in order to adapt to the methods and tools of different disciplines, such as developing predictive scenarios with general equilibrium tools and analysing explorative scenarios with energy system analysis tools. Furthermore, as marginals identified in differing future background systems determine the outcomes of consequential life cycle assessments (LCAs), it is considered advisable to develop and use explorative external scenarios based on possible marginals as a framework for consequential LCAs. This approach is illustrated using an on-going Danish research project.

  16. Waste to Energy Market | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation, search Name: Waste-to-Energy

  17. Retrieval Of Final Stored Radioactive Waste Resumes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingof EnhancedRestructuring

  18. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Recovery | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sureReportsofDepartmentSeries |Attacks |VisualizingWarm Weather andWaste

  19. Waste/By-Product Hydrogen | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02ReportWaste-to-Energy and Fuel CellDepartment

  20. Environmental effects of dredging technical notes. Assessment of the genotoxic potential of dredged material. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note describes an approach for assessing the genotoxic potential of dredged material. The use of integrated batteries of rapid and mechanistically interpretable in vitro and in vivo assays in a tiered approach is fundamental to applied toxicology. The research described here brings this approach to the testing of sediments. Work completed to date and future work will mesh to form an advanced and cost-effective methodology. The purpose of this methodology is to increase the accuracy of environmental risk assessments and facilitate making decisions concerning open-water disposal of dredged material. A great number of the contaminants typically found in dredged material are toxic to exposed organisms through effects on DNA. Such effects are usually the result of low-level chronic exposures. These effects can result in reproductive failure of organisms, impaired growth and development of offspring, and tumors (often cancerous) in vertebrates. Collectively, such effects are called `genotoxicity` and result from damage to the genome of a cell. The damage is heritable, that is, passed on to future cell generations upon duplication of the affected cells.

  1. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    density, making direct thermal energy storage methods, e.g.reduced. Conventional thermal energy harvesting and storageharvesting, storage, and utilization of thermal energy has

  2. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct energy conversion ..developed. Typically, direct energy conversion is achievedTechnologies 1.2.1. Direct energy conversion In a direct

  3. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electrode surfaces, and electric energy is stored as surfacetemperature end and electric energy is generated, thermalbeing the generated electric energy and the consumed thermal

  4. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the portion of thermal energy that can be converted toof high-performance thermal energy harvesting systems, butreferred to as the thermal energy from low- temperature heat

  5. Author's personal copy Pyroelectric waste heat energy harvesting using heat conduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent

    Author's personal copy Pyroelectric waste heat energy harvesting using heat conduction Felix Y. Lee heat harvesting Olsen cycle a b s t r a c t Waste heat can be directly converted into electrical energy Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Large amounts of waste heat are released as a by

  6. Author's personal copy Towards optimization of a pyroelectric energy converter for harvesting waste heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent

    Direct energy conversion Waste heat harvesting Ferroelectric materials Oscillating flow a b s t r a c for directly converting waste heat into electricity. The two-dimensional mass, momentum, and energy equations of waste heat as required by the second law of thermodynamics. For example, over 50% of the en- ergy

  7. Environmental effects of dredging. Interim guidance for predicting quality of effluent discharged from confined dredged material disposal areas--test procedures. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palermo, M.R.; Engler, R.M.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the following series of technical notes describe the functions necessary for predicting the quality of effluent discharged from confined dredged material disposal areas during dredging operations.

  8. RW - Radioactive Waste - Energy Conservation Plan

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - TProcuring SolarNo.Frequency | Department ofUnconsciously

  9. Portsmouth Waste Disposal | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613Portsmouth Site » Portsmouth Community Outreach »Environmental Cleanup » Portsmouth

  10. Cummins Waste Heat Recovery | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJuly 30,Crafty Gifts for theofPhotovoltaicsMay 16, 2013

  11. Waste Confidence Discussion | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium TransferonUS-IndiaVALUE STUDY4, 2009DepartmentCharacterization

  12. Waste to Energy Technology | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilizeRural PublicRatesAbout Us >

  13. U.S. Department of Energy Awards Contracts for Waste Storage...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Awards Contracts for Waste Storage Canisters for Yucca Mountain U.S. Department of Energy Awards Contracts for Waste Storage Canisters for Yucca Mountain May 21, 2008 - 12:00pm...

  14. Pilot dredging study, New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts, Superfund project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreliunas, V.L.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing of sediment from the northern portion of New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts, has revealed that most of the area is contaminated by polychlorinated. biphenyls (PCBs). In August 1984, the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) published a Feasibility Study of Remedial Action Alternatives for this area, which proposed five cleanup alternatives. Four of these dealt specifically with dredging the area to remove the contaminated sediments. In response to comments received, the USEPA asked the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to perform additional studies to better evaluate the engineering feasibility of dredging as a cleanup alternative. This study is a joint effort of the US Army Engineer Division, New England, Waltham, Mass., and the US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES), Vicksburg, Miss. This paper describes a proposed pilot study of dredging and dredged material disposal alternatives to support the engineering feasibility study.

  15. Contaminant modeling. Environmental effects of dredging. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, S.L.; Dortch, M.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This note provides initial information on contaminant models that are potentially applicable to situations where the presence of toxic materials in sediments complicates Corps of Engineers (CE) dredging activities.

  16. New Mexico Surface Water Quality Bureau Federal Dredge and Fill...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: New Mexico Surface Water Quality Bureau Federal Dredge and Fill Permits webpage Author New...

  17. Effects of Third DredgeUp on the Structure of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    During Dredge­Up : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 16 Envelope Breathing and Initial Abundances : : : : : : 29 3 Physics of Thermal Pulses 31 Introduction : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 31 Review of Stellar Evolution and Thermal Pulses : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 31 Evolution from

  18. A dispersion curve study of dredged spoil basin inlets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Male, Robert

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    13 19 IV. PROCEDURES AND TECHNIOUHS Test Procenures. Interpretation of Dispersion Curves. Data Analysis, 26 26 28 37 V. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS. VI. DISCUSSION. The Model as a Settling Tank Relationship to Dredging Practice. 58 58 70 VII... all the spoil must be confined. The additional costs to be incurred in that region over ten years vary from $2. 62 million to $12. 87 million according to the confinement scheme. In the USA, most of the dredging projects are under the con- trol...

  19. Capturing Waste Gas: Saves Energy, Lower Costs - Case Study, 2013 |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJuneWaste To Wisdom: UtilizingDepartment62-LNG -First12Department

  20. Salt Waste Processing Facility Fact Sheet | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCO OverviewRepository | DepartmentSEA-04:Department of¿QUÉFuture |Waste

  1. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Attracts World Interest | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclear Warheads|of Energy Washington SuccessWhenWaste Isolation

  2. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclear Warheads|of Energy Washington SuccessWhenWasteWIPPWaste

  3. Waste Treatment Plant and Tank Farm Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclear Warheads|of Energy WashingtonWaste IsolationTreatment Plant

  4. RRC - Surface Waste Management Manual | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformationeNevada <REC SolarRFMDSystemSurface Waste

  5. Regional Waste Systems Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, searchRayreviewAl., 2005) |RGGI Jump to:Waste Systems

  6. Sandia Energy - Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Accident Investigation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementing Nonlinear757KelleyEffectsonSandia'sEvent VideoWaste

  7. Sandia Energy - Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Technical Assessment Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementing Nonlinear757KelleyEffectsonSandia'sEvent VideoWasteReleased

  8. Guwahati Waste Management Company Ltd GWMCL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,Guizhou ZhenyuanGulfGuwahati Waste

  9. Energy Supply- Production of Fuel from Agricultural and Animal Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabriel Miller

    2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Society for Energy and Environmental Research (SEER) was funded in March 2004 by the Department of Energy, under grant DE-FG-36-04GO14268, to produce a study, and oversee construction and implementation, for the thermo-chemical production of fuel from agricultural and animal waste. The grant focuses on the Changing World Technologies (CWT) of West Hempstead, NY, thermal conversion process (TCP), which converts animal residues and industrial food processing biproducts into fuels, and as an additional product, fertilizers. A commercial plant was designed and built by CWT, partially using grant funds, in Carthage, Missouri, to process animal residues from a nearby turkey processing plant. The DOE sponsored program consisted of four tasks. These were: Task 1 Optimization of the CWT Plant in Carthage - This task focused on advancing and optimizing the process plant operated by CWT that converts organic waste to fuel and energy. Task 2 Characterize and Validate Fuels Produced by CWT - This task focused on testing of bio-derived hydrocarbon fuels from the Carthage plant in power generating equipment to determine the regulatory compliance of emissions and overall performance of the fuel. Task 3 Characterize Mixed Waste Streams - This task focused on studies performed at Princeton University to better characterize mixed waste incoming streams from animal and vegetable residues. Task 4 Fundamental Research in Waste Processing Technologies - This task focused on studies performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on the chemical reformation reaction of agricultural biomass compounds in a hydrothermal medium. Many of the challenges to optimize, improve and perfect the technology, equipment and processes in order to provide an economically viable means of creating sustainable energy were identified in the DOE Stage Gate Review, whose summary report was issued on July 30, 2004. This summary report appears herein as Appendix 1, and the findings of the report formed the basis for much of the subsequent work under the grant. An explanation of the process is presented as well as the completed work on the four tasks.

  10. Energy efficiency of substance and energy recovery of selected waste fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fricke, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.fricke@tu-bs.de [Technical University of Braunschweig, Leichtweiss-Institute, Department of Waste and Resource Management, Beethovenstrasse 51a, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Bahr, Tobias, E-mail: t.bahr@tu-bs.de [Technical University of Braunschweig, Leichtweiss-Institute, Department of Waste and Resource Management, Beethovenstrasse 51a, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Bidlingmaier, Werner, E-mail: werner.bidlingmaier@uni-weimar.de [Bauhaus-Universitaet Weimar, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Waste Management, Coudraystrasse 7, 99423 Weimar (Germany); Springer, Christian, E-mail: christian.springer@uni-weimar.de [Bauhaus-Universitaet Weimar, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Waste Management, Coudraystrasse 7, 99423 Weimar (Germany)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to reduce the ecological impact of resource exploitation, the EU calls for sustainable options to increase the efficiency and productivity of the utilization of natural resources. This target can only be achieved by considering resource recovery from waste comprehensively. However, waste management measures have to be investigated critically and all aspects of substance-related recycling and energy recovery have to be carefully balanced. This article compares recovery methods for selected waste fractions with regard to their energy efficiency. Whether material recycling or energy recovery is the most energy efficient solution, is a question of particular relevance with regard to the following waste fractions: paper and cardboard, plastics and biowaste and also indirectly metals. For the described material categories material recycling has advantages compared to energy recovery. In accordance with the improved energy efficiency of substance opposed to energy recovery, substance-related recycling causes lower emissions of green house gases. For the fractions paper and cardboard, plastics, biowaste and metals it becomes apparent, that intensification of the separate collection systems in combination with a more intensive use of sorting technologies can increase the extent of material recycling. Collection and sorting systems must be coordinated. The objective of the overall system must be to achieve an optimum of the highest possible recovery rates in combination with a high quality of recyclables. The energy efficiency of substance related recycling of biowaste can be increased by intensifying the use of anaerobic technologies. In order to increase the energy efficiency of the overall system, the energy efficiencies of energy recovery plants must be increased so that the waste unsuitable for substance recycling is recycled or treated with the highest possible energy yield.

  11. Immediate Deployment of Waste Energy Recovery Technologies at Multi Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis Castonguay

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Verso Paper Corp. implemented a portfolio of 13 commercially available proven industrial technologies each exceeding 30% minimum threshold efficiency and at least 25% efficiency increase. These sub-projects are a direct result of a grant received from the Department of Energy (DOE) through its FOA 0000044 (Deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems, District Energy Systems, Waste Energy Recovery Systems, and Efficient Industrial Equipment), which was funded by the American Recovery Act. These were installed at 3 sites in 2 states and are helping to reduce Verso costs, making the facilities more competitive. This created approximately 100 construction jobs (FTE's) and reduced impacted Verso facilities' expense budgets. These sub-projects were deployed at Verso paper mills located in Jay, Maine, Bucksport, Maine, and Sartell, Minnesota. The paper mills are the economic engines of the rural communities in which these mills are located. Reinvestment in waste energy recovery capital improvements is providing a stimulus to help maintain domestic jobs and to competitively position the US pulp and paper industry with rising energy costs. Energy efficiency improvements are also providing a positive environmental impact by reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the quantity of wastewater treated and discharged, and fossil fuel demand. As a result of these projects, when fully operating, Verso realized a total of approximately 1.5 TBtu/Year reduction in overall energy consumption, which is 119% of the project objectives. Note that three paper machines have since been permanently curtailed. However even with these shutdowns, the company still met its energy objectives. Note also that the Sartell mill's paper machine is down due to a recent fire which damaged the mill's electrical infrastructure (the company has not decided on the mill's future).

  12. Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems: The potential for energy recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Consonni, Stefano [Department of Energy, Politecnico di Milano, Via Lambruschini 4, 20156 Milan (Italy); LEAP - Laboratorio Energia Ambiente Piacenza, Via Bixio 27, 29100 Piacenza (Italy); Vigano, Federico, E-mail: federico.vigano@polimi.it [Department of Energy, Politecnico di Milano, Via Lambruschini 4, 20156 Milan (Italy); LEAP -Laboratorio Energia Ambiente Piacenza, Via Bixio 27, 29100 Piacenza (Italy)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: > The amount of waste available for energy recovery is significantly higher than the Unsorted Residual Waste (URW). > Its energy potential is always higher than the complement to 100% of the Source Separation Level (SSL). > Increasing SSL has marginal effects on the potential for energy recovery. > Variations in the composition of the waste fed to WtE plants affect only marginally their performances. > A large WtE plant with a treatment capacity some times higher than a small plant achieves electric efficiency appreciably higher. - Abstract: This article is part of a set of six coordinated papers reporting the main findings of a research project carried out by five Italian universities on 'Material and energy recovery in Integrated Waste Management Systems (IWMS)'. An overview of the project and a summary of the most relevant results can be found in the introductory article of the series. This paper describes the work related to the evaluation of mass and energy balances, which has consisted of three major efforts (i) development of a model for quantifying the energy content and the elemental compositions of the waste streams appearing in a IWMS; (ii) upgrade of an earlier model to predict the performances of Waste-to-Energy (WtE) plants; (iii) evaluation of mass and energy balances of all the scenarios and the recovery paths considered in the project. Results show that not only the amount of material available for energy recovery is significantly higher than the Unsorted Residual Waste (URW) left after Separate Collection (SC), because selection and recycling generate significant amounts of residues, but its heating value is higher than that of the original, gross waste. Therefore, the energy potential of what is left after recycling is always higher than the complement to 100% of the Source Separation Level (SSL). Also, increasing SSL has marginal effects on the potential for energy recovery: nearly doubling SSL (from 35% to 65%) reduces the energy potential only by one fourth. Consequently, even at high SSL energy recovery is a fundamental step of a sustainable waste management system. Variations of SSL do bring about variations of the composition, heating value and moisture content of the material fed to WtE plants, but these variations (i) are smaller than one can expect; (ii) have marginal effects on the performances of the WtE plant. These considerations suggest that the mere value of SSL is not a good indicator of the quality of the waste management system, nor of its energy and environmental outcome. Given the well-known dependence of the efficiency of steam power plants with their power output, the efficiency of energy recovery crucially depends on the size of the IWMS served by the WtE plant. A fivefold increase of the amount of gross waste handled in the IWMS (from 150,000 to 750,000 tons per year of gross waste) allows increasing the electric efficiencies of the WtE plant by about 6-7 percentage points (from 21-23% to 28.5% circa).

  13. Quantifying Wasted Write Energy in the Memory Hierarchy Charles Shelor, Jim Buchanan, and Krishna Kavi Ron Cytron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavi, Krishna

    Quantifying Wasted Write Energy in the Memory Hierarchy Charles Shelor, Jim Buchanan, and Krishna. Wasted writes consume energy, consume execution time as memory bandwidth and consume component lifetime of potential energy savings that can be obtained from eliminating wasted writes. If all of the wasted writes

  14. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microgrid: A Conceptual Solution”, 35th Annul IEEE Power Elecrronics Specialisrs Conference (2004) [60] R.J. Krane, Energy Storage

  15. Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Mission The team supports efforts that promote a more sustainable environment and implements...

  16. Energy Department and Catholic University Improve Safety of Nuclear Waste

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A new waste processing plant in Washington will help to safely remove nuclear and chemical waste, thanks to research from Catholic University.

  17. Sediment pass-through, an alternative to reservoir dredging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, L.L.; Lee, W.H. [Pacific Gas and Electric Co., San Francisco, CA (United States); Tu, S. [Pacific and Gas Electric Co., San Ramon, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) is studying an alternative {open_quotes}Sediment Management Plan{close_quotes} (SMP) to control sediments at Rock Creek Reservoir and the downstream Cresta Reservoir on the North Fork Feather River in Plumas County. The reservoirs are part of the 182,000 kW Rock Creek-Cresta Project hydroelectric development. Approximately 5.4 million cubic meters of sediments, deposited in the two reservoirs since they were placed in service in 1949 and 1950, partially obstruct the dams` low level outlets and pipe inlets supplying water for spillway gate operations. The sediments jeopardize the reliable and efficient operation of the dams and powerhouses. The SMP includes retrofitting Rock Creek and Cresta Dams with additional low-level gated outlets and modification of trash racks at the existing low level outlet pipes at each dam to improve sediment pass-through (SPT) capacity during high flows. Also, to enable construction of the dam modifications and to facilitate the initiation of SPT operation, dredging of approximately 46,000 cubic meters at Rock Creek Reservoir and 57,000 cubic meters at Cresta Reservoir can be accomplished using a new slurry pump dredging technology to minimize turbidity and re-suspension of solids during dredging. It is proposed to deposit the sediment on the reservoir bottoms, upstream of the areas to be dredged. The dredged sediments subsequently would be flushed from the reservoirs during SPT operations to ultimately be deposited in the dead storage volume of a large downstream reservoir, Lake Oroville. The SPT management plan supersedes more costly plans for major dredging, and may preclude the need for future maintenance dredging at the reservoirs.

  18. Energy implications of mechanical and mechanical–biological treatment compared to direct waste-to-energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cimpan, Ciprian, E-mail: cic@kbm.sdu.dk; Wenzel, Henrik

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Compared systems achieve primary energy savings between 34 and 140 MJ{sub primary}/100 MJ{sub input} {sub waste.} • Savings magnitude is foremost determined by chosen primary energy and materials production. • Energy consumption and process losses can be upset by increased technology efficiency. • Material recovery accounts for significant shares of primary energy savings. • Direct waste-to-energy is highly efficient if cogeneration (CHP) is possible. - Abstract: Primary energy savings potential is used to compare five residual municipal solid waste treatment systems, including configurations with mechanical (MT) and mechanical–biological (MBT) pre-treatment, which produce waste-derived fuels (RDF and SRF), biogas and/or recover additional materials for recycling, alongside a system based on conventional mass burn waste-to-energy and ash treatment. To examine the magnitude of potential savings we consider two energy efficiency levels (state-of-the-art and best available technology), the inclusion/exclusion of heat recovery (CHP vs. PP) and three different background end-use energy production systems (coal condensing electricity and natural gas heat, Nordic electricity mix and natural gas heat, and coal CHP energy quality allocation). The systems achieved net primary energy savings in a range between 34 and 140 MJ{sub primary}/100 MJ{sub input} {sub waste}, in the different scenario settings. The energy footprint of transportation needs, pre-treatment and reprocessing of recyclable materials was 3–9.5%, 1–18% and 1–8% respectively, relative to total energy savings. Mass combustion WtE achieved the highest savings in scenarios with CHP production, nonetheless, MBT-based systems had similarly high performance if SRF streams were co-combusted with coal. When RDF and SRF was only used in dedicated WtE plants, MBT-based systems totalled lower savings due to inherent system losses and additional energy costs. In scenarios without heat recovery, the biodrying MBS-based system achieved the highest savings, on the condition of SRF co-combustion. As a sensitivity scenario, alternative utilisation of SRF in cement kilns was modelled. It supported similar or higher net savings for all pre-treatment systems compared to mass combustion WtE, except when WtE CHP was possible in the first two background energy scenarios. Recovery of plastics for recycling before energy recovery increased net energy savings in most scenario variations, over those of full stream combustion. Sensitivity to assumptions regarding virgin plastic substitution was tested and was found to mostly favour plastic recovery.

  19. DOE Comments on Radioactive Waste | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPM | DepartmentIOffshoreDepartmentBeginson Radioactive Waste

  20. DOE Fellows Join Waste Management Conference | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPM |TRU Waste Cleanup at1450.5B OMB3.2 DOE F580.1ofFellows

  1. Los Alamos Waste Acceptance Criteria | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomy andTerms Loan TermsLongLorettaEnvironmentalWaste

  2. Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAM Revised DOEDepartmentaboutInformationFuel from Waste

  3. Portsmouth Waste Disposition Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - T enAmount forDecontamination andBoard -SiteWaste

  4. Packing TRU Waste Containers Design | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - T en YMedicine - Assistant PIAEnergyPacking TRU Waste

  5. Engine Waste Heat Recovery Concept Demonstration | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard |inHVACEnforcementEngaging Students in2 DOEEngineWaste Heat

  6. The waste-to-energy industry`s perspective on EPA`s proposed MACT regulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferraro, F.A. [Wheelabrator Technologies Inc., Hampton, NH (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 1, 1994, the US Environmental Protection Agency, under Section 129 of the Clean Air Act, proposed New Source Performance standards and Emissions guidelines for Municipal Waste Combustors. This paper will provide an overview of the proposed MACT regulations as they relate to large, mass-burn Municipal Waste Combustors. This paper will also present a view of the proposed regulations from the perspective the waste-to-energy industry as represented by the industry association, the Integrated Waste Services Association.

  7. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    thermoelectric energy generation (TEG) Conventional Energya thermoelectric generator (TEG), the key component is the$5.14/W, $11/W, and $3/W for TEG, thermogalvanic cell, SE,

  8. Global Waste to Energy Conversion Company GWECC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAddInformationEnergyEnergyGWECC Jump to:

  9. Kent County Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInteriasIowa: EnergyKanabecKenduskeag,Connecticut: EnergyNewKent

  10. CEWEP -Confederation of European Waste-to-Energy Plants Boulevard Clovis 12A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    CEWEP - Confederation of European Waste-to- Energy Plants Boulevard Clovis 12A B-1000 Brussels Tel incineration. That means that Waste-to-Energy (WtE) plants would be considered as performing energy recovery). Classifying WtE plants as recovery operations would in no way reduce these protection levels. Brussels, 13th

  11. DECONTAMINATING AND PROCESSING DREDGED MATERIAL FOR BENEFICIAL USE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CLESCERI,N.L.; STERN,E.A.; FENG,H.; JONES,K.W.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Management of contaminated dredged material is a major problem in the Port of New York and New Jersey. One component of an overall management plan can be the application of a decontamination technology followed by creation of a product suitable for beneficial use. This concept is the focus of a project now being carried out by the US Environmental Protection Agency-Region 2, the US Army Corps of Engineers-New York District, the US Department of Energy-Brookhaven National Laboratory, and regional university groups that have included Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Rutgers University, New Jersey Institute of Technology, and Stevens Institute of Technology. The project has gone through phased testing of commercial technologies at the bench scale (15 liters) and pilot scale (1.5--500 m{sup 3}) levels. Several technologies are now going forward to large-scale demonstrations that are intended to treat from 23,000 to 60,000 m{sup 3}. Selections of the technologies were made based on the effectiveness of the treatment process, evaluation of the possible beneficial use of the treated materials, and other factors. Major elements of the project are summarized here.

  12. Waste-to-Energy Workshop | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment of Energy MicrosoftVOLUMEWORKFORCENovember 5, 2014 9:00AM EST

  13. Modeling air emissions from contaminated sediment dredged materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valsaraj, K.T.; Thibodeaux, L.J. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Reible, D.D. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); [Univ. of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Volatilization rates for hydrophobic organic compounds from a confined disposal facility (CDF) containing contaminated dredged material are presently unknown. The primary purpose of this study is to indicate the availability of theoretical models for the evaluation of volatile emission from a CDF. Four emission locales are identified and modeled: the sediment relocation (dredging) locale, the exposed sediment locale, the ponded sediment locale, and the vegetation-covered sediment locale. Rate expressions are derived to estimate the volatile organic chemical (VOC) emission from each locale. Emission rates (in mass of total VOCs per unit time) are primarily dependent on the chemical concentration at the source, the surface area of the source, and the degree to which the dredged material is in direct contact with air. The relative magnitude of these three parameters provides a basis upon which a tentative ranking of emission rates from the different locales can be given. Exposed sediment results in the greatest estimated emissions of volatiles followed by water with high levels of suspended sediments, such as might occur during dredging or during placement in a CDF. Expected to be lower in volatile emissions are dredged materials covered by a quiescent water column or vegetation.

  14. Near-Field Sediment Resuspension Measurement and Modeling for Cutter Suction Dredging Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henriksen, John Christopher

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The sediment resuspension and turbidity created during dredging operations is both an economical and environmental issue. The movement of sediment plumes created from dredging operations has been predicted with numerical modeling, however, these far...

  15. Introduction `...as the dredge cleared the surface, we saw it full and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1995 Introduction `...as the dredge cleared the surface, we saw it full and overflowing with every the giant animals obtained from nearshore marine dredging (Laserson, 1947); the organisms collected

  16. Methodology for determining feasibility and cost for converting dredged material to topsoil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graalum, Sara Jo Ann

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year nearly 30 million cubic yards of sediment are dredged from the Texas waterways and ports. A majority of the dredged material is disposed in confined disposal facilities, and these disposal sites are being filled. As these sites reach...

  17. Waste to Energy: Escalating Energy Concerns to Push Global Market...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Concerns to Push Global Market to Grow at 8.1% CAGR from 2013 to 2019 Oil Shale Market is Estimated to Reach USD 7,400.70 Million by 2022 more Group members (32)...

  18. Waste-to-Energy Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02Report

  19. Waste Heat Recovery System: Lightweight Thermal Energy Recovery (LIGHTER) System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: GM is using shape memory alloys that require as little as a 10°C temperature difference to convert low-grade waste heat into mechanical energy. When a stretched wire made of shape memory alloy is heated, it shrinks back to its pre-stretched length. When the wire cools back down, it becomes more pliable and can revert to its original stretched shape. This expansion and contraction can be used directly as mechanical energy output or used to drive an electric generator. Shape memory alloy heat engines have been around for decades, but the few devices that engineers have built were too complex, required fluid baths, and had insufficient cycle life for practical use. GM is working to create a prototype that is practical for commercial applications and capable of operating with either air- or fluid-based heat sources. GM’s shape memory alloy based heat engine is also designed for use in a variety of non-vehicle applications. For example, it can be used to harvest non-vehicle heat sources, such as domestic and industrial waste heat and natural geothermal heat, and in HVAC systems and generators.

  20. Engineering geology criteria for dredged material disposal in upper Laguna Madre, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stinson, James Edmellaire

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    area showing dredged material islands and channel locations 3 Frequency of wind by direction at Corpus Christi 14 Wind roses compiled from data recorded at the weather monitoring station during field investigation 19 Sketch of drogue used.... The disposal of dredged material next to the channel minimizes handling costs and reduces dredging time. Open water disposal has been used extensively along the Gulf Coast for the dredging of the Gulf intracoastal Waterway and private channels, result- ing...

  1. New Bedford Harbor Superfund Project, Acushnet River estuary engineering feasibility study of dredging and dredged-material disposal alternatives. Report 11. Evaluation of conceptual dredging and disposal alternatives. Technical report, August 1985-July 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Averett, D.E.; Palermo, M.R.; Otis, M.J.; Rubinoff, P.B.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates conceptual dredging and disposal alternatives for the Acushnet River Estuary, a part of the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Site. Dredging for removal of the highly contaminated sediment and subsequent disposal in upland or nearshore confined disposal facilities or disposal in contaminated aquatic disposal facilities are alternative considered in the Engineering Feasibility Study of Dredging and Dredged Material Disposal Alternatives. Sediment testing and sediment-transport modeling performed as earlier tasks of the study form the basis for evaluation of the alternatives. The technical feasibility of conceptual design options is based on site availability, capacity, and characteristics and on sediment physical characteristics and dredged-material settling behavior as defined by laboratory testing. Contamination releases during dredging and disposal operations are estimated for each disposal option. A preliminary cost estimate for implementation of each option evaluated is alo presented.

  2. Waste-to-Energy Workshop Summary Report | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell Director ofDepartmentDRAFT -WasteinThisThis report

  3. Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCO Overview OCHCODepartment ofRecipientsandPublicPump Systems MatterPumpkin

  4. E ON Energy from Waste AG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict ofDongjinDynetek Europe GmbH Jump to:EAGE

  5. Reducing Waste and Harvesting Energy This Halloween | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010InJanuary 29, 2013RedbirdThis hybridThis graphic

  6. Reducing Waste and Saving Energy with Composting | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010InJanuary 29, 2013RedbirdThis hybridThis graphicErin

  7. Mercury-contaminated sludge treatment by dredging in Minamata Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshinaga, Kiyoto [Ministry of Transport, Niigata (Japan)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    To eradicate Minamata Disease, caused by the discharge of sewage containing methyl mercury and its accumulation in fish and shellfish through the food cycle, a large-scale sediment disposal project was conducted with special care taken to prevent new pollution resulting from the project itself. The basic approach to sediment disposal was to construct a highly watertight revetment to reclaim the inner area of the bay and then confine sediment dredged from the remaining contaminated area in the reclamation area through surface treatment. Before sediment disposal, boundary nets were installed to enclose the work area to prevent the mixing of contaminated and noncontaminated fish. Dredging work was successfully carried out by using four cutterless suction dredgers, newly developed in advance for minimizing resuspension of sediments. Dredged material was discharged into the reclamation area, filled up to sea level, and covered with a sandproof membrane, lightweight volcanic ash earth, and mountain soil.

  8. Portable XRF and wet materials: application to dredged contaminated sediments1 from waterways2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Portable XRF and wet materials: application to dredged contaminated sediments1 from waterways2 7 ABSTRACT: The sustainable management of dredged waterway sediments requires on-site determination8 commonly used for similar applications with contaminated soil, but the high water content of dredged10

  9. Regulatory Guidance Letter 87-08 SUBJECT: Testing Requirements for Dredged Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Regulatory Guidance Letter 87-08 SUBJECT: Testing Requirements for Dredged Material Evaluations that "The district engineer will review applications for permits for the discharge of dredged or fill)." The guidelines at 40 CFR 230.10(c) state in part that ".. no discharge of dredged or fill material shall

  10. ERDC/ELTR-14-11 Dredging Operations and Environmental Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ERDC/ELTR-14-11 Dredging Operations and Environmental Research Program Economical Treatment of Dredged Material to Facilitate Beneficial Use EnvironmentalLaboratory Trudy J. Estes and Christian J. Mc, visit the ERDC online library at http://acwc.sdp.sirsi.net/client/default. #12;Dredging Operations

  11. MONITORING AND MODELING NEARSHORE DREDGE DISPOSAL FOR INDIRECT BEACH NOURISHMENT, OCEAN BEACH, SAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MONITORING AND MODELING NEARSHORE DREDGE DISPOSAL FOR INDIRECT BEACH NOURISHMENT, OCEAN BEACH, SAN FRANCISCO Patrick L. Barnard1 , Daniel M. Hanes1 , Jamie Lescinski1 and Edwin Elias2 Nearshore dredge toward the shore, providing evidence that annual dredge disposal at this site could be beneficial over

  12. Dredged Material Management Plan (DMMP) and Supplemental Environmental Impact statement (EIS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Dredged Material Management Plan (DMMP) and Supplemental Environmental Impact statement (EIS for the management and disposal of dredged material for the Calcasieu River and Pass, Louisiana project. The actions and strategies set forth in the DMMP/SEIS provides for the management of material dredged through operations

  13. Submitted to Conference on Dredged Material Management: Options and Environmental Considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Submitted to Conference on Dredged Material Management: Options and Environmental Considerations Cambridge, Massachusetts ­ 3-6 December 2000 Decontamination and Beneficial Use of Dredged Materials* E of dredged material decontamination technologies for the NY/NJ Harbor. The goal of the project is to assemble

  14. Decontamination of Dredged Material from The Port of New York and New Jersey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Decontamination of Dredged Material from The Port of New York and New Jersey .K.W. Jones Brookhaven copyrightcoveringthispaper. #12;Decontamination of Dredged Material from The Port of New York and New Jersey K. W. Jones the dredging operations required for the efficient operation of the Port. Decontamination and beneficial reuse

  15. DECONTAMINATION AND BENEFICIAL REUSE OF DREDGED ESTUARINE SEDIMENT: THE WESTINGHOUSE PLASMA VITRIFICATION PROCESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    DECONTAMINATION AND BENEFICIAL REUSE OF DREDGED ESTUARINE SEDIMENT: THE WESTINGHOUSE PLASMA of the New York/New Jersey Harbor requires regular dredging. The offshore dumping facility has been closed, dredged material disposal, demonstration testing, process design. 1 McLaughlin, D. F., Fellow Engineer

  16. COASTAL ENGINEERING 2012 DREDGING OPTIMIZATION OF AN INLET SYSTEM FOR ADJACENT SHORE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    COASTAL ENGINEERING 2012 1 DREDGING OPTIMIZATION OF AN INLET SYSTEM FOR ADJACENT SHORE PROTECTION of this study is to investigate optimal dredging volumes and intervals, and to determine the beach placement mining at St. Augustine Inlet over 1.4-year simulations. Results determined that dredging scenarios under

  17. Use of phytostabilisation to remediate mtal polluted dredged V Bert', Ch Lors2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Use of phytostabilisation to remediate métal polluted dredged sédiment V Bert', Ch Lors2 scale on dredged sédiments polluted with metals. A sédiment deposit contaminated with metals of waterways générâtes numerous dredged sédiment deposits. Due to the local intensive industrial history

  18. Maintaining Access to America's Intermodal Ports/Technologies for Decontamination of Dredged

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Maintaining Access to America's Intermodal Ports/Technologies for Decontamination of Dredged will be the control and treatment of contaminated sediments dredged from our nation's waterways. More than 306 million cubic meters (m 3 ) (400 million cubic yards [cy]) of sediments are dredged annually from U.S. waterways

  19. Green Sturgeon, Longfin smelt, and dredging operations in the San Francisco Estuary FINAL AGENDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green Sturgeon, Longfin smelt, and dredging operations in the San Francisco Estuary FINAL AGENDA for Dredged Material 9:15-9:20 Ellen Johnck (Bay Planning Coalition) Welcome 9:20-9:30 Len Cardoza (Weston Solutions) Stakeholder perspective 9:30-9:45 David Woodbury (NMFS) Risk to green sturgeon from dredging

  20. Dredging: Environmental aspects. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning various environmental aspects of dredging and dredge spoil handling. The studies include the use of spoil sites, pollution control, effects on water quality, and sediment transport. Dredging operations at specific sites are discussed. Biological effects are included in a companion bibliography. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  1. ERDC/CHLTR-10-8 Channel Dredging and Geomorphic Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ERDC/CHLTR-10-8 Channel Dredging and Geomorphic Response at and Adjacent to Mobile Pass, Alabama for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;ERDC/CHL TR-10-8 September 2010 Channel Dredging, is an extensive natural inlet that has been improved by channel dredging activities since 1904, primarily through

  2. Case Study of Undrained Strength Stability Analysis for Dredged Material Placement Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Case Study of Undrained Strength Stability Analysis for Dredged Material Placement Areas Timothy D perimeter dike at the Craney Island Dredged Material Management Area CIDMMA using an undrained strength of the effective overburden stress of the dredged material and the marine clay underlying the dike. An undrained

  3. DECONTAMINATION AND BENEFICIAL REUSE OF DREDGED MATERIAL USING EXISTING INFRASTRUCTURE FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF LIGHTWEIGHT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    1 DECONTAMINATION AND BENEFICIAL REUSE OF DREDGED MATERIAL USING EXISTING INFRASTRUCTURE an environmentally acceptable and economically beneficial reuse option for the management of dredged material is self/UPCYCLE Associates' technological and commercial approach focuses on the utilization of dredged material

  4. The Role of the Federal Standard in the Beneficial Use of Dredged Material from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    The Role of the Federal Standard in the Beneficial Use of Dredged Material from U.S. Army Corps of Engineers New and Maintenance Navigation Projects Beneficial Uses of Dredged Materials U.S. Environmental'sternsinhabitingamarshcreatedbydredgedmaterialonPoplarIsland,Maryland. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers #12;The Role of the Federal Standard in the Beneficial Use of Dredged

  5. ERDC/CHLTR-12-18 Dredged Material Placement Site Capacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ERDC/CHLTR-12-18 Dredged Material Placement Site Capacity Analysis for Navigation Improvement. #12;ERDC/CHL TR-12-18 September 2012 Dredged Material Placement Site Capacity Analysis for Navigation of perfor- ming a dredged material placement (DMP) site capacity analysis for a Navigation Improvement

  6. Settlement of Dredged and Contaminated Material Placement Areas. II: Primary Consolidation, Secondary Compression,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Settlement of Dredged and Contaminated Material Placement Areas. II: Primary Consolidation, Secondary Compression, and Desiccation of Dredged Fill Input Parameters Timothy D. Stark 1; Hangseok Choi2, Secondary Compression, and Desiccation of Dredged Fill), which is described in a companion paper

  7. 112 STERN ET AL. Decontamination and BeneficialUse of Dredged Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    112 STERN ET AL. Decontamination and BeneficialUse of Dredged Materials E. A. STERN! U. S";.. ABSTRACT: Our group is leading a large-sale demonstration of dredged material decontamination technologies transformation of contaminated dredged material into an environmentally-benign material used in the manufacture

  8. Waste-to-Energy: Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.; Gelman, R.; Tomberlin, G.; Bain, R.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the U.S. Navy have worked together to demonstrate new or leading-edge commercial energy technologies whose deployment will support the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) in meeting its energy efficiency and renewable energy goals while enhancing installation energy security. This is consistent with the 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review report1 that encourages the use of 'military installations as a test bed to demonstrate and create a market for innovative energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies coming out of the private sector and DOD and Department of Energy laboratories,' as well as the July 2010 memorandum of understanding between DOD and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that documents the intent to 'maximize DOD access to DOE technical expertise and assistance through cooperation in the deployment and pilot testing of emerging energy technologies.' As part of this joint initiative, a promising waste-to-energy (WTE) technology was selected for demonstration at the Hickam Commissary aboard the Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam (JBPHH), Hawaii. The WTE technology chosen is called high-energy densification waste-to-energy conversion (HEDWEC). HEDWEC technology is the result of significant U.S. Army investment in the development of WTE technology for forward operating bases.

  9. Commercial treatability study capabilities for application to the US Department of Energy`s anticipated mixed waste streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA), which represents a national effort to develop and coordinate treatment solutions for mixed waste among all DOE facilities. The hazardous waste component of mixed waste is regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), while the radioactive component is regulated under the Atomic Energy Act, as implemented by the DOE, making mixed waste one of the most complex types of waste for the DOE to manage. The MWFA has the mission to support technologies that meet the needs of the DOE`s waste management efforts to characterize, treat, and dispose of mixed waste being generated and stored throughout the DOE complex. The technologies to be supported must meet all regulatory requirements, provide cost and risk improvements over available technologies, and be acceptable to the public. The most notable features of the DOE`s mixed-waste streams are the wide diversity of waste matrices, volumes, radioactivity levels, and RCRA-regulated hazardous contaminants. Table 1-1 is constructed from data from the proposed site treatment plans developed by each DOE site and submitted to DOE Headquarters. The table shows the number of mixed-waste streams and their corresponding volumes. This table illustrates that the DOE has a relatively small number of large-volume mixed-waste streams and a large number of small-volume mixed-waste streams. There are 1,033 mixed-waste streams with volumes less than 1 cubic meter; 1,112 mixed-waste streams with volumes between 1 and 1,000 cubic meters; and only 61 mixed-waste streams with volumes exceeding 1,000 cubic meters.

  10. EA-1862: Oneida Seven Generation Corporation Waste-To-Energy System, Ashwaubenon, Wisconsin

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oneida’s Energy Recovery Project would construct and operate a solid waste-to-electricity power plant on vacant property within the Bayport Industrial Center in the City of Green Bay, Brown County, Wisconsin. This energy recovery process would involve bringing municipal solid waste into the plant for sizing (shredding), sorting (removing recyclable material), and conveying into one of three pyrolytic gasification systems.

  11. RENEWABLE ENERGY FROM SWINE WASTE Bingjun He, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Brian

    RENEWABLE ENERGY FROM SWINE WASTE Bingjun He, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 1 Yuanhui Zhang, Ted waste and to produce renewable energy from swine manure. Experimental results showed that operating were also studied. Typical oil yield of the TCC process ranged from 60% to 65% on the input volatile

  12. 2014 ENERGY AND ECONOMIC VALUE OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE (MSW), INCLUDING NON-RECYCLED PLASTICS (NRP),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    1 2014 ENERGY AND ECONOMIC VALUE OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE (MSW), INCLUDING NON-RECYCLED PLASTICS #12;2 2014 ENERGY AND ECONOMIC VALUE OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE (MSW), INCLUDING NON-RECYCLED PLASTICS-recycled plastics (NRP). The study presented in this Report is based on 2011 data, compiled in the EEC 2013 Survey

  13. UPGRADING OF WASTE-TO-ENERGY PLANT IN BRESCIA, ITALY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    and district heating, gas supply, waste collection, treatment and disposal, and wastewa- ter treatment. Brescia was one of the first cities to have a well-established district heating net- work. Today, the waste

  14. Energy Efficient Design of a Waste Heat Rejection System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, P.

    In small and medium sized manufacturing facilities, several situations exist where sources of waste heat and sinks needing heat transfer coexist. Examples of waste heat include but are not limited to: drained hot water streams from water cooled...

  15. Biomass and Waste-to-Energy | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy:WhetherNovember 13, 2009OakDepartmentBillBelow are resources for Tribes

  16. Waste-to-Energy Projects at ArmyWaste to Energy Projects at Army Installations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Now!)p ( gy ) 2009 RDECOM WTE Technology Assessment Selected Army WTE Projects ERDC F l C ll D ERDC natural gas and steam by Oct 2016 [EISA 2007] Electricity use for federal government from renewable, NDAA 2007] Total consumption from renewable sources · At least 50% of required annual renewable energy

  17. Campus Energy, Water, and Waste Reduction Policy Page 1 of 7 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University No. 5505 Rev.: 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Campus Energy, Water, and Waste Reduction Policy Page 1 of 7 Virginia Polytechnic Institute __________________________________________________________________________________ Subject: Campus Energy, Water, and Waste Reduction Policy the highest standards in energy/water usage and waste reduction with consideration of the impact

  18. Proceedings of the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fifth of a series of waste minimization (WMIN)/reduction workshops (Waste Reduction Workshop V) was held at the Little Tree Inn in Idaho Falls, Idaho, on July 24--26, 1990. The workshops are held under the auspices of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for sharing site activities in WMIN/reduction planning. Topics covered were management commitment, organizational structure, goal setting, reporting requirements, data bases and tracking systems, pollution prevention, awareness and incentives, information exchange, process waste assessment (PWA) implementation, and recycling internal and external. The workshops assist DOE waste-generating sites in implementing WMIN/reduction programs, plans, and activities, thus providing for optimal waste reduction within the DOE complex. All wastes are considered within this discipline: liquid, solid, and airborne, within the categories of high-level waste (HLW), transuranic waste (TRU), low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste, and mixed waste.

  19. Recovery Act: Waste Energy Project at AK Steel Corporation Middletown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joyce, Jeffrey

    2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (“Air Products”) began development of a project to beneficially utilize waste blast furnace “topgas” generated in the course of the iron-making process at AK Steel Corporation’s Middletown, Ohio works. In early 2010, Air Products was awarded DOE Assistance Agreement DE-EE002736 to further develop and build the combined-cycle power generation facility. In June 2012, Air Products and AK Steel Corporation terminated work when it was determined that the project would not be economically viable at that time nor in the foreseeable future. The project would have achieved the FOA-0000044 Statement of Project Objectives by demonstrating, at a commercial scale, the technology to capture, treat, and convert blast furnace topgas into electric power and thermal energy.

  20. Environmental effects of dredging. Managing dredged material via thin-layer disposal in coastal marshes. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilber, P.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note describes how dredged material can be successfully managed in an environmentally sound manner in marshes by placing it in layers of 5 to 15 cm. (Unless otherwise indicated, all layer thicknesses indicated in this report refer to material that has undergone postdisposal consolidation.) Environmental studies of this process and of the regulatory history of thin-layer disposal in marshes are summarized. General planning and monitoring considerations are described, including descriptions of the types of equipment used to place dredged material in thin layers in marshes.

  1. 22c-MS&PMS-III AGB Thermal Pulsing and Dredge-ups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitko, Michael L.

    22c-MS&PMS-III DREDGE-UP AGB Thermal Pulsing and Dredge-ups Pre-AGB Dredge-ups 1st ­ on the RGB;Pre-Dredge-up C:N:O ~ 1 2 : 1 6 :1 After 1st C:N:O~ 1 3 : 1 3 :1 After 2nd C:N:O~0 to the surface. This is the 3rd Dredge-up phase that can bring C-rich material to the surface, changing the star

  2. 25c-MS&PMS-III AGB Thermal Pulsing and Dredge-ups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitko, Michael L.

    25c-MS&PMS-III DREDGE-UP AGB Thermal Pulsing and Dredge-ups Pre-AGB Dredge-ups 1st ­ on the RGB;Pre-Dredge-up C:N:O ~ 1 2 : 1 6 :1 After 1 st C:N:O~ 1 3 : 1 3 :1 After 2 nd C:N:O~0. This is the 3rd Dredge-up phase that can bring C-rich material to the surface, changing the star from an M

  3. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes...

  4. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MHRC System Concept ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with...

  5. SC Beta Graded Cavity Design for a Proposed 350 MHZ Linac for Waste Transmutation and Energy Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barni, D; Pagani, C; Pierini, P; Visona, S; Gemme, G; Parodi, R

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SC Beta Graded Cavity Design for a Proposed 350 MHZ Linac for Waste Transmutation and Energy Production

  6. Temporal effects of dredging and dredged material disposal on nekton in the offshore waters of Galveston, Texas, with notes on the natural histories of the most abundant taxa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henningsen, Brandt Flynn

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TEHPORAL 11FFEC S Ol DREDGING Ki'P3 DREDGED HATERIAL D. SPCSAL ON NEKTON IN THE OFF SHOPCE WATERS OI' GALVESTON, TEXAS, WITH NOTES ON THE NATLTAL HISTORIES OF THE HOST ABUNDANT 1'AXA A Thesis by BRMlDT FLYNN HENNINGSEN Submitted... to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment or the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1977 Hajor Subject: Biology TEMPORAL EFFECTS OF DREDGING AND DREDGED MATERIAL DISPOSAL ON NEKTON IN THE OFFSHORE WATERS...

  7. Covanta Begins Operating Nation's First Energy-from-Waste Unit under the EPA's New Source Performance Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Sampson, Director of Lee County's Solid Waste Division. Working with Lee County, Covanta oversaw. Mr. Orlando said Covanta was proud to be part of Lee County's comprehensive solid waste management generation projects. Covanta's energy-from-waste facilities convert municipal solid waste into renewable

  8. Technological options for management of hazardous wastes from US Department of Energy facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, S.; Newsom, D.; Barisas, S.; Humphrey, J.; Fradkin, L.; Surles, T.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides comprehensive information on the technological options for management of hazardous wastes generated at facilities owned or operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE). These facilities annually generate a large quantity of wastes that could be deemed hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Included in these wastes are liquids or solids containing polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, heavy metals, waste oils, spent solvents, acids, bases, carcinogens, and numerous other pollutants. Some of these wastes consist of nonnuclear hazardous chemicals; others are mixed wastes containing radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. Nearly 20 unit processes and disposal methods are presented in this report. They were selected on the basis of their proven utility in waste management and potential applicability at DOE sites. These technological options fall into five categories: physical processes, chemical processes, waste exchange, fixation, and ultimate disposal. The options can be employed for either resource recovery, waste detoxification, volume reduction, or perpetual storage. Detailed descriptions of each technological option are presented, including information on process performance, cost, energy and environmental considerations, waste management of applications, and potential applications at DOE sites. 131 references, 25 figures, 23 tables.

  9. Waste-to-Energy and Fuel Cell Technologies Overview | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02ReportWaste-to-Energy and Fuel Cell Technologies

  10. Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02ReportWaste-to-Energy and Fuel Cell Technologiesusing

  11. Waste-to-Energy: Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOE AwardsDNitrate Saltmilestone,Waste-to-Energy

  12. Environmental effects of dredging. Evaluating environmental effects of dredged material management alternatives - a technical framework. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palermo, M.R.; Francingues, N.R.; Engler, R.M.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technical Note presents a brief description of a joint U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Technical Framework for the identification of environmentally acceptable alternatives for the management of dredged material. This Technical Note replaces the earlier Technical Note EEDPA-06-14, which should be discarded.

  13. The Energy Impact of Industrial Recycling and Waste Exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, W. C.

    , Environmental Protection Agency Hazardous Waste Management System: Identification and Listing of Hazardous Wastes" as published in the Federal Register, Volume 45, No. 98, for May 19, 1980, pages 33121-33127. Specifically note Section 261.6 Rnd check... in this category are lubricating or hydraulic oils; all are combustible, with heats of combustion in the range of 19,000 Btu/lb. Changes underway in Federal and State regulations governing the management of hazardous wastes under the Resource Conservation...

  14. Waste energy: Feasibility study for Portage County and the University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abubakr, S.

    1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Concerning solid waste management, Portage County is in a better condition than the many other counties that are currently facing a solid waste disposal crisis. The landfill serving Portage County is relatively new and environmentally safe and has a life expectancy of about 15 more years. A waste-to-energy facility would effectively extend that life two to three times while at the same time reduce the cost of disposing the solid waste. Waupaca County does not have a landfill. This preliminary feasibility study will analyze the possibility of constructing a waste-to-energy facility in Portage County with the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point serving as the major market for the recovered energy. 57 refs., 23 figs., 23 tabs.

  15. The Current and Future Marketplace for Waste-To-Energy Cogeneration Facilities in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, S.

    , it is believed that 425 plants and projects will be in existence by the end of 1996. Representing a total capacity of 260,000 tons per day, by 1996 over 36% of all municipal solid waste generated in the United States will be incinerated by waste-to-energy...

  16. Dredging-induced near-field resuspended sediment concentrations and source strengths. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, M.A.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dredging in riverine, lacustrine, and estuarine environments introduces bottom sediments into overlying waters because of imperfect entrainment and incomplete capture of sediments resuspended during the dredging process and the spillage or leakage of sediments during subsequent transportation and disposal of the dredged sediments. Resuspension of bottom sediments and resulting dispersal may pose water quality problems in waters near dredging operations. Interest in this issue increases when the sediment being dredged is highly contaminated. Resuspension of sediments by dredging is affected by dredge characteristics, dredge operating conditions, properties of bottom and suspended sediments, and site-specific conditions such as bottom topography, ambient current, and depth. This report summarizes field studies conducted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to assess the suspended sediment concentrations in the water column in the vicinity of various dredge types. These concentration data are combined with conceptual models for resuspended sediment source strength geometries and velocity patterns to estimate sediment source strengths for cutterhead and clamshell dredges. Although unverified, these models provide a starting point for a more thorough analytical evaluation of the entire resuspension, transport, and deposition process.

  17. Dredging Operations Technical-Support Program. A framework for assessing the need for seasonal restrictions on dredging and disposal operations. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaSalle, M.W.; Clarke, D.G.; Homziak, J.; Lunz, J.D.; Fredette, T.J.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seasonal restrictions on dredging and/or disposal operations are based upon concerns about potential dredging- or disposal-induced negative impacts to biological resources. In many cases, however, information on the degree to which either naturally occurring or dredging-induced environmental alterations directly or indirectly affect organisms is poorly quantified, in which case restrictions are based upon a reason to believe notion. This report addresses the general acceptability of seasonal restrictions through a compilation of available information on physical-chemical environmental alterations associated with dredging and disposal operations, and critical information regarding the effects of these alterations on principal biological resources. Based on this information, a method for evaluating existing or proposed seasonal restrictions on dredging and/or disposal operations is presented. This framework reflects the present understanding of effects of dredging- or disposal-induced, as well as naturally occurring, environmental alterations upon biological resources. In many cases, the magnitude of dredging- or disposal-induced alterations falls well within the range of naturally occurring phenomena and imposes little or no additional stress upon resource populations. In some cases, however, the magnitude of alterations may exceed that which occurs naturally, whereby concerns about dredging- or disposal-induced alterations are justified and should be considered when planning a project.

  18. 10/12/2009 www.wtert.gr 1 Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    The Earth Engineering Center of Columbia University, New York Members of the Thermodynamics and Transport10/12/2009 www.wtert.gr 1 Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council SYNERGIA Dr. Efstratios MANAGEMENT IN GREECE & POTENTIAL FOR WASTE - TO - ENERGY ISWA Beacon Conference - Strategic Waste Management

  19. THERMAL TREATMENT REVIEW . WTE I THERMAL TREATMENT Since the beginning of this century, global waste-to-energy capacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    of new waste-to gasification process at an industrial scale The Waste-To-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT), headquartered at Columbia University in New York City, keeps a close watch on the thermal waste-to-energy capacity has increased steadily at the rate of about four million tonnes of MSW per year

  20. Optimal Use of Organic Waste in Future Energy Systems the Danish case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    consumption supplied by means of renewable energy in 2025 compared to 14% today and to have 10% biofuel need to cool off heat. New technologies make it possible to utilize organic waste in a new way

  1. Evaluation of Industrial Energy Options for Cogeneration, Waste Heat Recovery and Alternative Fuel Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hencey, S.; Hinkle, B.; Limaye, D. R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the energy options available to Missouri industrial firms in the areas of cogeneration, waste heat recovery, and coal and alternative fuel utilization. The project, being performed by Synergic Resources Corporation...

  2. Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage Industry

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Waste-to-value is a promising and comprehensive wastewater processing solution being pursued by GE that recovers valuable energy and purified water from the abundant wastewater generated and...

  3. Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference May 19-21, 2008 city population, Mumbai ranks first, while Tokyo comes in eighth at over 8 million. [8] Proceedings

  4. Waste Prevention-- What Can We Learn From the Success of Energy Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinmeyer, D.

    Enlightened Self Interest- A Parallel Path to Follow. The goals of stockholders, employees and the nations in which we live are clearly aligned in energy conservation and waste prevention. Call it “social responsibility”, call it “enlightened self...

  5. White dwarf evolutionary sequences for low-metallicity progenitors: The impact of third dredge-up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Althaus, Leandro G; Bertolami, Marcelo M Miller; Córsico, Alejandro H; García-Berro, Enrique

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new white dwarf evolutionary sequences for low-metallicity progenitors. White dwarf sequences have been derived from full evolutionary calculations that take into account the entire history of progenitor stars, including the thermally-pulsing and the post-asymptotic giant branch phases. We show that for progenitor metallicities in the range 0.00003--0.001, and in the absence of carbon enrichment due to the occurrence of a third dredge-up episode, the resulting H envelope of the low-mass white dwarfs is thick enough to make stable H burning the most important energy source even at low luminosities. This has a significant impact on white dwarf cooling times. This result is independent of the adopted mass-loss rate during the thermally-pulsing and post-AGB phases, and the planetary nebulae stage. We conclude that in the absence of third dredge-up episodes, a significant part of the evolution of low-mass white dwarfs resulting from low-metallicity progenitors is dominated by stable H burning. Our study...

  6. Mixed waste landfill cell construction at energy solutions LLC: a regulator's perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lukes, G.C.; Willoughby, O.H. [Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Div. of Solid and Hazardous Waste (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A small percentage of the property that EnergySolutions' (formerly Envirocare) operates at Clive, Utah is permitted by the State of Utah as a treatment, storage and disposal facility for mixed waste. Mixed Waste is defined as a hazardous waste (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 261.3) that also has a radioactive component. Typically, the waste EnergySolutions receives at its mixed waste facility is contaminated with heavy metals and organic compounds while also contaminated with radioactivity. For EnergySolutions, the largest generator of mixed waste is the United States Department of Energy. However, EnergySolutions also accepts a wide variety of mixed waste from other generators. For many wastes, EnergySolutions goes through the process of characterization and acceptance (if appropriate) of the waste, treating the waste (if necessary), confirmation that the waste meets Land Disposal Restriction, and disposal of the waste in its mixed waste landfill cell (MWLC). EnergySolutions originally received its State-issued Part B (RCRA) permit in 1990. The Permit allows a mixed waste landfill cell footprint that covers roughly 10 hectares and includes 20 individual 'sumps'. EnergySolutions chose to build small segments of the landfill cell as waste receipts dictated. Nearly 16 years later, EnergySolutions has just completed its Phase V construction project. 18 of the 20 sumps in the original design have been constructed. The last two sumps are anticipated to be its Phase VI construction project. Further expansion of its mixed waste disposal landfill capacity beyond the current design would require a permit modification request and approval by the Executive Secretary of the Utah Solid and Hazardous Waste Control Board. Construction of the landfill cell is governed by the Construction Quality Assurance/Quality Control manual of its State-issued Permit. The construction of each sump is made up of (from the bottom up): a foundation; three feet of engineered clay; primary and secondary geo-synthetics (60 mil HDPE, geo-fabric and geo-textile); a two foot soil protective cover; tertiary geo-synthetics (80 mil HDPE, geo-fabric and geo-textile); and a final two foot soil protective cover. The Utah Department of Environmental Quality Division of Solid and Hazardous Waste (UDEQ/DSHW) oversees the construction process and reviews the documentation after the construction is complete. If all aspects of the construction process are met, the Executive Secretary of the Utah Solid and Hazardous Waste Control Board approves the landfill cell for disposal. It is the role of the regulator to ensure to the stakeholders that the landfill cell has been constructed in accordance with the State-issued permit and that the cell is protective of human health and the environment. A final determination may require conflict resolution between the agency and the facility. (authors)

  7. Water-related environmental control requirements at municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, J C; Johnson, L D

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water use and waste water production, water pollution control technology requirements, and water-related limitations to their design and commercialization are identified at municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion systems. In Part I, a summary of conclusions and recommendations provides concise statements of findings relative to water management and waste water treatment of each of four municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion categories investigated. These include: mass burning, with direct production of steam for use as a supplemental energy source; mechanical processing to produce a refuse-derived fuel (RDF) for co-firing in gas, coal or oil-fired power plants; pyrolysis for production of a burnable oil or gas; and biological conversion of organic wastes to methane. Part II contains a brief description of each waste-to-energy facility visited during the subject survey showing points of water use and wastewater production. One or more facilities of each type were selected for sampling of waste waters and follow-up tests to determine requirements for water-related environmental controls. A comprehensive summary of the results are presented. (MCW)

  8. Bioassessment methods for determining the hazards of dredged-material disposal in the marine environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gentile, J.H.; Pesch, G.G.; Scott, K.J.; Nelson, W.; Munns, W.R.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 325 million cu m of sediment are dredged annually for navigation purposes in the United States. Of this, 46 million cu m are disposed of annually in the ocean. Decisions regarding the ocean disposal of dredged material result, in large part, from bioassessment-based estimates of contaminant exposure and ecological impacts. Predictions of impacts for an individual dredging project are estimated from laboratory determinations of the magnitude, bioavailability, bioaccumulation, and hazards (toxicity) of dredged material contaminants. Disposal site management of individual and multiple dredging projects requires monitoring for contaminant transport, availability and accumulation in biota, and the hazards to ecologically and commercially important populations. Because of their importance, suites of bioassessment methods representing several levels of biological organization have been proposed for predicting and assessing the hazards resulting from the ocean disposal of dredged material.

  9. A Los Alamos concept for accelerator transmutation of waste and energy production (ATW)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the diagrams presented at the ATW (Accelerator Transmutation of Waste and Energy Production) External Review, December 10-12, 1990, held at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Included are the charge to the committee and the presentations for the committee`s review. Topics of the presentations included an overview of the concept, LINAC technology, near-term application -- high-level defense wastes (intense thermal neutron source, chemistry and materials), advanced application of the ATW concept -- fission energy without a high-level waste stream (overview, advanced technology, and advanced chemistry), and a summary of the research issues.

  10. Continuous mercury monitor for thermal treatment and waste-to-energy operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlager, R.J.; Wilson, K.G.; Sappey, A.D.; Anderson, G.L.; Sagan, F.J. [ADA Technologies, Inc., Englewood, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Treating wastes by thermal means offers benefits in terms of reducing waste volumes and in recovering energy values from the wastes. Thermal treatment has been an effective technology for a number of years, and is being used more in the US. Significant sources of waste in the US are municipal solid waste, hospital wastes, hazardous wastes, and wastes generated form the DOE complex. Mercury is found in these wastes and is emitted as a pollutant from sources that treat these materials thermally. Because of mercury`s toxicity, there is a considerable amount of activity aimed at its regulation and control. One of the key elements to effectively control the release of mercury is the ability to continuously monitor its concentration from emitting sources. ADA Technologies is developing a continuous monitoring system for measuring these emissions in real time. A real-time analyzer will assure that compliance limits are met and that emissions are kept as low as possible. Because mercury is emitted from sources in several different forms, such as elemental mercury and mercuric chloride, provisions have been incorporated in the analyzer that will allow for the measurement of all mercury compounds. The system will provide a number of advantages over existing test methods: (1) it will provide a real-time measure of emissions rates; (2) it will assure facility operators, regulators, and the public that emissions control systems are working at peak efficiency; and (3) it will provide information as to the nature of the emitted mercury (elemental mercury or speciated compounds).

  11. Eddy pump dredging: Does it produce water quality impacts?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creek, K.D. [Pacific Gas and Electric Co., Ramon, CA (United States); Sagraves, T.H. [RESNA Industries, Magalia, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During a prototype demonstration at Pacific Gas and Electric Company`s (PG&E`s) Cresta Reservoir, the feasibility of a new dredging technique was tested for its reported ability to produce only minimal water quality impacts. The technique, developed by PBMK Consultants and Engineers, uses the EDDY Pump, a patented submerged slurry pump system with a higher solids-to-liquid ratio and lower re-suspension of sediment than achieved by conventional suction dredging. Turbidity and total suspended solids concentrations of water samples collected adjacent to and downstream of the pump head were similar to those of samples collected adjacent to and upstream of the pump head. Dissolved oxygen downstream of the pump head remained near saturation. The dredged sediment was pumped 600 m upstream of the pump head and discharged back to the surface of Cresta Reservoir. Increases in turbidity and total suspended solids downstream of the discharge site were minor. Throughout the demonstration, turbidity levels and total suspended solids concentrations remained well below allowable levels set by the California Regional Water Quality Control Board - no more than a 25 NTU turbidity increase over ambient background nor more than 80 mg/I total suspended solids, absolute.

  12. Low-Value Waste Gases as an Energy Source 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waibel, R. T.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste gases with potentially useful fuel value are generated at any number of points in refineries, chemical plants and other industrial and commercial sites. The higher quality streams have been utilized successfully in fuel systems for years...

  13. Low-Value Waste Gases as an Energy Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waibel, R. T.

    Waste gases with potentially useful fuel value are generated at any number of points in refineries, chemical plants and other industrial and commercial sites. The higher quality streams have been utilized successfully in fuel systems for years...

  14. Low Temperature Waste Energy Recovery at Chemical Plants and Refineries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferland, K.; papar, R.; Quinn, J.; Kumar, S.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    candidates of waste heat recovery technologies that might have an application in these industries. Four technologies that met the criteria of the Advisory Committee included: organic rankine cycle (ORC), absorption refrigeration and chilling, Kalina cycle...

  15. Geological criteria for the selection of unconfined dredged material disposal sites in estuaries and lagoons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McHam, Robert Michael

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    APPENDIX A DREDGED MATERIAL SEDIMENT DATA. . ~ ~. . . . . . . . 119 APPENDIX B DREDGED MATERIAL ISLAND PHOTOGRAPHIC AND AREA CALCULATION INFORMATION. . . ~ -. . . . ~ - - . 131 ITA e ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ s o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e e ~ ~ s o e o ~ ~ ~ o ~ 135 V LIST..., transport and redeposit the dredged sediment. Such a predictive capability would, allow the formulation of a geologically sound, placement criterion. The reduction in shoaling resulting from a placement criterion would reduce maintenance costs...

  16. Measuring the Effects of Cutter Suction Dredge Operating Parameters on Minor Losses due to Fixed Screens Installed at the Suction Inlet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Joshua Mark

    2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most efficient and versatile types of modern dredges is the cutter suction dredge. Specific regulations mandate the placement of screens over the suction mouth during dredging operations to prevent ordnance, wildlife, and other debris...

  17. Hybrid Solar Lighting Provides Energy Savings and Reduces Waste Heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapsa, Melissa Voss [ORNL; Maxey, L Curt [ORNL; Earl, Dennis Duncan [ORNL; Beshears, David L [ORNL; Ward, Christina D [ORNL; Parks, James Edgar [ORNL

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Artificial lighting is the largest component of electricity use in commercial U.S. buildings. Hybrid solar lighting (HSL) provides an exciting new means of reducing energy consumption while also delivering significant ancillary benefits associated with natural lighting in buildings. As more than half of all federal facilities are in the Sunbelt region (defined as having an average direct solar radiation of greater than 4 kWh/m2/day) and as more than half of all square footage available in federal buildings is also in the Sunbelt, HSL is an excellent technology fit for federal facilities. The HSL technology uses a rooftop, 4-ft-wide dish and secondary mirror that track the sun throughout the day (Fig. 1). The collector system focuses the sunlight onto 127 optical fibers. The fibers serve as flexible light pipes and are connected to hybrid light fixtures that have special diffusion rods that spread out the light in all directions. One collector powers about eight hybrid light fixtures-which can illuminate about 1,000 square feet. The system tracks at 0.1 accuracy, required by the two-mirror geometry to keep the focused beam on the fiber bundle. When sunlight is plentiful, the optical fibers in the luminaires provide all or most of the light needed in an area. During times of little or no sunlight, a sensor controls the intensity of the artificial lamps to maintain a desired illumination level. Unlike conventional electric lamps, the natural light produces little to no waste heat and is cool to the touch. This is because the system's solar collector removes the infrared light-the part of the spectrum that generates a lot of the heat in conventional bulbs-from the sunlight.

  18. CEWEP -Confederation of European Waste-to-Energy Plants Boulevard Clovis 12A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recovered Fuel) as a fuel in both cement kilns and power plants, dedicated Biomass Energy Plants (BEP in Renewable Electricity and Heat in TWh across Europe AD ­ Anaerobic Digestion; SRF ­ Solid Recovered Fuel; BEP ­ Biomass Energy Plants; LFG ­ Landfill Gas; WtE ­ Waste-to-Energy 1 Excluding agricultural

  19. Effects of burial by the disposal of dredged materials from the Columbia River on Pacific razor clams (Siliqua patula)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vavrinec, John; Kohn, Nancy P.; Hall, Kathleen D.; Romano, Brett A.

    2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual maintenance of the Columbia River navigation channel requires the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) to dredge sediment from the river and dispose of the sediment in coastal areas at the mouth of the Columbia River. Some of these disposal areas can be as shallow as 12 m deep in waters off the coastal beaches, and dredged material disposal activities have therefore raised concerns of impacts to local razor clam (Siliqua patula) populations that are prevalent in the area. The Corps’ Portland District requested that the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conduct laboratory experiments to evaluate the potential impacts of burial by dredged material to razor clams during disposal. Prior modeling of disposal events indicates three stresses that could have an impact on benthic invertebrates: convective descent and bottom encounter (compression forces due to bottom impact), dynamic collapse and spreading (surge as material washes over the bottom), and mounding (burial by material). Because the razor clam is infaunal, the effects of the first two components should be minimal, because the clams should be protected by substrate that is not eroded in the event and by the clams’ rapid digging capabilities. The mound resulting from the disposal, however, would bury any clams remaining in the footprint under as much as 12 cm of new sediment according to modeling, and the clams’ reaction to such an event and to burial is not known. Although the literature suggests that razor clams may be negatively affected by siltation and therefore perhaps by dredging and disposal activity, as well, impacts of this type have not been demonstrated. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential impacts of dredge material disposal on adult subtidal razor clam populations at the mouth of the Columbia River. Using the parameters defined in a previous model, a laboratory study was created in which a slurry was added to experimental chambers seeded with adult razor clams to produce burial mounds of various thicknesses. The laboratory results presented here have two implications for disposal operations.

  20. National Master Plan for Development of Waste-to-Energy in India 1 The National Master Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    by the local body. #12;2 National Master Plan for Development of Waste-to-Energy in India Out of these projects1 National Master Plan for Development of Waste-to-Energy in India 1 The National Master Plan The National Bio-energy Board (NBB), Ministry of Non-Conventional Energy Sources (MNES), is developing

  1. Municipal solid waste management: A bibliography of US Department of Energy contractor report through 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of Energy contractors continue to conduct research targeting the productive and responsible use of the more than 516,000 metric tons (567,000 tons) of municipal solid waste (MSW) that is generated each day in the United States. It is becoming more and more prudent to improve current methods of MSW management and to continue to search for additional cost-effective, energy-efficient means to manage our MSW resource. This bibliography provides information about technical reports on energy from municipal waste that were prepared under grants or contracts from the US DOE. The reports listed focus on energy from municipal waste technologies and energy conservation in wastewater treatment.

  2. Daily Gazette, Schenectady NY Letters to the Editor for Thursday, July 10, 2008 Nothing to fear, and much to gain, from waste-to-energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    , and much to gain, from waste-to-energy Schenectady is one of those misguided cities that sends its municipal solid wastes to distant landfills, costing much money, wasting valuable energy and increasing global warming and pollution of our environment. Waste-to-energy (WTE) is safe. I advised the Israel

  3. Environmental effects of dredging. Long-term evaluation of plants and animals colonizing contaminated estuarine dredged material placed in a wetland environment. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, C.R.; Brandon, D.L.; Engler, R.M.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note summarizes data collected between 1983 and 1989 that relate to plant and animal communities colonizing the wetland creation site of the US Army Corps of Engineers/Environmental Protection Agency Field Verification Program (FVP). The management of contaminated dredged material and the mobility of contaminants from the dredged material into plants and animals are also described and related to the evaluation of test results by Lee and others (1991). This site will be evaluated through September 1995 under the Long-Term Effects of Dredging (LEDO) Program.

  4. Pyroelectric waste heat energy harvesting using relaxor ferroelectric 8/65/35 PLZT and the Olsen cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent

    Pyroelectric waste heat energy harvesting using relaxor ferroelectric 8/65/35 PLZT and the Olsen December 2011 Published 26 January 2012 Online at stacks.iop.org/SMS/21/025021 Abstract Waste heat can in the online journal) 1. Introduction Waste heat is rejected as a by-product of power, refrigeration or heat

  5. -98 -97 -96 -95 -94 -93 -92 -91 -90 -89 -88 -87 -86 -85 Longitude (median for dredges)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geist, Dennis

    -85 Nb/Zr Longitude (median for dredges) Existing Data Western GSC Eastern GSC Ingle Investigating -98 -96 -94 -92 -90 -88 -86 -84 -82 -80 K/Ti*100 Longitude (median for dredges) Existing data Western

  6. SIGKDD Explorations. Copyright 2000 ACM SIGKDD, January 2000. Volume 1, Issue 2 page 52 Data Snooping, Dredging and Fishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, David

    Snooping, Dredging and Fishing: The Dark Side of Data Mining A SIGKDD99 Panel Report David Jensen Computer. A panel at the conference, entitled "Data Snooping, Dredging and Fishing: The Dark Side of Data Mining

  7. Waste Not, Want Not: Analyzing the Economic and Environmental Viability of Waste-to-Energy (WTE) Technology for Site-Specific Optimization of Renewable Energy Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Funk, K.; Milford, J.; Simpkins, T.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste-to-energy (WTE) technology burns municipal solid waste (MSW) in an environmentally safe combustion system to generate electricity, provide district heat, and reduce the need for landfill disposal. While this technology has gained acceptance in Europe, it has yet to be commonly recognized as an option in the United States. Section 1 of this report provides an overview of WTE as a renewable energy technology and describes a high-level model developed to assess the feasibility of WTE at a site. Section 2 reviews results from previous life cycle assessment (LCA) studies of WTE, and then uses an LCA inventory tool to perform a screening-level analysis of cost, net energy production, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and conventional air pollution impacts of WTE for residual MSW in Boulder, Colorado. Section 3 of this report describes the federal regulations that govern the permitting, monitoring, and operating practices of MSW combustors and provides emissions limits for WTE projects.

  8. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT WASTE PROCESSING ANNUAL TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bush, S.

    2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Waste Processing identifies and reduces engineering and technical risks and uncertainties of the waste processing programs and projects of the Department of Energy's Environmental Management (EM) mission through the timely development of solutions to technical issues. The risks, and actions taken to mitigate those risks, are determined through technology readiness assessments, program reviews, technology information exchanges, external technical reviews, technical assistance, and targeted technology development and deployment. The Office of Waste Processing works with other DOE Headquarters offices and project and field organizations to proactively evaluate technical needs, identify multi-site solutions, and improve the technology and engineering associated with project and contract management. Participants in this program are empowered with the authority, resources, and training to implement their defined priorities, roles, and responsibilities. The Office of Waste Processing Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) supports the goals and objectives of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - Office of Environmental Management Engineering and Technology Roadmap by providing direction for technology enhancement, development, and demonstration that will lead to a reduction of technical risks and uncertainties in EM waste processing activities. The MYPP summarizes the program areas and the scope of activities within each program area proposed for the next five years to improve safety and reduce costs and environmental impacts associated with waste processing; authorized budget levels will impact how much of the scope of activities can be executed, on a year-to-year basis. Waste Processing Program activities within the Roadmap and the MYPP are described in these seven program areas: (1) Improved Waste Storage Technology; (2) Reliable and Efficient Waste Retrieval Technologies; (3) Enhanced Tank Closure Processes; (4) Next-Generation Pretreatment Solutions; (5) Enhanced Stabilization Technologies; (6) Spent Nuclear Fuel; and (7) Challenging Materials. This report provides updates on 35 technology development tasks conducted during calendar year 2008 in the Roadmap and MYPP program areas.

  9. Low-level waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the US Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goyette, M.L.; Dolak, D.A.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides technical support information for use in analyzing environmental impacts associated with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management alternatives in the Waste-Management (WM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). Waste loads treated and disposed of for each of the LLW alternatives considered in the DOE WM PEIS are presented. Waste loads are presented for DOE Waste Management (WM) wastes, which are generated from routine operations. Radioactivity concentrations and waste quantities for treatment and disposal under the different LLW alternatives are described for WM waste. 76 refs., 14 figs., 42 tabs.

  10. Waste-Lithium-Liquid (WLL) Flow Battery for Stationary Energy Storage Applications Youngsik Kim* and Nina MahootcheianAsl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Waste-Lithium-Liquid (WLL) Flow Battery for Stationary Energy Storage Applications Youngsik Kim in a Waste-Lithium-Liquid (WLL) flow battery that can be used in a stationary energy storage application. Li* and Nina MahootcheianAsl Richard Lugar Center for Renewable Energy, Department of Mechanical Engineering

  11. Municipal solid waste management: A bibliography of US Department of Energy contractor reports through 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shepherd, P.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    US Department of Energy contractors continue to conduct research targeting the productive and responsible use of the more than 536,000 tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) that is generated each day in the United States. It is becoming more and more prudent to improve current methods of MSW management and to continue to search for additional cost-effective, energy-efficient means to manage our MSW resource. This bibliography is an updated version of Municipal Waste to Energy: An Annotated Bibliography of US Department of Energy Contractor Reports, by Caroline Brooks, published in 1987. Like its predecessor, this bibliography provides information about technical reports on energy from municipal waste that were prepared under grants or contracts from the US Department of Energy. The reports listed focus on energy from municipal waste technologies and energy conservation in wastewater treatment. The bibliography contains three indexes -- an author index, a subject index, and a title index. The reports are listed alphabetically in the subject areas and may appear under more than one subject. All of the reports cited in the original MSW bibliography are also included in this update. The number of copies of each report originally published varied according to anticipated public demand. However, all reports are available in either microfiche or hard copy form and may be ordered from the National Technical Information Service (NTIS), US Department of Commerce, Springfield, VA 22161. Explicit information on ordering reports is included in Appendix A.

  12. Bad wine makes for good energy Waste from improper fermentation can transform into electricity, hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MSNBC.com Bad wine makes for good energy Waste from improper fermentation can transform, a group of scientists from India recently developed a microbial fuel cell that uses wine to produce energy of wine could drop your electrical and gas bills. Using widely available microbes, scientists

  13. Analysis of environmental issues related to small-scale hydroelectric development. I. Dredging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M.; Dye, L.L.; Turner, R.R.; Hildebrand, S.G.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The small hydroelectric potential (less than or equal to 15-MW capacity) at existing dams in the US has been estimated to be approximately 5000 MW. Development of this resource by retrofitting these dams for hydroelectric generation may require dredging in order to (1) reclaim reservoir storage capacity lost as a result of sediment accumulation; (2) clear intake structures; and/or (3) construct/repair powerhouses, tailraces, and headraces. Dredging and disposal of dredged material at small-scale hydro sites may result in several potential environmental impacts, and their magnitude will depend upon many site-specific factors. The physical and chemical effects of dredging and disposal, their causes, and the biological effects engendered by these physical and chemical changes are discussed. Factors that could affect the severity (magnitude) of these effects (impacts) are emphasized, with the intent of providing guidance to developers of potential sites. A discussion of environmental contraints and mitigation, as well as guidelines for the early evaluation of the environmental feasibility of dredging, are included. A general introduction is provided on dredging equipment and disposal practices, with emphasis on those practices that would be applicable to small reservoirs. Regulations applicable to dredged material disposal and wetlands protection are discussed, and a preliminary analysis of the economic costs associated with dredging and disposal is presented.

  14. ERDC/ELTR-11-1 Dredging Operations and Environmental Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    , and to estimate full scale implementation costs at a scale compatible with a dredging operation. OverallERDC/ELTR-11-1 Dredging Operations and Environmental Research Program Mass Balance, Beneficial Use Products, and Cost Comparisons of Four Sediment Treatment Technologies Near Commercialization Environmental

  15. City of San Jose to host Renewable Energy From Waste Conference 2014 November 18-20, 2014, Double Tree by Hilton, San Jose, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    City of San Jose to host Renewable Energy From Waste Conference 2014 for the second Renewable Energy From Waste Conference, to be hosted by the City of San, California. Following the overwhelming success of the 2013 event, Renewable Energy

  16. Recovery of floral and faunal communities after placement of dredged material on seagrasses in Laguna Madre, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recovery of floral and faunal communities after placement of dredged material on seagrasses characteristics and use by fishery and forage organisms were detectable at dredged material placement sites three years after dredging. Clovergrass Halophila engelmannii was the initial colonist, but shoalgrass

  17. Estuaries Vol. 21, No. 4A, p. 646-651 December 1998 Processing Contaminated Dredged Material From the Port of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Estuaries Vol. 21, No. 4A, p. 646-651 December 1998 Processing Contaminated Dredged Material From environmentaleffectscausedby ocean disposal of the dredged material. Current proposals for solutions to the problem include to produce a complete "treatment train" for processing and decontaminating dredged material is described

  18. INITIAL DEVELOPMENT OF RIPARIAN AND MARSH VEGETATION ON DREDGED-MATERIAL ISLANDS IN THE SACRAMENTO-SAN JOAQUIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    INITIAL DEVELOPMENT OF RIPARIAN AND MARSH VEGETATION ON DREDGED-MATERIAL ISLANDS IN THE SACRAMENTO establishment and de- velopment were monitored for 3 1/2 years on a new, dredged-material island located within elevations when de- signing future levees, dredged-material deposition areas, and fish and wildlife habitat

  19. MOVEMENT OF SEA TURTLES CAPTURED NEAR HOPPER-DREDGED CHANNELS IN TEXAS AND LOUISIANA: 1993-1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;MOVEMENT OF SEA TURTLES CAPTURED NEAR HOPPER-DREDGED CHANNELS IN TEXAS AND LOUISIANA: 1993's ridley (Lepidochelys kempii) and 4 loggerhead (Caretta caretta) turtles were tracked near hopper dredged. Tracking data will determine short term fidelity to jettied passes, use of hopper dredged channels and long

  20. Applicability of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) Regulations to the Management of Navigational Dredged Material from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    to the Management of Navigational Dredged Material from the New York/New Jersey Harbor by Thomas John A thesis.........................................................................7 2.1 Interim Guidance for Freshwater Navigational Dredging...............................7 2 Management of Dredged Material........................................12 2.2 New York State Soil Clean Up

  1. US Department of Energy mixed waste characterization, treatment, and disposal focus area technical baseline development process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, J.A.; Gombert, D. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) created the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (MWFA) to develop and facilitate implementation of technologies required to meet its commitments for treatment of mixed wastes under the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCA), and in accordance with the Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Mixed wastes include both mixed low-level waste (MLLW) and mixed transuranic (MTRU) waste. The goal of the MWFA is to develop mixed waste treatment systems to the point of implementation by the Environmental Management (EM) customer. To accomplish this goal, the MWFA is utilizing a three step process. First, the treatment system technology deficiencies were identified and categorized. Second, these identified needs were prioritized. This resulted in a list of technical deficiencies that will be used to develop a technical baseline. The third step, the Technical Baseline Development Process, is currently ongoing. When finalized, the technical baseline will integrate the requirements associated with the identified needs into the planned and ongoing environmental research and technology development activities supported by the MWFA. Completion of this three-step process will result in a comprehensive technology development program that addresses customer identified and prioritized needs. The MWFA technical baseline will be a cost-effective, technically-defensible tool for addressing and resolving DOE`s mixed waste problems.

  2. Energy or compost from green waste? - A CO{sub 2} - Based assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kranert, Martin, E-mail: martin.kranert@iswa.uni-stuttgart.d [Universitaet Stuttgart, Institute for Sanitary Engineering, Water Quality and Solid Waste Management, Bandtaele 2, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Gottschall, Ralf; Bruns, Christian [Humus and Erden Kontor GmbH, Karlsbrunnenstrasse 11, D-37249 Neu-Eichenberg (Germany); Hafner, Gerold [Universitaet Stuttgart, Institute for Sanitary Engineering, Water Quality and Solid Waste Management, Bandtaele 2, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Green waste is increasingly extracted from the material recycling chain and, as a result of the financial subsidy arising from the German renewable energy law for the generation of energy from renewable raw materials; it is fed into the energy recovery process in biomass power stations. A reduction in climate relevant gases is also linked to the material recovery of green waste - in particular when using composts gained from the process as a new raw material in different types of potting compost and plant culture media as a replacement for peat. Unlike energy recovery, material valorisation is not currently subsidised. Through the analysis of material and energy valorisation methods for green waste, with particular emphasis on primary resource consumption and CO{sub 2}-balance, it could be determined that the use of green waste for energy generation and its recovery for material and peat replacement purposes can be considered to be on a par. Based on energy recovery or material oriented scenarios, it can be further deduced that no method on its own will achieve the desired outcome and that a combination of recycling processes is more likely to lead to a significant decrease of greenhouse gas emissions.

  3. WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    to Climate protection in light of the· Waste Framework Directive. The "energy package", e.g. the RenewablesWASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From

  4. Design and management for resource recovery. Volume 1. Energy from waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frankiewicz, T.C. (ed.)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 16 chapters in this volume represent a large fraction of the technical presentations made at the July 1979 Engineerng Foundation Conference, Municipal solid waste as a resource: the problem and the promise. This conference was held at a time when commercial interest in recovering resources from solid waste entered a growth phase and when the economics of energy recovery from waste improved dramatically. The purpose of the meeting, in Henniker, NH, was to deal openly with some of the past problems and look to the future to see if in fact the nagging early difficulties could be overcome. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 16 chapters, all of which were selected for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA); 2 will appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA).

  5. Benefits of supplementing an industrial waste anaerobic digester with energy crops for increased biogas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nges, Ivo Achu, E-mail: Nges.Ivo_Achu@biotek.lu.se [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Escobar, Federico; Fu Xinmei; Bjoernsson, Lovisa [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study demonstrates the feasibility of co-digestion food industrial waste with energy crops. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laboratory batch co-digestion led to improved methane yield and carbon to nitrogen ratio as compared to mono-digestion of industrial waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-digestion was also seen as a means of degrading energy crops with nutrients addition as crops are poor in nutrients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was concluded that co-digestion led an over all economically viable process and ensured a constant supply of feedstock. - Abstract: Currently, there is increasing competition for waste as feedstock for the growing number of biogas plants. This has led to fluctuation in feedstock supply and biogas plants being operated below maximum capacity. The feasibility of supplementing a protein/lipid-rich industrial waste (pig manure, slaughterhouse waste, food processing and poultry waste) mesophilic anaerobic digester with carbohydrate-rich energy crops (hemp, maize and triticale) was therefore studied in laboratory scale batch and continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) with a view to scale-up to a commercial biogas process. Co-digesting industrial waste and crops led to significant improvement in methane yield per ton of feedstock and carbon-to-nitrogen ratio as compared to digestion of the industrial waste alone. Biogas production from crops in combination with industrial waste also avoids the need for micronutrients normally required in crop digestion. The batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. This was done based on the ratio of methane yields observed for laboratory batch and CSTR experiments compared to full scale CSTR digestion of industrial waste. The economy of crop-based biogas production is limited under Swedish conditions; therefore, adding crops to existing industrial waste digestion could be a viable alternative to ensure a constant/reliable supply of feedstock to the anaerobic digester.

  6. Refinery gas waste heat energy conversion optimization in gas turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, A.D.; Francuz, D.J.; West, E.W. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilization of refinery fuel gas in gas turbines poses special challenges due to the combustion characteristics of the fuel gas which contains significant concentrations of hydrogen. Proper modifications to the combustion system of the existing gas turbines are required in order to combust such fuel gas streams in gas turbines while minimizing the NO{sub x} emissions. A novel approach to the utilization of this hydrogen bearing fuel gas in gas turbines consists of humidifying the fuel gas with water vapor by direct contact with hot water in a counter-current column, the feed water to the humidifier being first circulated through the refinery to recover waste heat. The refinery waste heat produces additional motive fluid with a result that the waste heat is converted to power in the gas turbine. Furthermore, the water vapor introduced into the fuel gas reduces the NO{sub x} formation and increases the gas turbine output, while the hydrogen present in the fuel gas provides the flame stability required when combusting a fuel gas containing a large concentration of water vapor.

  7. Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems: A life-cycle costing approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massarutto, Antonio [University of Udine, Udine (Italy); IEFE, Bocconi University, Milan (Italy); Carli, Alessandro de, E-mail: alessandro.decarli@unibocconi.it [IEFE, Bocconi University, Milan (Italy); Graffi, Matteo [University of Udine, Udine (Italy); IEFE, Bocconi University, Milan (Italy)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: > The study aims at assessing economic performance of alternative scenarios of MSW. > The approach is the life-cycle costing (LCC). > Waste technologies must be considered as complementary into an integrated strategy. - Abstract: A critical assumption of studies assessing comparatively waste management options concerns the constant average cost for selective collection regardless the source separation level (SSL) reached, and the neglect of the mass constraint. The present study compares alternative waste management scenarios through the development of a desktop model that tries to remove the above assumption. Several alternative scenarios based on different combinations of energy and materials recovery are applied to two imaginary areas modelled in order to represent a typical Northern Italian setting. External costs and benefits implied by scenarios are also considered. Scenarios are compared on the base of the full cost for treating the total waste generated in the area. The model investigates the factors that influence the relative convenience of alternative scenarios.

  8. Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems: Project overview and main results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Consonni, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.consonni@polimi.it [Department of Energy, Politecnico di Milano, Via Lambruschini 4, 20156 Milan (Italy); Giugliano, Michele [DIIAR, Environmental Section, Politecnico di Milano, P.za L. Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan (Italy); Massarutto, Antonio [Dse, Universita degli Studi di Udine and IEFE, Via Tomadini 30/a, 33100 Udine (Italy); Ragazzi, Marco [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Trento, Via Mesiano 77, 38123 Trento (Italy); Saccani, Cesare [DIEM, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 2, 40136 Bologna (Italy)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: > The source separation level (SSL) of waste management system does not qualify adequately the system. > Separately collecting organic waste gives less advantages than packaging materials. > Recycling packaging materials (metals, glass, plastics, paper) is always attractive. > Composting and anaerobic digestion of organic waste gives questionable outcomes. > The critical threshold of optimal recycling seems to be a SSL of 50%. - Abstract: This paper describes the context, the basic assumptions and the main findings of a joint research project aimed at identifying the optimal breakdown between material recovery and energy recovery from municipal solid waste (MSW) in the framework of integrated waste management systems (IWMS). The project was carried out from 2007 to 2009 by five research groups at Politecnico di Milano, the Universities of Bologna and Trento, and the Bocconi University (Milan), with funding from the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research (MIUR). Since the optimization of IWMSs by analytical methods is practically impossible, the search for the most attractive strategy was carried out by comparing a number of relevant recovery paths from the point of view of mass and energy flows, technological features, environmental impact and economics. The main focus has been on mature processes applicable to MSW in Italy and Europe. Results show that, contrary to a rather widespread opinion, increasing the source separation level (SSL) has a very marginal effects on energy efficiency. What does generate very significant variations in energy efficiency is scale, i.e. the size of the waste-to-energy (WTE) plant. The mere value of SSL is inadequate to qualify the recovery system. The energy and environmental outcome of recovery depends not only on 'how much' source separation is carried out, but rather on 'how' a given SSL is reached.

  9. Experimental and Analytical Studies on Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Felix

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    List of Figures Flow chart of the energy produced, used, andrising Figure 1.1: Flow chart of the energy produced, used,

  10. Status report on energy recovery from municipal solid waste: technologies, lessons and issues. Information bulletin of the energy task force of the urban consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review is presented of the lessons learned and issues raised regarding the recovery of energy from solid wastes. The review focuses on technologies and issues significant to currently operating energy recovery systems in the US - waterwall incineration, modular incineration, refuse derived fuels systems, landfill gas recovery systems. Chapters are: Energy Recovery and Solid Waste Disposal; Energy Recovery Systems; Lessons in Energy Recovery; Issues in Energy Recovery. Some basic conclusions are presented concerning the state of the art of energy from waste. Plants in shakedown or under construction, along with technologies in the development stages, are briefly described. Sources of additional information and a bibliography are included. (MCW)

  11. THESIS 2011 26-28 April 2011, Chatou FRANCE Simulation for the convective descent phase of dredged-sediment releases in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    THESIS 2011 26-28 April 2011, Chatou FRANCE Simulation for the convective descent phase of dredged in estuaries. It is then necessary to perform dredging to allow ships accessing to the docks. The dredged to the environment. The purpose of this work is to numerically study the process of dredged sediment with the help

  12. Nuclear Waste Fund Activities Management Team | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEWResponse to Time-Based Rates fromNuclear Security ConferenceWaste

  13. Environmental, Economic, and Energy Assessment of the Ultimate Analysis and Moisture Content of Municipal Solid Waste in a Parallel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    pollution for the co-combustion of coal with MSW using five MSW composition scenarios, four of which were ABSTRACT: Use of municipal solid waste (MSW) as fuel for electricity generation reduces landfill disposal-combustion is a waste-to-energy technology that can use MSW and coal as co-fuels, offering potential energy recovery

  14. Copyright 2009 by ASME Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Copyright © 2009 by ASME Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference of each technology has the potential 1 Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference NAWTEC17 May 18-20, 2009, Chantilly, Virginia, USA NAWTEC17-2356 #12;Copyright © 2009 by ASME

  15. Visit of Professor Avraam Karagiannidis to the Toulon Waste-to-Energy plant Toulon-France, December 11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    correspondingly). - Some heat is also being sold to a local (small) district heating network. More `heat' clientsVisit of Professor Avraam Karagiannidis to the Toulon Waste-to-Energy plant Toulon-France, December 11, 2009 The Toulon Waste-to-Energy (WTE) plant was built in 1984 and retrofitted in 1993

  16. US Department of Energy interim mixed waste inventory report: Waste streams, treatment capacities and technologies: Volume 4, Site specific---Ohio through South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report to provide an inventory of its mixed wastes and treatment capacities and technologies in response to Section 105(a) of the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct) of 1992 (Pub. L. No. 102-386). As required by the FFCAct-1992, this report provides site-specific information on DOE`s mixed waste streams and a general review of available and planned treatment facilities for mixed wastes at the following five Ohio facilities: Battelle Columbus Laboratories; Fernald Environmental Management Project; Mound Plant; Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant; and RMI, Titanium Company.

  17. Harnessing waste heat and reducing wasted lighting : three mechanical structures for efficient energy systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stronger, Brad A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents three mechanical structures designed for efficient energy systems. In [3], Cooley presents a modification of a fluorescent lamp which allows it to detect nearby occupants and dim itself automatically. ...

  18. Experimental and Analytical Studies on Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Felix

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-e?ciency direct conversion of heat to electrical energyJ. Yu and M. Ikura, “Direct conversion of low-grade heat tois concerned with direct conversion of thermal energy into

  19. A Cumulative Energy Demand indicator (CED), life cycle based, for industrial waste management decision making

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puig, Rita, E-mail: rita.puig@eei.upc.edu [Escola d’Enginyeria d’Igualada (EEI), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Plaça del Rei, 15, 08700 Igualada (Spain); Fullana-i-Palmer, Pere [UNESCO Chair in Life Cycle and Climate Change, Escola Superior de Comerç Internacional, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), c/Passeig Pujades, 1, 08003 Barcelona (Spain); Baquero, Grau; Riba, Jordi-Roger [Escola d’Enginyeria d’Igualada (EEI), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Plaça del Rei, 15, 08700 Igualada (Spain); Bala, Alba [UNESCO Chair in Life Cycle and Climate Change, Escola Superior de Comerç Internacional, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), c/Passeig Pujades, 1, 08003 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • We developed a methodology useful to environmentally compare industrial waste management options. • The methodology uses a Net Energy Demand indicator which is life cycle based. • The method was simplified to be widely used, thus avoiding cost driven decisions. • This methodology is useful for governments to promote the best environmental options. • This methodology can be widely used by other countries or regions around the world. - Abstract: Life cycle thinking is a good approach to be used for environmental decision-support, although the complexity of the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies sometimes prevents their wide use. The purpose of this paper is to show how LCA methodology can be simplified to be more useful for certain applications. In order to improve waste management in Catalonia (Spain), a Cumulative Energy Demand indicator (LCA-based) has been used to obtain four mathematical models to help the government in the decision of preventing or allowing a specific waste from going out of the borders. The conceptual equations and all the subsequent developments and assumptions made to obtain the simplified models are presented. One of the four models is discussed in detail, presenting the final simplified equation to be subsequently used by the government in decision making. The resulting model has been found to be scientifically robust, simple to implement and, above all, fulfilling its purpose: the limitation of waste transport out of Catalonia unless the waste recovery operations are significantly better and justify this transport.

  20. Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    used globally for energy recovery from municipal solid wastes is combustion of "as received" MSW require pre-processing of the MSW, combust the resulting syngas to generate steam, and produce a vitrified indust relativ as $50 minus 40-50% report mature main Bed ( units a of the value Th China about treated

  1. Waste-to-Energy and Fuel Cell T h l i O i

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . #12;Global Approach for Using Biogas Innovation for Our Energy Future #12;Anaerobic Digestion natural gas. Additi l l i t bi fAdditional cleanup is necessary to use biogas from anaerobic digesters Production via Anaerobic Digestion · Breweries (~73 Watts per barrel of beer) · Municipal Waste Water

  2. Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering Spring 2013 Solar Innovations -HVAC and Waste Stream Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PENNSTATE Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering Spring 2013 Solar Innovations - HVAC and Waste Stream Analysis Overview There are two problems that were voiced by Solar Innovations, HVAC system design and recycling stream improvement. The HVAC system was not providing even conditioning of office

  3. Thermal Energy Storage/Waste Heat Recovery Applications in the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beshore, D. G.; Jaeger, F. A.; Gartner, E. M.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and the Portland Cement Association have studied the potential benefits of using waste heat recovery methods and thermal energy storage systems in the cement manufacturing process. This work was performed under DOE Contract No. EC-77-C-01-50S4. The study has been...

  4. Use of Thermal Energy Storage to Enhance the Recovery and Utilization of Industrial Waste Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McChesney, H. R.; Bass, R. W.; Landerman, A. M.; Obee, T. N.; Sgamboti, C. T.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recovery and reuse of industrial waste heat may be limited if an energy source cannot be fully utilized in an otherwise available out of phase or unequal capacity end-use process. This paper summarizes the results of a technical and economic...

  5. Dredging: Technology and environmental aspects. May 1978-July 1989 (Citations from the Life Sciences Collection data base). Report for May 1978-July 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the technology and environmental impacts of dredging. Equipment, including semi-submersible cutter platforms, is described. Sediment movement, factors affecting sediment movement, and the disposal of dredged material, are discussed, and computer models predicting the fate of the dredged materials are considered. The environmental impacts of the dredged areas and the effects of ocean dumping of dredged material are also discussed. (This updated bibliography contains 352 citations, 22 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  6. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Buttermilk Channel, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Antrim, L.D; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q.; Tokos, J.J.S. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Buttermilk Channel was one of seven waterways that was sampled and evaluated for dredging and sediment disposal. Sediment samples were collected and analyses were conducted on sediment core samples. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the channel included bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of site water and elutriate, water column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Individual sediment core samples were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon. A composite sediment samples, representing the entire area proposed for dredging, was analyzed for bulk density, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Site water and elutriate were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBs.

  7. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Winyah Bay, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, J.A.; Gardiner, W.W.; Pinza, M.R.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The navigational channels of Winyah Bay, Georgetown Harbor, South Carolina require dredging to enable normal shipping traffic to use these areas. Before dredging, environmental assessments must be conducted to determine the suitability of this dredged sediment for unconfined, open-water disposal. The Charleston, South Carolina District Office of the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) requested that the Battelle/Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) collect sediment samples and conduct the required physical/chemical, toxicological, and bioaccumulation evaluations as required in the 1991 Implementation Manual. This report is intended to provide information required to address potential ecological effects of the Entrance Channel and Inner Harbor sediments proposed disposal in the ocean.

  8. Air pollution control systems and technologies for waste-to-energy facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Getz, N.P.; Amos, C.K. Jr.; Siebert, P.C. (Roy F. Weston, Inc., Burlington, MA (US))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the primary topics of concern to those planning, developing, and operating waste-to-energy (W-T-E) (also known as municipal waste combustors (MWCs)) facilities is air emissions. This paper presents a description of the state-of-the-art air pollution control (APC) systems and technology for particulate, heavy metals, organics, and acid gases control for W-T-E facilities. Items covered include regulations, guidelines, and control techniques as applied in the W-T-E industry. Available APC technologies are viewed in detail on the basis of their potential removal efficiencies, design considerations, operations, and maintenance costs.

  9. Unique Waste Leaves Portsmouth in a 'Pup' | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015 -Helicopter

  10. NREL: Technology Deployment - Biopower and Waste-to-Energy Solutions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid Integration NRELCost

  11. Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for the Food ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2014 2011 CHPIndustrial Distributed Energy R&D Portfolio Review - Summary Report Biogas Opportunities Roadmap Advanced Manufacturing Home Key Activities Research &...

  12. Grouting Begins on Next SRS Waste Tank | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov.Energy02.pdf7 OPAM Flash2011-37 OPAMResource Guide for

  13. IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty, Texas: EnergyHy9MoatEnergyElectricity AccessIFB AgroIGES

  14. Salt Waste Contractor Reaches Contract Milestone | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, anEnergyDepartmentDepartmentEnergySales of Fossil

  15. Nevada Solid Waste Forms and Guidance Documents Webpage | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: EnergyEnergyPPCR) JumpAirWork (Water Right)Solar One

  16. Nevada Washoe County Solid Waste Management Webpage | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: EnergyEnergyPPCR) JumpAirWork (WaterStormwaterInformation

  17. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Richmond Harbor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinza, M R; Ward, J A; Mayhew, H L; Word, J Q; Niyogi, D K; Kohn, N P [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the summer of 1991, Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) was contracted to conduct sampling and testing of sediments proposed for dredging of Richmond Harbor, California. The MSL collected sediment cores to a depth of [minus]40 ft MLLW ([minus]38 ft + 2 ft overdepth) from 28 (12-in. core) and 30 (4-in. core) stations. The sediment cores were allocated to six composite samples referred to as sediment treatments, which were then subjected to physical, chemical, toxicological, and bioaccumulation testing. Physical and chemical parameters included grain size, total organic carbon (TOC), total volatile solids (TVS), oil and grease, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyis (PCBs), priority pollutant metals, and butyltins. The results from the test treatments were compared to results from five reference treatments representative of potential in-bay and offshore disposal sites.

  18. Recovery of Energy and Chrome from Leather Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muralidhara, H. S.; Maggin, B.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy requirements for the leather tanning industry are considerable and depend primarily on nonrenewable fuels such as oil and natural gas. However, some 50 percent, approximately 1.85 x 1012 BTU/year, of the energy needed to support the U...

  19. Life-cycle costs for the Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherick, M.J.; Shropshire, D.E.; Hsu, K.M.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management has produced a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) in order to assess the potential consequences resulting from a cross section of possible waste management strategies for the DOE complex. The PEIS has been prepared in compliance with the NEPA and includes evaluations of a variety of alternatives. The analysis performed for the PEIS included the development of life-cycle cost estimates for the different waste management alternatives being considered. These cost estimates were used in the PEIS to support the identification and evaluation of economic impacts. Information developed during the preparation of the life-cycle cost estimates was also used to support risk and socioeconomic analyses performed for each of the alternatives. This technical report provides an overview of the methodology used to develop the life-cycle cost estimates for the PEIS alternatives. The methodology that was applied made use of the Waste Management Facility Cost Information Reports, which provided a consistent approach and estimating basis for the PEIS cost evaluations. By maintaining consistency throughout the cost analyses, life-cycle costs of the various alternatives can be compared and evaluated on a relative basis. This technical report also includes the life-cycle cost estimate results for each of the PEIS alternatives evaluated. Summary graphs showing the results for each waste type are provided and tables showing different breakdowns of the cost estimates are provided. Appendix E contains PEIS cost information that was developed using an approach different than the standard methodology described in this report. Specifically, costs for high-level waste are found in this section, as well as supplemental costs for additional low-level waste and hazardous waste alternatives.

  20. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) : FY10 development and integration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Sassani, David Carl; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Bouchard, Julie F.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Wang, Yifeng; Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the progress in fiscal year 2010 in developing the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with robust verification, validation, and software quality requirements. Waste IPSC activities in fiscal year 2010 focused on specifying a challenge problem to demonstrate proof of concept, developing a verification and validation plan, and performing an initial gap analyses to identify candidate codes and tools to support the development and integration of the Waste IPSC. The current Waste IPSC strategy is to acquire and integrate the necessary Waste IPSC capabilities wherever feasible, and develop only those capabilities that cannot be acquired or suitably integrated, verified, or validated. This year-end progress report documents the FY10 status of acquisition, development, and integration of thermal-hydrologic-chemical-mechanical (THCM) code capabilities, frameworks, and enabling tools and infrastructure.

  1. Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems. An evaluation based on life cycle assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giugliano, Michele; Cernuschi, Stefano [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Grosso, Mario, E-mail: mario.grosso@polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Rigamonti, Lucia [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports the environmental results, integrated with those arising from mass and energy balances, of a research project on the comparative analysis of strategies for material and energy recovery from waste, funded by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research. The project, involving the cooperation of five University research groups, was devoted to the optimisation of material and energy recovery activities within integrated municipal solid waste (MSW) management systems. Four scenarios of separate collection (overall value of 35%, 50% without the collection of food waste, 50% including the collection of food waste, 65%) were defined for the implementation of energetic, environmental and economic balances. Two sizes of integrated MSW management system (IWMS) were considered: a metropolitan area, with a gross MSW production of 750,000 t/year and an average province, with a gross MSW production of 150,000 t/year. The environmental analysis was conducted using Life Cycle Assessment methodology (LCA), for both material and energy recovery activities. In order to avoid allocation we have used the technique of the expansion of the system boundaries. This means taking into consideration the impact on the environment related to the waste management activities in comparison with the avoided impacts related to the saving of raw materials and primary energy. Under the hypotheses of the study, both for the large and for the small IWMS, the energetic and environmental benefits are higher than the energetic and environmental impacts for all the scenarios analysed in terms of all the indicators considered: the scenario with 50% separate collection in a drop-off scheme excluding food waste shows the most promising perspectives, mainly arising from the highest collection (and recycling) of all the packaging materials, which is the activity giving the biggest energetic and environmental benefits. Main conclusions of the study in the general field of the assessment of the environmental performance of any integrated waste management scheme address the importance of properly defining, beyond the design value assumed for the separate collection as a whole, also the yields of each material recovered; particular significance is finally related to the amount of residues deriving from material recovery activities, resulting on average in the order of 20% of the collected materials.

  2. London Waste and Recycling Board | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners andLodgepole, Nebraska: EnergyLomita, California: Energyand

  3. Construction Begins on New Waste Processing Facility | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesville EnergyDepartment.AttachmentEnergyGenerating Facility

  4. High Level Waste Corporate Board Charter | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department of Energy CompletingPresented By:DanielHigh

  5. Waste and Materials Disposition Information | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sureReportsofDepartmentSeries |Attacks |VisualizingWarm

  6. ADEQ Hazardous Waste Management website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 WindtheEnergySulfonate as aAAB

  7. ADEQ Managing Hazardous Waste Handbook | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 WindtheEnergySulfonate as aAABWaste Handbook Jump to:

  8. Hawaii DOH Hazardous Waste Section Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| OpenInformationHartsville,NewOpen EnergyWebpageCounty,

  9. Hawaii DOH Solid Waste Section Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| OpenInformationHartsville,NewOpen EnergyWebpageCounty,Section

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office: Waste Heat Recovery | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment of Energy MicrosoftVOLUME I ATheJune 23, 2015

  11. Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment of Energy MicrosoftVOLUMEWORKFORCE DIVERSITYMarchReports

  12. Nature and Waste Management P Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpen Energy InformationNatsource EuropeNature

  13. Notification of Regulated Waste Activity | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellence Seed LLCShores,Activity on Low Risk Sites

  14. Oregon DEQ Hazardous Waste Fact Sheet | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOfficeOhio:OpowerOrchardCity, Oregon:County,DEQ

  15. Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments fromof Energy Automation Worldof EnergyTAGS, PbTe and1

  16. Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments fromof Energy Automation Worldof EnergyTAGS, PbTe and10

  17. Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments fromof Energy Automation Worldof EnergyTAGS, PbTe

  18. US Integrated Waste Services Association | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLC Place: Dallas,UGIURDB SchemaNeal Hot Springs | OpenUS

  19. Energy Department Fellows Present Research at Waste Management Conference |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy Chinaof EnergyImpactOn July 2, 2014 inJohnSystems|inBuilding toDepartment of

  20. Montana Hazardous Waste Program Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana:Northeast AsiaAir| Open EnergyWebpage Jump

  1. NMAC 20.4 Hazardous Waste | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources JumpNEF Advisors LLCEnergyQuality

  2. NMED Hazardous Waste Bureau website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources JumpNEF AdvisorsState of New Mexico

  3. Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | Open Energy Information HanergyHarneysource HistoryInformation

  4. International Solid Waste Association (ISWA) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunanInformation source HistoryInternational Solar EnergySolid

  5. Agricultural Waste Solutions Inc AWS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifangwikiAgoura Hills, California:AgriFuel Company

  6. Integrated assessment of a new Waste-to-Energy facility in Central Greece in the context of regional perspectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkoulidis, G. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Papageorgiou, A., E-mail: giou6@yahoo.g [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Karagiannidis, A. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Kalogirou, S. [Waste to Energy Research and Technology Council (Greece)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The main aim of this study is the integrated assessment of a proposed Waste-to-Energy facility that could contribute in the Municipal Solid Waste Management system of the Region of Central Greece. In the context of this paper alternative transfer schemes for supplying the candidate facility were assessed considering local conditions and economical criteria. A mixed-integer linear programming model was applied for the determination of optimum locations of Transfer Stations for an efficient supplying chain between the waste producers and the Waste-to-Energy facility. Moreover different Regional Waste Management Scenarios were assessed against multiple criteria, via the Multi Criteria Decision Making method ELECTRE III. The chosen criteria were total cost, Biodegradable Municipal Waste diversion from landfill, energy recovery and Greenhouse Gas emissions and the analysis demonstrated that a Waste Management Scenario based on a Waste-to-Energy plant with an adjacent landfill for disposal of the residues would be the best performing option for the Region, depending however on the priorities of the decision makers. In addition the study demonstrated that efficient planning is necessary and the case of three sanitary landfills operating in parallel with the WtE plant in the study area should be avoided. Moreover alternative cases of energy recovery of the candidate Waste-to-Energy facility were evaluated against the requirements of the new European Commission Directive on waste in order for the facility to be recognized as recovery operation. The latter issue is of high significance and the decision makers in European Union countries should take it into account from now on, in order to plan and implement facilities that recover energy efficiently. Finally a sensitivity check was performed in order to evaluate the effects of increased recycling rate, on the calorific value of treated Municipal Solid Waste and the gate fee of the candidate plant and found that increased recycling efforts would not diminish the potential for incineration with energy recovery from waste and neither would have adverse impacts on the gate fee of the Waste-to-Energy plant. In general, the study highlighted the need for efficient planning in solid waste management, by taking into account multiple criteria and parameters and utilizing relevant tools and methodologies into this context.

  7. Environmental effects of dredging. Use of daphnia magna to predict consequences of bioaccumulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results reported herein represent a portion of the laboratory research evaluating the relationship between mercury and cadmium tissue residues and biological effects in the freshwater crustacean, Daphnia magna (commonly known as the water flea). Procedures presented here for a 28-day Daphnia magna toxicity test could be used in screening for water-column toxicity resulting from open-water disposal of a specific dredged material. As a part of its regulatory and dredging programs, the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers often conducts, or requires to be conducted, an assessment of the potential for bioaccumulation of environmental contaminants from sediment scheduled for dredging and open-water disposal. There is, at present, no generally accepted guidance available to aid in the interpretation of the biological consequences of bioaccumulation. To provide an initial basis for such guidance, the Environmental Laboratory is conducting both literature database analyses and experimental laboratory studies as part of the Long-Term Effects of Dredging Operations (LEDO) Program.

  8. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Shark River Project area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antrim, L.D.; Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Shark River Project was to evaluate proposed dredged material to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Tests and analyses were conducted on the Shark River sediments. The evaluation of proposed dredged material consisted of bulk sediment chemical and physical analysis, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, water-column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation tests. Individual sediment core samples collected from the Shark River were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). One sediment composite was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate, prepared from suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of the Shark River sediment composite, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBs. Benthic acute toxicity tests and bioaccumulation tests were performed.

  9. Steamship operator's thoughts on national dredging situation. [For coal-exporting ports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, J.N.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present depths of US coal-exporting ports are inadequate to permit handling of large, economically-sized bulkers. Because of this, the relative appeal of US coal to importers is considerably lessened. Several solutions are offered: coal-slurry pipelines, draft-assisted delivery systems, land based top-off stations, top-off concept, and a national dredging program. Although the topping-off alternative seems to be a viable means of addressing the problem, it should not be thought of as the ANSWER, but rather as a logical, cost effective interim method. Both top-off and dredging are needed to effectively address this issue. The author concludes that no matter how difficult bringing about a national dredging program may be, it must be done, for only through dredging can we achieve full optimization of our market potential in coal export.

  10. Scalable, Efficient Solid Waste Burner System - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitcheResearch Briefs TheSanket A.LittleFY13 |Sawteeth

  11. Quantum Well Thermoelectrics and Waste Heat Recovery | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+18, 2012 Qualified Energy ConservationDepartmentQuantum

  12. Environmental effects of dredging: Alternative dredging equipment and operational methods to minimize sea turtle mortalities. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickerson, D.D.; Nelson, D.A.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Five species of sea turtles occur along the United States coastlines and are listed as threatened or endangered. The loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) is listed as threatened, while the Kemp`s ridley (Lepidochelys kenipi), the hawksbill (Eretmochelys imbricata), and the leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea) are all less abundant and listed as endangered. Florida breeding populations of the green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) are listed as endangered, but green turtles in other US waters are considered threatened. The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) has determined, based on the best available information, that because of their life cycle and behavioral patterns only the loggerhead, the green, and the Kemp`s ridley are put at risk by hopper dredging activities (Studt 1987).

  13. The composition, heating value and renewable share of the energy content of mixed municipal solid waste in Finland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horttanainen, M., E-mail: mika.horttanainen@lut.fi; Teirasvuo, N.; Kapustina, V.; Hupponen, M.; Luoranen, M.

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • New experimental data of mixed MSW properties in a Finnish case region. • The share of renewable energy of mixed MSW. • The results were compared with earlier international studies. • The average share of renewable energy was 30% and the average LHVar 19 MJ/kg. • Well operating source separation decreases the renewable energy content of MSW. - Abstract: For the estimation of greenhouse gas emissions from waste incineration it is essential to know the share of the renewable energy content of the combusted waste. The composition and heating value information is generally available, but the renewable energy share or heating values of different fractions of waste have rarely been determined. In this study, data from Finnish studies concerning the composition and energy content of mixed MSW were collected, new experimental data on the compositions, heating values and renewable share of energy were presented and the results were compared to the estimations concluded from earlier international studies. In the town of Lappeenranta in south-eastern Finland, the share of renewable energy ranged between 25% and 34% in the energy content tests implemented for two sample trucks. The heating values of the waste and fractions of plastic waste were high in the samples compared to the earlier studies in Finland. These high values were caused by good source separation and led to a low share of renewable energy content in the waste. The results showed that in mixed municipal solid waste the renewable share of the energy content can be significantly lower than the general assumptions (50–60%) when the source separation of organic waste, paper and cardboard is carried out successfully. The number of samples was however small for making extensive conclusions on the results concerning the heating values and renewable share of energy and additional research is needed for this purpose.

  14. Dredging as remediation for white phosphorus contamination at Eagle River Flats, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, M.R.; Collins, C.M.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Eagle River Flats impact area is a Ft. Richardson Superfund site. It is a salt marsh that is contaminated with white phosphorus (WP), and remediation of sediments in permanently ponded areas may require dredging. A remotely piloted dredging system was designed, constructed, and deployed at the Flats as part of the overall site remediation feasibility study. Experience gained over two years of engineering study and contract operation indicates that, although feasible and effective, this alternative is slow, difficult, and very expensive.

  15. Effects in fish during dredging of Lake Jaernsjoen, River Emaan, Sweden

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foerlin, L. [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Zoophysiology; Norrgren, L.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of the investigation was to study biochemical, physiological and morphological effects in fish during dredging of sediment in a heavily PCB contaminated lake (Lake Jaernsjoen, River Emaan), and to provide a biological control program employing fish for the lake after dredging and restoration. Dredging of the PCB contaminated sediments in Lake Jaernsjoen took place in 1993 and 1994 (see Helgee and Troedsson, this conference). Three different caging studies were performed with one study each year of 1992, 1993 and 1994. Cages with fish were placed at different sites including sites both upstream and downstream the lake and sites at the lake. The fish were caged for four weeks. In 1992 a parallel study was performed of feral perch from the contaminated area. Caging of rainbow trout in Lake Jaernsjoen during dredging resulted in liver enlargement, induction of liver detoxification enzymes (for example EROD activity) and liver morphological changes such as degeneration and vacualization. Induction of EROD activity was also observed in the caged fish in 1992 study (before start of dredging). However no effect was seen on EROD activity in feral perch. The effects caused by dredging in the caged fish were more pronounced in 1994 study than in 1993 study. In the 1994 study effects were also observed in fish caged at sites downstream the lake. In 1993 the dredging area was closed off by a silt curtain whereas in 1994 no silt curtain was used. Therefore, the results seem to indicate that the more pronounced effect picture in the 1994 study seems to be caused by a higher release of suspended material during dredging without a protecting silt curtain (1994).

  16. An engineering geologic impact analysis of hydraulic dredging for lignite in Texas alluvial valleys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nolan, Erich Donald Luis

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and is the same site used by Cason ( 1982). These two studies exhibit that dredge mining of lignite at the Grimes County site is feasible economically and environmentally. A pilot dredge program is now needed to determine if the studies represent reality... lignite in alluvial valleys is feasible Table 1. Stratigraphic occurrence of Texas lignites (IUodified fram Cason, 1982) . North of the Colorado River OLIGOCENE CATAMOULA FORMATION South of the Colorado River Whitsett Formation Manning Formations...

  17. An engineering geologic impact analysis of hydraulic dredging for lignite in Texas alluvial valleys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nolan, Erich Donald Luis

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    floodplain, and the conditions will be conducive for aquifer restoration, soil restoration, revegetation, and wildlife habitat redevelopment. The study site for the present research is in the floodplain of the Navasota River in Grimes County, Texas..., and is the same site used by Cason ( 1982). These two studies exhibit that dredge mining of lignite at the Grimes County site is feasible economically and environmentally. A pilot dredge program is now needed to determine if the studies represent reality...

  18. Combined Municipal Solid Waste and biomass system optimization for district energy applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rentizelas, Athanasios A., E-mail: arent@central.ntua.gr; Tolis, Athanasios I., E-mail: atol@central.ntua.gr; Tatsiopoulos, Ilias P., E-mail: itat@central.ntua.gr

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Combined energy conversion of MSW and agricultural residue biomass is examined. • The model optimizes the financial yield of the investment. • Several system specifications are optimally defined by the optimization model. • The application to a case study in Greece shows positive financial yield. • The investment is mostly sensitive on the interest rate, the investment cost and the heating oil price. - Abstract: Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) disposal has been a controversial issue in many countries over the past years, due to disagreement among the various stakeholders on the waste management policies and technologies to be adopted. One of the ways of treating/disposing MSW is energy recovery, as waste is considered to contain a considerable amount of bio-waste and therefore can lead to renewable energy production. The overall efficiency can be very high in the cases of co-generation or tri-generation. In this paper a model is presented, aiming to support decision makers in issues relating to Municipal Solid Waste energy recovery. The idea of using more fuel sources, including MSW and agricultural residue biomass that may exist in a rural area, is explored. The model aims at optimizing the system specifications, such as the capacity of the base-load Waste-to-Energy facility, the capacity of the peak-load biomass boiler and the location of the facility. Furthermore, it defines the quantity of each potential fuel source that should be used annually, in order to maximize the financial yield of the investment. The results of an energy tri-generation case study application at a rural area of Greece, using mixed MSW and biomass, indicate positive financial yield of investment. In addition, a sensitivity analysis is performed on the effect of the most important parameters of the model on the optimum solution, pinpointing the parameters of interest rate, investment cost and heating oil price, as those requiring the attention of the decision makers. Finally, the sensitivity analysis is enhanced by a stochastic analysis to determine the effect of the volatility of parameters on the robustness of the model and the solution obtained.

  19. Air pollution control technology for municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion facilities: capabilities and research needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynch, J F; Young, J C

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three major categories of waste-to-energy conversion processes in full-scale operation or advanced demonstration stages in the US are co-combustion, mass incineration, and pyrolysis. These methods are described and some information on US conversion facilities is tabulated. Conclusions and recommendations dealing with the operation, performance, and research needs for these facilities are given. Section II identifies research needs concerning air pollution aspects of the waste-to-energy processes and reviews significant operating and research findings for the co-combustion, mass incinceration, and pyrolysis waste-to-energy systems.

  20. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Point Frazer Bend Reach, Winyah Bay, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardiner, W.W.; Ward, J.A.; Word, J.Q.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The port of Georgetown, South Carolina, is served by navigational channels within Winyah Bay and the lower Sampit River. Dredging is required to maintain these waterways and to facilitate normal shipping traffic. Prior to dredging, ecological evaluations must be conducted to determine the suitability of the proposed dredged material for open-ocean disposal. These evaluations are to be performed under Section 103 of the Marine Protection, Research, and, Sanctuaries Act of 1972 (MPRSA), following the testing protocols presented in Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal Testing Manual, hereafter referred to as the 1991 Implementation Manual. The Charleston Intensive Project is a reevaluation of sediments collected from two stations (IH-2 and IH-3) in the Frazier Point Bend reach of the Winyah Bay channel. Reference sediment was also collected from site IH-R2, just south of Hare Island. The results of physical/chemical analyses indicated that some contaminants of concern were present in test treatments representing dredged material when compared with the reference treatment IH-R2. The results of this study indicate that, based on the acute toxicity and chemical analyses, dredged material represented by these test treatments is suitable for open-ocean disposal.

  1. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Westchester Creek project area, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinza, M.R.; Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Westchester Creek project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from this area to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Westchester Creek was one of five waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers- New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in May 1995. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Westchester Creek project area consisted of bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, benthic acute and water-column toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Thirteen individual sediment core samples were collected from this area and analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). One composite sediment sample representing the Westchester Creek area to be dredged, was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which is prepared from the suspended- particulate phase (SPP) of the Westchester Creek sediment composite, was analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS.

  2. Data requirements for advancing techniques to predict dredge-induced sediment and contaminant releases -- A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Averett, D.E. [Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg, MS (United States). Waterways Experiment Station

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In many areas of the world, contaminated sediments are being considered a major factor in the redistribution of toxic chemicals in the environment. While removal of contaminated sediments from the aquatic environment is often the preferred alternative for reducing the potential impacts of contaminated sediment, regulatory agencies and the public often express concern about contaminant releases during dredging operations. The US Army Corps of Engineers continues to develop techniques for making a priori estimates of the sediment resuspension rates and contaminant releases during hydraulic and mechanical dredging activities. However, appropriate field data to verify and refine these techniques for a wide range of conditions are currently limited. Data needs include physical and operational characteristics of the dredge, waterway characteristics, sediment characteristics, sediment contaminant data, and water quality data collected during the dredging activity. This paper discusses key parameters required to improve the current predictive techniques and outlines the type of monitoring program needed to improve the comparability of the techniques to measured releases. The recommended monitoring program is derived from experiences with previous monitoring efforts. Planners of future dredging demonstrations are encouraged to collect similar data in order to advance the state of the art for predicting sediment and contaminant releases associated with dredging.

  3. Radioactive Waste Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1984-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish policies and guidelines by which the Department of Energy (DOE) manages tis radioactive waste, waste byproducts, and radioactively contaminated surplus facilities.

  4. Conserving Energy by Recovering Heat from Hot Waste Gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magnuson, E. E.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    supply, and 1150?1500 Cement kiln (wet process) 8oo~1100 isn't a shortage of energy then at least somewhat of a Copper reverberatory furnace 2000?~.'500 crisis? Diesel engine exhaust 1000?1200 Forge and billet.heating furnaces 1700?~ZOO... Temp. F aren't they really agreeing that there is going to be Ammonia oxidation process 1350?1475 an energy crisis? Steep price increases occur when Annealing furnace 1100?2000 Cement kiln (dry process) there are shortages, when demand exceeds...

  5. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Recovery Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  6. he Hanford Story Tank Waste Cleanup | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  7. Energy Secretary Bodman Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  8. California Waste Discharge Requirements Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  9. Energy Secretary Bodman Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan Departmentof EnergyPublic Law of the 109thEnergyonTour withBuses

  10. GTZ-Greenhouse Gas Calculator for Waste Management | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFifeGEXA Corp. (New Jersey) JumpGREET

  11. Coalition on West Valley Nuclear Wastes | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  12. WAC - 173 - 226 - Waste Discharge General Permit Program | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga,planningFlowmeterUtah: Energydba VisionInformation| Open

  13. WAC - 173-303 Dangerous Waste Regulations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga,planningFlowmeterUtah: EnergydbaInformation Underground03

  14. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Minimize Nuclear Waste |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  15. Grouting Begins on Next SRS Waste Tank | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  16. Huizenga Kicks Off Waste Management Conference | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  17. GNEP Element:Minimize Nuclear Waste | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAM RevisedFundingEnergy Issues Related

  18. SPRU Removes High-Risk Radioactive Waste | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy atLLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG - ORDER 2913|| DepartmentPro Forma Contract

  19. Pollution Prevention, Waste Reduction, and Recycling | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - T enAmount for IndividualEnergy Political Activity

  20. 6 CCR 1007-3: Hazardous Waste | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Windthe Commission |Information EffluentU.S.C. Home3:

  1. ARM 17-53 - Hazardous Waste | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEE Jump to: navigation, search Name:APPQuality Jump30-101

  2. Federal Court Dismisses Waste Fee Challenges | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in RepresentativeDepartmentEnergy FactorsID-11263CircularAgencyFederal Court

  3. Unique Waste Leaves Portsmouth in a 'Pup' | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  4. Hawaii Permit Application for Solid Waste Management Facility | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG|Information OpenEI ReferenceNoise Forms and Links

  5. Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Fact Sheet | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG|Information OpenEIHas Been HappeningHaysville,Haywood

  6. Hazardous Waste Generator Treatment Permit by Rule | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG|Information OpenEIHas Been

  7. Hazardous Waste Part A Permit Application | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG|Information OpenEIHas BeenLegal Document- OtherOther: Hazardous

  8. Idaho DEQ Waste Management and Permitting Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty, Texas:ITC TransmissionIdaho DEQ Storage Tanks

  9. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Activites | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium TransferonUS-IndiaVALUE STUDY4,Department of Energy (WIPP)

  10. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Attracts World Interest | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium TransferonUS-IndiaVALUE STUDY4,Department of Energy (WIPP)Isolation

  11. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium TransferonUS-IndiaVALUE STUDY4,Department of EnergyTransportation

  12. Datong Fuqiao Waste Incineration Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential Microhydro Site Jump(RedirectedDalianDasa

  13. Radioactive Waste Issues in Major Nuclear Incidents | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  14. Radioactive Waste Management Complex Wide Review | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  15. Integrated Waste Treatment Facility Fact Sheet | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  16. List of Municipal Solid Waste Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  17. GreenWaste Recovery Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG ContractingGreenOrder Jump to: navigation,GreenTower Jump

  18. Managing America's Defense Nuclear Waste | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  19. Packing TRU Waste Containers Design | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  20. Using Waste Heat for External Processes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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