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Sample records for drag reduction iii

  1. DRAG REDUCTION WITH SUPERHYDROPHOBIC RIBLETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbier, Charlotte N [ORNL; D'Urso, Brian R [ORNL; Jenner, Elliot [University of Pittsburgh

    2012-01-01

    Samples combining riblets and superhydrophobic surfaces are fabricated at University of Pittsburgh and their drag reduction properties are studied at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) in Oak Ridge National Laboratory with a commercial cone-and-plate rheometer. In parallel to the experiments, numerical simulations are performed in order to estimate the slip length at high rotational speed. For each sample, a drag reduction of at least 5% is observed in both laminar and turbulent regime. At low rotational speed, drag reduction up to 30% is observed with a 1 mm deep grooved sample. As the rotational speed increases, a secondary flow develops causing a slight decrease in drag reductions. However, drag reduction above 15% is still observed for the large grooved samples. In the turbulent regime, the 100 microns grooved sample becomes more efficient than the other samples in drag reduction and manages to sustain a drag reduction above 15%. Using the simulations, the slip length of the 100 micron grooved sample is estimated to be slightly above 100 micron in the turbulent regime.

  2. Active skin for turbulent drag reduction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mani, Raghavendran

    2002-01-01

    capitalizes on recent advances in active turbulent drag reduction and active material based actuation to develop an active or "smart" skin for turbulent drag reduction in realistic flight conditions. The skin operation principle is based on computational...

  3. Drag reduction in coal log pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marrero, T.R.; Liu, H.

    1996-12-31

    It is well-known that solutions of dissolved long-chain macromolecules produce lower friction or drag losses than with the solvent alone. In coal log pipeline (CLP), water is the conveying medium. Synthetic polymers such as poly(ethylene oxide) have been dissolved in water and tested for their extent of drag reduction as a function of concentration and other variables. Lab-scale experimental results for CLP indicate substantial drag reduction at low concentration levels of polymer. But, the macromolecules exhibit degradation under mechanical shear stresses. The large molecules break into smaller units. This degradation effect causes a loss of drag reduction. However, high levels of drag reduction can be maintained as follows: (1) by injecting polymer into the CLP at several locations along the pipeline, (2) by injecting polymer of different particle sizes, (3) by using more robust types of polymers, or (4) by using polymer-fiber mixtures. This report presents the value of drag-reducing agents in terms of pumping power net cost savings. In addition, this report outlines the environmental impact of drag reduction polymers, and end-of-pipeline water treatment processes. For an operating CLP, hundreds of miles in length, the use of poly(ethylene oxide) as a drag reducing agent provides significant pumping power cost savings at a minimal materials cost.

  4. Turbulent drag reduction through oscillating discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wise, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    The changes of a turbulent channel flow subjected to oscillations of wall flush-mounted rigid discs are studied by means of direct numerical simulations. The Reynolds number is $R_\\tau$=$180$, based on the friction velocity of the stationary-wall case and the half channel height. The primary effect of the wall forcing is the sustained reduction of wall-shear stress, which reaches a maximum of 20%. A parametric study on the disc diameter, maximum tip velocity, and oscillation period is presented, with the aim to identify the optimal parameters which guarantee maximum drag reduction and maximum net energy saving, computed by taking into account the power spent to actuate the discs. This may be positive and reaches 6%. The Rosenblat viscous pump flow is used to predict the power spent for disc motion in the turbulent channel flow and to estimate localized and transient regions over the disc surface subjected to the turbulent regenerative braking effect, for which the wall turbulence exerts work on the discs. The...

  5. Microbubble drag reduction phenomenon study in a channel flow 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimenez Bernal, Jose Alfredo

    2005-11-01

    An experimental study on drag reduction by injection of microbubbles was performed in the upper wall of a rectangular channel at Re = 5128. Particle Image Velocimetry measurement technique (PIV) was used to obtain instantaneous ...

  6. Reynolds number dependence of drag reduction by rod-like polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yacine Amarouchene; Daniel Bonn; Hamid Kellay; Ting-Shek Lo; Victor S. L'vov; Itamar Procaccia

    2006-07-06

    We present experimental and theoretical results addressing the Reynolds number (Re) dependence of drag reduction by sufficiently large concentrations of rod-like polymers in turbulent wall-bounded flows. It is shown that when Re is small the drag is {\\em enhanced}. On the other hand when Re increases the drag is reduced and eventually the Maximal Drag Reduction (MDR) asymptote is attained. The theory is shown to be in excellent agreement with experiments, rationalizing and explaining all the universal and the non-universal aspects of drag reduction by rod-like polymers.

  7. Comparison of Global Optimization Methods for Drag Reduction in the Automotive Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumas, Laurent

    Comparison of Global Optimization Methods for Drag Reduction in the Automotive Industry Laurent reduction problems in the automotive industry. All the methods consist in improving classical genetic of a GA is reduced by a factor up to 7. 1 Introduction The topic of drag reduction in the automotive

  8. Wall-pressure and PIV analysis for microbubble drag reduction investigation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominguez Ontiveros, Elvis Efren

    2005-11-01

    friction reductions were observed when the microbubbles were injected. Several measurements of wall-pressure were taken at various Reynolds numbers that ranged from 300 up to 6154. No significant drag reduction was observed for flows in the laminar range...

  9. Effect of pressure gradient on the drag reduction performance of two and three dimensional riblets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Aaron Chenault

    1991-01-01

    EFFECT OF PRESSURE GRADIENT ON THE DRAG REDUCTION PERFORMANCE OF TWO AND THREE DIMENSIONAL RIBLETS A Thesis by AARON CHENAULT HALL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering EFFECT OF PRESSURE GRADIENT ON THE DRAG REDUCTION PERFORMANCE OF TWO AND THREE DIMENSIONAL RIBLETS A Thesis by AARON CHENAULT HALL Approved as to style and content by...

  10. Aerodynamic Drag Reduction Apparatus For Wheeled Vehicles In Ground Effect

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortega, Jason M. (Pacifica, CA); Salari, Kambiz (Livermore, CA)

    2005-12-13

    An apparatus for reducing the aerodynamic drag of a wheeled vehicle in a flowstream, the vehicle having a vehicle body and a wheel assembly supporting the vehicle body. The apparatus includes a baffle assembly adapted to be positioned upstream of the wheel assembly for deflecting airflow away from the wheel assembly so as to reduce the incident pressure on the wheel assembly.

  11. Laminar drag reduction in microchannels using ultrahydrophobic surfaces Jia Ou, Blair Perot, and Jonathan P. Rothstein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothstein, Jonathan

    Laminar drag reduction in microchannels using ultrahydrophobic surfaces Jia Ou, Blair Perot for the laminar flow of water through microchannels using hydrophobic surfaces with well-defined micron flow is laminar and not turbulent, there are currently few demon- strated methods for significantly

  12. Drag Reduction Control for Flow over a Hump with Surface-Mounted Thermoacoustic Actuator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drag Reduction Control for Flow over a Hump with Surface-Mounted Thermoacoustic Actuator Chi-An Yeh of thermoacoustic actuators that locally introduce high-intensity acoustic waves for active flow control is examined-based thermoacoustic actuators, high-frequency actuation around Helmholtz number of 3.0 is considered. We observe

  13. A Fresh Approach to Flow Turbulence Towards Reduction of Skin-friction Drag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy expenditure sector, accounting for 30% of global consumption. Consequently, this sector is also energy expenditure sector, accounting for 30% of global consumption. A mere 1% reduction in drag Office of Scientific Research #12;Global Significance Transport by land, sea and air is the biggest

  14. Drag Reduction by Leidenfrost Vapor Layers Ivan U. Vakarelski,1,2,* Jeremy O. Marston,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Derek Y C

    of Technology, Hawthorn VIC 3122, Australia 5 Clean Combustion Research Center, King Abdullah University a continuous and robust lubricating layer on the surface of fast moving solid sphere in fluids. The resulting and then immersed in a fluid, we can investigate the drag reduction effect of the associated Leidenfrost vapor layer

  15. Rotational relaxation time as unifying time scale for polymer and fiber drag reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boelens, A M P

    2015-01-01

    Using hybrid Direct Numerical Simulation with Langevin dynamics, a comparison is performed between polymer and fiber stress tensors in turbulent flow. The stress tensors are found to be similar, suggesting a common drag reducing mechanism in the onset regime for both flexible polymers and rigid fibers. Since fibers do not have an elastic backbone this must be a viscous effect. Analysis of the viscosity tensor reveals that all terms are negligible, except the off-diagonal shear viscosity associated with rotation. Based on this analysis, we identify the rotational orientation time as the unifying time scale setting a new time criterion for drag reduction by both flexible polymers and rigid fibers.

  16. Investigation of Tractor Base Bleeding for Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortega, J; Salari, K; Storms, B

    2007-10-25

    One of the main contributors to the aerodynamic drag of a heavy vehicle is tractor-trailer gap drag, which arises when the vehicle operates within a crosswind. Under this operating condition, freestream flow is entrained into the tractor-trailer gap, imparting a momentum exchange to the vehicle and subsequently increasing the aerodynamic drag. While a number of add-on devices, including side extenders, splitter plates, vortex stabilizers, and gap sealers, have been previously tested to alleviate this source of drag, side extenders remain the primary add-on device of choice for reducing tractor-trailer gap drag. However, side extenders are not without maintenance and operational issues. When a heavy vehicle pivots sharply with respect to the trailer, as can occur during loading or unloading operations, the side extenders can become crushed against the trailer. Consequently, fleet operators are forced to incur additional costs to cover the repair or replacement of the damaged side extenders. This issue can be overcome by either shortening the side extenders or by devising an alternative drag reduction concept that can perform just as effectively as side extenders. To explore such a concept, we investigate tractor base bleeding as a means of reducing gap drag. Wind tunnel measurements are made on a 1:20 scale heavy vehicle model at a vehicle width-based Reynolds number of 420,000. The tractor bleeding flow, which is delivered through a porous material embedded within the tractor base, is introduced into the tractor-trailer gap at bleeding coefficients ranging from 0.0-0.018. To determine the performance of tractor base bleeding under more realistic operating conditions, computational fluid dynamics simulations are performed on a full-scale heavy vehicle within a crosswind for bleeding coefficients ranging from 0.0-0.13.

  17. Journal of Fluids and Structures 22 (2006) 973978 Bluff-body drag reduction by extremum-seeking control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    2006-01-01

    -seeking control J.F. Beaudoina,Ã, O. Cadotb , J.L. Aiderc , J.E. Wesfreidc a Department of Research and Innovation the lower the drag. The goal of the control is for the system to find itself an optimal set point, defined as the lowest cost of global energy consumption of the system (drag reduction versus energy used by the actuator

  18. Drag reduction of a bluff body using adaptive control methods Jean-Franois Beaudoina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    of Research and Innovation, PSA Peugeot-Citroën, 2 route de Gisy, 78943 Vélizy-Villacoublay, France Olivier Palaiseau Cedex, France Jean-Luc Aider Department of Research and Innovation, PSA Peugeot-Citroën, 2 route of the cylinder, the lower the drag. In a first study, the goal of the control is for the system to reach a drag

  19. Kinetics of Fe(III)*EDTA reduction by ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, W.; Harkness, J.B.L.; Mendelsohn, M.H.

    1992-12-01

    The kinetics of the reduction of ferric chelate by ascorbic acid have been determined at a typical flue-gas scrubber-system operating temperature ({approximately}55{degrees}C). The ascorbic acid reaction has the same reduction rate expression as the reduction by bisulfite ions, namely, first order with respect to the concentrations of both Fe(III)*EDTA and monoionic species of ascorbic acid. The reaction rate isnegative first order with respect to Fe(II)*EDTA concentration. In the pH range of 6--8, reduction of the hydrolyzed form of the metal chelate compound was negligible. The rate constant for the ascorbic acid reduction reaction is almost 400 times larger than that for the bisulfite reduction reaction under the same reaction conditions. There was no contribution associated with the nonionized form of ascorbic acid.

  20. Kinetics of Fe(III)*EDTA reduction by ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, W.; Harkness, J.B.L.; Mendelsohn, M.H.

    1992-01-01

    The kinetics of the reduction of ferric chelate by ascorbic acid have been determined at a typical flue-gas scrubber-system operating temperature ([approximately]55[degrees]C). The ascorbic acid reaction has the same reduction rate expression as the reduction by bisulfite ions, namely, first order with respect to the concentrations of both Fe(III)*EDTA and monoionic species of ascorbic acid. The reaction rate isnegative first order with respect to Fe(II)*EDTA concentration. In the pH range of 6--8, reduction of the hydrolyzed form of the metal chelate compound was negligible. The rate constant for the ascorbic acid reduction reaction is almost 400 times larger than that for the bisulfite reduction reaction under the same reaction conditions. There was no contribution associated with the nonionized form of ascorbic acid.

  1. Hydrophobic coatings for film boiling based drag reduction on a torpedo model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Ian J. (Ian James Kenneth)

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that porous, hydrophobic surfaces exhibit a dramatic reduction in critical heat flux (CHF), the amount of heat over a surface area required to initiate film boiling. Film boiling is characterized ...

  2. Isolation and microbial reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fe(III) phyllosilicate phases, and if possible, Fe(III) oxide phases, from a weathered shale saprolite sediment in order to permit experimentation with each phase in isolation....

  3. A perturbative model for predicting the high-Reynolds-number behaviour of the streamwise travelling waves technique in turbulent drag reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belan, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The background of this work is the problem of reducing the aerodynamic turbulent friction drag, which is an important source of energy waste in innumerable technological fields. We develop a theoretical framework aimed at predicting the behaviour of existing drag reduction techniques when used at the large values of Re which are typical of applications. We focus on one recently proposed and very promising technique, which consists in creating at the wall streamwise-travelling waves of spanwise velocity. A perturbation analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations that govern the fluid motion is carried out, for the simplest wall-bounded flow geometry, i.e. the plane channel flow. The streamwise base flow is perturbed by the spanwise time-varying base flow induced by the travelling waves. An asymptotic expansion is then carried out with respect to the velocity amplitude of the travelling wave. The analysis, although based on several assumptions, leads to predictions of drag reduction that agree well with the measure...

  4. The class III ribonucleotide reductase from Neisseria bacilliformis can utilize thioredoxin as a reductant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Yifeng

    The class III anaerobic ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) studied to date couple the reduction of ribonucleotides to deoxynucleotides with the oxidation of formate to CO[subscript 2]. Here we report the cloning and heterologous ...

  5. Anaerobic Benzene Oxidation in the Fe(III) Reduction Zone of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    Anaerobic Benzene Oxidation in the Fe(III) Reduction Zone of Petroleum-Contaminated Aquifers R O B North, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 The potential for anaerobic benzene. [14C]Benzene was not oxidized to 14CO2 at most sites examined, which is consistent with previous

  6. Reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composites: part III. Shrinkage of composite pellets during reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R.J. [Praxair Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Praxair Technological Center

    2008-12-15

    This article involves the evaluation of the volume change of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets and its implications on reduction kinetics under conditions prevalent in a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) that were simulated in the laboratory. The pellets, in general, were found to shrink considerably during the reduction due to the loss of carbon and oxygen from the system, sintering of the iron-oxide, and formation of a molten slag phase at localized regions inside the pellets due to the presence of binder and coal/wood-charcoal ash at the reduction temperatures. One of the shortcomings of the RHF ironmaking process has been the inability to use multiple layers of composite pellets because of the impediment in heat transport to the lower layers of a multilayer bed. However, pellet shrinkage was found to have a strong effect on the reduction kinetics by virtue of enhancing the external heat transport to the lower layers. The volume change of the different kinds of composite pellets was studied as a function of reduction temperature and time. The estimation of the change in the amount of external heat transport with varying pellet sizes for a particular layer of a multilayer bed was obtained by conducting heat-transfer tests using inert low-carbon steel spheres. It was found that if the pellets of the top layer of the bed shrink by 30 pct, the external heat transfer to the second layer increases by nearly 6 times.

  7. Microbial Reductive Transformation of Phyllosilicate Fe(III) and U(VI) in Fluvial Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan; Moore, Dean A.; Resch, Charles T.; Phillips, Jerry L.

    2012-04-14

    The microbial reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) were investigated in shallow aquifer sediments collected from subsurface Pleistocene flood deposits near the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River in Washington State. Increases in 0.5 N HCl-extractable Fe(II) were observed in incubated sediments and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that Fe(III) associated with phyllosilicates and pyroxene was reduced to Fe(II). Aqueous uranium(VI) concentrations decreased in incubated Hanford sediments with the rate and extent being greater in sediment amended with organic carbon. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bioreduced sediments indicated that 67-77% of the U signal was U(VI), probably as an adsorbed species associated with a new or modified reactive mineral phase. Phylotypes within the Deltaproteobacteria were more common in Hanford sediments incubated with U(VI) than without and in U(VI)-free incubations, members of the Clostridiales were dominant with sulfate-reducing phylotypes more common in the sulfate-amended sediments. These results demonstrate the potential for anaerobic reduction phyllosilicate Fe(III) and sulfate in Hanford unconfined aquifer sediments and biotransformations involving reduction and adsorption leading to decreased aqueous U concentrations.

  8. DOE Project on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCallen, R; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Pointer, D; Browand, F; Ross, J; Storms, B

    2007-01-04

    Class 8 tractor-trailers consume 11-12% of the total US petroleum use. At highway speeds, 65% of the energy expenditure for a Class 8 truck is in overcoming aerodynamic drag. The project objective is to improve fuel economy of Class 8 tractor-trailers by providing guidance on methods of reducing drag by at least 25%. A 25% reduction in drag would present a 12% improvement in fuel economy at highway speeds, equivalent to about 130 midsize tanker ships per year. Specific goals include: (1) Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles; (2) Develop innovative drag reducing concepts that are operationally and economically sound; and (3) Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate the potential of new drag-reduction devices. The studies described herein provide a demonstration of the applicability of the experience developed in the analysis of the standard configuration of the Generic Conventional Model. The modeling practices and procedures developed in prior efforts have been applied directly to the assessment of new configurations including a variety of geometric modifications and add-on devices. Application to the low-drag 'GTS' configuration of the GCM has confirmed that the error in predicted drag coefficients increases as the relative contribution of the base drag resulting from the vehicle wake to the total drag increases and it is recommended that more advanced turbulence modeling strategies be applied under those circumstances. Application to a commercially-developed boat tail device has confirmed that this restriction does not apply to geometries where the relative contribution of the base drag to the total drag is reduced by modifying the geometry in that region. Application to a modified GCM geometry with an open grille and radiator has confirmed that the underbody flow, while important for underhood cooling, has little impact on the drag coefficient of the vehicle. Furthermore, the evaluation of the impact of small changes in radiator or grille dimensions has revealed that the total drag is not particularly sensitive to those changes. This observation leads to two significant conclusions. First, a small increase in radiator size to accommodate heat rejection needs related to new emissions restrictions may be tolerated without significant increases in drag losses. Second, efforts to reduce drag on the tractor requires that the design of the entire tractor be treated in an integrated fashion. Simply reducing the size of the grille will not provide the desired result, but the additional contouring of the vehicle as a whole which may be enabled by the smaller radiator could have a more significant effect.

  9. FY2003 Annual Report: DOE Project on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCallen, R C; Salari, K; Ortega, J; DeChant, L J; Roy, C J; Payne, J J; Hassan, B; Pointer, W D; Browand, F; Hammache, M; Hsu, T; Ross, J; Satran, D; Heineck, J; Walker, S; Yaste, D; Englar, R; Leonard, A; Rubel, M; Chatelain, P

    2003-10-24

    Objective: {sm_bullet} Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles. {sm_bullet} Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate potential of new drag-reduction devices.

  10. Drag bit construction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hood, M.

    1986-02-11

    A mounting movable with respect to an adjacent hard face has a projecting drag bit adapted to engage the hard face. The drag bit is disposed for movement relative to the mounting by encounter of the drag bit with the hard face. That relative movement regulates a valve in a water passageway, preferably extending through the drag bit, to play a stream of water in the area of contact of the drag bit and the hard face and to prevent such water play when the drag bit is out of contact with the hard face. 4 figs.

  11. Methods of reducing vehicle aerodynamic drag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sirenko V.; Rohatgi U.

    2012-07-08

    A small scale model (length 1710 mm) of General Motor SUV was built and tested in the wind tunnel for expected wind conditions and road clearance. Two passive devices, rear screen which is plate behind the car and rear fairing where the end of the car is aerodynamically extended, were incorporated in the model and tested in the wind tunnel for different wind conditions. The conclusion is that rear screen could reduce drag up to 6.5% and rear fairing can reduce the drag by 26%. There were additional tests for front edging and rear vortex generators. The results for drag reduction were mixed. It should be noted that there are aesthetic and practical considerations that may allow only partial implementation of these or any drag reduction options.

  12. tidal form drag Sally Warner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W lunar hours potential flow power = 0 Velocity Form drag Power Cumulative power flood slack residual power = total power ­ potential flow drag = residual drag total form drag . . Dynamicallyactive potential flow drag estimate wave drag ratio L Y d Isohalines above a ridge Pressure anomaly ~U0w #12;When

  13. III

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  14. Bacterial Pu(V) reduction in the absence and presence of Fe(III)?NTA: modeling and experimental approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deo, Randhir P.; Rittmann, Bruce E.; Reed, Donald T. (AZU); (Guam); (LANL)

    2013-01-10

    Plutonium (Pu), a key contaminant at sites associated with the manufacture of nuclear weapons and with nuclear-energy wastes, can be precipitated to 'immobilized' plutonium phases in systems that promote bioreduction. Ferric iron (Fe{sup 3+}) is often present in contaminated sites, and its bioreduction to ferrous iron (Fe{sup 2+}) may be involved in the reduction of Pu to forms that precipitate. Alternately, Pu can be reduced directly by the bacteria. Besides Fe, contaminated sites often contain strong complexing ligands, such as nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA). We used biogeochemical modeling to interpret the experimental fate of Pu in the absence and presence of ferric iron (Fe{sup 3+}) and NTA under anaerobic conditions. In all cases, Shewanella alga BrY (S. alga) reduced Pu(V)(PuO{sub 2}{sup +}) to Pu(III), and experimental evidence indicates that Pu(III) precipitated as PuPO{sub 4(am)}. In the absence of Fe{sup 3+} and NTA, reduction of PuO{sub 2}{sup +} was directly biotic, but modeling simulations support that PuO{sub 2}{sup +} reduction in the presence of Fe{sup 3+} and NTA was due to an abiotic stepwise reduction of PuO{sub 2}{sup +} to Pu{sup 4+}, followed by reduction of Pu{sup 4+} to Pu{sup 3+}, both through biogenically produced Fe{sup 2+}. This means that PuO{sub 2}{sup +} reduction was slowed by first having Fe{sup 3+} reduced to Fe{sup 2+}. Modeling results also show that the degree of PuPO{sub 4(am)} precipitation depends on the NTA concentration. While precipitation out-competes complexation when NTA is present at the same or lower concentration than Pu, excess NTA can prevent precipitation of PuPO{sub 4(am)}.

  15. Energy Efficiency/ Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emisions Reduction Plan (TERP): Volume III- Technical Appendix 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.; Yazdani, B.; Culp, C.; Lewis, C.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Gilman, D.; Degelman, L.; McKelvey, K.

    2011-01-01

    ninth annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. The report is organized in three volumes. Volume I - Summary Report - provides...

  16. Energy Efficiency/ Renewable Energy Impact in The Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP): Volume III- Technical Appendix 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.; Yazdani, B.; Lewis, C.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mukhopadhyay, J..; Degelman, L.; McKelvey, K.; Clardige, D.; Ellis, S.; Kim, H.; Zilbershtein. G.; Gilman, D.

    2012-01-01

    this sixth annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (Preliminary Report) to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. In this preliminary report, the NOx emissions savings from the energy...

  17. A limpet shell shape that reduces drag: laboratory demonstration of a hydrodynamic mechanism and an exploration of its effectiveness in nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denny, Mark

    , Hopkins Marine Station, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, U.S.A. Received October 3, 1988 DENNY,M. 1989. A limpet is lift, so any reduction in drag is unlikely to enhance survivorship. The likelihood that drag reduction

  18. Coulomb Drag Mechanisms in Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abanin, D. A.

    Recent measurements revealed an anomalous Coulomb drag in graphene, hinting at new physics at charge neutrality. The anomalous drag is explained by a new mechanism based on energy transport, which involves interlayer energy ...

  19. Rotating flexible drag mill

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pepper, W.B.

    1984-05-09

    A rotating parachute for decelerating objects travelling through atmosphere at subsonic or supersonic deployment speeds includes a circular canopy having a plurality of circumferentially arranged flexible panels projecting radially from a solid central disk. A slot extends radially between adjacent panels to the outer periphery of the canopy. Upon deployment, the solid disk diverts air radially to rapidly inflate the panels into a position of maximum diameter. Air impinging on the panels adjacent the panel slots rotates the parachute during its descent. Centrifugal force flattens the canopy into a constant maximum diameter during terminal descent for maximum drag and deceleration.

  20. Towards an understanding of form drag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    form drag and wave drag } W/m N/m x 104 } } 1 cm of SSH N S Tidal conversion rate per unit width -250 body #12;Form drag and mixing U0 Form drag pressure Tidal energy conversion Form drag causes and understand the physical processes that play a role in energy conversion at Three Tree Point. Conclusions

  1. DOE Project on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag FY 2005 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCallen, R C; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Eastwood, C; Paschkewitz, J; Pointer, W D; DeChant, L J; Hassan, B; Browand, F; Radovich, C; Merzel, T; Plocher, D; Ross, J; Storms, B; Heineck, J T; Walker, S; Roy, C J

    2005-11-14

    Class 8 tractor-trailers consume 11-12% of the total US petroleum use. At high way speeds, 65% of the energy expenditure for a Class 8 truck is in overcoming aerodynamic drag. The project objective is to improve fuel economy of Class 8 tractor-trailers by providing guidance on methods of reducing drag by at least 25%. A 25% reduction in drag would present a 12% improvement in fuel economy at highway speeds, equivalent to about 130 midsize tanker ships per year. Specific goals include: (1) Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles; and (2) Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate the potential of new drag-reduction devices.

  2. DOE's effort to reduce truck aerodynamic drag through joint experiments and computations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salari, Kambiz (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); Browand, Fred (University of Southern California); Sreenivas, Kidambi (University of Tennessee, Chattanooga); Pointer, W. David (Argonne National Laboratory); Taylor, Lafayette (University of Tennessee, Chattanooga); Pankajakshan, Ramesh (University of Tennessee, Chattanooga); Whitfield, David (University of Tennessee, Chattanooga); Plocher, Dennis (University of Southern California); Ortega, Jason M. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); Merzel, Tai (University of Southern California); McCallen, Rose (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); Walker, Stephen M (NASA Ames Research Center); Heineck, James T (NASA Ames Research Center); Hassan, Basil; Roy, Christopher John (Auburn University); Storms, B. (NASA Ames Research Center); Ross, James (NASA Ames Research Center); Englar, Robert (Georgia Tech Research Institute); Rubel, Mike (Caltech); Leonard, Anthony (Caltech); Radovich, Charles (University of Southern California); Eastwood, Craig (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); Paschkewitz, John (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); Castellucci, Paul (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); DeChant, Lawrence Justin.

    2005-08-01

    Class 8 tractor-trailers are responsible for 11-12% of the total US consumption of petroleum. Overcoming aero drag represents 65% of energy expenditure at highway speeds. Most of the drag results from pressure differences and reducing highway speeds is very effective. The goal is to reduce aerodynamic drag by 25% which would translate to 12% improved fuel economy or 4,200 million gal/year. Objectives are: (1) In support of DOE's mission, provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag; (2) To shorten and improve design process, establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information; (3) Demonstrate new drag-reduction techniques; and (4) Get devices on the road. Some accomplishments are: (1) Concepts developed/tested that exceeded 25% drag reduction goal; (2) Insight and guidelines for drag reduction provided to industry through computations and experiments; (3) Joined with industry in getting devices on the road and providing design concepts through virtual modeling and testing; and (4) International recognition achieved through open documentation and database.

  3. Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Volume III--Technical Appendix 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, Jeff; Culp, Charles; Yazdani, Bahman; Gilman, Don; Muns, Shirley; Liu, Zi; Baltazar-Cervantes, Juan-Carlos; Mukhopadhyay, Jaya; Degelman, Larry; Claridge, David

    2009-01-01

    seventh annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. The report is organized in three volumes: Volume I – Summary Report – provides an executive...

  4. Analytical calculation of the drag force near drag crisis of a falling sphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assis, Armando V D B; Branco, N S

    2010-01-01

    We obtain analitically the $v^2$ dependence of the drag force on a falling sphere close to the drag crisis, as well as the drag coefficient at the drag crisis, with excellent agreement with experiment. We take into account the effects of viscosity in creating a turbulent boundary layer and perform the calculations using the Navier-Stokes equation.

  5. Form drag at Three Tree Point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for this study Seattle Tacoma Edwards et al., 2004 Puget Sound, WA Point Three Tree Previous work McCabe et al 24 ­ drag due to tilt = residual drag total form drag #12;Cruise at TTP in Dec. 2009 Seattle Tacoma

  6. Drag Measurements On A Platoon Of Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zabat, Michael; Farascaroli, Stefano; Browand, Frederick; Nestlerode, Michael; Baez, John

    1994-01-01

    yaw is meant to simulate a crosswind. The evenly distributedgoals v. ) Measurements of platoon drag in a crosswind.The presence of a crosswind is another important platoon

  7. Drag coefficient for the air-sea exchange in hurricane conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golbraikh, E

    2013-01-01

    The physical model is proposed for prediction of the non-monotonic drag coefficient variation with the neutral stability 10-m wind speed, U10. The model is based upon measurements of the foam coverage fraction and characteristic size of foam bubbles with U10, and on the drag coefficient approximation by the linearly weighted averaging over alternating foam-free and foam-covered portions of the ocean surface. The obtained drag coefficient is in fair agreement with that obtained by field measurements of the vertical variation of mean wind speed in Powell et al. (Nature, 2003) which discover reduction of the sea-surface drag with U10 rising to hurricane conditions.

  8. An Adhesion Model for the Drag Force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dan Comanescu

    2008-01-28

    The paper present a model for the drag force between a resistive medium and a solid body using the hypothesis that the drag force is created by the adhesion of some particles of the resistive medium on the solid body's surface. The study focus on the mass evolution of the solid body.

  9. FY 2004 Annual Report: DOE Project on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCallen, R C; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Eastwood, C; Whittaker, K; DeChant, L J; Roy, C J; Payne, J L; Hassan, B; Pointer, W D; Browand, F; Hammache, M; Hsu, T; Ross, J; Satran, D; Heineck, J T; Walker, S; Yaste, D; Englar, R; Leonard, A; Rubel, M; Chatelain, P

    2004-11-18

    The objective of this report is: (1) Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles; and (2) Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate potential of new drag-reduction devices. The approaches used were: (1) Develop and demonstrate the ability to simulate and analyze aerodynamic flow around heavy truck vehicles using existing and advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools; (2) Through an extensive experimental effort, generate an experimental data base for code validation; (3) Using experimental data base, validate computations; (4) Provide industry with design guidance and insight into flow phenomena from experiments and computations; and (5) Investigate aero devices (e.g., base flaps, tractor-trailer gap stabilizer, underbody skirts and wedges, blowing and acoustic devices), provide industry with conceptual designs of drag reducing devices, and demonstrate the full-scale fuel economy potential of these devices.

  10. Alleviation of fuselage form drag using vortex flows: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wortman, A.

    1987-09-15

    The concept of using vortex generators to reduce the fuselage form drag of transport aircraft combines the outflow from the plane of symmetry which is induced by the rotational component of the vortex flow with the energization of the boundary layer to reduce the momentum thickness and to delay or eliminate flow separation. This idea was first advanced by the author in 1981. Under a DOE grant, the concept was validated in wind tunnel tests of approximately 1:17 scale models of fuselages of Boeing 747 and Lockheed C-5 aircraft. The search for the minimum drag involved three vortex generator configurations with three sizes of each in six locations clustered in the aft regions of the fuselages at the beginning of the tail upsweep. The local Reynolds number, which is referred to the length of boundary layer run from the nose, was approximately 10{sup 7} so that a fully developed turbulent boundary layer was present. Vortex generator planforms ranged from swept tapered, through swept straight, to swept reverse tapered wings whose semi-spans ranged from 50% to 125% of the local boundary layer thickness. Pitch angles of the vortex generators were varied by inboard actuators under the control of an external proportional digital radio controller. It was found that certain combinations of vortex generator parameters increased drag. However, with certain configurations, locations, and pitch angles of vortex generators, the highest drag reductions were 3% for the 747 and about 6% for the C-5, thus confirming the arguments that effectiveness increases with the rate of upsweep of the tail. Greatest gains in performance are therefore expected on aft loading military transports. 10 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Volume III - Appendix, Annual Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, January 2006 - June 2007 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Degelman, L.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; McKelvey, K.; Montgomery, C.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Liu, Z.; Ahmed, M.; Verdict, M.; Muns, S.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Gilman, D.; Yazdani, B.; Culp, C.; Haberl, J. S.

    2009-02-20

    -12-03 ENERGY EFFICIENCY/RENEWABLE ENERGY IMPACT IN THE TEXAS EMISSIONS REDUCTION PLAN (TERP) VOLUME III ? APPENDIX Annual Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality January 2006 ? June 2007 Jeff Haberl, Ph.D., P.E.; Charles... 78711-3087 Dear Chairman Garcia: The Energy Systems Laboratory (Laboratory) at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station of the Texas A&M University System is pleased to provide its fifth annual report, ?Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact...

  12. 1 Introduction The question of whether unsteady flow control could lead to overall drag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was that a massive drag reduction must occur in the live dolphin. Since then, a wide scientific exploration on fish and fish-like motion has occurred. Gray's results, largely contested over the years because of the difficulty in obtaining force measurements on live fish, have since been verified by the development

  13. An Investigation into Satellite Drag Modeling Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mance, Stephen

    2010-03-23

    The errors in current atmospheric drag modeling are the primary source of error for orbit determination for objects in low Earth orbit (LEO) at lower altitudes in periods of high solar activity. This is a direct result of significant advancements...

  14. Towards an understanding of form drag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for this study Seattle Tacoma Edwards et al., 2004 Puget Sound, WA Point Three Tree Previous work McCabe et al form drag with bottom pressure sensors #12;Cruise at TTP in Dec. 2009 Seattle Tacoma Puget Sound, WA

  15. Towards an understanding of form drag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sides Form Drag #12;Motivation Seattle Tacoma Edwards et al., 2004 Puget Sound, WA Point Three TreeHigh pressure #12;Cruise at TTP in Dec. 2009 Seattle Tacoma Puget Sound, WA Point Three Tree Pressure sensors

  16. Drag reduction and solvation in polymer solutions Witold Brostow*1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    with low MDF for: oil well operations; crude oil trans- port; fire fighting; high sewer throughput; irrigation; hydrotransport of solids; marine applications; and bio- medical applications including in a variety of applications1, 2) : oil well operations,crude oil transport, fire fighting,increasing sewer

  17. Micro-textured surfaces for omniphobicity and drag-reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Wonjae

    2009-01-01

    When a liquid droplet contacts a surface possessing the appropriate combination of surface texture and solid surface energy, the liquid may not penetrate into the surface texture. Instead, the droplet sits partially on ...

  18. Active Skin for Turbulent Drag Reduction Othon K. Rediniotisa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -mail: rediniotis@aero.tamu.edu D.C.L.: e-mail: dlagoudas@aero.tamu.edu R. Mani: e-mail: raghav@tamu.edu G.E.K.: e

  19. Turbulent drag reduction by constant near-wall forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JIN XU, SUCHUAN DONG, MARTIN R. MAXEY and GEORGE E. KARNIADAKIS

    2007-06-07

    This transition of the shear layer is correlated with a Reynolds number ... The quest for 'taming' turbulence with the objective of reducing the skin friction on ...... in principle, extracts kinetic energy from the flow and the positive forcing further.

  20. Aerodynamic Drag Reduction Apparatus For Wheeled Vehicles In Ground Effect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation4563Abuse Tolerance(Conference)Geothermal Reservoirs:Adventures on

  1. Aerodynamic Drag Reduction Apparatus For Wheeled Vehicles In Ground Effect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation4563Abuse Tolerance(Conference)Geothermal Reservoirs:Adventures

  2. Fundamental and experimental studies of ion-drag pumping 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castaneda, Javier Augusto

    1992-01-01

    investigated the pumping of transformer oil by an ion-drag pump. They achieved velocities close to 14 cm/s using screen type electrodes. General Electric Company (1983) used Sharbaugh and Walker's ion-drag pump design and built it into a 167-kVA distribufion... experimentally the ion-drag pumping of Refrigerant 11, to develop a general one-dimensional theoretical model for ion-drag pumping, and to investigate the ionization and emission modes of ion-drag pumping using dodecylbenzene as a working fluid. Experimentally...

  3. SU-E-J-88: Margin Reduction of Level II/III Planning Target Volume for Image-Guided Simultaneous Integrated Boost Head-And-Neck Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Can, S; Neylon, J; Qi, S; Santhanam, A; Low, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of improved normal tissue sparing for head-and-neck (H'N) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) by employing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for target level II/III though a GPU-based deformable image registration and dose accumulation framework. Methods: Ten H'N simultaneous integrated boost cases treated on TomoTherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Weekly kVCT scans in addition to daily MVCT scans were acquired for each patient. Reduced margin plans were generated with 0- mm margin for level II and III PTV (while 3-5 mm margin for PTV1) and compared with the standard margin plan using 3-5mm margin to all CTV1-3 (reference plan). An in-house developed GPU-based 3D image deformation tool was used to register and deform the weekly KVCTs with the planning CT and determine the delivered mean/minimum/maximum dose, dose volume histograms (DVHs), etc. Results: Compared with the reference plans, the averaged cord maximum, the right and left parotid doses reduced by 22.7 %, 16.5 %, and 9 % respectively in the reduced margin plans. The V95 for PTV2 and PTV3 were found within 2 and 5% between the reference and tighter margin plans. For the reduced margin plans, the averaged cumulative mean doses were consistent with the planned dose for PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 within 1.5%, 1.7% and 1.4%. Similar dose variations of the delivered dose were seen for the reference and tighter margin plans. The delivered maximum and mean doses for the cord were 3.55 % and 2.37% higher than the planned doses; a 5 % higher cumulative mean dose for the parotids was also observed for the delivered dose than the planned doses in both plans. Conclusion: By imposing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for level II and III targets for H'N irradiation, acceptable cumulative doses were achievable when coupled with weekly kVCT guidance while improving normal structure sparing.

  4. Modelling LARES temperature distribution and thermal drag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phuc H. Nguyen; Richard Matzner

    2015-07-25

    The LARES satellite, a laser-ranged space experiment to contribute to geophysics observation, and to measure the general relativistic Lense-Thirring effect, has been observed to undergo an anomalous along-track orbital acceleration of -0.4 pm/s$^2$ (pm := picometer). This "drag" is not surprising; along track drag has previously been observed with the related LAGEOS satellites (-3.4 pm/s$^2$). It is hypothesized that the drag is principally due to anisotropic thermal radiation from the satellite's exterior. We report the results of numerical computations of the along-track orbital decay of the LARES satellite during the first 126 days after launch. The results depend to a significant degree on the visual and IR absorbance $\\alpha$ and emissivity $\\epsilon$ of the fused silica Cube Corner Reflectors. We present results for two values of $\\alpha_{IR}$ = $\\epsilon_{IR}$: 0.82, a standard number for "clean" fused silica; and 0.60, a possible value for silica with slight surface contamination subjected to the space environment. The heating and the resultant along-track acceleration depend on the plane of the orbit, the sun position, and in particular on the occurrence of eclipses, all of which are functions of time. Thus we compute the drag for specific days. We compare our model to observational data, available for a 120-day period starting with the 7th day after launch, which shows the average acceleration of -0.4 pm/s$^2$. With our model the average along-track drag over this 120-day period for CCR $\\alpha_{IR}$ = $\\epsilon_{IR}$ = 0.82 was computed to be -0.59 pm/s$^2$. For CCR $\\alpha_{IR}$ = $\\epsilon_{IR}$ = 0.60 we compute -0.36 pm/s$^2$. Thus, our model demonstrates that most of the anomalous along-track acceleration can be explained by thermal thrust, but there could be smaller contributions from unmodelled effects.

  5. Modelling LARES temperature distribution and thermal drag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phuc H. Nguyen; Richard Matzner

    2015-10-13

    The LARES satellite, a laser-ranged space experiment to contribute to geophysics observation, and to measure the general relativistic Lense-Thirring effect, has been observed to undergo an anomalous along-track orbital acceleration of -0.4 pm/s$^2$ (pm := picometer). This "drag" is not surprising; along track drag has previously been observed with the related LAGEOS satellites (-3.4 pm/s$^2$). It is hypothesized that the drag is principally due to anisotropic thermal radiation from the satellite's exterior. We report the results of numerical computations of the along-track orbital decay of the LARES satellite during the first 126 days after launch. The results depend to a significant degree on the visual and IR absorbance $\\alpha$ and emissivity $\\epsilon$ of the fused silica Cube Corner Reflectors. We present results for two values of $\\alpha_{IR}$ = $\\epsilon_{IR}$: 0.82, a standard number for "clean" fused silica; and 0.60, a possible value for silica with slight surface contamination subjected to the space environment. The heating and the resultant along-track acceleration depend on the plane of the orbit, the sun position, and in particular on the occurrence of eclipses, all of which are functions of time. Thus we compute the drag for specific days. We compare our model to observational data, available for a 120-day period starting with the 7th day after launch, which shows the average acceleration of -0.4 pm/s$^2$. With our model the average along-track drag over this 120-day period for CCR $\\alpha_{IR}$ = $\\epsilon_{IR}$ = 0.82 was computed to be -0.59 pm/s$^2$. For CCR $\\alpha_{IR}$ = $\\epsilon_{IR}$ = 0.60 we compute -0.36 pm/s$^2$. Thus, our model demonstrates that most of the anomalous along-track acceleration can be explained by thermal thrust, but there could be smaller contributions from unmodelled effects.

  6. The drag force during the transient regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Souza, P V S; de Oliveira, P M C

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the drag force acting on a cylinder in a wind tunnel. The inspiration comes from an experimental result: a small, light ball falls on air; its speed increases, reaches a maximum, decreases and finally stabilizes. This surprising breaking behavior is due to the gradual formation of the so-called von K\\'arm\\'an street of air vortices behind the ball: while it is not completely formed, the transient drag force is smaller than the known steady state value and the ball can reach speeds higher than its final value. To show it, we treat the similar problem of a cylinder inside a wind tunnel suddenly switched on, by solving the Navier-Stokes dynamic equation. We use a finite difference method with successive relaxations on a grid. We also treat the case of a rotating cylinder, leading to the Magnus force. The novelty is the method we use to calculate these forces, which avoids the traditional surface integration of velocity gradients; the latter demands a very precise determination of the ve...

  7. The messy truth about drag Richard Feynman once noted that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    the drag on a sphere moving at fixed speed through a viscous fluid. Many texts give the impression, viscous forces dominate near the sphere, but inertial forces do so in regions far away. This makes it hardTHESIS The messy truth about drag Richard Feynman once noted that scientific literature tends

  8. Upper bound analysis for drag anchors in soft clay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Byoung Min

    2007-04-25

    This study presents an upper bound plastic limit analysis for predicting drag anchor trajectory and load capacity. The shank and fluke of the anchor are idealized as simple plates. The failure mechanism involves the motion ...

  9. Drag, turbulence, and diffusion in flow through emergent vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nepf, Heidi

    Aquatic plants convert mean kinetic energy into turbulent kinetic energy at the scale of the plant stems and branches. This energy transfer, linked to wake generation, affects vegetative drag and turbulence intensity. ...

  10. Collisional effects on nonlinear ion drag force for small grains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, Ian H.

    The ion drag force arising from plasma flow past an embedded spherical grain is calculated self-consistently and non-linearly using particle in cell codes, accounting for ion-neutral collisions. Using ion velocity distribution ...

  11. Reducing Drag and Oscillation of Spheres Used for Buoyancy in Oceanographic Moorings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    components of drag and lift are presented. The drag force for an underwater sphere can be reduced by moreReducing Drag and Oscillation of Spheres Used for Buoyancy in Oceanographic Moorings JANE HURLEY: 10.1175/2006JTECHO472.1 © 2007 American Meteorological Society #12;b. Background The drag force

  12. CME propagation: Where does the solar wind drag take over?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachdeva, Nishtha; Colaninno, Robin; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the Sun-Earth dynamics of a set of eight well observed solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using data from the STEREO spacecraft. We seek to quantify the extent to which momentum coupling between these CMEs and the ambient solar wind (i.e., the aerodynamic drag) influences their dynamics. To this end, we use results from a 3D flux rope model fit to the CME data. We find that solar wind aerodynamic drag adequately accounts for the dynamics of the fastest CME in our sample. For the relatively slower CMEs, we find that drag-based models initiated below heliocentric distances ranging from 15 to 50 $R_{\\odot}$ cannot account for the observed CME trajectories. This is at variance with the general perception that the dynamics of slow CMEs are influenced primarily by solar wind drag from a few $R_{\\odot}$ onwards. Several slow CMEs propagate at roughly constant speeds above 15--50 $R_{\\odot}$. Drag-based models initiated above these heights therefore require negligible aerodynamic drag to explain their...

  13. Development of a Two-fluid Drag Law for Clustered Particles using Direct Numerical Simulation and Validation through Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gokaltun, Seckin; Munroe, Norman; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2014-12-31

    This study presents a new drag model, based on the cohesive inter-particle forces, implemented in the MFIX code. This new drag model combines an existing standard model in MFIX with a particle-based drag model based on a switching principle. Switches between the models in the computational domain occur where strong particle-to-particle cohesion potential is detected. Three versions of the new model were obtained by using one standard drag model in each version. Later, performance of each version was compared against available experimental data for a fluidized bed, published in the literature and used extensively by other researchers for validation purposes. In our analysis of the results, we first observed that standard models used in this research were incapable of producing closely matching results. Then, we showed for a simple case that a threshold is needed to be set on the solid volume fraction. This modification was applied to avoid non-physical results for the clustering predictions, when governing equation of the solid granular temperate was solved. Later, we used our hybrid technique and observed the capability of our approach in improving the numerical results significantly; however, improvement of the results depended on the threshold of the cohesive index, which was used in the switching procedure. Our results showed that small values of the threshold for the cohesive index could result in significant reduction of the computational error for all the versions of the proposed drag model. In addition, we redesigned an existing circulating fluidized bed (CFB) test facility in order to create validation cases for clustering regime of Geldart A type particles.

  14. SEC: Accounting Board Is Dragging Feet -WSJ http://www.wsj.com/articles/sec-accounting-board-is-dragging-feet-1418605107?KEYWORDS=sec+accounting+board+is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    #12;SEC: Accounting Board Is Dragging Feet - WSJ http://www.wsj.com/articles/sec-accounting-board-is-dragging-feet-1418605107?KEYWORDS=sec+accounting+board+is SEC: Accounting Board Is Dragging Feet Commission Officials officials publicly took issue with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board at a conference last week

  15. Fe(III) Oxide Reactivity Toward Biological versus Chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roden, Eric E.

    size, surface area, and solubility of the mineral. Such variations lead to a continuum of Fe(III) oxideFe(III) Oxide Reactivity Toward Biological versus Chemical Reduction E R I C E . R O D E N of synthetic Fe(III) oxides with a broad range of crystallinity and specific surface area were examined

  16. September 2002 Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag: Presentations and Summary of Comments and Conclusions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCallen, R

    2002-09-01

    A Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag was held at NASA Ames Research Center on September 23, 2002. The purpose of the meeting was to present and discuss technical details on the experimental and computational work in progress and future project plans. Representatives from the Department of Energy (DOE)/Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy/Office of FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), NASA Ames Research Center (NASA), University of Southern California (USC), California Institute of Technology (Caltech), Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Freightliner, and Portland State University participated in the meeting. This report contains the technical presentations (viewgraphs) delivered at the Meeting, briefly summarizes the comments and conclusions, and outlines the future action items. The meeting began with an introduction by the Project Lead Rose McCallen of LLNL, where she emphasized that the world energy consumption is predicted to relatively soon exceed the available resources (i.e., fossil, hydro, non-breeder fission). This short fall is predicted to begin around the year 2050. Minimizing vehicle aerodynamic drag will significantly reduce our Nation's dependence on foreign oil resources and help with our world-wide fuel shortage. Rose also mentioned that educating the populace and researchers as to our world energy issues is important and that our upcoming United Engineering Foundation (UEF) Conference on ''The Aerodynamics of Heavy Vehicles: Trucks, Busses, and Trains'' was one way our DOE Consortium was doing this. Mentioned were the efforts of Fred Browand from USC in organizing and attracting internationally recognized speakers to the Conference. Rose followed with an overview of the DOE project goals, deliverables, and FY03 activities. The viewgraphs are attached at the end of this report. Sid Diamond of DOE discussed the reorganization of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and that the Office of Heavy Vehicle Technology is now part of the Office of FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies. Sid reviewed the FY03 budget and provided information on some plans for FY04. The soon to be posted DOE request for proposals from industry for projects related to parasitic energy losses was discussed. A minimum of 50% cost share by industry will be required and the proposal must be submitted by industry. Collaborative efforts in aerodynamic drag with members of the DOE consortium are encouraged. Sid also mentioned interest in aerodynamic drag contribution due to wheel wells and underbody flow. Sid also mentioned his continued interest in the application of our computational and experimental expertise to the area of locomotive and railcar aerodynamics for the reduction of drag effects and thus, the reduction of fuel consumption by trains. In summary, the technical presentations at the meeting included a review of experimental results and plans by GTRI, USC, and NASA Ames, the computational results from LLNL and SNL for the integrated tractor-trailer benchmark geometry called the Ground Transportation System (GTS) model, and by LLNL for the tractor-trailer gap and trailer wake flow, and turbulence model development and benchmark simulations being investigated by Caltech. USC is also investigating an acoustic drag reduction device that has been named ''Mozart'', GTRI continues their investigation of a blowing device, and LLNL presented their ideas for 2 new base drag reduction devices. ANL presented their plans for a DOE supported Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with Paccar Truck Company utilizing commercial software tools to simulate the flow and drag for an actual tractor and showed the results of some preliminary griding attempts. The attendees also had the opportunity to tour the 12-ft pressure wind tunnel the machine shop were the Generic Conventional Model (GCM, a.k.a. SLRT) was being readied for the scheduled November experiments. Much of

  17. The no-drag frame for anomalous chiral fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephanov, Mikhail A

    2015-01-01

    We show that for an anomalous fluid carrying dissipationless chiral magnetic and/or vortical currents there is a frame in which a stationary obstacle experiences no drag, but energy and charge currents do not vanish, resembling superfluidity. However, unlike ordinary superfluid flow, the anomalous chiral currents do transport entropy in this frame. We show that the second law of thermodynamics completely determines the amounts of these anomalous non-dissipative currents in the "no-drag frame" as polynomials in temperature and chemical potential with known anomaly coefficients. These general results are illustrated and confirmed by a calculation in the chiral kinetic theory and quark-gluon plasma at high temperature.

  18. Enchancement of heat pipes with ion-drag pumps 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babin, Bruce Russell

    1991-01-01

    ENHANCEMENT OF HEAT PIPES WITH ION-DRAG PUMPS A Thesis by BRUCE RUSSELL BABIN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AE'M I. niversity in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIEiVCE August 1991... Malor Subject: Mechanical Engineering ENHANCEMENT OF HEAT PIPES WITH ION-DRAG PUMPS A Thesis by BRUCE RUSSELL BABIN Approved as to style and content by G. P. Peterson (Charr of Committee) L. S. Fletcher (Member) . Hassan ( Member) W. L...

  19. Lattice-Boltzmann simulations of the drag force on a sphere approaching a superhydrophobic striped plane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander L. Dubov; Sebastian Schmieschek; Evgeny S. Asmolov; Jens Harting; Olga I. Vinogradova

    2014-01-03

    By means of lattice-Boltzmann simulations the drag force on a sphere of radius R approaching a superhydrophobic striped wall has been investigated as a function of arbitrary separation h. Superhydrophobic (perfect-slip vs. no-slip) stripes are characterized by a texture period L and a fraction of the gas area $\\phi$. For very large values of h/R we recover the macroscopic formulae for a sphere moving towards a hydrophilic no-slip plane. For h/R=O(1) and smaller the drag force is smaller than predicted by classical theories for hydrophilic no-slip surfaces, but larger than expected for a sphere interacting with a uniform perfectly slipping wall. At a thinner gap, $h\\ll R$ the force reduction compared to a classical result becomes more pronounced, and is maximized by increasing $\\phi$. In the limit of very small separations our simulation data are in quantitative agreement with an asymptotic equation, which relates a correction to a force for superhydrophobic slip to texture parameters. In addition, we examine the flow and pressure field and observe their oscillatory character in the transverse direction in the vicinity of the wall, which reflects the influence of the heterogeneity and anisotropy of the striped texture. Finally, we investigate the lateral force on the sphere, which is detectable in case of very small separations and is maximized by stripes with $\\phi=0.5$.

  20. Lattice-Boltzmann simulations of the drag force on a sphere approaching a superhydrophobic striped plane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dubov, Alexander L; Asmolov, Evgeny S; Harting, Jens; Vinogradova, Olga I

    2014-01-01

    By means of lattice-Boltzmann simulations the drag force on a sphere of radius R approaching a superhydrophobic striped wall has been investigated as a function of arbitrary separation h. Superhydrophobic (perfect-slip vs. no-slip) stripes are characterized by a texture period L and a fraction of the gas area $\\phi$. For very large values of h/R we recover the macroscopic formulae for a sphere moving towards a hydrophilic no-slip plane. For h/R=O(1) and smaller the drag force is smaller than predicted by classical theories for hydrophilic no-slip surfaces, but larger than expected for a sphere interacting with a uniform perfectly slipping wall. At a thinner gap, $h\\ll R$ the force reduction compared to a classical result becomes more pronounced, and is maximized by increasing $\\phi$. In the limit of very small separations our simulation data are in quantitative agreement with an asymptotic equation, which relates a correction to a force for superhydrophobic slip to texture parameters. In addition, we examine ...

  1. Radiation pressure and gas drag forces on a melamine-formaldehyde microsphere in a dusty plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goree, John

    Radiation pressure and gas drag forces on a melamine-formaldehyde microsphere in a dusty plasma Bin and gas drag forces acting on a single melamine-formaldehyde microsphere. The radiation pressure force

  2. Bottom Drag, eddy diffusivity, wind work and the power integrals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, William R.

    Bottom Drag, eddy diffusivity, wind work and the power integrals Bill Young, Andrew Thompson field i.e., the meridional heat flux is pro Moreover, the mechanical energy balance in a statistical Moreover, the mechanical energy balance in a statistically st Appendix A) is U-2 x = | - 2 |2 + hyp

  3. TORQUE AND DRAG CALCULATIONS IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL WELLBORES 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prurapark, Ruktai A.

    2010-07-14

    Torque and drag (T&D) modeling is regarded as extremely helpful in well planning because it helps to predict and prevent drilling problems that might occur during the drilling process. Although T&D software has existed since the 1990s, some...

  4. Stochastic modeling of lift and drag dynamics under turbulent conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    Matthias Wächter Joachim Peinke ForWind - Center for Wind Energy Research University of Oldenburg, Germany measurement. The model is being developed with the aim to integrate it into a general wind energy converter dynamics, drag dynamics. 1 Introduction Wind energy converters (WECs) are permanently exposed to turbulent

  5. Variation in the aerodynamic drag coefficient due to changes in the shape of an automobile 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John Gilbert

    1968-01-01

    . in Gage Bridge Calibration Results 22 Total Strain Gage Bridge Calibration Results 23 13 14 Exterior of' Com'bination Box. Combination Box, Strain Indicator, and Connecting Cables 25 26 15 16 17 Aerodynamic Drag ? Top and. Windows Up... Aerodynamic Drag ? Top and Windows Down Aerodynamic Drag ? Top Down, Windows Up Aerodynamic Drag - Top Up, Windows Down 31 19 Bas"'c Circuit - Combination of Wheat. tone Bridge Outputs 'v Figure Page 20 Equivalent Circui. t - Combination of Vneatstone...

  6. Impact of non-hydrostatic effects and trapped lee waves on mountain wave drag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Impact of non-hydrostatic effects and trapped lee waves on mountain wave drag in directionally effects and trapped lee waves on mountain wave drag in directionally sheared flow. Quarterly Journal;AcceptedArticle Impact of non-hydrostatic effects and trapped lee waves on mountain wave drag

  7. Measurement of Tidal Form Drag Using Seafloor Pressure Sensors SALLY J. WARNER AND PARKER MACCREADY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacCready, Parker

    tides. The tidally averaged power removed from the tidal currents by form drag was 0.2 W m22 , whichMeasurement of Tidal Form Drag Using Seafloor Pressure Sensors SALLY J. WARNER AND PARKER MACCREADY the tidal form drag on a sloping ridge in 200 m of water that forms a 1-km headland at the surface in Puget

  8. Test, Evaluation, and Demonstration of Practical Devices/Systems to Reduce Aerodynamic Drag of Tractor/Semitrailer Combination Unit Trucks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Smith; Karla Younessi; Matt Markstaller; Dan Schlesinger; Bhaskar Bhatnagar; Donald Smith; Bruno Banceu; Ron Schoon; V.K. Sharma; Mark Kachmarsky; Srikant Ghantae; Michael Sorrels; Conal Deedy; Justin Clark; Skip Yeakel; Michael D. Laughlin; Charlotte Seigler; Sidney Diamond

    2007-04-30

    Class 8 heavy-duty trucks account for over three-quarters of the total diesel fuel used by commercial trucks (trucks with GVWRs more than 10,000 pounds) in the United States each year. At the highway speeds at which these trucks travel (i.e., 60 mph or greater), aerodynamic drag is a major part of total horsepower needed to move the truck down the highway, Reductions in aerodynamic drag can yield measurable benefits in fuel economy through the use of relatively inexpensive and simple devices. The goal of this project was to examine a number of aerodynamic drag reduction devices and systems and determine their effectiveness in reducing aerodynamic drag of Class 8 tractor/semitrailer combination-units, thus contributing to DOE's goal of reducing transportation petroleum use. The project team included major heavy truck manufacturers in the United States, along with the management and industry expertise of the Truck Manufacturers Association as the lead investigative organization. The Truck Manufacturers Association (TMA) is the national trade association representing the major North American manufacturers of Class 6-8 trucks (GVWRs over 19,500 lbs). Four major truck manufacturers participated in this project with TMA: Freightliner LLC; International Truck and Engine Corporation; Mack Trucks Inc.; and Volvo Trucks North America, Inc. Together, these manufacturers represent over three-quarters of total Class 8 truck sales in the United States. These four manufacturers pursued complementary research efforts as part of this project. The project work was separated into two phases conducted over a two-year period. In Phase I, candidate aerodynamic devices and systems were screened to focus research and development attention on devices that offered the most potential. This was accomplished using full-size vehicle tests, scale model tests, and computational fluid dynamics analyses. In Phase II, the most promising devices were installed on full-size trucks and their effect on fuel economy was determined, either through on-road testing or full-size wind tunnel testing. All of the manufacturers worked with devices and systems that offer practical solutions to reduce aerodynamic drag, accounting for functionality, durability, cost effectiveness, reliability, and maintainability. The project team members and their roles and responsibilities are shown in Figure 2-1. Figure 2-2 shows the Phase I and II project schedules for all four projects and associated management activities.

  9. Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) Volume III- Technical Appendix, Annual Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, January 2009 – December 2009 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Gilman, D.; Lewis, C.; McKelvey, K.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Degelman, L.

    2010-01-01

    report, 'Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan' to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. This report is organized in three volumes: Volume I - Summary Report - provides an executive summary...

  10. Experimental Investigation of the Fresnel Drag Effect in RF Coaxial Cables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald T Cahill; David Brotherton

    2010-09-29

    An experiment that confirms the Fresnel drag formalism in RF coaxial cables is reported. The Fresnel `drag' in bulk dielectrics and in optical fibers has previously been well established. An explanation for this formalism is given, and it is shown that there is no actual drag phenomenon, rather that the Fresnel drag effect is merely the consequence of a simplified description of EM scattering within a dielectric in motion wrt the dynamical 3-space. The Fresnel drag effect plays a critical role in the design of various light-speed anisotropy detectors.

  11. Chap. III : structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poinsot, Laurent

    Chap. III : Les objets structur´es Laurent Poinsot Plan Chap. III : Les objets structur´es Laurent Poinsot 25 septembre 2009 #12;Chap. III : Les objets structur´es Laurent Poinsot Plan Plan 1 Les objets structur´es Introduction S´equences Listes Ensembles Cha^ines de caract`eres #12;Chap. III : Les objets

  12. Assessment of Drag Models for Geldart A Particles in Bubbling Fluidized Beds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Estejab, Bahareh; Battaglia, Francine

    2015-10-08

    In order to accurately predict the hydrodynamic behavior of gas and solid phases using an Eulerian–Eulerian approach, it is crucial to use appropriate drag models to capture the correct physics. In this study, the performance of seven drag models for fluidization of Geldart A particles of coal, poplar wood, and their mixtures was assessed. In spite of the previous findings that bode badly for using predominately Geldart B drag models for fine particles, the results of our study revealed that if static regions of mass in the fluidized beds are considered, these drag models work well with Geldart A particles.more »It was found that drag models derived from empirical relationships adopt better with Geldart A particles compared to drag models that were numerically developed. Overall, the Huilin–Gidaspow drag model showed the best performance for both single solid phases and binary mixtures, however, for binary mixtures, Wen–Yu model predictions were also accurate.« less

  13. Proteome of Geobacter sulfurreducens grown with Fe(III) oxide or Fe(III) citrate as the electron acceptor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Y-H R.; Hixson, Kim K.; Aklujkar, Ma; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Lovley, Derek R.; Mester, Tunde

    2008-12-01

    e(III) oxides are the most abundant source of reducible Fe(III) by microorganisms in most soils and sediments, yet few studies on the physiology of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms during growth on Fe(III) oxide have been conducted because of the technical difficulties in working with cell growth and harvest in the presence of Fe(III) oxides. Geobacter sulfurreducens is a representative of the Geobacter species that predominate in a variety of subsurface environments in which Fe(III) oxide is important. In order to better understand the physiology of Geobacter species during growth on Fe(III) oxide, the proteome of G. sulfurreducens grown on Fe(III) oxide was compared with the proteome of cells grown with soluble Fe(III) citrate. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) revealed 19 proteins that were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). These included proteins related to protein synthesis, electron transfer and energy production, oxidative stress, protein folding, outer membrane proteins, nitrogen metabolism and hypothetical proteins. Further analysis of the proteome with the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag method revealed additional proteins associated with growth on Fe(III) oxide. These included the outer-membrane c-type cytochrome, OmcS and OmcG, which genetic studies have suggested are required for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Furthermore, several other cytochromes, as yet unstudied, were detected to be significantly up regulated during growth on Fe(III) oxide and other proteins of unknown function were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). PilA, the structural protein for pili, which is required for Fe(III) oxide reduction, and other pilin-associated proteins were also more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide. Confirmation of the differential expression of proteins known to be important in Fe(III) oxide reduction was observed, and an additional number of previously unidentified proteins were found with significant abundance in the cells grown under conditions of Fe(III) oxide reduction.

  14. DragNDrop Directions v7 Windows Users: How do I access DragNDrop web documents to place or update them?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    DragNDrop Directions v7 2/25/10 Windows Users: How do I access DragNDrop web documents to place or update them? If you are on the PPPL Domain: Open My Computer. Then the P drive. Find: P:\\web\

  15. Turbulent drag reduction by streamwise traveling waves Armin Zare, Binh K. Lieu, and Mihailo R. Jovanovic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jovanovic, Mihailo

    of Minnesota Initiative for Renewable Energy and the Environment under Early Career Award RC- 0014 simulations have provided motivation for the development of a model-based framework for designing traveling

  16. Dynamics on the Laminar-Turbulent Boundary and the Origin of the Maximum Drag Reduction Asymptote

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Michael D.

    Dynamical trajectories on the boundary in state space between laminar and turbulent plane channel flow—edge states—are computed for Newtonian and viscoelastic fluids. Viscoelasticity has a negligible effect on the properties ...

  17. RESEARCH ARTICLE Drag and lift reduction of a 3D bluff-body using active vortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    apparatus (chemical industry, energy production). From the academic point of view, it is an exciting-up with motorized vortex generators is proposed. Thanks to this active device. The optimal configurations depending academic and industrial research. From the indus- trial point of view, flow control is a way to increase

  18. Razor clam to RoboClam: burrowing drag reduction mechanisms and their robotic adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Amos

    Estimates based on the strength, size, and shape of the Atlantic razor clam (Ensis directus) indicate that the animal's burrow depth should be physically limited to a few centimeters; yet razor clams can dig as deep as 70 ...

  19. Aerodynamics overview of the ground transportation systems (GTS) project for heavy vehicle drag reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutierrez, W.T.; Hassan, B.; Croll, R.H.; Rutledge, W.H.

    1995-12-31

    The focus of the research was to investigate the fundamental aerodynamics of the base flow of a tractor trailer that would prove useful in fluid flow management. Initially, industry design needs and constraints were defined. This was followed by an evaluation of state-of-the-art Navier-Stokes based computational fluid dynamics tools. Analytical methods were then used in combination with computational tools in a design process. Several geometries were tested at 1:8 scale in a low speed wind tunnel. In addition to the baseline geometry, base add-on devices of the class of ogival boattails and slants were analyzed.

  20. Superhydrophobic turbulent drag reduction as a function of surface grating parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, H; Park, H; Sun, G; Sun, G; Kim, CJ

    2014-01-01

    increasing width of the water-air interface. Since the lossno air loss and flat air-water interface, numerical effortsKim 2009), was a stable air-water interface guaranteed and a

  1. Wavelet analysis study of microbubble drag reduction in a boundary channel flow 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhen, Ling

    2006-04-12

    components in streamwise-near-wall normal plane of a turbulent channel flow at Reynolds number of 5128 based on the half height of the channel were measured. The influence of the presence of microbubbles in the boundary layer was assessed and compared...

  2. Fuel Burn and Emissions Reduction Potential of Low Power/Low Drag Approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumont, Jean-Marie

    Changing aircraft operational procedures is one strategy that can be used to reduce fuel burn and mitigate environmental impacts of aviation in relatively short timeframes with existing aircraft types. This study quantifies ...

  3. Aerodynamic drag reduction apparatus for gap-divided bluff bodies such as

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation4563Abuse Tolerance(Conference)Geothermal

  4. Aerodynamic drag reduction apparatus for gap-divided bluff bodies such as

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation4563Abuse Tolerance(Conference)Geothermaltractor-trailers (Patent) |

  5. Chap. III : structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poinsot, Laurent

    Chap. III : Les objets structur´es Laurent Poinsot Plan Chap. III : Les objets structur´es Laurent Poinsot 25 septembre 2009 #12;Chap. III : Les objets structur´es Laurent Poinsot Plan Plan 1 Les objets structur´es Introduction S´equences Listes Ensembles Cha^ines de caract`eres 2 Quelques exercices #12;Chap

  6. An Inertial Cell Model for the Drag Force in Multi-phase Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tupper, Gary; Mainza, Aubrey

    2015-01-01

    A new model for the drag coefficient of a sphere in a concentrated system is described. It is based upon a cell-averaged model for the Stokes regime combined with a physically motivated extrapolation to arbitrary Reynolds number. It can be used as an alternative to the isolated particle drag coefficient in Euler-Lagrange modelling of solid-liquid multi-phase flow.The corresponding drag force also provides a dynamic bed equation for use in Euler-Euler modelling.

  7. DOE's effort to reduce truck aerodynamic drag : joint experiments and computations lead to smart design.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaste, David M (NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA); Salari, Kambiz (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Hammache, Mustapha (University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA); Browand, Fred (University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA); Pointer, W. David (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Ortega, Jason M. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); McCallen, Rose (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Walker, Stephen M (NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA); Heineck, James T (NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA); Hassan, Basil; Roy, Christopher John (Auburn University, Auburn, AL); Storms, B. (NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA); Satran, D. (NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA); Ross, James (NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA); Englar, Robert (Georgia Tech Research Institute, Atlanta, GA); Chatalain, Philippe (Caltech, Pasadena, CA); Rubel, Mike (Caltech, Pasadena, CA); Leonard, Anthony (Caltech, Pasadena, CA); Hsu, Tsu-Ya (University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA); DeChant, Lawrence Justin.

    2004-06-01

    At 70 miles per hour, overcoming aerodynamic drag represents about 65% of the total energy expenditure for a typical heavy truck vehicle. The goal of this US Department of Energy supported consortium is to establish a clear understanding of the drag producing flow phenomena. This is being accomplished through joint experiments and computations, leading to the smart design of drag reducing devices. This paper will describe our objective and approach, provide an overview of our efforts and accomplishments, and discuss our future direction.

  8. DOE's Effort to Reduce Truck Aerodynamic Drag-Joint Experiments and Computations Lead to Smart Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCallen, R; Salari, K; Ortega, J; DeChant, L; Hassan, B; Roy, C; Pointer, W; Browand, F; Hammache, M; Hsu, T; Leonard, A; Rubel, M; Chatalain, P; Englar, R; Ross, J; Satran, D; Heineck, J; Walker, S; Yaste, D; Storms, B

    2004-06-17

    At 70 miles per hour, overcoming aerodynamic drag represents about 65% of the total energy expenditure for a typical heavy truck vehicle. The goal of this US Department of Energy supported consortium is to establish a clear understanding of the drag producing flow phenomena. This is being accomplished through joint experiments and computations, leading to the 'smart' design of drag reducing devices. This paper will describe our objective and approach, provide an overview of our efforts and accomplishments, and discuss our future direction.

  9. DOEs Effort to Reduce Truck Aerodynamic Drag through Joint...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Drag through Joint Experiments and Computations 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 --...

  10. Different regimes of the uniaxial elongation of electrically charged viscoelastic jets due to dissipative air drag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauricella, Marco; Coluzza, Ivan; Pisignano, Dario; Succi, Sauro

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the effects of dissipative air drag on the dynamics of electrified jets in the early stage of the electrospinning process. The main idea is to use a Brownian noise to model air drag effects on the uniaxial elongation of the jets. The numerical model is used to probe the dynamics of electrified polymer jets at different conditions of air drag force. Numerical simulations show that the elongation of the charged jet filament is significantly affected by the presence of air drag force, providing prospective beneficial implications for the optimal design of future electrospinning experiments.

  11. DOEs Effort to Reduce Truck Aerodynamic Drag through Joint...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Washington D.C. vss14salari.pdf More Documents & Publications DOEs Effort to Reduce Truck Aerodynamic Drag through Joint Experiments and Computations Vehicle Technologies...

  12. DOEs Effort to Reduce Truck Aerodynamic Drag through Joint...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Meeting vss006salari2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications DOEs Effort to Reduce Truck Aerodynamic Drag through Joint Experiments and Computations Vehicle Technologies...

  13. Different regimes of the uniaxial elongation of electrically charged viscoelastic jets due to dissipative air drag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Lauricella; Giuseppe Pontrelli; Ivan Coluzza; Dario Pisignano; Sauro Succi

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the effects of dissipative air drag on the dynamics of electrified jets in the initial stage of the electrospinning process. The main idea is to use a Brownian noise to model air drag effects on the uniaxial elongation of the jets. The developed numerical model is used to probe the dynamics of electrified polymer jets at different conditions of air drag force, showing that the dynamics of the charged jet is strongly biased by the presence of air drag forces. This study provides prospective beneficial implications for improving forthcoming electrospinning experiments.

  14. DOEs Effort to Reduce Truck Aerodynamic Drag through Joint...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Truck Aerodynamic Drag through Joint Experiments and Computations 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

  15. Demand Reduction

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Grantees may use funds to coordinate with electricity supply companies and utilities to reduce energy demands on their power systems. These demand reduction programs are usually coordinated through...

  16. DragNDrop Directions v6 Windows Users: How do I access DragNDrop web documents to place or update them?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    DragNDrop Directions v6 12/12/05 Windows Users: How do I access DragNDrop web documents to place or update them? If you are on the PPPL Domain: Open My Computer. Then the P drive. Find the web folder. Find to your web files contact Lena Scimeca OS/X Users: How do I access the web documents to place or update

  17. November 16, 1999 1. Drag force on non spherical particles. (25 points)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCready, Mark J.

    ChEg 355 Fall 1999 Test #2 November 16, 1999 1. Drag force on non spherical particles. (25 points) Recall that the Stokes' law drag relation for a sphere in creeping flow is: FD = 6 µ R U, where µ is the fluid viscosity, R is the radius of the sphere, and U is the terminal velocity. It was mentioned

  18. Interparticle Potential and Drag Coefficient in Nematic Colloids Jurij Kotar,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osterman, Natan

    large bead separations (x > 4 m, at a sphere diameter of 3 m), the force decays proportional to xÿ6 un- distorted measurements of forces as well as effective drag coefficient of an immersed beadInterparticle Potential and Drag Coefficient in Nematic Colloids Jurij Kotar,1 Mojca Vilfan,2 Natan

  19. A ash-drag effect in random motion reveals involvement of preattentive motion processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitney, David

    A ash-drag effect in random motion reveals involvement of preattentive motion processing Department-ku, Tokyo, JapanIkuya Murakami The ash-drag (FDE) effect refers to the phenomenon in which the position of a stationary ashed object in one location appears shifted in the direction of nearby motion. Over the past

  20. A sea drag relation for hurricane wind speeds N. C. Zweers,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vries, Hans de

    A sea drag relation for hurricane wind speeds N. C. Zweers,1 V. K. Makin,1 J. W. de Vries,1 and G, the surface drag is overestimated in NWP models for hurricane wind speeds and the intensity of hurricane winds is tested in an NWP model. Two hurricanes in the Caribbean are modeled: Ivan (2004) and Katrina (2005

  1. Method and apparatus for planar drag strip casting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, John C. (Pittsburgh, PA); Campbell, Steven L. (Middletown, OH)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an improved process and apparatus for strip casting. The combination of a planar flow casting nozzle positioned back from the top dead center position with an attached nozzle extension, provides an increased level of casting control and quality. The nozzle extension provides a means of containing the molten pool above the rotating substrate to increase the control of molten metal at the edges of the strip and increase the range of coating thicknesses which may be produced. The level of molten metal in the containment means is regulated to be above the level of melt supplying the casting nozzle which produces a condition of planar drag flow with the casting substrate prior to solidification.

  2. Method and apparatus for planar drag strip casting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, J.C.; Campbell, S.L.

    1991-11-12

    The present invention is directed to an improved process and apparatus for strip casting. The combination of a planar flow casting nozzle positioned back from the top dead center position with an attached nozzle extension, provides an increased level of casting control and quality. The nozzle extension provides a means of containing the molten pool above the rotating substrate to increase the control of molten metal at the edges of the strip and increase the range of coating thicknesses which may be produced. The level of molten metal in the containment means is regulated to be above the level of melt supplying the casting nozzle which produces a condition of planar drag flow with the casting substrate prior to solidification. 5 figures.

  3. LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY Lab III - 1 In previous problems, you have been introduced to the concepts of kinetic energy, which is associated with the motion of an object, and internal energy, which is associated with the internal structure of a system. In this section, you work with another form of energy

  4. General-relativistic versus Newtonian: geometric dragging and dynamic anti-dragging in stationary disks in the first post-Newtonian approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr Jaranowski; Patryk Mach; Edward Malec; Michal Pirog

    2014-12-27

    We evaluate general-relativistic effects in motion of stationary accretion disks around a Schwarzschild black hole, assuming the first post-Newtonian (1PN) approximation. There arises an integrability condition, that leads to the emergence of two types of general-relativistic corrections to a Newtonian rotation curve. The well known geometric dragging of frames accelerates rotation but the hitherto unknown dynamic term, that reflects the disk structure, deccelerates rotation. The net result can diminish the Newtonian angular velocity of rotation in a central disk zone but the geometric dragging of frames dominates in the disk boundary zone. Both effects are nonlinear in nature and they disappear in the limit of test fluids. Dust disks can be only geometrically dragged while uniformly rotating gaseous disk are untouched at the 1PN order. General-relativistic contributions can strongly affect rotation periods in Keplerian motion for compact systems.

  5. Part III The President

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    III The President Executive Order 13653-Preparing the United States for the Impacts of Climate Change VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:41 Nov 05, 2013 Jkt 226001 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 4717...

  6. Experimental aero-acoustic assessment of swirling flows for drag applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mobed, Darius Darayes

    2007-01-01

    The need for quiet drag technologies stems from stricter requirements for and growing demand of low-noise aircraft. The research presented in this thesis regards the use of swirling exhaust flows capable of generating ...

  7. The gravitational drag force on an extended object moving in a gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernal, C G

    2013-01-01

    Using axisymmetrical numerical simulations, we revisit the gravitational drag felt by a gravitational Plummer sphere with mass M and core radius Rs, moving at constant velocity V0 through a background homogeneous medium of adiabatic gas. Since the potential is non-diverging, there is no gas removal due to accretion. When Rs is larger than the Bondi radius RB, the perturbation is linear at every point and the drag force is well fitted by the time-dependent Ostriker's formula with r_{min}= 2.25Rs, where r_{min} is the minimum impact parameter in the Coulomb logarithm. In the deep nonlinear supersonic regime (Rs2. As a consequence, the drag force does not depend sensitively on the nonlinearity parameter RB/Rs, for RB/Rs-values larger than a certain critical value. We show that our generalized Ostriker's formula for the drag force is more accurate than the formula suggested by Kim & Kim (2009).

  8. Drag reducing polymers as simple indicators of hemolytic potential in biomechanical devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shieh, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to determine if drag reducing polymers can be simple indicators of hemolytic potential in biomechanical devices. Specifically, three different blood pumps, known as a left ventricle ...

  9. Lift and drag in intruders moving through hydrostatic granular media at high speeds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potiguar, Fabricio Q

    2013-01-01

    Recently, experiments showed that forces on intruders dragged horizontally through dense, hydrostatic granular packings mainly depend on the local surface orientation and can be seen as the sum of the forces exerted on small surface elements. In order to understand such forces more deeply, we perform 2D soft-sphere molecular dynamics simulation, on similar set up, of an intruder dragged through a 50-50 bi-disperse granular packing, with diameters 0.30 and 0.34 cm. We measure, for both circular and half-circle shapes, the forces parallel (drag) and perpendicular (lift) to the drag direction as functions of the drag speed, with V=10.3-309 cm/s, and intruder depths, with D=3.75-37.5 cm. The drag forces on an intruder monotonically increase with V and D, and are larger for the circle. However, the lift force does not depend monotonically on V and D, and this relationship is affected by the shape of the intruder. The vertical force was negative for the half-circle, but for a small range of V and D, we measure posi...

  10. Hydrologic Flow Controls on Biologic Iron(III) Reduction in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgos, William

    for energy that likely increased cell synthesis, and decreased the concentration of sorbed Fe(II) that) in a goethite-coated sand was bioreduced by the DMRB Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 in a flow-through column

  11. Isolation and microbial reduction of Fe(III) phyllosilicates from

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journalspectroscopy of aerosols in(JournalTechnical Report: Is

  12. APPENDIX III III.1 Precipitation Daily Totals Preceding Precipitation Events-----------------------------------------III-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    APPENDIX III III.1 Precipitation Daily Totals Preceding Precipitation Events-----------------------------------------III-2 Figure III.1.1 Precipitation daily totals preceding the a) calibration and b) and c) validationPRECIPITATION DAILY TOTALS PRECEDING PRECIPITATION EVENTS 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 9/19/819/21/819/23/819/25/819/27

  13. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.D.

    1985-07-01

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report.

  14. Chapter III Jacobi's Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sleijpen, Gerard

    Chapter III Jacobi's Method 6 The algorithm Jacobi's method (JACOBI [1846]) is one of the oldest of the Jacobi method, we have used the following sources: Jacobi [1846], Wilkinson [1965, Chapter 5], Parlett j : (6.1) The idea in Jacobi [1846] was to use this for larger dimensional matrices in order

  15. Enhancement of PAH biomineralization rates by cyclodextrins under Fe(III)-reducing conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsay, Juliana

    biodegradation whereby the indi- genous microorganisms degrade the contaminants without intervention. However. Keywords: Cyclodextrin; Fe(III) reduction; Mineralization; PAH bioavailability; Polyaromatic hydrocarbons 1. Introduction Since polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are potentially toxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic

  16. On the horseshoe drag of a low-mass planet. I - Migration in isothermal disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casoli, J

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the unsaturated horseshoe drag exerted on a low-mass planet by an isothermal gaseous disk. In the globally isothermal case, we use a formal- ism, based on the use of a Bernoulli invariant, that takes into account pressure effects, and that extends the torque estimate to a region wider than the horse- shoe region. We find a result that is strictly identical to the standard horseshoe drag. This shows that the horseshoe drag accounts for the torque of the whole corotation region, and not only of the horseshoe region, thereby deserving to be called corotation torque. We find that evanescent waves launched downstream of the horseshoe U-turns by the perturbations of vortensity exert a feed-back on the upstream region, that render the horseshoe region asymmetric. This asymmetry scales with the vortensity gradient and with the disk's aspect ratio. It does not depend on the planetary mass, and it does not have any impact on the horseshoe drag. Since the horseshoe drag has a steep dependence on the width...

  17. Integrability Singular reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick, George

    Motivation Integrability Singular reduction Integration of Singular quotients Summary References Singular reduction of Poisson manifolds and integrability Rui L. Fernandes1 Joint work with J.P. Ortega Fernandes Singular reduction and integrability #12;Motivation Integrability Singular reduction Integration

  18. Drag force of Anisotropic plasma at finite $U(1)$ chemical potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long Cheng; Xian-Hui Ge; Shang-Yu Wu

    2015-04-16

    We perform the calculation of drag force acting on a massive quark moving through an anisotropic ${\\cal N}=4$ SU(N) Super Yang-Mills plasma in the presence of a $U(1)$ chemical potential. We present the numerical results for any real (prolate solution) or imaginary (oblate solution) value of anisotropy and arbitrary direction of the quark velocity with respect to the direction of anisotropy. We find the effect of chemical potential or charge density will enhance the drag force for the prolate solution, and opposite to the oblate solution. On the other hand, as the anisotropy increases, the drag force is enhanced, and the effect of chemical potential strengthens the enhancement.

  19. Drag force of Anisotropic plasma at finite $U(1)$ chemical potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long Cheng; Xian-Hui Ge; Shang-Yu Wu

    2015-08-25

    We perform the calculation of drag force acting on a massive quark moving through an anisotropic ${\\cal N}=4$ SU(N) Super Yang-Mills plasma in the presence of a $U(1)$ chemical potential. We present the numerical results for any real (prolate solution) or imaginary (oblate solution) value of anisotropy and arbitrary direction of the quark velocity with respect to the direction of anisotropy. We find the effect of chemical potential or charge density will enhance the drag force for the prolate solution, and opposite to the oblate solution. On the other hand, as the anisotropy increases, the drag force is enhanced, and the effect of chemical potential strengthens the enhancement.

  20. Lift and drag in intruders moving through hydrostatic granular media at high speeds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabricio Q. Potiguar; Yang Ding

    2013-07-18

    Recently, experiments showed that forces on intruders dragged horizontally through dense, hydrostatic granular packings mainly depend on the local surface orientation and can be seen as the sum of the forces exerted on small surface elements. In order to understand such forces more deeply, we perform 2D soft-sphere molecular dynamics simulation, on similar set up, of an intruder dragged through a 50-50 bi-disperse granular packing, with diameters 0.30 and 0.34 cm. We measure, for both circular and half-circle shapes, the forces parallel (drag) and perpendicular (lift) to the drag direction as functions of the drag speed, with V=10.3-309 cm/s, and intruder depths, with D=3.75-37.5 cm. The drag forces on an intruder monotonically increase with V and D, and are larger for the circle. However, the lift force does not depend monotonically on V and D, and this relationship is affected by the shape of the intruder. The vertical force was negative for the half-circle, but for a small range of V and D, we measure positive lift. We find no sign change for the lift on the circle, which is always positive. The explanation for the nonmonotonic dependence is related to the decrease in contacts on the intruder as V increases. This is qualitatively similar to supersonic flow detachment from an obstacle. The detachment picture is supported by simulation measurements of the velocity field around the intruder and force profiles measured on its surface.

  1. Observed drag coefficients in high winds in the near offshore of the South China Sea

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bi, Xueyan; Liu, Yangan; Gao, Zhiqiu; Liu, Feng; Song, Qingtao; Huang, Jian; Huang, Huijun; Mao, Weikang; Liu, Chunxia

    2015-07-14

    This paper investigates the relationships between friction velocity, 10 m drag coefficient, and 10 m wind speed using data collected at two offshore observation towers (one over the sea and the other on an island) from seven typhoon episodes in the South China Sea from 2008 to 2014. The two towers were placed in areas with different water depths along a shore-normal line. The depth of water at the tower over the sea averages about 15 m, and the depth of water near the island is about 10 m. The observed maximum 10 min average wind speed at a heightmore »of 10 m is about 32 m s?¹. Momentum fluxes derived from three methods (eddy covariance, inertial dissipation, and flux profile) are compared. The momentum fluxes derived from the flux profile method are larger (smaller) over the sea (on the island) than those from the other two methods. The relationship between the 10 m drag coefficient and the 10 m wind speed is examined by use of the data obtained by the eddy covariance method. The drag coefficient first decreases with increasing 10 m wind speed when the wind speeds are 5–10 m s?¹, then increases and reaches a peak value of 0.002 around a wind speed of 18 m s?¹. The drag coefficient decreases with increasing 10 m wind speed when 10 m wind speeds are 18–27 m s?¹. A comparison of the measurements from the two towers shows that the 10 m drag coefficient from the tower in 10 m water depth is about 40% larger than that from the tower in 15 m water depth when the 10 m wind speed is less than 10 m s?¹. Above this, the difference in the 10 m drag coefficients of the two towers disappears.« less

  2. Relativistic Drag and Emission Radiation Pressures in an Isotropic Photonic Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeff S. Lee; Gerald B. Cleaver

    2015-07-30

    By invoking the relativistic spectral radiance, as derived by Lee and Cleaver [1], the drag radiation pressure of a relativistic planar surface moving through an isotropic radiation field, with which it is in thermal equilibrium, is determined in inertial and non-inertial frames. The forward- and rearward-directed emission radiation pressures are also derived and compared. A fleeting (inertial frames) or ongoing (some non-inertial frames) Carnot cycle is shown to exist as a result of an intra-surfaces temperature gradient. The drag radiation pressure on an object with an arbitrary frontal geometry is also described.

  3. Relativistic Drag and Emission Radiation Pressures in an Isotropic Photonic Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jeff S

    2015-01-01

    By invoking the relativistic spectral radiance, as derived by Lee and Cleaver [1], the drag radiation pressure of a relativistic planar surface moving through an isotropic radiation field, with which it is in thermal equilibrium, is determined in inertial and non-inertial frames. The forward- and rearward-directed emission radiation pressures are also derived and compared. A fleeting (inertial frames) or ongoing (some non-inertial frames) Carnot cycle is shown to exist as a result of an intra-surfaces temperature gradient. The drag radiation pressure on an object with an arbitrary frontal geometry is also described.

  4. Plutonium (III) and uranium (III) nitrile complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enriquez, A. E.; Matonic, J. H.; Scott, B. L.; Neu, M. P.

    2002-01-01

    Iodine oxidation of uranium and plutonium metals in tetrahydrofuran and pyridine form AnI{sub 3}(THF){sub 4} and AnI{sub 3}(py){sub 4} (An = Pu, U). These compounds represent convenient entries Into solution An(III) chemistry in organic solvents. Extensions of the actinide metal oxidation methodology in nitrile solvents by I{sub 2}, AgPF{sub 6}, and TIPF{sub 6} are presented here. Treatment of Pu{sup 0} in acetonitrile with iodine yields a putative PuI{sub 3}(NCMe){sub x} intermediate which can be trapped with the tripodal nitrogen donor ligand tpza (tpza = (tris[(2-pyrazinyl)methyl]amine)) and forms the eight-coordinate complex (tpza)PuI{sub 3}(NCMe). Treatment of excess U{sup 0} metal by iodine in acetonitrile afforded a brown crystalline mixed valence complex, [U(NCMe){sub 9}][UI{sub 6}][I], instead of UI{sub 3}(NCMe){sub 4}. The analogous reaction in bezonitrile forms red crystalline UI{sub 4}(NCPh){sub 4}. In contrast, treatment of UI{sub 3}(THF){sub 4} with excess acetonitrile cleanly generates [U(NCMe){sub 9}][I]{sub 3}. Oxidation of Pu{sup 0} by either TI(I) or Ag(I) hexafluorophosphate salts generates a nine-coordinate homoleptic acetonitrile adduct [Pu(NCMe){sub 9}][PF{sub 6}]{sub 3}. Attempts to oxidize U{sub 0} with these salts were unsuccessful.

  5. Buoyancy eects on heat transfer and temperature proles in horizontal pipe ow of drag-reducing uids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguilar, Guillermo

    Buoyancy eects on heat transfer and temperature pro®les in horizontal pipe ¯ow of drag 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction In heated ¯ows in horizontal pipes February 2000 Abstract We have studied the extent to which buoyancy eects in horizontal pipe ¯ows of drag

  6. Analysis of Surface Drag of StromaxTM in Water Alec Ye || Alecye123@yahoo.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    the pressure drag and medium drag the same by having the same air foil design and only changing the experiment learned is data analysis. There is a lot of uncertainty and standard deviation calculated with practical the temperature of the water, temperature of the air, the amount of water in the tank, and the tightness

  7. Economic evaluation of volume reduction for Defense transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, C.M.

    1981-07-01

    This study evaluates the economics of volume reduction of retrievably stored and newly generated DOE transuranic waste by comparing the costs of reduction of the waste with the savings possible in transportation and disposal of the waste. The report develops a general approach to the comparison of TRU waste volume reduction costs and cost savings, establishes an initial set of cost data, and develops conclusions to support selecting technologies and facilities for the disposal of DOE transuranic waste. Section I outlines the analysis which considers seven types of volume reduction from incineration and compaction of combustibles to compaction, size reduction, shredding, melting, and decontamination of metals. The study considers the volume reduction of contact-handled newly generated, and retrievably stored DOE transuranic waste. Section II of this report describes the analytical approach, assumptions, and flow of waste material through sites. Section III presents the waste inventories, disposal, and transportation savings with volume reduction and the volume reduction techniques and savings.

  8. Computation of the drag force on a rough sphere close to a wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gérard-Varet, David

    2011-01-01

    We consider the effect of surface roughness on solid-solid contact in a Stokes flow. Various models for the roughness are considered, and a unified methodology is given to derive the corresponding asymptotics of the drag force. In this way, we recover and clarify the various expressions that can be found in the litterature.

  9. Sensitivity of the wind stress and storm surges to surface drag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vries, Hans de

    into the water spray generation (water droplets) #12;Background Air-Sea Interaction High and/or extreme windSensitivity of the wind stress and storm surges to surface drag changes Niels Zweers KNMI - Weather concept · Methodology ­ HIRLAM ­ WAQUA · Results · Conclusion Sensitivity of the wind stress and storm

  10. SECTION III: NUCLEAR THEORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845* Storage SystemsLight particleNUCLEAR7.0 -III:

  11. WCI-III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN A 035(92/02) nerg *4 o** 0, WF* W A ,WATCHWCHWCI-III

  12. Iii;.} An Ann

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHighHussein KhalilResearch88 SignPriceresponseIdeumIf youIii;.}

  13. III IIU Em Smiii

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See full Hydrocarbon Gas2 II NowIII IIU Em

  14. POPULATION III HYPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smidt, Joseph; Whalen, Daniel J. [T-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Wiggins, Brandon K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L. [CCS-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Johnson, Jarrett L., E-mail: dwhalen1999@gmail.com [XTD-PRI, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    Population III supernovae have been of growing interest of late for their potential to directly probe the properties of the first stars, particularly the most energetic events that are visible near the edge of the observable universe. Until now, hypernovae, the unusually energetic Type Ib/c supernovae that are sometimes associated with gamma-ray bursts, have been overlooked as cosmic beacons at the highest redshifts. In this, the latest of a series of studies on Population III supernovae, we present numerical simulations of 25-50 M {sub ?} hypernovae and their light curves done with the Los Alamos RAGE and SPECTRUM codes. We find that they will be visible at z = 10-15 to the James Webb Space Telescope and z = 4-5 to the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope, tracing star formation rates in the first galaxies and at the end of cosmological reionization. If, however, the hypernova crashes into a dense shell ejected by its progenitor, it is expected that a superluminous event will occur that may be seen at z ? 20 in the first generation of stars.

  15. III. Vacuum PumpsIII. Vacuum Pumps Gas transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Kai

    III. Vacuum PumpsIII. Vacuum Pumps Mechanism Gas transfer Gas capture FunctionFunction Roughing, Screw High vacuum Oil diffusion, Turbomolecular, Cryo, Ion Auxiliary Titanium Sublimation, LN2 Liu, UCD aggressive gases Liu, UCD Phy250-1, 2011, NanoFab22 May handle aggressive gases #12;IIIIII--B. High Vacuum

  16. LABORATORY III ENERGY AND CAPACITORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY III ENERGY AND CAPACITORS Lab III -1 All biological systems rely on the ability to store and transfer energy. In this laboratory you will investigate the storage and transfer of energy in capacitors successfully completing this laboratory, you should be able to: · Apply the concept of conservation of energy

  17. Search for Frame-Dragging-Like Signals Close to Spinning Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tajmar; F. Plesescu; B. Seifert; R. Schnitzer; I. Vasiljevich

    2008-04-22

    High-resolution accelerometer and laser gyroscope measurements were performed in the vicinity of spinning rings at cryogenic temperatures. After passing a critical temperature, which does not coincide with the material's superconducting temperature, the angular acceleration and angular velocity applied to the rotating ring could be seen on the sensors although they are mechanically de-coupled. A parity violation was observed for the laser gyroscope measurements such that the effect was greatly pronounced in the clockwise-direction only. The experiments seem to compare well with recent independent tests obtained by the Canterbury Ring Laser Group and the Gravity-Probe B satellite. All systematic effects analyzed so far are at least 3 orders of magnitude below the observed phenomenon. The available experimental data indicates that the fields scale similar to classical frame-dragging fields. A number of theories that predicted large frame-dragging fields around spinning superconductors can be ruled out by up to 4 orders of magnitude.

  18. July 2004 Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag: Presentation, Summary of Comments, and Conclusions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCallen, R; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Eastwood, C; DeChant, L; Hassan, B; Browand, F; Arcas, D; Ross, J; Heineck, J; Storms, B; Walker, S; Leonard, A; Roy, C; Whitfield, D; Pointer, D; Sofu, T; Englar, R; Funk, R

    2004-08-17

    A Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag was held in Portland, Oregon on July 1, 2004. The purpose of the meeting was to provide a summary of achievements, discuss pressing issues, present a general overview of future plans, and to provide a forum for dialogue with the Department of Energy (DOE) and industry representatives. The meeting was held in Portland, because the DOE Aero Team participated in an exclusive session on Heavy Truck Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag at the 34th AIAA Fluid Dynamics Conference and Exhibit in Portland on the morning of July 1st, just preceding our Working Group meeting. Even though the paper session was on the last day of the Conference, the Team presented to a full room of interested attendees.

  19. THE GRAVITATIONAL DRAG FORCE ON AN EXTENDED OBJECT MOVING IN A GAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernal, Cristian G.; Sánchez-Salcedo, F. J. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, P.O. Box 70-264, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico City (Mexico)

    2013-09-20

    Using axisymmetrical numerical simulations, we revisit the gravitational drag felt by a gravitational Plummer sphere with mass M and core radius R{sub s} moving at constant velocity V{sub 0} through a background homogeneous medium of adiabatic gas. Since the potential is non-diverging, there is no gas removal due to accretion. When R{sub s} is larger than the Bondi radius R{sub B} , the perturbation is linear at every point and the drag force is well fitted by the time-dependent Ostriker's formula with r{sub min} = 2.25R{sub s} , where r{sub min} is the minimum impact parameter in the Coulomb logarithm. In the deep nonlinear supersonic regime (R{sub s} << R{sub B} ), the minimum radius is no longer related to R{sub s} but to R{sub B} . We find r{sub min}=3.3M{sup -2.5}R{sub B} for Mach numbers of the perturber between 1.5 and 4, although r{sub min}= 2M{sup -2}R{sub B}=2GM/V{sup 2}{sub 0} also provides a good fit at M>2. As a consequence, the drag force does not depend sensitively on the nonlinearity parameter A, defined as R{sub B} /R{sub s} , for A values larger than a certain critical value A{sub cr}. We show that our generalized Ostriker's formula for the drag force is more accurate than the formula suggested by Kim and Kim.

  20. PUBLISHED VERSION Phonon drag force acting on a mobile crystal defect: Full treatment of discreteness and nonlinearity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author scattering calculations predict the drag force acting on defects and dislocations rises linearly

  1. Optical Clock and Drag-Free Requirements for a Shapiro Time-Delay Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neil Ashby; Peter L. Bender

    2011-06-10

    In the next decade or two, extremely accurate tests of general relativity under extreme conditions are expected from gravitational wave observations of binary black hole mergers with a wide range of mass ratios. In addition, major improvements are planned in both strong and weak equivalence principle tests; clock measurements based on the ACES program on the ISS; more accurate light-bending measurements; and other new types of tests. However, whether these tests are all consistent with general relativity or not, it still appears desirable to proceed with a much improved measurement of the Shapiro time delay. A suggested approach is based on using a high-quality optical clock in a drag-free spacecraft near the sun-earth L1 point and a smaller drag-free transponder spacecraft in a two-year period solar orbit. Laser phase travel-time measurements would be made between the two spacecraft over a period of 10 or 20 days around the time when the line of sight passes through the Sun. The requirements on the optical clock stability and on the drag-free systems will be discussed. The accuracy achievable for the time-delay appears to be better than 1 part in 100 million.

  2. Sandia Energy - III-Nitride Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    III-Nitride Nanowires Home Energy Research EFRCs Solid-State Lighting Science EFRC III-Nitride Nanowires III-Nitride NanowiresTara Camacho-Lopez2015-03-25T21:58:18+00:00...

  3. The Insignificance of P-R Drag in Detectable Extrasolar Planetesimal Belts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. C. Wyatt

    2005-01-04

    This paper considers a simple model in which dust produced in a planetesimal belt migrates in toward the star due to P-R drag suffering destructive collisions with other dust grains on the way. Assuming the dust is all of the same size, the resulting surface density distribution can be derived analytically and depends only on the parameter eta0=5000tau*sqrt(Mstar/r)/beta; this parameter can be determined observationally with the hypothesis that beta=0.5. For massive belts in which eta0>>1 dust is confined to the planetesimal belt, while the surface density of more tenuous belts, in which eta0belts at different distances from different mass stars shows that the dust belts which have been detected to date should have eta0>>1; dust belts with eta010. This means that these disks are so massive that mutual collisions prevent dust from reaching the inner regions of these systems and P-R drag can be ignored when studying their dynamics. Models for the formation of structure in debris disks by the trapping of particles into planetary resonances by P-R drag should be reconsidered. However, since collisions do not halt 100% of the dust, this means that in the absence of planetary companions debris disk systems should be populated by small quantities of hot dust which may be detectable in the mid-IR. Even in disks with eta0<<1 the temperature of dust emission is shown to be a reliable tracer of the planetesimal distribution meaning that inner holes in the dust distribution imply a lack of colliding planetesimals in the inner regions.

  4. Drag force in strongly coupled, anisotropic plasma at finite chemical potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Somdeb Chakraborty; Najmul Haque

    2014-10-26

    We employ methods of gauge/string duality to analyze the drag force on a heavy quark moving through a strongly coupled, anisotropic \\mathcal{N}=4, SU(N) super Yang- Mills plasma in the presence of a finite U(1) chemical potential. We present numerical results valid for any value of the anisotropy parameter and the U(1) charge density and arbitrary direction of the quark velocity with respect to the direction of anisotropy. In the small anisotropy limit we are also able to furnish analytical results.

  5. Aerodynamic Drag of Heavy Vehicles (Class 7-8): Simulation and Benchmarking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose McCallen, Dan Flowers, Tim Dunn; Jerry Owens; Fred Browand; Mustapha Hammache; Anthony Leonard; Mark Brady; Kambiz Salari; Walter Rutledge; James Ross; Bruce Storms; J. T. Heineck, David Driver; James Bell; Steve Walker; Gregory Zilliac

    2000-06-19

    This paper describes research and development for reducing the aerodynamic drag of heavy vehicles by demonstrating new approaches for the numerical simulation and analysis of aerodynamic flow. Experimental validation of new computational fluid dynamics methods are also an important part of this approach. Experiments on a model of an integrated tractor-trailer are underway at NASA Ames Research Center and the University of Southern California (USC). Companion computer simulations are being performed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and California Institute of Technology (Caltech) using state-of-the-art techniques.

  6. Systematic approach to analyzing and reducing aerodynamic drag of heavy vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCallen, R.; Browand, F.; Leonard, A.; Rutledge, W.

    1997-09-16

    This paper presents an approach for reducing aerodynamic drag of heavy vehicles by systematically analyzing trailer components using existing computational tools and moving on to the analyses of integrated tractor-trailers using advanced computational tools. Experimental verification and validation are also an important part of this approach. The project is currently in the development phase while we are in the process of constructing a Multi-Year Program Plan. Projects I and 2 as described in this paper are the anticipated project direction. Also included are results from past and current related activities by the project participants which demonstrate the analysis approach.

  7. Reply to Lliboutry's letter 'Why calculated basal drags of ice streams can be fallacious'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Veen, Cornelis J.; Whillans, Ian

    1995-01-01

    with this extrusion flow are very small, too small to affect our analysis in an important way. Extrusion flow may be an attractive idea but it cannot account for the unusual result of calculated reverse basal drag. In Whillans and Van der Veen (1993), we combined... suggests that deep ice can squeeze ahead, between the main body of ice above and the bed below, to the extent that the gross dynamics of the glacier is affected. Extrusion flow on a very large scale was discredited by Nye (1952) but the possibility...

  8. ASSESSING GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTIONS IN THE TRANSITION ECONOMIES USING A HYBRID ENERGY-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ASSESSING GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTIONS IN THE TRANSITION ECONOMIES USING A HYBRID ENERGY- ECONOMY: Assessing Greenhouse Gas Reductions in the Transition Economies Using a Hybrid Energy- Economy Model Project/Approved: _______________________________________ #12;iii ABSTRACT In this research, the CIMS hybrid energy-economy modelling framework is used

  9. Fermentation and Hydrogen Metabolism Affect Uranium Reduction by Clostridia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gao, Weimin; Francis, Arokiasamy J.

    2013-01-01

    Previously, it has been shown that not only is uranium reduction under fermentation condition common among clostridia species, but also the strains differed in the extent of their capability and the pH of the culture significantly affected uranium(VI) reduction. In this study, using HPLC and GC techniques, metabolic properties of those clostridial strains active in uranium reduction under fermentation conditions have been characterized and their effects on capability variance of uranium reduction discussed. Then, the relationship between hydrogen metabolism and uranium reduction has been further explored and the important role played by hydrogenase in uranium(VI) and iron(III) reduction bymore »clostridia demonstrated. When hydrogen was provided as the headspace gas, uranium(VI) reduction occurred in the presence of whole cells of clostridia. This is in contrast to that of nitrogen as the headspace gas. Without clostridia cells, hydrogen alone could not result in uranium(VI) reduction. In alignment with this observation, it was also found that either copper(II) addition or iron depletion in the medium could compromise uranium reduction by clostridia. In the end, a comprehensive model was proposed to explain uranium reduction by clostridia and its relationship to the overall metabolism especially hydrogen (H 2 ) production. « less

  10. First Stars III Conference Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian W. O'Shea; Christopher F. McKee; Alexander Heger; Tom Abel

    2008-01-14

    The understanding of the formation, life, and death of Population III stars, as well as the impact that these objects had on later generations of structure formation, is one of the foremost issues in modern cosmological research and has been an active area of research during the past several years. We summarize the results presented at "First Stars III," a conference sponsored by Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics. This conference, the third in a series, took place in July 2007 at the La Fonda Hotel in Santa Fe, New Mexico, U.S.A.

  11. ALGEBRA 1 PB-Z III. 23 III 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piazza, Paolo

    di X. I. Si mostri che entrambi (A, ) e (A, ) sono dei monoidi commutativi. Sia CX : A A l'applicazione che a B A associa il suo complementare in X: A B CX(B) = X \\ B A II. Tenendo presenti le leggi di de Morgan, si mostri che CX : (A, ) (A, ) e CX : (A, ) (A, ) sono isomorfismi di monoidi (1 ). III

  12. Dragging of inertial frames in the composed black-hole-ring system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hod, Shahar

    2015-01-01

    A well-established phenomenon in general relativity is the dragging of inertial frames by a spinning object. In particular, due to the dragging of inertial frames by a ring orbiting a central black hole, the angular-velocity of the black-hole horizon in the composed black-hole-ring system is no longer related to the black-hole angular-momentum by the simple Kerr-like (vacuum) relation $\\Omega^{\\text{Kerr}}_{\\text{H}}(J_{\\text{H}})=J_{\\text{H}}/2M^2R_{\\text{H}}$. Will has performed a perturbative treatment of the composed black-hole-ring system in the regime of slowly rotating black holes and found the explicit relation $\\Omega^{\\text{BH-ring}}_{\\text{H}}(J_{\\text{H}}=0,J_{\\text{R}},R)=2J_{\\text{R}}/R^3$ for the angular-velocity of a central black hole with zero angular-momentum. Analyzing a sequence of black-hole-ring configurations with adiabatically varying (decreasing) circumferential radii, we show that the expression found by Will implies a smooth transition of the central black-hole angular-velocity fro...

  13. TRUPACT-III Content Codes (TRUCON-III), Revision 2, July 2012

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    WIPP 11-3458 Rev. 2 TRUPACT-III CONTENT CODES (TRUCON-III) Revision 2 July 2012 This document supersedes DOEWIPP 10-3458, Revision 1 DOEWIPP 11-3458 Rev. 2 TRUPACT-III CONTENT...

  14. Title III hazardous air pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, R.

    1995-12-31

    The author presents an overview of the key provisions of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The key provisions include the following: 112(b) -- 189 Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP); 112(a) -- Major Source: 10 TPY/25 TPY; 112(d) -- Application of MACT; 112(g) -- Modifications; 112(I) -- State Program; 112(j) -- The Hammer; and 112(r) -- Accidental Release Provisions.

  15. Multimedia Authoring III: Web Authoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahlquist, Kam D.

    Multimedia Authoring III: Web Authoring · Many multimedia applications today have a Web manifestation, whether it is the application itself or something about the application, like a DVD info Web site · The Web can "wrap" other types of content as well: Flash, audio, video · The Web provides technologies

  16. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. 140: 792804, April 2014 Sensitivity of tropical-cyclone models to the surface drag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Roger K.

    , University of Munich, Germany b Department of Meteorology, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA cHurricane in this direction. Key Words: hurricanes; tropical cyclones; typhoons; surface drag coefficient; frictional drag in deep rotating clouds. A fraction of the angular momentum drawn inwards is lost because

  17. Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-02-14

    This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume III contains supporting materials not included in Volumes I and II.

  18. Development of EHD Ion-Drag Micropump for Microscale Electronics Cooling Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. K. Lee; A. J. Robinson; C. Y. Ching

    2008-01-07

    In this investigation, the numerical simulation of electrohydrodynamic (EHD) ion-drag micropumps with micropillar electrode geometries have been performed. The effect of micropillar height and electrode spacing on the performance of the micropumps was investigated. The performance of the EHD micropump improved with increased applied voltage and decreased electrode spacing. The optimum micropillar height for the micropump with electrode spacing of 40$\\mu$m and channel height of 100$\\mu$m at 200V was 40$\\mu$m, where a maximum mass flow rate of 0.18g/min was predicted. Compared to that of planar electrodes, the 3D micropillar electrode geometry enhanced the overall performance of the EHD micropumps.

  19. Drag coefficient for the air-sea exchange: foam impact in hurricane conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golbraikh, Ephim

    2014-01-01

    A physical model is proposed for the estimation of the foam impact on the variation of the effective drag coefficient, C_d, with reference to the wind speed U10 in stormy and hurricane conditions. In the present model C_d is approximated by partitioning the sea surface into foam-covered and foam-free areas. Based on the available optical and radiometric measurements of the fractional foam coverage and the characteristic roughness of the sea-surface in the saturation limit of the foam coverage, the model yields the resulting dependence of C_d vs U10. This dependence is in fair agreement with that evaluated from field measurements of the vertical variation of the mean wind speed.

  20. Progress in Reducing Aerodynamic Drag for Higher Efficiency of Heavy Duty Trucks (Class 7-8)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose McCallen; Richard Couch; Juliana Hsu; Fred Browand; Mustapha Hammache; Anthony Leonard; Mark Brady; Kambiz Salari; Walter Rutledge; James Ross; Bruce Storms; J.T. Heineck; David Driver; James Bell; Gregory Zilliac

    1999-12-31

    This paper describes research and development for reducing the aerodynamic drag of heavy vehicles by demonstrating new approaches for the numerical simulation and analysis of aerodynamic flow. In addition, greater use of newly developed computational tools holds promise for reducing the number of prototype tests, for cutting manufacturing costs, and for reducing overall time to market. Experimental verification and validation of new computational fluid dynamics methods are also an important part of this approach. Experiments on a model of an integrated tractor-trailer are underway at NASA Ames Research Center and the University of Southern California. Companion computer simulations are being performed by Sandia National Laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and California Institute of Technology using state-of-the-art techniques, with the intention of implementing more complex methods in the future.

  1. Published in the Proceedings of ASES-2001, the American Solar Energy Society A DRAG-AND-DROP ENERGY DESIGN TOOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    this data, Solar-5's built-in expert system designs two different reference homes called "Scheme 1 MeetsPublished in the Proceedings of ASES-2001, the American Solar Energy Society A DRAG-AND-DROP ENERGY the program to more precisely predict the building's performance and the energy cost savings of the ratepayer

  2. Turbulent flow and drag over fixed two-and three-dimensional dunes Jeremy G. Venditti1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venditti, Jeremy G.

    Turbulent flow and drag over fixed two- and three-dimensional dunes Jeremy G. Venditti1,2 Received measurements of turbulent flow were obtained over a fixed flat bed, two- dimensional (2-D) dunes and four types of three-dimensional (3-D) dune morphologies including (1) full width saddles, (2) full width lobes, (3

  3. Inclusion of a Drag Approach in the Town Energy Balance (TEB) Scheme: Offline 1D Evaluation in a Street Canyon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -scale urban surface energy balance for use in mesoscale meteorological models. Previous offline evaluations show that this urban module is able to simulate in good behavior road, wall, and roof temperatures urban canopy by introducing a drag force approach to account for the vertical effects of buildings

  4. Photoreversible Micellar Solution as a Smart Drag-Reducing Fluid for Use in District Heating/Cooling Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghavan, Srinivasa

    Photoreversible Micellar Solution as a Smart Drag-Reducing Fluid for Use in District Heating solution is developed as a promising working fluid for district heating/cooling systems (DHCs). It can systems. A promising application of DR fluids is in district heating/ cooling systems (DHCs)9

  5. Automated Purge Valve Joseph Edward Farrell, III.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    Automated Purge Valve by Joseph Edward Farrell, III. Bachelor of Science Marine Engineering the undersigned committee hereby approve the attached thesis Automated Purge Valve by Joseph Edward Farrell, III.D. Department Head Department of Marine and Environmental Systems #12;iii Abstract Title: Automated Purge Valve

  6. Alberta Alzheimer Research Program III Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michelson, David G.

    Alberta Alzheimer Research Program III Description The Alzheimer Society of Alberta and Northwest Territories (ASANT) and the Alberta Prion Research Institute (Prion Institute) present the Alberta Alzheimer Research Program (AARP) III. The AARP III allows qualified Alberta-based investigators to seek funding

  7. NIF Title III engineering plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deis, G

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to define the work that must be accomplished by the NIF Project during Title III Engineering. This definition is intended to be sufficiently detailed to provide a framework for yearly planning, to clearly identify the specific deliverables so that the Project teams can focus on them, and to provide a common set of objectives and processes across the Project. This plan has been preceded by similar documents for Title I and Title II design and complements the Site Management Plan, the Project Control Manual, the Quality Assurance Program Plan, the RM Parsons NIF Title III Configuration Control Plan, the Integrated Project Schedule, the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report, the Configuration Management Plan, and the Transition Plan.

  8. CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSION REDUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    ........................................................................................ 21 2.3.5 Pulp and paper industry Technologies and Measures in Pulp and Paper IndustryCARBON DIOXIDE EMISSION REDUCTION TECHNOLOGIES AND MEASURES IN US INDUSTRIAL SECTOR FINAL REPORT

  9. Paperwork Reduction Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Paperwork Reduction Act requires that all federal websites request permission from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) before collecting information from 10 or more members of the public....

  10. Turbulence structure of drag-reducing surfactant solution in two-dimensional channel with additional heat transfer enhancement method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, P.W.; Daisaka, H.; Kawaguchi, Y.; Yabe, A.; Hishida, K.; Maeda, M.

    1999-07-01

    The turbulent characteristics of a surfactant water solution in changing from drag-reducing flow to turbulent flow inside a two-dimensional smooth channel and in changing from turbulent flow to drag-reducing flow in the same channel with a mesh plug were investigated through LDV measurement in this study. The mesh plug was used to exert high shear stress to destroy micelle structures in the surfactant solution so that turbulence could be produced for better heat transfer. The two-component LDV system was installed on a movable platform, which could be moved streamwise of the flow to measure the two-dimensional velocity at different stations downstream from the mesh plug. The surfactant tested was Cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (C{sub 16}H{sub 33}N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}Cl, abbreviated as CTAC). Local tap water was used as solvent and same weight concentration of sodium salicylate was used as the counter-ion material. The investigation of turbulent parameters for the drag-reducing flow with increasing Reynolds number showed that when the Reynolds number exceeded the drag-reducing region, the turbulent character was the same as that of water. The turbulent parameters of surfactant flow downstream the mesh plug showed that the high heat transfer region had the same turbulent intensity as that of water flow. As the critical Reynolds number was approached, it became easier to obtain such a turbulent region by mesh plug. In such cases, the mesh helped to create high wall shear stress and therefore to destroy the super-ordered structures of rod-like micelles for introducing turbulence. However, it was found that the turbulent intensities of the velocity gradually decreased to the same as those of drag-reducing flow downstream from the mesh because the mesh plug only produced a local high shear stress.

  11. Klondike III III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:onItronKanoshKetchikanKlondike III I Wind Farm Jump to:IIIII

  12. Overview of the effect of Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments on the natural gas industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Child, C.J.

    1995-12-31

    The regulation of hazardous air pollutants by Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 has a potential wide-ranging impact for the natural gas industry. Title III includes a list of 189 hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) which are targeted for reduction. Under Title III, HAP emissions from major sources will be reduced by the implementation of maximum achievable control technology (MACT) standards. If the source is defined as a major source, it must also comply with Title V (operating permit) and Title VII (enhanced monitoring) requirements. This presentation will review Title III`s effect on the natural gas industry by discussing the regulatory requirements and schedules associated with MACT as well as the control technology options available for affected sources.

  13. Revista de Cincias da Computao, Volume III, Ano III, 2008, n3 Descoberta de Padres Sequenciais utilizando rvores Orientadas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavique, Luís

    Revista de Ciências da Computação, Volume III, Ano III, 2008, nº3 Descoberta de Padrões Sequenciais, estatística e funcionalidade de bases de dados. #12;Revista de Ciências da Computação, Volume III, Ano III

  14. Alta III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYork Jump to: navigation, searchAlpena,II (Vestas) JumpIII

  15. The Earth's Frame Dragging via Laser Ranged Satellites: a Response to 'Some considerations on the present-day results for the detection of frame-dragging after the final outcome of GP-B' by L. Iorio [arXiv:1105.4145

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Ries; I. Ciufolini; E. C. Pavlis; A. Paolozzi; R. Koenig; R. A. Matzner; G. Sindoniand H. Neumayer

    2013-05-13

    In this note, we reply to the preceding paper by Iorio: "Some considerations on the present-day results for the detection of frame-dragging after the final outcome of GP-B, Europhysics Letters", we address criticisms regarding the Lense-Thirring frame-dragging experiment results obtained from the laser ranging to the two LAGEOS satellites.

  16. Dragging of inertial frames in the composed black-hole-ring system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahar Hod

    2015-11-10

    A well-established phenomenon in general relativity is the dragging of inertial frames by a spinning object. In particular, due to the dragging of inertial frames by a ring orbiting a central black hole, the angular-velocity of the black-hole horizon in the composed black-hole-ring system is no longer related to the black-hole angular-momentum by the simple Kerr-like (vacuum) relation $\\Omega^{\\text{Kerr}}_{\\text{H}}(J_{\\text{H}})=J_{\\text{H}}/2M^2R_{\\text{H}}$. Will has performed a perturbative treatment of the composed black-hole-ring system in the regime of slowly rotating black holes and found the explicit relation $\\Omega^{\\text{BH-ring}}_{\\text{H}}(J_{\\text{H}}=0,J_{\\text{R}},R)=2J_{\\text{R}}/R^3$ for the angular-velocity of a central black hole with zero angular-momentum. Analyzing a sequence of black-hole-ring configurations with adiabatically varying (decreasing) circumferential radii, we show that the expression found by Will implies a smooth transition of the central black-hole angular-velocity from its asymptotic near-horizon value $\\Omega^{\\text{BH-ring}}_{\\text{H}}(J_{\\text{H}}=0,J_{\\text{R}},R\\to R^{+}_{\\text{H}})$ to its final Kerr (vacuum) value $\\Omega^{\\text{Kerr}}_{\\text{H}}(J^{\\text{new}}_{\\text{H}})$. We use this important observation in order to generalize the result of Will to the regime of black-hole-ring configurations in which the central black holes possess non-zero angular momenta. Remarkably, we find the simple universal relation $\\Delta\\Omega_{\\text{H}}\\equiv\\Omega^{\\text{BH-ring}}_{\\text{H}}(J_{\\text{H}},J_{\\text{R}},R\\to R^{+}_{\\text{H}})-\\Omega^{\\text{Kerr}}_{\\text{H}}(J_{\\text{H}})={{J_{\\text{R}}}/{4M^3}}$ for the asymptotic deviation of the black-hole angular-velocity in the composed black-hole-ring system from the corresponding angular-velocity of the unperturbed (vacuum) Kerr black hole with the same angular-momentum.

  17. REDUCTIONS WITHOUT REGRET: SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swegle, J.; Tincher, D.

    2013-09-16

    This paper briefly summarizes the series in which we consider the possibilities for losing, or compromising, key capabilities of the U.S. nuclear force in the face of modernization and reductions. The first of the three papers takes an historical perspective, considering capabilities that were eliminated in past force reductions. The second paper is our attempt to define the needed capabilities looking forward in the context of the current framework for force modernization and the current picture of the evolving challenges of deterrence and assurance. The third paper then provides an example for each of our undesirable outcomes: the creation of roach motels, box canyons, and wrong turns.

  18. Water Use Reduction | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facilities Water Use Reduction Water Use Reduction Water Use Reduction Water Use Reduction The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides agencies with guidance and...

  19. DOE/NNSA perspective safeguard by design: GEN III/III+ light water reactors and beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Paul Y

    2010-12-10

    An overview of key issues relevant to safeguards by design (SBD) for GEN III/IV nuclear reactors is provided. Lessons learned from construction of typical GEN III+ water reactors with respect to SBD are highlighted. Details of SBD for safeguards guidance development for GEN III/III+ light water reactors are developed and reported. This paper also identifies technical challenges to extend SBD including proliferation resistance methodologies to other GEN III/III+ reactors (except HWRs) and GEN IV reactors because of their immaturity in designs.

  20. Picturing wavepacket reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arthur Jabs

    2015-03-18

    A coherent picture of the wavepacket-reduction process is proposed which is formulated in the framework of a deterministic and realist interpretation where the concepts of knowledge or information and of point particles do not appear. It is shown how the picture accounts for the experiments on interaction-free and delayed-choice measurements and those on interference with partial absorption.

  1. Energy-Enstrophy Stability of beta-plane Kolmogorov Flow with Drag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yue-Kin Tsang; William R. Young

    2008-03-04

    We develop a new nonlinear stability method, the Energy-Enstrophy (EZ) method, that is specialized to two-dimensional hydrodynamics; the method is applied to a beta-plane flow driven by a sinusoidal body force, and retarded by drag with damping time-scale mu^{-1}. The standard energy method (Fukuta and Murakami, J. Phys. Soc. Japan, 64, 1995, pp 3725) shows that the laminar solution is monotonically and globally stable in a certain portion of the (mu,beta)-parameter space. The EZ method proves nonlinear stability in a larger portion of the (mu,beta)-parameter space. And by penalizing high wavenumbers, the EZ method identifies a most strongly amplifying disturbance that is more physically realistic than that delivered by the energy method. Linear instability calculations are used to determine the region of the (mu,beta)-parameter space where the flow is unstable to infinitesimal perturbations. There is only a small gap between the linearly unstable region and the nonlinearly stable region, and full numerical solutions show only small transient amplification in that gap.

  2. Granular mixtures modeled as elastic hard spheres subject to a drag force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francisco Vega Reyes; Vicente Garzo; Andres Santos

    2007-04-24

    Granular gaseous mixtures under rapid flow conditions are usually modeled by a multicomponent system of smooth inelastic hard spheres with constant coefficients of normal restitution. In the low density regime an adequate framework is provided by the set of coupled inelastic Boltzmann equations. Due to the intricacy of the inelastic Boltzmann collision operator, in this paper we propose a simpler model of elastic hard spheres subject to the action of an effective drag force, which mimics the effect of dissipation present in the original granular gas. The Navier--Stokes transport coefficients for a binary mixture are obtained from the model by application of the Chapman--Enskog method. The three coefficients associated with the mass flux are the same as those obtained from the inelastic Boltzmann equation, while the remaining four transport coefficients show a general good agreement, especially in the case of the thermal conductivity. Finally, the approximate decomposition of the inelastic Boltzmann collision operator is exploited to construct a model kinetic equation for granular mixtures as a direct extension of a known kinetic model for elastic collisions.

  3. GENERATION OF ELECTRIC CURRENTS IN THE CHROMOSPHERE VIA NEUTRAL-ION DRAG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasnoselskikh, V. [LPC2E, CNRS-University of Orleans, 3A Avenue de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Vekstein, G. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Alan Turing Building, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Hudson, H. S.; Bale, S. D.; Abbett, W. P. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-12-01

    We consider the generation of electric currents in the solar chromosphere where the ionization level is typically low. We show that ambient electrons become magnetized even for weak magnetic fields (30 G); that is, their gyrofrequency becomes larger than the collision frequency while ion motions continue to be dominated by ion-neutral collisions. Under such conditions, ions are dragged by neutrals, and the magnetic field acts as if it is frozen-in to the dynamics of the neutral gas. However, magnetized electrons drift under the action of the electric and magnetic fields induced in the reference frame of ions moving with the neutral gas. We find that this relative motion of electrons and ions results in the generation of quite intense electric currents. The dissipation of these currents leads to resistive electron heating and efficient gas ionization. Ionization by electron-neutral impact does not alter the dynamics of the heavy particles; thus, the gas turbulent motions continue even when the plasma becomes fully ionized, and resistive dissipation continues to heat electrons and ions. This heating process is so efficient that it can result in typical temperature increases with altitude as large as 0.1-0.3 eV km{sup -1}. We conclude that this process can play a major role in the heating of the chromosphere and corona.

  4. The effect of Poynting-Robertson drag on the triangular Lagrangian points

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christoph Lhotka; Alessandra Celletti

    2014-12-04

    We investigate the stability of motion close to the Lagrangian equilibrium points L4 and L5 in the framework of the spatial, elliptic, restricted three- body problem, subject to the radial component of Poynting-Robertson drag. For this reason we develop a simplified resonant model, that is based on averaging theory, i.e. averaged over the mean anomaly of the perturbing planet. We find temporary stability of particles displaying a tadpole motion in the 1:1 resonance. From the linear stability study of the averaged simplified resonant model, we find that the time of temporary stability is proportional to beta a1 n1 , where beta is the ratio of the solar radiation over the gravitational force, and a1, n1 are the semi-major axis and the mean motion of the perturbing planet, respectively. We extend previous results (Murray (1994)) on the asymmetry of the stability indices of L4 and L5 to a more realistic force model. Our analytical results are supported by means of numerical simulations. We implement our study to Jupiter-like perturbing planets, that are also found in extra-solar planetary systems.

  5. Working group meeting on heavy vehicle aerodynamic drag: presentations and summary of comments and conclusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Browand, F; Gutierrez, W; Leonard, A; McBride, D; McCallen, R; Ross, J; Roth, K; Rutledge, W; Salari, K

    1998-09-28

    The first Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag was held at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, New Mexico on August 28, 1998. The purpose of the meeting was to review the proposed Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) and provide an update on the Group"s progress. In addition, the technical details of each organization"s activities were presented and discussed. Presentations were given by representatives from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Transportation Technology Office of Heavy Vehicle Technology (OHVT), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), SNL, University of Southern California (USC), California Institute of Technology (Caltech), and NASA Ames Research Center. These presenters are part of a DOE appointed Technical Team assigned to developing the MYPP. The goal of the MYPP is to develop and demonstrate the ability to simulate and analyze aerodynamic flow around heavy truck vehicles using existing and advanced computational tools (A Multi-Year Program Plan for the Aerodynamic Design of Heavy Vehicles, R. McCallen, D. McBride, W. Rutledge, F. Browand, A. Leonard, .I. Ross, UCRL-PROP- 127753 Dr. Rev 2, May 1998). This report contains the technical presentations (viewgraphs) delivered at the Meeting, briefly summarizes the comments and conclusions from the Meeting participants, and outlines the future actions.

  6. Working group meeting on heavy vehicle aerodynamic drag: presentations and summary of comments and

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Browand, F; Gutierrez, W; Leonard, A; McBride, D; McCallen, R; Ross, J; Roth, K; Rutledge, W; Salari, K.

    1998-09-28

    The first Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag was held at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, New Mexico on August 28, 1998. The purpose of the meeting was to review the proposed Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) and provide an update on the Group s progress. In addition, the technical details of each organization s activities were presented and discussed. Presentations were given by representatives from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Transportation Technology Office of Heavy Vehicle Technology (OHVT), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), SNL, University of Southern California (USC), California Institute of Technology (Caltech), and NASA Ames Research Center. These presenters are part of a DOE appointed Technical Team assigned to developing the MYPP. The goal of the MYPP is to develop and demonstrate the ability to simulate and analyze aerodynamic flow around heavy truck vehicles using existing and advanced computational tools (A Multi-Year Program Plan for the Aerodynamic Design of Heavy Vehicles, R. McCallen, D. McBride, W. Rutledge, F. Browand, A. Leonard, .I. Ross, UCRL-PROP- 127753 Dr. Rev 2, May 1998). This report contains the technical presentations (viewgraphs) delivered at the Meeting, briefly summarizes the comments and conclusions from the Meeting participants, and outlines the future actions.

  7. 12-MONTH SAMPLE MULTI-YEAR OFFER LETTER TEACHING FACULTY III, RESEARCH FACULTY III,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    12-MONTH SAMPLE MULTI-YEAR OFFER LETTER TEACHING FACULTY III, RESEARCH FACULTY III, INSTRUCTIONAL SPECIALIST III OR SENIOR RESEARCH ASSOCIATE APPOINTMENT Dear Dr. xxx: I am pleased to offer you an ["in://facultyhandbook.fsu.edu). This offer is also contingent upon your providing the necessary documents to prove your identity

  8. 9-MONTH SAMPLE MULTI-YEAR OFFER LETTER TEACHING FACULTY III, RESEARCH FACULTY III,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    9-MONTH SAMPLE MULTI-YEAR OFFER LETTER TEACHING FACULTY III, RESEARCH FACULTY III, INSTRUCTIONAL SPECIALIST III OR SENIOR RESEARCH ASSOCIATE APPOINTMENT Dear Dr. xxx: I am pleased to offer you an ["in://facultyhandbook.fsu.edu/). This offer is also contingent upon your providing the necessary documents to prove your identity

  9. Progress Update: Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Emission Reduction Specialists

  10. Aluminum reduction cell electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodnow, W.H.; Payne, J.R.

    1982-09-14

    The invention is directed to cathode modules comprised of refractory hard metal materials, such as TiB[sub 2], for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the modules may be installed and replaced during operation of the cell and wherein the structure of the cathode modules is such that the refractory hard metal materials are not subjected to externally applied forces or rigid constraints. 9 figs.

  11. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A.P.; Olshavsky, M.A.

    1996-04-09

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed. They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline. 4 figs.

  12. LABORATORY III ELECTRIC ENERGY AND CAPACITORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY III ELECTRIC ENERGY AND CAPACITORS Lab III - 1 Our modern society functions in part because we have learned how to manipulate electrical energy. Almost all of our technology involves electrical energy in one form or another. In this laboratory you will investigate the conservation of energy

  13. Unit III-2 Orthogonal diagonalization 1 Orthogonal diagonalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkett, Stephen

    Unit III-2 Orthogonal diagonalization 1 Unit III-2 Orthogonal diagonalization Unit III-2 Orthogonal? Unit III-2 Orthogonal diagonalization 3 Real symmetric matrices · if A is a real symmetric matrix then to orthogonally diagonalize any real symmetric matrix Unit III-2 Orthogonal diagonalization 4 Diagonalization

  14. Forest Fuels ReductionForest Fuels Reduction Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    are the soil management and watershed implications from alternative fuels reduction approaches? 3. How do are the productivity and cost rates for alternative choices of equipment for mechanical fuels reduction; what of mechanical fuel reduction alternatives? What are the economic differences related to stand type

  15. A Numerical Study of the Effects of Superhydrophobic Surfaces on Skin-Friction Drag Reduction in Wall-Bounded Shear Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Hyunwook

    2015-01-01

    American Physics Society / Division of Fluid Dynamics (APS/American Physics Society / Division of Fluid Dynamics (APS/American Physics Society / Division of Fluid Dynamics (APS/

  16. A Numerical Study of the Effects of Superhydrophobic Surfaces on Skin-Friction Drag Reduction in Wall-Bounded Shear Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Hyunwook

    2015-01-01

    between no-slip surfaces and air-water interfaces due tolower the free energy of an air-water interface such that athe deflection of the air-water interface [1, 2, 51]. It is

  17. A Numerical Study of the Effects of Superhydrophobic Surfaces on Skin-Friction Drag Reduction in Wall-Bounded Shear Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Hyunwook

    2015-01-01

    in water, thereby achieving significant energy savings andscales, lower the free energy of an air-water interface such

  18. Complexation of N4-Tetradentate Ligands with Nd(III) and Am(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogden, Mark D.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Meier, G. Patrick; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Nash, Kenneth L.

    2012-12-06

    To improve understanding of aza-complexants in trivalent actinide–lanthanide separations, a series of tetradentate N-donor ligands have been synthesized and their complexation of americium(III) and neodymium(III) investigated by UV–visible spectrophotometry in methanolic solutions. The six pyridine/alkyl amine/imine ligands are N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,2-diaminoethane, N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,3-diaminopropane, trans-N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (BPMDAC), N,N’-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)piperazine, N,N’-bis-[pyridin-2-ylmethylene]ethane-1,2-diamine, and trans-N,Nbis-([pyridin-2-ylmethylene]-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine. Each ligand has two pyridine groups and two aliphatic amine/imine N-donor atoms arranged with different degrees of preorganization and structural backbone rigidity. Conditional stability constants for the complexes of Am(III) and Nd(III) by these ligands establish the selectivity patterns. The overall selectivity of Am(III) over Nd(III) is similar to that reported for the terdentate bis(dialkyltriazinyl)pyridine molecules. The cyclohexane amine derivative (BPMDAC) is the strongest complexant and shows the highest selectivity for Am(III) over Nd(III) while the imines appear to prefer a bridging arrangement between two cations. These results suggest that this series of ligands could be employed to develop an enhanced actinide(III)– lanthanide(III) separation system.

  19. Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU III VOC | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    III VOC Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU III VOC January 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName,...

  20. Theoretical Prediction of Am(III)/Eu(III) Selectivity to Aid the Design of Actinide-Lanthanide Separation Agents

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.; Hay, Benjamin P.

    2015-03-20

    Selective extraction of minor actinides from lanthanides is a critical step in the reduction of radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuels. However, the design of suitable ligands for separating chemically similar 4f- and 5f-block trivalent metal ions poses a significant challenge. Furthermore, first-principles calculations should play an important role in the design of new separation agents, but their ability to predict metal ion selectivity has not been systematically evaluated. We examine the ability of several density functional theory methods to predict selectivity of Am(III) and Eu(III) with oxygen, mixed oxygen–nitrogen, and sulfur donor ligands. The results establish a computational method capablemore »of predicting the correct order of selectivities obtained from liquid–liquid extraction and aqueous phase complexation studies. To allow reasonably accurate predictions, it was critical to employ sufficiently flexible basis sets and provide proper account of solvation effects. The approach is utilized to estimate the selectivity of novel amide-functionalized diazine and 1,2,3-triazole ligands.« less

  1. Onset of Wave Drag due to Generation of Capillary-Gravity Waves by a Moving Object as a Critical Phenomenon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teodor Burghelea; Victor Steinberg

    2001-04-21

    The onset of the {\\em wave resistance}, via generation of capillary gravity waves, of a small object moving with velocity $V$, is investigated experimentally. Due to the existence of a minimum phase velocity $V_c$ for surface waves, the problem is similar to the generation of rotons in superfluid helium near their minimum. In both cases waves or rotons are produced at $V>V_c$ due to {\\em Cherenkov radiation}. We find that the transition to the wave drag state is continuous: in the vicinity of the bifurcation the wave resistance force is proportional to $\\sqrt{V-V_c}$ for various fluids.

  2. Volume III, Chapter 4 TABLE OF CONTENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume III, Chapter 4 Eulachon #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 4.0 EULACHON (Thaleichthys pacificus..................................................................................................................... 4-4 4.1.5 Movements in Fresh Water ........................................................... 4-8 4.4.1 Water Development

  3. Volume III, Chapter 3 Pacific Lamprey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume III, Chapter 3 Pacific Lamprey #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 3.0 Pacific Lamprey (Lampetra................................................................................................... 3-9 3.4.3 Water Development ......................................................................... 3-11 3.4.6 Water Quality

  4. Volume III, Chapter 9 Channel Catfish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume III, Chapter 9 Channel Catfish #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 9.0 Channel Catfish (Ictalurus................................................................................................... 9-6 9.4.3 Water Development.............................................................................................. 9-6 9.4.4 Water Quality

  5. WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF SAMUEL D. RAUCH III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF SAMUEL D. RAUCH III DEPUTY ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR REGULATORY PROGRAMS and Management Act (Magnuson-Stevens Act; P.L. 94-265) were not sufficient. A Congressionally- mandated

  6. UNIVERSIDAD CARLOS III ESCUELA POLITCNICA SUPERIOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martín-Solís, José Ramón

    UNIVERSIDAD CARLOS III ESCUELA POLITÉCNICA SUPERIOR DEPARTAMENTO DE FISICA ESTUDIO DE MEDIOS DE, el alcance por parte de los países tercermundistas de los niveles de consumo propios de las

  7. Multijunction III-V Photovoltaics Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE invests in multijunction III-V solar cell research to drive down the costs of the materials, manufacturing, tracking techniques, and concentration methods used with this technology. Below is a...

  8. Aluminum reduction cell electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, J.R.

    1983-09-20

    The invention is directed to an anode-cathode structure for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the structure is comprised of a carbon anode assembly which straddles a wedge-shaped refractory hard metal cathode assembly having steeply sloped cathodic surfaces, each cathodic surface being paired in essentially parallel planar relationship with an anode surface. The anode-cathode structure not only takes into account the structural weakness of refractory hard metal materials but also permits the changing of the RHM assembly during operation of the cell. Further, the anode-cathode structure enhances the removal of anode gas from the interpolar gap between the anode and cathode surfaces. 10 figs.

  9. Dose Reduction Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-05-16

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

  10. SU-E-J-88: Margin Reduction of Level II/III Planning Target Volume...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    normal structure sparing. less Authors: Can, S ; Neylon, J ; Qi, S ; Santhanam, A ; Low, D 1 + Show Author Affiliations UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States) Publication...

  11. Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP): Volume III 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, Jeff; Culp, Charles; Yazdani, Bahman; Gilman, Don; Fitzpatrick, Tom; Muns, Shirley; Verdict, Malcolm; Ahmed, M.; Liu, Zi; Baltazar, Juan Carlos; Montgomery, Cynthia; McKelvey, Katherine; Mukhopadhyay, Jaya; Degelman, Larry

    2008-01-01

    The Energy Systems Laboratory, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under Texas Health and Safety Code Ann. § 388.003 (e), Vernon Supp. 2002, submits its third annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions...

  12. The Preparation of an Ultrastable Mesoporous Cr(III)-MOF via Reductive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopment TopMetathesisSediments and RelatedProject

  13. SU-E-J-88: Margin Reduction of Level II/III Planning Target Volume for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference) | SciTech ConnectDiagnostics (TechnicalELASTOMERS -System for

  14. 23 6 12 8:00 III-V/Ge CMOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsumoto, Shingo

    23 6 12 8:00 - 1 - 1. : III-V/Ge CMOS ~ 200%~ 2. : III-V (Ge) III-V/Ge CMOS (Si) 200% III-V/Ge CMOS 200% III-V/Ge CMOS () () () () III-V III-V/Ge CMOS (1) III-V Ge III-V/Ge CMOS (2) III-V-OI MOSFET (3) III-V/Ge CMOS "2011 Symposia on VLSI

  15. Design of Integrated III-Nitride/Non-III-Nitride Tandem Photovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toledo, N. G.; Friedman, D.J.; Farrell, R. M.; Perl, E. E.; Lin, C. T.; Bowers, J. E.; Speck, J. S.; Mishra, U. K.

    2012-03-01

    The integration of III-nitride and non-III-nitride materials for tandem solar cell applications can improve the efficiency of the photovoltaic device due to the added power contributed by the III-nitride top cell to that of high-efficiency multi-junction non-III-nitride solar cells if the device components are properly designed and optimized. The proposed tandem solar cell is comprised of a III-nitride top cell bonded to a non-III-nitride, series-constrained, multi-junction subcell. The top cell is electrically isolated, but optically coupled to the underlying subcell. The use of a III-nitride top cell is potentially beneficial when the top junction of a stand-alone non-III-nitride subcell generates more photocurrent than the limiting current of the non-III-nitride subcell. Light producing this excess current can either be redirected to the III-nitride top cell through high energy photon absorption, redirected to the lower junctions through layer thickness optimization, or a combination of both, resulting in improved total efficiency. When the non-III-nitride cell's top junction is the limiting junction, the minimum power conversion efficiency that the III-nitride top cell must contribute should compensate for the spectrum filtered from the multi-junction subcell for this design to be useful. As the III-nitride absorption edge wavelength, {lambda}{sub N}, increases, the performance of the multi-junction subcell decreases due to spectral filtering. In the most common spectra of interest (AM1.5G, AM1.5 D, and AM0), the technology to grow InGaN cells with {lambda}{sub N}<520 nm is found to be sufficient for III-nitride top cell applications. The external quantum efficiency performance, however, of state-of-the-art InGaN solar cells still needs to be improved. The effects of surface/interface reflections are also presented. The management of these reflection issues determines the feasibility of the integrated III-nitride/non-III-nitride design to improve overall cell efficiency.

  16. From iron(III) precursor to magnetite and vice versa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gotic, M.; Jurkin, T.; Music, S.

    2009-10-15

    The syntheses of nanosize magnetite particles by wet-chemical oxidation of Fe{sup 2+} have been extensively investigated. In the present investigation the nanosize magnetite particles were synthesised without using the Fe(II) precursor. This was achieved by {gamma}-irradiation of water-in-oil microemulsion containing only the Fe(III) precursor. The corresponding phase transformations were monitored. Microemulsions (pH {approx} 12.5) were {gamma}-irradiated at a relatively high dose rate of {approx}22 kGy/h. Upon 1 h of {gamma}-irradiation the XRD pattern of the precipitate showed goethite and unidentified low-intensity peaks. Upon 6 h of {gamma}-irradiation, reductive conditions were achieved and substoichiometric magnetite ({approx}Fe{sub 2.71}O{sub 4}) particles with insignificant amount of goethite particles found in the precipitate. Hydrated electrons (e{sub aq}{sup -}), organic radicals and hydrogen gas as radiolytic products were responsible for the reductive dissolution of iron oxide in the microemulsion and the reduction Fe{sup 3+} {yields} Fe{sup 2+}. Upon 18 h of {gamma}-irradiation the precipitate exhibited dual behaviour, it was a more oxidised product than the precipitate obtained after 6 h of {gamma}-irradiation, but it contained magnetite particles in a more reduced form ({approx}Fe{sub 2.93}O{sub 4}). It was presumed that the reduction and oxidation processes existed as concurrent competitive processes in the microemulsion. After 18 h of {gamma}-irradiation the pH of the medium shifted from the alkaline to the acidic range. The high dose rate of {approx}22 kGy/h was directly responsible for this shift to the acidic range. At a slightly acidic pH a further reduction of Fe{sup 3+} {yields} Fe{sup 2+} resulted in the formation of more stoichiometric magnetite particles, whereas the oxidation conditions in the acidic medium permitted the oxidation Fe{sup 2+} {yields} Fe{sup 3+}. The Fe{sup 3+} was much less soluble in the acidic medium and it hydrolysed and recrystallised as goethite. The {gamma}-irradiation of the microemulsion for 25 h at a lower dose rate of 16 kGy/h produced pure substoichiometric nanosize magnetite particles of about 25 nm in size and with the stoichiometry of Fe{sub 2.83}O{sub 4}.

  17. Binary-Fluid Turbulence: Signatures of Multifractal Droplet Dynamics and Dissipation Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pal, Nairita; Gupta, Anupam; Pandit, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    We present an extensive direct numerical simulation of statistically steady, homogeneous, isotropic turbulence in two-dimensional, binary-fluid mixtures with air-drag-induced friction by using the Cahn-Hilliard-Navier-Stokes equations. We choose parameters, e.g., the surface tension, such that we have a droplet of the minority phase moving inside a turbulent background of the majority phase. We characterize the deformation of the droplet and show that it displays multifractal dynamics. The probability distribution functions of the components of the acceleration of the center of mass of the droplet exhibit wide, non-Gaussian tails. Our study reveals that the droplet enhances the energy spectrum $E(k)$ when the wavenumber $k$ is large; this enhancement leads to dissipation reduction.

  18. 5, 755794, 2005 Reduction methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 5, 755­794, 2005 Reduction methods for chemical schemes S. Szopa et al. Title Page Abstract Assessment of the reduction methods used to develop chemical schemes: building of a new chemical scheme for VOC oxidation suited to three-dimensional multiscale HOx-NOx-VOC chemistry simulations S. Szopa 1

  19. Environmental Sustainability Paper Usage / Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;carbon footprint and develop carbon reduction projects around IT and staff/student behaviour change is supported by the Environmental Sustainability Manager and is seen as a key link to the University's Carbon Management Programme (e.g. to produce a forecast of carbon reductions as required by the Carbon Trust

  20. Doublet III neutral beam power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nerem, A.; Beal, J.W.; Colleraine, A.P.; LeVine, F.H.; Pipkins, J.F.; Remsen, D.B. Jr.; Tooker, J.F.; Varga, H.J.; Franck, J.V.

    1981-01-01

    The Doublet III neutral beam power system supplies pulsed power to the neutral beam injectors for plasma heating experiments on the Doublet III tokamak. The power supply system is connected to an ion source where the power is converted to an 80 kV, 80A, 0.5 sec beam of hydrogen ions at maximum power output. These energetic ions undergo partial neutralization via charge exchange in the beamline. The energetic neutral hydrogen atoms pass through the Doublet III toroidal and poloidal magnet fields and deposit their energy in the confined plasma. The unneutralized ions are deflected into a water-cooled dump. The entire system is interfaced through the neutral beam computer instrumentation and control system.

  1. Drag force on a sphere moving towards an anisotropic super-hydrophobic plane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evgeny S. Asmolov; Aleksey V. Belyaev; Olga I. Vinogradova

    2011-06-01

    We analyze theoretically a high-speed drainage of liquid films squeezed between a hydrophilic sphere and a textured super-hydrophobic plane, that contains trapped gas bubbles. A super-hydrophobic wall is characterized by parameters $L$ (texture characteristic length), $b_1$ and $b_2$ (local slip lengths at solid and gas areas), and $\\phi_1$ and $\\phi_2$ (fractions of solid and gas areas). Hydrodynamic properties of the plane are fully expressed in terms of the effective slip-length tensor with eigenvalues that depend on texture parameters and $H$ (local separation). The effect of effective slip is predicted to decrease the force as compared with expected for two hydrophilic surfaces and described by the Taylor equation. The presence of additional length scales, $L$, $b_1$ and $b_2$, implies that a film drainage can be much richer than in case of a sphere moving towards a hydrophilic plane. For a large (compared to $L$) gap the reduction of the force is small, and for all textures the force is similar to expected when a sphere is moving towards a smooth hydrophilic plane that is shifted down from the super-hydrophobic wall. The value of this shift is equal to the average of the eigenvalues of the slip-length tensor. By analyzing striped super-hydrophobic surfaces, we then compute the correction to the Taylor equation for an arbitrary gap. We show that at thinner gap the force reduction becomes more pronounced, and that it depends strongly on the fraction of the gas area and local slip lengths. For small separations we derive an exact equation, which relates a correction for effective slip to texture parameters. Our analysis provides a framework for interpreting recent force measurements in the presence of super-hydrophobic surface.

  2. HELIOSPHERIC PROPAGATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS: COMPARISON OF NUMERICAL WSA-ENLIL+CONE MODEL AND ANALYTICAL DRAG-BASED MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vršnak, B.; Žic, T.; Dumbovi?, M.; Temmer, M.; Möstl, C.; Veronig, A. M.; Taktakishvili, A.; Mays, M. L.; Odstr?il, D. E-mail: tzic@geof.hr E-mail: manuela.temmer@uni-graz.at E-mail: astrid.veronig@uni-graz.at E-mail: m.leila.mays@nasa.gov

    2014-08-01

    Real-time forecasting of the arrival of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at Earth, based on remote solar observations, is one of the central issues of space-weather research. In this paper, we compare arrival-time predictions calculated applying the numerical ''WSA-ENLIL+Cone model'' and the analytical ''drag-based model'' (DBM). Both models use coronagraphic observations of CMEs as input data, thus providing an early space-weather forecast two to four days before the arrival of the disturbance at the Earth, depending on the CME speed. It is shown that both methods give very similar results if the drag parameter ? = 0.1 is used in DBM in combination with a background solar-wind speed of w = 400 km s{sup –1}. For this combination, the mean value of the difference between arrival times calculated by ENLIL and DBM is ?-bar =0.09±9.0 hr with an average of the absolute-value differences of |?|-bar =7.1 hr. Comparing the observed arrivals (O) with the calculated ones (C) for ENLIL gives O – C = –0.3 ± 16.9 hr and, analogously, O – C = +1.1 ± 19.1 hr for DBM. Applying ? = 0.2 with w = 450 km s{sup –1} in DBM, one finds O – C = –1.7 ± 18.3 hr, with an average of the absolute-value differences of 14.8 hr, which is similar to that for ENLIL, 14.1 hr. Finally, we demonstrate that the prediction accuracy significantly degrades with increasing solar activity.

  3. Scalable Synchronous Queues William N. Scherer III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Michael L.

    Scalable Synchronous Queues William N. Scherer III University of Rochester scherer@cs.rochester.edu Abstract We present two new nonblocking and contention-free implementa- tions of synchronous queues. We present performance results on 16-processor SPARC and 4- processor Opteron machines. We compare

  4. Volume III, Chapter 7 TABLE OF CONTENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume III, Chapter 7 Walleye #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 7.0 Walleye (Stizostedium vitreum................................................................................................... 7-7 7.4.3 Water Development only in fresh water, as illustrated by the map in Figure 7-1 (Scott and Crossman 1998).Walleye also

  5. SCHOOL OF MEDICINE YEAR III CURRICULUM GUIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    1 SCHOOL OF MEDICINE YEAR III CURRICULUM GUIDE WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 2015-2016 Clinical Curriculum Guide 2015 -2016 Revised 06/23/15 KS/SET #12;2 Table of Contents A MESSAGE FROM ....................................................................................... 11 Overview of the Clinical Curriculum ...................................................... 11

  6. Blue Version Math 1432 -Exam III Name:____________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glowinski, Roland

    Blue Version Math 1432 - Exam III Name:____________________ Morgan, Spring 2003 Social Sec converge absolutely, converge conditionally, or diverge? #12;Blue Version 11. 3)1('',1)1(',2)1( -==-= fff of )2( +x . Write the solutions to Problems 13-17 in your blue book. Show all of your work. 13. (5

  7. III 1111111111111111111111111111111111 Physical Properties Data Compilations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PB280·795 III 1111111111111111111111111111111111 Physical Properties Data Compilations Relevant under title: Physical properties data compilations relevant to energy storage. (Nat. stand. ref. data. SHEET NSRDS-NBS 61, Part 1 4. TITLE AND SUATITLE Physical Properties Data Compilations Relevant

  8. Core Networks: Part III Ferhat Dikbiyik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Review: Core Networks Part III by F. Dikbiyik Session Code Session Title Industry Academia NMC Flexible Session Code Session Title Industry Academia OMW Optical Network Demos OTuI Spectrally Efficient-way optical wavelength multicasting was experimentally demonstrated based on the dual-pump FWM process in HNLF

  9. More "Circle Limit III" Patterns Douglas Dunham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham, Doug

    of the four. In Circle Limit III, four fish meet at right fin tips, three fish meet at left fin tips, and three fish meet at their noses. In this paper, we show patterns with other numbers of fish that meet none but "through traffic" #12;series, and all the fish belonging to one series have the same colour

  10. Economics of Steam Pressure Reduction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sylva, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    Economics of Steam Pressure Reduction is a technical paper that addresses the operating and economic advantages associated with the program to lower the steam operating pressure. Evaluation of a testing program will be discussed. The paper...

  11. Drag force on a sphere moving towards an anisotropic super-hydrophobic plane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asmolov, Evgeny S; Vinogradova, Olga I

    2011-01-01

    We analyze theoretically a high-speed drainage of liquid films squeezed between a hydrophilic sphere and a textured super-hydrophobic plane, that contains trapped gas bubbles. A super-hydrophobic wall is characterized by parameters $L$ (texture characteristic length), $b_1$ and $b_2$ (local slip lengths at solid and gas areas), and $\\phi_1$ and $\\phi_2$ (fractions of solid and gas areas). Hydrodynamic properties of the plane are fully expressed in terms of the effective slip-length tensor with eigenvalues that depend on texture parameters and $H$ (local separation). The effect of effective slip is predicted to decrease the force as compared with expected for two hydrophilic surfaces and described by the Taylor equation. The presence of additional length scales, $L$, $b_1$ and $b_2$, implies that a film drainage can be much richer than in case of a sphere moving towards a hydrophilic plane. For a large (compared to $L$) gap the reduction of the force is small, and for all textures the force is similar to expec...

  12. Affect of Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments on military facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trembly, L.A. [Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center, Port Hueneme, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    EPA has promulgated a number of NESHAPs in accordance with Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90) that have affected military installations. This paper provides a survey of NESHAP applicability on military installations and where feasible outlines compliance efforts and quantifies the emission reductions achieved. This paper focuses on NESHAPs promulgated since CAAA90. Specific NESHAPs that will be discussed include Halogenated Solvent Cleaners, Perchloroethylene Dry Cleaners, Chromium Electroplating and Anodizing Tanks, Ship Building and Repair Operations and Aerospace Manufacturing and Rework Operations. Other NESHAPs affecting military installations may be addressed if data are available.

  13. ODT’s OTIA III Bridge Program: Three Years of Environmental Stewardship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards, Shelley D.; Ryan, Bill

    2007-01-01

    February 2007. OTIA III Bridge Delivery Program. Monthlyfor ODOT’s OTIA III State Bridge Delivery Program: Manyimpacts. The OTIA III State Bridge Delivery Program (the

  14. Microlocal Analysis of Thermoacoustic (or Multiwave) Tomography, III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plamen Stefanov

    2012-07-20

    Microlocal Analysis of Thermoacoustic (or Multiwave). Tomography, III. Plamen Stefanov. Purdue University. TAT of brain imaging (discontinuous wave speed).

  15. EFFICIENT SPECTRAL-GALERKIN METHODS III: POLAR AND ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1999-10-21

    EFFICIENT SPECTRAL-GALERKIN METHODS III: POLAR AND CYLINDRICAL GEOMETRIES. ?. JIE SHEN†. SIAM J. SCI. COMPUT. c 1997 Society for ...

  16. Characterizing Test Methods and Emissions Reduction Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Test Methods and Emissions Reduction Performance of In-Use Diesel Retrofit Technologies from the National Clean Diesel Campaign Characterizing Test Methods and Emissions Reduction...

  17. Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for NEPA309 Reviewers Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for NEPA309 Reviewers The...

  18. Plasma-assisted catalytic reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogtlin, G.E.; Merritt, B.T.; Hsiao, M.C.; Wallman, P.H.; Penetrante, B.M.

    1998-01-27

    Non-thermal plasma gas treatment is combined with selective catalytic reduction to enhance NO{sub x} reduction in oxygen-rich vehicle engine exhausts. 8 figs.

  19. Engineering MulticomponentNanocatalystsfor Oxygen Reduction ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Engineering MulticomponentNanocatalystsfor Oxygen Reduction Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Engineering MulticomponentNanocatalystsfor Oxygen Reduction Authors: Guo,...

  20. Steam Pressure Reduction: Opportunities and Issues | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Steam Pressure Reduction: Opportunities and Issues Steam Pressure Reduction: Opportunities and Issues This brief details industrial steam generation systems best practices and...

  1. Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    as Reductants Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by Hydrocarbons Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Lean NOx...

  2. Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Publications Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by Hydrocarbons Selectlive Catalytic Reducution of NOx wilth Diesel-Based Fuels as Reductants...

  3. Solar Neutrino Measurement at SK-III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration; :; B. S. Yang

    2009-10-17

    The full Super-Kamiokande-III data-taking period, which ran from August of 2006 through August of 2008, yielded 298 live days worth of solar neutrino data with a lower total energy threshold of 4.5 MeV. During this period we made many improvements to the experiment's hardware and software, with particular emphasis on its water purification system and Monte Carlo simulations. As a result of these efforts, we have significantly reduced the low energy backgrounds as compared to earlier periods of detector operation, cut the systematic errors by nearly a factor of two, and achieved a 4.5 MeV energy threshold for the solar neutrino analysis. In this presentation, I will present the preliminary SK-III solar neutrino measurement results.

  4. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffmann, Michael R. (Pasadena, CA); Arnold, Robert G. (Pasadena, CA); Stephanopoulos, Gregory (Pasadena, CA)

    1989-01-01

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry.

  5. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffmann, M.R.; Arnold, R.G.; Stephanopoulos, G.

    1989-11-14

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry. 11 figs.

  6. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-04-20

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U),more »i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. In addition, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium.« less

  7. Emissions Reduction Impact of Renewables 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Yazdani, B.; Culp, C.

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory ? 2012 p. 25 Energy Systems Laboratory ? 2012 NOx REDUCTIONS FROM WIND POWER New 2010 Annual eGrid for NOx Emissions West Zone North Zone Houston Zone South Zone Unit: lbs of NOx/MWh Unit: lbs of NOx/MWh Unit: lbs of NOx/MWh Unit: lbs... of NOx/MWh Unit: lbs of NOx/MWh p. 26 Energy Systems Laboratory ? 2012 NOx REDUCTIONS FROM WIND POWER New 2010 OSD eGrid for NOx Emissions Unit: Tons of NOx/OSD p. 27 Energy Systems Laboratory ? 2012 p. 28 Energy Systems Laboratory ? 2012 p...

  8. 2008 world direct reduction statistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    This supplement discusses total direct reduced iron (DRI) production for 2007 and 2008 by process. Total 2008 production by MIDREX(reg sign) direct reduction process plants was over 39.8 million tons. The total of all coal-based processes was 17.6 million tons. Statistics for world DRI production are also given by region for 2007 and 2008 and by year (1970-2009). Capacity utilization for 2008 by process is given. World DRI production by region and by process is given for 1998-2008 and world DRI shipments are given from the 1970s to 2008. A list of world direct reduction plants is included.

  9. Water Use Reduction Case Studies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facilities Water Use Reduction Water Use Reduction Case Studies Water Use Reduction Case Studies These case studies offer examples of water use reduction projects implemented...

  10. Carbon Dioxide Reduction Through Urban Forestry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    accounting process; evaluate the cost-effectiveness of urban forestry programs with CO2 reduction measures carbon dioxide (CO2 ) reduction. The calculation of CO2 reduction that can be made with the use climate. With these Guidelines, they can: report current and future CO2 reductions through a standardized

  11. Boattail Plates With Non-Rectangular Geometries For Reducing Aerodynamic Base Drag Of A Bluff Body In Ground Effect

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortega, Jason M. (Pacifica, CA); Sabari, Kambiz (Livermore, CA)

    2006-03-07

    An apparatus for reducing the aerodynamic base drag of a bluff body having a leading end, a trailing end, a top surface, opposing left and right side surfaces, and a base surface at the trailing end substantially normal to a longitudinal centerline of the bluff body, with the base surface joined (1) to the left side surface at a left trailing edge, (2) to the right side surface at a right trailing edge, and (3) to the top surface at a top trailing edge. The apparatus includes left and right vertical boattail plates which are orthogonally attached to the base surface of the bluff body and inwardly offset from the left and right trailing edges, respectively. This produces left and right vertical channels which generate, in a flowstream substantially parallel to the longitudinal centerline, respective left and right vertically-aligned vortical structures, with the left and right vertical boattail plates each having a plate width defined by a rear edge of the plate spaced from the base surface. Each plate also has a peak plate width at a location between top and bottom ends of the plate corresponding to a peak vortex of the respective vertically-aligned vortical structures.

  12. Algorithm FIRE -- Feynman Integral REduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Smirnov

    2008-08-02

    The recently developed algorithm FIRE performs the reduction of Feynman integrals to master integrals. It is based on a number of strategies, such as applying the Laporta algorithm, the s-bases algorithm, region-bases and integrating explicitly over loop momenta when possible. Currently it is being used in complicated three-loop calculations.

  13. Background reduction in cryogenic detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Daniel A.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    This paper discusses the background reduction and rejection strategy of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment. Recent measurements of background levels from CDMS II at Soudan are presented, along with estimates for future improvements in sensitivity expected for a proposed SuperCDMS experiment at SNOLAB.

  14. tion Program on SIDS Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    Continu R ing Ed i u s ca k tion Program on SIDS Reduction CURRICULUM FOR NURSES U.S. DEPARTMENT of Pediatrics, First Candle/SIDS Alliance, and the Association of SIDS and Infant Mortality Programs. FIRST and is conducting live training sessions for this program at nursing conferences across the country. The mission

  15. A study of the reaction between bismuth (III) iodide and organic amine hydriodides 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Jack Clinton

    1960-01-01

    -ethylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (ill) 5. tr is- di- ethylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 6. tris-tri-ethylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 7. tr is-n-propylammoniumhexaiodobismuthate (III) 8. tris-di-n-propylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 9. di-iso...-propylammoniumtetraiodobismuthate (III) IO. tris-di-iso-propylammoniumhexaiodobismuthate (111) 11. tri-n-pr opylammoniumt~etr iodobismuthate (III) 12. tris-n-butylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 13. tris-iso-butylammoniumnonaiododibismuthate (III) 14. tris...

  16. Warm exo-Zodi from cool exo-Kuiper belts: the significance of P-R drag and the inference of intervening planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Grant M

    2015-01-01

    Poynting-Robertson drag has been considered an ineffective mechanism for delivering dust to regions interior to the cool Kuiper belt analogues seen around other Sun-like stars. This conclusion is however based on the very large contrast in dust optical depth between the parent belt and the interior regions that results from the dominance of collisions over drag in systems with detectable cool belts. Here, we show that the levels of habitable zone dust arising from detectable Kuiper belt analogues can be tens to a few hundreds of times greater than the optical depth in the Solar Zodiacal cloud. Dust enhancements of more than a few tens of `zodi' are expected to hinder future Earth-imaging missions, but relatively few undetectable Kuiper belts result in such levels, particularly around stars older than a few Gyr. Thus, current mid to far-IR photometric surveys have already identified most of the 20-25% of nearby stars where P-R drag from outer belts could seriously impact Earth-imaging. The LBTI should easily d...

  17. Reduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impactsand engineersAcquisition Office of

  18. Part III: Application Guidelines (Revised 2012)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAandSummary Areas ofEnergy On October 13,is aof Energy Officea.III:

  19. EXL III Group Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of the NationalDynetek EuropeEPG| OpenEXL III Group Corp

  20. Apollo Energy III LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex A S Jump to:Angola onAperion Energy Systems JumpBeach,III LLC

  1. Kotzebue Wind Project III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:onItronKanoshKetchikanKlondike III IKosovo-USAIDIII Jump to:

  2. Pomeroy III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2, Blue MountainSchoolPrairie JumpPolytechnic4Q07) WindIII

  3. Reduction And Immobilization Of Hexavalent Chromium By Microbially Reduced Fe-bearing Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, Michael E.; Glasser, Paul; Dong, Hailiang; Arey, Bruce W.; Kovarik, Libor

    2014-05-15

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) is a major contaminant in the environment. As a redox-sensitive element, the fate and toxicity of chromium is controlled by reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions. Previous research has shown the ability of structural Fe(II) in naturally present and chemically reduced clay minerals to reduce Cr6+ to Cr(III) as a way of immobilization and detoxification. However, it is still poorly known whether or not structural Fe(II) in biologically reduced clay minerals exhibits a similar reactivity and if so, what the kinetics and mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction are. The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics and possible mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction by structural Fe(II) in microbially reduced clay minerals and the nature of reduced Cr(III). Structural Fe(III) in nontronite (NAu-2), montmorillonite (SWy-2), chlorite (CCa-2), and clay-rich sediments from the Ringold Formation of the Hanford site of Washington State, USA was first bioreduced to Fe(II) by an iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens with acetate as the sole electron donor and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfate (AQDS) as electron shuttle in synthetic groundwater (pH 7). Biogenic Fe(II) was then used to reduce aqueous Cr6+ at three different temperatures, 10°, 20°, and 30°C, in order to determine the temperature dependence of the redox reaction between Cr6+ and clay-Fe(II). The results showed that nontronite and montmorillonite were most effective in reducing aqueous Cr6+ at all three temperatures. In contrast, most Fe(II) in chlorite was not reactive towards Cr6+ reduction at 10°C, though at 30°C there was some reduction. For all the clay minerals, the ratio of total Fe(II) oxidized to Cr6+ reduced was close to the expected stoichiometric value of 3. Characterization of the Cr-clay reaction product with scanning electron microscopy with focused ion beam and transmission electron microscopy with electron energy loss spectroscopy revealed that reduced chromium was possibly in the form of sub-nanometer Cr2O3 in association with residual clay minerals as micro-aggregates. This textural association was expected to minimize the chance of Cr(III) reoxidation upon exposure to oxidants. These results are important for our understanding of how various clay minerals may be used to reductively immobilize the heavy metal contaminant Cr in the environment.

  4. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 8

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III Collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search for extrasolar planets, and solve the mystery of dark energy. SDSS-III's first release, Data Release 8 (DR8), became available in the first half of 2012. DR8 contains all the images ever taken by the SDSS telescope. Together, these images make up the largest color image of the sky ever made. A version of the DR8 image is shown to the right. DR8 also includes measurements for nearly 500 million stars, galaxies, and quasars, and spectra for nearly two million. All of DR8's images, spectra, and measurements are available to anyone online. You can browse through sky images, look up data for individual objects, or search for objects anywhere using any criteria. SDSS-III will collect data from 2008 to 2014, using the 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. SDSS-III consists of four surveys, each focused on a different scientific theme. These four surveys are: 1) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS); 2) SEGUE-2 (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration); 3) The APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE); and 4) The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). [Copied with edits from http://www.sdss3.org/index.php

  5. Overview of reductants utilized in nuclear fuel reprocessing/recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patricia Paviet-Hartmann; Catherine Riddle; Keri Campbell; Edward Mausolf

    2013-10-01

    Most of the aqueous processes developed, or under consideration worldwide for the recycling of used nuclear fuel (UNF) utilize the oxido-reduction properties of actinides to separate them from other radionuclides. Generally, after acid dissolution of the UNF, (essentially in nitric acid solution), actinides are separated from the raffinate by liquid-liquid extraction using specific solvents, associated along the process, with a particular reductant that will allow the separation to occur. For example, the industrial PUREX process utilizes hydroxylamine as a plutonium reductant. Hydroxylamine has numerous advantages: not only does it have the proper attributes to reduce Pu(IV) to Pu(III), but it is also a non-metallic chemical that is readily decomposed to innocuous products by heating. However, it has been observed that the presence of high nitric acid concentrations or impurities (such as metal ions) in hydroxylamine solutions increase the likelihood of the initiation of an autocatalytic reaction. Recently there has been some interest in the application of simple hydrophilic hydroxamic ligands such as acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) for the stripping of tetravalent actinides in the UREX process flowsheet. This approach is based on the high coordinating ability of hydroxamic acids with tetravalent actinides (Np and Pu) compared with hexavalent uranium. Thus, the use of AHA offers a route for controlling neptunium and plutonium in the UREX process by complexant based stripping of Np(IV) and Pu(IV) from the TBP solvent phase, while U(VI) ions are not affected by AHA and remain solvated in the TBP phase. In the European GANEX process, AHA is also used to form hydrophilic complexes with actinides and strip them from the organic phase into nitric acid. However, AHA does not decompose completely when treated with nitric acid and hampers nitric acid recycling. In lieu of using AHA in the UREX + process, formohydroxamic acid (FHA), although not commercially available, hold promises as a replacement for AHA. FHA undergoes hydrolysis to formic acid which is volatile, thus allowing the recycling of nitric acid. Unfortunately, FHA powder was not stable in the experiments we ran in our laboratory. In addition, AHA and FHA also decompose to hydroxylamine which may undergo an autocatalytic reaction. Other reductants are available and could be extremely useful for actinides separation. The review presents the current plutonium reductants used in used nuclear fuel reprocessing and will introduce innovative and novel reductants that could become reducers for future research on UNF separation.

  6. TRUPACT-III Quick Facts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    sheet. TRUPACT-III Quick Facts More Documents & Publications U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Data Exchange Specification DOE ZERH Webinar: Efficient Hot Water...

  7. Coal Ash Behavior in Reducing Environments (CABRE) III Year 6...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (CABRE) III Year 6 - Activity 1.10 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Coal Ash Behavior in Reducing Environments...

  8. ALGEBRA III (Curso 1989-90) Teoria de conjuntos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alonso, José A.

    ALGEBRA III (Curso 1989-90) Teor´ia de conjuntos Jos´e A. Alonso Jim´enez Ejercicio 1. Probar que

  9. The CLEO III Detector Design and Physics Goals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CLEO III Detector Design and Physics Goals California 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Lessons : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : * *: : : : : : : 6 1.3 Physics overview

  10. SDSS-III: Massive Spectroscopic Surveys of the Distant Universe...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Massive Spectroscopic Surveys of the Distant Universe, the Milky Way Galaxy, and Extra-Solar Planetary Systems Citation Details In-Document Search Title: SDSS-III: Massive...

  11. Total synthesis of Class II and Class III Galbulimima Alkaloids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tjandra, Meiliana

    2010-01-01

    I. Total Synthesis of All Class III Galbulimima Alkaloids We describe the total synthesis of (+)- and (-)-galbulimima alkaloid 13, (-)-himgaline anad (-)-himbadine. The absolute stereochemistry of natural (-)-galbulimima ...

  12. EPA Source Reduction Assistance Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is accepting applications for the Source Reduction Assistance Grant Program to support pollution prevention/source reduction and/or resource conservation projects that reduce or eliminate pollution at the source.

  13. Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions under Policy Uncertainty: A General;1 Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions under Policy Uncertainty: A General Equilibrium Analysis Jennifer Morris* , Mort Webster* and John Reilly* Abstract The electric power sector, which

  14. Neptunium Binding Kinetics with Arsenazo(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh R. Martin; Aaron T. Johnson; Stephen P. Mezyk

    2014-08-01

    This document has been prepared to meet FCR&D level 2 milestone M2FT-14IN0304021, “Report on the results of actinide binding kinetics with aqueous phase complexants” This work was carried out under the auspices of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Advanced Separations Systems FCR&D work package. The report details kinetics experiments that were performed to measure rates of aqueous phase complexation for pentavalent neptunium with the chromotropic dye Arsenazo III (AAIII). The studies performed were designed to determine how pH, ionic strength and AAIII concentration may affect the rate of the reaction. A brief comparison with hexavalent neptunium is also made. It was identified that as pH was increased the rate of reaction also increased, however increasing the ionic strength and concentration of AAIII had the opposite effect. Interestingly, the rate of reaction of Np(VI) with AAIII was found to be slower than that of the Np(V) reaction.

  15. Benchmark On Sensitivity Calculation (Phase III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanova, Tatiana [IRSN; Laville, Cedric [IRSN; Dyrda, James [Atomic Weapons Establishment; Mennerdahl, Dennis [E. Mennerdahl Systems; Golovko, Yury [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Russia; Raskach, Kirill [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Russia; Tsiboulia, Anatoly [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Russia; Lee, Gil Soo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS); Woo, Sweng-Woong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS); Bidaud, Adrien [Labratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmolo-gie (LPSC); Patel, Amrit [NRC; Bledsoe, Keith C [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL; Gulliford, J. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivities of the keff eigenvalue to neutron cross sections have become commonly used in similarity studies and as part of the validation algorithm for criticality safety assessments. To test calculations of the sensitivity coefficients, a benchmark study (Phase III) has been established by the OECD-NEA/WPNCS/EG UACSA (Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment). This paper presents some sensitivity results generated by the benchmark participants using various computational tools based upon different computational methods: SCALE/TSUNAMI-3D and -1D, MONK, APOLLO2-MORET 5, DRAGON-SUSD3D and MMKKENO. The study demonstrates the performance of the tools. It also illustrates how model simplifications impact the sensitivity results and demonstrates the importance of 'implicit' (self-shielding) sensitivities. This work has been a useful step towards verification of the existing and developed sensitivity analysis methods.

  16. Final report : CO2 reduction using biomimetic photocatalytic nanodevices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, Robert M.; Shelnutt, John Allen; Medforth, Craig John (University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM); Song, Yujiang; Wang, Zhongchun; Miller, James Edward; Wang, Haorong

    2009-11-01

    Nobel Prize winner Richard Smalley was an avid champion for the cause of energy research. Calling it 'the single most important problem facing humanity today,' Smalley promoted the development of nanotechnology as a means to harness solar energy. Using nanotechnology to create solar fuels (i.e., fuels created from sunlight, CO{sub 2}, and water) is an especially intriguing idea, as it impacts not only energy production and storage, but also climate change. Solar irradiation is the only sustainable energy source of a magnitude sufficient to meet projections for global energy demand. Biofuels meet the definition of a solar fuel. Unfortunately, the efficiency of photosynthesis will need to be improved by an estimated factor of ten before biofuels can fully replace fossil fuels. Additionally, biological organisms produce an array of hydrocarbon products requiring further processing before they are usable for most applications. Alternately, 'bio-inspired' nanostructured photocatalytic devices that efficiently harvest sunlight and use that energy to reduce CO{sub 2} into a single useful product or chemical intermediate can be envisioned. Of course, producing such a device is very challenging as it must be robust and multifunctional, i.e. capable of promoting and coupling the multi-electron, multi-photon water oxidation and CO{sub 2} reduction processes. Herein, we summarize some of the recent and most significant work towards creating light harvesting nanodevices that reduce CO{sub 2} to CO (a key chemical intermediate) that are based on key functionalities inspired by nature. We report the growth of Co(III)TPPCl nanofibers (20-100 nm in diameter) on gas diffusion layers via an evaporation induced self-assembly (EISA) method. Remarkably, as-fabricated electrodes demonstrate light-enhanced activity for CO{sub 2} reduction to CO as evidenced by cyclic voltammograms and electrolysis with/without light irradiation. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time to observe such a light-enhanced CO{sub 2} reduction reaction based on nanostructured cobalt(III) porphyrin catalysts. Additionally, gas chromatography (GC) verifies that light irradiation can improve CO production by up to 31.3% during 2 hours of electrolysis. In addition, a variety of novel porphyrin nano- or micro-structures were also prepared including nanospheres, nanotubes, and micro-crosses.

  17. SALARY REDUCTION AGREEMENT ______ Original Agreement ______ Amended Agreement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    SALARY REDUCTION AGREEMENT ______ Original Agreement ______ Amended Agreement By this agreement that it will not apply to salary subsequently earned by giving at least thirty days written notice of the date(ies), by completing an amended Salary Reduction Agreement. The total of the salary reduction

  18. Reaction-Based Transport Modeling of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization at Area 2 of the NABIR Field Research Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeh, Gour-Tsyh

    2006-06-01

    This research project (started Fall 2004) was funded by a grant to The Pennsylvania State University, University of Central Florida, and The University of Alabama in the Integrative Studies Element of the NABIR Program (DE-FG04-ER63914/63915/63196). Dr. Eric Roden, formerly at The University of Alabama, is now at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. Our project focuses on the development of a mechanistic understanding and quantitative models of coupled Fe(III)/U(VI) reduction in FRC Area 2 sediments. This work builds on our previous studies of microbial Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, and is directly aligned with the Scheibe et al. NABIR FRC Field Project at Area 2.

  19. Lab 4--Signal Processing III: Diodes PHYS 309 Name

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herman, Rhett

    Lab 4--Signal Processing III: Diodes PHYS 309 Name: A. Introduction Diodes are essentially one it into . B. Basic circuits and signal processing Build the circuit shown below. Note the ground! Use a = 100 is set on "dc." Lab 4-1 #12;Lab 4--Signal Processing III: Diodes PHYS 309 Name: Now add a diode to your

  20. Doctoral Research Registration Policies III-2.35.01

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suri, Manil

    Doctoral Research Registration Policies III-2.35.01 printable version Doctoral students who have number that corresponds to your research mentor. Policy Number: 111-2.35.01 Policy Section: Responsible Administrator: Responsible Office: Approved by President: Originally Issued: Revision Date: UMBC Policy III-2.35

  1. A Comparison Between Model Reduction and Controller Reduction: Application to a PWR Nuclear Planty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gevers, Michel

    A Comparison Between Model Reduction and Controller Reduction: Application to a PWR Nuclear Planty model reduction with controller reduction for the same PWR system. We show that closed-loop techniques to the design of a low-order con- troller for a realistic model of order 42 of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR

  2. CONVERSION EXTRACTION DESULFURIZATION (CED) PHASE III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Boltz

    2005-03-01

    This project was undertaken to refine the Conversion Extraction Desulfurization (CED) technology to efficiently and economically remove sulfur from diesel fuel to levels below 15-ppm. CED is considered a generic term covering all desulfurization processes that involve oxidation and extraction. The CED process first extracts a fraction of the sulfur from the diesel, then selectively oxidizes the remaining sulfur compounds, and finally extracts these oxidized materials. The Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Petro Star Inc. a contract to fund Phase III of the CED process development. Phase III consisted of testing a continuous-flow process, optimization of the process steps, design of a pilot plant, and completion of a market study for licensing the process. Petro Star and the Degussa Corporation in coordination with Koch Modular Process Systems (KMPS) tested six key process steps in a 7.6-centimeter (cm) (3.0-inch) inside diameter (ID) column at gas oil feed rates of 7.8 to 93.3 liters per hour (l/h) (2.1 to 24.6 gallons per hour). The team verified the technical feasibility with respect to hydraulics for each unit operation tested and successfully demonstrated pre-extraction and solvent recovery distillation. Test operations conducted at KMPS demonstrated that the oxidation reaction converted a maximum of 97% of the thiophenes. The CED Process Development Team demonstrated that CED technology is capable of reducing the sulfur content of light atmospheric gas oil from 5,000-ppm to less than 15-ppm within the laboratory scale. In continuous flow trials, the CED process consistently produced fuel with approximately 20-ppm of sulfur. The process economics study calculated an estimated process cost of $5.70 per product barrel. The Kline Company performed a marketing study to evaluate the possibility of licensing the CED technology. Kline concluded that only 13 refineries harbored opportunity for the CED process. The Kline study and the research team's discussions with prospective refineries led to the conclusion that there were not likely prospects for the licensing of the CED process.

  3. Hawley ArcGIS Desktop III: GIS Workflows and Analysis Page 1 ArcGIS Desktop III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bier, Martin

    Hawley ArcGIS Desktop III: GIS Workflows and Analysis Page 1 ArcGIS Desktop III: GIS Workflows and Analysis Overview This 2-day course builds on the skills and knowledge taught in ArcGIS Desktop II: Tools a challenging analysis project. Audience This course is for experienced ArcGIS users who want to learn more

  4. Which Idling Reduction Technologeis are the Best? | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Idling Reduction Technologeis are the Best? Which Idling Reduction Technologeis are the Best? Benefits due to idling reduction depend on fuel and capital cost of equipment, idling...

  5. Engine Friction Reduction Through Surface Finish and Coatings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Friction Reduction Through Surface Finish and Coatings Engine Friction Reduction Through Surface Finish and Coatings Opportunities exist for friction reduction in piston rings and...

  6. SCR Technologies for NOx Reduction | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies for NOx Reduction SCR Technologies for NOx Reduction 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005deerhesser.pdf More...

  7. Dimensional Reduction in Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. 't Hooft

    2009-03-20

    The requirement that physical phenomena associated with gravitational collapse should be duly reconciled with the postulates of quantum mechanics implies that at a Planckian scale our world is not 3+1 dimensional. Rather, the observable degrees of freedom can best be described as if they were Boolean variables defined on a two-dimensional lattice, evolving with time. This observation, deduced from not much more than unitarity, entropy and counting arguments, implies severe restrictions on possible models of quantum gravity. Using cellular automata as an example it is argued that this dimensional reduction implies more constraints than the freedom we have in constructing models. This is the main reason why so-far no completely consistent mathematical models of quantum black holes have been found. Essay dedicated to Abdus Salam.

  8. Greenhouse Gas Reductions: SF6

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Anderson, Diana

    2013-04-19

    Argonne National Laboratory is leading the way in greenhouse gas reductions, particularly with the recapture and recycling of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). SF6 is a gas used in industry as an anti-arcing agent. It is an extremely potent greenhouse gas ? one pound of SF6 is equivalent to 12 tons of carbon dioxide. While the U.S. does not currently regulate SF6 emissions, Argonne is proactively and voluntarily recovering and recycling to reduce SF6 emissions. Argonne saves over 16,000 tons of SF6 from being emitted into the atmosphere each year, and by recycling the gas rather than purchasing it new, we save taxpayers over $208,000 each year.

  9. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

    2005-01-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) by providing information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. Task 5 focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  10. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

    2004-10-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) by providing information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. Task 5 focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  11. Continuous reduction of uranium tetrafluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMint, A.L.; Maxey, A.W.

    1993-10-21

    Operation of a pilot-scale system for continuous metallothermic reduction of uranium tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4} or green salt) has been initiated. This activity is in support of the development of a cost- effective process to produce uranium-iron (U-Fe) alloy feed for the Uranium-Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) program. To date, five runs have been made to reduce green salt (UF{sub 4}) with magnesium. During this quarter, three runs were made to perfect the feeding system, examine feed rates, and determine the need for a crust breaker/stirrer. No material was drawn off in any of the runs; both product metal and by-product salt were allowed to accumulate in the reactor.

  12. Towards Quantum Enigma Cipher III -Communication performance-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osamu Hirota

    2015-11-15

    Cloud computing system based on data centers has recently attracted considerable attention. In that system, all data are communicated via a high speed optical network between a customer and data center or between data centers. There is a serious threat so called "Eavesdropper data center business", which means the eavesdropper can get all data from the transmission line and sell specific data selected by the protocol analyzer to malicious people who want to get the secret data. So we need to consider cyber attack against Layer-1 (physical layer). Quantum cryptography has been developed to protect such an attack. In order to apply such a new security technologies, the communication performance is very important as well as its security, because the data speed is more than several Gbit/sec. This research note III will discuss communication performances of quantum key distribution (QKD) and quantum enigma cipher, and explaines that QKD based on single photon signals cannot realize appropriate data speed, but quantum enigma cipher can.

  13. Magnetic Fields in Population III Star Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turk, Matthew J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg

    2012-02-22

    We study the buildup of magnetic fields during the formation of Population III star-forming regions, by conducting cosmological simulations from realistic initial conditions and varying the Jeans resolution. To investigate this in detail, we start simulations from identical initial conditions, mandating 16, 32 and 64 zones per Jeans length, and studied the variation in their magnetic field amplification. We find that, while compression results in some amplification, turbulent velocity fluctuations driven by the collapse can further amplify an initially weak seed field via dynamo action, provided there is sufficient numerical resolution to capture vortical motions (we find this requirement to be 64 zones per Jeans length, slightly larger than, but consistent with previous work run with more idealized collapse scenarios). We explore saturation of amplification of the magnetic field, which could potentially become dynamically important in subsequent, fully-resolved calculations. We have also identified a relatively surprising phenomena that is purely hydrodynamic: the higher-resolved simulations possess substantially different characteristics, including higher infall-velocity, increased temperatures inside 1000 AU, and decreased molecular hydrogen content in the innermost region. Furthermore, we find that disk formation is suppressed in higher-resolution calculations, at least at the times that we can follow the calculation. We discuss the effect this may have on the buildup of disks over the accretion history of the first clump to form as well as the potential for gravitational instabilities to develop and induce fragmentation.

  14. REDUCTION CAPACITY OF SALTSTONE AND SALTSTONE COMPONENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, K.; Kaplan, D.

    2009-11-30

    The duration that saltstone retains its ability to immobilize some key radionuclides, such as technetium (Tc), plutonium (Pu), and neptunium (Np), depends on its capacity to maintain a low redox status (or low oxidation state). The reduction capacity is a measure of the mass of reductants present in the saltstone; the reductants are the active ingredients that immobilize Tc, Pu, and Np. Once reductants are exhausted, the saltstone loses its ability to immobilize these radionuclides. The reduction capacity values reported here are based on the Ce(IV)/Fe(II) system. The Portland cement (198 {micro}eq/g) and especially the fly ash (299 {micro}eq/g) had a measurable amount of reduction capacity, but the blast furnace slag (820 {micro}eq/g) not surprisingly accounted for most of the reduction capacity. The blast furnace slag contains ferrous iron and sulfides which are strong reducing and precipitating species for a large number of solids. Three saltstone samples containing 45% slag or one sample containing 90% slag had essentially the same reduction capacity as pure slag. There appears to be some critical concentration between 10% and 45% slag in the Saltstone formulation that is needed to create the maximum reduction capacity. Values from this work supported those previously reported, namely that the reduction capacity of SRS saltstone is about 820 {micro}eq/g; this value is recommended for estimating the longevity that the Saltstone Disposal Facility will retain its ability to immobilize radionuclides.

  15. Luminescent cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes having acetylide ligands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Mark E.; Bossi, Alberto; Djurovich, Peter Ivan

    2014-09-02

    The present invention relates to phosphorescent (triplet-emitting) organometallic materials. The phosphorescent materials of the present invention comprise Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes for use as triplet light-emitting materials. The Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes comprise at least one cyclometallating ligand and at least one alkynyl ligand bonded to the iridium. Also provided is an organic light emitting device comprising an anode, a cathode and an emissive layer between the anode and the cathode, wherein the emissive layer comprises a Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complex as a triplet emitting material.

  16. High efficiency III-nitride light-emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, Mary; Koleske, Daniel; Cho, Jaehee; Zhu, Di; Noemaun, Ahmed; Schubert, Martin F; Schubert, E. Fred

    2013-05-28

    Tailored doping of barrier layers enables balancing of the radiative recombination among the multiple-quantum-wells in III-Nitride light-emitting diodes. This tailored doping enables more symmetric carrier transport and uniform carrier distribution which help to reduce electron leakage and thus reduce the efficiency droop in high-power III-Nitride LEDs. Mitigation of the efficiency droop in III-Nitride LEDs may enable the pervasive market penetration of solid-state-lighting technologies in high-power lighting and illumination.

  17. Texas Rice, Volume III, Number 9, Winter Issue 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01

    stream_source_info 2003_Winter_Issue Vol III No 9.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 47032 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name 2003_Winter_Issue Vol III No 9.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8... Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas Winter 2003 Volume III Number 9 Texas Rice Rice Production In Texas Economically Strong - Environmentally Sound continued on page 6 It was a clear...

  18. Inductrack III configuration--a maglev system for high loads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F

    2013-11-12

    Inductrack III configurations are suited for use in transporting heavy freight loads. Inductrack III addresses a problem associated with the cantilevered track of the Inductrack II configuration. The use of a cantilevered track could present mechanical design problems in attempting to achieve a strong enough track system such that it would be capable of supporting very heavy loads. In Inductrack III, the levitating portion of the track can be supported uniformly from below, as the levitating Halbach array used on the moving vehicle is a single-sided one, thus does not require the cantilevered track as employed in Inductrack II.

  19. III-V Growth on Silicon Toward a Multijunction Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geisz, J.; Olson, J.; McMahon, W.; Friedman, D.; Kibbler, A.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.; Duda, A.; Ward, S.; Ptak, A.; Kurtz, S.; Wanlass, M.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Jiang, C. S.; Moutinho, H.; Norman, A.; Jones, K.; Romero, M.; Reedy, B.

    2005-11-01

    A III-V on Si multijunction solar cell promises high efficiency at relatively low cost. The challenges to epitaxial growth of high-quality III-Vs on Si, though, are extensive. Lattice-matched (LM) dilute-nitride GaNPAs solar cells have been grown on Si, but their performance is limited by defects related to the nitrogen. Advances in the growth of lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials make more traditional III-Vs, such as GaInP and GaAsP, very attractive for use in multijunction solar cells on silicon.

  20. NOx reduction in gas turbine combustors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, Nak Won

    1976-01-01

    NOx REDUCTION IN GAS TURBINE COMBUSTORS A Thesis by Nak Won Sung Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fullfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major Subject: Mechanical... Engineering NOx REDUCTION IN GAS TURBINE COMBUSTORS A Thesis by Nak Won Sung Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committe (Head of Department) (Member) August 1976 "40308 (Member) 1 1. 1 ABSTRACT NOx Reduction in Gas Turbine...

  1. Fate of Cd during Microbial Fe(III) Mineral Reduction by a Novel and Cd-Tolerant Geobacter Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    , potentially altering the dynamics of Cd uptake into food or phyto-remediating plants. INTRODUCTION The heavy atmospheric deposition and fertilization.7-9 Cd binds to clays, carbonates, organic matter, and Fe oxides via ternary complexes with organic matter.14 Several studies have investigated sorption mechanisms

  2. Flux analysis of central metabolic pathways in Geobacter metallireducens during reduction of soluble Fe(III)-NTA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Chakraborty, Romy; Garcia-Martin, Hector; Chu, Jeannie; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-01-01

    malic enzyme were absent. Gluconeogenesis and the pentoseGS-15 include gluconeogenesis, the TCA cycle, and thethat some key enzymes in gluconeogenesis were missing (EC

  3. Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Vol. III - Technical Appendix 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Gilman, D.; Verdict, M.; Yazdani, B.; Ahmed, M.; Muns, S.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Liu, Z.; Turner, W. D.; Degelman, L. O.; Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.

    2006-10-31

    ), including the 2001 Supplement (IECC 2001) which represents one of the first times that the EPA is considering State Implementation Plan (SIP) credits from energy conservation and renewable energy– an important new development for building efficiency... in the Dallas – Fort Worth area. ESL-IC-10/05-31 1 total to forty-one counties (sixteen non-attainment and twenty-five affected counties). On February 2004, the TCEQ issued a document entitled “Incorporating Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE...

  4. A Power Reduction Technique Through Dynamic Runtime Algorithm For CMOS VLSI Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kadry, Syed Md. Jaffrey Al-

    2012-01-01

    Standby power reductionPower Reduction in 32 bit FullAdder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Power Reduction

  5. Metal Artifact Reduction in Computed Tomography /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karimi, Seemeen

    2014-01-01

    Monoenergetic imaging of dual-energy CT reduces artifactsartifact reduction by dual energy computed tomography usingimage re- construction for dual energy X-ray transmission

  6. Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Publications 2013 Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Final Report Storage - Challenges and Opportunities Hydro-Pac Inc., A High Pressure Company...

  7. Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Operations Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations This document was used to determine facts and conditions...

  8. Dimension Reduction of Chemical Process Simulation Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truemper, Klaus

    transportation systems and the majority of electric power plants rely directly or indirectly on the combustion: dimension reduction, subgroup discovery, lazy learner, modeling combustion 1 Introduction Virtually all

  9. National Idling Reduction Network News - December 2009

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ssprogramssblilp.htm Environmental Finance Center, University of Maryland Port of Baltimore Clean Diesel Program (including Locomotive Engine Idle Reduction Grant Sub- Program)...

  10. National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2010

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ogramssblilp.htm Environmental Finance Center, University of Maryland Port of Baltimore Clean Diesel Program (including Locomotive Engine Idle Reduction Grant Sub- Program)...

  11. National Idling Reduction Network News - November 2009

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    essprogramssblilp.htm Environmental Finance Center, University of Maryland Port of Baltimore Clean Diesel Program (including Locomotive Engine Idle Reduction Grant Sub-Program)...

  12. Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 The documents...

  13. National Idling Reduction Network News - April 2011

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    go to http:www.transportation.anl.govenginesidlingtools.html. The idling reduction Web pages of DOE's Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center website have also...

  14. National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2011

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3, 2011 http:www07.grants.govsearchsearch.do? &modeVIEW&oppId101073 San Diego Air Pollution Control District (California) Goods Movement Emission Reduction Program:...

  15. National Idling Reduction Network News - July 2011

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3, 2011 http:www07.grants.govsearchsearch.do ?&modeVIEW&oppId101073 San Diego Air Pollution Control District (California) Goods Movement Emission Reduction Program:...

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office: National Idling Reduction Network...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Past Newsletters The National Idling Reduction Network News is currently sent as an HTML newsletter and issues starting with the May 2014 newsletter can be searched via the...

  17. Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and References report. The documents were examined and used to develop the final report. Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF)Technical...

  18. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

    2005-04-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) and provided information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 2 efforts also included preparation of a draft topical report entitled ''Deployment Issues Related to Geologic CO{sub 2} Sequestration in the PCOR Partnership Region'', which is nearing completion. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. The video will be completed and aired on Prairie Public Television in the next quarter. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. The addition of the Canadian province of Alberta to the PCOR Partnership region expanded the decision support system (DSS) geographic information system database. Task 5 screened and qualitatively assessed sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  19. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Lisa S. Botnen

    2005-07-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership characterization work is nearing completion, and most remaining efforts are related to finalizing work products. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) has developed a Topical Report entitled ''Deployment Issues Related to Geologic CO{sub 2} Sequestration in the PCOR Partnership Region''. Task 3 (Public Outreach) has developed an informational Public Television program entitled ''Nature in the Balance'', about CO{sub 2} sequestration. The program was completed and aired on Prairie Public Television in this quarter. Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) efforts are nearing completion, and data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation are being incorporated into a series of topical reports. The expansion of the Decision Support System Geographic Information System database has continued with the development of a ''save bookmark'' feature that allows users to save a map from the system easily. A feature that allows users to develop a report that summarizes CO{sub 2} sequestration parameters was also developed. Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options and developing economic estimates for important regional CO{sub 2} sequestration strategies.

  20. NOx reduction methods and apparatuses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tonkyn, Russell G.; Barlow, Stephan E.; Balmer, M. Lou; Maupin, Gary D.

    2004-10-26

    A NO.sub.x reduction method includes treating a first gas containing NO.sub.x, producing a second gas containing NO.sub.2, reducing a portion of the NO.sub.2 in the second gas to N.sub.2, and producing a third gas containing less NO.sub.x than the first gas, substantially all of the third gas NO.sub.x being NO. The method also includes treating the third gas, producing a fourth gas containing NO.sub.2, reducing a portion of the NO.sub.2 in the fourth gas to N.sub.2, and producing a fifth gas containing less NO.sub.x than the third gas, substantially all of the fifth gas NO.sub.x being NO. Treating the first and/or third gas can include treatment with a plasma. Reducing a portion of the NO.sub.2 in the second and/or fourth gas can include reducing with a catalyst. The method can further include controlling energy consumption of the plasmas independent of each other.

  1. III International Climate Change Adaptation Adaptation Futures 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 III International Climate Change Adaptation Conference Adaptation Futures 2014 12-16 Maio 2014 sucesso da primeira conferência Climate Adaptation Futures realizada em Queensland, Austrália, em 2010 e

  2. Kinematic Synthesis of Stephenson III Six-bar Function Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plecnik, MM; McCarthy, JM

    2015-01-01

    of Stephenson-II Function Generators”, Journal of MechanismsII Six-bar Function Generators for 11 Accuracy Points,”III Six-bar Function Generators Mark M. Plecnik, J. Michael

  3. TOTAL SES SL EJ//EK EN IV EN III

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    SL EJEK EN IV EN III NN (Engineering) NQ (ProfTechAdmin) NU (TechAdminSupport) RETIREMENT ELIGIBLE TO RETIRE IMMEDIATELY 11 13.9% ELIGIBLE TO RETIRE BY 3272014 29 36.7%...

  4. Protein signaling via type III secretion pathways in phytopathogenic bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    109 Protein signaling via type III secretion pathways in phytopathogenic bacteria Mary Beth Mudgett secretion pathway has revealed new mechanisms by which phytopathogenic bacteria infect plants are continually exposed to a number of potentially pathogenic bacteria. Phytopathogenic bacteria, in general

  5. The prospects for 10 nm III-V CMOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Alamo, Jesus A.

    The increasing difficulties for further scaling down of Si CMOS is bringing to the fore the investigation of alternative channel materials. Among these, III-V compound semiconductors are very attractive due to their ...

  6. 2012. 1 101 Cognitive Computing III: Deep Dynamic Prediction -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,4] . , . . . , . [5,6]. Marr 3 [7]. : ? ? ? / : ? ? : ? ? II #12 Bayesian Brain Models Physical Computing Models Marr 3 (rule- based systems, connectionist networks Computing III: Deep Dynamic Prediction - 2.4 Dynamic System Models . Marr 3

  7. Utility-Interconnected Photovoltaic Systems STEVENS III,JOHN...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    STEVENS III,JOHN W.; BONN,RUSSELL H.; GINN,JERRY W.; GONZALEZ,SIGIFREDO; KERN,GREG 14 SOLAR ENERGY; 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; INTERCONNECTED POWER SYSTEMS;...

  8. Guidance for Environmental Background Analysis Volume III: Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidance for Environmental Background Analysis Volume III: Groundwater Prepared for: Naval This guidance document provides instructions for characterizing groundwater background conditions and comparing datasets representing groundwater impacted by an actual or potential chemical release to appropriate

  9. III-Nitride Nanowires: Emerging Materials for Lighting and Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    III-Nitride Nanowires: Emerging Materials for Lighting and Energy Applications March 20, 2012 at 3pm36-428 George T. Wang Advanced Materials Science, Sandia National Laboratories...

  10. III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics at the National Center for Photovoltaics.

  11. EIS-0374: Klondike III/ Bigelow Canyon Wind Integration Project, OR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes BPA's decision to approve an interconnection requested by PPM Energy, Inc. (PPM) to integrate electrical power from their proposed Klondike III Wind roject (Wind Project) into the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS).

  12. Plutonium Oxidation and Subsequent Reduction by Mn (IV) Minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KAPLAN, DANIEL

    2005-09-13

    Plutonium sorbed to rock tuff was preferentially associated with manganese oxides. On tuff and synthetic pyrolusite (Mn{sup IV}O{sub 2}), Pu(IV) or Pu(V) was initially oxidized, but over time Pu(IV) became the predominant oxidation state of sorbed Pu. Reduction of Pu(V/VI), even on non-oxidizing surfaces, is proposed to result from a lower Gibbs free energy of the hydrolyzed Pu(IV) surface species versus that of the Pu(V) or Pu(VI) surface species. This work suggests that despite initial oxidation of sorbed Pu by oxidizing surfaces to more soluble forms, the less mobile form of Pu, Pu(IV), will dominate Pu solid phase speciation during long term geologic storage. The safe design of a radioactive waste or spent nuclear fuel geologic repository requires a risk assessment of radionuclides that may potentially be released into the surrounding environment. Geochemical knowledge of the radionuclide and the surrounding environment is required for predicting subsurface fate and transport. Although difficult even in simple systems, this task grows increasingly complicated for constituents, like Pu, that exhibit complex environmental chemistries. The environmental behavior of Pu can be influenced by complexation, precipitation, adsorption, colloid formation, and oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions (1-3). To predict the environmental mobility of Pu, the most important of these factors is Pu oxidation state. This is because Pu(IV) is generally 2 to 3 orders of magnitude less mobile than Pu(V) in most environments (4). Further complicating matters, Pu commonly exists simultaneously in several oxidation states (5, 6). Choppin (7) reported Pu may exist as Pu(IV), Pu(V), or Pu(VI) oxic natural groundwaters. It is generally accepted that plutonium associated with suspended particulate matter is predominantly Pu(IV) (8-10), whereas Pu in the aqueous phase is predominantly Pu(V) (2, 11-13). The influence of the character of Mn-containing minerals expected to be found in subsurface repository environments on Pu oxidation state distributions has been the subject of much recent research. Kenney-Kennicutt and Morse (14), Duff et al. (15), and Morgenstern and Choppin (16) observed oxidation of Pu facilitated by Mn(IV)-bearing minerals. Conversely, Shaughnessy et al. (17) used X-ray Absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) to show reduction of Pu(VI) by hausmannite (Mn{sup II}Mn{sub 2}{sup III}O{sub 4}) and manganite ({gamma}-Mn{sup III}OOH) and Kersting et al., (18) observed reduction of Pu(VI) by pyrolusite (Mn{sup IV}O{sub 2}). In this paper, we attempt to reconcile the apparently conflicting datasets by showing that Mn-bearing minerals can indeed oxidize Pu, however, if the oxidized species remains on the solid phase, the oxidation step competes with the formation of Pu(IV) that becomes the predominant solid phase Pu species with time. The experimental approach we took was to conduct longer term (approximately two years later) oxidation state analyses on the Pu sorbed to Yucca Mountain tuff (initial analysis reported by Duff et al., (15)) and measure the time-dependant changes in the oxidation state distribution of Pu in the presence of the Mn mineral pyrolusite.

  13. Functional Role of Infective Viral Particles on Metal Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coates, John D.

    2014-04-01

    A proposed strategy for the remediation of uranium (U) contaminated sites was based on the immobilization of U by reducing the oxidized soluble U, U(VI), to form a reduced insoluble end product, U(IV). Previous studies identified Geobacter sp., including G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens, as predominant U(VI)-reducing bacteria under acetate-oxidizing and U(VI)-reducing conditions. Examination of the finished genome sequence annotation of the canonical metal reducing species Geobacter sulfurreducens strain PCA and G. metallireduceans strain GS-15 as well as the draft genome sequence of G. uraniumreducens strain Rf4 identified phage related proteins. In addition, the completed genome for Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans and the draft genome sequence of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain G20, two more model metal-reducing bacteria, also revealed phage related sequences. The presence of these gene sequences indicated that Geobacter spp., Anaeromyxobacter spp., and Desulfovibrio spp. are susceptible to viral infection. Furthermore, viral populations in soils and sedimentary environments in the order of 6.4×10{sup 6}–2.7×10{sup 10} VLP’s cm{sup -3} have been observed. In some cases, viral populations exceed bacterial populations in these environments suggesting that a relationship may exist between viruses and bacteria. Our preliminary screens of samples collected from the ESR FRC indicated that viral like particles were observed in significant numbers. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential functional role viruses play in metal reduction specifically Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, the environmental parameters affecting viral infection of metal reducing bacteria, and the subsequent effects on U transport.

  14. QER- Comment of William Smith III

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Hello DOE, Thanks for accepting my comments on the Quadrennial Energy Review by e-mail. There will be those who wish to promote nuclear energy as a source of electricity for future use in the USA. I speak against this form of energy. Because it creates long-lived radioactive wastes, nuclear power is incompatible with the biological world in which we live and from which we evolved. The lasting nature of these wastes creates a moral quandry for us in this generation, as we leave behind such biological poisons for our descents to manage, in ways which we do not yet know. A further problem with nucler energy is that any fission reaction creates plutonium, the stuff of nuclear weapons. If nuclear power reactors were to be spread around the world, inevitably the proliferation of nuclear weapons would follow. So-called '4th generation' or 'thorium' reactors suffer from a similar problem, for although they may generate less plutonium, their fuel cycle involves creation of large amounts of U-233 which carries a similar proliferation risk to plutonium-239. I advocate crafting an energy future for our nation bsed on the natural flows of renewable energy, coupled with a diversified structure which generates electricity at many smaller sources. Implicit in any modern energy system is the increased efficiency of energy usage which will continue to lower the bulk amounts of energy, particularly electricity, which our society uses to satisfy our industrial, military, commercial, and personal needs. Clearly as a nation we must participate in the worldwide effort to control the buildup of carbon dioxide gases and other pollutants which threaten the stability of the earth's climate. I would like to bring to your attention these papers from the Rocky Mountain Institute which touch on the above issues: http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2009-09_FourNuclearMyths and http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2012-01_FarewellToFossilFuels and http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/E05-14_NuclearPowerEconomics.... If you have not yet done so, I strongly urge you to contact the Rocky Mountain Institute and contract with them for their advice in consulting on the Quadrennial Energy Review. Sincerely, William Wharton Smith III

  15. Blackbox Stencil Interpolation Method For Model Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peraire, Jaime

    Reservoir Simulation Computational intensive Large geological uncertainty Legacy or commercial code-space-parameter principal component analysis [8] K. Willcox et al., Balanced model reduction via the proper orthogonalBlackbox Stencil Interpolation Method For Model Reduction Han Chen Advisors: Qiqi Wang, Karen

  16. Coarse graining and control theory model reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Jean

    Coarse graining and control theory model reduction David E. Reynolds 1 ABSTRACT: We explain a method, inspired by control the- ory model reduction and interpolation theory, that rigorously applicable to nonequilibrium systems. KEY WORDS: coarse graining; control theory; model reduc- tion; Hankel

  17. Coarse graining and control theory model reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Jean

    Coarse graining and control theory model reduction David E. Reynolds 1 ABSTRACT: We explain a method, inspired by control the­ ory model reduction and interpolation theory, that rigorously applicable to nonequilibrium systems. KEY WORDS: coarse graining; control theory; model reduc­ tion; Hankel

  18. NOx Aftertreatment Using Ethanol as Reductant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The hydrocarbon-SCR that was developed using ethanol and E85 as the reductant showed high NOx reduction, no need for thawing, use of existing infrastructure, and reduced system cost making it a viable alternative to urea-based SCR

  19. Study the kinemages in this file, following along on this worksheet and answering its questions. Use chapter 1 of the Branden & Tooze textbook for background. Practice dragging back & forth slowly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, David

    . Use chapter 1 of the Branden & Tooze textbook for background. Practice dragging back & forth slowly a partial "ball&stick" representation. For a skeletal model, one aspect of the basic physical nature in this representation? ________ Now turn off the spheres and go back to View1. Selected atom labels can be turned on

  20. Study the kinemages in this file, following along on this worksheet and answering its questions. Use chapter 1 of the Branden & Tooze textbook for background. Practice dragging back & forth slowly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, David

    . Use chapter 1 of the Branden & Tooze textbook for background. Practice dragging back & forth slowly model, one aspect of the basic physical nature of the molecule - namely the chemical bonding arrangement you turn the H atoms on & off in this representation? ________ Now turn off the spheres and go back

  1. The thickening effect of interfacial surfactant in the drag-out coating problem This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daripa, Prabir

    The thickening effect of interfacial surfactant in the drag-out coating problem This article has-out coating problem Prabir Daripa1 and G Pa¸sa2 1 Department of Mathematics, Texas A&M University, College.1088/1742-5468/2009/07/L07002 Abstract. In experiments involving dip coating flows on an infinite flat substrate which

  2. REDUCTIONS WITHOUT REGRET: HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swegle, J.; Tincher, D.

    2013-09-09

    This is the first of three papers (in addition to an introductory summary) aimed at providing a framework for evaluating future reductions or modifications of the U.S. nuclear force, first by considering previous instances in which nuclear-force capabilities were eliminated; second by looking forward into at least the foreseeable future at the features of global and regional deterrence (recognizing that new weapon systems currently projected will have expected lifetimes stretching beyond our ability to predict the future); and third by providing examples of past or possible undesirable outcomes in the shaping of the future nuclear force, as well as some closing thoughts for the future. This paper examines the circumstances and consequences of the elimination of ? The INF-range Pershing II ballistic missile and Gryphon Ground-Launched Cruise Missile (GLCM), deployed by NATO under a dual-track strategy to counter Soviet intermediate-range missiles while pursuing negotiations to limit or eliminate all of these missiles. ? The Short-Range Attack Missile (SRAM), which was actually a family of missiles including SRAM A, SRAM B (never deployed), and SRAM II and SRAM T, these last two cancelled during an over-budget/behind-schedule development phase as part of the Presidential Nuclear Initiatives of 1991 and 1992. ? The nuclear-armed version of the Tomahawk Land-Attack Cruise Missile (TLAM/N), first limited to shore-based storage by the PNIs, and finally eliminated in deliberations surrounding the 2010 Nuclear Posture Review Report. ? The Missile-X (MX), or Peacekeeper, a heavy MIRVed ICBM, deployed in fixed silos, rather than in an originally proposed mobile mode. Peacekeeper was likely intended as a bargaining chip to facilitate elimination of Russian heavy missiles. The plan failed when START II did not enter into force, and the missiles were eliminated at the end of their intended service life. ? The Small ICBM (SICBM), or Midgetman, a road-mobile, single-warhead missile for which per-unit costs were climbing when it was eliminated under the PNIs. Although there were liabilities associated with each of these systems, there were also unique capabilities; this paper lays out the pros and cons for each. Further, we articulate the capabilities that were eliminated with these systems.

  3. SURVEY, ECOLOGY, AND SYSTEMATICS OF THE UPPER POTOMAC ESTUARY BIOTA: AUFWUCHS MICROFAUNA PHASE III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    PHASE III Interaction of Zooplankters and Blue-green Algal Blooms Under Organic and Thermal Pollution

  4. Enhanced High Temperature Performance of NOx Reduction Catalyst Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Feng; Kim, Do Heui; Luo, Jinyong; Muntean, George G.; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken; Currier, Neal; Kamasamudram, Krishna; Kumar, Ashok; Li, Junhui; Stafford, Randy; Yezerets, Aleksey; Castagnola, Mario; Chen, Hai Ying; Hess, Howard ..

    2012-12-31

    Two primary NOx after-treatment technologies have been recognized as the most promising approaches for meeting stringent NOx emission standards for diesel vehicles within the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) 2007/2010 mandated limits, NOx Storage Reduction (NSR) and NH3 selective catalytic reduction (SCR); both are, in fact being commercialized for this application. However, in looking forward to 2015 and beyond with expected more stringent regulations, the continued viability of the NSR technology for controlling NOx emissions from lean-burn engines such as diesels will require at least two specific, significant and inter-related improvements. First, it is important to reduce system costs by, for example, minimizing the precious metal content while maintaining, even improving, performance and long-term stability. A second critical need for future NSR systems, as well as for NH3 SCR, will be significantly improved higher and lower temperature performance and stability. Furthermore, these critically needed improvements will contribute significantly to minimizing the impacts to fuel economy of incorporating these after-treatment technologies on lean-burn vehicles. To meet these objectives will require, at a minimum an improved scientific understanding of the following things: i) the various roles for the precious and coinage metals used in these catalysts; ii) the mechanisms for these various roles; iii) the effects of high temperatures on the active metal performance in their various roles; iv) mechanisms for higher temperature NOx storage performance for modified and/or alternative storage materials; v) the interactions between the precious metals and the storage materials in both optimum NOx storage performance and long term stability; vi) the sulfur adsorption and regeneration mechanisms for NOx reduction materials; vii) materials degradation mechanisms in CHA-based NH3 SCR catalysts. The objective of this CRADA project between PNNL and Cummins, Inc. is to develop a fundamental understanding of the above-listed issues. Model catalysts that are based on literature formulations are the focus of the work being carried out at PNNL. In addition, the performance and stability of more realistic high temperature NSR catalysts, supplied by JM, are being studied in order to provide baseline data for the model catalysts that are, again, based on formulations described in the open literature. For this short summary, we will primarily highlight representative results from our recent studies of the stability of candidate high temperature NSR materials.

  5. Suspension Hydrogen Reduction of Iron Oxide Concentrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H.Y. Sohn

    2008-03-31

    The objective of the project is to develop a new ironmaking technology based on hydrogen and fine iron oxide concentrates in a suspension reduction process. The ultimate objective of the new technology is to replace the blast furnace and to drastically reduce CO2 emissions in the steel industry. The goals of this phase of development are; the performance of detailed material and energy balances, thermochemical and equilibrium calculations for sulfur and phosphorus impurities, the determination of the complete kinetics of hydrogen reduction and bench-scale testing of the suspension reduction process using a large laboratory flash reactor.

  6. Nox reduction system utilizing pulsed hydrocarbon injection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brusasco, Raymond M. (Livermore, CA); Penetrante, Bernardino M. (San Ramon, CA); Vogtlin, George E. (Fremont, CA); Merritt, Bernard T. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Hydrocarbon co-reductants, such as diesel fuel, are added by pulsed injection to internal combustion engine exhaust to reduce exhaust NO.sub.x to N.sub.2 in the presence of a catalyst. Exhaust NO.sub.x reduction of at least 50% in the emissions is achieved with the addition of less than 5% fuel as a source of the hydrocarbon co-reductants. By means of pulsing the hydrocarbon flow, the amount of pulsed hydrocarbon vapor (itself a pollutant) can be minimized relative to the amount of NO.sub.x species removed.

  7. Beta Reduction Constraints Manuel Bodirsky Katrin Erk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Beta Reduction Constraints Manuel Bodirsky Katrin Erk Alexander Koller Joachim Niehren Programming Systems Lab Dept. of Computational Linguistics Universit¨at des Saarlandes, Saarbr¨ucken, Germany www.ps.uni-sb.de/~{bodirsky,erk

  8. Energy Efficiency Interest Rate Reduction Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For new and existing home purchases that are rated 6 Star or 5 Star Plus, applicants are eligible for an interest rate reduction for the first $200,000 of the loan amount, with a blended interest...

  9. Sharing the Burden of GHG Reductions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacoby, Henry D.

    The G8 countries propose a goal of a 50% reduction in global emissions by 2050, in an effort that needs to take account of other agreements specifying that developing countries are to be provided with incentives to action ...

  10. Extreme Balance of System Hardware Cost Reduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On September 1, 2011, DOE announced $42.4 million in funding over three years for the Extreme Balance of System Hardware Cost Reduction (BOS-X) funding opportunity. Part of the SunShot Systems...

  11. National Idling Reduction Network News - April 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EBINAR&utmcampaignCH+Robinson+follo wup+2&utmmediumemail DieselProgress Nickel Supercapacitors as Part of an Idle-Reduction Strategy http:www.dpna- digital.comdpna...

  12. Reduction of metal oxides through mechanochemical processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Froes, Francis H. (Moscow, ID); Eranezhuth, Baburaj G. (Moscow, ID); Senkov, Oleg N. (Moscow, ID)

    2000-01-01

    The low temperature reduction of a metal oxide using mechanochemical processing techniques. The reduction reactions are induced mechanically by milling the reactants. In one embodiment of the invention, titanium oxide TiO.sub.2 is milled with CaH.sub.2 to produce TiH.sub.2. Low temperature heat treating, in the range of 400.degree. C. to 700.degree. C., can be used to remove the hydrogen in the titanium hydride.

  13. An Improvement of Diesel PM and NOx Reduction System | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications Development on simultaneous reduction system of NOx and PM from a diesel engine An Improvement of Diesel PM and NOx Reduction System New Diesel Emissions...

  14. Functionality of Commercial NOx Storage-Reduction Catalysts and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Functionality of Commercial NOx Storage-Reduction Catalysts and the Development of a Representative Model Functionality of Commercial NOx Storage-Reduction Catalysts and the...

  15. Dynamometer Evaluation of Plasma-Catalyst for Diesel NOx Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation of Plasma-Catalyst for Diesel NOx Reduction Dynamometer Evaluation of Plasma-Catalyst for Diesel NOx Reduction 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Ford Motor Company...

  16. Selective reduction of NOx in oxygen rich environments with plasma...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    reduction of NOx in oxygen rich environments with plasma-assisted catalysis: Catalyst development and mechanistic studies Selective reduction of NOx in oxygen rich environments...

  17. Development on simultaneous reduction system of NOx and PM from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on simultaneous reduction system of NOx and PM from a diesel engine Development on simultaneous reduction system of NOx and PM from a diesel engine 2003 DEER Converence...

  18. Enhanced High and Low Temperature Performance of NOx Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Low Temperature Performance of NOx Reduction Materials Enhanced High and Low Temperature Performance of NOx Reduction Materials 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

  19. Plasma Assisted Catalysis System for NOx Reduction | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plasma Assisted Catalysis System for NOx Reduction Plasma Assisted Catalysis System for NOx Reduction 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Noxtech, Inc. 2002deerslone.pdf More...

  20. Unique Catalyst System for NOx Reduction in Diesel Exhaust |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalyst System for NOx Reduction in Diesel Exhaust Unique Catalyst System for NOx Reduction in Diesel Exhaust Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions...

  1. Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction...

  2. Methodology for Estimating Reductions of GHG Emissions from Mosaic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Methodology for Estimating Reductions of GHG Emissions from Mosaic Deforestation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Methodology for Estimating Reductions of...

  3. Idling Emissions Reduction Technology with Low Temperature Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Idling Emissions Reduction Technology with Low Temperature Combustion of DI Biodiesel and PFI n-Butanol Idling Emissions Reduction Technology with Low Temperature Combustion of DI...

  4. National Idling Reduction Network News - April 2011 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. apr11networknews.pdf More...

  5. National Idling Reduction Network News - April 2010 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. apr10networknews.pdf More...

  6. National Idling Reduction Network News - October 2009 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. oct09networknews.pdf More...

  7. National Idling Reduction Network News - December 2009 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. dec09networknews.pdf More...

  8. Catalytic reduction system for oxygen-rich exhaust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogtlin, G.E.; Merritt, B.T.; Hsiao, M.C.; Wallman, P.H.; Penetrante, B.M.

    1999-04-13

    Non-thermal plasma gas treatment is combined with selective catalytic reduction to enhance NO{sub x} reduction in oxygen-rich vehicle engine exhausts. 8 figs.

  9. Carbon Emissions Reduction Potential in the US Chemicals and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon Emissions Reduction Potential in the US Chemicals and Pulp and Paper Industries by Applying CHP Technologies, June 1999 Carbon Emissions Reduction Potential in the US...

  10. Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Emission Credit Brokers 2002deersloan.pdf More Documents...

  11. Fuel economy and emissions reduction of HD hybrid truck over...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    economy and emissions reduction of HD hybrid truck over transient driving cycles and interstate roads Fuel economy and emissions reduction of HD hybrid truck over transient driving...

  12. Effects of dissimilatory sulfate reduction on iron (hydr)oxide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effects of dissimilatory sulfate reduction on iron (hydr)oxide reduction and microbial community development May 14, 2014 Tweet EmailPrint Aquatic and terrestrial environments are...

  13. 2014 Annual Planning Summary for the NNSA Global Threat Reduction...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Global Threat Reduction Initiative Office 2014 Annual Planning Summary for the NNSA Global Threat Reduction Initiative Office The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments...

  14. An Improvement of Diesel PM and NOx Reduction System | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Diesel PM and NOx Reduction System Development on simultaneous reduction system of NOx and PM from a diesel engine Simplification of Diesel Emission Control System Packaging...

  15. CRADA with Cummins on Characterization and Reduction of Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cummins on Characterization and Reduction of Combustion Variations CRADA with Cummins on Characterization and Reduction of Combustion Variations 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  16. 2013 Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Final Report 2013 Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Final Report...

  17. Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy and Light Vehicles Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy and...

  18. MOLECULAR MECHANISM OF MICROBIAL TECHNETIUM REDUCTION FINAL REPORT...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    TECHNETIUM REDUCTION FINAL REPORT Microbial Tc(VII) reduction is an attractive alternative strategy for bioremediation of technetium-contaminated subsurface environments....

  19. Selective Catalytic Reduction and Exhaust Gas Recirculation Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reduction and Exhaust Gas Recirculation Systems Optimization Selective Catalytic Reduction and Exhaust Gas Recirculation Systems Optimization A patented EGR-SCR approach was shown...

  20. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Battery Status and Cost Reduction...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Status and Cost Reduction Prospects EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Battery Status and Cost Reduction Prospects Presentation given by technology manager David Howell at the EV...

  1. Analise Matematica III semestre de 1999/2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunes, João Pimentel

    An´alise Matem´atica III 2o semestre de 1999/2000 Exerc´icio resolvido 11 O funcionamento de uma co resultados deste exerc´icio na constru¸c~ao (eventual) de co-inceneradoras reais. 1 #12;

  2. Analise Matematica III semestre de 2001/02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunes, João Pimentel

    An´alise Matem´atica III 1o semestre de 2001/02 Exerc´icio teste 5 (Entregar na aula pr´atica da descrito por S = {(x, y, z) R3 : 1 x2 + y2 + 2z2 4, z 0}. Ap´os t^e-los resolvido com alegria, a menina

  3. Analise Matematica III semestre de 2001/02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira dos Santos, Pedro

    An´alise Matem´atica III 1o semestre de 2001/02 Exerc´icio teste 5 (Entregar na aula pr´atica da descrito por S = {(x, y, z) R3 : 1 x2 + y2 + 2z2 4, z 0}. Ap´os t^e-los resolvido de cabe¸ca, com

  4. Bibliography: Physical Modeling of Musical Instruments Julius O. Smith III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith III, Julius Orion

    Bibliography: Physical Modeling of Musical Instruments Julius O. Smith III Center for Computer · N. H. Fletcher and T. D. Rossing, The Physics of Musical Instruments, Springer-Verlag, 1998 (2nd ed, eds., Mechanics of Musical Instruments, Springer-Verlag, 1995. (More specialized, advanced musical

  5. COMPUTER SCIENCE (Div. III) Chair, Associate Professor BRENT HEERINGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    1 COMPUTER SCIENCE (Div. III) Chair, Associate Professor BRENT HEERINGA Professors: BAILEY, DANYLUK of computers are the goals of the discipline of computer science. A sample of the areas of research investigated by the Williams Department of Computer Science alone illustrates the vast range of topics

  6. Evaluation of Non-intrusive Traffic Detection Technologies Phase III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    TPF-5(171) Evaluation of Non-intrusive Traffic Detection Technologies Ð Phase III #12 not intrude into pavement for installation. ·! Sensors above, below or to the side of the roadway qualify;Miovision #12;Miovision #12;Laser-based sensors #12;PEEK AxleLight #12;TIRTL #12;TIRTL #12;#12;#12;#12;

  7. Mathematics & Statistics Strategic Planning Phase III Part II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Mathematics & Statistics Strategic Planning Phase III Part II 1 Research and The Faculty Overview. Over the past two decades, the Department of Mathematics and Statistics has systematically worked toward its overarching goal of becoming one of the top 10 departments of mathematical sciences among

  8. Mathematics & Statistics Strategic Planning Phase III, Part I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Mathematics & Statistics Strategic Planning Phase III, Part I Departmental Scan & Enhancements and Scholarly Recognition 1. Overview. The Department of Mathematics and Statistics is a community of scholars. The M.S. programs in both Applied Mathematics and Statistics contribute to an important pipeline

  9. III International Climate Change Adaptation Adaptation Futures 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 III International Climate Change Adaptation Conference Adaptation Futures 2014 12-16 May 2014 of Research on Climate Change Vulnerability, Impacts and Adaptation (PROVIA), the Co and reports from the conference in newspapers 93 #12;4 1. INTRODUCTION Climate

  10. CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO #12;Blank page retained for pagination #12;MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, A BRIEF REVIEW 1 By DALE F. LEIPPER, Department oj Oceonography, Agricultural and Mechanical College oj Tuas The best general summary of the weather over the Gulf of Mexico

  11. Renewable Energies III Photovoltaics, Solar & Geo-Thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Energies III Photovoltaics, Solar & Geo-Thermal 21st August - 2nd September 2011 on the principles of solar energy conversion. Theoretical knowledge will be complemented with practical workshops of solar energy conversion. Theoretical knowledge will be comple- mented with practical workshops

  12. Methods for improved growth of group III nitride buffer layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melnik, Yurity; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

    2014-07-15

    Methods are disclosed for growing high crystal quality group III-nitride epitaxial layers with advanced multiple buffer layer techniques. In an embodiment, a method includes forming group III-nitride buffer layers that contain aluminum on suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. A hydrogen halide or halogen gas is flowing into the growth zone during deposition of buffer layers to suppress homogeneous particle formation. Some combinations of low temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) and high temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) may be used to improve crystal quality and morphology of subsequently grown group III-nitride epitaxial layers. The buffer may be deposited on the substrate, or on the surface of another buffer. The additional buffer layers may be added as interlayers in group III-nitride layers (e.g., GaN, AlGaN, AlN).

  13. Physiological Insights Towards Improving Fish Culture L. CURRY WOODS III*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamza, Iqbal

    Physiological Insights Towards Improving Fish Culture L. CURRY WOODS III* Department of Animal, and American Fisheries Society (AFS) Fish Culture Section, was held February 26 through March 2, 2007, in San Antonio, Texas. At this meeting, the AFS Fish Culture and Fish Physiol- ogy Sections co

  14. Land, Food & Community III LFS 450 -W2009 Term 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Land, Food & Community III LFS 450 - W2009 Term 2 Wednesdays 2:00-5:00 pm Classrooms: MCML 166-822-9607 UBC Food System Project Coordinator Sophia Baker-French sophiabakerfrench@yahoo.com Teaching Office, Campus and Community Planning Additional Resource Persons: Art Bomke, Agroecology, Food

  15. Universidad Carlos III de Madrid Departamento de Matem aticas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moro, Esteban

    Madrid. Abril de 1999 #12; #12; Universidad Carlos III de Madrid Departamento de Matem#19;aticas Tesis suelen aparecer los amigos y compa~neros, que son esa parte de la tesis que no depende de uno mismo. En#19;asticas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Objetivos de la tesis

  16. LABORATORY ROTATION REGISTRATION FORM Part III: ACKNOWLEDGED APPROVED BY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmons, Scott

    LABORATORY ROTATION REGISTRATION FORM Part III: ACKNOWLEDGED APPROVED BY Part II: ROTATION LABORATORY INFORMATION Instructions to the student: This form must be submitted with a completed OSHA Form). The Associate Dean's signature will be obtained by the Graduate Office. First Laboratory Rotation Period

  17. Predicting Efficient Antenna Ligands for Tb(III) Emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuel, Amanda P.S.; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth

    2008-10-06

    A series of highly luminescent Tb(III) complexes of para-substituted 2-hydroxyisophthalamide ligands (5LI-IAM-X) has been prepared (X = H, CH{sub 3}, (C=O)NHCH{sub 3}, SO{sub 3}{sup -}, NO{sub 2}, OCH{sub 3}, F, Cl, Br) to probe the effect of substituting the isophthalamide ring on ligand and Tb(III) emission in order to establish a method for predicting the effects of chromophore modification on Tb(III) luminescence. The energies of the ligand singlet and triplet excited states are found to increase linearly with the {pi}-withdrawing ability of the substituent. The experimental results are supported by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations performed on model systems, which predict ligand singlet and triplet energies within {approx}5% of the experimental values. The quantum yield ({Phi}) values of the Tb(III) complex increases with the triplet energy of the ligand, which is in part due to the decreased non-radiative deactivation caused by thermal repopulation of the triplet. Together, the experimental and theoretical results serve as a predictive tool that can be used to guide the synthesis of ligands used to sensitize lanthanide luminescence.

  18. Part III Research Project Stratosphere-Troposphere Exchange of Ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    Part III Research Project Stratosphere-Troposphere Exchange of Ozone Observed by Data Assimilation Stratosphere-Troposphere exchange of ozone at tropopause folds is an important process in the atmosphere. Reconstruction of the evolution of ozone at a tropopause fold by conventional means requires synoptic ozone

  19. A "Circle Limit III" Backbone Arc Formula Douglas Dunham1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham, Doug

    lines make with the bounding circle, and (2) are other such patterns of fish possible? H.S.M. Coxeter provided an exact expression to the answer the first question, and a 3-parameter family of possible fish III by showing a computer rendition of it in Figure 1. Figure 2 shows a pattern of angular fish from

  20. The Family of "Circle Limit III" Escher Patterns Douglas Dunham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham, Doug

    consider the third one of this sequence, Circle Limit III -- a pattern of fish, to be the most beautiful. In this woodcut, four fish meet at right fin tips, three fish meet at left fin tips, and three fish meet at their noses. The backbones of the fish are aligned along white circular arcs. Fish on one arc are the same

  1. MICCAI 2008 Workshop Proceedings Computational Biomechanics for Medicine III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vese, Luminita A.

    MICCAI 2008 Workshop Proceedings Computational Biomechanics for Medicine III Karol Miller, Poul M to fields outside traditional engineering, in particular to biology, the biomedical sciences, and medicine. Computational Biomechanics for Medicine Workshop series was established in 2006 with the first meeting held

  2. Thomas J. Feeley, III National Energy Technology Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    , 2005. Energy Information Agency, Annual Energy Outlook 2006, Regional Tables, 2007. WECC/CA WECC/RM 29Thomas J. Feeley, III National Energy Technology Laboratory First Western Forum on Energy & Water on Energy & Water, March 22, 2007 Outline · Background on issue · Thermoelectric withdrawal and consumption

  3. III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    29 III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27 The previous chapters focused on first generation biofuels. In this chapter we focus on second generation biofuels, specifically biofuels derived from cellulosic or lignocellulosic conversion. Advocates for the development of cellulosic

  4. Wireless Networks III, Fall 05 Lecture 2. Wireless TCP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwefel, Hans-Peter

    Wireless Networks III, Fall 05 Lecture 2. Wireless TCP Exercises 1. TCP Performance: GPRS Scenario or re-orderings occur.] c) Now consider cases of exactly one segment loss on the wireless link. Consider:] The network is now wireless and the wireless link causes an additional packet loss of p'=2%. Furthermore

  5. Chromium Isotope Fractionation During Reduction of Cr(VI) Under Saturated Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamieson-Hanes, Julia H.; Gibson, Blair D.; Lindsay, Matthew B.J.; Kim, Yeongkyoo; Ptacek, Carol J.; Blowes, David W.

    2012-10-25

    Chromium isotopes are potentially useful indicators of Cr(VI) reduction reactions in groundwater flow systems; however, the influence of transport on Cr isotope fractionation has not been fully examined. Laboratory batch and column experiments were conducted to evaluate isotopic fractionation of Cr during Cr(VI) reduction under both static and controlled flow conditions. Organic carbon was used to reduce Cr(VI) in simulated groundwater containing 20 mg L{sup -1} Cr(VI) in both batch and column experiments. Isotope measurements were performed on dissolved Cr on samples from the batch experiments, and on effluent and profile samples from the column experiment. Analysis of the residual solid-phase materials by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy confirmed association of Cr(III) with organic carbon in the column solids. Decreases in dissolved Cr(VI) concentrations were coupled with increases in {delta}{sup 53}Cr, indicating that Cr isotope enrichment occurred during reduction of Cr(VI). The {delta}{sup 53}Cr data from the column experiment was fit by linear regression yielding a fractionation factor ({alpha}) of 0.9979, whereas the batch experiments exhibited Rayleigh-type isotope fractionation ({alpha} = 0.9965). The linear characteristic of the column {delta}{sup 53}Cr data may reflect the contribution of transport on Cr isotope fractionation.

  6. Porosity reduction in Monterey Formation, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Compton, J.S.

    1987-05-01

    Porosity and grain density were determined for different lithologies from throughout a 1.2-km thick section of the Monterey and Sisquoc formations in the Santa Maria basin area, California. Porosity reduction by physical and chemical compaction in the predominantly siliceous sediment is controlled largely by the bulk sediment composition and silica phase transformations. Physical compaction of sediment grains from increasing overburden pressure is responsible for most of the gradual porosity reduction with increasing burial depth in opal-A siliceous ooze and diatomite. The porous, incompressible diatom frustule maintains a high porosity relative to clayey and calcareous sediment. Therefore, a positive correlation exists between porosity and biogenic silica (diatom) content of the sediment. During the opal-A to opal-CT silica phase transformation, solution of the porous diatom frustule and precipitation of cryptocrystalline opal-CT results in a porosity reduction that roughly correlates with the biogenic silica content of the sediment. Local porosity reduction occurs in pore-filling dolomite and chert nodules. Dry bulk density as well as porosity reduction tend to increase with sediment depth. Dolomite and organic matter have the most significant influence on the bulk density because of their respective high and low density. The maximum burial depth of the uplifted and eroded section is estimated by overlapping the porosity-depth relation of average deep-sea siliceous ooze.

  7. The [O III] Veil: Astropause of Eta Carinae's Wind?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith; Jon A. Morse; John Bally

    2005-07-07

    We present narrowband images of eta Carinae in the light of [O III] 5007 obtained with HST/WFPC2, as well as a ground-based image in the same emission line with a larger field of view. These images show a thin veil of [O III] emission around eta Car and its ejecta, confirming the existence of an oxygen-bearing ``cocoon'' inferred from spectra. This [O III] veil may be the remnant of the pre-outburst wind of eta Car, and its outer edge probably marks the interface where eta Car's ejecta meet the stellar wind of the nearby O4 V((f)) star HD303308 or other ambient material -- i.e., it marks the ``astropause'' in eta Car's wind. This veil is part of a more extensive [O III] shell that appears to be shaped and ionized by HD303308. A pair of HST images with a 10 yr baseline shows no proper motion, limiting the expansion speed away from eta Car to 12pm13 km/s, or an expansion age of a few times 10^4 yr. Thus, this is probably the decelerated pre-outburst LBV wind of eta Car. The [O III] morphology is very different from that seen in [N II], which traces young knots of CNO-processed material; this represents a dramatic shift in the chemical makeup of material recently ejected by eta Car. This change in the chemical abundances may have resulted from the sudden removal of the star's outer envelope during eta Car's 19th century outburst or an earlier but similar event.

  8. Complexation of Am(III) and Nd(III) by 1,10-Phenanthroline-2,9-Dicarboxylic Acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogden, Mark D.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Nilsson, Mikael; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Hancock, Robert D.; Nash, Ken L.

    2013-01-01

    The complexant 1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylic acid (PDA) is a planar tetradentate ligand that is more preorganized for metal complexation than its unconstrained analogue ethylendiiminodiacetic acid (EDDA). Furthermore, the backbone nitrogen atoms of PDA are aromatic, hence are softer than the aliphatic amines of EDDA. It has been hypothesized that PDA will selectively bond to trivalent actinides over lanthanides. In this report, the results of spectrophotometric studies of the complexation of Nd(III) and Am(III) by PDA are reported. Because the complexes are moderately stable, it was necessary to conduct these titrations using competitive equilibrium methods, competitive cation omplexing between PDA and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid, and competition between ligand protonation and complex formation. Stability constants and ligand protonation constants were determined at 0.1 mol/L ionic strength and at 0.5 mol/L ionic strength nitrate media at 21 ± 1 C. The stability constants are lower than those predicted from first principles and speciation calculations indicate that Am(III) selectivity over Nd(III) is less than that exhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline.

  9. Direct electrochemical reduction of metal-oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redey, Laszlo I. (Downers Grove, IL); Gourishankar, Karthick (Downers Grove, IL)

    2003-01-01

    A method of controlling the direct electrolytic reduction of a metal oxide or mixtures of metal oxides to the corresponding metal or metals. A non-consumable anode and a cathode and a salt electrolyte with a first reference electrode near the non-consumable anode and a second reference electrode near the cathode are used. Oxygen gas is produced and removed from the cell. The anode potential is compared to the first reference electrode to prevent anode dissolution and gas evolution other than oxygen, and the cathode potential is compared to the second reference electrode to prevent production of reductant metal from ions in the electrolyte.

  10. Shedding of Vortex Rings from an Oscillating Sphere in Superfluid He-4 below 0.5 K - The Origin of the Turbulent Drag Force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoepe, W

    2013-01-01

    The onset of turbulent flow around an oscillating sphere is known to occur at a critical velocity vc ~ sqrt(kappa omega) where kappa is the circulation quantum and omega is the oscillation frequency. However, in a small interval of driving force amplitudes F (or corresponding velocity amplitudes of few percent above vc) the turbulent flow is found to be unstable. The flow pattern switches intermittently between potential flow and turbulence. The lifetimes of the turbulent phases have an exponential distribution and the mean lifetimes tau grow very rapidly with increasing driving force, namely as tau(F) ~ exp [(F/F1)^2]. In this work this experimental result is analyzed in more detail than before, in particular the force F1 is identified. As a result, the turbulent drag force F(v) ~ (v^2 - vc^2) can be ascribed quantitatively to the shedding of vortex rings having the size of the sphere. Moreover, we can infer the average number of vortex rings that are shed per half-period at any given velocity v on the turbu...

  11. Aero III/IV Complex Variable Theory Handout 1 A. G. Walton Derivatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walton, Andrew G

    Aero III/IV Complex Variable Theory Handout 1 A. G. Walton Derivatives If i+}, is single the coefficients dn are unique. #12;Aero III/IV Complex Variable Theory Handout 2 A. G. Walton Residues

  12. Design of scaled electronic devices based on III-V materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lingquan

    2009-01-01

    superior III-V semiconductor material properties, namely theproperties and material versatility of the III-V semiconductormaterial properties, i.e. the electronic structure. Conventional treatment of semiconductor

  13. Perspectives Regarding Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction in the Northeast

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Presentation: North East States for Coordinated Air Use Management

  14. Nanowire-templated lateral epitaxial growth of non-polar group III nitrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, George T. (Albuquerque, NM); Li, Qiming (Albuquerque, NM); Creighton, J. Randall (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-03-02

    A method for growing high quality, nonpolar Group III nitrides using lateral growth from Group III nitride nanowires. The method of nanowire-templated lateral epitaxial growth (NTLEG) employs crystallographically aligned, substantially vertical Group III nitride nanowire arrays grown by metal-catalyzed metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) as templates for the lateral growth and coalescence of virtually crack-free Group III nitride films. This method requires no patterning or separate nitride growth step.

  15. "Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity and Poverty Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of plant, animal and micro-organism communities and the nonliving environment interacting as a functional and the nonliving environment interacting as a functional unit." "Ecosystem services are the benefits people capture for the foreseeable future. #12;John Beddington's "Perfect Storm" Population Increase Poverty Reduction Food Security

  16. Cost reduction ideas for LNG terminals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habibullah, A.; Weldin, F.

    1999-07-01

    LNG projects are highly capital intensive and this has long been regarded as being inevitable. However, recent developments are forcing the LNG industry to aggressively seek cost reductions. For example, the gas-to-liquids (GTL) process is increasingly seen as a potential rival technology and is often being touted as an economically superior alternative fuel source. Another strong driving force behind needed cost reductions is the low crude oil price which seems to have settled in the $10--13/bb. range. LNG is well positioned as the fuel of choice for environmentally friendly new power projects. As a result of the projected demand for power especially in the Pacific Rim countries several LNG terminal projects are under consideration. Such projects will require a new generation of LNG terminal designs emphasizing low cost, small scale and safe and fully integrated designs from LNG supply to power generation. The integration of the LNG terminal with the combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) power plant offers substantial cost savings opportunities for both plants. Various cost reduction strategies and their impact on the terminal design are discussed including cost reduction due to integration.

  17. Can fermions save large N dimensional reduction?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulo F. Bedaque; Michael I. Buchoff; Aleksey Cherman; Roxanne P. Springer

    2009-08-21

    This paper explores whether Eguchi-Kawai reduction for gauge theories with adjoint fermions is valid. The Eguchi-Kawai reduction relates gauge theories in different numbers of dimensions in the large $N$ limit provided that certain conditions are met. In principle, this relation opens up the possibility of learning about the dynamics of 4D gauge theories through techniques only available in lower dimensions. Dimensional reduction can be understood as a special case of large $N$ equivalence between theories related by an orbifold projection. In this work, we focus on the simplest case of dimensional reduction, relating a 4D gauge theory to a 3D gauge theory via an orbifold projection. A necessary condition for the large N equivalence between the 4D and 3D theories to hold is that certain discrete symmetries in the two theories must not be broken spontaneously. In pure 4D Yang-Mills theory, these symmetries break spontaneously as the size of one of the spacetime dimensions shrinks. An analysis of the effect of adjoint fermions on the relevant symmetries of the 4D theory shows that the fermions help stabilize the symmetries. We consider the same problem from the point of view of the lower dimensional 3D theory and find that, surprisingly, adjoint fermions are not generally enough to stabilize the necessary symmetries of the 3D theory. In fact, a rich phase diagram arises, with a complicated pattern of symmetry breaking. We discuss the possible causes and consequences of this finding.

  18. Harm reduction: lessons learned from tobacco control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , such as the psychoactive effects of the sub- stance. How do harm reduction efforts fare when exposed to the harsh realities, it is possible (often unconsciously) to modify subsequent smoking behaviour to titrate the amount of nicotine be modified, both consciously and unconsciously, to achieve this. Therefore, offer- ing lower strength drugs

  19. Water Reduction Methods for Strawberry Irrigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    Water Reduction Methods for Strawberry Irrigation Thomas Moore Raya Nedelcheva Joseph Vu Tony Mai #12;Abstract We took a look at the irrigation methods of strawberry farmers in the Pajaro Valley and ways that they could reduce the amount of water that it takes to produce their strawberries. In many

  20. Ozone Reductions using Residential Building Envelopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, of the U.S. Department of Energy Residential Building Envelopes Prepared For: California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy ResearchOzone Reductions using Residential Building Envelopes I.S. Walker, M.H. Sherman and W.W. Nazaroff

  1. University of Alberta MULTISPECTRAL REDUCTION OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowman,John C.

    University of Alberta MULTISPECTRAL REDUCTION OF TWO-DIMENSIONAL TURBULENCE by Malcolm Roberts Sciences c Malcolm Roberts Fall 2011 Edmonton, Alberta Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private

  2. Timelike reduction and T-duality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scuro, Sante Rodolfo

    1999-01-01

    expressions for the Killing sailors in Anti-de Sitter spacetime of odd dimension with respect to the field reparametrization in the bosonic sector. In addition, we perform Kaluza-Klein reduction along the time direction of D = 10 type IIB theory to D = 9. Then...

  3. BARNARD COLLEGE SALARY REDUCTION AGREEMENT TWU & 2110

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BARNARD COLLEGE SALARY REDUCTION AGREEMENT ­ TWU & 2110 By THIS AGREEMENT made between of this Agreement), the employee's basic monthly salary will be reduced by the amount indicated below, allocated so that it will not apply to salary subsequently earned. Standard SRA Deduction for 2015: The Amount

  4. BARNARD COLLEGE SALARY REDUCTION AGREEMENT Faculty & Administrators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BARNARD COLLEGE SALARY REDUCTION AGREEMENT ­ Faculty & Administrators By THIS AGREEMENT made is subsequent to the execution of this Agreement), the employee's basic monthly salary will be reduced party may terminate this Agreement as of the end of the month so that it will not apply to salary

  5. Generalized Elitzur's Theorem and Dimensional Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristian D. Batista; Zohar Nussinov

    2005-03-10

    We extend Elitzur's theorem to systems with symmetries intermediate between global and local. In general, our theorem formalizes the idea of {\\it dimensional reduction}. We apply the results of this generalization to many systems that are of current interest. These include liquid crystalline phases of Quantum Hall systems, orbital systems, geometrically frustrated spin lattices, Bose metals, and models of superconducting arrays.

  6. Waste reduction through consumer education. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, E.Z.

    1996-05-01

    The Waste Reduction through Consumer Education research project was conducted to determine how environmental educational strategies influence purchasing behavior in the supermarket. The objectives were to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate consumer education strategies for waste reduction. The amount of waste generated by packaging size and form, with an adjustment for local recyclability of waste, was determined for 14 product categories identified as having more waste generating and less waste generating product choices (a total of 484 products). Using supermarket scan data and shopper identification numbers, the research tracked the purchases of shoppers in groups receiving different education treatments for 9 months. Statistical tests applied to the purchase data assessed patterns of change between the groups by treatment period. Analysis of the data revealed few meaningful statistical differences between study groups or changes in behavior over time. Findings suggest that broad brush consumer education about waste reduction is not effective in changing purchasing behaviors in the short term. However, it may help create a general awareness of the issues surrounding excess packaging and consumer responsibility. The study concludes that the answer to waste reduction in the future may be a combination of voluntary initiatives by manufacturers and retailers, governmental intervention, and better-informed consumers.

  7. Reduction of Economic Inequality in Combinatorial Domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koolen, Marijn

    for assessing the fairness of a mechanism is the level of economic equality it can ensure. If it producesReduction of Economic Inequality in Combinatorial Domains Ulle Endriss Institute for Logic economic inequality, such as the Lorenz curve and the Gini index, are widely used in the social sciences

  8. Tracking the Sun III; The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2011-01-01

    from 1998-2009 Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost ofSystems MW Total Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost ofthrough 2009. Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost of

  9. Tracking the Sun III; The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2011-01-01

    U.S. from 1998-2009 Tracking the Sun III: The Installed CostMW No. Systems MW Total Tracking the Sun III: The InstalledU.S. through 2009. Tracking the Sun III: The Installed Cost

  10. Subsurface Uranium Fate and Transport: Integrated Experiments and Modeling of Coupled Biogeochemical Mechanisms of Nanocrystalline Uraninite Oxidation by Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides - Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peyton, Brent M. [Montana State University; Timothy, Ginn R. [University of California Davis; Sani, Rajesh K. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology

    2013-08-14

    Subsurface bacteria including sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) with subsequent precipitation of UO2. We have shown that SRB reduce U(VI) to nanometer-sized UO2 particles (1-5 nm) which are both intra- and extracellular, with UO2 inside the cell likely physically shielded from subsequent oxidation processes. We evaluated the UO2 nanoparticles produced by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 under growth and non-growth conditions in the presence of lactate or pyruvate and sulfate, thiosulfate, or fumarate, using ultrafiltration and HR-TEM. Results showed that a significant mass fraction of bioreduced U (35-60%) existed as a mobile phase when the initial concentration of U(VI) was 160 µM. Further experiments with different initial U(VI) concentrations (25 - 900 ?M) in MTM with PIPES or bicarbonate buffers indicated that aggregation of uraninite depended on the initial concentrations of U(VI) and type of buffer. It is known that under some conditions SRB-mediated UO2 nanocrystals can be reoxidized (and thus remobilized) by Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides, common constituents of soils and sediments. To elucidate the mechanism of UO2 reoxidation by Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, we studied the impact of Fe and U chelating compounds (citrate, NTA, and EDTA) on reoxidation rates. Experiments were conducted in anaerobic batch systems in PIPES buffer. Results showed EDTA significantly accelerated UO2 reoxidation with an initial rate of 9.5?M day-1 for ferrihydrite. In all cases, bicarbonate increased the rate and extent of UO2 reoxidation with ferrihydrite. The highest rate of UO2 reoxidation occurred when the chelator promoted UO2 and Fe(III) (hydr)oxide dissolution as demonstrated with EDTA. When UO2 dissolution did not occur, UO2 reoxidation likely proceeded through an aqueous Fe(III) intermediate as observed for both NTA and citrate. To complement to these laboratory studies, we collected U-bearing samples from a surface seep at the Rifle field site and have measured elevated U concentrations in oxic iron-rich sediments. To translate experimental results into numerical analysis of U fate and transport, a reaction network was developed based on Sani et al. (2004) to simulate U(VI) bioreduction with concomitant UO2 reoxidation in the presence of hematite or ferrihydrite. The reduction phase considers SRB reduction (using lactate) with the reductive dissolution of Fe(III) solids, which is set to be microbially mediated as well as abiotically driven by sulfide. Model results show the oxidation of HS– by Fe(III) directly competes with UO2 reoxidation as Fe(III) oxidizes HS– preferentially over UO2. The majority of Fe reduction is predicted to be abiotic, with ferrihydrite becoming fully consumed by reaction with sulfide. Predicted total dissolved carbonate concentrations from the degradation of lactate are elevated (log(pCO2) ~ –1) and, in the hematite system, yield close to two orders-of-magnitude higher U(VI) concentrations than under initial carbonate concentrations of 3 mM. Modeling of U(VI) bioreduction with concomitant reoxidation of UO2 in the presence of ferrihydrite was also extended to a two-dimensional field-scale groundwater flow and biogeochemically reactive transport model for the South Oyster site in eastern Virginia. This model was developed to simulate the field-scale immobilization and subsequent reoxidation of U by a biologically mediated reaction network.

  11. The Pseudomonas syringae type III effector HopG1 targets mitochondria, alters plant development and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    conserved molecules on microorganisms called pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) sometimes pathogen Pseudomonas syrin- gae uses a type III protein secretion system to inject type III effectors) and pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI). The type III effector HopG1

  12. Plasma-assisted catalytic storage reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Penetrante, Bernardino M. (San Ramon, CA); Vogtlin, George E. (Fremont, CA); Merritt, Bernard T. (Livermore, CA); Brusasco, Raymond M. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A two-stage method for NO.sub.x reduction in an oxygen-rich engine exhaust comprises a plasma oxidative stage and a storage reduction stage. The first stage employs a non-thermal plasma treatment of NO.sub.x gases in an oxygen-rich exhaust and is intended to convert NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons. The second stage employs a lean NO.sub.x trap to convert such NO.sub.2 to environmentally benign gases that include N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O. By preconverting NO to NO.sub.2 in the first stage with a plasma, the efficiency of the second stage for NO.sub.x reduction is enhanced. For example, an internal combustion engine exhaust is connected by a pipe to a first chamber in which a non-thermal plasma converts NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons, such as propene. A flow of such hydrocarbons (C.sub.x H.sub.y) is input from usually a second pipe into at least a portion of the first chamber. The NO.sub.2 from the plasma treatment proceeds to a storage reduction catalyst (lean NO.sub.x trap) that converts NO.sub.2 to N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O, and includes a nitrate-forming catalytic site. The hydrocarbons and NO.sub.x are simultaneously reduced while passing through the lean-NO.sub.x trap catalyst. The method allows for enhanced NO.sub.x reduction in vehicular engine exhausts, particularly those having relatively high sulfur contents.

  13. Plasma-assisted catalytic storage reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Penetrante, Bernardino M. (San Ramon, CA); Vogtlin, George E. (Fremont, CA); Merritt, Bernard T. (Livermore, CA); Brusasco, Raymond M. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A two-stage method for NO.sub.x reduction in an oxygen-rich engine exhaust comprises a plasma oxidative stage and a storage reduction stage. The first stage employs a non-thermal plasma treatment of NO.sub.x gases in an oxygen-rich exhaust and is intended to convert NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons. The second stage employs a lean NO.sub.x trap to convert such NO.sub.2 to environmentally benign gases that include N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O. By preconverting NO to NO.sub.2 in the first stage with a plasma, the efficiency of the second stage for NO.sub.x reduction is enhanced. For example, an internal combustion engine exhaust is connected by a pipe to a first chamber in which a non-thermal plasma converts NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons, such as propene. A flow of such hydrocarbons (C.sub.x H.sub.y) is input from usually a second pipe into at least a portion of the first chamber. The NO.sub.2 from the plasma treatment proceeds to a storage reduction catalyst (lean NO.sub.x trap) that converts NO.sub.2 to N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O, and includes a nitrate-forming catalytic site. The hydrocarbons and NO.sub.x are simultaneously reduced while passing through the lean-NO.sub.x trap catalyst. The method allows for enhanced NO.sub.x reduction in vehicular engine exhausts, particularly those having relatively high sulfur contents.

  14. Actinide (III) solubility in WIPP Brine: data summary and recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borkowski, Marian; Lucchini, Jean-Francois; Richmann, Michael K.; Reed, Donald T.

    2009-09-01

    The solubility of actinides in the +3 oxidation state is an important input into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) performance assessment (PA) models that calculate potential actinide release from the WIPP repository. In this context, the solubility of neodymium(III) was determined as a function of pH, carbonate concentration, and WIPP brine composition. Additionally, we conducted a literature review on the solubility of +3 actinides under WIPP-related conditions. Neodymium(III) was used as a redox-invariant analog for the +3 oxidation state of americium and plutonium, which is the oxidation state that accounts for over 90% of the potential release from the WIPP through the dissolved brine release (DBR) mechanism, based on current WIPP performance assessment assumptions. These solubility data extend past studies to brine compositions that are more WIPP-relevant and cover a broader range of experimental conditions than past studies.

  15. Analise Matematica III semestre de 1999/2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granja, Gustavo

    An´alise Matem´atica III 1o semestre de 1999/2000 Exerc´icio teste 7 Mostre que existe uma vizinhan resolvido para u e v como fun¸c~oes de x e y. Calcule a derivada u x (1, 1). Solu¸c~ao: Consideremos a fun teorema da fun¸c~ao impl´icita, em alguma vizinhan¸ca de (1, 1, 1, 1), o sistema pode ser resolvido em

  16. Can Population III Stars at High Redshifts produce GRB's?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

    2010-08-24

    Gamma ray bursts are the most luminous physical phenomena in the universe, consisting of flashes of gamma rays that last from seconds to hours. There have been attempts to observe gamma ray bursts, for example, from population III stars of about 500 solar mass at high redshifts. Here we argue that collapse of such high mass stars does not lead to gamma ray burst as their core collapse temperatures are not sufficient to produce gamma rays, leading to GRBs.

  17. Method of fabricating vertically aligned group III-V nanowires

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2014-11-25

    A top-down method of fabricating vertically aligned Group III-V micro- and nanowires uses a two-step etch process that adds a selective anisotropic wet etch after an initial plasma etch to remove the dry etch damage while enabling micro/nanowires with straight and smooth faceted sidewalls and controllable diameters independent of pitch. The method enables the fabrication of nanowire lasers, LEDs, and solar cells.

  18. Raft River III Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/Water Use/NevadaaToolsRadioactiveRadiometricsIII Geothermal

  19. Novel reactions of a neutral organic reductant : reductive coupling and nanoparticle synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mork, Anna Jolene

    2012-01-01

    A recently developed bis-pyridinylidene neutral organic electron donor captured our interest as a potential source of new chemistries for reductive coupling and the synthesis of group IV nanoparticles. This super electron ...

  20. PROJECT PROFILE: High-Efficiency, Low-Cost, One-Sun, III-V Photovoltaics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low-cost III-V photovoltaics have the potential to lower the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) because III-V cells outperform silicon in terms of efficiency and annual energy harvesting efficiency. In this project, researchers will address both the high costs of III-V epitaxy and single crystal substrates. Hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) is the most promising inexpensive, rapid-growth technique for high efficiency, III-V materials. The continued development of high-throughput HVPE, will be coupled with novel epitaxial liftoff strategies to enable III-V solar cells that are cost-competitive under one-sun conditions.

  1. GAS KINEMATICS AND THE DRAGGED MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE HIGH-MASS MOLECULAR OUTFLOW SOURCE G192.16-3.84: AN SMA VIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Hauyu Baobab; Ho, Paul T. P. [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Qiu Keping [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhang Qizhou [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Girart, Josep M. [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai, (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciencies, C5p 2, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    We report Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of polarized 0.88 mm thermal dust emission and various molecular line transitions toward the early B-type (L{sub *} {approx} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} L{sub Sun }) star-forming region G192.16-3.84 (IRAS 05553+1631). The peak of the continuum Stokes-I emission coincides with a hot rotating disk/envelope (SO{sub 2} rotational temperature T{sub rot}{sup SO{sub 2}}{approx}84{sup +18}{sub -13} K), with a north-south velocity gradient. Joint analysis of the rotation curve traced by HCO{sup +} 4-3 and SO{sub 2} 19{sub 1,19}-18{sub 0,18} suggests that the dense molecular gas is undergoing a spinning-up rotation, marginally bound by the gravitational force of an enclosed mass M{sub *+gas+dust} {approx} 11.2-25.2 M{sub Sun }. Perpendicular to the rotational plane, a {approx}>100/cos (i) km s{sup -1} (i {approx} 63 Degree-Sign ) high velocity molecular jet and a {approx}15-20 km s{sup -1} expanding biconical cavity were revealed in the CO 3-2 emission. The polarization percentage of the 0.88 mm continuum emission decreases toward the central rotating disk/envelope. The polarization angle in the inner {approx}2'' (0.015 pc) disk/envelope is perpendicular to the plane of the rotation. The magnetic field lines, which are predominantly in the toroidal direction along the disk plane, are likely to be dragged by the gravitationally accelerated rotation.

  2. Definitive design report: Design report project W-025, Radioactive Mixed Waste (RMW) Land Disposal Facility NON-DRAG-OFF. Revision 1, Volume 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roscha, V.

    1994-11-29

    The purpose of this report is to describe the definitive design of the Radioactive Mixed Waste (RMW) Non-Drag-Off disposal facility, Project W-025. This report presents a n of the major landfill design features and a discussion of how each of the criteria is addressed in the design. The appendices include laboratory test results, design drawings, and individual analyses that were conducted in support of the design. Revision 1 of this document incorporates design changes resulting from an increase in the required operating life of the W-025 landfill from 2 to 20 years. The rationale for these design changes is described in Golder Associates Inc. 1991a. These changes include (1) adding a 1.5-foot-thick layer of compacted admix directory-under the primary FML on the floor of the landfill to mitigate the effects of possible stress cracking in the primary flexible membrane liner (FML), and (2) increasing the operations layer thickness from two to three feet over the entire landfill area, to provide additional protection for the secondary admix layer against mechanical damage and the effects of freezing and desiccation. The design of the W-025 Landfill has also been modified in response to the results of the EPA Method 9090 chemical compatibility testing program (Golder Associates Inc. 1991b and 1991c), which was completed after the original design was prepared. This program consisted of testing geosynthetic materials and soil/bentonite admix with synthetic leachate having the composition expected during the life of the W-025 Landfill., The results of this program indicated that the polyester geotextile originally specified for the landfill might be susceptible to deterioration. On this basis, polypropylene geotextiles were substituted as a more chemically-resistant alternative. In addition, the percentage of bentonite in the admix was increased to provide sufficiently low permeability to the expected leachate.

  3. NSIDC Data Center: Energy Reduction Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-05-01

    The Green Data Center Project was a successful effort to significantly reduce the energy use of the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). Through a full retrofit of a traditional air conditioning system, the cooling energy required to meet the data center’s constant load has been reduced by over 70% for summer months and over 90% for cooler winter months. This significant reduction is achievable through the use of airside economization and a new indirect evaporative cooling cycle. One of the goals of this project was to create awareness of simple and effective energy reduction strategies for data centers. Although this particular project was able to maximize the positive effects of airside economization and indirect evaporative cooling because of its geographic location, similar strategies may also be relevant for many other sites and data centers in the United States.

  4. Modelling Hydrogen Reduction and Hydrodeoxygenation of Oxygenates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Y.; Xu, Q.; Cheah, S.

    2013-01-01

    Based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) simulations, we have studied the reduction of nickel oxide and biomass derived oxygenates (catechol, guaiacol, etc.) in hydrogen. Both the kinetic barrier and thermodynamic favorability are calculated with respect to the modeled reaction pathways. In early-stage reduction of the NiO(100) surface by hydrogen, the pull-off of the surface oxygen atom and simultaneous activation of the nearby Ni atoms coordinately dissociate the hydrogen molecules so that a water molecule can be formed, leaving an oxygen vacancy on the surface. In hydrogen reaction with oxygenates catalyzed by transition metals, hydrogenation of the aromatic carbon ring normally dominates. However, selective deoxygenation is of particular interest for practical application such as biofuel conversion. Our modeling shows that doping of the transition metal catalysts can change the orientation of oxygenates adsorbed on metal surfaces. The correlation between the selectivity of reaction and the orientation of adsorption are discussed.

  5. Plant-Wide NOx Reduction Strategies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baukal, C.; Waibel, D.; Webster, T.

    2006-01-01

    flue gases into the flame is a proven technique for reducing NOx emissions (see Figure 6). There are two common ways to recirculate combustion exhaust products through a flame – flue gas recirculation (FGR) and internal flue gas recirculation... reduces NOx. Garg (1992) estimated NOx reductions of up to 50% using flue gas recirculation [7]. combustor burner fuel recirculated combustion products air ID fan to atmosphere Figure 7. Schematic of flue gas recirculation [8]. Internal flue gas...

  6. Bibliography of greenhouse-gas reduction strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tompkins, M.M.; Mintz, M.M.

    1995-03-01

    A bibliography of greenhouse-gas reduction strategies has been compiled to assist the Climate change Action Plan Task Force in their consideration of strategies to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions from personal motor vehicles. The document contains a summary of the literature, including it major directions and implications; and annotated listing of 32 recent pertinent documents; and a listing of a larger group of related reports.

  7. Denksport: Oxidations, oxidations and reductions too

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -(+)-tartrate as a ligand Sharpless asymmetric epoxidation Shi epoxidation #12;HSO5 -O OO O O O O O O O O OH O O SO3 - + OH- - OH- O O O O O O O O SO3 - O O O O O O O SO4 2- R3R1 R2 R3R1 R2 O #12;Reductions O OH B Me H O 8 F OH

  8. Incomplete Dirac reduction of constrained Hamiltonian systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Chandre

    2014-12-16

    First-class constraints constitute a potential obstacle to the computation of a Poisson bracket in Dirac's theory of constrained Hamiltonian systems. Using the pseudoinverse instead of the inverse of the matrix defined by the Poisson brackets between the constraints, we show that a Dirac-Poisson bracket can be constructed, even if it corresponds to an incomplete reduction of the original Hamiltonian system. The uniqueness of Dirac brackets is discussed.

  9. MFV Reductions of MSSM Parameter Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. S. AbdusSalam; C. P. Burgess; F. Quevedo

    2015-02-09

    The 100+ free parameters of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) make it computationally difficult to compare systematically with data, motivating the study of specific parameter reductions such as the cMSSM and pMSSM. Here we instead study the reductions of parameter space implied by using minimal flavour violation (MFV) to organise the R-parity conserving MSSM, with a view towards systematically building in constraints on flavour-violating physics. Within this framework the space of parameters is reduced by expanding soft supersymmetry-breaking terms in powers of the Cabibbo angle, leading to a 24-, 30- or 42-parameter framework (which we call MSSM-24, MSSM-30, and MSSM-42 respectively), depending on the order kept in the expansion. We provide a Bayesian global fit to data of the MSSM-30 parameter set to show that this is manageable with current tools. We compare the MFV reductions to the 19-parameter pMSSM choice and show that the pMSSM is not contained as a subset. The MSSM-30 analysis favours a relatively lighter TeV-scale pseudoscalar Higgs boson and $\\tan \\beta \\sim 10$ with multi-TeV sparticles.

  10. Reduction of dimension for nonlinear dynamical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heather A. Harrington; Robert A. Van Gorder

    2015-08-24

    We consider reduction of dimension for nonlinear dynamical systems. We demonstrate that in some cases, one can reduce a nonlinear system of equations into a single equation for one of the state variables, and this can be useful for computing the solution when using a variety of analytical approaches. In the case where this reduction is possible, we employ differential elimination to obtain the reduced system. While analytical, the approach is algorithmic, and is implemented in symbolic software such as {\\sc MAPLE} or {\\sc SageMath}. In other cases, the reduction cannot be performed strictly in terms of differential operators, and one obtains integro-differential operators, which may still be useful. In either case, one can use the reduced equation to both approximate solutions for the state variables and perform chaos diagnostics more efficiently than could be done for the original higher-dimensional system, as well as to construct Lyapunov functions which help in the large-time study of the state variables. A number of chaotic and hyperchaotic dynamical systems are used as examples in order to motivate the approach.

  11. BioPS'06, October 24-25, III.19-III.26 3D HP Protein Folding Problem using Ant Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fidanova, Stefka

    BioPS ® BioPS'06, October 24-25, III.19-III.26 3D HP Protein Folding Problem using Ant Algorithm for the correct structure in the huge conformation space. Due to the complexity of the protein folding problem protein folding problem. It is based on very simple design choices in particular with respect

  12. Harnessing microbial subsurface metal reduction activities to synthesise nanoscale cobalt ferrite with enhanced magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coker, Victoria S.; Telling, Neil D.; van der Laan, Gerrit; Pattrick, Richard A.D.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Arenholz, Elke; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E.P.; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2009-03-24

    Nanoscale ferrimagnetic particles have a diverse range of uses from directed cancer therapy and drug delivery systems to magnetic recording media and transducers. Such applications require the production of monodisperse nanoparticles with well-controlled size, composition, and magnetic properties. To fabricate these materials purely using synthetic methods is costly in both environmental and economical terms. However, metal-reducing microorganisms offer an untapped resource to produce these materials. Here, the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens is used to synthesize magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. A combination of electron microscopy, soft X-ray spectroscopy, and magnetometry techniques was employed to show that this method of biosynthesis results in high yields of crystalline nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution and magnetic properties equal to the best chemically synthesized materials. In particular, it is demonstrated here that cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles with low temperature coercivity approaching 8 kOe and an effective anisotropy constant of {approx} 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup -3} can be manufactured through this biotechnological route. The dramatic enhancement in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles by the introduction of high quantities of Co into the spinel structure represents a significant advance over previous biomineralization studies in this area using magnetotactic bacteria. The successful production of nanoparticulate ferrites achieved in this study at high yields could open up the way for the scaled-up industrial manufacture of nanoparticles using environmentally benign methodologies. Production of ferromagnetic nanoparticles for pioneering cancer therapy, drug delivery, chemical sensors, catalytic activity, photoconductive materials, as well as more traditional uses in data storage embodies a large area of inorganic synthesis research. In particular, the addition of transition metals other than Fe into the structure of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) has been shown to greatly enhance the magnetic properties of the particles, tailoring them to different commercial uses. However, synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles is often carried out at high temperatures with toxic solvents resulting in high environmental and energy costs. Additionally, these ferrite nanoparticles are not intrinsically biocompatible, and to make them suitable for insertion into the human body is a rather intricate task. A relatively unexplored resource for magnetic nanomaterial production is subsurface Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, as these microorganisms are capable of producing large quantities of nanoscale magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) at ambient temperatures. Metal-reducing bacteria live in environments deficient in oxygen and conserve energy for growth through the oxidation of hydrogen or organic electron donors, coupled to the reduction of oxidized metals such as Fe(III)-bearing minerals. This can result in the formation of magnetite via the extracellular reduction of amorphous Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides causing the release of soluble Fe(II) and resulting in complete recrystallization of the amorphous mineral into a new phase. Some previous studies have reported altering the composition of biogenic magnetite produced by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria for industrial and environmental applications. However, research into the commercial exploitation of bacteria to form magnetic minerals has focused primarily on magnetotactic bacteria which form magnetosomal magnetite internally using very different pathways to those bacteria forming magnetite outside the cell. Magnetotactic bacteria live at the sediment-water interface and use internal nanomagnets to guide them to their preferred environmental niche using the Earth's magnetic field. Since magnetotactic bacteria generally grow optimally under carefully controlled microaerobic conditions, the culturing processes for these organisms are challenging and result in low yields of nanomagnetite. Despite these limitations, magnetotactic bacteria have bee

  13. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report III, Volume 2. Specifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-01-01

    Report III, Volume 2 contains those specifications numbered K through Y, as follows: Specifications for Compressors (K); Specifications for Piping (L); Specifications for Structures (M); Specifications for Insulation (N); Specifications for Electrical (P); Specifications for Concrete (Q); Specifications for Civil (S); Specifications for Welding (W); Specifications for Painting (X); and Specifications for Special (Y). The standard specifications of Bechtel Petroleum Incorporated have been amended as necessary to reflect the specific requirements of the Breckinridge Project and the more stringent specifications of Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. These standard specifications are available for the Initial Effort (Phase Zero) work performed by all contractors and subcontractors.

  14. Section III, Division 5 - Development And Future Directions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morton, Dana K. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)] [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Jetter, Robert I [Consultant] [Consultant; Nestell, James E. [MPR Associates Inc.] [MPR Associates Inc.; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL] [ORNL; Sham, Sam [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides commentary on a new division under Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (BPV) Code. This new Division 5 has an issuance date of November 1, 2011 and is part of the 2011 Addenda to the 2010 Edition of the BPV Code. The new Division covers the rules for the design, fabrication, inspection and testing of components for high temperature nuclear reactors. Information is provided on the scope and need for Division 5, the structure of Division 5, where the rules originated, the various changes made in finalizing Division 5, and the future near-term and long-term expectations for Division 5 development.

  15. Incised marks on Late Helladic and Late Minoan III pottery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirschfeld, Nicolle Elise

    1990-01-01

    was very short. 'sBased on published descriptions or photos, those vases marked "No Date (ND)" on my chart probably also can be assigned to a LH/LM III, but the separate category is maintained until this assumption can be justified in detail. t4Enk. T. 7... MeB T. VI. Equivalencies for the Ugarit levels are as follows: Ugarit Recent 2 = 1450-1365 = LC IIA = LH/LM IIIA1 Ugarit Recent 3 = 1365-1185 = LC IIB-IIIA1 = LH IIIA2- LH IIIC1 early = LM lIIA2 ? LMIIIC J. -C. Courtois, "Ugarit grid, strata...

  16. ARM - Field Campaign - AIRS Validation Soundings Phase III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22, 2012III ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We

  17. TRUPACT-III Quick Facts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternational Affairs, Before theFebruary 1,7/109TESLA TESLATRUPACT-III Quick Facts

  18. Ridgetop Energy Wind Farm III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewable Energy| OpenNew York: EnergyIII Jump to:

  19. Black Rock III Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental JumpInformationBio-Gas Technologies, LLCMichigan:Earth, Wisconsin:BlackIII

  20. Horse Hollow III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam: Energyarea,Magazine Jump to:II Wind Farm JumpHorseII WindIII

  1. Klondike III I Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:onItronKanoshKetchikanKlondike III I Wind Farm Jump to:

  2. Klondike III II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:onItronKanoshKetchikanKlondike III I Wind Farm Jump to:II

  3. Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:onItronKanoshKetchikanKlondike III IKosovo-USAIDIII Jump

  4. Lamar Wind Energy Project III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformationWinds Jump to: navigation, searchLakota RidgeIII Jump

  5. Biglow Canyon Phase III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYorkColoradoBelcherCarbon SequestrationTreeIII Wind Farm

  6. Title III of the Defense Production Act | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsState ofSavings for Specific2HeldTidalTimothyOilBradITitle III

  7. Greenhouse Gas Reductions Under Low Carbon Fuel Standards?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Stephen P.; Knittel, Christopher R; Hughes, Jonathan E.

    2007-01-01

    CSEM WP 167 Greenhouse Gas Reductions under Low Carbon Fuel94720-5180 www.ucei.org Greenhouse Gas Reductions under LowLCFS) seeks to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by capping an

  8. Friction and Wear Reduction in Diesel Engine Valve Trains | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reduction in Diesel Engine Valve Trains Friction and Wear Reduction in Diesel Engine Valve Trains Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review...

  9. Investigation on continuous soot oxidation and NOx reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on continuous soot oxidation and NOx reduction by SCR coated DPF Investigation on continuous soot oxidation and NOx reduction by SCR coated DPF Evaluation of CSI catalyst for NOx...

  10. Non-Hardware ("Soft") Cost-Reduction Roadmap for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Non-Hardware ("Soft") Cost- Reduction Roadmap for Residential and Small Commercial Solar Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 · www.nrel.gov Non-Hardware ("Soft") Cost- Reduction Roadmap

  11. Optimal Deployment of Emissions Reduction Technologies for Construction Equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quadrifoglio, Luca

    Optimal Deployment of Emissions Reduction Technologies for Construction Equipment Muhammad Ehsanul The objective of this research was to develop a multiob- jective optimization model to deploy emissions reduction technologies for nonroad construction equipment to re- duce emissions in a cost

  12. Identify Petroleum Reduction Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As defined by the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction strategies for Federal vehicles and equipment are based on the three driving principles of petroleum reduction: Reduce vehicle miles traveled Improve fuel efficiency Use alternative fuels.

  13. Does Dimensionality Reduction improve the Quality of Motion Interpolation? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitzer, Sebastian; Klanke, Stefan; Vijayakumar, Sethu

    2009-01-01

    In recent years nonlinear dimensionality reduction has frequently been suggested for the modelling of high-dimensional motion data. While it is intuitively plausible to use dimensionality reduction to recover low ...

  14. Delaware Greenhouse Gas Reduction Projects Grant Program (Delaware)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Delaware Greenhouse Gas Reduction Projects Grant Program is funded by the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Projects Fund, established by the Act to Amend Title 7 of the Delaware Code Relating to a...

  15. Line geometry and electromagnetism III: groups of transformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. H. Delphenich

    2014-04-16

    The role of linear and projective groups of transformations in line geometry and electromagnetism is examined in accordance with Klein's Erlanger Programm for geometries. The group of collineations of real projective space is chosen as the most general group, and reductions to some of its various subgroups are then detailed according to their relevance to electromagnetic fields, and especially wave-like ones.

  16. Surface Organometallic-Catalyzed Oxidation and Reductions | The...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface Organometallic-Catalyzed Oxidation and Reductions Surface-immobilized heterogeneous organometallic compounds have varying activity compared to homogeneous analogues -...

  17. Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologies Program Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum...

  18. Reduction of pumping energy losses in district heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zakin, J.L.

    1991-12-01

    This project was designed to explore the effects of different structures of cationic surfactant drag reducing additives on their efficiency and on their effective temperature ranges. The goal was to develop surfactant systems that would be useful in the appropriate temperature ranges for district heating systems (50--110{degree}C) and for district cooling systems (2--20{degree}C). To this end the chemical compositions of quaternary annonium salts and of counter-ions were varied. More than twenty different commercial or semi commercial quarterly ammonium salts from US suppliers and two from a German supplier (Hoechst) were tested along with thirty five different counter-ions. In addition, blends of several of each were also tested. A further object of this project was to check the compatibility of surfactant drag reducers with commercial or semi-commercial corrosion inhibitors in regard to maintaining their drag reducing ability and corrosion inhibiting capability.

  19. Reduction of pumping energy losses in district heating and cooling systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zakin, J.L.

    1991-12-01

    This project was designed to explore the effects of different structures of cationic surfactant drag reducing additives on their efficiency and on their effective temperature ranges. The goal was to develop surfactant systems that would be useful in the appropriate temperature ranges for district heating systems (50--110{degree}C) and for district cooling systems (2--20{degree}C). To this end the chemical compositions of quaternary annonium salts and of counter-ions were varied. More than twenty different commercial or semi commercial quarterly ammonium salts from US suppliers and two from a German supplier (Hoechst) were tested along with thirty five different counter-ions. In addition, blends of several of each were also tested. A further object of this project was to check the compatibility of surfactant drag reducers with commercial or semi-commercial corrosion inhibitors in regard to maintaining their drag reducing ability and corrosion inhibiting capability.

  20. Empirical Dynamical System Reduction I: Global Nonlinear Transformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miranda, Rick

    Empirical Dynamical System Reduction I: Global Nonlinear Transformations Michael Kirby and Rick (CNLKL) for the data reduction and semi­analytical remodeling of dynamical systems. The unconstrained­Lo`eve (CNLKL) 12 5. Reduction and Semi­analytic Remodeling of Dynamical Systems 17 6. Summary and Directions