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1

Applications Received by DOE/FE to Export Domestically Produced...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Applications Received by DOEFE to Export Domestically Produced LNG from the Lower-48 States (as of August 7, 2013) All Changes Since July 12, 2013 Update Are In Red 1 Company...

2

Applications Received by DOE/FE to Export Domestically Produced...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Applications Received by DOEFE to Export Domestically Produced LNG from the Lower-48 States (as of September 19, 2013) All Changes Since September 11, 2013 Update Are In Red 1...

3

Natural Gas Demand: New Domestic Uses and LNG Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov Natural Gas Demand: New Domestic Uses and LNG Exports Natural Gas Demand Outlook

4

DOE National Laboratory Breakthrough Could Enhance Use of Domestic Natural  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Breakthrough Could Enhance Use of Domestic Breakthrough Could Enhance Use of Domestic Natural Gas, Methane Hydrate Resources DOE National Laboratory Breakthrough Could Enhance Use of Domestic Natural Gas, Methane Hydrate Resources August 25, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A process and related technology that could enhance the nation's ability to use natural gas and vast methane hydrate energy resources has been developed by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The method for rapidly forming methane hydrate, along with concurrent development of specialized nozzles to facilitate the process are breakthroughs that could lead to significant reductions in the cost of storing and transporting natural gas, potentially increasing utilization of

5

Effect of Increased Natural Gas Exports on Domestic Energy Markets  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Effect of Increased Natural Gas Effect of Increased Natural Gas Exports on Domestic Energy Markets as requested by the Office of Fossil Energy January 2012 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the U.S. Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Effects of Increased Natural Gas Exports on Domestic Energy Markets i Contacts The Office of Energy Analysis prepared this report under the guidance of John Conti, Assistant

6

Applications Received by DOE/FE to Export Domestically Produced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

year to non-FTA countries. (g) Jordan Cove Energy Project, L.P. requested authority to export the equivalent of 1.2 Bcfd of natural gas to FTA countries and 0.8 Bcfd to...

7

Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In order to prevent waste and to avoid the drilling of unnecessary wells and to encourage the development of coal seam natural gas producing areas in Louisiana, the commissioner of conservation is...

8

Delivery of Hydrogen Produced from Natural Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for economic storage, handling and delivery of hydrogen. Office of Fossil Energy Milestone · 2006: Define & Petroleum Technology Office of Fossil Energy June 3, 2003 Hydrogen Coordination Meeting #12;Key NearDelivery of Hydrogen Produced from Natural Gas Christopher Freitas Office of Natural Gas

9

Carbon Pollution Being Captured, Stored and Used to Produce More Domestic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Pollution Being Captured, Stored and Used to Produce More Carbon Pollution Being Captured, Stored and Used to Produce More Domestic Oil Carbon Pollution Being Captured, Stored and Used to Produce More Domestic Oil May 10, 2013 - 11:38am Addthis Learn more about how the Office of Fossil Energy's carbon capture, utilization and storage program is benefiting the economy and the environment. Acting Assistant Secretary Smith Acting Assistant Secretary Smith Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary and Acting Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy What does this project do? More than 90% of the CO2 at the facility (approx. 1M metric tons of CO2 per year) will be delivered for sequestration and enhanced oil recovery. Oil production at a Texas oil field will increase from 1.6 to 3.1 million barrels annually, and the CO2 will be stored underground.

10

Changes related to "Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Special page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana)" Coal seam natural gas producing areas...

11

Applications Received by DOE/FE to Export Domestically Produced LNG  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Applications Received by DOE/FE to Export Domestically Produced LNG Applications Received by DOE/FE to Export Domestically Produced LNG from the Lower-48 States (as of December 6, 2013) All Changes Since November 15, 2013 Update Are In Red 1 Company Quantity (a) FTA Applications (b) (Docket Number) Non-FTA Applications (c) (Docket Number) Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC 2.2 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) (d) Approved (10-85-LNG) Approved (10-111-LNG) Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC 1.4 Bcf/d (d) Approved (10-160-LNG) Approved (10-161-LNG) Lake Charles Exports, LLC 2.0 Bcf/d (e) * Approved (11-59-LNG) Approved (11-59-LNG) Carib Energy (USA) LLC 0.03 Bcf/d: FTA 0.01 Bcf/d: non-FTA (f) Approved (11-71-LNG) Under DOE Review (11-141-LNG) Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP 1.0 Bcf/d: FTA 0.77 Bcf/d: non-FTA

12

Applications Received by DOE/FE to Export Domestically Produced LNG  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Applications Received by DOE/FE to Export Domestically Produced LNG Applications Received by DOE/FE to Export Domestically Produced LNG from the Lower-48 States (as of December 31, 2013) All Changes Since December 6, 2013 Update Are In Red 1 Company Quantity (a) FTA Applications (b) (Docket Number) Non-FTA Applications (c) (Docket Number) Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC 2.2 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) (d) Approved (10-85-LNG) Approved (10-111-LNG) Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC 1.4 Bcf/d (d) Approved (10-160-LNG) Approved (10-161-LNG) Lake Charles Exports, LLC 2.0 Bcf/d (e) * Approved (11-59-LNG) Approved (11-59-LNG) Carib Energy (USA) LLC 0.03 Bcf/d: FTA 0.01 Bcf/d: non-FTA (f) Approved (11-71-LNG) Under DOE Review (11-141-LNG) Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP 1.0 Bcf/d: FTA 0.77 Bcf/d: non-FTA

13

Research needs to maximize economic producibility of the domestic oil resource  

SciTech Connect

NIPER was contracted by the US Department of Energy Bartlesville (Okla.) Project Office (DOE/BPO) to identify research needs to increase production of the domestic oil resource, and K A Energy Consultants, Inc. was subcontracted to review EOR field projects. This report summarizes the findings of that investigation. Professional society and trade journals, DOE reports, dissertations, and patent literature were reviewed to determine the state-of-the-art of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and drilling technologies and the constraints to wider application of these technologies. The impacts of EOR on the environment and the constraints to the application of EOR due to environmental regulations were also reviewed. A review of well documented EOR field projects showed that in addition to the technical constraints, management factors also contributed to the lower-than-predicted oil recovery in some of the projects reviewed. DOE-sponsored projects were reviewed, and the achievements by these projects and the constraints which these projects were designed to overcome were also identified. Methods of technology transfer utilized by the DOE were reviewed, and several recommendations for future technology transfer were made. Finally, several research areas were identified and recommended to maximize economic producibility of the domestic oil resource. 14 figs., 41 tabs.

Tham, M.K.; Burchfield, T.; Chung, Ting-Horng; Lorenz, P.; Bryant, R.; Sarathi, P.; Chang, Ming Ming; Jackson, S.; Tomutsa, L. (National Inst. for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States)); Dauben, D.L. (K and A Energy Consultants, Inc., Tulsa, OK (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

United States Producing and Nonproducting Crude Oil and Natural Gas Reserves From 1985 Through 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

United States Producing and Nonproducing Crude Oil and Natural Gas Reserves From 1985 Through 2004 By Philip M. Budzik Abstract The Form EIA-23 survey of crude oil and natural gas producer reserves permits reserves to be differentiated into producing reserves, i.e., those reserves which are available to the crude oil and natural gas markets, and nonproducing reserves, i.e., those reserves which are unavailable to the crude oil and natural gas markets. The proportion of nonproducing reserves relative to total reserves grew for both crude oil and natural gas from 1985 through 2004, and this growth is apparent in almost every major domestic production region. However, the growth patterns in nonproducing crude oil and natural gas reserves are

15

The domestic natural gas and oil initiatve. First annual progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the first of a series of annual progress reports designed to inform the industry and the public of the accomplishments of the Domestic Natural Gas and Oil Initiative (the Initiative) and the benefits realized. Undertaking of the Initiative was first announced by Hazel O`Leary, Secretary of the Department of Energy (Department or DOE), in April 1993.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Rice Production Texas produces nearly 225,000 acres high quality long grain rice for domestic and export  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rice Production · Texas produces nearly 225,000 acres high quality long grain rice for domestic and export markets. · Rice produces $145 million for farmers and generates $480 million for Texas. · Pest-chemicalpracticestoreducewaterweevildamageincludelaserlevelinganddelayed floodingforwatermanagement,seedingratesforuniformstands,andselectiveplanting dates. · 100% of the Texas rice acreage

Wilkins, Neal

17

Effect of Increased Natural Gas Exports on Domestic Energy Markets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Appendix B. Summary Tables Table B1. U.S. Annual Average Values from 2015 to 2025 low/ low/ high/ high/ low/ low/ high/ high/ low/ low/ high/ high/ low/ low/ high/ high/ baseline slow rapid slow rapid baseline slow rapid slow rapid baseline slow rapid slow rapid baseline slow rapid slow rapid NATURAL GAS VOLUMES (Tcf) Net Exports (1.90) (0.29) 0.11 0.17 1.74 (1.32) 0.32 0.70 0.79 2.35 (2.72) (1.17) (0.88) (0.73) 0.66 (2.00) (0.38) 0.01 0.07 1.64 gross imports 3.62 3.70 3.70 3.74 3.76 3.19 3.25 3.26 3.27 3.31 4.27 4.42 4.53 4.48 4.68 3.70 3.78 3.79 3.82 3.85

18

Top 5 producing states' combined marketed natural gas output rose ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Combined marketed natural gas production from the top five natural gas producing statesTexas, Louisiana, Wyoming, Oklahoma, and Coloradoincreased by about 7.5% ...

19

Which states consume and produce the most natural gas? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Which states consume and produce the most natural gas? U.S. consumption of natural gas in 2011 was 24.4 Tcf, the top five states that consumed the ...

20

Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Page Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana) This is the approved revision of this...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "domestically produced natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Top 5 producing states' combined marketed natural gas output rose ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary All Reports ... Due primarily to drilling programs in the Marcellus shale ... Alaska is the country's second leading natural gas producer in terms of ...

22

Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana) Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana) Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Louisiana Department of Natural Resources In order to prevent waste and to avoid the drilling of unnecessary wells and to encourage the development of coal seam natural gas producing areas in Louisiana, the commissioner of conservation is authorized, as provided in this law, to establish a single unit to be served by one or more wells for a coal seam natural gas producing area. Without in any way modifying the authority granted to the commissioner to establish a drilling unit or

23

Economics of producing substitute natural gas from coal. Occasional pub  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the cost levelization approach, the economics of producing substitute natural gas (SNG) are examined under different assumptions regarding conversion technologies, coal types and plant financing. A comparison of levelized constant dollar cost-of-service price estimated for Westinghouse and dry bottom Lurgi processes for 1990-2019 shows that SNG from coal produced at western sites is competitive with natural gas and fuel oils.

Rosenberg, J.I.; Ashby, A.B.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

The domestic natural gas and oil initiative. Energy leadership in the world economy  

SciTech Connect

Two key overarching goals of this Initiative are enhancing the efficiency and competitiveness of U.S. industry and reducing the trends toward higher imports. These goals take into account new Federal policies that reflect economic needs, including economic growth, deficit reduction, job creation and security, and global competitiveness, as well as the need to preserve the environment, improve energy efficiency, and provide for national security. The success of this Initiative clearly requires coordinated strategies that range far beyond policies primarily directed at natural gas and oil supplies. Therefore, this Initiative proposes three major strategic activities: Strategic Activity 1 -- increase domestic natural gas and oil production and environmental protection by advancing and disseminating new exploration, production, and refining technologies; Strategic Activity 2 -- stimulate markets for natural gas and natural-gas-derived products, including their use as substitutes for imported oil where feasible; and Strategic Activity 3 -- ensure cost-effective environmental protection by streamlining and improving government communication, decision making, and regulation. Finally, the Initiative will reexamine the costs and benefits of increase oil imports through a broad new Department of Energy study. This study will form the basis for additional actions found to be warranted under the study.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

National gas survey. Volume I, Chapter 9. Future domestic natural gas supplies. Preliminary draft  

SciTech Connect

This report presents four separate forecasts for the future gas supplies for the 1971--1990 period. The forecasts were prepared by the Federal Power Commission staff, and all forecasts are made with the assumption that the domestic market will be able to absorb all the gas that might become available during the specified period. Information is included for future available supplies from the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf as well as from conventional sources and from gas that might be produced as a result of stimulation of low-permeability reservoirs. The general assumptions used for the future gas supply projections are included in the appendix of the report. The data are presented in 65 separate tables and 14 figures. (BLM)

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Chelan County PUD - Sustainable Natural Alternative Power Producers Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sustainable Natural Alternative Power Producers Sustainable Natural Alternative Power Producers Program Chelan County PUD - Sustainable Natural Alternative Power Producers Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local Government Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Water Wind Maximum Rebate $1.50/kWh Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Amount Varies; 2012 payment was $0.16/kWh Provider Chelan County Public Utility District The Sustainable Natural Alternative Power (SNAP) program encourages customers to install alternative power generators such as solar panels and wind turbines and connect them to the District's electrical distribution system by offering an incentive payment based on the system's production.

27

Producing Natural Gas From Shale | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Producing Natural Gas From Shale Producing Natural Gas From Shale Producing Natural Gas From Shale January 26, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis The Office of Fossil Energy sponsored early research that refined more cost-effective and innovative production technologies for U.S. shale gas production -- such as directional drilling. By 2035, EIA projects that shale gas production will rise to 13.6 trillion cubic feet, representing nearly half of all U.S. natural gas production. | Image courtesy of the Office of Fossil Energy. The Office of Fossil Energy sponsored early research that refined more cost-effective and innovative production technologies for U.S. shale gas production -- such as directional drilling. By 2035, EIA projects that shale gas production will rise to 13.6 trillion cubic feet, representing

28

Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic Materials Print Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic Materials Print Doing Nature One Better Biological tissues such as those that make up our organs are amazing feats of structural engineering. Even more fantastic, the tissues assemble themselves from building blocks based on the proteins that cells synthesize without any outside direction. And, if this isn't mind-boggling enough, consider how all this takes place over large distances with both precision and accuracy. Chemists and materials scientists would dearly like to lift a few pages out of nature's instruction manual and use their wisdom to construct complex structures that do human bidding. Unfortunately, that book is not yet for sale, so the would-be engineers have to find other ways to mimic nature as best they can.

29

Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic Materials Print Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic Materials Print Doing Nature One Better Biological tissues such as those that make up our organs are amazing feats of structural engineering. Even more fantastic, the tissues assemble themselves from building blocks based on the proteins that cells synthesize without any outside direction. And, if this isn't mind-boggling enough, consider how all this takes place over large distances with both precision and accuracy. Chemists and materials scientists would dearly like to lift a few pages out of nature's instruction manual and use their wisdom to construct complex structures that do human bidding. Unfortunately, that book is not yet for sale, so the would-be engineers have to find other ways to mimic nature as best they can.

30

Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic Materials Print Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic Materials Print Doing Nature One Better Biological tissues such as those that make up our organs are amazing feats of structural engineering. Even more fantastic, the tissues assemble themselves from building blocks based on the proteins that cells synthesize without any outside direction. And, if this isn't mind-boggling enough, consider how all this takes place over large distances with both precision and accuracy. Chemists and materials scientists would dearly like to lift a few pages out of nature's instruction manual and use their wisdom to construct complex structures that do human bidding. Unfortunately, that book is not yet for sale, so the would-be engineers have to find other ways to mimic nature as best they can.

31

Nonsalt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonsalt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonsalt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonsalt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 2006-Dec 12/29 841 2007-Jan 01/05 823 01/12 806 01/19 755 01/26 716 2007-Feb 02/02 666 02/09 613 02/16 564 02/23 538 2007-Mar 03/02 527 03/09 506 03/16 519 03/23 528 03/30 550 2007-Apr 04/06 560 04/13 556 04/20 568 04/27 590 2007-May 05/04 610 05/11 629 05/18 648 05/25 670

32

Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1993-Dec 12/31 570 1994-Jan 01/07 532 01/14 504 01/21 440 01/28 414 1994-Feb 02/04 365 02/11 330 02/18 310 02/25 309 1994-Mar 03/04 281 03/11 271 03/18 284 03/25 303 1994-Apr 04/01 287 04/08 293 04/15 308 04/22 334 04/29 353 1994-May 05/06 376 05/13 399 05/20 429 05/27 443

33

System and method for producing substitute natural gas from coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a system and method for producing substitute natural gas and electricity, while mitigating production of any greenhouse gasses. The system includes a hydrogasification reactor, to form a gas stream including natural gas and a char stream, and an oxygen burner to combust the char material to form carbon oxides. The system also includes an algae farm to convert the carbon oxides to hydrocarbon material and oxygen.

Hobbs, Raymond (Avondale, AZ)

2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

34

Salt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Salt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Salt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Salt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 2006-Dec 12/29 101 2007-Jan 01/05 109 01/12 107 01/19 96 01/26 91 2007-Feb 02/02 78 02/09 63 02/16 52 02/23 54 2007-Mar 03/02 59 03/09 58 03/16 64 03/23 70 03/30 78 2007-Apr 04/06 81 04/13 80 04/20 80 04/27 83 2007-May 05/04 85 05/11 88 05/18 92 05/25 97 2007-Jun 06/01 100 06/08 101 06/15 102 06/22 102 06/29 102

35

Comparative life-cycle air emissions of coal, domestic natural gas, LNG, and SNG for electricity generation  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that in the coming decades the United States' natural gas (NG) demand for electricity generation will increase. Estimates also suggest that NG supply will increasingly come from imported liquefied natural gas (LNG). Additional supplies of NG could come domestically from the production of synthetic natural gas (SNG) via coal gasification-methanation. The objective of this study is to compare greenhouse gas (GHG), SOx, and NOx life-cycle emissions of electricity generated with NG/LNG/SNG and coal. This life-cycle comparison of air emissions from different fuels can help us better understand the advantages and disadvantages of using coal versus globally sourced NG for electricity generation. Our estimates suggest that with the current fleet of power plants, a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have lower GHG emissions than coal. If advanced technologies with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) are used, however, coal and a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have very similar life-cycle GHG emissions. For SOx and NOx we find there are significant emissions in the upstream stages of the NG/LNG life-cycles, which contribute to a larger range in SOx and NOx emissions for NG/LNG than for coal and SNG. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Pages that link to "Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana)" Coal seam natural gas producing areas...

37

A program to develop the domestic natural gas industry in Indonesia: Case history of two World Bank projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indonesia depends heavily on revenues from the export of LNG and oil, the availability of which appears to be decreasing. It is therefore making a strong effort to accelerate development of a domestic natural gas industry. A high priority has been given to the conversion of power plants and city gas systems, including local industries and commercial facilities, from liquid fuels to natural gas. This will release more oil for export, help to meet the objectives of Repelita V, and provide substantial environmental benefits. The World Bank recently provided loans to the Indonesian Government for two projects that are aimed at substituting natural gas for oil and manufactured gas in domestic markets. One project involves expansion of the gas distribution systems of Indonesia's natural gas utility (PGN) in three cities: Jakarta and Bogor in Java, and Medan in Sumatra. The project also includes training programs for PGN staff and an energy pricing policy study to be carried out by Indonesia's Ministry of Mines and Energy. The second project involves expansion of the supply of natural gas for Surabaya and twelve other towns in its vicinity in East Java, and further expansion of Medan's supply system. Technical assistance will be provided to enhance the skills ofPGN and the Ministry of Mines and Energy, and a Gas Technology Unit similar to the Institute of Gas Technology will be established at Indonesia's Research and Development Center for Oil and Gas (LEMIGAS) in Jakarta. 14 refs., 3 figs., 11 tabs.

Klass, D.L. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)); Khwaja, S. (World Bank, Washington, DC (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Domestic Chickens  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chickens Chickens Nature Bulletin No. 396-A November 21, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation DOMESTIC CHICKENS The domestic chicken belongs to a family of hen-like ground-dwelling birds which includes the quail, grouse, partridge, pheasant, turkey, guineafowl and peafowl. Because of their anatomy and relatively small brains, some scientists think that they, -- rather than the ostrich, emu, cassowary and other flightless kinds -- are the most primitive birds. Chickens, undoubtedly, are the silliest of all domestic animals. There is an old riddle: "Why does a chicken cross the road?" Anyone who has seen a squawking hen try to run or fly just ahead of an automobile, will answer: "No brains ".

39

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of assisting U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions by providing access to information during Fiscal Year 2002 (FY02). Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its ten Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and three satellite offices that efficiently extend the program reach. They bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors interact with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, various technical publications and other outreach efforts. These are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs), who are area operators and service companies working with the regional networks. The role of the national Headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. The organization effectively combines federal funding through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy with state and industry funding to achieve important goals for all of these sectors. This integrated funding base is combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff to achieve notable results. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies, especially for smaller companies without direct contact with R&D efforts. The DOE participation is managed through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), which deploys a national natural gas program via the Strategic Center for Natural Gas (SCNG) and a national oil program through the National Petroleum Technology Office (NTPO). This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY02. Activities were maintained at recent record levels. Strategic planning from multiple sources within the framework of the organization gives PTTC the vision to have even more impact in the future. The Houston Headquarters (HQ) location has strived to serve PTTC well in better connecting with producers and the service sector. PTTC's reputation for unbiased bottom line information stimulates cooperative ventures with other organizations. Efforts to build the contact database, exhibit at more trade shows and a new E-mail Technology Alert service are expanding PTTC's audience. All considered, the PTTC network has proven to be an effective way to reach domestic producers locally, regionally and nationally.

Unknown

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 201,567 147,250 61,339 23,149 9,789 29,178 13,371 19,352 10,151 24,102 52,809 137,962 1995 166,242 120,089 100,955 31,916 17,279 19,712 35,082 62,364 16,966 33,762 102,735 181,097 1996 223,932 157,642 141,292 36,788 27,665 26,393 32,861 27,599 20,226 34,000 116,431 142,519 1997 204,601 103,715 43,894 54,285 24,898 34,122 65,631 42,757 30,579 32,257 113,422 180,582 1998 143,042 69,667 97,322 25,555 30,394 38,537 33,314 37,034 51,903 17,812 60,078 168,445 1999 189,816 77,848 104,690 44,930 22,829 26,085 58,109 60,549 25,888 43,790 66,980 165,046

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "domestically produced natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 20,366 29,330 55,297 93,538 129,284 83,943 104,001 98,054 88,961 65,486 49,635 27,285 1995 24,645 25,960 57,833 78,043 101,019 100,926 77,411 54,611 94,759 84,671 40,182 33,836 1996 34,389 48,922 38,040 76,100 98,243 88,202 88,653 109,284 125,616 91,618 37,375 48,353 1997 45,327 35,394 89,625 83,137 107,821 99,742 71,360 95,278 116,634 117,497 49,750 33,170 1998 41,880 59,324 73,582 119,021 128,323 96,261 107,136 94,705 87,920 129,117 58,026 47,924 1999 35,830 50,772 49,673 80,879 110,064 100,132 72,348 67,286 103,587 79,714 66,465 32,984

42

AGA Producing Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Producing Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 393,598 297,240 289,617 356,360 461,202 516,155 604,504 678,168 747,928 783,414 775,741 673,670 1995 549,759 455,591 416,294 457,969 533,496 599,582 638,359 634,297 713,319 766,411 700,456 552,458 1996 369,545 263,652 195,447 224,002 279,731 339,263 391,961 474,402 578,991 638,500 562,097 466,366 1997 314,140 248,911 297,362 326,566 401,514 471,824 478,925 532,982 617,733 705,879 642,254 494,485 1998 391,395 384,696 362,717 457,545 550,232 610,363 684,086 748,042 784,567 893,181 888,358 768,239 1999 611,978 585,458 530,610 568,307 653,498 728,071 744,307 750,460 826,493 858,836 849,011 718,513

43

AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2,026,828 2,068,220 2,068,220 2,068,428 2,068,428 2,068,428 2,074,428 2,082,928 2,082,928 2,082,928 2,082,928 2,082,928 1995 2,082,928 2,096,611 2,096,611 2,096,176 2,096,176 2,096,176 2,090,331 2,090,331 2,090,331 2,090,331 2,090,331 2,090,331 1996 2,095,131 2,106,116 2,110,116 2,108,116 2,110,116 2,127,294 2,126,618 2,134,784 2,140,284 2,140,284 2,144,784 2,144,784 1997 2,143,603 2,149,088 2,170,288 2,170,288 2,170,178 2,170,178 2,189,642 2,194,242 2,194,242 2,194,242 2,194,242 2,194,242 1998 2,194,242 2,194,242 2,194,242 2,194,242 2,194,242 2,205,540 2,205,540 2,205,540 2,205,540 2,205,540 2,205,540 2,197,859

44

AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 1,433,462 1,329,400 1,322,914 1,388,877 1,498,496 1,553,493 1,643,445 1,714,361 1,785,350 1,819,344 1,810,791 1,716,773 1995 1,601,428 1,510,175 1,467,414 1,509,666 1,586,445 1,662,195 1,696,619 1,688,515 1,768,189 1,818,098 1,757,160 1,613,046 1996 1,436,765 1,325,994 1,223,139 1,264,513 1,334,894 1,395,779 1,443,970 1,525,797 1,631,006 1,686,652 1,614,154 1,519,539 1997 1,379,108 1,303,888 1,356,678 1,385,616 1,461,221 1,536,339 1,542,480 1,596,011 1,683,987 1,770,002 1,707,810 1,559,636 1998 1,456,136 1,442,993 1,420,644 1,515,050 1,610,474 1,666,304 1,739,745 1,803,097 1,840,984 1,950,772 1,945,897 1,807,163

45

How much does it cost to produce crude oil and natural gas? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much does it cost to produce crude oil and natural gas? A measure of the total cost to produce crude oil and natural gas is the upstream costs.

46

Rising Gasoline Prices and the Role of Available Domestic Oil and Natural Gas Resources  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Richard G. Newell, Administrator, U.S. Energy Information Administration, to: Committee on Natural Resources, United States House of Representatives; Washington, DCMarch 17, 2011

2011-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

47

Chelan County PUD- Sustainable Natural Alternative Power Producers Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Sustainable Natural Alternative Power (SNAP) program encourages customers to install alternative power generators such as solar panels and wind turbines and connect them to the District's...

48

Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a glass substrate into a solution containing the virus and withdrawing it in just the right way, they were able to produce various structures. The process they developed could...

49

Horizontal natural gas storage caverns and methods for producing same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides caverns and methods for producing caverns in bedded salt deposits for the storage of materials that are not solvents for salt. The contemplated salt deposits are of the bedded, non-domed variety, more particularly salt found in layered formations that are sufficiently thick to enable the production of commercially usefully sized caverns completely encompassed by walls of salt of the formation. In a preferred method, a first bore hole is drilled into the salt formation and a cavity for receiving insolubles is leached from the salt formation. Thereafter, at a predetermined distance away from the first bore hole, a second bore hole is drilled towards the salt formation. As this drill approaches the salt, the drill assumes a slant approach and enters the salt and drills through it in a horizontal direction until it intersects the cavity for receiving insolubles. This produces a substantially horizontal conduit from which solvent is controlledly supplied to the surrounding salt formation, leaching the salt and producing a concentrated brine which is removed through the first bore hole. Insolubles are collected in the cavity for receiving insolubles. By controlledly supplying solvent, a horizontal cavern is produced with two bore holes extending therefrom.

Russo, Anthony (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Evolution of domestic kitchen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Domestic kitchen area is the most important, most intensely used functional area in the apartment. With regard to laboratory nature of kitchen works, equipment and users of different age and physical fitness, kitchen is a potentially dangerous place. ... Keywords: domestic kitchen, ergonomics, socialization, technical progress

Jerzy Charytonowicz; Dzoana Latala

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

How much does it cost to produce crude oil and natural gas? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. ... How much does it cost to produce crude oil and natural gas?

52

Review of {sup 222}Rn in natural gas produced from unconventional sources  

SciTech Connect

A review of the literature on trace radioactivity in natural gas and natural gas products has been performed and the consequent radioactivity concentrations and dose rates due to natural radioactive elements in natural gas produced from Devonian shale wells, western tight gas sands, geo-pressurized aquifiers and coal beds have been studied. Preliminary data on {sup 222}Rn concentrations from these energy sources fall within the range observed for more conventional sources. Gas produced from reservoirs with higher than average natural /sup 238/U higher than average levels of {sup 222}Rn. Massive fracturing techniques do not appear to raise the relative concentration of radon in natural gas.

Gogolak, C.V.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Producing Natural Gas from Shale Opportunities and Challenges of a Major  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

continuing annual support to STRONGER (the State Review of Oil and Natural Gas Environmental Regulation1 Producing Natural Gas from Shale ­ Opportunities and Challenges of a Major New Energy Source ~2300 TCF (85% Shale Gas) "100 years of Natural Gas" U.S. Consumption 23 TCF/y #12;5 Opportunity: Global

Nur, Amos

54

Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling and Analysis Results for 2011  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 7 and 8, 2011. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

None

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

domestic | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

domestic domestic Dataset Summary Description The energy consumption data consists of five spreadsheets: "overall data tables" plus energy consumption data for each of the following sectors: transport, domestic, industrial and service. Each of the five spreadsheets contains a page of commentary and interpretation. Source UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Date Released July 31st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption coal Coke domestic Electricity Electricity Consumption energy data Industrial Natural Gas Petroleum service sector transportation UK Data application/zip icon Five Excel spreadsheets with UK Energy Consumption data (zip, 2.6 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment The data in ECUK are classified as National Statistics

56

June 2011 Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site  

SciTech Connect

Annual natural gas and produced water monitoring was conducted for gas wells adjacent to Section 36, where the Gasbuggy test was conducted, in accordance with the draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Gasbuggy Site, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. Sampling and analysis were conducted as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Natural gas samples were collected for tritium and carbon-14 analyses. Produced water samples were collected and analyzed for tritium, gamma-emitting radionuclides (by high-resolution gamma spectrometry), gross alpha, and gross beta. A duplicate produced water sample was collected from well 30-039-21743. Produced water samples were not collected at locations 30-039-30161 and 30-039-21744 because of the lack of water. Samples were not collected from location 30-039-29988 because the well was shut-in.

None

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

,"AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030872m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5030872m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

58

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and natural gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. Networking opportunities that occur with a Houston Headquarters (HQ) location are increasing name awareness. Focused efforts by Executive Director Don Duttlinger to interact with large independents, national service companies and some majors are continuing to supplement the support base of the medium to smaller industry participants around the country. PTTC is now involved in many of the technology-related activities that occur in high oil and natural gas activity areas. Access to technology remains the driving force for those who do not have in-house research and development capabilities and look to the PTTC to provide services and options for increased efficiency.

Unknown

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

59

New Technologies that Enhance Environmental Protection, Increase Domestic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Technologies that Enhance Environmental Protection, Increase New Technologies that Enhance Environmental Protection, Increase Domestic Production, Result from DOE-Supported Consortium New Technologies that Enhance Environmental Protection, Increase Domestic Production, Result from DOE-Supported Consortium September 13, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - New technologies that help small, independent oil and natural gas operators contribute to domestic energy production while improving environmental protection have resulted from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) support of the Stripper Well Consortium (SWC). "Stripper wells" are wells that produce less than 10 barrels of oil or 60,000 standard cubic feet of natural gas per day. According to the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission, more than 375,000 U.S. stripper

60

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and natural gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTTC's Board made a strategic decision to relocate the Headquarters (HQ) office from Washington, DC to Houston, Texas. Driving force behind relocation was to better connect with independent producers, but cost savings could also be realized. Relocation was accomplished in late December 2000, with the HQ office being fully operational by January 2001. Early indications are that the HQ relocation is, in fact, enabling better networking with senior executives of independents in the Houston oil community. New Board leadership, elected in March 2001, will continue to effectively guide PTTC.

Unknown

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "domestically produced natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Geochemical and Strontium Isotope Characterization of Produced Waters from Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale, a major gas-bearing unit in the Appalachian Basin, results in significant quantities of produced water containing high total dissolved solids (TDS). We carried out a strontium (Sr) isotope investigation to determine the utility of Sr isotopes in identifying and quantifying the interaction of Marcellus Formation produced waters with other waters in the Appalachian Basin in the event of an accidental release, and to provide information about the source of the dissolved solids. Strontium isotopic ratios of Marcellus produced waters collected over a geographic range of 375 km from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania define a relatively narrow set of values (?{sub Sr}{sup SW} = +13.8 to +41.6, where ?{sub Sr}{sup SW} is the deviation of the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio from that of seawater in parts per 10{sup 4}); this isotopic range falls above that of Middle Devonian seawater, and is distinct from most western Pennsylvania acid mine drainage and Upper Devonian Venango Group oil and gas brines. The uniformity of the isotope ratios suggests a basin-wide source of dissolved solids with a component that is more radiogenic than seawater. Mixing models indicate that Sr isotope ratios can be used to sensitively differentiate between Marcellus Formation produced water and other potential sources of TDS into ground or surface waters.

Chapman, Elizabeth C; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.; Kirby, Carl S.; Hammack, Richard W.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Edenborn, Harry M.

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

62

Geochemical and Strontium Isotope Characterization of Produced Waters from Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Extraction  

SciTech Connect

Extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale, a major gas-bearing unit in the Appalachian Basin, results in significant quantities of produced water containing high total dissolved solids (TDS). We carried out a strontium (Sr) isotope investigation to determine the utility of Sr isotopes in identifying and quantifying the interaction of Marcellus Formation produced waters with other waters in the Appalachian Basin in the event of an accidental release, and to provide information about the source of the dissolved solids. Strontium isotopic ratios of Marcellus produced waters collected over a geographic range of ?375 km from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania define a relatively narrow set of values (?Sr SW = +13.8 to +41.6, where ?Sr SW is the deviation of the 87Sr/86Sr ratio from that of seawater in parts per 104); this isotopic range falls above that of Middle Devonian seawater, and is distinct from most western Pennsylvania acid mine drainage and Upper Devonian Venango Group oil and gas brines. The uniformity of the isotope ratios suggests a basin-wide source of dissolved solids with a component that is more radiogenic than seawater. Mixing models indicate that Sr isotope ratios can be used to sensitively differentiate between Marcellus Formation produced water and other potential sources of TDS into ground or surface waters.

Elizabeth C. Chapman, Rosemary C. Capo, Brian W. Stewart,*, Carl S. Kirby, Richard W. Hammack, Karl T. Schroeder, and Harry M. Edenborn

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

63

Evaluation of Reformer Produced Synthesis Gas for Emissions Reductions in Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc. (RRFCS) has developed a system that produces synthesis gas from air and natural gas. A near-term application being considered for this technology is synthesis gas injection into reciprocating engines for reducing NOx emissions. A proof of concept study using bottled synthesis gas and a two-stroke reciprocating engine showed that injecting small amounts of highflammables content synthesis gas significantly improved combustion stability and enabled leaner engine operation resulting in over 44% reduction in NOx emissions. The actual NOx reduction that could be achieved in the field is expected to be engine specific, and in many cases may be even greater. RRFCS demonstrated that its synthesis gas generator could produce synthesis gas with the flammables content that was successfully used in the engine testing. An economic analysis of the synthesis gas approach estimates that its initial capital cost and yearly operating cost are less than half that of a competing NOx reduction technology, Selective Catalytic Reduction. The next step in developing the technology is an integrated test of the synthesis gas generator with an engine to obtain reliability data for system components and to confirm operating cost. RRFCS is actively pursuing opportunities to perform the integrated test. A successful integrated test would demonstrate the technology as a low-cost option to reduce NOx emissions from approximately 6,000 existing two-stroke, natural gas-fired reciprocating engines used on natural gas pipelines in North America. NOx emissions reduction made possible at a reasonable price by this synthesis gas technology, if implemented on 25% of these engines, would be on the order of 25,000 tons/year.

Mark V. Scotto; Mark A. Perna

2010-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

64

Evaluation of Reformer Produced Synthesis Gas for Emissions Reductions in Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc. (RRFCS) has developed a system that produces synthesis gas from air and natural gas. A near-term application being considered for this technology is synthesis gas injection into reciprocating engines for reducing NO{sub x} emissions. A proof of concept study using bottled synthesis gas and a two-stroke reciprocating engine showed that injecting small amounts of high-flammable content synthesis gas significantly improved combustion stability and enabled leaner engine operation resulting in over 44% reduction in NO{sub x} emissions. The actual NO{sub x} reduction that could be achieved in the field is expected to be engine specific, and in many cases may be even greater. RRFCS demonstrated that its synthesis gas generator could produce synthesis gas with the flammable content that was successfully used in the engine testing. An economic analysis of the synthesis gas approach estimates that its initial capital cost and yearly operating cost are less than half that of a competing NO{sub x} reduction technology, Selective Catalytic Reduction. The next step in developing the technology is an integrated test of the synthesis gas generator with an engine to obtain reliability data for system components and to confirm operating cost. RRFCS is actively pursuing opportunities to perform the integrated test. A successful integrated test would demonstrate the technology as a low-cost option to reduce NO{sub x} emissions from approximately 6,000 existing two-stroke, natural gas-fired reciprocating engines used on natural gas pipelines in North America. NO{sub x} emissions reduction made possible at a reasonable price by this synthesis gas technology, if implemented on 25% of these engines, would be on the order of 25,000 tons/year.

Mark Scotto

2010-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

65

Assessment of potential domestic fossil-fuel resources for SNG (substitute natural gas) production. Final report, February 1983-August 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quality and availability of naturally occurring resources and industrial by-products which could be gasified and thereby serve as feedstock for SNG plants were studied to identify those resources with the greatest potential for exploitation in this regard. KRSI accumulated information from a large number of literature sources relative to the resources identified by GRI for study. To the extent possible, KRSI then organized this information to highlight for each resource the grades available, typical chemical compositions, quantities and locations of reserves, recovery methods and rates of production and consumption. This information clearly shows that coal is the most practical source of long-term feedstock for SNG in the contiguous USA. Coal resources amount to 84% (by quads) of the energy resources which were studied. In comparison, peat, shale oil and tar sand contain about 11% of the total.

Cover, A.E.; Hubbard, D.A.; Shah, K.V.; Koneru, P.B.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and natural gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. Networking opportunities that occur with a Houston Headquarters (HQ) location are increasing name awareness. Focused efforts by Executive Director Don Duttlinger to interact with large independents, national service companies and some majors are continuing to supplement the support base of the medium to smaller industry participants around the country. PTTC is now involved in many of the technology-related activities that occur in high oil and natural gas activity areas. Access to technology remains the driving force for those who do not have in-house research and development capabilities and look to the PTTC to provide services and options for increased efficiency. Looking forward to the future, the Board, Regional Lead Organization (RLO) Directors and HQ staff developed a 10-year vision outlining what PTTC needs to accomplish in supporting a national energy plan. This vision has been communicated to Department of Energy (DOE) staff and PTTC looks forward to continuing this successful federal-state-industry partnership. As part of this effort, several more examples of industry using information gained through PTTC activities to impact their bottom line were identified. Securing the industry pull on technology acceptance was the cornerstone of this directional plan.

Unknown

2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

67

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of assisting U.S. independent oil and gas producers to make timely, informed technology decisions. Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and 3 Satellite Offices that encompass all of the oil- and natural gas-producing regions in the U.S. Active volunteer leadership from the Board and regional Producer Advisory Groups keeps activities focused on producer's needs. Technical expertise and personal networks of national and regional staff enable PTTC to deliver focused, technology-related information in a manner that is cost and time effective for independents. The organization effectively combines federal funding through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy with matching state and industry funding, forming a unique partnership. This final report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments. In this final fiscal year of the contract, activities exceeded prior annual activity levels by significant percentages. Strategic planning implemented during the year is focusing PTTC's attention on changes that will bear fruit in the future. Networking and connections are increasing PTTC's sphere of influence with both producers and the service sector. PTTC's reputation for unbiased bottom-line information stimulates cooperative ventures. In FY03 PTTC's regions held 169 workshops, drawing 8,616 attendees. There were nearly 25,000 reported contacts. This represents a 38% increase in attendance and 34% increase in contacts as compared to FY02 activity. Repeat attendance at regional workshops, a measure of customer satisfaction and value received, remained strong at 50%. 39% of participants in regional workshops respond ''Yes'' on feedback forms when asked if they are applying technologies based on knowledge gained through PTTC. This feedback confirms that producers are taking action with the information they receive. RLO Directors captured examples demonstrating how PTTC activities influenced industry activity. Additional follow-up in all regions explored industry's awareness of PTTC and the services it provides. PTTC publishes monthly case studies in the ''Petroleum Technology Digest in World Oil'' and monthly Tech Connections columns in the ''American Oil and Gas Reporter''. Email Tech Alerts are utilized to notify the O&G community of DOE solicitations and demonstration results, PTTC key technical information and meetings, as well as industry highlights. Workshop summaries are posted online at www.pttc.org. PTTC maintains an active exhibit schedule at national industry events. The national communications effort continues to expand the audience PTTC reaches. The network of national and regional websites has proven effective for conveying technology-related information and facilitating user's access to basic oil and gas data, which supplement regional and national newsletters. The regions frequently work with professional societies and producer associations in co-sponsored events and there is a conscious effort to incorporate findings from DOE-supported research, development and demonstration (RD&D) projects within events. The level of software training varies by region, with the Rocky Mountain Region taking the lead. Where appropriate, regions develop information products that provide a service to industry and, in some cases, generate moderate revenues. Data access is an on-going industry priority, so all regions work to facilitate access to public source databases. Various outreach programs also emanate from the resource centers, including targeted visits to producers.

Donald F. Duttlinger; E. Lance Cole

2003-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

Treating Coalbed Natural Gas Produced Water for Beneficial Use By MFI Zeolite Membranes  

SciTech Connect

Desalination of brines produced from oil and gas fields is an attractive option for providing potable water in arid regions. Recent field-testing of subsurface sequestration of carbon dioxide for climate management purposes provides new motivation for optimizing efficacy of oilfield brine desalination: as subsurface reservoirs become used for storing CO{sub 2}, the displaced brines must be managed somehow. However, oilfield brine desalination is not economical at this time because of high costs of synthesizing membranes and the need for sophisticated pretreatments to reduce initial high TDS and to prevent serious fouling of membranes. In addition to these barriers, oil/gas field brines typically contain high concentrations of multivalent counter cations (eg. Ca{sup 2+} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) that can reduce efficacy of reverse osmosis (RO). Development of inorganic membranes with typical characteristics of high strength and stability provide a valuable option to clean produced water for beneficial uses. Zeolite membranes have a well-defined subnanometer pore structure and extreme chemical and mechanical stability, thus showing promising applicability in produced water purification. For example, the MFI-type zeolite membranes with uniform pore size of {approx}0.56 nm can separate ions from aqueous solution through a mechanism of size exclusion and electrostatic repulsion (Donnan exclusion). Such a combination allows zeolite membranes to be unique in separation of both organics and electrolytes from aqueous solutions by a reverse osmosis process, which is of great interest for difficult separations, such as oil-containing produced water purification. The objectives of the project 'Treating Coalbed Natural Gas Produced Water for Beneficial Use by MFI Zeolite Membranes' are: (1) to conduct extensive fundamental investigations and understand the mechanism of the RO process on zeolite membranes and factors determining the membrane performance, (2) to improve the membranes and optimize operating conditions to enhance water flux and ion rejection, and (3) to perform long-term RO operation on tubular membranes to study membrane stability and to collect experimental data necessary for reliable evaluations of technical and economic feasibilities. Our completed research has resulted in deep understanding of the ion and organic separation mechanism by zeolite membranes. A two-step hydrothermal crystallization process resulted in a highly efficient membrane with good reproducibility. The zeolite membranes synthesized therein has an overall surface area of {approx}0.3 m{sup 2}. Multichannel vessels were designed and machined for holding the tubular zeolite membrane for water purification. A zeolite membrane RO demonstration with zeolite membranes fabricated on commercial alpha-alumina support was established in the laboratory. Good test results were obtained for both actual produced water samples and simulated samples. An overall 96.9% ion rejection and 2.23 kg/m{sup 2}.h water flux was achieved in the demonstration. In addition, a post-synthesis modification method using Al{sup 3+}-oligomers was developed for repairing the undesirable nano-scale intercrystalline pores. Considerable enhancement in ion rejection was achieved. This new method of zeolite membrane modification is particularly useful for enhancing the efficiency of ion separation from aqueous solutions because the modification does not need high temperature operation and may be carried out online during the RO operation. A long-term separation test for actual CBM produced water has indicated that the zeolite membranes show excellent ion separation and extraordinary stability at high pressure and produced water environment.

Robert Lee; Liangxiong Li

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

Gas supplies of interstate natural gas pipeline companies, 1986  

SciTech Connect

The publication provides information on the total reserves, production, and deliverability capabilities of the 90 interstate pipeline companies. The gas supplies of interstate pipeline companies consist of the certificated, dedicated, recoverable, salable natural gas available from domestic in-the-ground reserves; gas purchased under contracts with other interstate pipeline companies; domestically produced coal gas, liquefied natural gas (LNG), and synthetic natural gas (SNG); and imported natural gas and LNG. The domestic in-the-ground reserves consist of company-owned reserves including natural gas in underground storage, reserves dedicated to or warranted under contracts with independent producers, and supplemental or short-term supplies purchased from independent producers and intrastate pipeline companies. To avoid duplicate reporting of domestic in-the-ground reserves, the volumes of gas under contract agreement between jurisdictional pipelines have been excluded in summarizing State and national reserves. Volumes contracted under agreements with foreign suppliers include pipeline imports from Canada and Mexico. 7 figs., 18 tabs.

Not Available

1987-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

70

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Nuclear > Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report Data for: 2005 Release Date: May 15, 2006 Next Release: May 15, 2007

71

AGA Producing Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) AGA Producing Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 393,598 297,240 289,617 356,360 461,202 516,155 604,504 678,168 747,928 783,414 775,741 673,670 1995 156,161 158,351 126,677 101,609 72,294 83,427 33,855 -43,870 -34,609 -17,003 -75,285 -121,212 1996 -180,213 -191,939 -220,847 -233,967 -253,766 -260,320 -246,398 -159,895 -134,327 -127,911 -138,359 -86,091 1997 -55,406 -14,740 101,915 102,564 121,784 132,561 86,965 58,580 38,741 67,379 80,157 28,119 1998 77,255 135,784 65,355 130,979 148,718 138,540 205,160 215,060 166,834 187,302 246,104 273,754

72

State Support of Domestic Production  

SciTech Connect

This project was developed in response to a cooperative agreement offering by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under the State Support of Domestic Production DE-FC26-04NT15456. The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) performed efforts in support of State programs related to the security, reliability and growth if our nation's domestic production of oil and natural gas. The project objectives were to improve the States ability to monitor the security of oil and gas operations; to maximize the production of domestic oil and natural gas thereby minimizing the threat to national security posed by interruptions in energy imports; to assist States in developing and maintaining high standards of environmental protection; to assist in addressing issues that limit the capacity of the industry; to promote the deployment of the appropriate application of technology for regulatory efficiency; and to inform the public about emerging energy issues.

Amy Wright

2007-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

73

AGA Producing Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) AGA Producing Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 -32.80 -42.10 -53.10 -51.10 -47.60 -43.40 -38.60 -25.20 -18.80 -16.70 -19.80 -15.60 1997 -15.00 -5.60 52.10 45.80 43.50 39.10 22.20 12.30 6.70 10.60 14.30 6.00 1998 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 38.30 55.40 1999 56.40 52.20 46.30 24.20 18.80 19.30 8.80 0.30 5.30 -3.80 0.00 0.00 2000 -14.80 -32.50 -28.30 -30.80 -35.70 -34.40 -30.70 -30.60 -28.40 -22.30 -28.90 -46.70 2001 -38.30 -35.20 -37.70 -12.80 9.80 25.20 31.70 43.40 46.40 30.90 52.60 127.30 2002 127.50 140.90 136.10 82.90 59.20 34.80 18.30 10.40 3.10 -0.50 -14.40 -23.90

74

AGA Producing Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Producing Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 1,039,864 1,032,160 1,033,297 1,032,517 1,037,294 1,037,338 1,038,940 1,036,193 1,037,422 1,035,931 1,035,050 1,043,103 1995 1,051,669 1,054,584 1,051,120 1,051,697 1,052,949 1,062,613 1,058,260 1,054,218 1,054,870 1,051,687 1,056,704 1,060,588 1996 1,067,220 1,062,343 1,027,692 1,040,511 1,055,164 1,056,516 1,052,009 1,051,395 1,052,015 1,048,151 1,052,057 1,053,173 1997 1,064,968 1,054,977 1,059,316 1,059,050 1,059,706 1,064,515 1,063,554 1,063,029 1,066,254 1,064,123 1,065,557 1,065,151 1998 1,064,741 1,058,297 1,057,927 1,057,506 1,060,241 1,055,941 1,055,660 1,055,056 1,056,417 1,057,591 1,057,539 1,038,925

75

Natural Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Department supports research and policy options to ensure environmentally sustainable domestic and global supplies of oil and natural gas.

76

Market potential of IGCC for domestic power production  

SciTech Connect

Mitretek Systems and CONSOL Inc. have completed the first phase of a market potential study for Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) domestic power production. The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded this study. The objective of this study is to provide DOE with data to estimate the future domestic market potential of IGCC for electricity generation. Major drivers in this study are the state of technology development, feedstock costs, environmental control costs, demand growth, and dispatchability. This study examines IGCC potential for baseload power production in the Northeast U. S., an important market area by virtue of existing coal infrastructure and proximity to coal producing regions. IGCC market potential was examined for two levels of technology development as a function of natural gas price and carbon tax. This paper discusses the results of this study, including the levels of performance and cost necessary to insure competitiveness with natural gas combined cycle plants.

Gray, D.; Tomlinson, G.; Hawk, E.; Maskew, J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Benefits Benefits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Natural Gas Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Natural Gas Benefits and Considerations Compressed and liquefied natural gas are clean, domestically produced alternative fuels. Using these fuels in natural gas vehicles increases

78

A full fuel-cycle analysis of energy and emissions impacts of transportation fuels produced from natural gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Because of its abundance and because it offers significant energy and evironmental advantages, natural gas has been promoted for use in motor vehicles. A number of transportation fuels are produced from natural gas; each is distinct in terms of upstream production activities and vehicle usage. In this study, the authors avaluate eight fuels produced from natural gas - compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, hydrogen, dimethyl ether, Fischer-Tropsch diesel, and electricity--for use in five types of motor vehicles--spark-ignition vehicles, compression-ignition vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, battery-powered electric vehicles, and fuel-cell vehicles. Because of great uncertainties associated with advances both in fuel production and vehicle technologies, they evaluate near-term and long-term fuels and vehicle technologies separately. Furthermore, for long-term options, they establish both an incremental technology scenario and a leap-forward technology scenario to address potential technology improvements. The study reveals that, in general, the use of natural gas-based fuels reduces energy use and emissions relative to use of petroleum-based gasoline and diesel fuel, although different natural gas-based fuels in different vehicle technologies can have significantly different energy and emissions impacts.

Wang, M.Q.; Huang, H.S.

2000-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

79

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect

During FY99, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTfC's national organization has active grassroots programs that connect with independents through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). These activities--including technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, and other outreach efforts--are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs). The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY99, which lay the groundwork for further growth in the future.

Donald Duttlinger

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect

During FY99, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTTC's national organization has active grassroots programs that connect with independents through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). These activities--including technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, and other outreach efforts--are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs). The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY99, which lay the groundwork for further growth in the future.

Unknown

1999-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "domestically produced natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect

During FY00, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTTC's national organization has active grassroots programs that connect with independents through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). These activities--including technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, and other outreach efforts--are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs). The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY00, which lay the groundwork for further growth in the future.

Unknown

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions during Fiscal Year 2001 (FY01). Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its ten Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). They bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors interact with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, various technical publications and other outreach efforts. These are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs), who are area operators and service companies working with the regional networks. The role of the national Headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. The organization effectively combines federal funding through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy, state, and industry funding to achieve important goals for all of these sectors. This integrated funding base, combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff, are achieving notable results. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies, especially for smaller companies without direct contact to R&D efforts. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY01, which lays the groundwork for further growth in the future. At a time of many industry changes and wide market movements, the organization itself is adapting to change. PTTC has built a reputation and expectation among producers and other industry participants to quickly distribute information addressing technical needs. The organization efficiently has an impact on business economics as the focus remains on proven applicable technologies, which target cost reduction and efficiency gains.

Donald Duttlinger

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions during Fiscal Year 2000 (FY00). Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its ten Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) who bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors connect with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, various technical publications and other outreach efforts. These are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs), who are area operators and service companies working with the Regional Lead Organizations. The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. The organization effectively combines federal, state, and industry funding to achieve important goals for all of these sectors. This integrated funding base, combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff, are achieving notable results. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies, especially for smaller companies. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY00, which lays the groundwork for further growth in the future. At a time of many industry changes and market movements, the organization has built a reputation and expectation to address industry needs of getting information distributed quickly which can impact the bottom line immediately.

Unknown

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Long-term contracts and asset specificity revisited : an empirical analysis of producer-importer relations in the natural gas industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze structural changes in long-term contracts in the international trade of natural gas. Using a unique data set of 262 long-term contracts between natural gas producers and importers, we estimate the ...

Neumann, Anne

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect

In pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) functions as a cohesive national organization that implements industry's directives through active regional programs. The role of the national headquarters (HQ) organization includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. PTTC relies on 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) as its main program delivery mechanism to industry. Through its regions, PTTC connects with independent oil and gas producers--through technology workshops, resources centers, websites, newsletters, and other outreach efforts. The organization effectively combines federal, state, and industry funding to achieve important goals for all of these sectors. This integrated funding base, combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff, are achieving notable results. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies, especially for smaller companies. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY98, and its strategy for achieving further growth in the future.

Unknown

1998-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

Layering and temperature-dependent magnetization and anisotropy of naturally produced Ni/NiO multilayers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ni/NiO multilayers were grown by magnetron sputtering at room temperature, with the aid of the natural oxidation procedure. That is, at the end of the deposition of each single Ni layer, air is let to flow into the vacuum chamber through a leak valve. Then, a very thin NiO layer ({approx}1.2 nm) is formed. Simulated x-ray reflectivity patterns reveal that layering is excellent for individual Ni-layer thickness larger than 2.5 nm, which is attributed to the intercalation of amorphous NiO between the polycrystalline Ni layers. The magnetization of the films, measured at temperatures 5-300 K, has almost bulk-like value, whereas the films exhibit a trend to perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) with an unusual significant positive interface anisotropy contribution, which presents a weak temperature dependence. The power-law behavior of the multilayers indicates a non-negligible contribution of higher order anisotropies in the uniaxial anisotropy. Bloch-law fittings for the temperature dependence of the magnetization in the spin-wave regime show that the magnetization in the multilayers decreases faster as a function of temperature than the one of bulk Ni. Finally, when the individual Ni-layer thickness decreases below 2 nm, the multilayer stacking vanishes, resulting in a dramatic decrease of the interface magnetic anisotropy and consequently in a decrease of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

Pappas, S. D.; Trachylis, D.; Velgakis, M. J. [Laboratory of High-Tech Materials, School of Engineering, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece); Kapaklis, V.; Joensson, P. E.; Papaioannou, E. Th. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Delimitis, A. [Chemical Process Engineering Research Institute (CPERI), Centre for Research and Technology Hellas (CERTH), 57001 Thermi, Thessaloniki (Greece); Poulopoulos, P. [Laboratory of High-Tech Materials, School of Engineering, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece); Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Arnimallee 14, D-14195 Berlin-Dahlem (Germany); Materials Science Department, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece); Fumagalli, P. [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Arnimallee 14, D-14195 Berlin-Dahlem (Germany); Politis, C. [Laboratory of High-Tech Materials, School of Engineering, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas 76019 (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Northern Cheyenne Reservation Coal Bed Natural Resource Assessment and Analysis of Produced Water Disposal Options  

SciTech Connect

Coalbed methane (CBM) development in the Powder River Basin (PRB) is currently one of the most active gas plays in the United States. Monthly production in 2002 reached about 26 BCF in the Wyoming portion of the basin. Coalbed methane reserves for the Wyoming portion of the basin are approximately 25 trillion cubic feet (TCF). Although coal beds in the Powder River Basin extend well into Montana, including the area of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, the only CBM development in Montana is the CX Field, operated by the Fidelity Exploration, near the Wyoming border. The Northern Cheyenne Reservation is located on the northwest flank of the PRB in Montana with a total land of 445,000 acres. The Reservation consists of five districts, Lame Deer, Busby, Ashland, Birney, and Muddy Cluster and has a population of 4,470 according to the 2000 Census. The CBM resource represents a significant potential asset to the Northern Cheyenne Indian Tribe. Methane gas in coal beds is trapped by hydrodynamic pressure. Because the production of CBM involves the dewatering of coalbed to allow the release of methane gas from the coal matrix, the relatively large volume of the co-produced water and its potential environmental impacts are the primary concerns for the Tribe. Presented in this report is a study conducted by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology (MBMG) in partnership with the Northern Cheyenne Tribe to assess the Tribes CBM resources and evaluate applicable water handling options. The project was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through the Native American Initiative of the National Petroleum Technology Office, under contract DEAC07- 99ID13727. Matching funds were granted by the MBMG in supporting the work of geologic study and mapping conducted at MBMG.

Shaochang Wo; David A. Lopez; Jason Whiteman Sr.; Bruce A. Reynolds

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report"...

89

U.S. Domestic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2011 Domestic and foreign distribution of U.S. coal by State of...

90

Naturally Occurring Radionuclides of Ash Produced by Coal Combustion. The Case of the Kardia Mine in Northern Greece  

SciTech Connect

West Macedonia Lignite Center (WMLC), located in Northwest Greece, releases into the atmosphere about 21,400 tons/year of fly ash through the stacks of four coal fired plants. The lignite ash contains naturally occurring radionuclides, which are deposited on the WMLC basin. This work investigates the natural radioactivity of twenty six ash samples, laboratory produced from combustion of lignite, which was sampled perpendicularly to the benches of the Kardia mine. The concentrations of radionuclides {sup 40}K, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 232}Th, were measured spectroscopically and found round one order of magnitude as high as those of lignite. Subsequently the Radionuclide Partitioning Coefficients of radionuclides were calculated and it was found that they are higher for {sup 232}Th, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K, because the latter have closer affinity with the inorganic matrix of lignite. During combustion up to one third of the naturally occurring radioisotopes escape from the solid phase into the flue gases. With comparison to relative global data, the investigated ash has been found to have relatively high radioactivity, but the emissions of the WMLC radionuclides contribute only 0.03% to the mean annual absorbed dose.

Fotakis, M.; Tsikritzis, L.; Tzimkas, N.; Kolovos, N.; Tsikritzi, R. [Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of West Macedonia, Department of Pollution Control Technologies, Koila, Kozani, 50100 (Greece)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

91

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Natural Gas Natural Gas Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas on AddThis.com... More in this section... Natural Gas Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Natural Gas Fuel Prices Find natural gas fuel prices and trends. Natural gas is a domestically produced gaseous fuel, readily available

92

Carbon Pollution Being Captured, Stored and Used to Produce More...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Pollution Being Captured, Stored and Used to Produce More Domestic Oil Carbon Pollution Being Captured, Stored and Used to Produce More Domestic Oil May 10, 2013 - 11:38am...

93

U.S. Domestic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Domestic and Foreign Coal Distribution by State of Origin ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2012 Domestic and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by State of Origin, 2012 (thousand short tons) Coal Exports Coal Origin State and Region Domestic Distribution By Coal Mines By Brokers & Traders* Total Exports Total Distribution Alabama 8,597.7 10,332.9 324.6 10,657.6 19,255.3 Alaska 618.2 967.8 - 967.8 1,586.0 Arizona 7,450.2 - - - 7,450.2 Arkansas 105.5 - - - 105.5 Colorado 19,992.7 3,467.7 3,039.6 6,507.3 26,500.0 Illinois 34,350.9 12,340.9 1,434.6 13,775.5 48,126.4 Indiana 34,712.2 375.3 96.7 472.0 35,184.2 Kansas 4.3 - - - 4.3 Kentucky Total 74,483.7 5,668.3 3,170.3 8,838.6 83,322.4

94

Domestic utility attitudes toward foreign uranium supply  

SciTech Connect

The current embargo on the enrichment of foreign-origin uranium for use in domestic utilization facilities is scheduled to be removed in 1984. The pending removal of this embargo, complicated by a depressed worldwide market for uranium, has prompted consideration of a new or extended embargo within the US Government. As part of its on-going data collection activities, Nuclear Resources International (NRI) has surveyed 50 domestic utility/utility holding companies (representing 60 lead operator-utilities) on their foreign uranium purchase strategies and intentions. The most recent survey was conducted in early May 1981. A number of qualitative observations were made during the course of the survey. The major observations are: domestic utility views toward foreign uranium purchase are dynamic; all but three utilities had some considered foreign purchase strategy; some utilities have problems with buying foreign uranium from particular countries; an inducement is often required by some utilities to buy foreign uranium; opinions varied among utilities concerning the viability of the domestic uranium industry; and many utilities could have foreign uranium fed through their domestic uranium contracts (indirect purchases). The above observations are expanded in the final section of the report. However, it should be noted that two of the observations are particularly important and should be seriously considered in formulation of foreign uranium import restrictions. These important observations are the dynamic nature of the subject matter and the potentially large and imbalanced effect the indirect purchases could have on utility foreign uranium procurement.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Domestic Uranium Production Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report - Annual Domestic Uranium Production Report - Annual With Data for 2012 | Release Date: June 06, 2013 | Next Release Date: May 2014 |full report Previous domestic uranium production reports Year: 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 Go Drilling Figure 1. U.S. Uranium drilling by number of holes, 2004-2012 U.S. uranium exploration drilling was 5,112 holes covering 3.4 million feet in 2012. Development drilling was 5,970 holes and 3.7 million feet. Combined, total uranium drilling was 11,082 holes covering 7.2 million feet, 5 percent more holes than in 2011. Expenditures for uranium drilling in the United States were $67 million in 2012, an increase of 24 percent compared with 2011. Mining, production, shipments, and sales U.S. uranium mines produced 4.3 million pounds U3O8 in 2012, 5 percent more

96

Renewable Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Natural Gas JOHN DAVIS: The use of clean, domestic natural gas as highway fuel in place of imported oil is growing in popularity with fleets and trucking companies. While natural gas from underground deposits is arguably a limited resource, there is a renewable, eco-friendly resource that we have right here in the U.S.A. And we're here now to give you the straight poop! Every family, farm animal and food processing plant in America produces organic waste that creates a mix of methane, CO2 and other elements called bio gas when it decomposes. Rotten vegetables, moldy bread, last night's leftovers --- they all break down when our garbage gets to the land fill. Incredibly, for

97

Gas supplies of interstate natural gas pipeline companies 1985  

SciTech Connect

This publication provides information on the total reserves, production, and deliverability capabilities of the 91 interstate pipeline companies. The gas supplies of interstate pipeline companies consist of the certificated, dedicated, recoverable, salable natural gas available from domestic in-the-ground reserves; gas purchased under contracts with other interstate pipeline companies; domestically produced coal gas, liquefied natural gas (LNG), and synthetic natural gas (SNG); and imported natural gas and LNG. The domestic in-the-ground reserves consist of company owned reserves including natural gas in underground storage, reserves dedicated to or warranted under contracts with independent producers, and supplemental or short-term supplies purchased from independent producers and intrastate pipeline companies. To avoid duplicate reporting of domestic in-the-ground reserves, the volumes of gas under contract agreement between jurisdictional pipelines have been excluded in summarizing state and national reserves. Volumes contracted under agreements with foreign suppliers include pipeline imports from Canada and Mexico and LNG from Algeria. 7 figs., 18 tabs.

Not Available

1986-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

98

Gas supplies of interstate natural gas pipeline companies, 1984  

SciTech Connect

This publication provides information on the total reserves, production, and deliverability capabilities of 89 interstate pipeline companies. The gas supplies of interstate pipeline companies consist of the certificated, dedicated, recoverable, salable natural gas available from domestic in-the-ground reserves; gas purchased under contracts with other interstate pipeline companies; domestically produced coal gas, liquefied natural gas (LNG), and synthetic natural gas (SNG); and imported natural gas and LNG. The domestic in-the-ground reserves consist of company-owned reserves including natural gas in underground storage, reserves dedicated to or warranted under contracts with independent producers, and supplemental or short-term supplies purchased from independent producers and intrastate pipeline companies. To avoid duplicate reporting of domestic in-the-ground reserves, the volumes of gas under contract agreement between jurisdictional pipelines have been excluded in summarizing state and national reserves. Volumes contracted under agreements with foreign suppliers include pipeline imports from Canada and Mexico and LNG from Algeria. 8 figs., 18 tabs.

Price, R.

1985-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

99

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

udrilling 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Next Release Date: May 2014 Table 1. U.S. uranium drilling activities, 2003-2012 Year Exploration Drilling

100

Domestic Animals that go Wild  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and become tamer than their wild relatives. By the artificial selection of breeding stock, these domesticated animals have been greatly modified to fill man's needs for better...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "domestically produced natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stripper Well Consortium Stripper Well Consortium DE-FC26-00NT41025 Goal: The goal is to enhance the ability of the domestic production industry to keep stripper wells producing at economic production rates in an environmentally safe manner, maximizing the recovery of domestic hydrocarbon resources. Objective: The objective is to develop and manage an industry-driven consortium that provides a cost-efficient vehicle for developing, transferring, and deploying new technologies into the private sector that focus on improving the production performance of domestic natural gas and oil stripper wells. Performer: The Pennsylvania State University (Energy Institute) - Project management Accomplishments: Established a consortium governing structure, constitution and bylaws, Established areas of research focus (reservoir remediation and characterization, well bore cleanup, and surface systems optimization) and rules for proposal submission and selection, and

102

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the private sector that focus on improving the production performance of domestic natural gas and oil stripper wells. Performer: The Pennsylvania State University (Energy...

103

U.S. Domestic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Domestic and foreign distribution of U.S. coal by State of origin, 2011 (thousand short tons) Coal Exports Coal Origin State and Region Domestic Distribution By Coal Mines By Brokers & Traders* Total Exports Total Distribution Alabama 9,222.6 9,030.7 1,127.4 10,158.1 19,380.7 Alaska 1,015.6 1,203.2 - 1,203.2 2,218.8 Arizona 7,872.5 - - - 7,872.5 Arkansas 7.2 - - - 7.2 Colorado 22,949.4 1,713.8 1,286.4 3,000.2 25,949.6 Illinois 31,679.5 4,641.9 830.4 5,472.4 37,151.9 Indiana 36,633.9 120.0 522.2 642.2 37,276.1 Kansas 31.1 - - - 31.1 Kentucky Total 96,148.9 3,533.7 3,610.7 7,144.4 103,293.3 East 56,548.9 2,328.7 3,186.2 5,514.9 62,063.7 West 39,600.1 1,205.0 424.5 1,629.5 41,229.6 Louisiana 3,854.7 - - - 3,854.7 Maryland 2,203.8 171.3 327.8 499.1 2,702.9 Mississippi 2,701.2 - - - 2,701.2 Missouri 350.3 - - - 350.3 Montana 25,346.4

104

Comparative evaluation of the impacts of domestic gas and electric heat pump heating on air pollution in California  

SciTech Connect

Residential space and water heating accounts for approximately 12% of California's and 15% of the United States, energy consumption. most Of the residential heating is by direct use of natural gas. combustion of natural gas is a contributor to the overall air pollution,, especially CO and NO{sub x} in the urban areas. Another efficient method for domestic water and space heating is use of electric heat pumps, the most popular category of which uses air as its heat source. Electric heat pumps do not emit air pollutants at the point of use, but use electric power, which is a major contributor to air pollution at its point of generation from fossil fuels. It is the specific objective of this report to evaluate and compare the energy efficiency and source air pollutants of natural gas heaters and electric heat pumps used for domestic heating. Effect of replacing natural gas heaters with electric heat pumps on air pollutant emissions due to domestic heating in two urban areas and in California as a whole has also been evaluated. The analysis shows that with the present state of technology, electric heat pumps have higher heating efficiencies than natural gas heaters. Considering the current electricity generation mix in the US, electric heat pumps produce two to four times more NO{sub x}, much less CO, and comparable amount of CO{sub 2} per unit of useful heating energy compared to natural gas heaters. With California mix, electric heat pumps produce comparable NO{sub x} and much less CO and approximately 30% less CO{sub 2} per unit heat output. Replacement of natural gas heaters with electric heat pumps will slightly increase the overall NO{sub x}, and reduce CO and CO{sub 2} emissions in California. The effect of advanced technology power generation and heat pump heating has also been analyzed.

Ganji, A. (San Francisco State Univ., CA (United States). Div. of Engineering)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Comparative evaluation of the impacts of domestic gas and electric heat pump heating on air pollution in California. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Residential space and water heating accounts for approximately 12% of California`s and 15% of the United States, energy consumption. most Of the residential heating is by direct use of natural gas. combustion of natural gas is a contributor to the overall air pollution,, especially CO and NO{sub x} in the urban areas. Another efficient method for domestic water and space heating is use of electric heat pumps, the most popular category of which uses air as its heat source. Electric heat pumps do not emit air pollutants at the point of use, but use electric power, which is a major contributor to air pollution at its point of generation from fossil fuels. It is the specific objective of this report to evaluate and compare the energy efficiency and source air pollutants of natural gas heaters and electric heat pumps used for domestic heating. Effect of replacing natural gas heaters with electric heat pumps on air pollutant emissions due to domestic heating in two urban areas and in California as a whole has also been evaluated. The analysis shows that with the present state of technology, electric heat pumps have higher heating efficiencies than natural gas heaters. Considering the current electricity generation mix in the US, electric heat pumps produce two to four times more NO{sub x}, much less CO, and comparable amount of CO{sub 2} per unit of useful heating energy compared to natural gas heaters. With California mix, electric heat pumps produce comparable NO{sub x} and much less CO and approximately 30% less CO{sub 2} per unit heat output. Replacement of natural gas heaters with electric heat pumps will slightly increase the overall NO{sub x}, and reduce CO and CO{sub 2} emissions in California. The effect of advanced technology power generation and heat pump heating has also been analyzed.

Ganji, A. [San Francisco State Univ., CA (United States). Div. of Engineering

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

The Paradox of Domesticity: Resistance to the Myth of Home in Contemporary American Literature and Film  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation focuses on novels and films produced in the second half of the twentieth century that critique traditional notions of home in contemporary America to expand on the large body of work on American domesticity in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. These texts demonstrate the damaging power and overwhelming force of conventional domesticity, complicating traditional notions of home by speaking from positions of marginality. In each text, key figures react to limited ideologies of domesticity that seek to maintain sameness, silence, and servitude by enacting embodied resistance to domestic entrapment. The areas of convergence between the figure of the conventional, middle-class home, and the material and psychic reality of home disavow the expectations of the middle-class home ideal and offer real resistance to narrow, and often damaging, visions of home. These spaces allow for new conceptions of home and suggest that it may be possible to conceive of home as something other than fixed in place, governed by family and community, or created by prolific consumption of goods. In this way, this dissertation intervenes in the established binary of home/stability in opposition to mobility/freedom, which maintains the limits of appropriate ways of establishing and enacting domesticity along gender and class lines. By considering portraits of domesticity that are often left out of discussions of home in the United States my research intersects with a broad range of theoretical fields and discourses about mobility, historical and popular culture representations of the tramp, the body and surveillance, the home as spatial construct, and housekeeping as both oppressive and subversive. Drawing on historical and theoretical examinations of women within the home space, coupled with literary criticism and close-readings, I seek to determine the nature of confining domesticity and examine the varied ways that different groups of people respond to their entrapment. At stake in this dissertation is a deeper understanding of the ways that literary and filmic representations of home at the end of the twentieth century suggest a conflict between the ways that home and houses, are popularly represented and the fact that home remains a contested and dangerous space.

Cox, Kimberly O'Dell

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Status of domestic uranium industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The domestic uranium industry continues to operate at a reduced level, due to low prices and increased foreign competition. For four years (1984-1987) the Secretary of Energy declared the industry to be nonviable. A similar declaration is expected for 1988. Exploration and development drilling, at the rate of 2 million ft/year, continue in areas of producing mines and recent discoveries, especially in northwestern Arizona, northwestern Nebraska, south Texas, Wyoming, and the Paradox basin of Colorado and Utah. Production of uranium concentrate continues at a rate of 13 to 15 million lb of uranium oxide (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}) per year. Conventional mining in New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, and Texas accounts for approximately 55% of the production. The remaining 45% comes from solution (in situ) mining, from mine water recovery, and as by-products from copper production and the manufacture of phosphoric acid. Solution mining is an important technique in Wyoming, Nebraska, and Texas. By-product production comes from phosphate plants in Florida and Louisiana and a copper mine in Utah. Unmined deposits in areas such as the Grants, New Mexico, district are being investigated for their application to solution mining technology. The discovered uranium resources in the US are quite large, and the potential to discover additional resources is excellent. However, higher prices and a strong market will be necessary for their exploitation.

Chenoweth, W.L.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Natural  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary of U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Imports Volume (million cubic feet) Pipeline Canada............................. 2,094,387 2,266,751 2,566,049 2,816,408 2,883,277 Mexico .............................. 0 1,678 7,013 6,722 13,862 Total Pipeline Imports....... 2,094,387 2,268,429 2,573,061 2,823,130 2,897,138 LNG Algeria .............................. 43,116 81,685 50,778 17,918 35,325 United Arab Emirates ....... 0 0 0 0 4,949 Total LNG Imports............. 43,116 81,685 50,778 17,918 40,274 Total Imports......................... 2,137,504 2,350,115 2,623,839 2,841,048 2,937,413 Average Price (dollars per thousand cubic feet) Pipeline Canada............................. 1.84 2.02 1.86 1.48 1.96 Mexico .............................. - 1.94 1.99 1.53 2.25 Total Pipeline Imports.......

109

REQUEST BY PRAXAIR, INC.(PRAXAIR) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS TO INVENTIONS MADE UNDER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PRAXAIR, INC.(PRAXAIR) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF PRAXAIR, INC.(PRAXAIR) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS TO INVENTIONS MADE UNDER CONTRACT NO. DE-FC26-00NT41027 ENTITLED "NOVEL REACTOR FOR THE PRODUCTION OF SYNTHESIS GAS"; W(A)-01-005, CH1058. Praxair has requested an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights to inventions its employees may conceive or first actually reduce to practice in the performance of Contract No. DE-FC26-00NT41027. As brought out in the attached waiver petition, the work will focus on development of an advanced technology for producing synthesis gas from a reaction of natural gas with pure methane. This process combines the use of a short-reaction time catalyst with Praxair's gas mixing technology to provide a novel reactor system. The total cost of this work under the

110

Applications Received by DOE/FE to Export Domestically Produced...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LNG, LP 1.0 Bcfd: FTA 0.77 Bcfd: non-FTA Approved (11-115-LNG) Approved (11-128-LNG) Jordan Cove Energy Project, L.P. 1.2 Bcfd: FTA 0.8 Bcfd: non-FTA (g) Approved (11-127-LNG)...

111

Natural gas liquids consumption, production, and reserves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas liquids are condensates that occur during production and liquids recovered during processing, and they are classified as lease condensate or natural gas plant liquids (NGPL). There has been a decline in total domestic production, but an increase in ethane and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) during the past decade. Statistical tables illustrate trends in the production of NGPLs and liquefied refinery gases (LRG), imports and exports, and marketing and sales. World production data show that, while the US now produces close to 41% of world output, the production trends in other areas are increasing as ours decline. 10 tables. (DCK)

Sala, D.

1983-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

112

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Domestic Uranium Production Report June 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration | 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report ii Contacts This report was prepared by the staff of the Renewables and Uranium Statistics Team, Office of Electricity,

113

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Cameco Crow Butte Operation Dawes, Nebraska 1,000,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating Operating Hydro Resources, Inc. Church Rock McKinley, New Mexico 1,000,000 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Hydro Resources, Inc. Crownpoint McKinley, New Mexico 1,000,000 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Lost Creek ISR LLC Lost Creek Project Sweetwater, Wyoming 2,000,000 Developing

114

Impact of foreign LPG operations on domestic LPG markets  

SciTech Connect

During 1978 the federal government passed legislation allowing a major increase in natural gas prices and offering hope that some portion of the supply will be allowed to reach free market levels. The mechanism for decontrol of crude oil was also put into effect. This favorable government action and higher world oil prices have led to a major resurgence in domestic exploration. In addition to the supply effects, there appears to have been a substantial demand response to the latest round of world oil price increases. The purpose of this paper is to discuss how these events have affected domestic LPG markets and pricing.

Jones, C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports 2012 - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This growth led to greater domestic natural gas supply and relatively low prices in the United States, thus reducing U.S. reliance on foreign natural gas.

116

U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports 2012 - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In the face of unprecedented levels of domestic natural gas production, ... in New England that hinder natural gas flow from the Marcellus shale play and ...

117

December natural gas prices spike in Boston - Today in Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Although growth in domestic natural gas production has driven down natural gas prices throughout most of the United States in recent years, ...

118

The domestic context  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development contributes to sustainable development by advancing policy recommendations on international trade and investment, economic policy, climate change, measurement and assessment, and natural resources management. Through the Internet, we report on international negotiations and share knowledge gained through collaborative projects with global partners, resulting in more rigorous research, capacity building in developing countries and better dialogue between North and South. IISDs vision is better living for all sustainably; its mission is to champion innovation, enabling societies to live sustainably. IISD is registered as a charitable organization in Canada and has 501(c)(3) status in the United States. IISD receives core operating support from the Government of Canada, provided through the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the

Felix B. Dayo; Felix B. Dayo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

WA_02_042_GENERAL_MOTORS_POWER_TRAIN_DIV_Waiver_of_Domestic_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

42GENERALMOTORSPOWERTRAINDIVWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA02042GENERALMOTORSPOWERTRAINDIVWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA02042GENERALMOTORSPOWERTRAINDIVWaiverofDomest...

120

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Expand Domestic Use of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Expand Domestic Use of Nuclear Power Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Expand Domestic Use of Nuclear Power GNEP will build on the recent advances made by the President and Congress to stimulate new nuclear plant construction in the U.S. This will be accomplished by demonstrating the success of the streamlined regulations for siting, constructing and operating new nuclear plants through the Nuclear Power 2010 program, and by implementing incentives enacted through the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005). At 20 percent of the total electricity supply in the nation, nuclear power is the second largest source of domestic electricity, while seventy percent comes from fossil burning fuels (coal, natural gas, and oil). Increasing the amount of

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121

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Midwest Region  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Pipelines in the Midwest Region Overview | Domestic Gas | Canadian Imports | Regional Pipeline Companies & Links. Overview Twenty-six interstate and at ...

122

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 million pounds U 3 O 8 $0 to $30 per pound $0 to $50 per pound $0 to $100 per pound Properties with Exploration Completed, Exploration Continuing, and Only Assessment Work W W 102.0 Properties Under Development for Production W W W Mines in Production W 21.4 W Mines Closed Temporarily and Closed Permanently W W 133.1 In-Situ Leach Mining W W 128.6 Underground and Open Pit Mining W W 175.4 Arizona, New Mexico and Utah 0 W 164.7 Colorado, Nebraska and Texas W W 40.8 Wyoming W W 98.5 Total 51.8 W 304.0 W = Data withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Note: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report"

123

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Number of Holes Feet (thousand) Number of Holes Feet (thousand) Number of Holes Feet (thousand) 2003 NA NA NA NA W W 2004 W W W W 2,185 1,249 2005 W W W W 3,143 1,668 2006 1,473 821 3,430 1,892 4,903 2,713 2007 4,351 2,200 4,996 2,946 9,347 5,146 2008 5,198 2,543 4,157 2,551 9,355 5,093 2009 1,790 1,051 3,889 2,691 5,679 3,742 2010 2,439 1,460 4,770 3,444 7,209 4,904 2011 5,441 3,322 5,156 3,003 10,597 6,325 2012 5,112 3,447 5,970 3,709 11,082 7,156 NA = Not available. W = Data withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Note: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report" (2003-

124

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 State(s) 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Wyoming 134 139 181 195 245 301 308 348 424 512 Colorado and Texas 48 140 269 263 557 696 340 292 331 248 Nebraska and New Mexico 92 102 123 160 149 160 159 134 127 W Arizona, Utah, and Washington 47 40 75 120 245 360 273 281 W W Alaska, Michigan, Nevada, and South Dakota 0 0 0 16 25 30 W W W W California, Montana, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Virginia 0 0 0 0 9 17 W W W W Total 321 420 648 755 1,231 1,563 1,096 1,073 1,191 1,196 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report" (2003-2012). Table 7. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by state, 2003-2012 person-years

125

The domestic travel sector in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China is already the largest domestic tourism market in the world. Chinese citizens made as many as 800 million overnight domestic trips in 2005. While travel is not a new concept in China, the disposable income they wield, ...

Anders, Jeff, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Assessment of Unglazed Solar Domestic Water Heaters  

SciTech Connect

Conference paper investigating cost-performance tradeoffs in replacing glazed collectors with unglazed collectors in solar domestic water heating systems.

Burch, J.; Salasovich, J.; Hillman, T.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Declaration of Termination of Domestic Partnership Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DPT (01-2012) DPT (01-2012) SANDIA PROPRIETARY INFORMATION PERSONALLY IDENTIFIABLE INFORMATION (PII) (WHEN COMPLETE) Declaration of Termination of Domestic Partnership Form To be completed by the employee and submitted to the Sandia Benefits Customer Service Center at the address above. Please keep a copy for your records. Sworn Affidavit We, __________________________________________ and _____________________________________________ Employee Domestic Partner __________________________________________ _____________________________________________ Employee Social Security Number Domestic Partner Social Security Number __________________________________________ _____________________________________________ Employee Date of Birth Domestic Partner Date of Birth

128

NNSA: Securing Domestic Radioactive Material | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Securing Domestic Radioactive Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency...

129

Notes towards an ethnography of domestic technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports the key findings of an ethnographic study of domestic technology in the home. The issues addressed include: the gendered division of domestic labour and gendered product design; the privatisation of domestic space through entertainment ... Keywords: enjoyability, ethnography, gender, technology, usability

Mark Blythe; Andrew Monk

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Energy Information Administration/Natural Gas Monthly October 2000  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Monthly October 2000 Natural Gas Monthly October 2000 vii Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Entering the 2000-2001 Heating Season During the summer and fall of 2000 natural gas prices reached record highs for a nonheating season period. The dramatic rise in prices resulted from an upsurge in natural gas demand, mainly from electric generation needs during a warmer-than-usual spring and summer. The increased demand has occurred while domestic production levels have continued to decrease over the past several years. 1 Low natural gas prices during 1998 and 1999 dampened exploration and development efforts and caused some lower producing wells to be shut in or abandoned. Natural gas pipeline capacity, on the other hand, has grown with end-use demand, and as sources of new supply have developed, new pipelines have been

131

Domestic Institutions and the Supply and Demand of Remittances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many countries are dependent upon capital flows for their balance of payments accounts. Sources of expenditures include foreign direct investment (FDI), portfolio investment (PI) and remittances. While the determinants of FDI and PI have been extensively analyzed, the analyses of remittance flows from host to home countries are largely lacking and wide-ranging. Factors predominantly not considered are domestic institutions which support or encourage international remittance exchange. Nations routinely desire to control international immigration and capital movement. Consequently they adopt domestic policies which create and enforce institutions that manage both capital and labor mobility across borders. Additionally, researchers commonly neglect to consider the impact of both the supply and demand factors simultaneously, or in other words, the domestic condition (home and host) which both push and pull migrants to migrate and remit. Further, given the non-dyadic nature of the data, there arises a need to "regionalize" the data. To test the effects of variations in immigration institutional attributes, I employ a pooled data set of approximately 104 nations from 1990 to 2004. Controlling for existing explanations and regional influences, I find that domestic institutions have a significant impact on the ability of an individual to migrate to a host country and to eventually remit back to their country of origin.

Hicks, Brian N.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Activity at U.S. Mills and In-Situ-Leach Plants 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Ore from Underground Mines and Stockpiles Fed to Mills 1 0 W W W 0 W W W W W Other Feed Materials 2 W W W W W W W W W W Total Mill Feed W W W W W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W W W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W W W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) E2,000 2,282 2,689 4,106 4,534 3,902 3,708 4,228 3,991 4,146 (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) E1,600 2,280 2,702 3,838 4,050 4,130 3,620 5,137 4,000 3,911 Deliveries (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W 3,786 3,602 3,656 2,044 2,684 2,870 3,630 Weighted-Average Price (dollars per pound U 3 O 8 ) W W W 28.98 42.11 43.81 36.61 37.59 52.36 49.63 Notes: The 2003 annual amounts were estimated by rounding to the nearest 200,000 pounds to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Totals may not equal sum of components

133

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS CLASS WAIVER OF THE U.S. GOVERNMENT'S DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. GOVERNMENT'S DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT U.S. GOVERNMENT'S DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS ARISING UNDER THE MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION AND ENHANCED PASSIVE REMEDIATION OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS ALTERNATIVE PROJECT TO PROJECT SUBCONTRACTORS UNDER DOE CONTRACT NO. DE-AC09-96SR18500 AND TO THE LARGE BUSINESS LOWER TIER SUBCONTRACTORS THEREUNDER; (W(C)-2004-001) [ORO-785] This waiver of the U.S. Government's domestic and foreign patent rights in Monitored Natural Attenuation and Enhanced Passive Remediation of Chlorinated Solvents Alternative Project (MNA/EPR Alternative Project) subject inventions is intended to cover Project Subcontractors under DOE Contract No. DE-AC09-96SR18500 with Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), other than domestic small business and nonprofit organization project subcontractors and lower tier subcontractors covered

134

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Production / Mining Method 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 (estimated contained thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W W W W W W W W (estimated contained thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W 2,681 4,259 W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W W W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) E2,200 2,452 3,045 4,692 4,541 3,879 4,145 4,237 4,114 4,335 Underground 1 2 4 5 6 10 14 4 5 6 Open Pit 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 In-Situ Leaching 2 3 4 5 5 6 4 4 5 5 Other Sources 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 Total Mines and Sources 4 6 10 11 12 17 20 9 11 12 Other 1 Number of Operating Mines Table 2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-2012 Underground Open Pit In-Situ Leaching Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report" (2003-2012).

135

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 9 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Year Exploration Mining Milling Processing Reclamation Total 2003 W W W W 117 321 2004 18 108 W W 121 420 2005 79 149 142 154 124 648 2006 188 121 W W 155 755 2007 375 378 107 216 155 1,231 2008 457 558 W W 154 1,563 2009 175 441 W W 162 1,096 2010 211 400 W W 125 1,073 2011 208 462 W W 102 1,191 2012 161 462 W W 179 1,196 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report" (2003-2012). Table 6. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by category, 2003-2012 person-years W = Data withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Note: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

136

Energy Performance Certificate Non-Domestic Building  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

66 the building is. ... Non-Domestic Building Energy Performance Asset Rating ... This certificate shows the energy rating of this building.

137

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Item 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 E2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Surface Drilling (million feet) 1.1 0.7 1.3 3.0 4.9 4.6 2.5 1.0 0.7 W W 1.2 1.7 2.7 5.1 5.1 3.7 4.9 6.3 7.2 Drilling Expenditures (million dollars) 1 5.7 1.1 2.6 7.2 20.0 18.1 7.9 5.6 2.7 W W 10.6 18.1 40.1 67.5 81.9 35.4 44.6 53.6 66.6 (million pounds U 3 O 8 ) 2.1 2.5 3.5 4.7 4.7 4.8 4.5 3.1 2.6 2.4 2.2 2.5 3.0 4.7 4.5 3.9 4.1 4.2 4.1 4.3 (million pounds U 3 O 8 ) 3.1 3.4 6.0 6.3 5.6 4.7 4.6 4.0 2.6 2.3 2.0 2.3 2.7 4.1 4.5 3.9 3.7 4.2 4.0 4.1 (million pounds U 3 O 8 ) 3.4 6.3 5.5 6.0 5.8 4.9 5.5 3.2 2.2 3.8 1.6 2.3 2.7 3.8 4.0 4.1 3.6 5.1 4.0 3.9 (person-years) 871 980 1,107 1,118 1,097 1,120 848 627 423 426 321 420 648 755 1,231 1,563 1,096 1,073 1,191 1,196

138

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Milling Capacity (short tons of ore per day) 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Cotter Corporation Canon City Mill Fremont, Colorado 0 Standby Standby Standby Reclamation Demolished EFR White Mesa LLC White Mesa Mill San Juan, Utah 2,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating Operating Energy Fuels Resources Corporation Piñon Ridge Mill Montrose, Colorado 500 Developing Developing Developing Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Kennecott Uranium Company/Wyoming Coal Resource Company Sweetwater Uranium Project Sweetwater, Wyoming 3,000 Standby Standby Standby Standby Standby Uranium One Americas, Inc. Shootaring Canyon Uranium Mill Garfield, Utah 750 Changing License To Operational Standby

139

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

11 11 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Total Land and Other 2003 W W 31.3 NA NA NA W 2004 10.6 27.8 48.4 NA NA NA 86.9 2005 18.1 58.2 59.7 NA NA NA 136.0 2006 40.1 65.9 115.2 41.0 23.3 50.9 221.2 2007 67.5 90.4 178.2 77.7 50.3 50.2 336.2 2008 81.9 221.2 164.4 65.2 50.2 49.1 467.6 2009 35.4 141.0 104.0 17.3 24.2 62.4 280.5 2010 44.6 133.3 99.5 20.2 34.5 44.7 277.3 2011 53.6 168.8 96.8 19.6 43.5 33.7 319.2 2012 66.6 186.9 99.4 16.8 33.3 49.3 352.9 Notes: Expenditures are in nominal U.S. dollars. Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report" (2003-2012). Reclamation Drilling: All expenditures directly associated with exploration and development drilling.

140

NETL: News Release - DOE's Oil and Gas Produced-Water Program Logs Key  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July 20, 2007 July 20, 2007 DOE's Oil and Gas Produced-Water Program Logs Key Milestones Cost-Effectively Treating Coproduced Water Boosts U.S. Energy, Water Supplies MORGANTOWN, WV - A research program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is making significant progress in developing new ways to treat and use water coproduced with oil and natural gas. The ultimate benefit is a two-for-one solution that expects to boost domestic energy supplies while enhancing the Nation's water supply. Coproduced water-some of which occurs naturally in subsurface formations, and some that is recovered following injection of water into an oil or gas reservoir to boost production-accounts for 98 percent of all waste generated by U.S. oil and natural gas operations. Produced-water volumes average nine barrels for each barrel of oil produced. Handling, treating, and safely disposing of this produced water has been a tough, costly challenge for oil and natural gas producers for decades. Much of the produced water has high concentrations of minerals or salts that make it unsuitable for beneficial use or surface discharge. An oilfield operator often must reinject such produced water into deep formations, sometimes resorting to costly trucking of the water to deep-injection well sites specially designated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "domestically produced natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Prediction of domestic warm-water consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents methodologies able to predict dynamic warm water consumption in district heating systems, using time-series analysis. A simulation model according to the day of a week has been chosen for modeling the domestic warm water consumption ... Keywords: autoregressive model, district heating systems, domestic warm water, prediction, simulation, time series models

Elena Serban; Daniela Popescu

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Domestic load scheduling using genetic algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An approach using a genetic algorithm to optimize the scheduling of domestic electric loads, according to technical and user-defined constraints and input signals, is presented and illustrative results are shown. The aim is minimizing the end-user's ... Keywords: automated energy management, domestic load scheduling, electric loads, genetic algorithms

Ana Soares; llvaro Gomes; Carlos Henggeler Antunes; Hugo Cardoso

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Support for Natural Gas...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

would expand the use of domestic natural gas reserves to reduce dependence on imported oil. In addition, the legislature urges federal agencies to purchase, when possible,...

144

Key New England natural gas pipeline reflects seasonal flow ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Liquefied natural gas (LNG) deliveries into New England have been declining in recent years, as low domestic prices provide an unattractive market to LNG shippers.

145

Demo Projects Introduce New Class of Natural Gas Vehicles (Fact...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

address technical and marketplace barriers. With the United States' wealth of natural gas reserves, vehicles powered using this plentiful domestic resource are important...

146

Smolt Migration Characteristics and Mainstem Snake and Columbia River Detection Rates of PIT-Tagged Grande Ronde and Imnaha River Naturally Produced Spring Chinook Salmon, Annual Reports 1993, 1994, 1995 : Fish Research Project, Oregon.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This reports on the second, third, and fourth years of a multi-year study to assess smolt migration characteristics and cumulative detection rates of naturally produced spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) from Northeast Oregon streams. The goal of this project is to develop an understanding of interpopulational and interannual variation in several early life history parameters of naturally produced spring and summer chinook salmon in the Grande Ronde and Imnaha River subbasins. This project will provide information to assist chinook salmon population recovery efforts. Specific populations included in the study are: (1) Catherine Creek; (2) Upper Grande Ronde River; (3) Lostine River; (4) Imnaha River; (5) Wenaha River; and (6) Minam River. In this document, the authors present findings and activities from research completed in 1993, 1994, and 1995.

Walters, Timothy R.; Carmichael, Richard W.; Keefe, MaryLouise

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly - Energy Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

All Nuclear Reports All Nuclear Reports Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly Data for 3rd Quarter 2013 | Release Date: October 31, 2013 | Next Release Date: February 2014 | full report Previous Issues Year: 2013-Q2 2013-Q1 2012-Q4 2012-Q3 2012-Q2 2012-Q1 2011-Q4 2011-Q3 2011-Q2 2011-Q1 2010-Q4 2010-Q3 2010-Q2 2010-Q1 2009-Q4 2009-Q3 2009-Q2 2009-Q1 2008-Q4 2008-Q3 2008-Q2 2008-Q1 Go 3rd Quarter 2013 U.S. production of uranium concentrate in the third quarter 2013 was 1,171,278 pounds U3O8, down 16 percent from the previous quarter and up 12 percent from the third quarter 2012. Third quarter 2013 uranium production is at its highest level since 1999. During the third quarter 2013, U.S. uranium was produced at six U.S. uranium facilities. U.S. Uranium Mill in Production (State)

148

Natural gas pipeline technology overview.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States relies on natural gas for one-quarter of its energy needs. In 2001 alone, the nation consumed 21.5 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. A large portion of natural gas pipeline capacity within the United States is directed from major production areas in Texas and Louisiana, Wyoming, and other states to markets in the western, eastern, and midwestern regions of the country. In the past 10 years, increasing levels of gas from Canada have also been brought into these markets (EIA 2007). The United States has several major natural gas production basins and an extensive natural gas pipeline network, with almost 95% of U.S. natural gas imports coming from Canada. At present, the gas pipeline infrastructure is more developed between Canada and the United States than between Mexico and the United States. Gas flows from Canada to the United States through several major pipelines feeding U.S. markets in the Midwest, Northeast, Pacific Northwest, and California. Some key examples are the Alliance Pipeline, the Northern Border Pipeline, the Maritimes & Northeast Pipeline, the TransCanada Pipeline System, and Westcoast Energy pipelines. Major connections join Texas and northeastern Mexico, with additional connections to Arizona and between California and Baja California, Mexico (INGAA 2007). Of the natural gas consumed in the United States, 85% is produced domestically. Figure 1.1-1 shows the complex North American natural gas network. The pipeline transmission system--the 'interstate highway' for natural gas--consists of 180,000 miles of high-strength steel pipe varying in diameter, normally between 30 and 36 inches in diameter. The primary function of the transmission pipeline company is to move huge amounts of natural gas thousands of miles from producing regions to local natural gas utility delivery points. These delivery points, called 'city gate stations', are usually owned by distribution companies, although some are owned by transmission companies. Compressor stations at required distances boost the pressure that is lost through friction as the gas moves through the steel pipes (EPA 2000). The natural gas system is generally described in terms of production, processing and purification, transmission and storage, and distribution (NaturalGas.org 2004b). Figure 1.1-2 shows a schematic of the system through transmission. This report focuses on the transmission pipeline, compressor stations, and city gates.

Folga, S. M.; Decision and Information Sciences

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Macroeconomic Real Gross Domestic Product  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Macroeconomic Real Gross Domestic Product (billion chained 2009 dollars - SAAR) ............. 15,584 15,680 15,819 15,886 15,970 16,068 16,173 16,295 16,422 16,557 16,701 16,832 15,742 16,127 16,628 Real Disposable Personal Income (billion chained 2009 dollars - SAAR) ............. 11,502 11,618 11,703 11,757 11,883 11,970 12,057 12,151 12,273 12,363 12,451 12,526 11,645 12,015 12,403 Real Personal Consumption Expend. (billion chained 2009 dollars - SAAR) ............. 10,644 10,692 10,729 10,813 10,884 10,959 11,036 11,114 11,191 11,264 11,343 11,416 10,719 10,998 11,304 Real Fixed Investment (billion chained 2009 dollars - SAAR) ............. 2,420 2,458 2,491 2,508 2,551 2,604 2,655 2,700 2,752 2,816 2,885 2,944 2,469 2,627 2,849 Business Inventory Change (billion chained 2009 dollars - SAAR) .............

150

Department of Energy to Invest $50 Million to Advance Domestic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Advance Domestic Solar Manufacturing Market, Achieve SunShot Goal Department of Energy to Invest 50 Million to Advance Domestic Solar Manufacturing Market, Achieve SunShot...

151

2nd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Information Administration: Form EIA-851A and Form EIA-851Q, ""Domestic Uranium Production Report.""" "4 U.S. Energy Information Administration 2nd Quarter 2013 Domestic...

152

Department of Energy Awards $338 Million to Accelerate Domestic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here Home Department of Energy Awards 338 Million to Accelerate Domestic Geothermal Energy Department of Energy Awards 338 Million to Accelerate Domestic Geothermal...

153

Maricopa Assn. of Governments - PV and Solar Domestic Water Heating...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assn. of Governments - PV and Solar Domestic Water Heating Permitting Standards Maricopa Assn. of Governments - PV and Solar Domestic Water Heating Permitting Standards Eligibility...

154

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Expand Domestic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Expand Domestic Use of Nuclear Power Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Expand Domestic Use of Nuclear Power GNEP will...

155

Effect of Increased Natural Gas Exports on Domestic Energy Markets  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIAs data, analyses, and forecasts are ... policy changes, and technological breakthroughs.

156

NETL: News Release - NETL's Oil and Natural Gas Program Provides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

24, 2007 24, 2007 Oil and Natural Gas Program Uses Stranded Gas to Revive Oil Production Project Generates Energy from Waste Gas to Restore Marginal Fields WASHINGTON, DC - A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project is turning "stranded" natural gas at marginal, or low-production, oil fields into fuel for distributed electric power. The breakthrough is bringing previously idle oil fields back into production and could boost domestic oil production by some 28 million barrels per year within the next 10 years, helping to reduce the Nation's dependence on foreign oil sources. Stranded gas is natural gas that is uneconomic to produce for one or more reasons: the energy, or Btu content, may be too low; the gas may be too impure to use; or, the volume may be too small to warrant a pipeline connection to the gas infrastructure. Non-commercial gas is sometimes produced along with oil, becoming an environmental liability. This unwanted byproduct of oil production has become a major problem in California oil fields where producers have been forced to abandon sites early, leaving valuable reserves of domestic oil untapped.

157

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 5, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 27, 2011) Mild temperatures coupled with continued strong domestic production resulted in natural gas cash market prices dropping modestly at nearly all domestic pricing points over the week. The lone exception was the Henry Hub price which rose a token 2 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (0.5 percent) to $4.35 per MMBtu on April 27. Working natural gas in storage rose to 1,685 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, April 22, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 31 Bcf, with storage volumes positioned

158

Natural Gas Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Production. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Survey of Producing States and Mineral Management Service Evolving Estimate in Natural Gas Monthly.

159

WA_03_043_GENERAL_ELECTRIC_POWER_SYSTEMS_Waiver_of_Domestic_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3043GENERALELECTRICPOWERSYSTEMSWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA03043GENERALELECTRICPOWERSYSTEMSWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA03043GENERALELECTRICPOWERSYSTEMSWaiverofDom...

160

WA_03_050_GENERAL_ELECTRIC__POWER_SYSTEMS_Waiver_of_Domestic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

50GENERALELECTRICPOWERSYSTEMSWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA03050GENERALELECTRICPOWERSYSTEMSWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA03050GENERALELECTRICPOWERSYSTEMSWaiverofDomes...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "domestically produced natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

WA_02_042_GENERAL_MOTORS_POWER_TRAIN_DIV_Waiver_of_Domestic_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WA02042GENERALMOTORSPOWERTRAINDIVWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA02042GENERALMOTORSPOWERTRAINDIVWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA02042GENERALMOTORSPOWERTRAINDIVWaiverof...

162

WA_97_018_INTERNATIONAL_FUEL_CELLS_CORPS_Waiver_of_Domestic_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7018INTERNATIONALFUELCELLSCORPSWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA97018INTERNATIONALFUELCELLSCORPSWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA97018INTERNATIONALFUELCELLSCORPSWaiverofDom...

163

Secure Fuels from Domestic Resources- Oil Shale and Tar Sands  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Profiles of Companies Engaged in Domestic Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resource and Technology Development

164

U.S. Domestic Oil Production Exceeds Imports for First Time in 18 Years |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Domestic Oil Production Exceeds Imports for First Time in 18 Domestic Oil Production Exceeds Imports for First Time in 18 Years U.S. Domestic Oil Production Exceeds Imports for First Time in 18 Years November 15, 2013 - 3:47pm Addthis Source: Energy Information Administration Short Term Energy Outlook Allison Lantero Allison Lantero Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs In February 1995, The Brady Bunch Movie and Billy Madison were in movie theaters, "Creep" by TLC was at the top of the Billboard charts, and the Yahoo! search engine had not yet been unveiled. It was also the last month the U.S. produced more oil than it imported. Until last month. During remarks in Cleveland yesterday, President Obama noted this historic milestone: in October, America produced more oil here at home than we imported from overseas.

165

U.S. Domestic Oil Production Exceeds Imports for First Time in 18 Years |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Domestic Oil Production Exceeds Imports for First Time in 18 U.S. Domestic Oil Production Exceeds Imports for First Time in 18 Years U.S. Domestic Oil Production Exceeds Imports for First Time in 18 Years November 15, 2013 - 3:47pm Addthis Source: Energy Information Administration Short Term Energy Outlook Allison Lantero Allison Lantero Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs In February 1995, The Brady Bunch Movie and Billy Madison were in movie theaters, "Creep" by TLC was at the top of the Billboard charts, and the Yahoo! search engine had not yet been unveiled. It was also the last month the U.S. produced more oil than it imported. Until last month. During remarks in Cleveland yesterday, President Obama noted this historic milestone: in October, America produced more oil here at home than we imported from overseas.

166

Solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water system installed at Columbia Gas System Service Corp. , Columbus, Ohio. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Energy System located at the Columbia Gas Corporation, Columbus, Ohio, has 2978 ft/sup 2/ of Honeywell single axis tracking, concentrating collectors and provides solar energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. A 1,200,000 Btu/h Bryan water-tube gas boiler provides hot water for space heating. Space cooling is provided by a 100 ton Arkla hot water fired absorption chiller. Domestic hot water heating is provided by a 50 gallon natural gas domestic storage water heater. Extracts are included from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: October 31, 2013 Next Release Date: February 2014 Mills - conventional milling 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 Mills - other operations 2 2 3 2 2 2 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 In-Situ-Leach Plants 3 5 6 6 4 3 3 2 2 3 3 5 5 6 3 4 5 5 5 Byproduct Recovery Plants 4 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total 9 11 9 7 6 4 3 2 3 4 6 6 7 4 5 6 6 6 End of 2005 End of 2006 End of 2007 End of 2008 End of 2009 3 Not including in-situ-leach plants that only produced uranium concentrate from restoration. 4 Uranium concentrate as a byproduct from phosphate production. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A and Form EIA-851Q, "Domestic Uranium Production Report." End of 2010 End of 2011 End of 2012 End of 3rd Quarter 2013 1 Milling uranium-bearing ore. 2 Not milling ore, but producing uranium concentrate from other (non-ore) materials.

168

Domestic Energy Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Domestic Energy Partners Domestic Energy Partners Jump to: navigation, search Name Domestic Energy Partners Place Orem, Utah Zip 84057 Product Focused on biodiesel production technology. Coordinates 40.29805°, -111.695414° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.29805,"lon":-111.695414,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

169

Delivery of Hydrogen Produced from Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Identify and evaluate the most promising approaches and options for economic storage, handling and delivery of hydrogen. Office of Fossil Energy Milestone * 2006: Define a...

170

Smart meter aware domestic energy trading agents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The domestic energy market is changing with the increasing availability of energy micro-generating facilities. On the long run, households will have the possibility to trade energy for purchasing to and for selling from a number of different actors. ... Keywords: agents, energy trade, smart meter

Nicola Capodieci; Giuliano Andrea Pagani; Giacomo Cabri; Marco Aiello

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Metered Mail Form Domestic Mail Only  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metered Mail Form Domestic Mail Only For USPS Mail Only Charge to Department First Class Mail Media Meter Form. · All outgoing USPS Mail that needs postage should be kept separate from all other mail already be sealed prior to being metered. Failure to properly seal this type of mail could result

Palmeri, Thomas

172

Multiple factors push Western Europe to use less natural gas and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Abundant supply: The availability of low-priced natural gas in the United States has made coal a less competitive fuel for domestic power generation.

173

U.S. natural gas imports fall for third year in a row - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. net imports of natural gas have fallen for three consecutive years, due largely to growing domestic production from shale gas formations.

174

2nd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report 2nd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: August 7, 2013 Next Release Date: November 2013 0 500,000...

175

Table 23. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by API ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

23. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by API Gravity Energy Information Administration / Petroleum Marketing Annual 1996 45. Created Date:

176

NETL: News Release - DOE to Help Develop New Tools for Increasing Domestic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

15, 2001 15, 2001 DOE to Help Develop New Tools for Increasing Domestic Oil Production Projects Aimed at Producing More Oil from Older Wells, Finding Missed Oil, and Ensuring Environmental Protection TULSA, OK - America's best hope for slowing or perhaps halting the decline in domestic oil production may be new technologies that locate oil previously missed, produce oil that today's processes leave behind, and ensure that tomorrow's producers can meet strict environmental standards. With the President's National Energy Policy calling for continued public-private partnerships to develop new oilfield technologies, the Department of Energy plans to add 12 new projects in three categories to its ongoing petroleum research program. The projects were selected in the first round of a broad-ranging solicitation issued last December by the department's Office of Fossil Energy. Another round of project winners will be announced later this year.

177

Encouraging the Domestic Small Turbine Market  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The state incentives for home-based renewables in the domestic market continue to grow and change creating opportunities for the small wind turbine market. Tracking the opportunities to get small wind turbines included in incentive policies and developing a proactive industry approach is important because market changes can occur anytime. There are near-term opportunities to work with states in developing their strategies for disbursing system benefit charges, adding tags to existing policies for other small renewables to include small wind, and developing state-wide net metering programs. Other opportunities to improve the domestic market exist but will be quite challenging to implement. Other opportunities include federal tax credits, state wind access laws, equipment verification for specific states, and leasing programs for small wind turbines.

Forsyth, T.

2001-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

178

Respiratory symptoms in Indian women using domestic cooking fuels  

SciTech Connect

The effect of domestic cooking fuels producing various respiratory symptoms was studied in 3,701 women. Of these, 3,608 were nonsmoking women who used four different types of cooking fuels: biomass, LPG, kerosene, and mixed fuels. The overall respiratory symptoms were observed in 13 percent of patients. Mixed fuel users experienced more respiratory symptoms (16.7 percent), followed by biomass (12.6 percent), stove (11.4 percent), and LPG (9.9 percent). Chronic bronchitis in chulla users was significantly higher than that in kerosene and LPG users (p less than 0.05). Dyspnea and postnasal drip were significantly higher in the women using mixed fuels. Smoking women who are also exposed to cooking fuels experienced respiratory symptoms more often than nonsmokers (33.3 percent vs 13 percent).

Behera, D.; Jindal, S.K. (Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Case for utility involvement in solar-domestic water heating  

SciTech Connect

Credibility of system performance over an extended period of time is still a major concern for prospective buyers of solar-collector systems. Although Congress has enacted solar legislation with the intention of assisting homeowners in the adoption of solar energy, it apparently did not consider which organizational entities could best address the concerns of the consumer and accelerate the adoption of solar energy for domestic hot water heating. This article points out that legislation which does not encourage full participation by utilities in the marketing of solar energy has produced very low adoption rates compared to the size of the solar market potential. It also describes some of the empirical results of one utility company's efforts with a large-scale solar demonstration program, and presents some findings for the investor-owned utility industry to consider before Congress takes additional legislative action in this area. 11 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

Smackey, B.M.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Smart Domestic Appliances Provide Flexibility for Sustainable Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Smart Domestic Appliances Provide Flexibility for Sustainable Energy Smart Domestic Appliances Provide Flexibility for Sustainable Energy Systems (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Smart Domestic Appliances Provide Flexibility for Sustainable Energy Systems (Webinar) Focus Area: Crosscutting Topics: Training Material Website: www.leonardo-energy.org/webinar-smart-domestic-appliances-provide-flex Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/smart-domestic-appliances-provide-fle Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation Regulations: Net Metering & Interconnection In this video, the viewer learns about the benefits and difficulties

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "domestically produced natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 3, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 23, 2011) Natural gas spot prices were soft again at nearly all domestic pricing points. The Henry Hub price fell 10 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (2.5 percent) for the week ending February 23, to $3.83 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, February 18, according to the Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied draw for the week was 81 Bcf, with storage volumes shifting to 48 Bcf below year-ago levels. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the March 2011 natural

182

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 17, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 9, 2011) Natural gas spot prices remained soft at nearly all domestic pricing points. The Henry Hub price rose an insignificant 2 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (0.5 percent) for the week ending March 9, to $3.81 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,674 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, March 4, according to the Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied draw for the week was 71 Bcf, with storage volumes positioned 32 Bcf above year-ago levels. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the April 2011 natural

183

Energy Perspectives: For most fuel sources, domestic ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

More than three-quarters of this energy production came from nonrenewable fossil fuels: coal, natural gas, crude oil, and natural gas plant liquids.

184

Natural gas sdtrategic plan  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s natural gas program is aimed at meeting simultaneously our national energy needs, reducing oil imports, protecting our environment, and improving our economy The Natural Gas Strategic Plan for 1995 represents a Department-wide effort to articulate the key issues related to the expanded development and utilization of natural gas, and defines the roles of the federal government and US industry in partnering to accomplish the strategic goals defined. The four overarching goals of the Natural Gas Strategic Plan are to: foster the development of advanced natural gas technologies; encourage the adoption of advanced natural gas technologies in new and existing markets; support the removal of policy impediments to natural gas use in new and existing markets; and foster technologies and policies to maximize the environmental benefits of natural gas use. DOE`s proposed fiscal year (FY) 1996 budget represents a commitment to natural gas research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) from reservoir to end use. DOE has redirected and increased funding for its natural gas exploration, production, delivery and storage, processing, and utilization RD&D programs, shifting funds from other energy programs to programs that will enhance efficiency and advance the role of natural gas in our domestic energy resources portfolio.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

NATURAL GAS VARIABILITY IN CALIFORNIA: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS AND DEVICE PERFORMANCE EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF POLLUTANT EMISSIONS FROM RESIDENTIAL APPLIANCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ofvariationsinnaturalgascompositionandphysical2.1.2. Fuel Gas Compositions Bothdomesticnaturalgasandnaturalgasappliancesvarywith(areaffectedby)variabilityinfuel composition

Singer, Brett C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, February 3, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 26, 2011) Natural gas spot prices were soft at all domestic pricing points. The Henry Hub price fell 8 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (about 1.7 percent) for the week ending January 26, to $4.40 per MMBtu. The West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price settled at $86.15 per barrel ($14.85 per MMBtu), on Wednesday, January 26. This represents a decrease of $4.70 per barrel, or $0.81 per MMBtu, from the previous Wednesday. Working natural gas in storage fell to 2,542 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, January 21, according to the Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The

187

EIA-Revisions to Gross Domestic product and Implications for the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revisions to Gross Domestic Product and Implications for the Comparisons Revisions to Gross Domestic Product and Implications for the Comparisons Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections in Past Editions (1982-2008) Revisions to Gross Domestic Product and Implications for the Comparisons The concept of GDP is a commonly used measure of economic activity. It can be expressed in nominal dollars or, with the use of a matched price index to remove inflation, in "real" terms. Movements in nominal GDP show how the value of goods and services produced by the United States changes over time, while real GDP is a measure of how the physical production of the economy has grown. While simple in concept, the projecting of nominal and real GDP and the interpretation of these projected measures relative to "history" is not simple or straightforward. The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) within the U.S. Department of Commerce continually adjusts the National Income and Product Accounts data, with comprehensive revisions completed every 4 or 5 years. The last four major revisions (1985, 1991, 1995, and 1999) incorporated definitional and statistical changes, as well as emphasizing new ways of presenting the data. Also, prior to AEO1993 aggregate economic activity was measured and projected on the basis of Gross National Product (GNP) as opposed to Gross Domestic Product (GDP). For the period from 1984 through 2004, nominal GNP is on average approximately 0.45 percent above nominal GDP.

188

Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(R&D) programs aimed at protecting the environment while enhancing domestic oil and gas exploration and production. Natural gas and crude oil provide two-thirds of our Nation's...

189

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY CONSOLIDATED NATURAL GAS...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONSOLIDATED NATURAL GAS (CNG) (THE PARTICIPANT) FOR ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS IN INVENTIONS OF THE PARTICIPANT UNDER DOE-PETC CRADA NO.PC-93-009,...

190

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Northeast Region  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Northeast Region Northeast Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipelines in the Northeast Region Overview | Domestic Gas | Canadian Imports | Regional Pipeline Companies & Links Overview Twenty interstate natural gas pipeline systems operate within the Northeast Region (Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Virginia, and West Virginia). These interstate pipelines deliver natural gas to several intrastate natural gas pipelines and at least 50 local distribution companies in the region. In addition, they also serve large industrial concerns and, increasingly, natural gas fired electric power generation facilities.

191

EIA-182 DOMESTIC CRUDE OIL FIRST PURCHASE REPORT INSTRUCTIONS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

average wellhead price for selected domestic crude oil streams aggregated by State. First purchase volumes are also used in ... such as butane and

192

Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Origin State,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Final May 2010 2008 Changes in Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources Introduction The Coal Distribution Report - Annual provides detailed information on domestic coal...

193

Leaching of Uranium and Vanadium from Korean Domestic Ore  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ISASMELT for Recycling of Valuable Elements Contributing to a More Sustainable Society Leaching of Uranium and Vanadium from Korean Domestic Ore.

194

3rd Quarter 2011 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3rd Quarter 2011 Domestic Uranium Production Report Subject: U.S ... drilling, employment, exploration, in situ leach, inventory, mill, mine, nuclear, ...

195

Factor Adjustment Costs: Implications for Domestic and Export Sales Dynamics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??CHAPTER 1: Empirical work on export dynamics has generally assumed constant marginal production cost and therefore ignored domestic product market conditions. However, recent studies have (more)

Liu, Yanping

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Crude Oil Prices Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

197

Low Energy Ventilation and Cooling of Non-Domestic Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Contact: Paul Mathew Short's Cambridge University-based research group develops passive and hybrid low-energy design strategies for non-domestic buildings in different...

198

Keeping Home: Another Look at Domesticity in Antebellum America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Woman's Home. 1869. Intro. Nicole Tonkovich.Catherine Beecher's Views of Home Economics." History ofThe American Woman's Home: American Domesticity in Extreme

Chandler, Linda Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Foreign Research Reactor/Domestic Research Reactor Receipt Coordinator...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Research ReactorDomestic Research Reactor Receipt Coordinator, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile...

200

Determining the antiquity of dog origins: canine domestication as a model for the consilience between molecular genetics and archaeology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Archaeologists have favored a date of 14,000-15,000 years before present (BP) for canine domestication. However, recent studies of mutations in the mitochondrial DNA sequence by molecular geneticists have implied that dogs were domesticated over 100,000 years ago, which has challenged traditional theory. Geneticists have further hypothesized that dogs originated from wolf ancestors based upon the number of substitutions observed in dog and wolf haplotypes. Although both disciplines provide substantial evidence for their theories, the origin of dog domestication remains controversial. Several areas continue to be debatable. First, both geneticists and archaeologists incorrectly use the term domestication to describe events that clearly can not be proven to under human control. Second, the evolutionary development of canines is viewed by molecular biologists as well as archaeologist to be indicators of domestication without any further exploration of other probable causes. Third, the studies in canine genetics are so complex that most archaeologists have difficulty in providing evidence that would be contradictory to molecular theory. Fourth, both fields of study continually ignore innate behavioral characteristics of wolves that would make domestication highly improbable. Fifth, geneticists rely heavily on data gathered from sequencing of mitochondrial DNA, which has been assumed to maternally inherited. However recent human studies have shown that this assumption has now been proven to be incorrect. And finally, not only are morphological traits of fossilized dogs and wolves so similar that making a taxonomic identification improbable, but also the amount of archaeological remains available are too sparse and fragmented for accurate affiliation. An alternate theory of canine domestication will be proposed utilizing data gathered from the archaeological record and molecular research. I hypothesize that dogs diverged naturally from wolves 100,000 years ago as a result of the natural course of evolution, not human intervention, and had already evolved into a dog prior to being domesticated by humans 14,000-15,000 years ago. Evidence will be presented to clearly show that this hypothesis is a more accurate scenario of canine domestication.

Raisor, Michelle Jeanette

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "domestically produced natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY 3M COMPANY FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOMESTIC AND DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE- EE0003837, W(A)-2011-057, CH-1633 The Petitioner, 3M Company (3M) was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled , "Polymeric Multilayer Infrared Reflecting Film Development". The pu rpose of the agreement is to develop a polymeric multilayer infrared reflecting film that is essentially clear and colorless in the visible portion of the electromagnetic spectra (visible light transmission of about 89%) while reflecting 90-95% of the infrared energy in the 850 nm to 1830 nm specified spectra. The film will have a nominal thickness of 3 mils, be polymeric in nature (contains no metals, metal oxides, or other material types) and be essentially clear in appearance.

202

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY BPXA EXPLORATION (ALASKA), INC., FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BPXA EXPLORATION (ALASKA), INC., FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND BPXA EXPLORATION (ALASKA), INC., FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC26-01 NT41332; W(A)-03-023, CH-1149 The Petitioner, BPXA Exploration (Alaska), Inc. (BPXA), was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled, "Resource Characterization and Quantification of Natural Gas-Hydrate and Associated Free-Gas Accumulations in the Prudhoe Bay - Kuparuk River Area on the North Slope of Alaska." The purpose of the cooperative agreement is to characterize, quantify and determine the commercial potential of in-place and recoverable gas- hydrate and associated free-gas resources in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU), Kuparuk River Unit (KRU) and Milne Point Unit (MPU) areas on the Alaska North Slope (ANS). Only limited gas

203

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Central Region  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Central Region Central Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipelines in the Central Region Overview | Domestic Gas | Exports | Regional Pipeline Companies & Links Overview Twenty-two interstate and at least thirteen intrastate natural gas pipeline companies (see Table below) operate in the Central Region (Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming). Twelve interstate natural gas pipeline systems enter the region from the south and east while four enter from the north carrying Canadian supplies. The average utilization rates on those shipping Canadian natural gas tend to be higher than those carrying domestic supplies.

204

Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas/Electricity Via Catalytic Coal Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Co-ProduCtion of SubStitute natural GaS / eleCtriCity via CatalytiC Coal GaSifiCation Description The United States has vast reserves of low-cost coal, estimated to be sufficient for the next 250 years. Gasification-based technology, such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), is the only environmentally friendly technology that provides the flexibility to co-produce hydrogen, substitute natural gas (SNG), premium hydrocarbon liquids including transportation fuels, and electric power in desired combinations from coal and other carbonaceous feedstocks. Rising costs and limited domestic supply of crude oil and natural gas provide a strong incentive for the development of coal gasification-based co-production processes. This project addresses the co-production of SNG and electricity from coal via gasification

205

NTRM Producer Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NTRM Producer Information. An NTRM (NIST Traceable Reference Material) is a commercially produced reference ...

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

206

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 26, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 18, 2011) The threat of shut-in production arising from lower Mississippi River flooding likely sent prices up temporarily at nearly all domestic pricing points over the week but the gains failed to stick. The Henry Hub price lost a modest 7 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (1.9 percent) to close at $4.15 per MMBtu on May 18. Working natural gas in storage rose to 1,919 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, May 13, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 92 Bcf, leaving storage volumes

207

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 2, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 17, 2010) Natural gas spot prices fell modestly at nearly all domestic pricing points, likely because expectations for colder weather were slow in materializing and storage levels rose again. The Henry Hub price fell 23 cents (about 6 percent) for the week ending November 17, to $3.77 per million Btu (MMBtu). The West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price settled at $80.43 per barrel ($13.87 per MMBtu), on Wednesday, November 17. This represents a decrease of $7.34 per barrel, or $1.27 per MMBtu, from the previous Wednesday. Working natural gas in storage set another new all-time record

208

Agricultural Investment Risk Relationship to National Domestic Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This empirical case study investigated the uncertainty of agricultural investment schemes in Nigeria and their relationship to national domestic production. Government administrations have invested a substantial amount of money into the agricultural ... Keywords: Agriculture, Bank Credit, Investment, National Domestic Production, Risk, Uncertainty

Alex Ehimare Omankhanlen

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

A walk from the wild side: the genetics of domestication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

* and Pam Wiener2 Summary The phenotypic variation found in domesticated plants and animals is striking, so much so that Darwin used it to illustrate the power of selection to effect change. Recent developments colour or growth rate, two traits that have been strongly selected during livestock domestication. His

Goodrich, Justin

210

Table 6.4 Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Natural Gas Well ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals From Crude Oil, Natural Gas, Coalbed, ... Total (Gross Withdrawals ... natural gas wells divided by the number of producing wells, ...

211

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY WMPI. INC., AND TEXACO, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WMPI. INC., AND TEXACO, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC WMPI. INC., AND TEXACO, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC26-00NT40693, W(A)-00-026, CH-1041 The Petitioner Waste Management and Processors, Inc. (WMPI), was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled, "Early Entrance Coproduction Plant- Decentralized Gasification Cogenerating Transportation Fuels and Steam from Available Feedstocks". Petitioner Texaco Power & Gasification (Texaco) is a subcontractor to WMPI. The overall purpose of the cooperative agreement is to prove the feasibility of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces ultraclean fuels of Fischer-Tropsch naphtha and diesel with either power or steam as the major co-product. The objective includes the design and

212

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS SREQUEST BY CREE, INC FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SREQUEST BY CREE, INC FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND SREQUEST BY CREE, INC FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC26-03NT41943; W(A)-03-051, CH-1170 The Petitioner, Cree, Inc., (Cree) was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled, "High Efficiency LED Lamp for Solid State Lighting." The purpose of the cooperative agreement is to develop the technology, fabrication processes, and prototypes to demonstrate solid-state lamps based on GaN semiconductor LEDs that are viable replacements for energy inefficient incandescent lighting solutions. The ultimate goal of the program is to deliver to the Department of Energy solid-state lamp prototypes that produce 1000 Im of white flux at an efficacy of 1001m/w, with the potential of improvement to 150 Im/W beyond the time frame of the

213

Natural gas contracts in efficient portfolios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report addresses the {open_quotes}contracts portfolio{close_quotes} issue of natural gas contracts in support of the Domestic Natural Gas and Oil Initiative (DGOI) published by the U.S. Department of Energy in 1994. The analysis is a result of a collaborative effort with the Public Service Commission of the State of Maryland to consider {open_quotes}reforms that enhance the industry`s competitiveness{close_quotes}. The initial focus of our collaborative effort was on gas purchasing and contract portfolios; however, it became apparent that efficient contracting to purchase and use gas requires a broader consideration of regulatory reform. Efficient portfolios are obtained when the holder of the portfolio is affected by and is responsible for the performance of the portfolio. Natural gas distribution companies may prefer a diversity of contracts, but the efficient use of gas requires that the local distribution company be held accountable for its own purchases. Ultimate customers are affected by their own portfolios, which they manage efficiently by making their own choices. The objectives of the DGOI, particularly the efficient use of gas, can be achieved when customers have access to suppliers of gas and energy services under an improved regulatory framework. The evolution of the natural gas market during the last 15 years is described to account for the changing preferences toward gas contracts. Long-term contracts for natural gas were prevalent before the early 1980s, primarily because gas producers had few options other than to sell to a single pipeline company, and this pipeline company, in turn, was the only seller to a gas distribution company.

Sutherland, R.J.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Liquefied Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Natural gas plays a vital role in the U.S. energy supply and in achieving the nation's economic and environmental goals. One of several supply options involves increasing imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) to ensure that American consumers have adequate supplies of natural gas for the future. Natural gas consumption in the United States is expected to increase slightly from about 24.3 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) in 2011 to 26.6 Tcf by 2035. Currently, most of the demand for natural gas in the United States is met with domestic production and imports via pipeline from Canada. A small percentage of gas supplies are imported and received as liquefied natural gas. A significant portion of the world's natural gas resources are

215

Table 23. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by API Gravity  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

"Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Report." 23. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by API Gravity Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1997...

216

Table 23. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by API Gravity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

EIA-182, "Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Report." 23. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by API Gravity Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1996...

217

Table D1. Population, U.S. Gross Domestic Product, and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table D1. Population, U.S. Gross Domestic Product, and Implicit Price Deflator, 1949-2011: Year: Population: U.S. Gross Domestic Product: United States 1

218

Domestic Hot Water Consumption in Four Low-Income Apartment Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Domestic Hot Water Consumption in Four Low-Income Apartment Buildings Title Domestic Hot Water Consumption in Four Low-Income Apartment Buildings Publication Type Conference...

219

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

220

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "domestically produced natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Why Hydrogen? Hydrogen from Diverse Domestic Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& RELIABILITY ZERONEAR ZERO ZERONEAR ZERO EMISSIONS EMISSIONS Why Hydrogen? Biomass Hydro Wind Solar Coal Nuclear Natural Gas Oil S e q u e s t r a t i o n Biomass Hydro Wind...

222

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 1, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 24, 2010) The natural gas market is transitioning to spring, a “shoulder” season of lower demand between the relatively high-demand periods of winter and summer. As space-heating demand ebbed during the report week, prices declined across the lower 48 States. The Henry Hub spot price ended trading yesterday, March 24, at $4.02 per million Btu (MMBtu), a decrease of $0.25 compared with the previous Wednesday, March 17. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices continued to decline as storage inventories appeared more than adequate and domestic production remained strong. The futures contract for April

223

Secretary Bodman Tours Refinery and Calls for More Domestic Refining  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tours Refinery and Calls for More Domestic Tours Refinery and Calls for More Domestic Refining Capacity Secretary Bodman Tours Refinery and Calls for More Domestic Refining Capacity May 18, 2006 - 10:43am Addthis Highlights President Bush's Four-Point Plan to Combat High Energy Prices PORT ARTHUR, TX - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today renewed the call for expanded oil refining capacity in the United States and discussed additional steps the Department of Energy (DOE) is taking to prepare for the upcoming hurricane season. Secretary Bodman made the statements after touring the Motiva Refinery in Port Arthur, Texas. "We need a more robust energy sector; and one way to do that is to strengthen and expand our domestic oil refining capacity. We're hopeful that Motiva will continue to work to expand their capacity to 600,000

224

From South Carolina to Massachusetts, Recovery Act Boosts Domestic Wind |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

From South Carolina to Massachusetts, Recovery Act Boosts Domestic From South Carolina to Massachusetts, Recovery Act Boosts Domestic Wind From South Carolina to Massachusetts, Recovery Act Boosts Domestic Wind November 2, 2010 - 5:02pm Addthis Jacques Beaudry-Losique Director, Wind & Water Program Last week, Clemson University broke ground on a facility critical to the expansion of domestic wind power. At a converted Navy base in North Charleston, this one-of-a-kind center will test large drivetrains - the machinery that converts wind energy to electricity. With $45 million of Recovery Act funding from the Department of Energy, and another $53 million matched by private funding, the test facility will allow engineers to simulate 20 years worth of wear and tear on large drivetrains in only a few months. Some of the wind gust exposure tests made possible by this facility

225

NNSA: Securing Domestic Radioactive Material | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NNSA: Securing Domestic Radioactive Material | National Nuclear Security NNSA: Securing Domestic Radioactive Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > NNSA: Securing Domestic Radioactive Material Fact Sheet NNSA: Securing Domestic Radioactive Material Apr 12, 2013 The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA),

226

Ground-Source Heat Pumps for Domestic and Commercial Applications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ground-Source Heat Pumps for Domestic and Commercial Applications in Europe Speaker(s): Gran Hellstrm Date: May 2, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of...

227

The Morisco House in Granada : domestic space in cultural transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines issues of cultural, religious, and personal identity as reflected in domestic space, with the premise that expressions of the built environment evolve from concepts of self. These themes are particularly ...

Mosier, Lisa G. (Lisa Gayle)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

18.60 19.11 18.73 18.63 17.97 18.75 18.10 See footnotes at end of table. 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual...

229

Study on the performance improvements of electrical domestic appliance factory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis has two objectives. First, it aims to help TECHSOL electronics domestic appliance measure and analyze its current performance. Secondly, it is aimed to ascertain where a small improvement can result in significant ...

Kasan Hidayat, Andy Darwin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Observations from the field: Solar domestic hot water installation recommendations  

SciTech Connect

The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) was ten years old in 1984. Constant contact has been maintained between the Center and solar businesses selling and installing domestic hot water systems in Florida and throughout the Southern states of the Caribbean. FSEC has thus had the opportunity to visit or discuss thousands of DHW system installations with homeowners and installers. This paper provides an overview of lessons learned and some of the resulting installation recommendations for direct, open-loop domestic hot water systems.

Cromer, C.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

www.crs.gov R42814 Natural Gas in the U.S. Economy: Opportunities for Growth Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to the growth in natural gas production, primarily from shale gas, the United States is benefitting from some of the lowest prices for natural gas in the world and faces the question of how to best use this resource. Different segments of the U.S. economy have different perspectives on the role natural gas can play. Suppliers, which have become the victims of their own production success, are facing low prices that are forecast to remain low. Some companies that have traditionally produced only natural gas have even turned their attention to oil in order to improve their financial situation. Smaller companies are having a difficult time continuing operations and larger companies, including international companies, have bought into many shale gas assets. Prices have remained low even as consumption has increased, in part, because producers have raised production to meet the demand and because companies have improved efficiency and extraction techniques. Some companies, many with large production operations, have applied for permits to export natural gas. This has raised concerns from consumers of natural gas that domestic prices will rise. The debate regarding exports is ongoing. Industries that consume natural gas have seen input costs drop, and some have heralded low

Robert Pirog; Michael Ratner

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Impacts of Imported Liquefied Natural Gas on Residential Appliance Components: Literature Review  

SciTech Connect

An increasing share of natural gas supplies distributed to residential appliances in the U.S. may come from liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports. The imported gas will be of a higher Wobbe number than domestic gas, and there is concern that it could produce more pollutant emissions at the point of use. This report will review recently undertaken studies, some of which have observed substantial effects on various appliances when operated on different mixtures of imported LNG. While we will summarize findings of major studies, we will not try to characterize broad effects of LNG, but describe how different components of the appliance itself will be affected by imported LNG. This paper considers how the operation of each major component of the gas appliances may be impacted by a switch to LNG, and how this local impact may affect overall safety, performance and pollutant emissions.

Lekov, Alex; Sturges, Andy; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle

2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

233

NATURAL GAS FOR TRANSPORTATION OR ELECTRICITY? CLIMATE CHANGE IMPLICATIONS Date: 27-Oct-11  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ethanol. Given that future natural gas supply is limited, despite forecasts of increased domestic. If the objective of a policy were the reduction of GHG emissions using a limited supply of natural gas, the bestNATURAL GAS FOR TRANSPORTATION OR ELECTRICITY? CLIMATE CHANGE IMPLICATIONS Date: 27-Oct-11 Natural

234

"Characteristic(a)","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.3;" 1.3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources" "Characteristic(a)","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

235

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Coalbed Natural Gas Produced-Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead DE-FC26-05NT15551...

236

Optical interference produced by artificial light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless infrared transmission systems for indoor use are affected by noise and interference induced by natural and artificial ambient light. This paper presents a characterisation (through extensive measurements) of the interference produced by artificial ...

Adriano J. C. Moreira; Rui T. Valadas; A. M. de Oliveira Duarte

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

industry in protecting our environment while exploring for and producing natural gas and oil. They are joined by Anadarko and other industry sponsors from GPRI to identify and...

238

Natural gas monthly, August 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report presents information on natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

dry natural gas production - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Dry natural gas production: The process of producing consumer-grade natural gas. Natural gas withdrawn from reservoirs is reduced by volumes used at the production ...

240

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "domestically produced natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

242

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

243

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

244

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

245

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

246

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

247

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

248

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

249

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

250

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

251

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

252

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

253

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

254

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

255

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

256

Economic benefits of R and D on gas supply technologies. [Unconventioal natural gas resources which are tight sands, Devonian shale, coal seam gas, and gas co-produced with water  

SciTech Connect

Advanced natural gas supply technologies, if successful, could lower the average cost of gas to consumers by 18% and increase the expected gas demand by 2 quads/year by the year 2000. Advanced production techniques for unconventional gas will have by far the greatest impact on future gas prices, providing economic benefits of between $200 billion and $320 billion. Advanced SNG from coal will provide only a $9 billion benefit if unconventional gas meets all of its performance targets. However, higher demand and failure of unconventional gas R and D could raise the benefits of SNG research to $107 billion. SNG research provides a hedge value that increases the likelihood of receiving a positive payoff from gas supply R and D. Changing the performance goals for SNG research to emphasize cost reduction rather than acceleration of the date of commercialization would greatly increase the potential benefits of the program. 9 references, 8 figures, 5 tables.

Darrow, K.G.; Ashby, A.B.; Nesbitt, D.M.; Marshalla, R.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

EPA's Liquefied Natural Gas Regulatory Roadmap  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Regulatory Roadmap July 2006 EPA230-B-06-001 About this Roadmap Natural gas continues to play an important role in meeting our nation's growing energy needs. In 2005, natural gas accounted for 23% of our nation's total energy consumption. 1 The Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA) projects that domestic consumption of natural gas will continue to increase and that imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) will meet much of the increased demand. 2 LNG, created when natural gas is converted into a liquid state by cooling it to a temperature close to negative 260°F, presents an efficient way to transport natural gas via ship from foreign production areas to the United States. The cooling process reduces the

258

Maricopa Assn. of Governments - PV and Solar Domestic Water Heating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maricopa Assn. of Governments - PV and Solar Domestic Water Heating Maricopa Assn. of Governments - PV and Solar Domestic Water Heating Permitting Standards Maricopa Assn. of Governments - PV and Solar Domestic Water Heating Permitting Standards < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Program Info State Arizona Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Provider Maricopa Association of Governments In an effort to promote uniformity, the Maricopa Association of Governments (MAG) approved standard procedures for securing necessary electrical/building permits for residential (single-family) and commercial PV systems. These procedures are a part of the MAG Building Code Standards. The standards address requirements for the solar installation, plans,

259

Department of Energy Awards $338 Million to Accelerate Domestic Geothermal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

38 Million to Accelerate Domestic 38 Million to Accelerate Domestic Geothermal Energy Department of Energy Awards $338 Million to Accelerate Domestic Geothermal Energy October 29, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced up to $338 million in Recovery Act funding for the exploration and development of new geothermal fields and research into advanced geothermal technologies. These grants will support 123 projects in 39 states, with recipients including private industry, academic institutions, tribal entities, local governments, and DOE's National Laboratories. The grants will be matched more than one-for-one with an additional $353 million in private and non-Federal cost-share funds. "The United States is blessed with vast geothermal energy resources, which

260

Domestic Uranium Production Report 3rd Quarter 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Domestic Uranium Production Report 3rd Quarter 2013 October 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | 3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report ii This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. October 2013

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "domestically produced natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report 3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report 3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: October 31, 2013 Next Release Date: February 2014 Capacity (short tons of ore per day) 2012 1st Quarter 2013 2nd Quarter 2013 3rd Quarter 2013 EFR White Mesa LLC White Mesa Mill San Juan, Utah 2,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating-Processing Alternate Feed Energy Fuels Resources Corporation Piñon Ridge Mill Montrose, Colorado 500 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Permitted And Licensed Energy Fuels Wyoming Inc Sheep Mountain Fremont, Wyoming 725 - Undeveloped Undeveloped Undeveloped Kennecott Uranium Company/Wyoming Coal Resource Company Sweetwater Uranium Project Sweetwater, Wyoming 3,000

262

Department of Energy Awards $338 Million to Accelerate Domestic Geothermal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Awards $338 Million to Accelerate Domestic Department of Energy Awards $338 Million to Accelerate Domestic Geothermal Energy Department of Energy Awards $338 Million to Accelerate Domestic Geothermal Energy October 29, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced up to $338 million in Recovery Act funding for the exploration and development of new geothermal fields and research into advanced geothermal technologies. These grants will support 123 projects in 39 states, with recipients including private industry, academic institutions, tribal entities, local governments, and DOE's National Laboratories. The grants will be matched more than one-for-one with an additional $353 million in private and non-Federal cost-share funds. "The United States is blessed with vast geothermal energy resources, which

263

U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports 2012 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports 2012 U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports 2012 With data for 2012 | Release date: July 23, 2013 | Print Previous Reports Years: 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1993 Go Summary In the face of unprecedented levels of domestic natural gas production, net imports of natural gas into the United States fell 23 percent in 2012. Net imports as a percentage of total natural gas consumed decreased to around 6 percent from 8 percent in 2011. A combination of both higher exports and lower imports led to a decline in net imports in 2012. Based on preliminary data for 2012, domestic dry natural gas production increased by about 5 percent to 24,063 billion cubic feet (Bcf). This growth led to greater domestic natural gas supply and relatively low prices in the United States,

264

Hydrogen from Diverse Domestic ResourcesHydrogen from Diverse Domestic Resources Distributed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/NEAR ZERO EMISSIONSEMISSIONS Why Hydrogen? Biomass Hydro Wind Solar Coal Nuclear Natural Gas Oil Sequestration Biomass Hydro Wind Solar Biomass Hydro Wind Solar Coal Nuclear Natural Gas Oil Sequestration #12 Projected Light Trucks Heavy Vehicles Year Air MarineMarine RailOff-roadOff-road Cars U.S. Energy Dependence

265

Plants producing DHA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CSIRO researchers published results in November 2012 showing that the long-chain n-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) can be produced in land plants in commercially valuable quantities. Plants producing DHA inform Magazine algae algal AOCS bi

266

Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves 2009 November 2010 ... produce unconventional gas economically. Production.

267

REQUEST BY PRAXAIR, INC.(PRAXAIR) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of an advanced technology for producing synthesis gas from a reaction of natural gas with pure methane. This process combines the use of a short-reaction time catalyst with...

268

Adaptive Experimentation and Domestic Food Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Working Paper examines the dynamics of maize production in distinct environments and localities in Brong Ahafo Region, Ghana, and the various factors that have influenced patterns of agricultural adaptation, innovation and transformation. Specifically, it analyses the influences of neoliberal policies on the institutional framework of maize seed policy, on the technical recommendations of state institutions and on farmer production systems. Drawing on detailed interviews with market traders and small-scale producers, it also contrasts the priorities of farmers with the recommendations of agricultural services and the extent to which research recommendations reflect or fail to reflect the actual developments in maize production systems. Finally, it explores the implications of policy support for the commercialisation of seeds for the wider seed system, including interactions between the formal, informal and market sectors.

Modernisation Farmer; Kojo Sebastian Amanor

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

DOE's Program Regulating Liquefied Natural Gas Export Applications |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE's Program Regulating Liquefied Natural Gas Export DOE's Program Regulating Liquefied Natural Gas Export Applications DOE's Program Regulating Liquefied Natural Gas Export Applications June 18, 2013 - 10:15am Addthis Statement of Christopher Smith, Acting Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittees on Energy and Power. Thank you Chairman Whitfield, Ranking Member Rush, and members of the Subcommittee; I appreciate the opportunity to be here today to discuss the Department of Energy's (DOE) program regulating the export of natural gas, including liquefied natural gas (LNG). Recent Developments in LNG Exports The boom in domestic shale gas provides unprecedented opportunities for the United States. Over the last several years, domestic natural gas production

270

The significant screwdriver: care, domestic masculinity, and interaction design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HCI is increasingly recognizing its accountability to stakeholders beyond individual end users. The field now acknowledges that interaction designs participate in social formations, exerting political force whether or not designers intend them to. Inspired ... Keywords: domestic care work, feminist HCI, gender, interaction design, research through design

Shaowen Bardzell; Shad Gross; Jeffrey Wain; Austin Toombs; Jeffrey Bardzell

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Wattsup?: motivating reductions in domestic energy consumption using social networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the design, deployment and evaluation of "Wattsup", an innovative application which displays live autonomously logged data from the Wattson energy monitor, allowing users to compare domestic energy consumption on Facebook. Discussions ... Keywords: competitive energy saving, persuasive technology, social networking, sustainability, user experience

Derek Foster; Shaun Lawson; Mark Blythe; Paul Cairns

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

The Domestic Battery, From A Chemical Perspective Craig Riley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Domestic Battery, From A Chemical Perspective Craig Riley Physics 222 A. LaRosa Project Report Winter 2001 The battery has been used for many years as a power source for the quick application the mechanics of this source. The following paragraphs will outline the history of the battery, its anatomy

La Rosa, Andres H.

273

Back to the shed: gendered visions of technology and domesticity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the tropes of the age of ubiquitous computing is the migration of computation into new spaces. Domestic environments have been a particular focus of attention for many. However, these spaces are neither empty nor neutral. They are already populated ...

Genevieve Bell; Paul Dourish

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Chloroplast DNA Variation Confirms a Single Origin of Domesticated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

diversity. This result led them to conclude that these lines do, in fact, trace back to a single origin of single vs. multiple origins of sunflower domestication based on patterns of cpDNA variation in wild loci per lane on an automated DNA sequencer, PCR products were labeled by including a fluorescently

Burke, John M.

275

Domestic artefacts: sustainability in the context of indian middle class  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sustainability has become one of the important research topics in the field of Human Computer Interaction (HCI). However, the majority of work has focused on the Western culture. In this paper, we explore sustainable household practices in the developing ... Keywords: design, developing countries, domestic settings, sustainability

Dhaval Vyas

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Analysis Model for Domestic Hot Water Distribution Systems: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A thermal model was developed to estimate the energy losses from prototypical domestic hot water (DHW) distribution systems for homes. The developed model, using the TRNSYS simulation software, allows researchers and designers to better evaluate the performance of hot water distribution systems in homes. Modeling results were compared with past experimental study results and showed good agreement.

Maguire, J.; Krarti, M.; Fang, X.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium conentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Solar heating/cooling and domestic hot-water systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing awareness of global warming forces policy makers and industries to face two challenges: reducing greenhouse gas emissions and securing stable energy supply against ever-increasing world energy consumption, which is projected to increase by ... Keywords: buildings heating, domestic hot-water, energetical analysis, renewable energy sources, solar cooling technologies, solar energy collection, solar thermal systems

Ioan Srbu; Marius Adam

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Crisis information concerns: Information needs of domestic violence survivors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The personal crisis of coping with or escaping from a violent relationship requires that survivors have accurate, current, appropriate, and contextually-useful information. Police and shelter staff, who are the governmental and private sector first-responders, ... Keywords: Domestic violence, ELIS model, Formal help information system, Human information behavior, Informal help information system, Intimate partner violence

Lynn Westbrook

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

NORTH PORTAL - DOMESTIC COLD WATER CALCULATION - CHANGE HOUSE FACILITY #5008  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this design analysis and calculation is to determine the demand for domestic cold water and to size the supply main piping for the Change House Facility No.5008 in accordance with the Uniform Plumbing Code (Section 4.4.1) and US Department of Energy Order 6430.1A-1540 (Section 4.4.2).

S. Mastilovic

2000-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "domestically produced natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Cascade Natural Gas - Conservation Incentives for New Homes | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cascade Natural Gas - Conservation Incentives for New Homes Cascade Natural Gas - Conservation Incentives for New Homes Cascade Natural Gas - Conservation Incentives for New Homes < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount High Efficiency Natural Gas Furnace: $150 High Efficiency Natural Gas Hearth: $70 Conventional Natural Gas Water Heater: $40 Condensing Tankless Water Heater: $200 Combined Domestic Water/Hydronic Space Heating System (usingTankless Water Heater): $800 Energy Star Certified Home: $350 Energy Star Certified Plus Home: $750

282

Producing biofuels using polyketide synthases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides for a non-naturally occurring polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing a carboxylic acid or a lactone, and a composition such that a carboxylic acid or lactone is included. The carboxylic acid or lactone, or derivative thereof, is useful as a biofuel. The present invention also provides for a recombinant nucleic acid or vector that encodes such a PKS, and host cells which also have such a recombinant nucleic acid or vector. The present invention also provides for a method of producing such carboxylic acids or lactones using such a PKS.

Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Keasling, Jay D

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

283

Process for producing advanced ceramics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the synthesis of homogeneous advanced ceramics such as SiC+AlN, SiAlON, SiC+Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, and Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 +AlN from natural clays such as kaolin, halloysite and montmorillonite by an intercalation and heat treatment method. Included are the steps of refining clays, intercalating organic compounds into the layered structure of clays, drying the intercalated mixture, firing the treated atmospheres and grinding the loosely agglomerated structure. Advanced ceramics produced by this procedure have the advantages of homogeneity, cost effectiveness, simplicity of manufacture, ease of grind and a short process time. Advanced ceramics produced by this process can be used for refractory, wear part and structure ceramics.

Kwong, Kyei-Sing (Tuscaloosa, AL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Future world oil supply and demand-the impact on domestic exploration  

SciTech Connect

Current world oil consumption (demand) of about 68 million B/D will increase to over 81 million B/D in 10 years. World oil production capacity (supply), currently 6-8% over current demand, cannot meet this demand without adequate investments to boost capacity, particularly in the Middle East. Because of low oil prices these investments are not being made. In 10 years the Middle East needs to supply over 50% of the worlds oil; the Far East will by then surpass North America in demand. It is very possible that there will soon be a period of time when the supply/demand balance will be, or will perceived to be failing. This may cause rapid rises in crude oil prices until the balance is again achieved. Crude oil prices are actually quite volatile; the steadiness and abnormally low prices in recent years has been due to several factors that probably won`t be present in the period when the supply/demand situation is seen to be unbalanced. Domestic oil exploration is strongly affected by the price of crude oil and domestic producers should soon benefit by rising oil prices. Exploration will be stimulated, and small incremental amounts of new oil should be economically viable. Oil has been estimated to be only 2% of the total cost of producing all U.S. goods and services-if so, then oil price increase should not create any real problems in the total economic picture. Nevertheless, certain industries and life styles heavily dependent on cheap fuel will have problems, as the days of cheap oil will be gone. Future undiscovered oil in the Earth could be one trillion barrels or more, equal to the amount now considered as proved reserves. There will soon be more of a challenge to find and produce this oil in sufficient quantity and at a competitive cost with other sources of energy. This challenge should keep us busy.

Townes, H.L.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Domestic production of medical isotope Mo-99 moves a step closer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Domestic production of medical isotope Mo-99 Domestic production of medical isotope Mo-99 moves a step closer Irradiated uranium fuel has been recycled and reused for molybdenum-99...

286

U.S. Domestic Oil Production Exceeds Imports for First Time in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Domestic Oil Production Exceeds Imports for First Time in 18 Years U.S. Domestic Oil Production Exceeds Imports for First Time in 18 Years November 15, 2013 - 3:47pm Addthis...

287

Innovation at Los Alamos Unlocking a New Source of Domestic Oil...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at Los Alamos Unlocking a New Source of Domestic Oil... From Algae Innovation at Los Alamos Unlocking a New Source of Domestic Oil... From Algae May 17, 2011 - 12:46pm Addthis...

288

The Lessons of Practice: Domestic Policy Reform as a Way to Address...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Lessons of Practice: Domestic Policy Reform as a Way to Address Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: The Lessons of Practice: Domestic Policy Reform as...

289

The Impact of the Colorado Domestic Partnership Act on Colorado's State Budget  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

October 2006 The Impact of the Colorado Domestic PartnershipAct on Colorado's State Budget http://www.law.ucla.edu/2006 The Impact of the Colorado Domestic Partnership Act on

Badgett, M.V. Lee; Sears, Brad; Lee, Roger; MacCartney, Danielle

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

The evolution of U.S. commercial domestic aircraft operations from 1991 to 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objective of this thesis is to explore the evolution of U.S. commercial domestic aircraft operations from 1991 to 2010 and describe the implications for future U.S. commercial domestic fleets. Using data collected ...

Wulz, Alexander Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

EIA-Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review-Revisions to Gross Domestic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revisions to Gross Domestic Product and Implications for the Comparisons The concept of GDP is a commonly used measure of economic activity. It can be expressed in nominal dollars or, with the use of a matched price index to remove inflation, in "real" terms. Movements in nominal GDP show how the value of goods and services produced by the United States changes over time, while real GDP is a measure of how the physical production of the economy has grown. While simple in concept, the projecting of nominal and real GDP and the interpretation of these projected measures relative to "history" is not simple or straightforward. The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) within the U.S. Department of Commerce continually adjusts the National Income and Product Accounts data, with comprehensive revisions completed every 4 or 5 years. The last four major revisions (1985, 1991, 1995, and 1999) incorporated definitional and statistical changes, as well as emphasizing new ways of presenting the data. Also, prior to AEO1993 aggregate economic activity was measured and projected on the basis of Gross National Product (GNP) as opposed to Gross Domestic Product (GDP). For the period from 1984 through 2004, nominal GNP is on average approximately 0.45 percent above nominal GDP.

292

Searching, naturally  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: artificial intelligence, computational linguistics, information retrieval, knowledge representation, natural language processing, text processing

Eileen E. Allen

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

WA_03_015_HYBRID_POWER_GENERATION_SYSTEMS_Waiver_of_Domestic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home WA03015HYBRIDPOWERGENERATIONSYSTEMSWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA03015HYBRIDPOWERGENERATIONSYSTEMS...

294

WA_03_017_HYBRID_POWER_GENERATION_SYSTEMS_Waiver_of_Domestic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home WA03017HYBRIDPOWERGENERATIONSYSTEMSWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA03017HYBRIDPOWERGENERATIONSYSTEMS...

295

WA_1993_006_CUMMINS_POWER_GENERATION_INC_Waiver_of_Domestic_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home WA1993006CUMMINSPOWERGENERATIONINCWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA1993006CUMMINSPOWERGENERATIONINCWaiv...

296

WA_03_014_HYBRID_POWER_GENERATION_SYSTEMS_Waiver_of_Domestic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home WA03014HYBRIDPOWERGENERATIONSYSTEMSWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA03014HYBRIDPOWERGENERATIONSYSTEMS...

297

WA_04_036_HRL_Laboratories_LLC_.Waiver_pof_dDomestic_fand_Fo...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9GENERALMOTORSCORPWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA02042GENERALMOTORSPOWERTRAINDIVWaiverofDomestic.pdf WA03044CATERPILLARINCWaiverofDomesticandForeignR...

298

WA_98_019_SIEMENS_SOLAR_INDUSTRIES_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Fo...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8019SIEMENSSOLARINDUSTRIESWaiverofDomesticandFo.pdf WA98019SIEMENSSOLARINDUSTRIESWaiverofDomesticandFo.pdf WA98019SIEMENSSOLARINDUSTRIESWaiverofDomestic...

299

WA_03_019_GENERAL_MOTORS_CORP_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SCORPWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf More Documents & Publications WA01019GENERALELECTRICCORPWaiverofDomesticandForei.pdf WA1993020GENERALMOTORSWaiverofDomest...

300

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY INVENTOR FOR THE W AIYER OF DOMESTIC AND  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ATMOSPHERIC TEMPERATURE DIFFERENTIAL POWER ATMOSPHERIC TEMPERATURE DIFFERENTIAL POWER GENERA TOR" DEVELOPED UNDER DOE CONTRACT NO . DE- AT(29-1)-789; DOE INVENTION DISCLOSURE NO. S-43,860; DOE WAIVER NO. W(I) 2008-004. The Petitioner, Anthony J. Russo (Inventor), has requested a waiver of the Government ' s domestic and foreign patent rights in a subject invention entitled "Atmospheric Temperature Differential Power Generator." The invention was conceived by the Inventor while an employee of the Sandia Corporation (Sandia). Sandia is the M&O contractor for the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), a government-owned, contractor- operated (GOCO) facility, subject to DOE contract number DE-AT(29-1)-789 at the time the invention was made. The subject invention relates to the natural temperature differential between high and low

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "domestically produced natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Drilling Sideways -- A Review of Horizontal Well Technology and Its Domestic Application  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

TR-0565 TR-0565 Distribution Category UC-950 Drilling Sideways -- A Review of Horizontal Well Technology and Its Domestic Application April 1993 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, under the general direction of Diane W. Lique, Director of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Craig H. Cranston, Chief of the Reserves and Production Branch, and David F. Morehouse, Senior Supervisory Geologist. Information regarding

302

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations, 1992--1995  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1992, 1993, 1994, and 1995. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sum (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measured do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Rails Beyond Coal The Impacts of "New Energy" & the Dawning of the Domestic Intermodal Age  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rails Beyond Coal ­ The Impacts of "New Energy" & the Dawning of the Domestic Intermodal Age AB) /perishables/others/Coal? Exports ­ "legs"? #12;UNCERTAIN Paper Ethanol Export Coal! Rail Intermediate term volume prospects ABOVE GDP BELOW GD Domestic Coal (?) ABOVE GDP Intermodal/Domestic (++) Intermodal

Bustamante, Fabián E.

304

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

305

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

306

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

307

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

308

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

309

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

310

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

311

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

312

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

313

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

314

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

315

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

316

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

317

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

318

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

319

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 129 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each projection year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. Natural gas flow patterns are a function of the pattern in the previous year, coupled

320

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module This  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This This page inTenTionally lefT blank 127 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through a regional interstate representative pipeline network, for both a peak (December through March) and off-peak period during each projection year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. Natural gas flow patterns are a function of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "domestically produced natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Natural Gas Year-In-Review  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Natural gas production grew by 7.9 percent in 2011, with large gains in onshore production offsetting continuing declines in the Gulf of Mexico. Production grew despite a year over year decline in prices. Growth in the electric power and industrial sectors drove overall increases in total consumption. Strength in domestic supplies, as well as mild weather in the fourth quarter of the year, reduced the need for pipeline imports, while pipeline exports from the U.S. to Mexico increased substantially.

Katie Teller

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

322

Limited Electricity Generation Supply and Limited Natural Gas Supply Cases (released in AEO2008)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Development of U.S. energy resources and the permitting and construction of large energy facilities have become increasingly difficult over the past 20 years, and they could become even more difficult in the future. Growing public concern about global warming and CO2 emissions also casts doubt on future consumption of fossil fuelsparticularly coal, which releases the largest amount of CO2 per unit of energy produced. Even without regulations to limit greenhouse gas emissions in the United States, the investment community may already be limiting the future use of some energy options. In addition, there is considerable uncertainty about the future availability of, and access to, both domestic and foreign natural gas resources.

Information Center

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

323

Thailand's natural rubber economy in an international setting: an econometric investigation  

SciTech Connect

The Thai natural rubber economy is described in the context of the world rubber market. An econometric model is estimated for 15 structural equations; it includes the Thai, US, and rest-of-the-world rubber economies. Several simulation experiments are analyzed for the period from 1984 to 1995. Impact and dynamic multipliers are reported for major endogenous variables in response to changes in US GDP, world crude oil price, Thai replanting cess tax and Thai natural rubber production. A 1%, one-time increase in the US GDP has a positive effect on the Singapore natural rubber price. A world crude oil price decline shock has a negative effect in both the short-run and the long-run. The INRO buffer stock stabilization policy as well as alternative domestic Thai policies of market intervention are analyzed. The simulation results show that buffer stock management which allows a price band of +/-20% around the price target has the most stabilized price, compared to other band widths and no stock management. The outcome of the increase of the Thai replanting cess tax raises not only cess tax revenue, but also producer and export earning. Results showed that a decrease in rubber production positively affected producer and export earnings in the long-run.

Suwanakul, S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Origin State: Alabama  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q2 by Origin State: Alabama Q2 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) 1 / 58 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) Destination State Transportation Mode Electricity Generation Coke Plants Industrial Plants Excluding Coke Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 875 12 33 - 920 Alabama River 855 - - - 855 Alabama Truck 155 84 230 - 469 Alabama Total 1,885 96 263 - 2,244 Florida Railroad - - 8 - 8 Georgia Railroad 118 - - - 118 Georgia Truck s - 15 - 15 Georgia Total 118 - 15 - 133 Indiana Railroad - 83 - - 83 Indiana Truck 17 34 - - 50 Indiana Total 17 116 - - 133 Kentucky Railroad 83 - - - 83 Pennsylvania Railroad 95 - - - 95 Origin State Total 2,197 212 285 - 2,695 Railroad 1,171 95 40 - 1,305 River 855 - - - 855 Truck 171 118 245 - 534 2 / 58 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Origin State: Alaska

325

Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q1 by Destination State: Alabama  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q1 by Destination State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) 1 / 64 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q1 by Destination State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) Origin State Transportation Mode Electricity Generation Coke Plants Industrial Plants Excluding Coke Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 950 4 84 - 1,038 Alabama River 1,110 - - - 1,110 Alabama Truck 37 170 249 - 456 Alabama Total 2,096 174 333 - 2,603 Arkansas Railroad - 6 - - 6 Colorado Railroad 279 - - - 279 Illinois Railroad 11 - - - 11 Illinois River 109 - - - 109 Illinois Total 119 - - - 119 Indiana River 197 - - - 197 Kentucky Railroad 442 - 28 - 471 Kentucky Truck - - 2 - 2 Kentucky Total 442 - 31 - 473 Kentucky (East) Railroad 357 - 28 - 385 Kentucky (East) Truck - - 2 - 2 Kentucky (East)

326

REQUEST BY INTEROTEX, LTD. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INTEROTEX, LTD. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC INTEROTEX, LTD. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE IN THE COURSE OF OR UNDER DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RFP SY-033-86 UNDER DOE CONTRACT NO. DE-AC05-960R22464; DOE WAIVER DOCKET W(A)-97-019 [ORO-661] The Petitioner, Interotex, Ltd., has made a timely request for an advance waiver to worldwide rights in Subject Inventions made in the course of or under RFP SY-033-86 under Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC05-960R22464. This proposed project has three main purposes and two phases. One purpose is to further develop and prototype a complete Hi-Cool Interotex air conditioner. Another purpose is to design, develop, and prototype a limited quantity of "outdoor heat rejection units" suitable for GAX thermally activated heat pumps and air-conditioners. The third

327

REQUEST BY KENNAMETAL, INC.., FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

KENNAMETAL, INC.., FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC KENNAMETAL, INC.., FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE IN THE COURSE OF OR UNDER SUBCONTRACT NO. 4000017596 UNDER DOE PRIME CONTRACT NO. DE-AC05-00OR22725; DOE WAIVER DOCKET W(A)-02-045 [ORO-775] Petitioner, Kennametal, Inc., has made a timely request for an advance waiver to worldwide rights in Subject Inventions made in the course of or under Subcontract No. 4000017596 under DOE Prime Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle, Inc. The scope of this work is for the development of hot-section materials for advanced microturbines. The objective of this effort is to identify an existing structural ceramic that is being manufactured for other applications, that commensurate with the requirements of advanced microturbines, shows

328

Table 5. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 2508 2373 2256 2161 2088 2022 1953 1891 1851 1825 1799 1781 1767 1759 1778 1789 1807 1862 AEO 1995 2402 2307 2205 2095 2037 1967 1953 1924 1916 1905 1894 1883 1887 1887 1920 1945 1967 AEO 1996 2387 2310 2248 2172 2113 2062 2011 1978 1953 1938 1916 1920 1927 1949 1971 1986 2000 AEO 1997 2362 2307 2245 2197 2143 2091 2055 2033 2015 2004 1997 1989 1982 1975 1967 1949 AEO 1998 2340 2332 2291 2252 2220 2192 2169 2145 2125 2104 2087 2068 2050 2033 2016 AEO 1999 2340 2309 2296 2265 2207 2171 2141 2122 2114 2092 2074 2057 2040 2025 AEO 2000 2193 2181 2122 2063 2016 1980 1957 1939 1920 1904 1894 1889 1889

329

United States Domestic Research Reactor Infrastrucutre TRIGA Reactor Fuel Support  

SciTech Connect

The United State Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure Program at the Idaho National Laboratory manages and provides project management, technical, quality engineering, quality inspection and nuclear material support for the United States Department of Energy sponsored University Reactor Fuels Program. This program provides fresh, unirradiated nuclear fuel to Domestic University Research Reactor Facilities and is responsible for the return of the DOE-owned, irradiated nuclear fuel over the life of the program. This presentation will introduce the program management team, the universities supported by the program, the status of the program and focus on the return process of irradiated nuclear fuel for long term storage at DOE managed receipt facilities. It will include lessons learned from research reactor facilities that have successfully shipped spent fuel elements to DOE receipt facilities.

Douglas Morrell

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Destination State: Alabama  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

61 61 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Destination State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) 1 / 61 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Destination State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) Origin State Transportation Mode Electricity Generation Coke Plants Industrial Plants Excluding Coke Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 875 12 33 - 920 Alabama River 855 - - - 855 Alabama Truck 155 84 230 - 469 Alabama Total 1,885 96 263 - 2,244 Colorado Railroad 123 - - - 123 Illinois River 145 - - - 145 Indiana River 246 - - - 246 Indiana Truck 37 - - - 37 Indiana Total 283 - - - 283 Kentucky Railroad 426 - 30 - 457 Kentucky (East) Railroad 172 - 30 - 202 Kentucky (West) Railroad 255 - - - 255 Oklahoma Railroad - 6 - - 6 Utah Railroad 30 - - - 30 Virginia Railroad - 14 - - 14 West Virginia Railroad - 75 - -

331

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY BAKER HUGHES INTEQ FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

t t 0 STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY BAKER HUGHES INTEQ FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC26-05NT15488; W(A)-05-016, CH-1279 The Petitioner, Baker Hughes INTEQ (BHI) was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled, "Microhole Wireless Steering and Logging While Drilling System." The purpose of the cooperative agreement is to develop a modular and effective Coiled Tubing Drilling (CTD) system that allows operators to produce existing oil reservoirs, mainly on the North American continent, in a much more effective way than is possible today. This will be accomplished by providing accurate and precise real-time geosteering even under conditions where the rig surface gear and equipment need to be minimized for cost

332

REQUEST BY EATON CORPORATION FOR ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ADVANCE WAIVER OF ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE IN THE COURSE OF OR UNDER A SUBCONTRACT LET BY MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC., UNDER MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACT NO. DE-AC05-840R21400; DOE WAIVER DOCKET W(A)-93-003 [0RO-548] Eaton Corporation (Eaton) has made a timely request for an advance waiver to worldwide rights in Subject Inventions made in the course of or under Subcontract 86X-SL807C with Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) under its management and operating contract. The scope of the work calls for the development of a single step rough-finishing process suitable for producing high-quality silicon nitride ceramic parts at high material removal rates and at a lower cost than can be achieved using conventional

333

Table 1.14 Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Includes those quantities for which royalties were paid based on the value of the natural gas plant liquids produced. Additional quantities of natural gas plant ...

334

Natural gas monthly, November 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground state data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

Not Available

1993-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

335

Natural gas monthly, April 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 31 tabs.

NONE

1995-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

336

Natural gas monthly, June 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

Not Available

1993-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

337

Natural gas monthly, July 1998  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 25 tabs.

NONE

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Natural gas monthly: December 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. Articles are included which are designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Natural gas monthly, June 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 25 tabs.

NONE

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Natural gas monthly: September 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 24 tabs.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "domestically produced natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Controllers for solar domestic hot-water systems  

SciTech Connect

This document is intended as a resource for designers and installers of solar domestic hot water systems. It provides key functional control strategy and equipment alternatives and equipment descriptions adequate for writing effective DHW controller specifications. It also provides the installer with adequate technical background to understand the functional aspects of the controller. Included are specific instructions to install, check out, and troubleshoot the controller installation.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Solar domestic hot water system inspection and performance evaluation handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A reference source and procedures are provided to a solar technician for inspecting a solar domestic hot water system after installation and for troubleshooting the system during a maintenance call. It covers six generic DHW systems and is designed to aid the user in identifying a system type, diagnosing a system's problem, and then pinpointing and evaluating specific component problems. A large amount of system design and installation information is also included.

Not Available

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Lead levels in whole blood of New Zealand domestic animals  

SciTech Connect

A survey of whole-blood lead in domestic animals of New Zealand was conducted. 1142 animals were examined (252 cattle, 113 cats, 271 dogs, 258 horses, and 248 sheep). Data was analyzed as to age, sex, breed and animals known to be poisoned. Variations in lead concentration with different environments were noted with special reference to elevated lead in animals near automobile service stations, which could indicate potential danger to humans working in such areas.

Ward, N.I.; Brooks, R.R.; Roberts, E.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Establishment of an Industry-Driven Consortium Focused on Improving the Production Performance of Domestic Stripper Wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the sixth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Organized and hosted two technology transfer meetings; (2) Collaborated with the Pennsylvania Oil and Gas Association (POGAM) to host a Natural Gas Outlook conference in Pittsburgh, PA; (3) Provided a SWC presentation at the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) meeting in Jackson Hole, WY; and (4) Completed and released a stripper well industry documentary entitled: ''Independent Oil: Rediscovering America's Forgotten Wells''.

Joel Morrison; Sharon Elder

2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

345

Why Sequencea Biogas-Producing Microbial Community?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Biogas-Producing Microbial Community? a Biogas-Producing Microbial Community? The world population is steadily growing, and so is the amount of waste produced by human activity. For example, an estimated 236 million tons of municipal solid waste are produced annually in the U.S., 50% of which is biomass. At the same time, energy sources are rapidly depleting. Converting organic waste to renewable biofuel by anaerobic digestion hence represents one appealing option to mitigate this problem. Biogas is a natural by-product of the decomposition of organic matter in an oxygen-free environment and comprises primarily methane and carbon dioxide. This naturally occurring process has been known for more than a century. More recently, it has been gaining importance as more efficient anaerobic digestion technologies have been developed to treat and recover energy (in

346

Opportunities and Domestic Barriers to Clean Energy Investment in Chile |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Opportunities and Domestic Barriers to Clean Energy Investment in Chile Opportunities and Domestic Barriers to Clean Energy Investment in Chile Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Opportunities and Domestic Barriers to Clean Energy Investment in Chile Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Finance, Market analysis, Background analysis Website: www.iisd.org/pdf/2010/bali_2_copenhagen_Chile_Jun2010.pdf Country: Chile UN Region: Latin America and the Caribbean Coordinates: -35.675147°, -71.542969° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-35.675147,"lon":-71.542969,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

347

Report on Produced Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 2009 Produced Water Volumes and Management Practices Page 3 Table of Contents Executive Summary ........................................................................................................................ 7 Chapter 1 - Introduction ............................................................................................................. 11 1.1 Purpose .......................................................................................................................... 11 1.2 Background ................................................................................................................... 11 1.3 Overview ....................................................................................................................... 11

348

Coal markets squeeze producers  

SciTech Connect

Supply/demand fundamentals seem poised to keep prices of competing fossil fuels high, which could cushion coal prices, but increased mining and transportation costs may squeeze producer profits. Are markets ready for more volatility?

Ryan, M.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

AGA Producing Regions Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 181,202 117,919 6,043 -70,389 -119,495 -54,764 -90,630 -78,703 -78,810 -41,384 3,174 110,677 1995 141,597 94,129 43,122 -46,127 -83,740 -81,214 -42,329 7,753 -77,793 -50,909 62,552 147,261 1996 189,543 108,720 103,253 -39,312 -70,578 -61,809 -55,791 -81,685 -105,390 -57,617 79,056 94,165 1997 159,274 68,321 -45,732 -28,852 -82,922 -65,620 -5,729 -52,520 -86,054 -85,240 63,672 147,412 1998 101,163 10,342 23,740 -93,466 -97,929 -57,723 -73,822 -57,671 -36,017 -111,305 2,052 120,522 1999 153,986 27,076 55,017 -35,949 -87,235 -74,047 -14,239 -6,737 -77,700 -35,924 515 132,062 2000 201,606 127,455 21,465 -13,293 -27,098 -58,272 -39,442 -4,324 -66,987 -78,226 66,960 220,332

350

AGA Producing Region Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,894,503 1,780,012 1,829,817 1,964,003 2,054,202 2,124,803 1994-2013 Base Gas 1,076,234 1,074,821 1,075,297 1,077,568 1,080,613 1,080,790 1994-2013 Working Gas 818,269 705,191...

351

Chelan County PUD - Sustainable Natural Alternative Power Producers...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the customer receives the additional benefit of net metering. If the output of the inverter is connected directly to the transformer, the customer does not receive any net...

352

Chelan County PUD - Sustainable Natural Alternative Power Producers...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Water Wind Maximum Rebate 1.50kWh Program Information District of Columbia Program Type Performance-Based Incentive...

353

Pennsylvania is the fastest-growing natural gas-producing ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. ... ...

354

Oil removal for produced water treatment and micellar cleaning of ultrafiltration membranes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Produced water is a major waste produced from oil and natural gas wells in the state of Texas. This water could be a possible source (more)

Beech, Scott Jay

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Figure SR2. Net Imports as Percentage of Domestic Consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Figure SR2 of the U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports: 2009. This report provides an overview of U.S. international natural gas trade in 2009. Natural gas import and ...

356

Model documentation: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System; Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is a component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. This report documents the archived version of NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts used in support of the Annual Energy Outlook 1994, DOE/EIA-0383(94). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. It is intended to fulfill the legal obligation of the EIA to provide adequate documentation in support of its models (Public Law 94-385, Section 57.b.2). This report represents Volume 1 of a two-volume set. (Volume 2 will report on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues.) Subsequent chapters of this report provide: (1) an overview of the NGTDM (Chapter 2); (2) a description of the interface between the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and the NGTDM (Chapter 3); (3) an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM (Chapter 4); (4) the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module (Chapter 5); (5) the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module (Chapter 6); (6) the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module (Chapter 7); (7) the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module (Chapter 8); and (8) a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs (Chapter 9).

NONE

1994-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

357

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Intrastate Natural Gas Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Intrastate Natural Gas Pipeline Segment Intrastate Natural Gas Pipeline Segment About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Intrastate Natural Gas Pipeline Segment Overview Intrastate natural gas pipelines operate within State borders and link natural gas producers to local markets and to the interstate pipeline network. Approximately 29 percent of the total miles of natural gas pipeline in the U.S. are intrastate pipelines. Although an intrastate pipeline system is defined as one that operates totally within a State, an intrastate pipeline company may have operations in more than one State. As long as these operations are separate, that is, they do not physically interconnect, they are considered intrastate, and are not jurisdictional to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). More than 90 intrastate natural gas pipelines operate in the lower-48 States.

358

Energy Perspectives: For most fuel sources, domestic production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

359

Annual Survey Forms for Domestic Oil and Gas Reserves  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2001 Annual Report 147 Source: Energy Information Administration ...

360

Domestic supply of liquid fuels projected to increase, resulting ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "domestically produced natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Capital expenditures for the FRS companies' domestic refining/marketing segment decreased 16 percent from 2008 to $22 billion in 2009 while foreign ...

362

"Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.4;" 1.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.4;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"Any",,,,,,,,,"Shipments" "NAICS",,"Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and",,"of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",0.4,0.4,19.4,8.9,2,6.9,5.4,0,10.1,9.1 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",0,0,21.1,14.7,8.4,13.3,7.9,"X",17.9,9.1

363

Process for producing hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

A process for producing hydrogen by an electrolysis of water with an aqueous solution of an alkali hydroxide is provided. It is to use an electrolytic cell prepared by bonding a gas and liquid permeable anode on one surface of a cation-exchange membrane of a fluorinated polymer and a gas and liquid permeable cathode on the other surface of the membrane. An economical metal can be used as the substance for the electrolytic cell. Hydrogen can be produced at a low voltage in stable for a long time.

Oda, Y.; Morimoto, T.; Suzuki, K.

1984-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

364

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 5, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 27, 2011) Mild temperatures coupled with continued strong domestic production resulted in natural gas cash market prices dropping modestly at nearly all domestic pricing points over the week. The lone exception was the Henry Hub price which rose a token 2 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (0.5 percent) to $4.35 per MMBtu on April 27. Working natural gas in storage rose to 1,685 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, April 22, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 31 Bcf, with storage volumes positioned

365

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

reflects increased domestic crude oil and natural gas production, increased use of biofuels (much of which are produced domestically), and demand reductions resulting from the...

366

Drilling often results in both oil and natural gas production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In 2011 and 2012, more than 50% of new wells produced both oil and natural gas. Despite this phenomenon, many traditional methods for estimating oil and natural gas ...

367

Pumped Solar Domestic Hot Water (SDHW) system design guidelines  

SciTech Connect

This article provides practical guidelines based on experience gained from the design, installation, and commissioning of a pumped Solar Domestic Hot Water (SDHW) system in Saudi Arabia. The authors believe that such information is not readily available and will be useful to designers and installers of SDHW systems within the region. Since the current motivation for buying SDHW systems in Saudi Arabia is not strictly economic, it is imperative that a professional reference be available, against which the soundness of any technical decisions could be confirmed prior to their implementation. The intent is to ensure that systems designed and installed will operate reliably, therefore enhancing customer satisfaction.

Arshad, K.; Said, S.A.M. (King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Storage Storage About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Underground Natural Gas Storage Overview | Regional Breakdowns Overview Underground natural gas storage provides pipelines, local distribution companies, producers, and pipeline shippers with an inventory management tool, seasonal supply backup, and access to natural gas needed to avoid imbalances between receipts and deliveries on a pipeline network. There are three principal types of underground storage sites used in the United States today. They are: · depleted natural gas or oil fields (326), · aquifers (43), or · salt caverns (31). In a few cases mine caverns have been used. Most underground storage facilities, 82 percent at the beginning of 2008, were created from reservoirs located in depleted natural gas production fields that were relatively easy to convert to storage service, and that were often close to consumption centers and existing natural gas pipeline systems.

369

METHOD OF PRODUCING NEUTRONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing neutrons is described in which there is employed a confinement zone defined between longitudinally spaced localized gradient regions of an elongated magnetic field. Changed particles and neutralizing electrons, more specifically deuterons and tritons and neutralizng electrons, are injected into the confinement field from ion sources located outside the field. The rotational energy of the parrticles is increased at the gradients by imposing an oscillating transverse electrical field thereacross. The imposition of such oscillating transverse electrical fields improves the reflection capability of such gradient fielda so that the reactive particles are retained more effectively within the zone. With the attainment of appropriate densities of plasma particles and provided that such particles are at a sufficiently high temperature, neutron-producing reactions ensue and large quantities of neutrons emerge from the containment zone. (AEC)

Imhoff, D.H.; Harker, W.H.

1964-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Gas-export potential will grow until domestic economies hike local demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prospects appear good for near-term growth of exportable natural-gas supplies for some member countries of the Commonwealth of Independent States (C.I.S.). These conclusions are a result of Enron Corp.'s recent investigations in the C.I.S. and other former Soviet republics. They are based on data obtained in cooperation with Vinigaz, the research arm of the Russian state gas concern Gazprom, and from various other research and consulting groups. These studies indicate that gas-export potential will grow as local demand for gas shrinks in the C.I.S. (as the energy needs of the individual republics decline during the period of economic transition) and while the C.I.S.-area countries continue to require foreign currency to help fund redevelopment and reduce debt. This concluding of two articles reviews the economic outlook for outside investment in the oil, gas, and gas-liquids infrastructure and the role of natural-gas supply and price in the development of domestic and export markets.

Carson, M.; Stram, B. (Enron Corp., Houston, TX (United States))

1993-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

371

Natural gas monthly, June 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is the executive summary from Natural Gas 1994: Issues and Trends. 6 figs., 31 tabs.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Natural gas monthly, April 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are present3ed each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article is entitled ``Natural gas pipeline and system expansions.`` 6 figs., 27 tabs.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Natural gas monthly, July 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is entitled ``Intricate puzzle of oil and gas reserves growth.`` A special report is included on revisions to monthly natural gas data. 6 figs., 24 tabs.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Natural gas monthly, May 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The featured articles for this month are: Opportunities with fuel cells, and revisions to monthly natural gas data.

Not Available

1994-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

375

Natural gas monthly, November 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the Natural Gas Monthly features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is ``US natural gas imports and exports-1995``. 6 figs., 24 tabs.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Natural gas monthly, September 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

Not Available

1993-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

377

Natural gas monthly, August 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. This month`s feature article is on US Natural Gas Imports and Exports 1994.

NONE

1995-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

378

Natural gas monthly, June 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The natural gas monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article for this month is Natural Gas Industry Restructuring and EIA Data Collection.

NONE

1996-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

379

Natural gas monthly, October 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article in this issue is a special report, ``Comparison of Natural Gas Storage Estimates from the EIA and AGA.`` 6 figs., 26 tabs.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the archived version of the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts used in support of the Annual Energy Outlook 2013.

Joe Benneche

2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "domestically produced natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research April 13, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Today, three federal agencies announced a formal partnership to coordinate and align all research associated with development of our nation's abundant unconventional natural gas and oil resources. The partnership exemplifies the cross-government coordination required under President Obama's Executive Order released earlier today, which created a new Interagency Working Group to Support Safe and Responsible Development of Unconventional Domestic Natural Gas Resources. This new partnership will help coordinate current and future

382

Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research April 13, 2012 - 3:01pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Today, three federal agencies announced a formal partnership to coordinate and align all research associated with development of our nation's abundant unconventional natural gas and oil resources. The partnership exemplifies the cross-government coordination required under President Obama's Executive Order released earlier today, which created a new Interagency Working Group to Support Safe and Responsible Development of Unconventional Domestic Natural Gas Resources. This new partnership will help coordinate current and future

383

Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research April 13, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Today, three federal agencies announced a formal partnership to coordinate and align all research associated with development of our nation's abundant unconventional natural gas and oil resources. The partnership exemplifies the cross-government coordination required under President Obama's Executive Order released earlier today, which created a new Interagency Working Group to Support Safe and Responsible Development of Unconventional Domestic Natural Gas Resources. This new partnership will help coordinate current and future

384

Model documentation: Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The methodology employed allows the analysis of impacts of regional capacity constraints in the interstate natural gas pipeline network and the identification of pipeline capacity expansion requirements. There is an explicit representation of core and noncore markets for natural gas transmission and distribution services, and the key components of pipeline tariffs are represented in a pricing algorithm. Natural gas pricing and flow patterns are derived by obtaining a market equilibrium across the three main elements of the natural gas market: the supply element, the demand element, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. The NGTDM consists of four modules: the Annual Flow Module, the Capacity F-expansion Module, the Pipeline Tariff Module, and the Distributor Tariff Module. A model abstract is provided in Appendix A.

NONE

1995-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

385

Water management technologies used by Marcellus Shale Gas Producers.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas represents an important energy source for the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), about 22% of the country's energy needs are provided by natural gas. Historically, natural gas was produced from conventional vertical wells drilled into porous hydrocarbon-containing formations. During the past decade, operators have increasingly looked to other unconventional sources of natural gas, such as coal bed methane, tight gas sands, and gas shales.

Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

386

A model of the domestic hot water load  

SciTech Connect

The electrical load required to supply domestic hot water is an important load for two reasons: (1) It represents a large portion (30 to 50%) of the domestic load; (2) It is a load which can easily be controlled by the consumer or the supplier, because the use of the hot water need not coincide with the heating of hot water. A model representing the electrical system load due to hot water consumption from storage water heaters is provided. Variable parameters include the average amount of water used, the mean and deviation of distributions of usage times, thermostat settings, inlet water temperature and electrical heating element ratings. These parameters are used to estimate the after diversity electricity demand profile, and were verified for accuracy by comparison with measurements. The model enables this prediction of the effects of load control, examples of which are given in this paper. The model is also useful for evaluation of the response which could be expected from demand-side management options. These include changing the size of heating elements, reduction in water consumption and reduction in thermostat settings.

Lane, I.E. [Energy Efficiency Enterprises, Lynnwood Manor (South Africa); Beute, N. [Cape Technikon, Cape Town (South Africa)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Table 5. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual" Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million barrels)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",2507.55,2372.5,2255.7,2160.8,2087.8,2022.1,1952.75,1890.7,1850.55,1825,1799.45,1781.2,1766.6,1759.3,1777.55,1788.5,1806.75,1861.5 "AEO 1995",,2401.7,2306.8,2204.6,2095.1,2036.7,1967.35,1952.75,1923.55,1916.25,1905.3,1894.35,1883.4,1887.05,1887.05,1919.9,1945.45,1967.35 "AEO 1996",,,2387.1,2310.45,2248.4,2171.75,2113.35,2062.25,2011.15,1978.3,1952.75,1938.15,1916.25,1919.9,1927.2,1949.1,1971,1985.6,2000.2 "AEO 1997",,,,2361.55,2306.8,2244.75,2197.3,2142.55,2091.45,2054.95,2033.05,2014.8,2003.85,1996.55,1989.25,1981.95,1974.65,1967.35,1949.1

388

Potential of vegetable oils as a domestic heating fuel  

SciTech Connect

The dependence on imported oil for domestic heating has led to the examination of other potential fuel substitutes. One potential fuel is some form of vegetable oil, which could be a yearly-renewable fuel. In Western Canada, canola has become a major oilseed crop; in Eastern Canada, sunflowers increasingly are becoming a source for a similar oil; for this reason, the Canadian Combustion Research Laboratory (CCRL) has chosen these oils for experimentation. Trials have been conducted in a conventional warm air oil furnace, fitted with a flame retention head burner. Performance has been measured with pure vegetable oils as well as a series of blends with conventional No. 2 oil. The effects of increased fuel pressure and fuel preheating are established. Emissions of carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, unburned hydrocarbons and particulates are given for both steady state and cyclic operation. Canola oil cannot be fired in cyclic operation above 50:50 blends with No. 2 oil. At any level above a 10% blend, canola is difficult to burn, even with significant increased pressure and temperature. Sunflower oil is much easier to burn and can be fired as a pure fuel, but with high emissions of incomplete combustion products. An optimum blend of 50:50 sunflower in No. 2 oil yields emissions and performance similar to No. 2 oil. This blend offers potential as a means of reducing demand of imported crude oil for domestic heating systems.

Hayden, A.C.S.; Begin, E.; Palmer, C.E.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 U.S. Energy Information Administration / 3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report 3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: October 31, 2013 Next Release Date: February 2014 Table 1. Total production of uranium concentrate in the United States, 1996 - 3rd Quarter 2013 pounds U 3 O 8 Calendar-Year Quarter 1st Quarter 2nd Quarter 3rd Quarter 4th Quarter Calendar-Year Total 1996 1,734,427 1,460,058 1,691,796 1,434,425 6,320,706 1997 1,149,050 1,321,079 1,631,384 1,541,052 5,642,565 1998 1,151,587 1,143,942 1,203,042 1,206,003 4,704,574 1999 1,196,225 1,132,566 1,204,984 1,076,897 4,610,672 2000 1,018,683 983,330 981,948 973,585 3,975,545 2001 709,177 748,298 628,720 553,060 2,639,256 2002 620,952 643,432 579,723 E500,000 E2,344,107 2003 E400,000 E600,000 E400,000 E600,000

390

Natural gas monthly, July 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. A glossary is included. 7 figs., 33 tabs.

Not Available

1990-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

391

Natural gas monthly, February 1994  

SciTech Connect

The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. The NGM also features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

Not Available

1994-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

392

Natural gas monthly, October 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. A glossary of the terms used in this report is provided to assist readers in understanding the data presented in this publication. 6 figs., 30 tabs.

NONE

1995-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

393

Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Origin State, Consumer...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Origin State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation Home > Coal > Annual Coal Distribution > Coal Origin Map > Domestic Distribution by Origin: Alaska Data For: 2002...

394

Domestic Price List | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Domestic Price List New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) NBL Home About Programs Certified Reference Materials Prices and Certificates Ordering Information Training New Brunswick...

395

WA_05_046_GENERAL_MOTORS_CORPORATION_Waiver_of_domestic_and_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Publications WA04070GENERALMOTORSCORPORATIONWaiverofDomesticand.pdf WA02042GENERALMOTORSPOWERTRAINDIVWaiverofDomestic.pdf Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-031...

396

Importance of Swedish Cogeneration Plants for the Domestic Energy System and the North European Power Exchange.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This report examines Swedish cogeneration importance for the domestic energy system and for the North European power exchange. Carbon dioxide emissions and generation cost of (more)

Virk, Mubashir

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Fuel cells for domestic heat and power: are they worth it?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fuel cells could substantially decarbonise domestic energy production, but at what cost? It is known that these micro-CHP systems are expensive but actual price data (more)

Staffell, Iain

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Drilling Sideways - A Review of Horizontal Well Technology and Its Domestic Application  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Focuses primarily on domestic horizontal drilling applications, past and present, and on salient aspects of current and near-future horizontal drilling and completion technology.

Robert F. King

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and distribution Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each projection year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and

400

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each projection year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "domestically produced natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and distribution Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each projection year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution

402

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Natural Gas Transmission and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model Regions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution

403

Natural Gas Regulation - Other Gas-Related Information Sources | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Regulation - Other Gas-Related Information Sources Natural Gas Regulation - Other Gas-Related Information Sources Natural Gas Regulation - Other Gas-Related Information Sources The single largest source of energy information available is the Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA). The EIA publishes extensive reports on natural gas and other energy sources. Domestic natural gas markets are regulated in part by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The commission's chief area of concern is the interstate natural gas market. Natural gas moves for the most part by pipeline in the United States. The safety of those pipelines is the concern of the Department of Transportation's Office of Pipeline Safety. In Canada the regulation of interprovincial and international natural gas is the responsibility of the National Energy Board. Their areas of

404

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) projects that natural gas prices will remain relatively high for the rest of 2004. Wellhead prices are expected to average $5.41 per MMBtu through the end of the storage refill season (October 31) and $5.59 in November and December. Spot prices (composites for producing-area hubs) averaged about $5.30 per MMBtu in the first quarter of this year but are currently near $6.00. Barring cooler-than-normal weather this summer, the likelihood appears small that spot prices will fall significantly below $5.65 per MMBtu for the rest of 2004. Overall in 2004, spot prices will likely average $5.62 per MMBtu and wellhead prices will average $5.33. In 2005, spot prices are expected to increase to $5.90 per MMBtu. As in other recent projections, this outcome depends on modest growth in domestic production and total available supply (including imports and storage inventories) in both 2004 and 2005. Underground storage facilities reported net injections of 199 Bcf for April, well above the previous 5-year average of 139 Bcf. At the end of April, storage stocks were only about 2 percent below the 5-year average level and 37 percent higher than last year at this time based on monthly survey data.

405

Natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Over time the electricity mix gradually shifts to lower-carbon options, led by growth in natural gas and renewable generation U.S. electricity net generation trillion kilowatthours 6

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski Usnic; Adam Sieminski Usnic

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas. Under the baseline winter weather scenario, EIA expects end-of-October working gas inventories will total 3,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) and end March ...

407

Natural Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

originate? I need to give the intitial natural source of this energy. Replies: The energy source for most known organisms is the sun. Some organisms, such as deep-sea vent fauna...

408

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. Subsequent chapters of this report provide: an overview of NGTDM; a description of the interface between the NEMS and NGTDM; an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM; the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module; the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module; the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module; the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module; and a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Natural Gas Spot Price Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 of 17 7 of 17 Notes: Despite signs that domestic natural gas production has begun to turn around (the Texas Railroad Commission now reports year-to-date (through Sep.) gains in Texas gas production of 1.2 percent, compared to a 4.7-percent decline for the same months in 1999 versus 1998) the reality of the U.S. gas market is that supply responses have been too little, too late to prevent record-high spot prices and prospects for very high average prices this winter. We now expect to see peak monthly spot wellhead prices this winter of over $6.00 per thousand cubic feet (mcf) (December). Last month we maintained confidence that conditions would improve enough to keep the $5.10 per mcf recorded in October as the peak for this heating season. With partial data available, a monthly average value of about $5.60 per mcf looks likely for

410

NATURE OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES  

SciTech Connect

The integrated processes of nuclear industry are considered to define the nature of wastes. Processes for recovery and preparation of U and Th fuels produce wastes containing concentrated radioactive materials which present problems of confinement and dispersal. Fundamentals of waste treatment are considered from the standpoint of processes in which radioactive materials become a factor such as naturally occurring feed materials, fission products, and elements produced by parasitic neutron capture. In addition, the origin of concentrated fission product wastes is examined, as well as characteristics of present wastes and the level of fission products in wastes. Also, comments are included on high-level wastes from processes other than solvent extraction, active gaseous wastes, and low- to intermediate-level liquid wastes. (J.R.D.)

Culler, F.L. Jr.

1959-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

411

Natural gas monthly, April 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This issue of the Natural Gas Monthly presents the most recent estimates of natural gas data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Estimates extend through April 1998 for many data series. The report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, feature articles are presented designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. This issue contains the special report, ``Natural Gas 1997: A Preliminary Summary.`` This report provides information on natural gas supply and disposition for the year 1997, based on monthly data through December from EIA surveys. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Process for thermochemically producing hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogen is produced by the reaction of water with chromium sesquioxide and strontium oxide. The hydrogen producing reaction is combined with other reactions to produce a closed chemical cycle for the thermal decomposition of water.

Bamberger, Carlos E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Richardson, Donald M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: October 31, 2013 Next Release Date: February 2014 2012 1st Quarter 2013 2nd Quarter 2013 3rd Quarter 2013 Cameco Crow Butte Operation Dawes, Nebraska 1,000,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating Hydro Resources, Inc. Church Rock McKinley, New Mexico 1,000,000 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Hydro Resources, Inc. Crownpoint McKinley, New Mexico 1,000,000 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Lost Creek ISR, LLC, a subsidiary of Ur- Energy USA Inc. Lost Creek Project Sweetwater, Wyoming 2,000,000 Under Construction Under Construction

414

Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q1 by Origin State: Alabama  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q1 by Origin State: Alabama Q1 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) 1 / 58 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q1 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) Destination State Transportation Mode Electricity Generation Coke Plants Industrial Plants Excluding Coke Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 950 4 84 - 1,038 Alabama River 1,110 - - - 1,110 Alabama Truck 37 170 249 - 456 Alabama Total 2,096 174 333 - 2,603 Florida Railroad - - 22 - 22 Georgia Railroad 45 - - - 45 Georgia Truck s - 20 - 21 Georgia Total 45 - 20 - 65 Hawaii Ocean Vessel s - - - s Indiana Railroad - 78 - - 78 Indiana Truck - 32 - - 32 Indiana Total - 110 - - 110 South Carolina Truck - - 2 - 2 Tennessee Truck - - 1 - 1 Texas Railroad 72 - - - 72 Origin State Total 2,213 284 378 - 2,875 Ocean Vessel s - - - s Railroad 1,066 82 106 - 1,255 River 1,110 - - - 1,110 Truck 37 202 272 - 511 2 / 58

415

Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination State,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2008 2008 Final May 2010 2008 Changes in Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources Introduction The Coal Distribution Report - Annual provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin State, destination State, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-exporting State. This Final 2008 Coal Distribution Report - Annual, supersedes the Preliminary 2008 Coal Distribution Report - Annual. This report relies on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys of the coal industry and electric power generation industry. In addition, the report contains actual annual data instead of imputed data for smaller electric generation plants that are excluded from the

416

A VISION FOR America's Energy Future More Diverse More Domestic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VISION FOR VISION FOR America's Energy Future More Diverse More Domestic More Efficient Business Roundtable (www.businessroundtable.org) is an association of chief executive officers of leading U.S. companies with $4.5 trillion in annual revenues and more than 10 million employees. Member companies comprise nearly a third of the total value of the U.S. stock market and represent more than 40 percent of all corporate income taxes paid to the federal government. Collectively, they returned $112 billion in dividends to shareholders and the economy in 2005. Roundtable companies give more than $7 billion a year in combined charitable contributions, representing nearly 60 percent of total corporate giving. They are technology innovation leaders, with $90 billion in annual research and development (R&D) spending - nearly half

417

Reducing Onshore Natural Gas and Oil Exploration and Production Impacts Using a Broad-Based Stakeholder Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Never before has the reduction of oil and gas exploration and production impacts been as important as it is today for operators, regulators, non-governmental organizations and individual landowners. Collectively, these stakeholders are keenly interested in the potential benefits from implementing effective environmental impact reducing technologies and practices. This research project strived to gain input and insight from such a broad array of stakeholders in order to identify approaches with the potential to satisfy their diverse objectives. The research team examined three of the most vital issue categories facing onshore domestic production today: (1) surface damages including development in urbanized areas, (2) impacts to wildlife (specifically greater sage grouse), and (3) air pollution, including its potential contribution to global climate change. The result of the research project is a LINGO (Low Impact Natural Gas and Oil) handbook outlining approaches aimed at avoiding, minimizing, or mitigating environmental impacts. The handbook identifies technical solutions and approaches which can be implemented in a practical and feasible manner to simultaneously achieve a legitimate balance between environmental protection and fluid mineral development. It is anticipated that the results of this research will facilitate informed planning and decision making by management agencies as well as producers of oil and natural gas. In 2008, a supplemental task was added for the researchers to undertake a 'Basin Initiative Study' that examines undeveloped and/or underdeveloped oil and natural gas resources on a regional or geologic basin scope to stimulate more widespread awareness and development of domestic resources. Researchers assessed multi-state basins (or plays), exploring state initiatives, state-industry partnerships and developing strategies to increase U.S. oil and gas supplies while accomplishing regional economic and environmental goals.

Amy Childers

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

418

System for treating produced water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method were used to treat produced water. Field-testing demonstrated the removal of contaminants from produced water from oil and gas wells.

Sullivan, Enid J. (Los Alamos, NM); Katz, Lynn (Austin, TX); Kinney, Kerry (Austin, TX); Bowman, Robert S. (Lemitar, NM); Kwon, Soondong (Kyungbuk, KR)

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

419

P E Appendix D N D I Real Gross Domestic Product by State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appendix D Real Gross Domestic Product by State The real gross domestic product (GDP) ... R 75.5 R 76.9 R 75.0 R 78.7 R 82.4 R 86.3 R 87.2 R 92.0 R 96.5 R 96.4

420

Modelling domestic energy consumption at district scale: A tool to support national and local energy policies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the development, evaluation and application of the Domestic Energy and Carbon Model (DECM) for predicting the energy consumptions and carbon dioxide emissions of the existing English housing stock. A novel feature of DECM is the adoption ... Keywords: Domestic energy model, Dwelling carbon emission, Housing stock model, Local energy policy

Vicky Cheng; Koen Steemers

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "domestically produced natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Trinity College Green Week 2012 Energy Competition Win a Domestic Energy Meter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trinity College Green Week 2012 Energy Competition ­ Win a Domestic Energy Meter As part of College and in many typical workplaces. The competition prizes will be 2 whole house energy meters. These meters allow would you like to win a domestic whole house energy meter as part of Trinity College Green Week 2012

O'Mahony, Donal E.

422

Making by making strange: Defamiliarization and the design of domestic technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article argues that because the home is so familiar, it is necessary to make it strange, or defamiliarize it, in order to open its design space. Critical approaches to technology design are of both practical and social importance in the home. Home ... Keywords: Human-computer interaction, anthropology, defamiliarization, domestic labor, domestic technology, ethnicity, ethnography, gender, home entertainment

Genevieve Bell; Mark Blythe; Phoebe Sengers

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Natural System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural System Natural System Evaluation and Tool Development - FY11 Progress Report Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Program Yifeng Wang (SNL) Michael Simpson (INL) Scott Painter (LANL) Hui-Hai Liu (LBNL) Annie B. Kersting (LLNL) July 15, 2011 FCRD-USED-2011-000223 UFD Natural System Evaluation - FY11 Year-End Report July 15, 2011 2 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

424

Major Energy Producers  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

206(92) 206(92) Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1992 January 1994 Elk. I nergy Information dministration This publication and other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. All telephone orders should be directed to: U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents McPherson Square Bookstore U.S. Government Printing Office 1510 H Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20402 Washington, DC 20005 (202)783-3238 (202)653-2050 FAX (202)512-2233 FAX (202)376-5055 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., eastern time, M-F 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., eastern time, M-F All mail orders should be directed to: U.S. Government Printing Office P.O. Box 371954 Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954 Complimentary subscriptions and single issues are available to certain groups of subscribers, such as

425

H. R. 4564: a bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 to provide a deduction and special net operating loss rules with respect to certain losses on domestic crude oil, to increase tariffs on petroleum and petroleum products, to require the Strategic Petroleum Reserve to be filled with stripper well oil, and to eliminate certain restrictions on the sale of natural gas and on the use of natural gas and oil. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, April 10, 1986  

SciTech Connect

The Secure Energy Supply Act of 1986 amends the Internal Revenue Code of 1954. Title I provides a deduction and special net operating loss treatment for certain losses on crude oil. Title II increases tariffs on petroleum and petroleum products, the revenues of which will cover authorized refunds. Title III provides that only stripper well oil or oil exchanged for stripper well oil will be used to fill the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Title IV removes wellhead price controls and repeals Natural Gas Act jurisdiction over certain first sales of natural gas. Later titles repeal certain restrictions on the use of natural gas and petroleum, repeal incremental pricing requirements, and promote flexibility in rescheduling or marking down troubled loans. The bill was referred to the House Committees on Ways and Means, Energy and Commerce, and Banking, Finance, and Urban Affairs.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Natural Gas Transmission  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. In addition, natural gas flow patterns are a function of the pattern in the previous year, coupled with the relative prices of gas supply options as translated to the represented market

427

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Natural Gas Transmission  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. In addition, natural gas flow patterns are a function of the pattern in the previous year, coupled with the relative prices of gas supply options as translated to the represented market

428

EA-1929: NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic 9: NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production of the Medical Isotope Molybdenum-99 EA-1929: NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production of the Medical Isotope Molybdenum-99 SUMMARY This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to use federal funds to support and accelerate Northstar Medical Radioisotopes' project to develop domestic, commercial production capability for the medical isotope Molybdenum-99 without the use of highly enriched uranium. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 24, 2012 EA-1929: Finding of No Significant Impact NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production of the Medical Isotope Molybdenum-99

429

EA-1929: NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

29: NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic 29: NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production of the Medical Isotope Molybdenum-99 EA-1929: NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production of the Medical Isotope Molybdenum-99 SUMMARY This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to use federal funds to support and accelerate Northstar Medical Radioisotopes' project to develop domestic, commercial production capability for the medical isotope Molybdenum-99 without the use of highly enriched uranium. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 24, 2012 EA-1929: Finding of No Significant Impact NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production of the Medical Isotope Molybdenum-99

430

A comparison of central and individual systems for space conditioning and domestic hot water in new multifamily buildings  

SciTech Connect

This report compares the energy performance and life-cycle cost of central and individual heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems as well as domestic hot water (DHW) systems in new multifamily buildings. The different systems were analyzed by using DOE-2.1C to model prototypical apartment buildings in Chicago and Atlanta with Weather Year for Energy Calculation weather data. The building is equipped with either a central chiller and gas-fired boiler, which supply four-pipe fan coils in each apartment, or is conditioned by individual packaged terminal air conditioners in each apartment. The building with central HVAC also has a central, gas-fired domestic hot water system; the building with individual units has electric water heaters in each apartment. The individual systems were modeled with and without a setback thermostat. The use of natural gas for space and water heating and the more efficient central chiller resulted in an annual energy cost savings for the central system in both cities. A life-cycle cost comparison of system types shows that apartment buildings with as few as five units in Chicago and as few as 30 units in Atlanta should be designed with central HVAC and DHW systems.

Byrne, S.J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., Berkeley, CA (US)); Fay, J.M. (Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1994 through 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1994, 1995, 1996, and 1997. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (compliance costs and lease availability) have a significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas equipment and production operations.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

OPEC and lower oil prices: Impacts on production capacity, export refining, domestic demand and trade balances  

SciTech Connect

The East-West Center received a research grant from the US Department of Energy's Office of Policy, Planning, and Analysis to study the impact of lower oil prices on OPEC production capacity, on export refineries, and the petroleum trade. The project was later expanded to include balance-of-payments scenarios and impacts on OPEC domestic demand. The Department of Energy requested that the study focus on the Persian Gulf countries, as these countries have the largest share of OPEC reserves and production. Since then, staff members from the East-West Center have visited Iran, the United Arab Emirates, and Saudi Arabia and obtained detailed information from other countries. In addition, the East-West Center received from a number of large international oil companies and national governments valuable information on OPEC production capabilities. In order to safeguard the confidential nature of this information, these data have been aggregated in this report. The East-West Center considers the results presented to be the most up-to-date information and analysis available today. This report also provides a major reassessment of the export refining and economic competitiveness of Middle East refineries. As pioneers of the research on OPEC export refineries, the East-West Center has fully reevaluated the performance and outlook of these refineries as of the present. 21 figs., 20 tabs.

Fesharaki, F.; Fridley, D.; Isaak, D.; Totto, L.; Wilson, T.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Genetically Engineered Ethanol Producing Microorganisms ...  

Search PNNL. PNNL Home; About; Research; Publications; Jobs; News; Contacts; Genetically Engineered Ethanol Producing Microorganisms. Battelle ...

434

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

134,294 32,451 0.37 0 0.00 32 1.09 43,764 0.83 10,456 0.38 39,786 1.26 126,488 0.63 C o n n e c t i c u t Connecticut 54. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Connecticut, 1992-1996...

435

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3.91 119,251 0.60 229 7.81 374,824 7.15 2,867 0.10 189,966 6.01 915,035 4.57 O h i o Ohio 83. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Ohio, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996...

436

Natural games  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Behavior in the context of game theory is described as a natural process that follows the 2nd law of thermodynamics. The rate of entropy increase as the payoff function is derived from statistical physics of open systems. The thermodynamic formalism relates everything in terms of energy and describes various ways to consume free energy. This allows us to associate game theoretical models of behavior to physical reality. Ultimately behavior is viewed as a physical process where flows of energy naturally select ways to consume free energy as soon as possible. This natural process is, according to the profound thermodynamic principle, equivalent to entropy increase in the least time. However, the physical portrayal of behavior does not imply determinism. On the contrary, evolutionary equation for open systems reveals that when there are three or more degrees of freedom for behavior, the course of a game is inherently unpredictable in detail because each move affects motives of moves in the future. Eventually, when no moves are found to consume more free energy, the extensive-form game has arrived at a solution concept that satisfies the minimax theorem. The equilibrium is Lyapunov-stable against variation in behavior within strategies but will be perturbed by a new strategy that will draw even more surrounding resources to the game. Entropy as the payoff function also clarifies motives of collaboration and subjective nature of decision making.

Jani Anttila; Arto Annila

2011-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

437

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0.00 53 1.81 147,893 2.82 7,303 0.27 93,816 2.97 398,581 1.99 W i s c o n s i n Wisconsin 97. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wisconsin, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994...

438

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

10,799 1,953 0.02 0 0.00 0 0.00 2,523 0.05 24 0.00 2,825 0.09 7,325 0.04 V e r m o n t Vermont 93. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Vermont, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995...

439

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

845,998 243,499 2.75 135,000 0.68 35 1.19 278,606 5.32 7,239 0.26 154,642 4.90 684,022 3.42 P e n n s y l v a n i a Pennsylvania 86. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas...

440

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Major Natural Gas Transportation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Transportation Corridors Natural Gas Transportation Corridors About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Major Natural Gas Transportation Corridors Corridors from the Southwest | From Canada | From Rocky Mountain Area | Details about Transportation Corridors The national natural gas delivery network is intricate and expansive, but most of the major transportation routes can be broadly categorized into 11 distinct corridors or flow patterns. 5 major routes extend from the producing areas of the Southwest 4 routes enter the United States from Canada 2 originate in the Rocky Mountain area. A summary of the major corridors and links to details about each corridor are provided below. Corridors from the Southwest Region

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "domestically produced natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

US crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1996 annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EIA annual reserves report series is the only source of comprehensive domestic proved reserves estimates. This publication is used by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and other interested parties to obtain accurate estimates of the Nation`s proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids. These data are essential to the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy policy and legislation. This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1996, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1996. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1996 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

U.S. crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1995 annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EIA annual reserves report series is the only source of comprehensive domestic proved reserves estimates. This publication is used by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and other interested parties to obtain accurate estimates of the Nation`s proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids. These data are essential to the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy policy and legislation. This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1995, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1995. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1995 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

ii Produced Water Pretreatment for Water Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal drilling and slickwater hydrofracturing have enabled shale gas to become a significant contributor to the United States energy supply. Hydrofracturing typically requires 2MM 6.5MM gallons of water per shale gas well. About 15-25 % of this water returns to the surface as flowback within 30 days after hydrofracturing. Produced water continues to flow at a much reduced rate, e.g. 2-10 bbl/day, for the life of the well. In addition to high salinity and hardness levels (Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba), much Marcellus produced water also contains significant levels of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), particularly radium. The near absence of disposal wells in Pennsylvania initially forced much of the produced water to be trucked into Ohio for disposal by deep-well injection (UIC). Currently up to 95 % of the

Principal Investigator; James M. Silva; James M. Silva; Hope Matis; William L. Kostedt Iv; Vicki Watkins

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

High performance in low-flow solar domestic hot water systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Low-flow solar hot water heating systems employ flow rates on the order of 1/5 to 1/10 of the conventional flow. Low-flow systems are of interest because the reduced flow rate allows smaller diameter tubing, which is less costly to install. Further, low-flow systems result in increased tank stratification. Lower collector inlet temperatures are achieved through stratification and the useful energy produced by the collector is increased. The disadvantage of low-flow systems is the collector heat removal factor decreases with decreasing flow rate. Many solar domestic hot water systems require an auxiliary electric source to operate a pump in order to circulate fluid through the solar collector. A photovoltaic driven pump can be used to replace the standard electrical pump. PV driven pumps provide an ideal means of controlling the flow rate, as pumps will only circulate fluid when there is sufficient radiation. Peak performance was always found to occur when the heat exchanger tank-side flow rate was approximately equal to the average load flow rate. For low collector-side flow rates, a small deviation from the optimum flow rate will dramatically effect system performance.

Dayan, M.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

445

Low-Cost Solar Domestic Hot Water Systems for Mild Climates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In FY99, Solar Heating and Lighting set the goal to reduce the life-cycle cost of saved-energy for solar domestic hot water (SDHW) systems in mild climates by 50%, primarily through use of polymer technology. Two industry teams (Davis Energy Group/SunEarth (DEG/SE) and FAFCO) have been developing un-pressurized integral-collector-storage (ICS) systems having load-side heat exchangers, and began field-testing in FY04. DEG/SE?s ICS has a rotomolded tank and thermoformed glazing. Based upon manufacturing issues, costs, and poor performance, the FAFCO team changed direction in late FY04 from an un-pressurized ICS to a direct thermosiphon design based upon use of pool collectors. Support for the teams is being provided for materials testing, modeling, and system testing. New ICS system models have been produced to model the new systems. A new ICS rating procedure for the ICS systems is undergoing testing and validation. Pipe freezing, freeze protection valves, and overheating have been tested and analyzed.

Burch, J.; Christensen, C.; Merrigan, T.; Hewett, R.; Jorgensen, G.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Comparative analysis of the production costs and life-cycle GHG emissions of FT liquid fuels from coal and natural gas  

SciTech Connect

Liquid transportation fuels derived from coal and natural gas could help the United States reduce its dependence on petroleum. The fuels could be produced domestically or imported from fossil fuel-rich countries. The goal of this paper is to determine the life-cycle GHG emissions of coal- and natural gas-based Fischer-Tropsch (FT) liquids, as well as to compare production costs. The results show that the use of coal- or natural gas-based FT liquids will likely lead to significant increases in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared to petroleum-based fuels. In a best-case scenario, coal- or natural gas-based FT-liquids have emissions only comparable to petroleum-based fuels. In addition, the economic advantages of gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuels are not obvious: there is a narrow range of petroleum and natural gas prices at which GTL fuels would be competitive with petroleum-based fuels. CTL fuels are generally cheaper than petroleum-based fuels. However, recent reports suggest there is uncertainty about the availability of economically viable coal resources in the United States. If the U.S. has a goal of increasing its energy security, and at the same time significantly reducing its GHG emissions, neither CTL nor GTL consumption seem a reasonable path to follow. 28 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

Cold-Climate Solar Domestic Water Heating Systems: Life-Cycle Analyses and Opportunities for Cost Reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conference paper regarding research in potential cost-savings measures for cold-climate solar domestic water hearing systems.

Burch, J.; Salasovich, J.; Hillman, T.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Table 2. Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Projected Real GDP Growth Trend (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 3.1% 3.2% 2.9% 2.8% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% AEO 1995 3.7% 2.8% 2.5% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% AEO 1996 2.6% 2.2% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 1.6% AEO 1997 2.1% 1.9% 2.0% 2.2% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.1% 2.1% 1.5% AEO 1998 3.4% 2.9% 2.6% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 1.8% AEO 1999 3.4% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 1.8% AEO 2000 3.8% 2.9% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5%

449

Table 3. Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 4.3% 3.8% 3.6% 3.3% 3.2% 3.2% AEO 1983 3.3% 3.3% 3.4% 3.3% 3.2% 3.1% 2.7% AEO 1984 2.7% 2.4% 2.9% 3.1% 3.1% 3.1% 2.7% AEO 1985 2.3% 2.2% 2.7% 2.8% 2.9% 3.0% 3.0% 3.0% 2.9% 2.8% 2.8% AEO 1986 2.6% 2.5% 2.7% 2.5% 2.5% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% AEO 1987 2.7% 2.3% 2.4% 2.5% 2.5% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.4% 2.3% AEO 1989* 4.0% 3.4% 3.1% 3.0% 2.9% 2.8% 2.7% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% AEO 1990 2.9% 2.3% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% AEO 1991 0.8% 1.0% 1.7% 1.8% 1.8% 1.9% 2.0% 2.1% 2.1% 2.1% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% AEO 1992 -0.1% 1.6% 2.0% 2.2% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2%

450

Table 6. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual (million barrels per day) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 8.79 8.85 8.84 8.80 8.66 8.21 AEO 1983 8.67 8.71 8.66 8.72 8.80 8.63 8.11 AEO 1984 8.86 8.70 8.59 8.45 8.28 8.25 7.19 AEO 1985 8.92 8.96 9.01 8.78 8.38 8.05 7.64 7.27 6.89 6.68 6.53 AEO 1986 8.80 8.63 8.30 7.90 7.43 6.95 6.60 6.36 6.20 5.99 5.80 5.66 5.54 5.45 5.43 AEO 1987 8.31 8.18 8.00 7.63 7.34 7.09 6.86 6.64 6.54 6.03 AEO 1989* 8.18 7.97 7.64 7.25 6.87 6.59 6.37 6.17 6.05 6.00 5.94 5.90 5.89 AEO 1990 7.67 7.37 6.40 5.86 5.35 AEO 1991 7.23 6.98 7.10 7.11 7.01 6.79 6.48 6.22 5.92 5.64 5.36 5.11 4.90 4.73 4.62 4.59 4.58 4.53 4.46 4.42 AEO 1992 7.37 7.17 6.99 6.89 6.68 6.45 6.28 6.16 6.06 5.91 5.79 5.71 5.66 5.64 5.62 5.63 5.62 5.55 5.52 AEO 1993 7.20 6.94 6.79 6.52 6.22 6.00 5.84 5.72

451

Natural Resources in China Water resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Large reserves of coal, but natural gas and oil are becoming scarce. Import approximately the same, petroleum, natural gas, uranium, etc. Metallic mineral resources include iron, copper, tungsten, aluminum in the production of petrochemicals Materials produced from natural gas or crude oil, such as plastics

Pan, Feifei

452

The Effect of Higher Hydrocarbons on the Ignition Delay of Natural Gas Fuels at Gas Turbine Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This investigation focuses on studying autoignition of fuels primarily used for stationary gas turbine operation today and others that are garnering interest for future use. Most stationary gas turbine engines operate today on natural gas. Natural gas can either come from domestic or foreign sources. Natural gas from foreign sources is typically imported as a chilled liquid, so it is commonly referred to as liquefied natural gas (LNG). Variations in fuel characteristics at the source, coupled with fuel q...

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

453

REQUEST BY CUMMINS ENGINE COMPANY, INC., FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CUMMINS ENGINE COMPANY, INC., FOR AN ADVANCE CUMMINS ENGINE COMPANY, INC., FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE IN THE COURSE OF OR UNDER DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GRANT NO. DE-FG05-970R22584; DOE WAIVER DOCKET W(A)-97-036 [ORO-671] Petitioner, Cummins Engine Company, Inc., has made a timely request for an advance waiver to worldwide rights in Subject Inventions made in the course of or under Department of Energy (DOE) Grant No. DE-FG05-970R22584 made to the Gas Research Institute (GRI). Petitioner is a subcontractor to GRI under the grant. The work under this grant calls for the development of technologies to improve spark ignition natural gas engine efficiencies for automotive markets. Two other companies, Mack Truck and Deere & Company, are also subcontractors under this project. Deere

454

Natural Gas Monthly, June 1985. [Contains glossary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current data on natural and supplemental gas consumption, disposition, production, prices, storage, imports, and exports in the United States are provided for each year from 1978 through 1985, with monthly data for the most recent 3 years. Some data are also given by state or city; some data are also given for previous years. Operating and financial data for major interstate natural gas pipeline companies, as well as data on filings, ceiling prices, and transportation under the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978, are also included. Explanatory notes, a discussion of data sources, and a glossary are included. Three reports previously published as separate annuals are now published in this report. The three are: ''Underground Natural Gas Storage in the United States'' (DOE/EIA-0239); ''US Imports and Exports of Nautral Gas'' (DOE/EIA-0188); and ''Main Line Sales of Natural Gas to Industrial Users'' (DOE/EIA-0129). Titles of feature articles for this issue are: (1) Residential and natural gas sales per customer in northeastern United States; and (2) Domestic natural gas reserves and production dedicated to interstate pipeline companies, 1984. 6 refs., 32 tabs.

Not Available

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Produced Water R&D | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shale Gas » Produced Water Shale Gas » Produced Water R&D Produced Water R&D Developed as a result of lessons learned from the NETL funded demonstration project, the Altela 600 water treatment system (shown above) treats about 25,000 gallons per day of produced and flowback water from hydraulic fracturing. [Photo courtesy of Altela Inc.] Developed as a result of lessons learned from the NETL funded demonstration project, the Altela 600 water treatment system (shown above) treats about 25,000 gallons per day of produced and flowback water from hydraulic fracturing. [Photo courtesy of Altela Inc.] Drilling and fracturing wells produce water along with the natural gas. Some of this water is returned fracture fluid and some is natural formation water. The actual water production of a particular well depends on the well

456

Survey of domestic research on superconducting magnetic energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a survey of domestic research on superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) undertaken with the support of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Superconductivity Pilot Center. Each survey entry includes the following: Name, address, and other telephone and facsimile numbers of the principal investigator and other staff members; funding for fiscal year 1991, 1992, 1993; brief descriptions of the program, the technical progress to date, and the expected technical progress; a note on any other collaboration. Included with the survey are recommendations intended to help DOE decide how best to support SMES research and development (R&D). To summarize, I would say that important elements of a well-rounded SMES research program for DOE are as follows. (1) Construction of a large ETM. (2) Development of SMES as an enabling technology for solar and wind generation, especially in conjunction with the ETM program, if possible. (3) Development of small SMES units for electric networks, for rapid transit, and as noninterruptible power supplies [uses (2), (3), and (4) above]. In this connection, lightweight, fiber-reinforced polymer structures, which would be especially advantageous for space and transportation applications, should be developed. (4) Continued study of the potential impacts of high-temperature superconductors on SMES, with construction as soon as feasible of small SMES units using high-temperature superconductors (HTSs).

Dresner, L.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Survey of domestic research on superconducting magnetic energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a survey of domestic research on superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) undertaken with the support of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Superconductivity Pilot Center. Each survey entry includes the following: Name, address, and other telephone and facsimile numbers of the principal investigator and other staff members; funding for fiscal year 1991, 1992, 1993; brief descriptions of the program, the technical progress to date, and the expected technical progress; a note on any other collaboration. Included with the survey are recommendations intended to help DOE decide how best to support SMES research and development (R D). To summarize, I would say that important elements of a well-rounded SMES research program for DOE are as follows. (1) Construction of a large ETM. (2) Development of SMES as an enabling technology for solar and wind generation, especially in conjunction with the ETM program, if possible. (3) Development of small SMES units for electric networks, for rapid transit, and as noninterruptible power supplies (uses (2), (3), and (4) above). In this connection, lightweight, fiber-reinforced polymer structures, which would be especially advantageous for space and transportation applications, should be developed. (4) Continued study of the potential impacts of high-temperature superconductors on SMES, with construction as soon as feasible of small SMES units using high-temperature superconductors (HTSs).

Dresner, L.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Energy Department Approves Gulf Coast Exports of Liquefied Natural Gas |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Approves Gulf Coast Exports of Liquefied Natural Approves Gulf Coast Exports of Liquefied Natural Gas Energy Department Approves Gulf Coast Exports of Liquefied Natural Gas May 20, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy today issued a conditional authorization approving an application to export liquefied natural gas (LNG) from the Sabine Pass LNG Terminal in Louisiana, paving the way for thousands of new construction and domestic natural gas production jobs in Louisiana, Texas, and several other states. Subject to final environmental and regulatory approval, Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC will retrofit an existing LNG import terminal in Louisiana so that it can also be used for exports. This is the first long-term authorization to export natural gas from the lower 48 states as LNG to all U.S. trading partners.

459

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

about the natural gas demand and supply situation in thereplace the marginal supply of natural gas, which in the USproduction and supply of domestically produced natural gas

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Natural Gas Production and U.S. Oil Imports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Production and U.S. Oil Imports Natural Gas Production and U.S. Oil Imports Natural Gas Production and U.S. Oil Imports January 26, 2012 - 11:14am Addthis Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless Data Integration Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? Over the next 33 years, the Energy Information Administration expect domestic natural gas production to increase to 28 trillion cubic feet per year, contributing to a decline in U.S. reliance on imported crude oil. During the State of the Union speech Tuesday night, President Obama spoke of the importance of reducing our reliance on imported oil by increasing domestic energy production. As the U.S. has only 2 percent of the world's oil reserves, natural gas and renewable energy production will play an important role in reducing our net oil imports.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "domestically produced natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Natural Gas Production and U.S. Oil Imports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Production and U.S. Oil Imports Natural Gas Production and U.S. Oil Imports Natural Gas Production and U.S. Oil Imports January 26, 2012 - 11:14am Addthis Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless Data Integration Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? Over the next 33 years, the Energy Information Administration expect domestic natural gas production to increase to 28 trillion cubic feet per year, contributing to a decline in U.S. reliance on imported crude oil. During the State of the Union speech Tuesday night, President Obama spoke of the importance of reducing our reliance on imported oil by increasing domestic energy production. As the U.S. has only 2 percent of the world's oil reserves, natural gas and renewable energy production will play an important role in reducing our net oil imports.

462

REQUEST BY NORTON COMPANY FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NORTON COMPANY FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF NORTON COMPANY FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE IN THE COURSE OF OR UNDER MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS SUBCONTRACT NO. 86X-SB182C UNDER CONTRACT NO. DE-AC04-840R21400; DOE WAIVER DOCKET W(A)-93-022 [0RO-553] Norton Company (Norton) has made a timely request for an advance waiver to worldwide rights in Subject Inventions made in the course of or under Phase II of Energy Systems Subcontract No. 86X-SB182C. The scope of the work calls for the development and verification of significant improvements in processing methods, process controls, and nondestructive evaluation developed under Phase I of the subcontract which can be commercially implemented to produce high reliability silicon nitride components for advanced heat engine applications.

463

Produced water associated with the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary: Produced water associated with the oil and gas (O&G) industry annually introduces hundreds of billions of gallons of brackish wastewa- ter in the U.S. alone. Most produced water is highly saline companies pay to have this contaminated produced water trucked to reinjection sites for disposal--an expen

464

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2008 6, 2008 Next Release: July 3, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Natural gas spot price movements were mixed this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, June 18-25), with price decreases generally occurring in producing areas in the Gulf of Mexico region and price increases at trading locations in the Rockies, the Midcontinent, and the Northeast. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.17 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $12.76. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), a trend of rising prices for futures contracts was at least temporarily interrupted. After trading at $13.20 per MMBtu on Monday, the futures contract for July delivery decreased by 45 cents in value over the next 2 days and ended the

465

Natural networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scale-free and non-computable characteristics of natural networks are found to result from the least-time dispersal of energy. To consider a network as a thermodynamic system is motivated since ultimately everything that exists can be expressed in terms of energy. According to the variational principle, the network will grow and restructure when flows of energy diminish energy differences between nodes as well as relative to nodes in surrounding systems. The natural process will yield scale-free characteristics because the nodes that contribute to the least-time consumption of free energy preferably attach to each other. Network evolution is a path-dependent and non-deterministic process when there are two or more paths to consume a common source of energy. Although evolutionary courses of these non-Hamiltonian systems cannot be predicted, many mathematical functions, models and measures that characterize networks can be recognized as appropriate approximations of the thermodynamic equation of motion that has been derived from statistical physics of open systems.

Tuomo Hartonen; Arto Annila

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

466

Signposts of Change in Evolving Natural Gas Markets: Key Factors Affecting Expected Future Supply and Demand for Natural Gas in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, the North American natural gas industry has undergone a major restructuring as a result of the so-called shale revolution.This is an amazing situation when one considers the magnitude of the changes the shale revolution has spurred not only in domestic natural gas markets, but across many sectors of the overall economy.In essence, the shale revolution is a black swan event that many industry observers consider to have been a once in more than ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

467

Testa Produce | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Testa Produce Testa Produce Jump to: navigation, search Name Testa Produce Facility Testa Produce Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Testa Produce Developer Testa Produce Energy Purchaser Testa Produce Location Chicago IL Coordinates 41.81065982°, -87.65433311° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.81065982,"lon":-87.65433311,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

468

The Lessons of Practice: Domestic Policy Reform as a Way to Address Climate  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Lessons of Practice: Domestic Policy Reform as a Way to Address Climate The Lessons of Practice: Domestic Policy Reform as a Way to Address Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Lessons of Practice: Domestic Policy Reform as a Way to Address Climate Change Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.iisd.org/pdf/2009/bali_2_copenhagen_dom_policy_lessons.pdf The Lessons of Practice: Domestic Policy Reform as a Way to Address Climate Change Screenshot References: The Lessons of Practice[1] Summary "The objectives of this paper are threefold: to review experience to date with policy reforms that can help mitigate climate change, to review work

469

Domestic U.S. Reactor Conversions: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Domestic U.S. Reactor Conversions: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Domestic U.S. Reactor Conversions: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Domestic U.S. Reactor Conversions: Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Domestic U.S. Reactor Conversions: Fact Sheet Mar 23, 2012 The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) helps convert research

470

ADVANCE WAIVER OF THE U.S. GOVERNMENT'S DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ADVANCE WAIVER OF THE U.S. GOVERNMENT'S DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN ADVANCE WAIVER OF THE U.S. GOVERNMENT'S DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS ARISING UNDER THE DEPARTMENT'S ACCELERATED SITE TECHNOLOGY DEPLOYMENT TO THE AWARDEES AND ANY LARGE BUSINESS LOWER TIER SUBCONTRACTORS THEREUNDER W(C)-98-003 CH- 0952 This is a waiver of the U.S. Government's domestic and foreign patent rights in subject inventions made under awards issued in the Department of Energy's Accelerated Site Technology Deployment. The class waiver applies to the prime awardees and also to any lower tier subcontractors provided the other criteria for the class waiver are met. This class waiver does not apply to domestic small business and nonprofit organizations which are entitled to elect to retain title to their subject inventions pursuant to Public Law 96-517, as amended. This class waiver is

471

Lessons for the future: experiences with the installation and use of today's domestic sensors and technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Domestic environments are receiving increasing attention as sites of deployment for pervasive technologies, as evidenced by the growing number of studies of homes and maturing technologies in prototype aware/smart homes. The challenge now is to move ...

Mark Stringer; Geraldine Fitzpatrick; Eric Harris

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

REQUEST BY FORD MOTOR COMPANY, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement of Considerations REQUEST BY FORD MOTOR COMPANY, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE IN THE COURSE OF OR UNDER DEPARTMENT OF...

473

REQUEST BY FORD MOTOR COMPANY FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FORD MOTOR COMPANY FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE IN THE COURSE OF OR UNDER A SUBCONTRACT UNDER DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTRACT NO....

474

Department of Energy to Invest $50 Million to Advance Domestic Solar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

50 Million to Advance Domestic 50 Million to Advance Domestic Solar Manufacturing Market, Achieve SunShot Goal Department of Energy to Invest $50 Million to Advance Domestic Solar Manufacturing Market, Achieve SunShot Goal August 2, 2011 - 3:53pm Addthis August 2, 2011 Department of Energy to Invest $50 Million to Advance Domestic Solar Manufacturing Market, Achieve SunShot GoalSUNPATH Program Will Boost American Competitiveness, Lower Cost of Solar Energy Washington D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced a $50 million investment over two years for the SUNPATH program, aimed to help the nation reclaim its competitive edge in solar manufacturing. SUNPATH, which stands for Scaling Up Nascent PV At Home, represents the second solar Photovoltaic Manufacturing Initiative (PVMI) supporting the Department of

475

U.S. Domestic and Foreign Coal Distribution by State of Origin  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Domestic and Foreign Coal Distribution by State of Origin Domestic and Foreign Coal Distribution by State of Origin ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 Domestic and foreign distribution of U.S. coal by State of origin, 2010 (thousand short tons) Coal Exports Coal Origin State and Region Domestic Distribution By Coal Mines By Brokers & Traders* Total Exports Total Distribution Alabama 10,679.56 9,223.70 408.00 9,631.70 20,311.26 Alaska 920.68 1,080.60 88.05 1,168.65 2,089.33 Arizona 7,761.18 - - - 7,761.18 Arkansas 0.43 - - - 0.43 Colorado 21,831.81 748.98 1,446.25 2,195.23 24,027.04 Illinois 33,176.21 2,505.51

476

Transitions in domestic architecture and home culture in twentieth century Iran  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation explores the transformation of the Iranian home in twentieth century Iran. While surveying the socio political underpinnings and aesthetic ends of domesticity in Iranian culture from the early twentieth ...

Karimi, Z. Pamela (Zahra Pamela)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

REQUEST BY VARIAN MEDICAL SYSTEMS FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VARIAN MEDICAL SYSTEMS FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN AN IDENTIFIED INVENTION (S- 105,965) MADE IN THE COURSE OF OR UNDER BWXT Y-12, LLC SUBCONTRACT NO....

478

Figure 98. API gravity of U.S. domestic and imported crude ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Title: Figure 98. API gravity of U.S. domestic and imported crude oil supplies, 1990-2040 (degrees) Subject: Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Author: U.S. E ...

479

The Impact on Oregon's Budget of Introducing Same-Sex Domestic Parternships  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact on the State of Vermont of Allowing Same-Sex CouplesCouncil. 2002. Report of the Vermont Domestic partnership6 New Jersey, 7 and Vermont. 8 The full methodology for our

Badgett, M.V. Lee; Sears, Brad; Kukura, Elizabeth; Lau, Holning

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

International and Domestic Market Opportunities for Biomass Power: Volumes I and II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report examines the domestic and international markets for biopower. Domestic and foreign markets present fundamentally different challenges to private power developers. Volume I focuses on the domestic market for biopower. The domestic challenge lies in finding economically viable opportunities for biopower. Vol. I outlines the current state of the U.S. biomass industry, discusses policies affecting biomass development, describes some demonstration projects currently underway, and discusses the future direction of the industry. Volume II focuses on the international market for biopower. Recent literature states that the electricity investment and policy climate in foreign markets are the key elements in successful private project development. Vol. II discusses the financing issues, policy climate, and business incentives and barriers to biopower development. As India and China are the largest future markets for biopower, they are the focus of this volume. Three other top markets- -Brazil, Indonesia, and the Philippines--are also discussed. Potential financial resources wrap up the discussion.

Not Available

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "domestically produced natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Spatial empowerment : the appropriation of public spaces by Filipina domestic workers in Hong Kong  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On a typical Sunday afternoon, hundreds of Filipina domestic workers (FDW) gather on the floor of public spaces in prime real estate areas of downtown Hong Kong. Over the last few decades, Hong Kong experienced rapid ...

Tillu, Jasmine Susanna

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Golden Technologies Company, Inc. Request for An Advance Waiver of Domestic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Golden Technologies Company, Inc. Request for An Advance Waiver of Golden Technologies Company, Inc. Request for An Advance Waiver of Domestic and Foreign Rights. January 10, 1995 Golden Technologies Company, Inc. Request for An Advance Waiver of Domestic and Foreign Rights. January 10, 1995 Golden Technologies Company contracted with Eaton to develop advanced manufacturing technology for the cost-effective production of ceramic heat engine components. Because GTC was cost sharing 50%, had experience in product commercialization, and because the technology of ceramic engine parts could have a significant positive effect on the economy, the waiver of domestic and foreign rights was granted. Golden Technologies Company, Inc. Request for An Advance Waiver of Domestic and Foreign Rights. January 10, 1995 More Documents & Publications

483

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS ADVANCE WAIVER OF THE U.S. GOVERNMENT'S DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THE U.S. GOVERNMENT'S DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN THE U.S. GOVERNMENT'S DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS ARISING UNDER INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION PROJECTS AT TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT- DESIGNATED TEST BED FACILITIES TO THE DEMONSTRATOR W(A)-95-011 AND TO THE LARGE BUSINESS LOWER TIER SUBCONTRACTORS THEREUNDER. This waiver of the U.S. Government's domestic and foreign patent rights in Innovative Technology Demonstration Projects' subject inventions is intended to cover Innovative Environmental Technology Demonstrators and lower tier subcontractors, other than domestic small business and nonprofit organization Demonstrators and lower tier subcontractors covered by Public Law 96-517, demonstrating innovative environmental technology, under contract or other agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE),

484

The Impact on the New Mexico Budget of Offering Domestic Partnerships to Same-Sex Couples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

same-sex couples in New Mexico who choose to celebrate theirThe Impact on the New Mexico Budget of Offering DomesticCommittee of the New Mexico Senate Presented by Professor

Sears, Brad

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Sacramento area, solar domestic water heater installers survey report  

SciTech Connect

Information regarding generic type, make, and costs of solar domestic water heater (SDWH) systems in the Sacramento, Roseville, and Davis area is reported. Sixteen SDWH installers/do-it-yourself kit dealers were identified and surveyed by phone. The survey participants were divided into three categories: (1) installers in business for one year or longer, (eight firms); (2) installers in business less than one year, (five firms); and (3) SDWH do-it-yourself kit dealers, (three firms). The survey report establishes an average cost for SDWH pump systems for new single family unit production housing (1350 square feet), with hot water demand typical of an average family of four, and roof mounted collectors. For the first two categories, the SDWH system average cost is $2469 (this includes both open loop and heat exchanger systems with circulating pumps). The average cost of the open loop pump system is $2321; whereas, the heat exchanger pump system average cost is $2592. The participants were questioned concerning discounts they would offer to builders purchasing SDWH's in volume. From their responses, an 11% discount for a purchase of ten systems was derived for the first two installers categories. The average cost of an installed SDWH pump system purchased in a volume of ten units is $2201. The average cost of an installed SDWH open loop system is $2066, and a heat exchanger system is $2307. For the third category, the do-it-yourself kit dealers, a 12% discount was derived for a purchase of ten systems. The average cost of a do-it-yourself pump kit when purchased in a volume of ten units is $1481. The average cost of an open loop pump kit is $1386, and a heat exchanger pump kit is $1672.

Hutchcraft, T.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Applications of shape analysis to domestic and international security.  

SciTech Connect

The rapidly growing area of cooperative international security calls for pervasive deployment of smart sensors that render valuable information and reduce operational costs and errors. Among the sensors used, vision sensors are by far the most versatile, tangible, and rich in the information they provide about their environment. On the flip side, they are also the most complex to analyze automatically for the extraction of high-level information. The ability to process imagery in a useful manner requires at least partial functional emulation of human capabilities of visual understanding. Of all visual cues available in image data, shape is perhaps the most important for understanding the content of an image. In this paper we present an overview of ongoing research at LANL on geometric shape analysis. The objective of our research is to develop a computational framework for multiscale characterization, analysis, and recognition of shapes. This framework will enable the development of a comprehensive and connected body of mathematical methods and algorithms, based on the topological, metrical, and morphological properties of shapes. We discuss its potential applications to automated surveillance, monitoring, container tracking and inspection, weapons dismantlement, and treaty verification. The framework will develop a geometric filtering scheme for extracting semantically salient shape features. This effort creates a paradigm for solving shape-related problems in Pattern Recognition, Computer Vision, and Image Understanding in a conceptually cohesive and algorithmically amenable manner. The research aims to develop an advanced image analysis capability at LANL for solving a wide range of problems in automated facility surveillance, nuclear materials monitoring, treaty verification, and container inspection and tracking. The research provides the scientific underpinnings that will enable us to build smart surveillance cameras, with a direct practical impact on LANL's capabilities in domestic and international safeguards and security.

Prasad, Lakshman; Skourikhine, A. N. (Alexei N.); Doak, J. E. (Justin E.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Promising freeze protection alternatives in solar domestic hot water systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since the gains associated with solar thermal energy technologies are comparatively small in relation to the required capital investment, it is vital to maximize conversion efficiency. While providing the necessary function of freeze protection, the heat exchanger commonly included in solar domestic water heating systems represents a system inefficiency. This thesis explores two alternate methods of providing freeze protection without resorting to a heat exchanger. Commonly, collectors are made of rigid copper tubes separated by copper or aluminum fins. Cracking damage can occur when water is allowed to freeze and expand inside the non compliant tubes. The possibility of making collectors out of an elastic material was investigated and shown to be effective. Since unlike copper, elastomers typically have low thermal conductivities, the standard collector performance prediction equations do not apply. Modified thermal performance prediction equations were developed which can be used for both low and high thermal conductivity materials to provide accurate predictions within a limited range of plate geometries. An elastomeric collector plate was then designed and shown to have comparable performance to a copper plate collector whose aperture area is approximately 33% smaller. Another options for providing freeze protection to an SDHW system is to turn it off during the winter. Choosing a three-season operating period means two things. First, the system will have different optimums such as slope and collector area. Second, the wintertime solar energy incident on the collector is unavailable for meeting a heating loa