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1

Sensitivity of storage field performance to geologic and cavern design parameters in salt domes.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sensitivity study was performed utilizing a three dimensional finite element model to assess allowable cavern field sizes for strategic petroleum reserve salt domes. A potential exists for tensile fracturing and dilatancy damage to salt that can compromise the integrity of a cavern field in situations where high extraction ratios exist. The effects of salt creep rate, depth of salt dome top, dome size, caprock thickness, elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, lateral stress ratio of surrounding rock, cavern size, depth of cavern, and number of caverns are examined numerically. As a result, a correlation table between the parameters and the impact on the performance of storage field was established. In general, slower salt creep rates, deeper depth of salt dome top, larger elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, and a smaller radius of cavern are better for structural performance of the salt dome.

Ehgartner, Brian L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Park, Byoung Yoon

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Sensitivity of storage field performance to geologic and cavern design parameters in salt domes.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sensitivity study was performed utilizing a three dimensional finite element model to assess allowable cavern field sizes in strategic petroleum reserve salt domes. A potential exists for tensile fracturing and dilatancy damage to salt that can compromise the integrity of a cavern field in situations where high extraction ratios exist. The effects of salt creep rate, depth of salt dome top, dome size, caprock thickness, elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, lateral stress ratio of surrounding rock, cavern size, depth of cavern, and number of caverns are examined numerically. As a result, a correlation table between the parameters and the impact on the performance of a storage field was established. In general, slower salt creep rates, deeper depth of salt dome top, larger elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, and a smaller radius of cavern are better for structural performance of the salt dome.

Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon; Herrick, Courtney Grant

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Reservoir simulation of co2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery in Tensleep Formation, Teapot Dome field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Teapot Dome field is located 35 miles north of Casper, Wyoming in Natrona County. This field has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy to implement a field-size CO2 storage project. With a projected storage of 2.6 million tons of carbon...

Gaviria Garcia, Ricardo

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

4

Geology of Bravo Dome carbon dioxide gas field, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bravo Dome carbon dioxide gas field is located in Union and Harding Counties of northeast New Mexico. The Bravo Dome field covers approximately 800,000 acres, but areal boundaries of the field have not been fully defined. Production in 1989 was 113 bcf of gas from 272 wells. Cumulative production at the end of 1989 was 626 bcf. Estimated recoverable reserves are more than 10 tcf. The gas is 98-99% CO{sub 2}. Most CO{sub 2} produced from Bravo Dome is used for enhanced oil recovery in the Permian basin. The Bravo Dome is a faulted, southeast-plunging, basement-cored anticlinal nose. It is bordered on the east and south by large high-angle faults of Pennsylvanian and Wolfcampian (Early Permian) age. The principal reservoir in the Bravo Dome field is the Tubb sandstone (Leonardian-Permian) at depths of 1,900 to 2,950 ft. The Tubb consists of 0-400 ft of fine- to medium-grained, well-sorted, orange feldspathic sandstone. It rests unconformably on Precambrian basement on the highest parts of the Bravo Dome and is not offset by late Paleozoic faults that form the dome. The Cimmaron Anhydrite (Leonardian-Permian) conformably overlies the Tubb and is a vertical seal. The trap at Bravo Dome has structural and stratigraphic aspects. Drape of Tubb sandstone over the dome created structural closure on the northeast, southeast, and southwest flanks of the field. Trapping on the northwest flank of the field is associated with regional northwest thinning of the Tubb.

Broadhead, R.F. (New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Tatum Dome field study and analysis of monitoring data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a summary and interpretation of data collected at the Tatum Dome Site during April and May 1984. In addition to raw data, description of field activities and laboratory analytical results are presented. The report also includes all analytical results of shallow well samples from the site, and chemical, mineralogical and mechanical analyses of soil samples collected during April 1985. Analysis and interpretation of laboratory analyses are included.

Fordham, J.W.; Fenske, P.R.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Let’s Try That Again: Selling the Teapot Dome Oil Field  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The first time the Teapot Dome Oilfield was sold, it threw the Harding administration into scandal. Now -- 93 years later -- we're selling the field legally.

7

,"Underground Natural Gas Storage - Storage Fields Other than...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Underground Natural Gas Storage - Storage Fields Other than Salt Caverns",8,"Monthly","102014","115...

8

Characterization of cement from a well at Teapot Dome Oil Field: Implications for geological sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wellbores represent the weakest link in terms of CO2 storage permanence. As a result, special attention to the numerous existing wells that perforate storage formations is needed. The pre-injection condition of the cement can influence the rate (and type) of alteration by the injected CO2 plume. The condition of the existing well cement depends on a variety of factors including wellbore/formation and wellbore/brine interactions as well as the composition and type of cement placed in the well (i.e. type of admixtures used, water/solids ratio, sulfate resistant mixes, etc.). In this paper, the details of recovering wellbore cement from an older well to determine pre-injection seal integrity are described. Petrographical and chemical analyses are presented for samples of cement that were retrieved from a 19-year-old well at Teapot Dome in Wyoming. Examination revealed that the retrieved cement had altered as a result of original slurry composition and with respect to the local downhole wellbore environment. Although samples were obtained from a single well, significant differences were observed in their alteration and condition. Sulfate attack resulted in abundant ettringite formation in a cement sample taken adjacent to the Wall Creek sandstone (3060 ft), while cement taken adjacent to the Tensleep formation (5478 ft) was decalcified and enriched in magnesium, owing to reaction of calcium hydroxide in the cement with the dolomitic formation.

George W. Scherer; Barbara Kutchko; Niels Thaulow; Andrew Duguid; Bryant Mook

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Teapot Dome: Characterization of a CO2-enhanced oil recovery and storage site in Eastern Wyoming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...storage, and underground coal gasification. Vicki Stamp has more than...unparalleled opportunity for industry and others to use the site...projects are intimately linked to industry-driven enhanced oil recovery...three-dimensional models United States waste disposal Wyoming GeoRef...

S. Julio Friedmann; Vicki W. Stamp

10

Tatum Dome field study report and monitoring data analysis: A supplemental report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a supplement to the Water Resources Center, Desert Research Institute report, DOE/NV/10384-03, ``Tatum Dome Field Study Report and Monitoring Data Analysis,`` Water Resources Center Publication No. 45044. The field study was initiated during the Spring of 1984 because of persistent tritium concentrations in the Surficial Aquifer determined from observed annual water samples from the series of hydrologic monitoring holes (HMH). An anomalous increase in tritium concentrations in monthly water samples from some of the hydrologic monitoring holes was also observed during the Spring of 1984 by the State of Mississippi, Division of Radiological Health. This Spring increase in tritium concentrations may well have been present earlier, but was not recognized because monthly tritium concentration data were not collected prior to 1984. It is hypothesized that groundwater in the Surficial Aquifer is made up of two layers. The older and deeper water within the Surficial Aquifer contains tritium contamination. The shallower water, infiltrating from recent precipitation, is essentially tritium free. These waters do not naturally mix completely and are only significantly mixed in the hydrologic monitoring holes by the sampling procedure. The quantity of shallow infiltrating precipitation available for mixing varies inversely with the rate of evapotranspiration. Since dispersive mixing along the boundary between the two waters also occurs as a result of groundwater movement, the average concentration of tritium in the Surficial Aquifer is decreased by dilution as well as radioactive decay.

Fenske, P.R.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Tatum Dome field study report and monitoring data analysis: A supplemental report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a supplement to the Water Resources Center, Desert Research Institute report, DOE/NV/10384-03, Tatum Dome Field Study Report and Monitoring Data Analysis,'' Water Resources Center Publication No. 45044. The field study was initiated during the Spring of 1984 because of persistent tritium concentrations in the Surficial Aquifer determined from observed annual water samples from the series of hydrologic monitoring holes (HMH). An anomalous increase in tritium concentrations in monthly water samples from some of the hydrologic monitoring holes was also observed during the Spring of 1984 by the State of Mississippi, Division of Radiological Health. This Spring increase in tritium concentrations may well have been present earlier, but was not recognized because monthly tritium concentration data were not collected prior to 1984. It is hypothesized that groundwater in the Surficial Aquifer is made up of two layers. The older and deeper water within the Surficial Aquifer contains tritium contamination. The shallower water, infiltrating from recent precipitation, is essentially tritium free. These waters do not naturally mix completely and are only significantly mixed in the hydrologic monitoring holes by the sampling procedure. The quantity of shallow infiltrating precipitation available for mixing varies inversely with the rate of evapotranspiration. Since dispersive mixing along the boundary between the two waters also occurs as a result of groundwater movement, the average concentration of tritium in the Surficial Aquifer is decreased by dilution as well as radioactive decay.

Fenske, P.R.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Detailed compositional analysis of gas seepage at the National Carbon Storage Test Site, Teapot Dome, Wyoming, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A baseline determination of CO2 and CH4 fluxes and soil gas concentrations of CO2 and CH4 was made over the Teapot Dome oil field in the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) in Wyoming, USA. This was done in anticipation of experimentation with CO2 sequestration in the Pennsylvanian Tensleep Sandstone underlying the field at a depth of 1680 m. The baseline data were collected during the winter, 2004 in order to minimize near-surface biological activity in the soil profile. The baseline data were used to select anomalous locations that may be the result of seeping thermogenic gas, along with background locations. Five 10-m holes were drilled, 3 of which had anomalous gas microseepage, and 2 were characterized as “background.” These were equipped for nested gas sampling at depths of 10-, 5-, 3-, 2-, and 1-m depths. Methane concentrations as high as 170,000 ppmv (17%) were found, along with high concentrations of C2H6, C3H8, n-C4H10, and i-C4H10. Much smaller concentrations of C2H4 and C3H6 were observed indicating the beginning of hydrocarbon oxidation in the anomalous holes. The anomalous 10-m holes also had high concentrations of isotopically enriched CO2, indicating the oxidation of hydrocarbons. Concentrations of the gases decreased upward, as expected, indicating oxidation and transport into the atmosphere. The ancient source of the gases was confirmed by 14C determinations on CO2, with radiocarbon ages approaching 38 ka within 5 m of the surface. Modeling was used to analyze the distribution of hydrocarbons in the anomalous and background 10-m holes. Diffusion alone was not sufficient to account for the hydrocarbon concentration distributions, however the data could be fit with the addition of a consumptive reaction. First-order rate constants for methanotrophic oxidation were obtained by inverse modeling. High rates of oxidation were found, particularly near the surface in the anomalous 10-m holes, demonstrating the effectiveness of the process in the attenuation of CH4 microseepage. The results also demonstrate the importance of CH4 measurements in the planning of a monitoring and verification program for geological CO2 sequestration in sites with significant remaining hydrocarbons (i.e. spent oil reservoirs).

Ronald W. Klusman

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

An Approach to Mapping of Shallow Petroleum Reservoirs Using Integrated Conventional 3D and Shallow P- and SH-Wave Seismic Reflection Methods at Teapot Dome Field in Casper, Wyoming.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Using the famous Teapot Dome oil field in Casper, Wyoming, USA as a test case, we demonstrate how high-resolution compressional (P) and horizontally polarized shear… (more)

Okojie-Ayoro, Anita Onohuome 1981-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Stratigraphic and structural analysis of Shannon Sandstone, Teapot Dome field: implications for secondary and tertiary oil recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy and Lawrence-Allison Associates have initiated three enhanced oil recovery (EOR) pilot projects in the last 4 years in the Shannon Sandstone at the Teapot Dome field. Performance of these pilot projects has generally been poor. As a result, a reevaluation of the geology for the entire field and for the pilot areas was conducted in an attempt to explain the pilots' performances. Based on core descriptions, conceptual reservoir flow patterns, and post-fireflood coring, only the bar-margin facies was found amenable to fluid displacement processes for oil recovery. This results in 25 million bbl of oil originally in place vs 180 million bbl of oil originally in place as a target for EOR. Stratigraphy alone does not explain the observed production patterns and simulation of the reservoir. Faulting and fracturing are extensive. Based on faults mapped in the in-situ pilot area, 12 to 16 northeast-trending normal faults per mile can be projected. Fracture orientations were obtained by mapping calcareous streaks in the upper and lower Shannon. These orientations confirm directions of premature fluid breakthroughs observed in the pilot projects and in the old East Teapot waterflood. Water resistivities and total dissolved solids measurements, water-cut maps, and daily oil production maps suggest that some faults are partial to total barriers to fluid flow across the field.

Chappelle, H.; Emsurak, G.; Obernyer, S.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Salt dome discoveries mounting in Mississippi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exploratory drilling around piercement salt domes in Mississippi has met with a string of successes in recent months. Exploration of these salt features is reported to have been initiated through the review of non-proprietary, 2D seismic data and subsurface control. This preliminary data and work were then selectively upgraded by the acquisition of additional, generally higher quality, conventional 2D seismic lines. This current flurry of successful exploration and ensuing development drilling by Amerada Hess Corp. on the flanks of salt domes in Mississippi has resulted in a number of significant Hosston discoveries/producers at: Carson salt dome in Jefferson Davis County; Dry Creek salt dome in Covington County, Midway salt dome in lamar County, Monticello salt dome in Lawrence County, and Prentiss salt dome in Jefferson Davis County. The resulting production from these fields is gas and condensate, with wells being completed on 640 acre production units.

Ericksen, R.L. [Mississippi Office of Geology, Jackson, MS (United States)

1996-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

16

Fracture characterization and fluid flow simulation with geomechanical constraints for a CO2–EOR and sequestration project Teapot Dome Oil Field, Wyoming, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mature oil and gas reservoirs are attractive targets for geological sequestration of CO2 because of their potential storage capacities and the possible cost offsets from enhanced oil recovery (EOR). In this work, we analyze the fracture system of the Tensleep Formation to develop a geomechanically-constrained 3D reservoir fluid flow simulation at Teapot Dome Oil Field, WY, USA. Teapot Dome is the site of a proposed CO2-EOR and sequestration pilot project. The objective of this work is to model the migration of the injected CO2 in the fracture reservoir, as well as to obtain limits on the rates and volumes of CO2 that can be injected, without compromising seal integrity. Furthermore we want to establish the framework to design injection experiments that will provide insight into the fracture network of the reservoir, in particular of fracture permeability and connectivity. Teapot Dome is an elongated asymmetrical, basement-cored anticline with a north-northeast axis. The Tensleep Fm. in this area is highly fractured, and consists of an intercalation of eolian-dune sandstones and inter-dune deposits. The dune sandstones are permeable and porous intervals with different levels of cementation that affects their porosity, permeability, and fracture intensity. The inter-dune deposits consist of thin sabkha carbonates, minor evaporates, and thin but widespread extensive beds of very low-permeability dolomicrites. The average permeability is 30 mD, ranging from 10–100 mD. The average reservoir thickness is 50 ft. The caprock for the Tensleep Fm. consists of the Opeche Shale member, and the anhydrite of the Minnekhata member. The reservoir has strong aquifer drive. In the area under study, the Tensleep Fm. has its structural crest at 1675 m. It presents a 2-way closure trap against a NE-SW fault to the north and possibly the main thrust to the west. The CO2-EOR and sequestration project will consist of the injection of 1 million cubic feet of supercritical CO2 for six weeks. A previous geomechanical analysis suggested that the trapping faults do not appear to be at risk of reactivation and it was estimated that caprock integrity is not a risk by the buoyancy pressure of the maximum CO2 column height that the formation can hold. However, in the present study we established the presence of critically stressed minor faults and fractures in the reservoir and caprock, which if reactivated, could not only enhance the permeability of the reservoir, but potentially compromise the top seal capacity. The results of the preliminary fluid flow simulations indicate that the injected CO2 will rapidly rise to the top layers, above the main producing interval, and will accumulate in the fractures, where almost none will get into the matrix.

Laura Chiaramonte; Mark Zoback; Julio Friedmann; Vicki Stamp; Chris Zahm

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Steam-foam pilot project in Dome-Tumbador, Midway-Sunset field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a steam-foam pilot project in the Potter sand, Midway-Sunset field. The pilot consists of four inverted five-spot patterns with a confined producer covering 5.2 acres (2.1 ha). Steam foam was generated by continuous injection of steam with NaCl, alpha olefin sodium sulfonate, and nitrogen. Production and subsurface data, obtained from two observation wells, were used as monitoring tools in the pilot. Overall, during the first 2 years of foam injection, 207,000 bbl (32 900 m/sup 3/) of incremental oil was produced.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Modeling of Field Distribution and Energy Storage in Diphasic Dielectrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling of Field Distribution and Energy Storage in Diphasic Dielectrics S. K. Patil, M. Y, USA Modeling of electrostatic field distribution and energy storage in diphasic dielectrics containing to the increased energy storage density. For composites with lower volume fractions of high-permittivity inclusions

Koledintseva, Marina Y.

19

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INJECTION FEASIBILITY: TEAPOT DOME EOR PILOT L. Chiaramonte,of an engineered leak at the Teapot Dome field experimentalleakage experiment at Teapot Dome, WY, NETL 3rd Annual

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

,"Underground Natural Gas Storage - Salt Cavern Storage Fields"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Cavern Storage Fields" Salt Cavern Storage Fields" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Underground Natural Gas Storage - Salt Cavern Storage Fields",8,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm10vmall.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/oil_gas/natural_gas/data_publications/natural_gas_monthly/ngm.html" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dome storage field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

NETL: Carbon Storage - Small-Scale Field Tests  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Small-Scale Field Tests Small-Scale Field Tests Carbon Storage Small-Scale Field Tests The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting a number of small-scale field tests (injection of less than 500,000 million metric tons of CO2 per year) to explore various geologic CO2 storage opportunities within the United States and portions of Canada. DOE's small-scale field test efforts are designed to demonstrate that regional reservoirs have the capability to store thousands of years of CO2 emissions and provide the basis for larger volume, commercial-scale CO2 tests. The field studies are focused on developing better understanding 11 major types of geologic storage reservoir classes, each having their own unique opportunities and challenges. Understanding these different storage classes provides insight into how the systems influence fluids flow within these systems today, and how CO2 in geologic storage would be anticipated to flow in the future. The different storage formation classes include: deltaic, coal/shale, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Basaltic interflow zones are also being considered as potential reservoirs. These storage reservoirs contain fluids that may include natural gas, oil, or saline water; any of which may impact CO2 storage differently. The data gathered during these small-scale tests provides valuable information regarding specific formations that have historically not been evaluated for the purpose of CO2 storage. The Carbon Storage Program strategy includes an established set of field test objectives applicable to the small-scale projects:

22

Lava Dome | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

"coulees." Volcanic domes commonly occur within the craters or on the flanks of large composite volcanoes. The nearly circular Novarupta Dome that formed during the 1912 eruption...

23

Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program Background: The U.S. DOE's Sequestration Program began with a small appropriation of $1M in 1997 and has grown to be the largest most comprehensive CCS R&D program in the world. The U.S. DOE's sequestration program has supported a number of projects implementing CO2 injection in the United States and other countries including, Canada, Algeria, Norway, Australia, and Germany. The program has also been supporting a number of complementary R&D projects investigating the science of storage, simulation, risk assessment, and monitoring the fate of the injected CO2 in the subsurface.

24

Geology of Damon Mound Salt Dome, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geological investigation of the stratigraphy, cap-rock characteristics, deformation and growth history, and growth rate of a shallow coastal diapir. Damon Mound salt dome, located in Brazoria County, has salt less than 600 feet and cap rock less than 100 feet below the surface; a quarry over the dome provides excellent exposures of cap rock as well as overlying Oligocene to Pleistocene strata. These conditions make it ideal as a case study for other coastal diapirs that lack bedrock exposures. Such investigations are important because salt domes are currently being considered by chemical waste disposal companies as possible storage and disposal sites. In this book, the author reviews previous research, presents additional data on the subsurface and surface geology at Damon Mound, and evaluates Oligocene to post-Pleistocene diapir growth.

Collins, E.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), Teapot Dome Field, Wyoming: Case history of the in situ combustion pilot operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) is a federally owned oil field that has been in operation since 1922 and has produced more than 15 million barrels of oil since full production began in 1976. The Shannon sandstone is the shallowest and most productive of nine producing formations at NPR-3. Since only 5% of the Shannon`s estimated 144 million bbl of original oil in place (OOIP) was estimated to be recoverable by primary means, studies were undertaken in 1978 to determine the most suitable enhanced oil recovery (EOR) method which would merit a pilot test and could ultimately lead to a fieldwide application.

Sarathi, P.S.; Olsen, D.K.; Williams, C.R.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Final report on decommissioning of wells, boreholes, and tiltmeter sites, Gulf Coast Interior Salt Domes of Louisiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the late 1970s, test holes were drilled in northern Louisiana in the vicinity of Vacherie and Rayburn`s Salt Domes as part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) (rename the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM)) program. The purpose of the program was to evaluate the suitability of salt domes for long term storage or disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The Institute for Environmental Studies at Louisiana State University (IES/LSU) and Law Engineering Testing Company (LETCo) of Marietta, Georgia performed the initial field studies. In 1982, DOE awarded a contract to the Earth Technology Corporation (TETC) of Long Beach, California to continue the Gulf Coast Salt Dome studies. In 1986, DOE deferred salt domes from further consideration as repository sites. This report describes test well plugging and site abandonment activities performed by SWEC in accordance with Activity Plan (AP) 1--3, Well Plugging and Site Restoration of Work Sites in Louisiana. The objective of the work outlined in this AP was to return test sites to as near original condition as possible by plugging boreholes, removing equipment, regrading, and seeding. Appendices to this report contain forms required by State of Louisiana, used by SWEC to document decommissioning activities, and pertinent documentation related to lease/access agreements.

Not Available

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) geological site characterization report, Big Hill Salt Dome  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geological and geophysical analyses of the Big Hill Salt Dome were performed to determine the suitability of this site for use in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Development of 140 million barrels (MMB) of storage capacity in the Big Hill Salt Dome is planned as part of the SPR expansion to achieve 750 MMB of storage capacity. Objectives of the study were to: (1) Acquire, evaluate, and interpret existing data pertinent to geological characterization of the Big Hill Dome; (2) Characterize the surface and near-surface geology and hydrology; (3) Characterize the geology and hydrology of the overlying cap rock; (4) Define the geometry and geology of the dome; (5) Determine the feasibility of locating and constructing 14 10-MMB storage caverns in the south portion of the dome; and (6) Assess the effects of natural hazards on the SPR site. Recommendations are included. (DMC)

Hart, R.J.; Ortiz, T.S.; Magorian, T.R.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

EIS-0010: Strategic Petroleum Reserves, Sulphur Mines Salt Dome, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Strategic Petroleum Reserves prepared this EIS to assess the environmental impacts of the proposed storage of 24 million barrels of crude oil at the Sulphur Mines salt dome located in Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana, including construction and operation impacts.

29

Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storage Storage DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Storage A discussion of depleted UF6 cylinder storage activities and associated risks. Management Activities for Cylinders in Storage The long-term management of the existing DUF6 storage cylinders and the continual effort to remediate and maintain the safe condition of the DUF6 storage cylinders will remain a Departmental responsibility for many years into the future. The day to day management of the DUF6 cylinders includes actions designed to cost effectively maintain and improve their storage conditions, such as: General storage cylinder and storage yard maintenance; Performing regular inspections of cylinders; Restacking and respacing the cylinders to improve drainage and to

30

Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Risks » Storage Environmental Risks » Storage Depleted UF6 Environmental Risks line line Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Environmental Risks of Depleted UF6 Storage Discussion of the potential environmental impacts from storage of depleted UF6 at the three current storage sites, as well as potential impacts from the storage of depleted uranium after conversion to an oxide form. Impacts Analyzed in the PEIS The PEIS included an analysis of the potential environmental impacts from continuing to store depleted UF6 cylinders at the three current storage sites, as well as potential impacts from the storage of depleted uranium after conversion to an oxide form. Impacts from Continued Storage of UF6 Cylinders Continued storage of the UF6 cylinders would require extending the use of a

31

Equilibrium analysis of masonry domes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis developed a new method to analyze the structural behavior of masonry domes: the modified thrust line analysis. This graphical-based method offers several advantages to existing methods. It is the first to account ...

Lau, Wanda W

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Modeling of Hydrogen Storage Materials: A Reactive Force Field for NaH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling of Hydrogen Storage Materials: A Reactive Force Field for NaH Ojwang' J.G.O.*, Rutger van is the fall in potential energy surface during heating. Keywords: hydrogen storage, reactive force field governing hydrogen desorption in NaH. During the abstraction process of surface molecular hydrogen charge

Goddard III, William A.

33

DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test November 12, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team of regional partners has begun injecting 8,000 tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) to evaluate the carbon storage potential and test the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential of the Mississippian-aged Clore Formation in Posey County, Ind. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is seen as a key technology for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and helping to mitigate climate change. The injection, which is expected to last 6-8 months, is an integral step in DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program. The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) is conducting the field test to

34

Dome Tech | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dome Tech Dome Tech Jump to: navigation, search Name Dome-Tech Place Edison, New Jersey Zip 8837 Sector Services Product Edison-based provider of services in engineering, energy consulting, & project development with the intention of optimising building performance. Coordinates 40.556614°, -82.866255° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.556614,"lon":-82.866255,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

35

Fast foldable tent domes Aswin P.L. Jgers a,b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-gust accelerations around large obstacles. This applies also to future large solar telescopes. At present two over the whole dome size. Simultaneously, a variety of wind-speed and -direction sensors measure the wind field around the dome. In addition, fast sensitive air- pressure sensors placed on the supporting

Rutten, Rob

36

DOE-Sponsored Field Test Finds Potential for Permanent Storage of CO2 in  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Field Test Finds Potential for Permanent Storage of Field Test Finds Potential for Permanent Storage of CO2 in Lignite Seams DOE-Sponsored Field Test Finds Potential for Permanent Storage of CO2 in Lignite Seams November 4, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A field test sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has demonstrated that opportunities to permanently store carbon in unmineable seams of lignite may be more widespread than previously documented. This finding supports national efforts to address climate change through long-term storage of CO2 in underground geologic reservoirs. Lowering the core barrel at the PCOR Partnership lignite site.The PCOR Partnership, one of seven partnerships in DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program, collaborated with Eagle Operating Inc. (Kenmare, N.D.) to complete the field test in Burke County, N.D. In March

37

EIS-0029: Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Texoma Group Salt Domes, Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana and Jefferson County, TX  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Strategic Petroleum Reserves developed this EIS to analyze the environmental impacts which could occur during site preparation and operation of oil storage facilities at each of four proposed candidate sites in the Texoma Group of salt domes.

38

SECONDARY NATURAL GAS RECOVERY IN THE APPALACHIAN BASIN: APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES IN A FIELD DEMONSTRATION SITE, HENDERSON DOME, WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objectives of this project were to test and evaluate technologies that would result in improved characterization of fractured natural-gas reservoirs in the Appalachian Basin. The Bureau of Economic Geology (Bureau) worked jointly with industry partner Atlas Resources, Inc. to design, execute, and evaluate several experimental tests toward this end. The experimental tests were of two types: (1) tests leading to a low-cost methodology whereby small-scale microfractures observed in matrix grains of sidewall cores can be used to deduce critical properties of large-scale fractures that control natural-gas production and (2) tests that verify methods whereby robust seismic shear (S) waves can be generated to detect and map fractured reservoir facies. The grain-scale microfracture approach to characterizing rock facies was developed in an ongoing Bureau research program that started before this Appalachian Basin study began. However, the method had not been tested in a wide variety of fracture systems, and the tectonic setting of rocks in the Appalachian Basin composed an ideal laboratory for perfecting the methodology. As a result of this Appalachian study, a low-cost commercial procedure now exists that will allow Appalachian operators to use scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of thin sections extracted from oriented sidewall cores to infer the spatial orientation, relative geologic timing, and population density of large-scale fracture systems in reservoir sandstones. These attributes are difficult to assess using conventional techniques. In the Henderson Dome area, large quartz-lined regional fractures having N20E strikes, and a subsidiary set of fractures having N70W strikes, are prevalent. An innovative method was also developed for obtaining the stratigraphic and geographic tops of sidewall cores. With currently deployed sidewall coring devices, no markings from which top orientation can be obtained are made on the sidewall core itself during drilling. The method developed in this study involves analysis of the surface morphology of the broken end of the core as a top indicator. Together with information on the working of the tool (rotation direction), fracture-surface features, such as arrest lines and plume structures, not only give a top direction for the cores but also indicate the direction of fracture propagation in the tough, fine-grained Cataract/Medina sandstones. The study determined that microresistivity logs or other image logs can be used to obtain accurate sidewall core azimuths and to determine the precise depths of the sidewall cores. Two seismic S-wave technologies were developed in this study. The first was a special explosive package that, when detonated in a conventional seismic shot hole, produces more robust S-waves than do standard seismic explosives. The importance of this source development is that it allows S-wave seismic data to be generated across all of the Appalachian Basin. Previously, Appalachian operators have not been able to use S-wave seismic technology to detect fractured reservoirs because the industry-standard S-wave energy source, the horizontal vibrator, is not a practical source option in the heavy timber cover that extends across most of the basin. The second S-wave seismic technology that was investigated was used to verify that standard P-wave seismic sources can create robust downgoing S-waves by P-to-S mode conversion in the shallow stratigraphic layering in the Appalachian Basin. This verification was done by recording and analyzing a 3-component vertical seismic profile (VSP) in the Atlas Montgomery No. 4 well at Henderson Dome, Mercer County, Pennsylvania. The VSP data confirmed that robust S-waves are generated by P-to-S mode conversion at the basinwide Onondaga stratigraphic level. Appalachian operators can thus use converted-mode seismic technology to create S-wave images of fractured and unfractured rock systems throughout the basin.

BOB A. HARDAGE; ELOISE DOHERTY; STEPHEN E. LAUBACH; TUCKER F. HENTZ

1998-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

39

Porous media experience applicable to field evaluation for compressed air energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey is presented of porous media field experience that may aid in the development of a compressed air energy storage field demonstration. Work done at PNL and experience of other groups and related industries is reviewed. An overall view of porous media experience in the underground storage of fluids is presented. CAES experience consists of site evaluation and selection processes used by groups in California, Kansas, and Indiana. Reservoir design and field evaluation of example sites are reported. The studies raised questions about compatibility with depleted oil and gas reservoirs, storage space rights, and compressed air regulations. Related experience embraces technologies of natural gas, thermal energy, and geothermal and hydrogen storage. Natural gas storage technology lends the most toward compressed air storage development, keeping in mind the respective differences between stored fluids, physical conditions, and cycling frequencies. Both fluids are injected under pressure into an aquifer to form a storage bubble confined between a suitable caprock structure and partially displaced ground water. State-of-the-art information is summarized as the necessary foundation material for field planning. Preliminary design criteria are given as recommendations for basic reservoir characteristics. These include geometric dimensions and storage matrix properties such as permeability. Suggested ranges are given for injection air temperature and reservoir pressure. The second step in developmental research is numerical modeling. Results have aided preliminary design by analyzing injection effects upon reservoir pressure, temperature and humidity profiles. Results are reported from laboratory experiments on candidate sandstones and caprocks. Conclusions are drawn, but further verification must be done in the field.

Allen, R.D.; Gutknecht, P.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Dolomite in Permian Paleosols of the Bravo Dome CO2 Field, U.S.A.: Permian Reflux Followed by Late Recrystallization at Elevated Temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of Petroleum Geology, Atlas of Oil and Gas Fields...1999, Palaeogeographic Atlas: University of Texas-Arlington...Gabal Ataqu, northwest Gulf of Suez, Egypt: Sedimentary Geology...Sandstone Member United States wind transport Yeso Formation...

Katherine A. Hartig; Gerilyn S. Soreghan; Robert H. Goldstein; Michael H. Engel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dome storage field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Dome-Tech and Merck Teaming Profile  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dome-Tech, Inc. Merck & Co., Inc. Dome-Tech, Inc. Merck & Co., Inc. 510 Thornall Street One Merck Drive Edison, New Jersey 08837 Whitehouse Station, New Jersey 08889 Business: Energy Engineering Consulting Business: Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Ed Liberty Rob Colucci Vice President, Energy Advisors Senior Director, Energy and Sustainability Phone: 732-590-0122 ext. 165 Phone: 908-423-4971 Email: e_liberty@dome-tech.com Email: robert_colucci@merck.com Dome-Tech installs 1.6 MW DC solar power tracking system at Merck to reduce CO 2 emissions Project Scope Dome-Tech installed a 1.6 megawatt solar photovoltaic (PV) system at Merck's corporate headquarters in New Jersey - with no capital investment by Merck. Project Summary Dome-Tech worked with SunPower to install 7,000 solar panels on 7 acres of land at Merck's

42

DOE-Sponsored Field Test Demonstrates Viability of Simultaneous CO2 Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Field Test Demonstrates Viability of Simultaneous CO2 Field Test Demonstrates Viability of Simultaneous CO2 Storage and Enhanced Oil Recovery in Carbonate Reservoirs DOE-Sponsored Field Test Demonstrates Viability of Simultaneous CO2 Storage and Enhanced Oil Recovery in Carbonate Reservoirs June 28, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A field test conducted by a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team of regional partners has demonstrated that using carbon dioxide (CO2) in an enhanced oil recovery method dubbed "huff-and-puff" can help assess the carbon sequestration potential of geologic formations while tapping America's valuable oil resources. The Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, one of seven in DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program, collaborated with Eagle Operating Inc. to complete the test in the Northwest McGregor Oil Field in Williams

43

Gas storage and separation by electric field swing adsorption  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Gases are stored, separated, and/or concentrated. An electric field is applied across a porous dielectric adsorbent material. A gas component from a gas mixture may be selectively separated inside the energized dielectric. Gas is stored in the energized dielectric for as long as the dielectric is energized. The energized dielectric selectively separates, or concentrates, a gas component of the gas mixture. When the potential is removed, gas from inside the dielectric is released.

Currier, Robert P; Obrey, Stephen J; Devlin, David J; Sansinena, Jose Maria

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

44

Final report on decommissioning boreholes and wellsite restoration, Gulf Coast Interior Salt Domes of Mississippi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1978, eight salt domes in Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi were identified for study as potential locations for a nuclear waste repository as part of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program. Three domes were selected in Mississippi for ``area characterization`` phase study as follows: Lampton Dome near Columbia, Cypress Creek Dome near New Augusta, and Richton Dome near Richton. The purpose of the studies was to acquire geologic and geohydrologic information from shallow and deep drilling investigations to enable selection of sites suitable for more intensive study. Eleven deep well sites were selected for multiple-well installations to acquire information on the lithologic and hydraulic properties of regional aquifers. In 1986, the Gulf Coast salt domes were eliminated from further consideration for repository development by the selection of three candidate sites in other regions of the country. In 1987, well plugging and restoration of these deferred sites became a closeout activity. The primary objectives of this activity are to plug and abandon all wells and boreholes in accordance with state regulations, restore all drilling sites to as near original condition as feasible, and convey to landowners any wells on their property that they choose to maintain. This report describes the activities undertaken to accomplish these objectives, as outlines in Activity Plan 1--2, ``Activity Plan for Well Plugging and Site Restoration of Test Hole Sites in Mississippi.``

Not Available

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

RESULTS OF FIELD TESTING DOE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Energy facility located within Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), also known as Teapot Dome Oil Field, about 35 miles north of Casper, Wyoming. Teapot Dome Field, Natrona...

46

Resurgent Dome Complex | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Resurgent Dome Complex Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Resurgent Dome Complex Dictionary.png Resurgent Dome Complex: Resurgent domes are encountered near the center of many caldera depressions, and form via uplift of the caldera valley floor due to movement in the underlying magma chamber. Resurgent domes typically host numerous deformation structures that act as conduits for hydrothermal fluids in the shallow crust. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Topographic Features List of topographic features commonly encountered in geothermal resource

47

PLANT RESISTANCE Field and Storage Testing Bt Potatoes for Resistance to Potato  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PLANT RESISTANCE Field and Storage Testing Bt Potatoes for Resistance to Potato Tuberworm Lansing, MI 48824 J. Econ. Entomol. 97(4): 1425Ð1431 (2004) ABSTRACT Potato tuberworm, Phthorimaea operculella (Zeller), is the most serious insect pest of potatoes worldwide. The introduction of the Bacillus

Douches, David S.

48

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Tatum Salt Dome Test Site...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Tatum Salt Dome Test Site - MS 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Tatum Salt Dome Test Site (MS.01) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site...

49

EIS-0024: Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Capline Group Salt Domes, Iberia, Napoleonville, Weeks Island Expansion, Bayou Choctaw Expansion, Chacahoula- Iberia, Iberville, and Lafourche Parishes, Louisiana  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Strategic Petroleum Reserves developed this EIS to analyze the environmental impacts which would occur during site preparation and operation of oil storage facilities at each of five proposed candidate sites in the Capline Group of salt domes.

50

Energy management in solar thermal power plants with double thermal storage system and subdivided solar field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the paper, two systems for solar thermal power plants (STPPs) are devised for improving the overall performance of the plant. Each one attempts to reduce losses coming from two respective sources. The systems are simulated and compared to a reference STPP. They consists on: (a) a double thermal energy storage (DTS) with different functionalities for each storage and (b) the subdivision of the solar collector field (SSF) into specialised sectors, so that each sector is designed to meet a thermal requirement, usually through an intermediate heat exchanger. This subdivision reduces the losses in the solar field by means of a decrease of the temperature of the heat transfer fluid (HTF). Double thermal energy storage is intended for keeping the plant working at nominal level for many hours a day, including post-sunset hours. One of the storages gathers a fluid which is heated up to temperatures above the nominal one. In order to make it work, the solar field must be able to overheat the fluid at peak hours. The second storage is the classical one. The combination of both allows the manager of the plant to keep the nominal of the plant for longer periods than in the case of classical thermal energy storage. To the authors’ knowledge, it is the first time that both configurations are presented and simulated for the case of parabolic through STPP with HTF technology. The results show that, if compared to the reference STPP, both configurations may raise the annual electricity generation (up to 1.7% for the DTS case and 3.9% for the SSF case).

Antonio Rovira; María José Montes; Manuel Valdes; José María Martínez-Val

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

,"U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)" Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","nga_epg0_sacwd_nus_mmcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/nga_epg0_sacwd_nus_mmcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

52

Electric field detection of coherent synchrotron radiation in a storage ring generated using laser bunch slicing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electric field of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) generated by laser bunch slicing in a storage ring has been detected by an electro-optic sampling method. The gate pulses for sampling are sent through a large-mode-area photonic-crystal fiber. The observed electric field profile of the CSR is in good agreement with the spectrum of the CSR observed using Fourier transform far-infrared spectrometry, indicating good phase stability in the CSR. The longitudinal density profiles of electrons modulated by laser pulses were evaluated from the electric field profile.

Katayama, I. [Interdisciplinary Research Center, Yokohama National University, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Shimosato, H.; Bito, M.; Furusawa, K. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-8531 (Japan); Adachi, M.; Zen, H.; Kimura, S.; Katoh, M. [UVSOR, Institute of Molecular Science, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); School of Physical Sciences, Graduate Universities for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Shimada, M. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Yamamoto, N.; Hosaka, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Ashida, M. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-8531 (Japan); PRESTO, JST (Japan)

2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

53

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE. A NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AUBURN UNIVERSITY FIELD EXPERIMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage , LBL No. 10194.Mathematical modeling of thermal energy storage in aquifers,of Current Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Programs (in

Tsang, Chin Fu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Energy Department Sells Historic Teapot Dome Oilfield  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Today, the Energy Department finalized the sale of the historic Teapot Dome Oilfield located 35 miles north of Casper, Wyoming to Stranded Oil Resources Corporation, a subsidiary of Allegheny Capital Corporation.

55

Seal integrity and feasibility of CO2 sequestration in the Teapot Dome EOR pilot: geomechanical site characterization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports a preliminary investigation of CO2 sequestration and seal integrity at Teapot Dome oil field, Wyoming, USA, with...2 leakage along reservoir-bounding faults. CO2 injection into reservoirs creat...

Laura Chiaramonte; Mark D. Zoback; Julio Friedmann; Vicki Stamp

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Tatum Dome Project, Lamar County, Mississippi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tatum Dome site, near Hattiesburg, Mississippi, has been host to two nuclear detonations and two nonnuclear gas detonations. The top of the cavity formed by the detonations was 2660 feet below land surface and 1160 feet below the top of the salt dome. All detonations were totally contained within the salt dome in which they were fired. Activities at the site occurred between 1964 ad 1970. In 1978, NV was asked to provide proof that radiological contamination was not adversely affecting water quality in the aquifers over Tatum Dome. All except the Surficial Aquifer, which was known to be contaminated by tritium, were extensively tested to obtain hydrological data. Sufficient samples were taken to determine if contamination existed in the aquifer around the emplacement casing at surface ground zero (SGZ). Low tritium concentrations were found in the Local Aquifer, approximately 150 to 200 feet below land surface, during this project, but no radioactivity was found in any of the other aquifers above Tatum Dome. The Local Aquifer is the next aquifer below the Surficial Aquifer.

Fenske, P.R.; Humphrey, T.M. Jr.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

,"U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)" Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1391_nus_8a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1391_nus_8a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:06 PM"

58

,"U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)" Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1391_nus_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1391_nus_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:05 PM"

59

Accurate correction of magnetic field instabilities for high-resolution isochronous mass measurements in storage rings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Isochronous mass spectrometry (IMS) in storage rings is a successful technique for accurate mass measurements of short-lived nuclides with relative precision of about $10^{-5}-10^{-7}$. Instabilities of the magnetic fields in storage rings are one of the major contributions limiting the achievable mass resolving power, which is directly related to the precision of the obtained mass values. A new data analysis method is proposed allowing one to minimise the effect of such instabilities. The masses of the previously measured at the CSRe $^{41}$Ti, $^{43}$V, $^{47}$Mn, $^{49}$Fe, $^{53}$Ni and $^{55}$Cu nuclides were re-determined with this method. An improvement of the mass precision by a factor of $\\sim 1.7$ has been achieved for $^{41}$Ti and $^{43}$V. The method can be applied to any isochronous mass experiment irrespective of the accelerator facility. Furthermore, the method can be used as an on-line tool for checking the isochronous conditions of the storage ring.

P. Shuai; H. S. Xu; Y. H. Zhang; Yu. A. Litvinov; M. Wang; X. L. Tu; K. Blaum; X. H. Zhou; Y. J. Yuan; G. Audi; X. L. Yan; X. C. Chen; X. Xu; W. Zhang; B. H. Sun; T. Yamaguchi; R. J. Chen; C. Y. Fu; Z. Ge; W. J. Huang; D. W. Liu; Y. M. Xing; Q. Zeng

2014-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

60

Radar investigation of the Hockley salt dome  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Geophysics RADAR INVESTIGATION OF THE HOCKLEY SALT DOME A Thesis by UAMES ANDREW HLUCHANEK A'pproved as to style and content by: (Head of Departme t ? Member) May 1. 973 ABSTRACT Radar investigation of the Hockley Salt Dome. . (Nay, 1973) James... Andrew Hluchanek, B. S. , Texas A&M University Directed by: Dr. Robert R. Unterberger Radar probing through salt was accomplished at 17 radar stations established in the United Salt Company mine at Hockley, Texas. The top of the salt dom is mapped...

Hluchanek, James Andrew

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dome storage field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Earthquake triggering and large-scale geologic storage of carbon dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Mountaineer plant each year. Similarly, stress measurements at Teapot Dome, Wyoming, the US government-owned oil field where pilot...Seal integrity and feasibility of CO2 sequestration in the Teapot Dome EOR pilot: Geomechanical site characterization . Environ...

Mark D. Zoback; Steven M. Gorelick

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

EIS-0021: Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Seaway Group Salt Domes, Brazoria County, Texas (also see EIS-0075-S and EIS-0029)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve Office developed this statement to analyze the environmental impacts which would occur during site preparation and operation of oil storage facilities at each of five proposed candidate sites in the Seaway Group of salt domes.

63

Occurrence of gypsum in Gulf coast salt domes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Occurrence of gypsum in Gulf coast salt domes Barton Donald Clinton...OF GYPSUM IN THE GULF COAST SALT DOMES. Sir: On accountof thepaucityof...concerningtheoccurrenceof gypsumandanhydriteon the salt domes. The followingremarksmay...5o-footsill of saltat 3,350feetat Palangana,possiblyalsoStrattonRidge...

Donald Clinton Barton

64

EIS-0075: Strategic Petroleum Reserve Phase III Development, Texoma and Seaway Group Salt Domes (West Hackberry and Bryan Mound Expansion, Big Hill Development) Cameron Parish, Louisiana, and Brazoria and Jefferson Counties, Texas  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Also see EIS-0021 and EIS-0029. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Office developed this EIS to assess the environmental impacts of expanding the existing SPR storage capacity from 538 million to 750 million barrels of storage and increasing the drawdown capability from 3.5 million to 4.5 million barrels per day. This EIS incorperates two previously issued EISs: DOE/EIS-0021, Seaway Group of Salt Domes, and DOE/EIS-0029, Texoma Group of Salt Domes.

65

DEVELOPMENT OF METHODOLOGY AND FIELD DEPLOYABLE SAMPLING TOOLS FOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL INTERROGATION IN LIQUID STORAGE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project developed methodology and field deployable tools (test kits) to analyze the chemical and microbiological condition of the fuel storage medium and determine the oxide thickness on the spent fuel basin materials. The overall objective of this project was to determine the amount of time fuel has spent in a storage basin to determine if the operation of the reactor and storage basin is consistent with safeguard declarations or expectations. This project developed and validated forensic tools that can be used to predict the age and condition of spent nuclear fuels stored in liquid basins based on key physical, chemical and microbiological basin characteristics. Key parameters were identified based on a literature review, the parameters were used to design test cells for corrosion analyses, tools were purchased to analyze the key parameters, and these were used to characterize an active spent fuel basin, the Savannah River Site (SRS) L-Area basin. The key parameters identified in the literature review included chloride concentration, conductivity, and total organic carbon level. Focus was also placed on aluminum based cladding because of their application to weapons production. The literature review was helpful in identifying important parameters, but relationships between these parameters and corrosion rates were not available. Bench scale test systems were designed, operated, harvested, and analyzed to determine corrosion relationships between water parameters and water conditions, chemistry and microbiological conditions. The data from the bench scale system indicated that corrosion rates were dependent on total organic carbon levels and chloride concentrations. The highest corrosion rates were observed in test cells amended with sediment, a large microbial inoculum and an organic carbon source. A complete characterization test kit was field tested to characterize the SRS L-Area spent fuel basin. The sampling kit consisted of a TOC analyzer, a YSI multiprobe, and a thickness probe. The tools were field tested to determine their ease of use, reliability, and determine the quality of data that each tool could provide. Characterization was done over a two day period in June 2011, and confirmed that the L Area basin is a well operated facility with low corrosion potential.

Berry, T.; Milliken, C.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Hathcock, D.; Heitkamp, M.

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

66

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FEASIBILITY: TEAPOT DOME EOR PILOT L. Chiaramonte, M.TO IDENTIFY OPTIMAL CO 2 EOR STORAGE SITES V. Núñez Lopez,from a carbon dioxide EOR/sequestration project. Energy

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Ge atom distribution in buried dome islands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser-assisted atom probe tomography microscopy is used to provide direct and quantitative compositional measurements of tri-dimensional Ge distribution in Ge dome islands buried by Si. Sub-nanometer spatial resolution 3D imaging shows that islands keep their facets after deposition of the Si cap, and that the island/substrate/Si cap interfaces are abrupt. The core of the domes contains 55% of Ge, while the island shell exhibits a constant composition of 15% of Ge. The {l_brace}113{r_brace} facets of the islands present a Ge enrichment up to 35%. The wetting layer composition is not homogeneous, varying from 9.5% to 30% of Ge.

Portavoce, A.; Berbezier, I.; Ronda, A.; Mangelinck, D. [CNRS, IM2NP, Case 142, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Hoummada, K. [Aix-Marseille Universite, IM2NP, Case 142, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)

2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

68

THE WIDE-AREA ENERGY STORAGE AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PHASE II Final Report - Flywheel Field Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operated for the U.S. department of Energy (DOE) by Battelle Memorial Institute for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE) and California Energy Commission (CEC). A wide-area energy management system (WAEMS) is a centralized control system that operates energy storage devices (ESDs) located in different places to provide energy and ancillary services that can be shared among balancing authorities (BAs). The goal of this research is to conduct flywheel field tests, investigate the technical characteristics and economics of combined hydro-flywheel regulation services that can be shared between Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and California Independent System Operator (CAISO) controlled areas. This report is the second interim technical report for Phase II of the WAEMS project. This report presents: 1) the methodology of sharing regulation service between balancing authorities, 2) the algorithm to allocate the regulation signal between the flywheel and hydro power plant to minimize the wear-and-tear of the hydro power plants, 3) field results of the hydro-flywheel regulation service (conducted by the Beacon Power), and 4) the performance metrics and economic analysis of the combined hydro-flywheel regulation service.

Lu, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.; Weimar, Mark R.; Rudolph, Frank; Murthy, Shashikala; Arseneaux, Jim; Loutan, Clyde; Chowdhury, S.

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

Geomechanical testing of MRIG-9 core for the potential SPR siting at the Richton salt dome.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laboratory testing program was developed to examine the mechanical behavior of salt from the Richton salt dome. The resulting information is intended for use in design and evaluation of a proposed Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage facility in that dome. Core obtained from the drill hole MRIG-9 was obtained from the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology. Mechanical properties testing included: (1) acoustic velocity wave measurements; (2) indirect tensile strength tests; (3) unconfined compressive strength tests; (4) ambient temperature quasi-static triaxial compression tests to evaluate dilational stress states at confining pressures of 725, 1450, 2175, and 2900 psi; and (5) confined triaxial creep experiments to evaluate the time-dependent behavior of the salt at axial stress differences of 4000 psi, 3500 psi, 3000 psi, 2175 psi and 2000 psi at 55 C and 4000 psi at 35 C, all at a constant confining pressure of 4000 psi. All comments, inferences, discussions of the Richton characterization and analysis are caveated by the small number of tests. Additional core and testing from a deeper well located at the proposed site is planned. The Richton rock salt is generally inhomogeneous as expressed by the density and velocity measurements with depth. In fact, we treated the salt as two populations, one clean and relatively pure (> 98% halite), the other salt with abundant (at times) anhydrite. The density has been related to the insoluble content. The limited mechanical testing completed has allowed us to conclude that the dilatational criteria are distinct for the halite-rich and other salts, and that the dilation criteria are pressure dependent. The indirect tensile strengths and unconfined compressive strengths determined are consistently lower than other coastal domal salts. The steady-state-only creep model being developed suggests that Richton salt is intermediate in creep resistance when compared to other domal and bedded salts. The results of the study provide only limited information for structural modeling needed to evaluate the integrity and safety of the proposed cavern field. This study should be augmented with more extensive testing. This report documents a series of test methods, philosophies, and empirical relationships, etc., that are used to define and extend our understanding of the mechanical behavior of the Richton salt. This understanding could be used in conjunction with planned further studies or on its own for initial assessments.

Dunn, Dennis P.; Broome, Scott Thomas; Bronowski, David R.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Hofer, John H.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers achieved a significant milestone in the decommissioning of a Cold War reactor at the Savannah River Site this month after they safely removed its rusty, orange, 75-foot-tall dome. With the help of a 660-ton crane and lifting lugs, the workers pulled the 174,000-pound dome off the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor, capping more than 16 months of preparations. Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning More Documents & Publications Recovery Act Changes Hanford Skyline with Explosive Demolitions Recovery Act Workers Add Time Capsule Before Sealing Reactor for Hundreds

71

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geologic Storage Geologic Storage Carbon Storage Geologic Storage Focus Area Geologiccarbon dioxide (CO2) storage involves the injection of supercritical CO2 into deep geologic formations (injection zones) overlain by competent sealing formations and geologic traps that will prevent the CO2 from escaping. Current research and field studies are focused on developing better understanding 11 major types of geologic storage reservoir classes, each having their own unique opportunities and challenges. Understanding these different storage classes provides insight into how the systems influence fluids flow within these systems today, and how CO2 in geologic storage would be anticipated to flow in the future. The different storage formation classes include: deltaic, coal/shale, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Basaltic interflow zones are also being considered as potential reservoirs. These storage reservoirs contain fluids that may include natural gas, oil, or saline water; any of which may impact CO2 storage differently. The following summarizes the potential for storage and the challenges related to CO2 storage capability for fluids that may be present in more conventional clastic and carbonate reservoirs (saline water, and oil and gas), as well as unconventional reservoirs (unmineable coal seams, organic-rich shales, and basalts):

72

Feasibility of Aquifer Storage Recovery for the Mustang, Oklahoma Well Field.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The purpose of this study was to determine the economic and geochemical feasibility of utilizing aquifer storage recovery (ASR) technology to store water in the… (more)

Wright, Krishna E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Internal Geology and Evolution of the Redondo Dome, Valles Caldera...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A detailed inventory was made of subsurface samples taken from deep geothermal test wells drilled in the resurgent Redondo dome in the Valles caldera of New Mexico. Attention...

74

Information Sheet 2011/1/29 DOT Folddown Protective Domes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to protect solar telescopes by providing a dome that can be folded down flat to minimize temperature and wind effects, this concept can also be used for other situations. The two solar telescope domes that were built are located on top of towers at an altitude of approximately 2300 m on mountains

Rutten, Rob

75

cryogenic storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Storage in which (a) the superconductive property of materials is used to store data and (b) use is made of the phenomenon that superconductivity is destroyed in the presence of a magnetic field, thus enabling...

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE IN MINED CAVERNS IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK-RESULTS OF FIELD INVESTIGATIONS AT STRIPA, SWEDEN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste Storage in Mined Caverns—Program Summary. LawrenceWASTE STORAGE IN MINED CAVERNS IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK- BESULTS

Witherspoon, P.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Safe storage and effective monitoring of CO2 in depleted gas fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Department of Exploration Geophysics...engineering and the oil and gas industries...The higher costs of offshore storage...rate was the benchmark for the...because of cost. Figure S4...Asia Pacific Oil & Gas Conference...2009), A benchmark study on...sequestration process. Exploration Geophysics...

Charles R. Jenkins; Peter J. Cook; Jonathan Ennis-King; James Undershultz; Chris Boreham; Tess Dance; Patrice de Caritat; David M. Etheridge; Barry M. Freifeld; Allison Hortle; Dirk Kirste; Lincoln Paterson; Roman Pevzner; Ulrike Schacht; Sandeep Sharma; Linda Stalker; Milovan Urosevic

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Distribution of quaternary rhyolite dome of the Coso Range, California:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of quaternary rhyolite dome of the Coso Range, California: of quaternary rhyolite dome of the Coso Range, California: Implications for extent of the geothermal anomaly Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Distribution of quaternary rhyolite dome of the Coso Range, California: Implications for extent of the geothermal anomaly Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Thirty-eight separate domes and flows of phenocryst-poor, high-silica rhyolite of similar major element chemical composition were erupted over the past 1 m.y. from vents arranged in a crudely S-shaped array atop a granitic horst in the Coso Range, California. Most of the extrusions are probably less than about 0.3 m.y. old. The area is one of Quaternary basaltic volcanism and crustal extension. The central part of

79

Icosadeltahedral geometry of fullerenes, viruses and geodesic domes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I discuss the symmetry of fullerenes, viruses and geodesic domes within a unified framework of icosadeltahedral representation of these objects. The icosadeltahedral symmetry is explained in details by examination of all of these structures. Using Euler's theorem on polyhedra, it is shown how to calculate the number of vertices, edges, and faces in domes, and number of atoms, bonds and pentagonal and hexagonal rings in fullerenes. Caspar-Klug classification of viruses is elaborated as a specific case of icosadeltahedral geometry.

Antonio Siber

2007-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

80

Use of dipmeter logs to refine structural mapping of Teapot Dome, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Teapot field, now Naval Petroleum Reserve 3, is an elongated, asymmetric structural dome with a north-northeast axial trend located on the southwest edge of the Powder River basin. Currently, more than 800 wells of various depths penetrate multiple reservoirs; over 30 dipmeter logs have been run during the past 34 years. Although structure contour maps of individual stratigraphic horizons have been drawn simply from conventional well data, more subtle features of deformation are interpreted from the use of dipmeter logs. Because dips are generally less than 15/sup 0/, careful computation of transverse and longitudinal dip directions was required for detailed structural analysis. All depth, dip, and azimuth data were entered into computer files, and a flow chart of steps for computer processing and structural interpretation was devised and followed. As designed by C.A. Bengston, SCAT (Statistical Curvature Analysis Technique) plots were drawn by computer. Interpretation of SCAT plots yielded quantitative descriptions of the asymmetry of Teapot dome, curvature of the anticlinal axial plane, vertical discontinuity of beds, location and orientation of normal faults, and curvature of beds in drag zones adjacent to faults. Structural definition was necessary to outline boundaries of reservoirs with tilted fluid contacts on the flanks of the dome and along fault planes. Location of such faults would be particularly important for the discovery of deeper pools, for instance, in the Tensleep Formation.

Beinkafner, K.J.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dome storage field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Cold domes over the warm pool: a study of the properties of cold domes produced by mesoscale convective systems during TOGA COARE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in specific humidity within their cold domes. As a result, increases in the latent heat fluxes observed in the cold domes were more dependent on the increases in wind speed. Stronger cold domes (cool, dry and strong winds) were associated with squall line MCSs...

Caesar, Kathy-Ann Lois

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

82

Compilation and summary of technical and economic assessments in the field of energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is presented which was extracted from various assessments of energy storage technologies conducted during the past four years, primarily under the auspices of the Office of Energy Systems Research and Development (formerly the Division of Energy Storage Systems). A thorough search of the relevant literature was conducted using the DOE/RECON computerized data base and other sources. Only tabular or graphic material was abstracted from the documents. The material has been organized in two ways: by the intended end use, i.e., vehicles, utility load leveling, residential load leveling, industrial, and solar, and within each end use, by technology. The summary tables attempt to compare the results of different studies of the same technology or end use. No attempt is made to summarize the conclusions of each individual study, but rather to point out areas of agreement or disagreement between them. The reader should be aware of the risks in making comparisons between studies conducted by researchers with possibly differing purposes and assumptions. Any conclusions based on the summary sections are more indicative than definitive.

DeVries, J.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

A feasibility study of ECBM recovery and CO2 storage for a producing CBM field in Southeast Qinshui Basin, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a geo-engineering and economic analysis of the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery and CO2 storage in the South Shizhuang CBM Field, Southeast Qinshui Basin, China. We construct a static model using the well log and laboratory data and then upscale this model to use in dynamic simulations. We history match field water and gas rates using the dynamic model. The parameters varied during the history match include porosity and permeability. Using the history matched dynamic model, we make predictions of CBM and ECBM recoveries for various field developments. We build a techno-economic model that calculates the incremental nominal net present value (NPV) of the ECBM incremental recovery and CO2 storage over the CBM recovery. We analyse how the NPV is affected by well spacing, CH4 price, carbon credit and the type of coal. Our analyses suggest that 300 m is the optimum well spacing for the study area under the current CH4 price in China and with a zero carbon credit. Using this well spacing, we predict the recoveries for different injection gas compositions of CO2 and N2 and different injection starting times. The results show that gas injection yields incremental CBM production whatever the composition of the injected gas. Pure CO2 injection yields highest ECBM for low swelling coals while flue gas injection gives highest ECBM for high swelling coals. However, the differences in recoveries are small. Injection can be economically viable depending on the CH4 price and the carbon credit. At current prices and no carbon credit, flue gas injection is commercial. At higher CH4 prices and/or with the introduction of carbon credits, co-optimisation could be commercially viable. High carbon credits favour injecting pure CO2 rather than other gases because this stores more CO2. Injecting CO2 at late stage increases CO2 storage but decreases the project's NPV. High-swelling coals require about $20/tonnes additional carbon credit.

Fengde Zhou; Wanwan Hou; Guy Allinson; Jianguang Wu; Jianzhong Wang; Yildiray Cinar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

The development of self aligning geodesic dome geometries and their application at Chernobyl  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

William M. Hardy and the author have been actively working towards the goal of establishing a non-profit engineering firm to provide remedial answers to environmental crises. Their immediate concerns are nuclear waste. Their first project has been to provide a design for the second sarcophagus planned at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in the Ukraine. The sarcophagus will provide a habitat in which to robotically dismantle the power plant and dispose of the radioactive material over a 100+ year period. The Chernobyl Ukritiye Dome structure will `float` on a sufficiently wide, concentrically ``toothed`` footing, supported on a bed of crushed rock so that a minimum of vibrational site disturbance is achieved during construction. This will eliminate the need for a conventional poured concrete foundation and the associated excavating. The Chernobyl Ukritiye Dome will potentially be the single largest structure ever erected in the world. A goal and benefit of this project will be a minimum of exposure to radioactivity for the labor pool because of extensive off site fabrication and as much of the construction as possible will be done robotically. Not only will this structure provide superior long term encapsulation, but once completed, it will become the premiere storage location for the entire region during the next several hundred years.

Hoelzen, E.C.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

Potential for CO2 storage in depleted fields on the Dutch Continental Shelf–Cost estimate for offshore facilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study was performed on capital and operational costs for offshore injection of CO2 into depleted fields. The main focus was on the design and costs of process requirements for injection, required conservation (hibernation) and modification of existing platforms between end of gas/oil production and start of CO2 injection. Also cost estimates for new platforms are provided. The study is ‘high level’ and generic in nature as no specific target for CO2 storage has been selected. For the purpose of this study a simplified approach is used for determination of the required injection facilities and platform modifications. Nevertheless, the study provides a good indication on the level of expenditures that can be expected.

Floor Jansen; Rob Steinz; Boudewijn van Gelder

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

LANL demolishes first containment dome at disposal area  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LANL Demolishes First Containment Dome LANL Demolishes First Containment Dome LANL demolishes first containment dome at disposal area It once housed thousands of drums of radioactive waste that have been shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for disposal. September 30, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

87

A mechanical model of early salt dome growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A MECHANICAL MODEL OF EARLY SALT DOME GROWTH A Thesis by FRANK ALBERT IRWIN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1988... Major Subject: Geology A MECHANICAL MODEL OF EARLY SALT DOME GROWTH A Thesis by FRANK ALBERT IRWIN Approved as to style and content by: aymond C. Fletcher (Chair of Committee) John H. Spang (Member) Wi tamR. B ant (Mem ) John H. Sp g (Head...

Irwin, Frank Albert

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

88

Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques '02- Workshop Proceedings Abstract Research into the practicality of digital mapping by Placer Dome Exploration...

89

Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems: REFERENCE SITE INITIAL ASSESSMENT FOR A SALT DOME REPOSITORY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a methodology demonstration for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI), the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program conducted an initial reference site analysis of the long-term effectiveness of a salt dome repository. The Hainesville Salt Dome in Texas was chosen to be representative of the Gulf Coast interior salt domes; however, the Hainesville Site has been eliminated as a possible nuclear waste repository site. The data used for this exercise are not adequate for an actual assessment, nor have all the parametric analyses been made that would adequately characterize the response of the geosystem surrounding the repository. Additionally, because this was the first exercise of the complete AEGIS and WASTE Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) methodology, this report provides the initial opportunity for the methodology, specifically applied to a site, to be reviewed by the community outside the AEGIS. The scenario evaluation, as a part of the methodology demonstration, involved consideration of a large variety of potentially disruptive phenomena, which alone or in concert could lead to a breach in a salt dome repository and to a subsequent transport of the radionuclides to the environment. Without waste- and repository-induced effects, no plausible natural geologic events or processes which would compromise the repository integrity could be envisioned over the one-million-year time frame after closure. Near-field (waste- and repository-induced) effects were excluded from consideration in this analysis, but they can be added in future analyses when that methodology development is more complete. The potential for consequential human intrusion into salt domes within a million-year time frame led to the consideration of a solution mining intrusion scenario. The AEGIS staff developed a specific human intrusion scenario at 100 years and 1000 years post-closure, which is one of a whole suite of possible scenarios. This scenario resulted in the delivery of radionuclidecontaminated brine to the surface, where a portion was diverted to culinary salt for direct ingestion by the existing population. Consequence analyses indicated calculated human doses that would be highly deleterious. Additional analyses indicated that doses well above background would occur from such a scenario t even if it occurred a million years into the future. The way to preclude such an intrusion is for continued control over the repository sitet either through direct institutional control or through the effective passive transfer of information. A secondary aspect of the specific human intrusion scenario involved a breach through the side of the salt dome t through which radionuclides migrated via the ground-water system to the accessible environment. This provided a demonstration of the geotransport methodology that AEGIS can use in actual site evaluations, as well as the WRIT program's capabilities with respect to defining the source term and retardation rates of the radionuclides in the repository. This reference site analysis was initially published as a Working Document in December 1979. That version was distributed for a formal peer review by individuals and organizations not involved in its development. The present report represents a revisiont based in part on the responses received from the external reviewers. Summaries of the comments from the reviewers and responses to these comments by the AEGIS staff are presented. The exercise of the AEGIS methodology was successful in demonstrating the methodologyt and thus t in providing a basis for substantive peer review, in terms of further development of the AEGIS site-applications capability and in terms of providing insight into the potential for consequential human intrusion into a salt dome repository.

Harwell,, M. A.; Brandstetter,, A.; Benson,, G. L.; Bradley,, D. J.; Serne,, R. J.; Soldat, J. K; Cole,, C. R.; Deutsch,, W. J.; Gupta,, S. K.; Harwell,, C. C.; Napier,, B. A.; Reisenauer,, A. E.; Prater,, L. S.; Simmons,, C. S.; Strenge,, D. L.; Washburn,, J. F.; Zellmer,, J. T.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems: REFERENCE SITE INITIAL ASSESSMENT FOR A SALT DOME REPOSITORY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a methodology demonstration for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI), the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program conducted an initial reference site analysis of the long-term effectiveness of a salt dome repository. The Hainesville Salt Dome in Texas was chosen to be representative of the Gulf Coast interior salt domes; however, the Hainesville Site has been eliminated as a possible nuclear waste repository site. The data used for this exercise are not adequate for an actual assessment, nor have all the parametric analyses been made that would adequately characterize the response of the geosystem surrounding the repository. Additionally, because this was the first exercise of the complete AEGIS and WASTE Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) methodology, this report provides the initial opportunity for the methodology, specifically applied to a site, to be reviewed by the community outside the AEGIS. The scenario evaluation, as a part of the methodology demonstration, involved consideration of a large variety of potentially disruptive phenomena, which alone or in concert could lead to a breach in a salt dome repository and to a subsequent transport of the radionuclides to the environment. Without waste- and repository-induced effects, no plausible natural geologic events or processes which would compromise the repository integrity could be envisioned over the one-million-year time frame after closure. Near-field (waste- and repository-induced) effects were excluded from consideration in this analysis, but they can be added in future analyses when that methodology development is more complete. The potential for consequential human intrusion into salt domes within a million-year time frame led to the consideration of a solution mining intrusion scenario. The AEGIS staff developed a specific human intrusion scenario at 100 years and 1000 years post-closure, which is one of a whole suite of possible scenarios. This scenario resulted in the delivery of radionuclidecontaminated brine to the surface, where a portion was diverted to culinary salt for direct ingestion by the existing population. Consequence analyses indicated calculated human doses that would be highly deleterious. Additional analyses indicated that doses well above background would occur from such a scenario t even if it occurred a million years into the future. The way to preclude such an intrusion is for continued control over the repository sitet either through direct institutional control or through the effective passive transfer of information. A secondary aspect of the specific human intrusion scenario involved a breach through the side of the salt dome t through which radionuclides migrated via the ground-water system to the accessible environment. This provided a demonstration of the geotransport methodology that AEGIS can use in actual site evaluations, as well as the WRIT program's capabilities with respect to defining the source term and retardation rates of the radionuclides in the repository. This reference site analysis was initially published as a Working Document in December 1979. That version was distributed for a formal peer review by individuals and organizations not involved in its development. The present report represents a revisiont based in part on the responses received from the external reviewers. Summaries of the comments from the reviewers and responses to these comments by the AEGIS staff are presented. The exercise of the AEGIS methodology was sUGcessful in demonstrating the methodologyt and thus t in providing a basis for substantive peer review, in terms of further development of the AEGIS site-applications capability and in terms of providing insight into the potential for consequential human intrusion into a salt dome repository.

Harwell,, M. A.; Brandstetter,, A.; Benson,, G. L.; Raymond,, J. R.; Brandley,, D. J.; Serne,, R. J.; Soldat,, J. K.; Cole,, C. R.; Deutsch,, W. J.; Gupta,, S. K.; Harwell,, C. C.; Napier,, B. A.; Reisenauer,, A. E.; Prater,, L. S.; Simmons,, C. S.; Strenge,, D. L.; Washburn,, J. F.; Zellmer,, J. T.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

ON THE NATURE OF RECONNECTION AT A SOLAR CORONAL NULL POINT ABOVE A SEPARATRIX DOME  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three-dimensional magnetic null points are ubiquitous in the solar corona and in any generic mixed-polarity magnetic field. We consider magnetic reconnection at an isolated coronal null point whose fan field lines form a dome structure. Using analytical and computational models, we demonstrate several features of spine-fan reconnection at such a null, including the fact that substantial magnetic flux transfer from one region of field line connectivity to another can occur. The flux transfer occurs across the current sheet that forms around the null point during spine-fan reconnection, and there is no separator present. Also, flipping of magnetic field lines takes place in a manner similar to that observed in the quasi-separatrix layer or slip-running reconnection.

Pontin, D. I. [Division of Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); Priest, E. R. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Galsgaard, K., E-mail: dpontin@maths.dundee.ac.uk [Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen DK-2100 (Denmark)

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

92

EIA - Natural Gas Storage Data & Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Storage Storage Weekly Working Gas in Underground Storage U.S. Natural gas inventories held in underground storage facilities by East, West, and Producing regions (weekly). Underground Storage - All Operators Total storage by base gas and working gas, and storage activity by State (monthly, annual). Underground Storage by Type U.S. storage and storage activity by all operators, salt cavern fields and nonsalt cavern (monthly, annual). Underground Storage Capacity Storage capacity, working gas capacity, and number of active fields for salt caverns, aquifers, and depleted fields by State (monthly, annual). Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage By State (annual). Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Estimates of natural gas in underground storage for the U.S. and three regions of the U.S.

93

Geological evaluation of Gulf Coast salt domes: overall assessment of the Gulf Interior Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The three major phases in site characterization and selection are regional studies, area studies, and location studies. This report characterizes regional geologic aspects of the Gulf Coast salt dome basins. It includes general information from published sources on the regional geology; the tectonic, domal, and hydrologic stability; and a brief description the salt domes to be investigated. After a screening exercise, eight domes were chosen for further characterization: Keechi, Oakwood, and Palestine Domes in Texas; Vacherie and Rayburn's domes in North Louisiana; and Cypress Creek and Richton domes in Mississippi. A general description of each, maps of the location, property ownership, and surface geology, and a geologic cross section were presented for each dome.

none,

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1973-2014 Withdrawals 43,752 63,495 73,368 47,070 52,054 361,393 1973-2014 Salt Cavern Storage Fields Natural Gas in Storage 381,232 399,293 406,677 450,460 510,558 515,041...

95

Lead, zinc, and strontium in limestone cap rock from Tatum salt dome, Mississippi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Limestone cap rock at Tatum salt dome, Mississippi, contains disseminated pyrite, sphalerite, and galena, and disseminated to massive amounts of strontianite (SrCO/sub 3/) and celestite (SrSO/sub 4/). Sulfide minerals are locally present in bitumen-rich areas of the upper, massive portion of the limestone cap rock, whereas strontium minerals are disseminated throughout this zone. However, sulfide and strontium minerals are most abundant in the lower banded portion of the limestone cap rock, which consists of alternating subhorizontal light and dark-colored bands. The dark bands are composed of calcite of variable grain size, sulfides, quartz, dolomite, albite, and up to 1% bitumen that apparently formed by the biodegradation of crude oil. Lighter bands are composed of variable amounts of coarsely crystalline, euhedral calcite, strontianite, and celestite resulting in strontium (Sr) contents of up to 30% locally. Banded limestone cap rock at Tatum dome formed at the top of the actively dissolving anhydrite zone by a combination of sulfate reduction and oxidation of liquid hydrocarbons by bacteria to cause the precipitation of calcite and sulfide minerals and the accumulation of insoluble residue from the anhydrite (quartz, albite, dolomite). Lead and zinc in the sulfide minerals could have been derived from the dissolving anhydrite, but the abundance of Sr minerals present requires an external source. Present-day oil field brines in central Mississippi contain up to 3000 ppm Sr, and basin brines of similar composition apparently contributed Sr to the cap-rock environment during formation.

Saunders, J.A.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Teapot Dome: Site Characterization of a CO2- Enhanced Oil Recovery Site in Eastern Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), better known as the Teapot Dome oil field, is the last U.S. federally-owned and -operated oil field. This provides a unique opportunity for experiments to provide scientific and technical insight into CO{sub 2}-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and other topics involving subsurface fluid behavior. Towards that end, a combination of federal, academic, and industrial support has produced outstanding characterizations of important oil- and brine-bearing reservoirs there. This effort provides an unparalleled opportunity for industry and others to use the site. Data sets include geological, geophysical, geochemical, geomechanical, and operational data over a wide range of geological boundary conditions. Importantly, these data, many in digital form, are available in the public domain due to NPR-3's federal status. Many institutions are already using portions of the Teapot Dome data set as the basis for a variety of geoscience, modeling, and other research efforts. Fifteen units, 9 oil-bearing and 6 brine-bearing, have been studied to varying degrees. Over 1200 wells in the field are active or accessible, and over 400 of these penetrate 11 formations located below the depth that corresponds to the supercritical point for CO{sub 2}. Studies include siliciclastic and carbonate reservoirs; shale, carbonate, and anhydrite cap rocks; fractured and unfractured units; and over-pressured and under-pressured zones. Geophysical data include 3D seismic and vertical seismic profiles. Reservoir data include stratigraphic, sedimentological, petrologic, petrographic, porosity, and permeability data. These have served as the basis for preliminary 3D flow simulations. Geomechanical data include fractures (natural and drilling induced), in-situ stress determination, pressure, and production history. Geochemical data include soil gas, noble gas, organic, and other measures. The conditions of these reservoirs directly or indirectly represent many reservoirs in the U.S., Canada, and overseas.

Friedmann, S J; Stamp, V

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Conceptual model for regional radionuclide transport from a salt dome repository: a technical memorandum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposal of high-level radioactive wastes is a major environmental problem influencing further development of nuclear energy in this country. Salt domes in the Gulf Coast Basin are being investigated as repository sites. A major concern is geologic and hydrologic stability of candidate domes and potential transport of radionuclides by groundwater to the biosphere prior to their degradation to harmless levels of activity. This report conceptualizes a regional geohydrologic model for transport of radionuclides from a salt dome repository. The model considers transport pathways and the physical and chemical changes that would occur through time prior to the radionuclides reaching the biosphere. Necessary, but unknown inputs to the regional model involve entry and movement of fluids through the repository dome and across the dome-country rock interface and the effect on the dome and surrounding strata of heat generated by the radioactive wastes.

Kier, R.S.; Showalter, P.A.; Dettinger, M.D.

1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

98

Comparison of geomechanical deformation induced by megatonne-scale CO2 storage at Sleipner, Weyburn, and In Salah  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Otway (62) Basins, a sedimentary basin in Japan (63), Teapot Dome, Wyoming (64), and The Rose Run Sandstone, Ohio (65), Weyburn (66), and the Dogger Carbonate, Paris...simulation of a CO 2 sequestration project in a mature oil field, Teapot Dome, Wy. PhD thesis (Stanford University, Stanford, CA...

James P. Verdon; J.-Michael Kendall; Anna L. Stork; R. Andy Chadwick; Don J. White; Rob C. Bissell

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Predicting optical and thermal characteristics of transparent single-glazed domed skylights  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optical and thermal characteristics of domed skylights are important to solve the trade-off between daylighting and thermal design. However, there is a lack of daylighting and thermal design tools for domed skylights. Optical and thermal characteristics of transparent single-glazed hemispherical domed skylights under sun and sky light are evaluated based on an optical model for domed skylights. The optical model is based on tracing the beam and diffuse radiation transmission through the dome surface. A simple method is proposed to replace single-glazed hemispherical domed skylights by optically and thermally equivalent single-glazed planar skylights to accommodate limitations of energy computer programs. Under sunlight, single-glazed hemispherical domed skylights yield slightly lower equivalent solar transmittance and solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) at near normal zenith angles than those of single-glazed planar skylights. However, single-glazed hemispherical domed skylights yield substantially higher equivalent solar transmittance and SHGC at high zenith angles and around the horizon. Under isotropic skylight, single-glazed hemispherical domed skylights yield slightly lower equivalent solar transmittance and SHGC than those of single-glazed planar skylights. Daily solar heat gains of single-glazed hemispherical domed skylights are higher than those of single-glazed horizontal planar skylights in both winter and summer. In summer, the solar heat gain of single-glazed hemispherical domed skylights can reach 3% to 9% higher than those of horizontal single-glazed planar skylights for latitudes varying between 0 and 55{degree} (north/south). In winter, however, the solar heat gains of single-glazed hemispherical domed skylights increase significantly with the increase of the site latitude and can reach 232% higher than those of horizontal single-glazed planar skylights, particularly for high latitude countries.

Laouadi, A.; Atif, M.R.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Fractures of the Dammam Dome Carbonate Outcrops: Their Characterization, Development, and Implications for Subsurface Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The exposed Tertiary carbonates of the Dammam Dome present an opportunity to study fractures in outcrops within the oil-producing region of Eastern Saudi Arabia. The… (more)

Al-Fahmi, Mohammed M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dome storage field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Draft environmental assessment: Richton Dome site, Mississippi. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 112). [Contains Glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy identified the Richton dome site as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geo

Not Available

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Dome-Tech Merck Teaming Profile Pres 3-17-05  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, 2005 , 2005 Energy Conservation Through Retro- Commissioning of Building 800 Presented by: TM , CEM, NEBB Vincent Gates, Energy Manager, Merck Keith A. Rinaldi, LEED 2 10-Mar-05 Dome-Tech Field Services We specialize in "hands on" testing, evaluation and Retro-Cx of existing HVAC and utility systems. We identify and solve problems, reduce energy expenses and improve indoor air quality. We save companies significant money without requiring large capital outlays. 3 10-Mar-05 Building 800 - Background * Multi-Science Building * Constructed and occupied in 2000 * 325,000 square feet * Consists of R&D laboratories, support spaces and administrative offices * Sixteen air handling units with VFD's * Sixteen constant volume exhaust fans * Three 200 HP chilled water pumps

103

PHOTOMETRY OF VARIABLE STARS FROM DOME A, ANTARCTICA: RESULTS FROM THE 2010 OBSERVING SEASON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present results from a season of observations with the Chinese Small Telescope ARray, obtained over 183 days of the 2010 Antarctic winter. We carried out high-cadence time-series aperture photometry of 9125 stars with i ?< 15.3 mag located in a 23 deg{sup 2} region centered on the south celestial pole. We identified 188 variable stars, including 67 new objects relative to our 2008 observations, thanks to broader synoptic coverage, a deeper magnitude limit, and a larger field of view. We used the photometric data set to derive site statistics from Dome A. Based on two years of observations, we find that extinction due to clouds at this site is less than 0.1 and 0.4 mag during 45% and 75% of the dark time, respectively.

Wang, Lingzhi; Zhu, Zonghong [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Macri, Lucas M.; Wang, Lifan [Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Ashley, Michael C. B.; Lawrence, Jon S.; Luong-Van, Daniel; Storey, John W. V. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052 (Australia); Cui, Xiangqun; Feng, Long-Long; Gong, Xuefei; Liu, Qiang; Shang, Zhaohui; Yang, Huigen; Yang, Ji; Yuan, Xiangyan; Zhou, Xu; Zhu, Zhenxi [Chinese Center for Antarctic Astronomy, Nanjing 210008 (China); Pennypacker, Carl R. [Center for Astrophysics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); York, Donald G., E-mail: wanglingzhi@bao.ac.cn [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Radar investigation of the Cote Blanche salt dome  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PADAR IiVVESTICATIOH CF THE COZE ELANCHR SALT DO&: A Thests EOHEET DOSAED SZEVAET Subm-'tt. ii' to the Crsduete Coilege of Ter: s AVi', i;nlu xsity in partfal fulfi' line?t of th ': quiremen fc z' tht degree o %P t S "t Clt. 'iCE iugust. l...HIC major Sub jest: Ceoohysfes RADAR INVESTIGATION OP THE COTE BLANCHE SALT DOME A Thesis by ROBERT DONALD STEWART Approved as to style and nor. tent by: (Chairman of Comml ee) ( Ir~c" (Head of De rtment ? Member) (Member) August 1974 ABSTRACT...

Stewart, Robert Donald

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

105

In-situ gamma-ray site characterization of the Tatum Salt Dome Test Site in Lamar County, Mississippi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field surveys of gamma-ray emitting nuclides and soil core sampling were conducted at 12 sites on the Tatum Salt Dome Test Site and surrounding control areas to determine exposure rates from surficial radioactivity. 137Cs was the only man-made radionuclide detected and was most abundant at three off-site locations on cultivated lawns. 137Cs inventories at all of the on-site survey locations were lower than expected, given the high annual precipitation in the area. The vertical distributions were more extended than those reported for undisturbed sites. Pressurized ion chamber measurements indicated no significant differences in exposure rates on and off the test site.

Faller, S.H. (Environmental Protection Agency, Las Vegas, NV (United States))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Reserve Class Gas Reserve Class 0 20 40 10 30 Miles ± The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface structural information. The data and methods used in their creation are detailed in a report, "Scientific Inventory of Onshore Federal Lands' Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves and the Extent and Nature of Restrictions to Their Development", prepared by the US Departments of Interior, Agriculture and Energy. Unnamed fields and fields generically named "wildcat" were renamed to a concatenate of their basin and state of occurrence,

107

BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Reserve Class Liquids Reserve Class 0 20 40 10 30 Miles ± The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface structural information. The data and methods used in their creation are detailed in a report, "Scientific Inventory of Onshore Federal Lands' Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves and the Extent and Nature of Restrictions to Their Development", prepared by the US Departments of Interior, Agriculture and Energy. Unnamed fields and fields generically named "wildcat" were renamed to a concatenate of their basin and state of occurrence,

108

BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

BOE Reserve Class BOE Reserve Class 0 20 40 10 30 Miles ± The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface structural information. The data and methods used in their creation are detailed in a report, "Scientific Inventory of Onshore Federal Lands' Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves and the Extent and Nature of Restrictions to Their Development", prepared by the US Departments of Interior, Agriculture and Energy. Unnamed fields and fields generically named "wildcat" were renamed to a concatenate of their basin and state of occurrence,

109

Fluid Flow In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera- Implications From  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Flow In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera- Implications From Fluid Flow In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera- Implications From Thermal Data And Deep Electrical Sounding Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Fluid Flow In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera- Implications From Thermal Data And Deep Electrical Sounding Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Temperatures of 100°C are measured at 3 km depth in a well located on the resurgent dome in the center of Long Valley Caldera, California, despite an assumed >800°C magma chamber at 6-8 km depth. Local downflow of cold meteoric water as a process for cooling the resurgent dome is ruled out by a Peclet-number analysis of temperature logs. These analyses reveal zones with fluid circulation at the upper and lower

110

Vlf Electromagnetic Investigations Of The Crater And Central Dome Of Mount  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vlf Electromagnetic Investigations Of The Crater And Central Dome Of Mount Vlf Electromagnetic Investigations Of The Crater And Central Dome Of Mount St Helens, Washington Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Vlf Electromagnetic Investigations Of The Crater And Central Dome Of Mount St Helens, Washington Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A very low frequency (VLF) electromagnetic induction survey in the crater of Mount St. Helens has identified several electrically conductive structures that appear to be associated with thermal anomalies and ground water within the crater. The most interesting of these conductive structures lies beneath the central dome. It is probably a partial melt of dacite similar to that comprising the June 1981 lobe of the central dome. Author(s): James N. Towle

111

A reservoir management study of a mature oil field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to other mature oil fields to make sound engineering and business decisions. I interpreted the geological structure and stratigaphy of the salt dome oil field. Structure, isopach and cross-sectional maps were constructed. Depositional environments...

Peruzzi, Tave

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

112

Field lines twisting in a noisy corona: implications for energy storage and release, and initiation of solar eruptions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present simulations modeling closed regions of the solar corona threaded by a strong magnetic field where localized photospheric vortical motions twist the coronal field lines. The linear and nonlinear dynamics are investigated in the reduced magnetohydrodynamic regime in Cartesian geometry. Initially the magnetic field lines get twisted and the system becomes unstable to the internal kink mode, confirming and extending previous results. As typical in this kind of investigations, where initial conditions implement smooth fields and flux-tubes, we have neglected fluctuations and the fields are laminar until the instability sets in. But previous investigations indicate that fluctuations, excited by photospheric motions and coronal dynamics, are naturally present at all scales in the coronal fields. Thus, in order to understand the effect of a photospheric vortex on a more realistic corona, we continue the simulations after kink instability sets in, when turbulent fluctuations have already developed in the co...

Rappazzo, A F; Einaudi, G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Experience in testing of a solution mined storage cavern  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recertification tests were made of the U.S. Department of Energy/Strategic Petroleum Reserve oil storage cavern No. 6 in the West Hackberry, LA, salt dome. The cavern has a volume of 8,600,000 bbl. Tests included hydrostatic tests of the brine filled cavern and nitrogen leak tests of the 3 wells entering the cavern. Test procedures are described and test results are discussed.

Goin, K.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Field Lines Twisting in a Noisy Corona: Implications for Energy Storage and Release, and Initiation of Solar Eruptions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present simulations modeling closed regions of the solar corona threaded by a strong magnetic field where localized photospheric vortical motions twist the coronal field lines. The linear and nonlinear dynamics are investigated in the reduced magnetohydrodynamic regime in Cartesian geometry. Initially the magnetic field lines get twisted and the system becomes unstable to the internal kink mode, confirming and extending previous results. As typical in this kind of investigations, where initial conditions implement smooth fields and flux-tubes, we have neglected fluctuations and the fields are laminar until the instability sets in. However, previous investigations indicate that fluctuations, excited by photospheric motions and coronal dynamics, are naturally present at all scales in the coronal fields. Thus, in order to understand the effect of a photospheric vortex on a more realistic corona, we continue the simulations after kink instability sets in, when turbulent fluctuations have already developed in the corona. In the nonlinear stage the system never returns to the simple initial state with ordered twisted field lines, and kink instability does not occur again. Nevertheless, field lines get twisted, although in a disordered way, and energy accumulates at large scales through an inverse cascade. This energy can subsequently be released in micro-flares or larger flares, when interaction with neighboring structures occurs or via other mechanisms. The impact on coronal dynamics and coronal mass ejections initiation is discussed.

A. F. Rappazzo; M. Velli; G. Einaudi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

FIELD LINES TWISTING IN A NOISY CORONA: IMPLICATIONS FOR ENERGY STORAGE AND RELEASE, AND INITIATION OF SOLAR ERUPTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present simulations modeling closed regions of the solar corona threaded by a strong magnetic field where localized photospheric vortical motions twist the coronal field lines. The linear and nonlinear dynamics are investigated in the reduced magnetohydrodynamic regime in Cartesian geometry. Initially the magnetic field lines get twisted and the system becomes unstable to the internal kink mode, confirming and extending previous results. As typical in this kind of investigations, where initial conditions implement smooth fields and flux-tubes, we have neglected fluctuations and the fields are laminar until the instability sets in. However, previous investigations indicate that fluctuations, excited by photospheric motions and coronal dynamics, are naturally present at all scales in the coronal fields. Thus, in order to understand the effect of a photospheric vortex on a more realistic corona, we continue the simulations after kink instability sets in, when turbulent fluctuations have already developed in the corona. In the nonlinear stage the system never returns to the simple initial state with ordered twisted field lines, and kink instability does not occur again. Nevertheless, field lines get twisted, although in a disordered way, and energy accumulates at large scales through an inverse cascade. This energy can subsequently be released in micro-flares or larger flares, when interaction with neighboring structures occurs or via other mechanisms. The impact on coronal dynamics and coronal mass ejections initiation is discussed.

Rappazzo, A. F. [Bartol Research Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, DE 19716 (United States); Velli, M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Einaudi, G., E-mail: rappazzo@udel.edu [Berkeley Research Associates, Inc., 6537 Mid Cities Avenue, Beltsville, MD 20705 (United States)

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

116

Time of growth of Opelika Dome, Henderson and Van Zandt counties, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT The Gpelilca fielc! is located in lienderson nuM Van Zandt countiss? Texas. This location is ir. the western part c f the petroliferous F~t Texas Basin. The fielo has a dome-shapeu stxucture wl&ich is believed to hove been caused bi' a &esp...-seated salt ccome. At least 27 salt domes have been identifiec! in the Fast Texas Basin ared the;-. tructures of the known salt doves ars similar to the structure of the Opelika dome. The times and amounts cf, &cx&wth of ths & ore as well as the tires...

Peterson, Thomas Lowe

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

117

A statistical analysis of well production rates from UK oil and gas fields – Implications for carbon capture and storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The number of wells required to dispose of global CO2 emissions by injection into geological formations is of interest as a key indicator of feasible deployment rate, scale and cost. Estimates have largely been driven by forecasts of sustainable injection rate from mathematical modelling of the CO2 injection process. Recorded fluid production rates from oil and gas fields can be considered an observable analogue in this respect. The article presents statistics concerning Cumulative average Bulk fluid Production (CBP) rates per well for 104 oil and gas fields from the UK offshore region. The term bulk fluid production is used here to describe the composite volume of oil, gas and water produced at reservoir conditions. Overall, the following key findings are asserted: (1) CBP statistics for UK offshore oil and gas fields are similar to those observed for CO2 injection projects worldwide. (2) 50% probability of non-exceedance (PNE) for CBP for oil and gas fields without water flood is around 0.35 Mt/yr/well of CO2 equivalent. (3) There is negligible correlation between reservoir transmissivity and CBP. (4) Study of net and gross CBP for water flood fields suggest a 50% PNE that brine co-production during CO2 injection could lead to a 20% reduction in the number of wells required.

Simon A. Mathias; Jon G. Gluyas; Eric J. Mackay; Ward H. Goldthorpe

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

The Thermal Regime In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Regime In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera, Thermal Regime In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera, California- Inferences From Precision Temperature Logs In Deep Wells Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: The Thermal Regime In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera, California- Inferences From Precision Temperature Logs In Deep Wells Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Long Valley Caldera in eastern California formed 0.76 Ma ago in a cataclysmic eruption that resulted in the deposition of 600 km3 of Bishop Tuff. The total current heat flow from the caldera floor is estimated to be ~ 290 MW, and a geothermal power plant in Casa Diablo on the flanks of the resurgent dome (RD) generates ~40 MWe. The RD in the center of the caldera was uplifted by ~ 80 cm between 1980 and 1999 and was explained by most

119

Structural constraints on the exhumation of the Tso Morari Dome, NW Himalaya  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Tso Morari culmination in the Ladakh region of northwest India is a large (>3,000 km²) structural dome cored by coesite-bearing rocks of Indian continental crustal affinity. As one of only two localities in the Himalaya ...

Clark, Ryan J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Fluid Flow In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera- Implications...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera- Implications From Thermal Data And Deep Electrical Sounding Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dome storage field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Recovery Act Funds Test Reactor Dome Removal in Historic D&D Project |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Recovery Act Funds Test Reactor Dome Removal in Historic D&D Recovery Act Funds Test Reactor Dome Removal in Historic D&D Project Recovery Act Funds Test Reactor Dome Removal in Historic D&D Project February 1, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Jim Giusti, DOE (803) 952-7697 james-r.giusti@srs.gov Paivi Nettamo, SRNS (803) 646-6075 paivi.nettamo@srs.gov AIKEN, S.C. - The landscape of the Savannah River Site (SRS) is a little flatter and a little less colorful with the removal today of the 75-foot-tall rusty-orange dome from the Cold War-era test reactor. This $25-million reactor decommissioning and deactivation project is funded By the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Affectionately known by SRS employees as "Hector," the iconic Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) has stood in the Site's B Area since 1959

122

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

American Recovery and Reinvestment American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers achieved a significant milestone in the decommissioning of a Cold War reactor at the Sa- vannah River Site this month after they safely re- moved its rusty, orange, 75-foot-tall dome. With the help of a 660-ton crane and lifting lugs, the work- ers pulled the 174,000-pound dome off the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor, capping more than 16 months of preparations. Workers will cut the dome into smaller pieces for disposal. Removal of the dome allows workers to access the 219,000-pound reactor vessel and two steam generators so they can remove and permanently dispose them onsite. Re- maining equipment will be moved to the cavity vacated by the vessel, and below-grade portions of the reactor will be

123

Variability of bottom water domes and geostrophic currents in the eastern Gulf of Maine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VARIABILITY OF BOTTOM WATER DOMES AND GEOSTROPHIC CURRENTS IN THE EASTERN GULF OF MAINE A Thesis by ERIK SAUL GQTTLIEB Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1987 Major Subject: Oceanography VARIABILITY OF BOTTOM WATER DOMES AND GEOSTROPHIC CURRENTS IN THE EASTERN GULF OF ~ A Thesis by ERIK SAUL GOTTLIEB Approved as to style and content by: Davi A. rooks (Chairman...

Gottlieb, Erik S

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

124

Three-dimensional representations of salt-dome margins at four active strategic petroleum reserve sites.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Existing paper-based site characterization models of salt domes at the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been converted to digital format and visualized using modern computer software. The four sites are the Bayou Choctaw dome in Iberville Parish, Louisiana; the Big Hill dome in Jefferson County, Texas; the Bryan Mound dome in Brazoria County, Texas; and the West Hackberry dome in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. A new modeling algorithm has been developed to overcome limitations of many standard geological modeling software packages in order to deal with structurally overhanging salt margins that are typical of many salt domes. This algorithm, and the implementing computer program, make use of the existing interpretive modeling conducted manually using professional geological judgement and presented in two dimensions in the original site characterization reports as structure contour maps on the top of salt. The algorithm makes use of concepts of finite-element meshes of general engineering usage. Although the specific implementation of the algorithm described in this report and the resulting output files are tailored to the modeling and visualization software used to construct the figures contained herein, the algorithm itself is generic and other implementations and output formats are possible. The graphical visualizations of the salt domes at the four Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites are believed to be major improvements over the previously available two-dimensional representations of the domes via conventional geologic drawings (cross sections and contour maps). Additionally, the numerical mesh files produced by this modeling activity are available for import into and display by other software routines. The mesh data are not explicitly tabulated in this report; however an electronic version in simple ASCII format is included on a PC-based compact disk.

Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Stein, Joshua S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Carbon Capture and Storage Poster | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Carbon Capture and Storage - In Depth (poster) More Documents & Publications Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program Training...

126

Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances Advances made in rechargeable solid hydrogen fuel storage tanks. March 21, 2012 Field experiments on the Alamosa Canyon...

127

Features of Bayou Choctaw SPR caverns and internal structure of the salt dome.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The intent of this study is to examine the internal structure of the Bayou Choctaw salt dome utilizing the information obtained from graphical representations of sonar survey data of the internal cavern surfaces. Many of the Bayou Choctaw caverns have been abandoned. Some existing caverns were purchased by the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program and have rather convoluted histories and complex cavern geometries. In fact, these caverns are typically poorly documented and are not particularly constructive to this study. Only two Bayou Choctaw caverns, 101 and 102, which were constructed using well-controlled solutioning methods, are well documented. One of these was constructed by the SPR for their use while the other was constructed and traded for another existing cavern. Consequently, compared to the SPR caverns of the West Hackberry and Big Hill domes, it is more difficult to obtain a general impression of the stratigraphy of the dome. Indeed, caverns of Bayou Choctaw show features significantly different than those encountered in the other two SPR facilities. In the number of abandoned caverns, and some of those existing caverns purchased by the SPR, extremely irregular solutioning has occurred. The two SPR constructed caverns suggest that some sections of the caverns may have undergone very regular solutioning to form uniform cylindrical shapes. Although it is not usually productive to speculate, some suggestions that point to the behavior of the Bayou Choctaw dome are examined. Also the primary differences in the Bayou Choctaw dome and the other SPR domes are noted.

Munson, Darrell E.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

A comparison between semi-spheroid- and dome-shaped quantum dots coupled to wetting layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the epitaxial growth method, self-assembled semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots (QDs) are formed on the wetting layer (WL). However for sake of simplicity, researchers sometimes assume semi-spheroid-shaped QDs to be dome-shaped (hemisphere). In this work, a detailed and comprehensive study on the difference between electronic and transition properties of dome- and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots is presented. We will explain why the P-to-S intersubband transition behaves the way it does. The calculated results for intersubband P-to-S transition properties of quantum dots show two different trends for dome-shaped and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots. The results are interpreted using the probability of finding electron inside the dome/spheroid region, with emphasis on the effects of wetting layer. It is shown that dome-shaped and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots feature different electronic and transition properties, arising from the difference in lateral dimensions between dome- and semi-spheroid-shaped QDs. Moreover, an analogy is presented between the bound S-states in the quantum dots and a simple 3D quantum mechanical particle in a box, and effective sizes are calculated. The results of this work will benefit researchers to present more realistic models of coupled QD/WL systems and explain their properties more precisely.

Shahzadeh, Mohammadreza; Sabaeian, Mohammad, E-mail: Sabaeian@scu.ac.ir [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Ahvaz, 61357-43135 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ORNL Distinguished Scientist Parans Paranthaman is discovering new materials with potential for greatly increasing batteries' energy storage capacity and bring manufacturing back to the US.

Paranthaman, Parans

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

130

Energy Storage  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

ORNL Distinguished Scientist Parans Paranthaman is discovering new materials with potential for greatly increasing batteries' energy storage capacity and bring manufacturing back to the US.

Paranthaman, Parans

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

131

MULTIPLE WELL VARIABLE RATE WELL TEST ANALYSIS OF DATA FROM THE AUBURN UNIVERSITY THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experimental Thermal energy storage in confined aquifers. ©lAUBURN UNIVERSITY THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE PROGRM1 Christineseries of aquifer thermal energy storage field experiments.

Doughty, Christine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Degradation of Dome Cutting Minerals in Hanford Waste - 13100  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Hanford Tank Farms, recent changes in retrieval technology require cutting new risers in several single-shell tanks. The Hanford Tank Farm Operator is using water jet technology with abrasive silicate minerals such as garnet or olivine to cut through the concrete and rebar dome. The abrasiveness of these minerals, which become part of the high-level waste stream, may enhance the erosion of waste processing equipment. However, garnet and olivine are not thermodynamically stable in Hanford waste, slowly degrading over time. How likely these materials are to dissolve completely in the waste before the waste is processed in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant can be evaluated using theoretical analysis for olivine and collected direct experimental evidence for garnet. Based on an extensive literature study, a large number of primary silicates decompose into sodalite and cancrinite when exposed to Hanford waste. Given sufficient time, the sodalite also degrades into cancrinite. Even though cancrinite has not been directly added to any Hanford tanks during process times, it is the most common silicate observed in current Hanford waste. By analogy, olivine and garnet are expected to ultimately also decompose into cancrinite. Garnet used in a concrete cutting demonstration was immersed in a simulated supernate representing the estimated composition of the liquid retrieving waste from Hanford tank 241-C-107 at both ambient and elevated temperatures. This simulant was amended with extra NaOH to determine if adding caustic would help enhance the degradation rate of garnet. The results showed that the garnet degradation rate was highest at the highest NaOH concentration and temperature. At the end of 12 weeks, however, the garnet grains were mostly intact, even when immersed in 2 molar NaOH at 80 deg. C. Cancrinite was identified as the degradation product on the surface of the garnet grains. In the case of olivine, the rate of degradation in the high-pH regimes of a waste tank is expected to depend on two main parameters: carbonate is expected to slow olivine degradation rates, whereas hydroxide is expected to enhance olivine dissolution rates. Which of these two competing dissolution drivers will have a larger impact on the dissolution rate in the specific environment of a waste tank is currently not identifiable. In general, cancrinite is much smaller and less hard than either olivine or garnet, so would be expected to be less erosive to processing equipment. Complete degradation of either garnet or olivine prior to being processed at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant cannot be confirmed, however. (authors)

Reynolds, Jacob G.; Cooke, Gary A.; Huber, Heinz J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, P.O. Box 850, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, P.O. Box 850, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Degradation of dome cutting minerals in Hanford waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Hanford Tank Farms, recent changes in retrieval technology require cutting new risers in several single-shell tanks. The Hanford Tank Farm Operator is using water jet technology with abrasive silicate minerals such as garnet or olivine to cut through the concrete and rebar dome. The abrasiveness of these minerals, which become part of the high-level waste stream, may enhance the erosion of waste processing equipment. However, garnet and olivine are not thermodynamically stable in Hanford waste, slowly degrading over time. How likely these materials are to dissolve completely in the waste before the waste is processed in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant can be evaluated using theoretical analysis for olivine and collected direct experimental evidence for garnet. Based on an extensive literature study, a large number of primary silicates decompose into sodalite and cancrinite when exposed to Hanford waste. Given sufficient time, the sodalite also degrades into cancrinite. Even though cancrinite has not been directly added to any Hanford tanks during process times, it is the most common silicate observed in current Hanford waste. By analogy, olivine and garnet are expected to ultimately also decompose into cancrinite. Garnet used in a concrete cutting demonstration was immersed in a simulated supernate representing the estimated composition of the liquid retrieving waste from Hanford tank 241-C-107 at both ambient and elevated temperatures. This simulant was amended with extra NaOH to determine if adding caustic would help enhance the degradation rate of garnet. The results showed that the garnet degradation rate was highest at the highest NaOH concentration and temperature. At the end of 12 weeks, however, the garnet grains were mostly intact, even when immersed in 2 molar NaOH at 80 deg C. Cancrinite was identified as the degradation product on the surface of the garnet grains. In the case of olivine, the rate of degradation in the high-pH regimes of a waste tank is expected to depend on two main parameters: carbonate is expected to slow olivine degradation rates, whereas hydroxide is expected to enhance olivine dissolution rates. Which of these two competing dissolution drivers will have a larger impact on the dissolution rate in the specific environment of a waste tank is currently not identifiable. In general, cancrinite is much smaller and less hard than either olivine or garnet, so would be expected to be less erosive to processing equipment. Complete degradation of either garnet or olivine prior to being processed at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant cannot be confirmed, however.

Reynolds, Jacob G.; Huber, Heinz J.; Cooke, Gary A.

2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

134

Soil load above Hanford waste storage tanks (2 volumes)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of work performed as part of the Dome Load Control Project in 1994. Section 2 contains the calculations of the weight of the soil over the tank dome for each of the 75-feet-diameter waste-storage tanks located at the Hanford Site. The chosen soil specific weight and soil depth measured at the apex of the dome crown are the same as those used in the primary analysis that qualified the design. Section 3 provides reference dimensions for each of the tank farm sites. The reference dimensions spatially orient the tanks and provide an outer diameter for each tank. Section 4 summarizes the available soil surface elevation data. It also provides examples of the calculations performed to establish the present soil elevation estimates. The survey data and other data sources from which the elevation data has been obtained are printed separately in Volume 2 of this Supporting Document. Section 5 contains tables that provide an overall summary of the present status of dome loads. Tables summarizing the load state corresponding to the soil depth and soil specific weight for the original qualification analysis, the gravity load requalification for soil depth and soil specific weight greater than the expected actual values, and a best estimate condition of soil depth and specific weight are presented for the Double-Shell Tanks. For the Single-Shell Tanks, only the original qualification analysis is available; thus, the tabulated results are for this case only. Section 6 provides a brief overview of past analysis and testing results that given an indication of the load capacity of the waste storage tanks that corresponds to a condition approaching ultimate failure of the tank. 31 refs.

Pianka, E.W. [Advent Engineering Services, Inc., San Ramon, CA (United States)

1995-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

135

Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome In Long  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome In Long Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome In Long Valley Caldera, East-Central California, Usa, From Recent Pumping Tests And Geochemical Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome In Long Valley Caldera, East-Central California, Usa, From Recent Pumping Tests And Geochemical Sampling Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Quaternary volcanic unrest has provided heat for episodic hydrothermal circulation in the Long Valley caldera, including the present-day hydrothermal system, which has been active over the past 40 kyr. The most recent period of crustal unrest in this region of east-central California began around 1980 and has included periods of

136

field  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

9%2A en Ten-Year Site Plans (TYSP) http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsinfopsinfopstysp

field field-type-text field-field-page-name">

137

Hydrogen Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On-board hydrogen storage for transportation applications continues to be one of the most technically challenging barriers to the widespread commercialization of hydrogen-fueled vehicles. The EERE...

138

Energy Storage - More Information | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Storage - More Information Energy Storage - More Information Energy Storage - More Information As energy storage technology may be applied to a number of areas that differ in power and energy requirements, DOE's Energy Storage Program performs research and development on a wide variety of storage technologies. This broad technology base includes batteries (both conventional and advanced), flywheels, electrochemical capacitors, superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES), power electronics, and control systems. The Energy Storage Program works closely with industry partners, and many of its projects are highly cost-shared. The Program collaborates with utilities and State energy organizations such as the California Energy Commission and New York State Energy Research and Development Authority to field major pioneering storage installations that

139

3-D Finite Element Analyses of the Egan Cavern Field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three-dimensional finite element analyses were performed for the two gas-filled storage caverns at the Egan field, Jennings dome, Louisiana. The effects of cavern enlargement on surface subsidence, storage loss, and cavern stability were investigated. The finite element model simulated the leaching of caverns to 6 and 8 billion cubic feet (BCF) and examined their performance at various operating conditions. Operating pressures varied from 0.15 psi/ft to 0.9 psi/ft at the bottom of the lowest cemented casing. The analysis also examined the stability of the web or pillar of salt between the caverns under differential pressure loadings. The 50-year simulations were performed using JAC3D, a three dimensional finite element analysis code for nonlinear quasistatic solids. A damage criterion based on onset of dilatancy was used to evaluate cavern instability. Dilation results from the development of microfractures in salt and, hence, potential increases in permeability onset occurs well before large scale failure. The analyses predicted stable caverns throughout the 50-year period for the range of pressures investigated. Some localized salt damage was predicted near the bottom walls of the caverns if the caverns are operated at minimum pressure for long periods of time. Volumetric cavern closures over time due to creep were moderate to excessive depending on the salt creep properties and operating pressures. However, subsidence above the cavern field was small and should pose no problem, to surface facilities.

Klamerus, E.W.; Ehgartner, B.L.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Three-dimensional Thermal and Airflow (3D-TAF) Model of a Dome-covered  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Three-dimensional Thermal and Airflow (3D-TAF) Model of a Dome-covered Three-dimensional Thermal and Airflow (3D-TAF) Model of a Dome-covered House in Canada Speaker(s): Yaolin Lin Date: October 6, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 A dome-covered house is an example of sustainable design that draws from biological forms in nature. A three-dimensional thermal and air flow (3D-TAF) model was developed to estimate the energy needs of a dome-covered house. This model has two components: a thermal model to calculate the temperature; and an air flow model to find the velocities, which are needed to estimate the surface convection. The two models are solved iteratively at every time step until they converge. I will present the numerical methods for solving the mathematical models, and compared the results with other simulated and experimental results from similar structures. I will

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141

Dome-shaped microresonators and the Born-Oppenheimer Jens U. Nockela and David H. Fosterb  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dome-shaped microresonators and the Born-Oppenheimer method Jens U. N¨ockela and David H. Fosterb a explore the Born-Oppenheimer method as an alternative to the paraxial approximation. The conditions the major results of paraxial theory can also be derived from the Born-Oppenheimer method. We discuss how

Nöckelm, Jens

142

Beryllium-10 in the Taylor Dome ice core: Applications to Antarctic glaciology and paleoclimatology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An ice core was drilled at Taylor dome, East Antarctica, reaching to bedrock at 554 meters. Oxygen-isotope measurements reveal climatic fluctuations through the last interglacial period. To facilitate comparison of the Taylor Dome paleoclimate record with geologic data and results from other deep ice cores, several glaciological issues need to be addressed. In particular, accumulation data are necessary as input for numerical ice-flow-models, for determining the flux of chemical constituents from measured concentrations, and for calculation of the offset in age between ice and trapped air in the core. The analysis of cosmogenic beryllium-10 provides a geochemical method for constraining the accumulation-rate history at Taylor Dome. High-resolution measurements were made in shallow firn cores and snow pits to determine the relationship among beryllium-10 concentrations, wet and dry deposition mechanisms, and snow-accumulation rates. Comparison between theoretical and measured variations in deposition over the last 75 years constrains the relationship between beryllium-10 deposition and global average production rates. The results indicate that variations in geomagnetically-modulated production-rate do not strongly influence beryllium-10 deposition at Taylor Dome. Although solar modulation of production rate is important for time scales of years to centuries, snow-accumulation rate is the dominant control on ice-core beryllium-10 concentrations for longer periods. Results show that the Taylor Dome core can be used to provide new constraints on regional climate over the last 130,000 years, complementing the terrestrial and marine geological record from the Dry Valley, Transantarctic Mountains and western Ross Sea.

Steig, E.J.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

143

Experience in testing of a solution mined storage cavern. [Strategic Petroleum Reserve  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recertification tests were made of the Department of Energy/Strategic Petroleum Reserve oil storage cavern number 6 in the West Hackberry, Louisiana Salt Dome. The cavern has a volume of 8,600,000 barrels. Tests included hydrostatic tests of the brine filled cavern and nitrogen leak tests of the three wells entering the cavern. Test procedures are described and test results are discussed.

Goin, K.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

NETL: Carbon Storage - Program Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Overview Program Overview Carbon Storage Program Overview The Carbon Storage Program involves three key elements for technology development: Core Research and Development (Core R&D), Infrastructure, and Global Collaborations. The image below displays the relationship among the three elements and provides a means for navigation throughout NETL's Storage Program Website. Click on Image to Navigate Storage Website Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player NETL's Carbon Storage Program Structure CORE R&D Core R&D is driven by industry's technology needs and segregates those needs into focus areas to more efficiently obtain solutions that can then be tested and deployed in the field. The Core R&D Element contains four

146

Enhancement of Local Air Pollution by Urban CO2 Domes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For this study, the nested global-through-urban 3-D model, GATOR-GCMOM (13-17) was used to examine the effects of locally emitted CO2 on local climate and air pollution. ... Jacobson, M. Z. GATOR-GCMM: 2. A study of day- and nighttime ozone layers aloft, ozone in national parks, and weather during the SARMAP Field Campaign J. Geophys. ... GATOR-GCMM 2. A study of daytime and nighttime ozone layers aloft, ozone in national parks, and weather during the SARMAP field campaign ...

Mark Z. Jacobson

2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

147

The origin of the structural depression above Gulf coast salt domes with particular reference to Clay Creek dome, Washington County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oT ~ttee THd ORIGTN OF Tiki STRUCTURAL S&iR "'SION ABOV' ULF COAST SALT KRISS UITH PARTI'ULAR ~~JCS TO ' LAY CRgdK DGIQ JA' HI:. ' TON COK;TY~ TWAS Alfred Norman licDowsll A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural... Application of kodel Theory to uepression problem 13 Salt mis 'cele Models 14 Hodel Fault Patterns . 16 Aegio. ial Setting of Slay Greek oalt Dome. . . ~ Structural Interpretation of Faulting on Glar Greek Tertiary Growth History of 'la; Greek Some...

McDowell, Alfred Norman

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

148

NETL: Natural Gas and Petroleum Storage Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storage Storage Strategic Petroleum Reserve Click on project number for a more detailed description of the project Project Number Project Name Primary Performer DE-FE0014830 Strategic Petroleum Reserve Core Laboratories Natural Gas Storage There are currently no active storage projects Storage - Completed Projects Click on project number for a more detailed description of the project Project Number Project Name Primary Performer DE-DT0000358 Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northrop Grumman Missions System DE-FC26-03NT41813 Geomechanical Analysis and Design Criteria Terralog Technologies DE-FC26-03NT41779 Natural Gas Storage Technology Consortium Pennsylvania State University (PSU) DE-FC26-03NT41743 Improved Deliverability in Gas Storage Fields by Identifying the Timing and Sources of Damage Using Smart Storage Technology Schlumberger Technology Corporation

149

Energy Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Daniel R. Borneo, PE Daniel R. Borneo, PE Sandia National Laboratories September 27, 2007 San Francisco, CA PEER REVIEW 2007 DOE(SNL)/CEC Energy Storage Program FYO7 Projects Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. 2 Presentation Outline * DOE(SNL)/CEC Collaboration - Background of DOE(SNL)/CEC Collaboration - FY07 Project Review * Zinc Bromine Battery (ZBB) Demonstration * Palmdale Super capacitor Demonstration * Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) Regional Transit (RT) Super capacitor demonstration * Beacon Flywheel Energy Storage System (FESS) 3 Background of DOE(SNL)/CEC Collaboration * Memorandum of Understanding Between CEC and DOE (SNL). - In Place since 2004

150

Energy Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Development Concept Development Concept Nitrogen-Air Battery F.M. Delnick, D. Ingersoll, K.Waldrip Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM presented to U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Research Program Washington, DC November 2-4, 2010 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Funded by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy through Sandia National Laboratories Full Air Breathing Battery Concept * Concept is to use O 2 and N 2 as the electrodes in a battery * Novel because N 2 is considered inert * Our group routinely reacts N 2 electrochemically

151

Hydrate Control for Gas Storage Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to identify low cost hydrate control options to help mitigate and solve hydrate problems that occur in moderate and high pressure natural gas storage field operations. The study includes data on a number of flow configurations, fluids and control options that are common in natural gas storage field flow lines. The final phase of this work brings together data and experience from the hydrate flow test facility and multiple field and operator sources. It includes a compilation of basic information on operating conditions as well as candidate field separation options. Lastly the work is integrated with the work with the initial work to provide a comprehensive view of gas storage field hydrate control for field operations and storage field personnel.

Jeffrey Savidge

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

Quasi-static rock mechanics data for rocksalt from three Strategic Petroleum Reserve domes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Triaxial compression and extension experiments have been run on rocksalt samples from three Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) domes. Seventeen quasi-static tests were loaded at mean stress rates of .66 to 1.04 psi/sec (4.5 to 7.2 kPa/sec), confining pressures of 14.5 to 2000 psi (0.1 to 13.8 MPa) and temperatures of 22 to 100/sup 0/C. Eleven of the test specimens were from Bryan Mound, Texas, and three each were from Bayou Choctaw, Louisiana, and West Hackberry, Louisiana. In general, the resulting mechanical data from the three domes are similar, and they are consistent with previously published data. Ultimate sample strengths are directly related to confining pressure (least principal stress) and indirectly related to temperature, while ductility increases with both pressure and temperature.

Price, R.H.; Wawersik, W.R.; Hannum, D.W.; Zirzow, J.A.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Salt tectonism and seismic stratigraphy of the Upper Jurassic in the Destin Dome Region, northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SALT TECI'ONISM AND SEISMIC STRATIGRAPHY OF THE UPPER JURASSIC IN THE DESTIN DOME REGION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by GRANT MACRAE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1990 Major Subject: Oceanography SALT TECI'ONISM AND SEISMIC STRATIGRAPHY OF THE UPPER JURASSIC IN THE DESTIN DOME REGION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by GRANT MACRAE Approved...

MacRae, Grant

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

154

Constraints on the magnitude and rate of CO2 dissolution at Bravo Dome natural gas field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Methods. ME 10: Development Geology Reference...cleanenergy/energy-and-you/affect...Energy Frontier Research Center, funded...consider the thermal energy released as the chamber cools...assuming a high geothermal gradient of 35...source in 1981. Energy density of supercritical...

Kiran J. Sathaye; Marc A. Hesse; Martin Cassidy; Daniel F. Stockli

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

156

Superconducting magnetic energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent programmatic developments in Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) have prompted renewed and widespread interest in this field. In mid 1987 the Defense Nuclear Agency, acting for the Strategic Defense Initiative Office, issued a request for proposals for the design and construction of SMES Engineering Test Model (ETM). Two teams, one led by Bechtel and the other by Ebasco, are now engaged in the first phase of the development of a 10 to 20 MWhr ETM. This report presents the rationale for energy storage on utility systems, describes the general technology of SMES, and explains the chronological development of the technology. The present ETM program is outlined; details of the two projects for ETM development are described in other papers in these proceedings. The impact of high T/sub c/ materials on SMES is discussed. 69 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Hassenzahl, W.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Spindletop salt-cavern points way for future natural-gas storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spindletop underground natural-gas storage complex began operating in 1993, providing 1.7 bcf of working-gas capacity in its first cavern. The cavern and related facilities exemplify the importance and advantages of natural-gas storage in leached salt caverns. Development of a second cavern, along with continued leaching of the initial cavern, target 5 bcf of available working-gas capacity in both caverns by the end of this year. The facilities that currently make up the Spindletop complex include two salt dome gas-storage wells and a 24,000-hp compression and dehydration facility owned by Sabine Gas; two salt dome gas-storage wells and a 15,900-hp compression and dehydration facility owned by Centana; a 7,000-hp leaching plant; and three jointly owned brine-disposal wells. The paper discusses the development of the storage facility, design goals, leaching plant and wells, piping and compressors, dehydration and heaters, control systems, safety and monitoring, construction, first years operation, and customer base.

Shotts, S.A.; Neal, J.R.; Solis, R.J. (Southwestern Gas Pipeline Inc., The Woodlands, TX (United States)); Oldham, C. (Centana Intrastate Pipeline Co., Beaumont, TX (United States))

1994-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

158

Nuclear materials management storage study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Weapons and Materials Planning (DP-27) requested the Planning Support Group (PSG) at the Savannah River Site to help coordinate a Departmental complex-wide nuclear materials storage study. This study will support the development of management strategies and plans until Defense Programs` Complex 21 is operational by DOE organizations that have direct interest/concerns about or responsibilities for nuclear material storage. They include the Materials Planning Division (DP-273) of DP-27, the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Facilities (DP-60), the Office of Weapons Complex Reconfiguration (DP-40), and other program areas, including Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). To facilitate data collection, a questionnaire was developed and issued to nuclear materials custodian sites soliciting information on nuclear materials characteristics, storage plans, issues, etc. Sites were asked to functionally group materials identified in DOE Order 5660.1A (Management of Nuclear Materials) based on common physical and chemical characteristics and common material management strategies and to relate these groupings to Nuclear Materials Management Safeguards and Security (NMMSS) records. A database was constructed using 843 storage records from 70 responding sites. The database and an initial report summarizing storage issues were issued to participating Field Offices and DP-27 for comment. This report presents the background for the Storage Study and an initial, unclassified summary of storage issues and concerns identified by the sites.

Becker, G.W. Jr.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

LLNL-Generated Content for the California Academy of Sciences, Morrison Planetarium Full-Dome Show: Earthquake  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The California Academy of Sciences (CAS) Morrison Planetarium is producing a 'full-dome' planetarium show on earthquakes and asked LLNL to produce content for the show. Specifically the show features numerical ground motion simulations of the M 7.9 1906 San Francisco and a possible future M 7.05 Hayward fault scenario earthquake. The show also features concepts of plate tectonics and mantle convection using images from LLNL's G3D global seismic tomography. This document describes the data that was provided to the CAS in support of production of the 'Earthquake' show. The CAS is located in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco and hosts over 1.6 million visitors. The Morrison Planetarium, within the CAS, is the largest all digital planetarium in the world. It features a 75-foot diameter spherical section projection screen tilted at a 30-degree angle. Six projectors cover the entire field of view and give a three-dimensional immersive experience. CAS shows strive to use scientifically accurate digital data in their productions. The show, entitled simply 'Earthquake', will debut on 26 May 2012. They are working on graphics and animations based on the same data sets for display on LLNL powerwalls and flat-screens as well as for public release.

Rodgers, A J; Petersson, N A; Morency, C E; Simmons, N A; Sjogreen, B

2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

160

Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History All Operators Net Withdrawals 192,093 33,973 -348,719 -17,009 -347,562 -7,279 1967-2012 Injections 3,132,920 3,340,365 3,314,990 3,291,395 3,421,813 2,825,427 1935-2012 Withdrawals 3,325,013 3,374,338 2,966,180 3,274,385 3,074,251 2,818,148 1944-2012 Salt Cavern Storage Fields Net Withdrawals 20,001 -42,044 -56,010 -58,295 -92,413 -19,528 1994-2012 Injections 400,244 440,262 459,330 510,691 532,893 465,005 1994-2012 Withdrawals 420,245 398,217 403,321 452,396 440,480 445,477 1994-2012 Nonsalt Cavern Storage Net Withdrawals 172,092 76,017 -292,710 41,286 -255,148 12,249 1994-2012 Injections 2,732,676 2,900,103 2,855,667 2,780,703 2,888,920 2,360,422 1994-2012 Withdrawals

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dome storage field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History All Operators Net Withdrawals 192,093 33,973 -348,719 -17,009 -347,562 -7,279 1967-2012 Injections 3,132,920 3,340,365 3,314,990 3,291,395 3,421,813 2,825,427 1935-2012 Withdrawals 3,325,013 3,374,338 2,966,180 3,274,385 3,074,251 2,818,148 1944-2012 Salt Cavern Storage Fields Net Withdrawals 20,001 -42,044 -56,010 -58,295 -92,413 -19,528 1994-2012 Injections 400,244 440,262 459,330 510,691 532,893 465,005 1994-2012 Withdrawals 420,245 398,217 403,321 452,396 440,480 445,477 1994-2012 Nonsalt Cavern Storage Net Withdrawals 172,092 76,017 -292,710 41,286 -255,148 12,249 1994-2012 Injections 2,732,676 2,900,103 2,855,667 2,780,703 2,888,920 2,360,422 1994-2012 Withdrawals

162

The effect of the ectoparasitic snail, Boonea impressa, on the growth and health of oysters under field conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, while excluding predators suoh as crabs and oyster drills. Two domes contained experimental oysters parasitized by ~EL'mggg at a concentration of 10 snails/oyster. a realistic level of parasitism based on field observations in Texas bays (White 1984..., while excluding predators suoh as crabs and oyster drills. Two domes contained experimental oysters parasitized by ~EL'mggg at a concentration of 10 snails/oyster. a realistic level of parasitism based on field observations in Texas bays (White 1984...

Wilson, E. A

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

163

Solid-State Hydrogen Storage: Storage Capacity,Thermodynamics...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage: Storage Capacity,Thermodynamics and Kinetics. Solid-State Hydrogen Storage: Storage Capacity,Thermodynamics and Kinetics. Abstract: Solid-state reversible...

164

Energy Dense, Lighweight, Durable, Systems for Storage and Delivery of Hydrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work presented in this report summarizes the current state-of-the-art in on-board storage on compressed gaseous hydrogen as well as the development of analysis tools, methods, and theoretical data for devising high performance design configurations for hydrogen storage. The state-of-the-art in the area of compressed hydrogen storage reveals that the current configuration of the hydrogen storage tank is a seamless cylindrical part with two end domes. The tank is composed of an aluminum liner overwrapped with carbon fibers. Such a configuration was proved to sustain internal pressures up to 350 bars (5,000 psi). Finite-element stress analyses were performed on filament-wound hydrogen storage cylindrical tanks under the effect of internal pressure of 700 bars (10,000 psi). Tank deformations, stress fields, and intensities induced at the tank wall were examined. The results indicated that the aluminum liner can not sustain such a high pressure and initiate the tank failure. Thus, hydrogen tanks ought to be built entirely out of composite materials based on carbon fibers or other innovative composite materials. A spherical hydrogen storage tank was suggested within the scope of this project. A stress reduction was achieved by this change of the tank geometry, which allows for increasing the amount of the stored hydrogen and storage energy density. The finite element modeling of both cylindrical and spherical tank design configurations indicate that the formation of stress concentration zones in the vicinity of the valve inlet as well as the presence of high shear stresses in this area. Therefore, it is highly recommended to tailor the tank wall design to be thicker in this region and tapered to the required thickness in the rest of the tank shell. Innovative layout configurations of multiple tanks for enhanced conformability in limited space have been proposed and theoretically modeled using 3D finite element analysis. Optimum tailoring of fiber orientations and lay-ups are needed to relieve the high stress in regions of high stress concentrations between intersecting tanks/ tank sections. Filament winding process is the most suitable way for producing both cylindrical and spherical hydrogen storage tanks with high industrial quality. However, due to the unavailability of such equipment at West Virginia University and limited funding, the composite structures within this work were produced by hand layup and bag molding techniques. More advanced manufacturing processes can significantly increase the structural strength of the tank and enhances its performance and also further increase weight saving capabilities. The concept of using a carbon composite liner seems to be promising in overcoming the low strength of the aluminum liner at internal high pressures. This could be further enhanced by using MetPreg filament winding to produce such a liner. Innovative designs for the polar boss of the storage tanks and the valve connections are still needed to reduce the high stress formed in these zones to allow for the tank to accommodate higher internal pressures. The Continuum Damage Mechanics (CDM) approach was applied for fault-tolerant design and efficient maintenance of lightweight automotive structures made of composite materials. Potential effects of damage initiation and accumulation are formulated for various design configurations, with emphasis on lightweight fiber-reinforced composites. The CDM model considers damage associated with plasticity and fatigue.

Jacky Pruez; Samir Shoukry; Gergis William; Thomas Evans; Hermann Alcazar

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

165

Regulated underground storage tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guidance package is designed to assist DOE Field operations by providing thorough guidance on the underground storage tank (UST) regulations. (40 CFR 280). The guidance uses tables, flowcharts, and checklists to provide a roadmap'' for DOE staff who are responsible for supervising UST operations. This package is tailored to address the issues facing DOE facilities. DOE staff should use this guidance as: An overview of the regulations for UST installation and operation; a comprehensive step-by-step guidance for the process of owning and operating an UST, from installation to closure; and a quick, ready-reference guide for any specific topic concerning UST ownership or operation.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Regulated underground storage tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guidance package is designed to assist DOE Field operations by providing thorough guidance on the underground storage tank (UST) regulations. [40 CFR 280]. The guidance uses tables, flowcharts, and checklists to provide a ``roadmap`` for DOE staff who are responsible for supervising UST operations. This package is tailored to address the issues facing DOE facilities. DOE staff should use this guidance as: An overview of the regulations for UST installation and operation; a comprehensive step-by-step guidance for the process of owning and operating an UST, from installation to closure; and a quick, ready-reference guide for any specific topic concerning UST ownership or operation.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Underground natural gas storage reservoir management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to research technologies and methodologies that will reduce the costs associated with the operation and maintenance of underground natural gas storage. This effort will include a survey of public information to determine the amount of natural gas lost from underground storage fields, determine the causes of this lost gas, and develop strategies and remedial designs to reduce or stop the gas loss from selected fields. Phase I includes a detailed survey of US natural gas storage reservoirs to determine the actual amount of natural gas annually lost from underground storage fields. These reservoirs will be ranked, the resultant will include the amount of gas and revenue annually lost. The results will be analyzed in conjunction with the type (geologic) of storage reservoirs to determine the significance and impact of the gas loss. A report of the work accomplished will be prepared. The report will include: (1) a summary list by geologic type of US gas storage reservoirs and their annual underground gas storage losses in ft{sup 3}; (2) a rank by geologic classifications as to the amount of gas lost and the resultant lost revenue; and (3) show the level of significance and impact of the losses by geologic type. Concurrently, the amount of storage activity has increased in conjunction with the net increase of natural gas imports as shown on Figure No. 3. Storage is playing an ever increasing importance in supplying the domestic energy requirements.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Zakhidov, 1971. "Storage of Solar Energy in a Sandy-Aquifer Storage of Hot Water from Solar Energy Collectors,"with solar energy systems, aquifer energy storage provides a

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Carbon Storage in Basalt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...immobile and thus the storage more secure, though...continental margins have huge storage capacities adjacent...unlimited supplies of seawater. On the continents...present in the target storage formation can be pumped up and used to dissolve...

Sigurdur R. Gislason; Eric H. Oelkers

2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

170

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zakhidov, 1971. "Storage of Solar Energy in a Sandy-Gravelwith solar energy systems, aquifer energy storage provides aAquifer Storage of Hot Water from Solar Energy Collectors,"

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Solar Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various types of thermal energy storage systems are introduced and their importance and desired characteristics are outlined. Sensible heat storage, which is one of the most commonly used storage systems in pract...

E. Paykoç; S. Kakaç

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydro, compressed air, and battery energy storage are allenergy storage sys tem s suc h as pumped hydro and compressed air.

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

The Thermal Environment of the Fiber Glass Dome for the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The New Solar Telescope (NST) is a 1.6-meter off-axis Gregory-type telescope with an equatorial mount and an open optical support structure. To mitigate the temperature fluctuations along the exposed optical path, the effects of local/dome-related seeing have to be minimized. To accomplish this, NST will be housed in a 5/8-sphere fiberglass dome that is outfitted with 14 active vents evenly spaced around its perimeter. The 14 vents house louvers that open and close independently of one another to regulate and direct the passage of air through the dome. In January 2006, 16 thermal probes were installed throughout the dome and the temperature distribution was measured. The measurements confirmed the existence of a strong thermal gradient on the order of 5 degree Celsius inside the dome. In December 2006, a second set of temperature measurements were made using different louver configurations. In this study, we present the results of these measurements along with their integration into the thermal control system (ThCS) and the overall telescope control system (TCS).

A. P. Verdoni; C. Denker; J. R. Varsik; S. Shumko; J. Nenow; R. Coulter

2007-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

175

Hydrogen and Hydrogen-Storage Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Currently, neutron applications in the field of hydrogen and hydrogen-storage materials represent a large and promising research ... relevant topics from this subject area, including hydrogen bulk properties (con...

Milva Celli; Daniele Colognesi; Marco Zoppi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Design and Assessment of a Battery-Supercapacitor Hybrid Energy Storage System for Remote Area Wind Power Systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Recent advances in innovative energy storage devices such as supercapacitors have made battery-supercapacitor hybrid energy storage systems technically attractive. However the field of hybrid energy… (more)

Gee, A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Depositional environment of the Middle Pennsylvanian granite wash: Lambert 1, Hryhor, and Sundance fields, northern Palo Duro basin, Oldham County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, electric logs, drill stem tests, dip logs, and seismic records. Five granite wash fields have been discovered adjacent to the Bravo Dome in Oldham County, Texas; the Lambert 'I, Hryhor, Sundance, Pond, and Brandi. The section at Lambert 1, Hryhor..., electric logs, drill stem tests, dip logs, and seismic records. Five granite wash fields have been discovered adjacent to the Bravo Dome in Oldham County, Texas; the Lambert 'I, Hryhor, Sundance, Pond, and Brandi. The section at Lambert 1, Hryhor...

Wharton, Amy Laura

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

178

Identification of damage in dome-like structures using hybrid sensor measurements and artificial neural networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A damage detection scheme using multi-type sensor-based hybrid sensing and artificial-neural-network- (ANN-) based information processing was developed for dome-like structures used in civil infrastructure. Accelerometers and strain sensors were used to provide a hybrid measurement with the purpose of acquiring rich information associated with structural damage. The optimal placement of multiple sensors was explored so as to capture the most appropriate and sensitive signal features (damage parameter vectors) for damage characterization. A back-propagation ANN was constructed with the inputs extracted from the hybrid measurement. To validate the capacity of the proposed damage identification scheme, finite element analysis was conducted to identify damage in a Schwedler dome structure as an example. The performance of ANNs, trained by three kinds of damage parameter vector extracted from signals captured by (i) a sole accelerometer, (ii) a sole strain sensor, and (iii) both kinds of sensor was compared, to observe that the one trained by hybrid sensor measurement outperformed the others. Error analysis for a series of parametric studies, in which noise at different levels was included in the training input, was further carried out, and robustness of the proposed damage identification scheme under noisy measurement was demonstrated.

Wei Lu; Jun Teng; Youlin Xu; Zhongqing Su

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to jointly host technology transfer meetings and occasional field excursions. A total of 15 technology transfer/strategic planning workshops were held.

Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

180

Storage | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Storage Storage Storage Energy storage isn’t just for AA batteries. Thanks to investments from the Energy Department's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), energy storage may soon play a bigger part in our electricity grid, making it possible to generate more renewable electricity. Learn more. Energy storage isn't just for AA batteries. Thanks to investments from the Energy Department's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), energy storage may soon play a bigger part in our electricity grid, making it possible to generate more renewable electricity. Learn more.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dome storage field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Field Mapping At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mt Area (Blackwell) Mt Area (Blackwell) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) Exploration Activity Details Location Marysville Mt Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geologic mapping has outlined a structure which may be a partial control on the high heat flow. The Cretaceous intrusive (outlined by the magnetic data) and the heat flow anomaly occupy a broad dome in the Precambrian rocks, the stock outcropping in the northwest portion of the dome, and the heat flow anomaly restricted to the southwest portion of the dome. References D. D. Blackwell (Unknown) Exploration In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa

182

Thermal energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various types of thermal stares for solar systems are surveyed which include: long-term water stores for solar systems; ground storage using soil as an interseasonal energy store; ground-water aquifers; pebble or rock bed storage; phase change storage; solar ponds; high temperature storage; and cold stores for solar air conditioning system. The use of mathematical models for analysis of the storage systems is considered

W.E.J. Neal

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Sub–inertial dynamics of density–driven flows in a continuously stratified fluid on a sloping bottom. II. Isolated eddies and radiating cold domes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...eddies and radiating cold domes Francis J. Poulin Gordon E. Swaters Applied Mathematics...and radiating cold domes By Francis J. Poulin and Gordon E. Swaters Applied Mathematics...Introduction This paper is a continuation of Poulin & Swaters (1999), hereafter referred...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

AZ CO2 Storage Pilot  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO2 Storage Pilot Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Initiative Review Meeting Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania October 7, 2008 John Henry Beyer, Ph.D. WESTCARB Program Manager, Geophysicist 510-486-7954, jhbeyer@lbl.gov Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Earth Sciences Division, MS 90-1116 Berkeley, CA 94720 2 WESTCARB region has major CO2 point sources 3 WESTCARB region has many deep saline formations - candidates for CO2 storage WESTCARB also created GIS layers for oil/gas fields and deep coal basins Source: DOE Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada 4 - Aspen Environmental - Bevilacqua-Knight, Inc. Arizona Utilities CO2 Storage Pilot Contracting and Funding Flow Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley National

185

NREL: Energy Storage - Energy Storage Thermal Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Thermal Management Infrared image of rectangular battery cell. Infrared thermal image of a lithium-ion battery cell with poor terminal design. Graph of relative...

186

NREL: Energy Storage - Energy Storage Systems Evaluation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Systems Evaluation Photo of man standing between two vehicles and plugging the vehicle on the right into a charging station. NREL system evaluation has confirmed...

187

,"Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by Storage Type" by Storage Type" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","All Operators",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1973" ,"Data 2","Salt Cavern Storage Fields",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Data 3","Nonsalt Cavern Storage",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_stor_type_s1_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_stor_type_s1_m.htm"

188

Microsoft Word - RMOTC Partners Honored for Teapot Dome Technology Test.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

October 30, 2008 The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) is providing the following information on local activities: RMOTC: PARTNERS HONORED FOR TEAPOT DOME TECHNOLOGY TEST Casper, Wyoming - Two partners of the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) were honored at the 2008 Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) Mid-Continent Region meeting in Denver, Colo in September. WhisperGen LLC of New Zealand and BP America shared an Excellence in Technology Transfer award for their combined efforts in testing Stirling Cycle electrical generators for use at remote wellsites and the wide dissemination of those test results to the oil and gas industry. Stirling Cycle engines are external combustion engines which offer advantages over traditional

189

STATEMENT OF CONSID ERATIONS CLASS WAIVER OF THE GOVERNMENT'S DOMES'I'!C: AND FO  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CONSID CONSID ERATIONS CLASS WAIVER OF THE GOVERNMENT'S DOMES'I'!C: AND FO REIGN PATENT RIGHTS AND ALLOGATION OF DATA RIGHTS ARlSlNG FROM THE USE OF DOE FACI L!TI ES ANP FACILITY CON1'RACTORS BY OR FOR Tl !IRD-PARTY SPONSORS: DOE W A.IVER NO. W(C)-2011-009. Introduction The Deparlrnenr of Energy (and its predecessor agencies) (collectively. '·DOE'' or "Department") considers each of its DOE Facilities (i.e .. National Laboratori es, single-purpose research facilities, and other Department faci lities hereinafter referred to individually as '·Facility'' or collectively as "Facilities'') a unique and val uable national resource that should be made available to the extent feas ible fo r non- Federa l research and development activities and studies for third-party Sponsors.

190

Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Mexico Renewable Energy Storage Task Force On January 28, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Infrastructure Security, News, News & Events, Partnership,...

191

Intrapleural Fluid Infusion for MR-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation in the Liver Dome  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rationale and Objectives Magnetic resonance–guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) ablation of tumors in the liver dome is challenging because of the presence of air in the costophrenic angle. In this study, we used a porcine liver model and a clinical MR-HIFU system to assess the feasibility and safety of using intrapleural fluid infusion (IPI) to create an acoustic window for MR-HIFU ablation in the liver dome. Materials and Methods Healthy adult Dalland land pigs (n = 6) under general anesthesia were used with animal committee approval. Degassed saline (200–800 mL) was infused into the intrapleural space under ultrasound guidance. A clinical 1.5-T MR-HIFU system was used to perform sonications (4-mm treatment cells, 300–450 W, 20–30 seconds) in the liver dome under real-time MR thermometry. An intercostal firing technique was used to prevent rib heating in one experiment. Technical success was defined as a temperature increase (>10°C) in the target area. After termination, the animal was examined for thermal damage to liver, diaphragm, pleura, lung, or intercostal muscle. Results An acoustic window was established in all animals. A temperature increase in the target area was achieved in all animals (max. 47°C–67°C). MR thermometry showed no heating outside the target area. Intercostal firing effectively reduced rib heating (55°C vs. 42°C). Postmortem examination revealed no unwanted thermal damage. One complication occurred, in the first experiment, because of an ill-suited needle (displacement of the needle). Conclusions The results indicate that IPI may be used safely to assist MR-HIFU ablation of tumors in the liver dome. For reliable tissue coagulation, IPI must be combined with an intercostal sonication technique. Considering the proportion of patients with tumors in the liver dome, IPI widens the applicability of MR-HIFU ablation for liver tumors considerably.

Joost W. Wijlemans; Martijn de Greef; Gerald Schubert; Chrit T.W. Moonen; Maurice A.A.J. van den Bosch; Mario Ries

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Fluid flow in the resurgent dome of Long Valley Caldera: implications from thermal data and deep electrical sounding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Temperatures of 100°C are measured at 3 km depth in a well located on the resurgent dome in the center of Long Valley Caldera, California, despite an assumed >800°C magma chamber at 6–8 km depth. Local downflow of cold meteoric water as a process for cooling the resurgent dome is ruled out by a Peclét-number analysis of temperature logs. These analyses reveal zones with fluid circulation at the upper and lower boundaries of the Bishop Tuff, and an upflow zone in the metasedimentary rocks. Vertical Darcy velocities range from 10 to 70 cm a?1. A 21-km-long geoelectrical profile across the caldera provides resistivity values to the order of 100 to >103 ?m down to a depth of 6 km, as well as variations of self-potential. Interpretation of the electrical data with respect to hydrothermal fluid movement confirms that there is no downflow beneath the resurgent dome. To explain the unexpectedly low temperatures in the resurgent dome, we challenge the common view that the caldera as a whole is a regime of high temperatures and the resurgent dome is a local cold anomaly. Instead, we suggest that the caldera was cooled to normal thermal conditions by vigorous hydrothermal activity in the past, and that a present-day hot water flow system is responsible for local hot anomalies, such as Hot Creek and the area of the Casa Diablo geothermal power plant. The source of hot water has been associated with recent shallow intrusions into the West Moat. The focus of planning for future power plants should be to locate this present-day flow system instead of relying on heat from the old magma chamber.

Daniel F.C Pribnow; Claudia Schütze; Suzanne J Hurter; Christina Flechsig; John H Sass

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

NETL: Carbon Storage - Knowledge Sharing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Knowledge Sharing Knowledge Sharing Carbon Storage Knowledge Sharing Outreach Efforts at SECARB's Anthropogenic Test Site in Alabama Outreach Efforts at SECARB's Anthropogenic Test Site in Alabama In order to achieve the commercialization of CO2 storage technologies, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) acknowledges that knowledge sharing between various entities is essential. Distribution of the results and lessons learned from both field projects and Core R&D efforts will provide the foundation for future, large-scale CCS field tests across North America and in addressing future challenges associated with public acceptance, infrastructure (pipelines, compressor stations, etc.), and regulatory framework. DOE promotes information and knowledge sharing through various avenues including the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP)

194

Onboard Storage Tank Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Sandia National Laboratories co-hosted the Onboard Storage Tank Workshop on April 29th, 2010. Onboard storage tank experts gathered to share lessons learned...

195

Solar Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The intermittent nature of the solar energy supply makes the provision of adequate energy storage essential for the majority of practical applications. Thermal storage is needed for both low-temperature and high-...

Brian Norton BSc; MSc; PhD; F Inst E; C Eng

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Storage of Solar Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy storage provides a means for improving the performance and efficiency of a wide range of energy systems. It also plays an important role in energy conservation. Typically, energy storage is used when there...

H. P. Garg

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Chemical Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The oldest and most commonly practiced method to store solar energy is sensible heat storage. The underlying technology is well developed and the basic storage materials, water and rocks, are available ... curren...

H. P. Garg; S. C. Mullick; A. K. Bhargava

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Cool Storage Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilities have promoted the use of electric heat and thermal storage to increase off peak usage of power. High daytime demand charges and enticing discounts for off peak power have been used as economic incentives to promote thermal storage systems...

Eppelheimer, D. M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Safe Home Food Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proper food storage can preserve food quality and prevent spoilage and food/borne illness. The specifics of pantry, refrigerator and freezer storage are given, along with helpful information on new packaging, label dates, etc. A comprehensive table...

Van Laanen, Peggy

2002-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

200

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Definitions Definitions Definitions Since 2006, EIA has reported two measures of aggregate capacity, one based on demonstrated peak working gas storage, the other on working gas design capacity. Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity: This measure sums the highest storage inventory level of working gas observed in each facility over the 5-year range from May 2005 to April 2010, as reported by the operator on the Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Underground Gas Storage Report." This data-driven estimate reflects actual operator experience. However, the timing for peaks for different fields need not coincide. Also, actual available maximum capacity for any storage facility may exceed its reported maximum storage level over the last 5 years, and is virtually certain to do so in the case of newly commissioned or expanded facilities. Therefore, this measure provides a conservative indicator of capacity that may understate the amount that can actually be stored.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dome storage field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Methodology  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary Prices Exploration & Reserves Production Imports/Exports Pipelines Storage Consumption All Natural Gas Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Consumption Exploration & Reserves Imports/Exports & Pipelines Prices Production Projections Storage All Reports ‹ See All Natural Gas Reports Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity With Data for November 2012 | Release Date: July 24, 2013 | Next Release Date: Spring 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 Go Methodology Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity Estimates: Estimates are based on aggregation of the noncoincident peak levels of working gas inventories at individual storage fields as reported monthly over a 60-month period ending in November 2012 on Form EIA-191, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage

202

Thermochemical Energy Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation summarizes the introduction given by Christian Sattler during the Thermochemical Energy Storage Workshop on January 8, 2013.

203

Energy Storage Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy Storage Systems – An Old Idea Doing New Things with New Technology article for the International Assoication of ELectrical Inspectors

Conover, David R.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests, and Project Team Metal hydride gas storage Cryogenic gas storage Compressed gas storage Adsorbed gas storage...

205

Net Withdrawals of Natural Gas from Underground Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

206

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Storage Storage About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Underground Natural Gas Storage Overview | Regional Breakdowns Overview Underground natural gas storage provides pipelines, local distribution companies, producers, and pipeline shippers with an inventory management tool, seasonal supply backup, and access to natural gas needed to avoid imbalances between receipts and deliveries on a pipeline network. There are three principal types of underground storage sites used in the United States today. They are: · depleted natural gas or oil fields (326), · aquifers (43), or · salt caverns (31). In a few cases mine caverns have been used. Most underground storage facilities, 82 percent at the beginning of 2008, were created from reservoirs located in depleted natural gas production fields that were relatively easy to convert to storage service, and that were often close to consumption centers and existing natural gas pipeline systems.

207

Storage Sub-committee  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Storage Sub-committee Storage Sub-committee 2012 Work Plan Confidential 1 2012 Storage Subcommittee Work Plan * Report to Congress. (legislative requirement) - Review existing and projected research and funding - Review existing DOE, Arpa-e projects and the OE 5 year plan - Identify gaps and recommend additional topics - Outline distributed (review as group) * Develop and analysis of the need for large scale storage deployment (outline distributed again) * Develop analysis on regulatory issues especially valuation and cost recovery Confidential 2 Large Scale Storage * Problem Statement * Situation Today * Benefits Analysis * Policy Issues * Technology Gaps * Recommendations * Renewables Variability - Reserves and capacity requirements - Financial impacts - IRC Response to FERC NOI and update

208

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology DOE R&D Activities National Hydrogen Storage Compressed/Liquid Hydrogen Tanks Testing and Analysis Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards

209

Chemical Storage-Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storage - Storage - Overview Ali T-Raissi, FSEC Hydrogen Storage Workshop Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois August 14-15, 2002 Hydrogen Fuel - Attributes * H 2 +½ O 2 → H 2 O (1.23 V) * High gravimetric energy density: 27.1 Ah/g, based on LHV of 119.93 kJ/g * 1 wt % = 189.6 Wh/kg (0.7 V; i.e. η FC = 57%) * Li ion cells: 130-150 Wh/kg Chemical Hydrides - Definition * They are considered secondary storage methods in which the storage medium is expended - primary storage methods include reversible systems (e.g. MHs & C-nanostructures), GH 2 & LH 2 storage Chemical Hydrides - Definition (cont.) * The usual chemical hydride system is reaction of a reactant containing H in the "-1" oxidation state (hydride) with a reactant containing H in the "+1" oxidation

210

NETL: Carbon Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storage Storage Technologies Carbon Storage (formerly referred to as the "Carbon Sequestration Program") Program Overview For quick navigation of NETL's Carbon Storage Program website, please click on the image. NETL's Carbon Storage Program Fossil fuels are considered the most dependable, cost-effective energy source in the world. The availability of these fuels to provide clean, affordable energy is essential for domestic and global prosperity and security well into the 21st century. However, a balance is needed between energy security and concerns over the impacts of concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere - particularly carbon dioxide (CO2). NETL's Carbon Storage Program is developing a technology portfolio of safe, cost-effective, commercial-scale CO2 capture, storage, and mitigation

211

Design Considerations for High Energy Electron -- Positron Storage Rings  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

High energy electron-positron storage rings give a way of making a new attack on the most important problems of elementary particle physics. All of us who have worked in the storage ring field designing, building, or using storage rings know this. The importance of that part of storage ring work concerning tests of quantum electrodynamics and mu meson physics is also generally appreciated by the larger physics community. However, I do not think that most of the physicists working tin the elementary particle physics field realize the importance of the contribution that storage ring experiments can make to our understanding of the strongly interacting particles. I would therefore like to spend the next few minutes discussing the sort of things that one can do with storage rings in the strongly interacting particle field.

Richter, B.

1966-11-00T23:59:59.000Z

212

Carbon Capture, Utilization & Storage | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Carbon Capture, Utilization & Storage Carbon Capture, Utilization & Storage Carbon Capture, Utilization & Storage Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory demonstrated coal gasification in large-scale field experiments at the Rocky Mountain Test Facility (above) near Hanna, Wyoming. Coal gasification and sequestration of the carbon dioxide produced are among the technologies being used in a Texas Clean Energy Project. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory demonstrated coal gasification in large-scale field experiments at the Rocky Mountain Test Facility (above) near Hanna, Wyoming. Coal gasification and sequestration of the carbon dioxide produced are among the technologies being used in a Texas Clean Energy Project. Carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS), also referred to as carbon

213

Depositional environment of upper Cretaceous woodbine sandstones, Kurten field, Brazos County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at Madisonvil le, this trend extends southwest through Grimes, Brazos and Washington counties with the occur r ence of Ferguson Crossing, Mil1ican and Brenham salt domes, Drilling History The Kurten Field was di scovered in August, 1976, with the compl e... at Madisonvil le, this trend extends southwest through Grimes, Brazos and Washington counties with the occur r ence of Ferguson Crossing, Mil1ican and Brenham salt domes, Drilling History The Kurten Field was di scovered in August, 1976, with the compl e...

Watkins, John Mark

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

214

Questions and Answers - Why are the Halls in bio-dome shapes?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

How much does it cost a yearto run Jefferson Lab? How much does it cost a year<br>to run Jefferson Lab? Previous Question (How much does it cost a year to run Jefferson Lab?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (Why did it take so long to build Jefferson Lab?) Why did it take so longto build Jefferson Lab? Why are the Halls in bio-dome shapes? The answer to your question is the answer to many questions... money. The shape of our experimental halls was that which could do the job and spend the least amount of money. There are several reasons for this that you won't quite understand unless you have taken geometry. If you need to enclose a certain amount of AREA, but have to pay for the LENGTH of wall you use, you want to build whatever type of building will enclose that AREA with the shortest LENGTH of wall. It just so happens a circle encloses the

215

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - International Energy Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

International Energy International Energy Storage Program Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - International Energy Storage Program Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) held an annual peer review on September 27, 2007 in San Francisco, CA. Eighteen presentations were divided into categories; those related to international energy storage programs are below. Other presentation categories were: Economics - Benefit Studies and Environment Benefit Studies Utility & Commercial Applications of Advanced Energy Storage Systems Power Electronics Innovations in Energy Storage Systems ESS 2007 Peer Review - DOE-CEC Energy Storage Program FY07 Projects - Daniel Borneo, SNL.pdf ESS 2007 Peer Review - Joint NYSERDA-DOE Energy Storage Initiative Projects

216

NETL: Carbon Storage - Infrastructure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Infrastructure Carbon Storage Infrastructure The Infrastructure Element of DOE's Carbon Storage Program is focused on research and development (R&D) initiatives to advance geologic CO2 storage toward commercialization. DOE determined early in the program's development that addressing CO2 mitigation on a regional level is the most effective way to address differences in geology, climate, population density, infrastructure, and socioeconomic development. This element includes the following efforts designed to support the development of regional infrastructure for carbon capture and storage (CCS). Click on Image to Navigate Infrastructure Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) - This

217

Sorption Storage Technology Summary  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presented at the R&D Strategies for Compressed, Cryo-Compressed and Cryo-Sorbent Hydrogen Storage Technologies Workshops on February 14 and 15, 2011.

218

Storage of solar energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A framework is presented for identifying appropriate systems for storage of electrical, mechanical, chemical, and thermal energy in solar energy supply systems. Classification categories include the nature ... su...

Theodore B. Taylor

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) oil storage cavern sulfur mines 7. Certification tests and analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cavern 7 at the Sulphur Mines, Louisiana SPR oil storage site was certified for oil storage on December 17, 1977. The Dowell Sonar caliper survey taken November 29, 1977, indicated a total cavern volume of 5.60 x 10/sup 6/ bbls. The surveys taken December 19, 1979, and June 10, 1981, indicated a total cavern volume of 6.33 x 10/sup 6/ and 6.36 x 10/sup 6/ bbls respectively. This volume increase was a result of continued brining, prior to June 10, 1981, to get brine enrichment for PPG. A well leak test in May 1981 indicated some well leakage. Well workover actions to repair well and wellhead leaks were taken by Texas Brine Corp/Dravo Utility Constructors, Inc. (TBC/DUCI). Testing was restarted in June 1981 using test procedures which were developed in conjunction with the procedures and testing of West Hackberry cavern 6. This report includes a general history of the cavern and a description of the certification testing, analyses, conclusions, and recommendations. The data from cavern 7 and 6 indicate no fluid communication between caverns. Cavern 7 is about 160 ft from the dome edge. The pressure data at maximum operating pressure is comparable to the data from both West Hackberry cavern 6 and Sulphur Mines cavern 6. Therefore, it is considered unlikely that there is a leak to the dome edge. The well test data indicates leaks in the well casing seat area are approximately 100 bbls/yr.

Beasley, R.R.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dome storage field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

1 BASEMENT STORAGE 3 MICROSCOPE LAB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MECHANICAL ROOM 13 SHOWER ROOMSAIR COMPRESSOR 14 NITROGEN STORAGE 15 DIESEL FUEL STORAGE 16 ACID NEUT. TANK 17a ACID STORAGE 17b INERT GAS STORAGE 17c BASE STORAGE 17d SHELVES STORAGE * KNOCK-OUT PANEL

Boonstra, Rudy

222

NETL: Carbon Storage - Reference Shelf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf Carbon Storage Reference Shelf Below are links to Carbon Storage Program documents and reference materials. Each of the 10 categories has a variety of documents posted for easy access to current information - just click on the category link to view all related materials. RSS Icon Subscribe to the Carbon Storage RSS Feed. Carbon Storage Collage 2012 Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas IV Carbon Sequestration Project Portfolio DOE/NETL Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage RD&D Roadmap Public Outreach and Education for Carbon Storage Projects Carbon Storage Technology Program Plan Carbon Storage Newsletter Archive Impact of the Marcellus Shale Gas Play on Current and Future CCS Activities Site Screening, Selection, and Initial Characterization for Storage of CO2 in Deep Geologic Formations Carbon Storage Systems and Well Management Activities Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting of CO2 Stored in Deep Geologic Formations

223

Science Programs for a 2 m-class Telescope at Dome C, Antarctica: PILOT, the Pathfinder for an International Large Optical Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cold, dry and stable air above the summits of the Antarctic plateau provides the best ground-based observing conditions from optical to sub-mm wavelengths to be found on the Earth. PILOT is a proposed 2 m telescope, to be built at Dome C in Antarctica, able to exploit these conditions for conducting astronomy at optical and infrared wavelengths. While PILOT is intended as a pathfinder towards the construction of future grand-design facilities, it will also be able to undertake a range of fundamental science investigations in its own right. This paper provides the performance specifications for PILOT, including its instrumentation. It then describes the kinds of science projects that it could best conduct. These range from planetary science to the search for other solar systems, from star formation within the Galaxy to the star formation history of the Universe, and from gravitational lensing caused by exo-planets to that produced by the cosmic web of dark matter. PILOT would be particularly powerful for wide-field imaging at infrared wavelengths, achieving near-diffraction limited performance with simple tip-tilt wavefront correction. PILOT would also be capable of near-diffraction limited performance in the optical wavebands, as well be able to open new wavebands for regular ground based observation; in the mid-IR from 17 to 40 microns and in the sub-mm at 200 microns.

M. G. Burton; J. Lawrence; M. C. B. Ashley; J. A. Bailey; C. Blake; T. R. Bedding; J. Bland-Hawthorn; I. A. Bond; K. Glazebrook; M. G. Hidas; G. Lewis; S. N. Longmore; S. T. Maddison; S. Mattila; V. Minier; S. D. Ryder; R. Sharp; C. H. Smith; J. W. V. Storey; C. G. Tinney; P. Tuthill; A. J. Walsh; W. Walsh; M. Whiting; T. Wong; D. Woods; P. C. M. Yock

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

224

Results of hydraulic tests at Gibson Dome No. 1, Elk Ridge No. 1, and E. J. Kubat boreholes, Paradox Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydraulic testing was conducted in three boreholes in southeastern Utah to provide a portion of the data needed to characterize the hydrogeology of the Elk Ridge and Gibson Dome areas of the western Paradox Basin, Utah. The tests at the E. J. Kubat borehole yielded representative values of transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, storativity, and potentiometric levels of the Leadville Limestone. Testing at Elk Ridge No. 1 provided values of similar parameters for the combined thickness of the upper Honaker Trail, Elephant Canyon, and Cedar Mesa formations. Composite transmissivities of similar zones from these borehole tests compared closely with the results of testing at borehole GD-1. A comparison of results from lab tests on core with results of extensive borehole testing at GD-1 indicates that short-term drill stem tests in a single well can provide representative estimates of bulk transmissivities and hydraulic conductivities in this field area for test zones that have a hydraulic conductivity of greater than about 1 x 10/sup -7/ cm/sec. However, lab tests produce more representative values of effective porosity and matrix permeability of individual strata. Results of lab tests and long-term borehole tests confirm that the lower Honaker Trail and upper Paradox formations have extremely low conductivities in the vicinity of the GD-1 borehole. The results of these tests were complete as of January 1981. 22 references, 29 figures, 5 tables.

Thackston, J.W.; Preslo, L.M.; Hoexter, D.E.; Donnelly, N.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Natural Gas Depleted Fields Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6,801,291 6,805,490 6,917,547 7,074,773 7,104,948 7,038,245 6,801,291 6,805,490 6,917,547 7,074,773 7,104,948 7,038,245 1999-2012 Alabama 11,000 11,000 11,000 11,000 13,500 13,500 1999-2012 Arkansas 22,000 22,000 21,760 21,760 21,359 21,853 1999-2012 California 487,711 498,705 513,005 542,511 570,511 592,411 1999-2012 Colorado 98,068 95,068 105,768 105,768 105,858 124,253 1999-2012 Illinois 103,731 103,606 103,606 218,106 220,070 220,070 1999-2012 Indiana 32,804 32,946 32,946 30,003 30,003 30,003 1999-2012 Iowa 0 1999-2012 Kansas 287,996 281,291 281,370 283,891 283,800 283,974 1999-2012 Kentucky 210,792 210,792 210,801 212,184 212,184 212,184 1999-2012 Louisiana 527,051 527,051 528,626 528,626 528,626 402,626 1999-2012 Maryland 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 1999-2012

226

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology Methodology Methodology Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity Estimates: Estimates are based on aggregation of the noncoincident peak levels of working gas inventories at individual storage fields as reported monthly over a 60-month period ending in April 2010 on Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage Report." The months of measurement for the peak storage volumes by facilities may differ; i.e., the months do not necessarily coincide. As such, the noncoincident peak for any region is at least as big as any monthly volume in the historical record. Data from Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage Report," are collected from storage operators on a field-level basis. Operators can report field-level data either on a per reservoir basis or on an aggregated reservoir basis. It is possible that if all operators reported on a per reservoir basis that the demonstrated peak working gas capacity would be larger. Additionally, these data reflect inventory levels as of the last day of the report month, and a facility may have reached a higher inventory on a different day of the report month, which would not be recorded on Form EIA-191M.

227

Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Storage Materials Database Demonstration Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration Presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Hydrogen Storage...

228

Solid-state hydrogen storage: Storage capacity, thermodynamics, and kinetics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solid-state reversible hydrogen storage systems hold great promise for onboard applications. ... key criteria for a successful solid-state reversible storage material are high storage capacity, suitable thermodyn...

William Osborn; Tippawan Markmaitree; Leon L. Shaw; Ruiming Ren; Jianzhi Hu…

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Large Scale Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work is mainly an experimental investigation on the storage of solar energy and/or the waste heat of a ... lake or a ground cavity. A model storage unit of (1×2×0.75)m3 size was designed and constructed. The...

F. Çömez; R. Oskay; A. ?. Üçer

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Carbon Capture and Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is the long-term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. This includes a range of approaches including soil carbon sequestration (e.g., through no-till farming), terrestrial biomass sequestration (e.g., through planting forests), direct ocean injection of CO{sub 2} either onto the deep seafloor or into the intermediate depths, injection into deep geological formations, or even direct conversion of CO{sub 2} to carbonate minerals. Some of these approaches are considered geoengineering (see the appropriate chapter herein). All are considered in the 2005 special report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 2005). Of the range of options available, geological carbon sequestration (GCS) appears to be the most actionable and economic option for major greenhouse gas reduction in the next 10-30 years. The basis for this interest includes several factors: (1) The potential capacities are large based on initial estimates. Formal estimates for global storage potential vary substantially, but are likely to be between 800 and 3300 Gt of C (3000 and 10,000 Gt of CO{sub 2}), with significant capacity located reasonably near large point sources of the CO{sub 2}. (2) GCS can begin operations with demonstrated technology. Carbon dioxide has been separated from large point sources for nearly 100 years, and has been injected underground for over 30 years (below). (3) Testing of GCS at intermediate scale is feasible. In the US, Canada, and many industrial countries, large CO{sub 2} sources like power plants and refineries lie near prospective storage sites. These plants could be retrofit today and injection begun (while bearing in mind scientific uncertainties and unknowns). Indeed, some have, and three projects described here provide a great deal of information on the operational needs and field implementation of CCS. Part of this interest comes from several key documents written in the last three years that provide information on the status, economics, technology, and impact of CCS. These are cited throughout this text and identified as key references at the end of this manuscript. When coupled with improvements in energy efficiency, renewable energy supplies, and nuclear power, CCS help dramatically reduce current and future emissions (US CCTP 2005, MIT 2007). If CCS is not available as a carbon management option, it will be much more difficult and much more expensive to stabilize atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions. Recent estimates put the cost of carbon abatement without CCS to be 30-80% higher that if CCS were to be available (Edmonds et al. 2004).

Friedmann, S

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

231

Warehouse and Storage Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Warehouse and Storage Warehouse and Storage Characteristics by Activity... Warehouse and Storage Warehouse and storage buildings are those used to store goods, manufactured products, merchandise, raw materials, or personal belongings. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Warehouse and Storage Buildings... While the idea of a warehouse may bring to mind a large building, in reality most warehouses were relatively small. Forty-four percent were between 1,001 and 5,000 square feet, and seventy percent were less than 10,000 square feet. Many warehouses were newer buildings. Twenty-five percent were built in the 1990s and almost fifty percent were constructed since 1980. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

232

Sandia National Laboratories: evaluate energy storage opportunity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

energy storage opportunity 2013 Electricity Storage Handbook Published On July 31, 2013, in Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety, Grid...

233

Sandia National Laboratories: implement energy storage projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

implement energy storage projects 2013 Electricity Storage Handbook Published On July 31, 2013, in Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety,...

234

Hydrogen Storage Fact Sheet | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Storage Fact Sheet Hydrogen Storage Fact Sheet Fact sheet produced by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office describing hydrogen storage. Hydrogen Storage More Documents & Publications...

235

Compressed Air Storage Strategies | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Storage Strategies Compressed Air Storage Strategies This tip sheet briefly discusses compressed air storage strategies. COMPRESSED AIR TIP SHEET 9 Compressed Air Storage...

236

Baseline studies of surface gas exchange and soil-gas composition in preparation for CO{sub 2} sequestration research: Teapot Dome, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A baseline determination of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} fluxes and soil-gas concentrations of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} was made over the Teapot Dome oil field in the Naval Petroleum Reserve 3 in Natrona County, Wyoming, United States. This was done in anticipation of the experimentation with CO{sub 2} sequestration in the Pennsylvanian Tensleep Sandstone underlying the field at a depth of 1680 m. The measurements were made in January 2004 to capture the system with minimum biological activity in the soils, resulting in a minimum CO{sub 2} flux and a maximum CH{sub 4} flux. The CO{sub 2} fluxes were measured in the field with an infrared spectroscopic method. The CH{sub 4} fluxes were determined from gas-chromatographic measurements on discrete samples from under the flux chambers. The CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} were determined at 30-, 60-, and 100-cm depths in soil gas by gas chromatography. A total of 40 locations had triplicate flux measurements using 1.00-m{sup 2} chambers, and soil gas was sampled at single points at each of the 40 locations. Carbon dioxide fluxes averaged 227.1 CO{sub 2} m{sup -2} day{sup -1}, a standard deviation of 186.9 mg m{sup -2} day{sup -1}, and a range of - 281.7 to 732.9 mg m{sup -2} day{sup -1}, not including one location with subsurface infrastructure contamination. Methane fluxes averaged 0.137 mg CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} day{sup -1}, standard deviation of 0.326 mg m{sup -2} day{sup -1}, and a range of -0.481 to 1.14 mg m{sup -2} day{sup -1}, not including the same contaminated location.

Klusman, R.W. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (US). Dept. of Chemistry & Geochemistry

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

,"Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sourcekey","N5030US2","N5010US2","N5020US2","N5070US2","N5050US2","N5060US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)","U.S. Total Natural Gas in Underground...

238

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 1980 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the areal extent of the magma reservoir Notes The distribution of quaternary rhyolite dome of the Coso Range was analyzed. Thirty-eight separate domes and flows of phenocryst-poor, high-silica rhyolite of similar major element chemical composition were erupted over the past 1 m.y. from vents arranged in a crudely S-shaped array atop a granitic horst in the Coso Range, California. The immediate source of heat for the surficial geothermal phenomena is probably a silicic

239

EIS-0001: Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Bryan Mound Salt Dome, Brazoria County, Texas  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Strategic Petroleum Reserve prepared this SEIS to address the environmental impacts of construction and operation of two types of brine disposal systems and a new water supply system. This EIS supplements FES 76/77-6, Bryan Mound Storage Site.

240

EXERGETIC ANALYSIS OF A STEAM-FLASHING THERMAL STORAGE SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cost benefits are still evident. Currently, there are many solar power plants that have been announced Abstract Thermal energy storage is attractive in the design of concentrator solar thermal systems because, power output from a solar field. At the right cost, a storage system can improve overall economics

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dome storage field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the appropriate composition for the hydrogen storage material, such, for example, LaNi.sub.5 and other AB.sub.5 type materials and AB.sub.5+x materials, where x is from about -2.5 to about +2.5, including x=0, and the melt is gas atomized under conditions of melt temperature and atomizing gas pressure to form generally spherical powder particles. The hydrogen storage powder exhibits improved chemcial homogeneity as a result of rapid solidfication from the melt and small particle size that is more resistant to microcracking during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. A hydrogen storage component, such as an electrode for a battery or electrochemical fuel cell, made from the gas atomized hydrogen storage material is resistant to hydrogen degradation upon hydrogen absorption/desorption that occurs for example, during charging/discharging of a battery. Such hydrogen storage components can be made by consolidating and optionally sintering the gas atomized hydrogen storage powder or alternately by shaping the gas atomized powder and a suitable binder to a desired configuration in a mold or die.

Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ellis, Timothy W. (Doylestown, PA); Pecharsky, Vitalij K. (Ames, IA); Ting, Jason (Ames, IA); Terpstra, Robert (Ames, IA); Bowman, Robert C. (La Mesa, CA); Witham, Charles K. (Pasadena, CA); Fultz, Brent T. (Pasadena, CA); Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Arcadia, CA)

2000-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

242

Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Molten Salt Energy-Storage Demonstration On May 21, 2014, in Capabilities, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility,...

243

NREL: Transportation Research - Energy Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Transportation Research Cutaway image of an automobile showing the location of energy storage components (battery and inverter), as well as electric motor, power...

244

Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

| Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 4252011 eere.energy.gov Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Ned Stetson Storage Tech...

245

Hydrogen storage gets new hope  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen storage gets new hope Hydrogen storage gets new hope A new method for "recycling" hydrogen-containing fuel materials could open the door to economically viable...

246

Energy Storage | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Energy Storage Energy Storage One of the distinctive characteristics of the electric power sector is that the amount of electricity that can be generated is relatively fixed over...

247

The Utility Battery Storage Systems Program Overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utility battery energy storage allows a utility or customer to store electrical energy for dispatch at a time when its use is more economical, strategic, or efficient. The UBS program sponsors systems analyses, technology development of subsystems and systems integration, laboratory and field evaluation, and industry outreach. Achievements and planned activities in each area are discussed.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

FE Carbon Capture and Storage News  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

carbon-capture-storage-news Office of Fossil Energy carbon-capture-storage-news Office of Fossil Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585202-586-6503 en Energy Department Invests to Drive Down Costs of Carbon Capture, Support Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Pollution http://energy.gov/articles/energy-department-invests-drive-down-costs-carbon-capture-support-reductions-greenhouse-gas Energy Department Invests to Drive Down Costs of Carbon Capture, Support Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Pollution

249

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

251

The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis > The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage Analysis > The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage Latest update: August 2004 Printer-Friendly Version Natural gas-a colorless, odorless, gaseous hydrocarbon-may be stored in a number of different ways. It is most commonly held in inventory underground under pressure in three types of facilities. These are: (1) depleted reservoirs in oil and/or gas fields, (2) aquifers, and (3) salt cavern formations. (Natural gas is also stored in liquid form in above-ground tanks. A discussion of liquefied natural gas (LNG) is beyond the scope of this report. For more information about LNG, please see the EIA report, The Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status & Outlook.) Each storage type has its own physical characteristics (porosity, permeability, retention capability) and economics (site preparation and maintenance costs, deliverability rates, and cycling capability), which govern its suitability to particular applications. Two of the most important characteristics of an underground storage reservoir are its capacity to hold natural gas for future use and the rate at which gas inventory can be withdrawn-its deliverability rate (see Storage Measures, below, for key definitions).

252

Sorption thermal storage for solar energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Sorption technologies, which are considered mainly for solar cooling and heat pumping before, have gained a lot of interests for heat storage of solar energy in recent years, due to their high energy densities and long-term preservation ability for thermal energy. The aim of this review is to provide an insight into the basic knowledge and the current state of the art of research on sorption thermal storage technologies. The first section is concerned with the terminology and classification for sorption processes to give a clear scope of discussion in this paper. Sorption thermal storage is suggested to cover four technologies: liquid absorption, solid adsorption, chemical reaction and composite materials. Then the storage mechanisms and descriptions of basic closed and open cycles are given. The progress of sorption materials, cycles, and systems are also reviewed. Besides the well-known sorbents like silica gels and zeolites, some new materials, including aluminophosphates (AlPOs), silico-aluminophosphates (SAPOs) and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), are proposed for heat storage. As energy density is a key criterion, emphais is given to the comparison of storage densities and charging tempertures for different materials. Ongoing research and development studies show that the challenges of the technology focus on the aspects of different types of sorption materials, the configurations of absorption cycles and advanced adsorption reactors. Booming progress illustrates that sorption thermal storage is a realistic and sustainable option for storing solar energy, especially for long-term applications. To bring the sorption storage solution into market, more intensive studies in fields of evaluation of advanced materials and development of efficient and compact prototypes are still required.

N. Yu; R.Z. Wang; L.W. Wang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Mineralogic and isotopic constraints on the origin of strontium-rich cap rock, Tatum Dome, Mississippi, U.S.A.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The limestone portion of the salt dome cap rock at Tatum dome, Mississippi, is composed of an upper massive zone and a lower banded zone. The upper zone consists of equigranular fine-crystalline calcite with veinlets and disseminations of carbonaceous matter associated with minor amounts of detrital and authigenic quartz, sulfides and Sr minerals. The lower zone is composed of alternating light and dark calcite bands. The dark bands are composed of fine-grained and peloidal calcite, quartz, bitumen and disseminated sulfide minerals. The lighter bands consist of variable proportions of generally coarse-crystalline euhedral calcite, celestite and strontianite resulting in Sr contents of up to 30% locally. Solubility data for celestite, strontianite, calcite and anhydrite suggest that a decrease in temperature favors the replacement of Ca minerals by Sr minerals, which is consistent with the observed mineral textures and paragenesis. However, the source of cap rock Sr is difficult to determine. Anhydrite at Tatum dome contains 800 ppm Sr, but the abundance of Sr minerals in the limestone cap rock and the 87Sr86Sr ratios of limestone cap rock minerals require a Sr source other than local anhydrite. Sr released by the replacement of anhydrite by calcite is capable of producing a molar ratio of celestite to calcite of only ? 0.001, yet locally this ratio is ? 3. A likely source of additional Sr is oilfield brines, such as those in central Mississippi that contain up to 3000 ppm Sr along with significant Pb and Zn. Episodic introduction of brines into the cap rock in combination with the action of sulfate-reducing bacteria probably caused the sequential production of the dark bands. The lighter bands probably reflect introduction of a later Sr-enriched fluid or evolution of the original fluid in combination with changes in the chemical parameters controlling mineral precipitation. Calcite was replaced by Sr minerals during this later Sr-rich event.

James A. Saunders; James D. Prikryl; Harry H. Posey

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Hydrogen Storage- Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- - Overview George Thomas, Hydrogen Consultant to SNL * and Jay Keller, Hydrogen Program Manager Sandia National Laboratories H 2 Delivery and Infrastructure Workshop May 7-8, 2003 * Most of this presentation has been extracted from George Thomas' invited BES Hydrogen Workshop presentation (May 13-14, 2003) Sandia National Laboratories 4/14/03 2 Sandia National Laboratories From George Thomas, BES workshop 5/13/03 H 2 storage is a critical enabling technology for H 2 use as an energy carrier The low volumetric density of gaseous fuels requires a storage method which compacts the fuel. Hence, hydrogen storage systems are inherently more complex than liquid fuels. Storage technologies are needed in all aspects of hydrogen utilization. production distribution utilization

255

NETL: Carbon Storage FAQs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Where is CO2 storage happening today? Where is CO2 storage happening today? Sleipner Project (Norway) Sleipner Project (Norway) Carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is currently happening across the United States and around the world. Large, commercial-scale projects, like the Sleipner CO2 Storage Site in Norway, the Weyburn-Midale CO2 Project in Canada, and the In Salah project in Algeria, have been injecting CO2 for many years. Each of these projects stores more than 1 million tons of CO2 per year. Large-scale efforts are currently underway in Africa, China, Australia, and Europe, too. These commercial-scale projects are demonstrating that large volumes of CO2 can be safely and permanently stored. Additionally, a multitude of pilot efforts are underway in different parts of the world to determine suitable locations and technologies for future

256

Carbon Capture and Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main object of the carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies is the...2...emissions produced in the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal, oil, or natural gas. CCS involves first the capture of the emit...

Ricardo Guerrero-Lemus; José Manuel Martínez-Duart

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Multiported storage devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the past decade the demand for systems that can process and deliver massive amounts of storage has increased. Traditionally, large disk farms have been deployed by connecting several disks to a single server. A problem with this configuration...

Grande, Marcus Bryan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

258

NETL: Carbon Storage FAQs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

different options for CO2 storage? different options for CO2 storage? Oil and gas reservoirs, many containing carbon dioxide (CO2), as well as natural deposits of almost pure CO2, can be found in many places in the United States and around the world. These are examples of long-term storage of CO2 by nature, where "long term" means millions of years. Their existence demonstrates that naturally occurring geologic formations and structures of various kinds are capable of securely storing CO2 deep in the subsurface for very long periods of time. Because of the economic importance of oil and gas, scientists and engineers have studied these natural deposits for many decades in order to understand the physical and chemical processes which led to their formation. There are also many decades of engineering experience in subsurface operations similar to those needed for CO2 storage. The most directly applicable experience comes from the oil industry, which, for 40 years, has injected CO2 in depleted oil reservoirs for the recovery of additional product through enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Additional experience comes from natural gas storage operations, which have utilized depleted gas reservoirs, as well as reservoirs containing only water. Scientists and engineers are now combining the knowledge obtained from study of natural deposits with experience from analogous operations as a basis for studying the potential for large-scale storage of CO2 in the deep subsurface.

259

Carbon-based Materials for Energy Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Architectures for Solar Energy Production, Storage andArchitectures for Solar Energy Production, Storage and

Rice, Lynn Margaret

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Efficiency optimization for atomic frequency comb storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the efficiency of the atomic frequency comb storage protocol. We show that for a given optical depth, the preparation procedure can be optimize to significantly improve the retrieval. Our prediction is well supported by the experimental implementation of the protocol in a Tm{sup 3+}:YAG crystal. We observe a net gain in efficiency from 10 to 17% by applying the optimized preparation procedure. In the perspective of high bandwidth storage, we investigate the protocol under different magnetic fields. We analyze the effect of the Zeeman and superhyperfine interaction.

Bonarota, M.; Ruggiero, J.; Le Goueet, J.-L.; Chaneliere, T. [Laboratoire Aime Cotton, CNRS-UPR 3321, Univ. Paris-Sud, Bat. 505, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dome storage field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

DOE Partner Begins Carbon Storage Test | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Partner Begins Carbon Storage Test Partner Begins Carbon Storage Test DOE Partner Begins Carbon Storage Test June 25, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- A Department of Energy sponsored project in Hopkins County, Kentucky has begun injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) into a mature oil field to assess the region's CO2 storage capacity and feasibility for enhanced oil recovery. The project is part of DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) program and is being conducted by The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC). The project is part of the RCSP's "validation phase," where field tests are being conducted nationwide to assess the most promising sites to deploy carbon capture and storage technologies. This project is expected to create 13 full time jobs which will be

262

Savannah River Hydrogen Storage Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation from the Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting held June 19, 2003 in Washington, DC.

263

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with the second 3-months of the project and encompasses the period December 31, 2003, through March 31, 2003. During this 3-month, the dialogue of individuals representing the storage industry, universities and the Department of energy was continued and resulted in a constitution for the operation of the consortium and a draft of the initial Request for Proposals (RFP).

Robert W. Watson

2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

264

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created-the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2006 to September 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: {lg_bullet} Subaward contracts for all 2006 GSTC projects completed; {lg_bullet} Implement a formal project mentoring process by a mentor team; {lg_bullet} Upcoming Technology Transfer meetings: {sm_bullet} Finalize agenda for the American Gas Association Fall Underground Storage Committee/GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting in San Francisco, CA. on October 4, 2006; {sm_bullet} Identify projects and finalize agenda for the Fall GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA on November 8, 2006; {lg_bullet} Draft and compile an electronic newsletter, the GSTC Insider; and {lg_bullet} New members update.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

265

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Current Technology to someone Current Technology to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology Gaseous and Liquid Hydrogen Storage Materials-Based Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Storage Challenges Status of Hydrogen Storage Technologies DOE R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Current Technology

266

DOE Global Energy Storage Database  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The DOE International Energy Storage Database has more than 400 documented energy storage projects from 34 countries around the world. The database provides free, up-to-date information on grid-connected energy storage projects and relevant state and federal policies. More than 50 energy storage technologies are represented worldwide, including multiple battery technologies, compressed air energy storage, flywheels, gravel energy storage, hydrogen energy storage, pumped hydroelectric, superconducting magnetic energy storage, and thermal energy storage. The policy section of the database shows 18 federal and state policies addressing grid-connected energy storage, from rules and regulations to tariffs and other financial incentives. It is funded through DOE’s Sandia National Laboratories, and has been operating since January 2012.

267

Studies of solid state hydrogen storage materials by SAXS and QENS Qing Shi a, b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studies of solid state hydrogen storage materials by SAXS and QENS Qing Shi a, b , Hjalte S than that of other chemical fuels1 . However, hydrogen storage is still a key problem remaining on reversible hydrogen storage in complex metal hydrides, these materials have dominated the research field due

268

Prediction of the effects of compositional mixing in a reservoir on conversion to natural gas storage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The increased interest in the development of new Gas Storage Fields over the lastseveral decades has created some interesting challenges for the industry. Most existinggas… (more)

Brannon, Alan W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Energy conversions and storage caused by an unsteady poloidal flow in active solar regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss coupling processes between a magnetic field and an unsteady plasma motion, and analyze the features of energy storage and conversions in active region.

Zhongyuan Li; W. R. Hu

270

The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage Latest update: August 2004 Natural gas-a colorless, odorless, gaseous hydrocarbon-may be stored in a number of different ways. It is most commonly held in inventory underground under pressure in three types of facilities. These are: (1) depleted reservoirs in oil and/or gas fields, (2) aquifers, and (3) salt cavern formations. (Natural gas is also stored in liquid form in above-ground tanks. A discussion of liquefied natural gas (LNG) is beyond the scope of this report. For more information about LNG, please see the EIA report, The Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status & Outlook.) Each storage type has its own physical characteristics (porosity, permeability, retention capability) and economics (site preparation and

271

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period April 1, 2004, through June 30, 2004. During this 3-month period, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was made. A total of 17 proposals were submitted to the GSTC. A proposal selection meeting was held June 9-10, 2004 in Morgantown, West Virginia. Of the 17 proposals, 6 were selected for funding.

Robert W. Watson

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity by State, December 31, 1996 (Capacity in Billion Cubic Feet) Table State Interstate Companies Intrastate Companies Independent Companies Total Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Percent of U.S. Capacity Alabama................. 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 3 0.04 Arkansas ................ 0 0 3 32 0 0 3 32 0.40 California................ 0 0 10 470 0 0 10 470 5.89 Colorado ................ 4 66 5 34 0 0 9 100 1.25 Illinois ..................... 6 259 24 639 0 0 30 898 11.26 Indiana ................... 6 16 22 97 0 0 28 113 1.42 Iowa ....................... 4 270 0 0 0 0 4 270 3.39 Kansas ................... 16 279 2 6 0 0 18 285 3.57 Kentucky ................ 6 167 18 49 0 0 24 216 2.71 Louisiana................ 8 530 4 25 0 0 12 555 6.95 Maryland ................ 1 62

273

Radioactive waste storage issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

Kunz, D.E.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Flywheel Energy Storage Module  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

kWh/100 kW kWh/100 kW Flywheel Energy Storage Module * 100KWh - 1/8 cost / KWh vs. current State of the Art * Bonded Magnetic Bearings on Rim ID * No Shaft / Hub (which limits surface speed) * Flexible Motor Magnets on Rim ID * Develop Touch-down System for Earthquake Flying Rim Eliminate Shaft and Hub Levitate on Passive Magnetic Bearings Increase Rim Tip Speed Larger Diameter Thinner Rim Stores More Energy 4 X increase in Stored Energy with only 60% Increase in Weight Development of a 100 kWh/100 kW Flywheel Energy Storage Module High Speed, Low Cost, Composite Ring with Bore-Mounted Magnetics Current State of the Art Flywheel Limitations of Existing Flywheel * 15 Minutes of storage * Limited to Frequency Regulation Application * Rim Speed (Stored Energy) Limited by Hub Strain and Shaft Dynamics

275

NREL: Learning - Hydrogen Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Storage On the one hand, hydrogen's great asset as a renewable energy carrier is that it is storable and transportable. On the other hand, its very low natural density requires storage volumes that are impractical for vehicles and many other uses. Current practice is to compress the gas in pressurized tanks, but this still provides only limited driving range for vehicles and is bulkier than desirable for other uses as well. Liquefying the hydrogen more than doubles the fuel density, but uses up substantial amounts of energy to lower the temperature sufficiently (-253°C at atmospheric pressure), requires expensive insulated tanks to maintain that temperature, and still falls short of desired driving range. One possible way to store hydrogen at higher density is in the spaces within the crystalline

276

Storage Ring Operation Modes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Longitudinal bunch profile and Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Longitudinal bunch profile and Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Source Parameter Table Storage Ring Operation Modes Standard Operating Mode, top-up Fill pattern: 102 mA in 24 singlets (single bunches) with a nominal current of 4.25 mA and a spacing of 153 nanoseconds between singlets. Lattice configuration: Low emittance lattice with effective emittance of 3.1 nm-rad and coupling of 1%. Bunch length (rms): 33.5 ps. Refill schedule: Continuous top-up with single injection pulses occurring at a minimum of two minute intervals, or a multiple of two minute intervals. Special Operating Mode - 324 bunches, non top-up Fill pattern: 102 mA in 324 uniformly spaced singlets with a nominal single bunch current of 0.31 mA and a spacing of 11.37 nanoseconds between singlets.

277

AB Levitator and Electricity Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The author researched this new idea - support of flight by any aerial vehicles at significant altitude solely by the magnetic field of the planet. It is shown that current technology allows humans to create a light propulsion (AB engine) which does not depend on air, water or ground terrain. Simultaniosly, this revolutionary thruster is a device for the storage of electricity which is extracted and is replenished (during braking) from/into the storage with 100 percent efficiency. The relative weight ratio of this engine is 0.01 - 0.1 (from thrust). For some types of AB engine (toroidal form) the thrust easily may be changed in any direction without turning of engine. The author computed many projects using different versions of offered AB engine: small device for levitation-flight of a human (including flight from Earth to Outer Space), fly VTOL car (track), big VTOL aircrat, suspended low altitude stationary satellite, powerful Space Shuttle-like booster for travel to the Moon and Mars without spending energ...

Bolonkin, A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

FOREST CENTRE STORAGE BUILDING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOREST CENTRE STORAGE BUILDING 3 4 5 6 7 8 UniversityDr. 2 1 G r e n f e l l D r i v e MULTI BUILDING STORAGE BUILDING LIBRARY & COMPUTING FINE ARTS FOREST CENTRE ARTS &SCIENCE BUILDING ARTS &SCIENCE BUILDING A&S BUILDING EXTENSIO N P7 P5.1 P5 P2 P3.1 P3.2 P6 P8 P4 P2 P2 P4 P8 P2.4 PARKING MAP GRENFELL

deYoung, Brad

279

Marketing Cool Storage Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

storage has been substantiated. bv research conducted by Electric Power Research Institute, and by numerous installations, it has become acknowledged that cool stora~e can provide substantial benefits to utilities and end-users alike. A need was reco...~ned to improve utility load factors, reduce peak electric demands, and other-wise mana~e the demand-side use of electricity. As a result of these many pro~rams, it became apparent that the storage of coolin~, in the form of chilled water, ice, or other phase...

McCannon, L.

280

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Characterization Efforts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RCSP Geologic Characterization Efforts RCSP Geologic Characterization Efforts The U.S. Department of Energy created a nationwide network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) in 2003 to help determine and implement the technology, infrastructure, and regulations most appropriate to promote carbon storage in different regions of the United States and Canada. The RCSP Initiative is being implemented in three phases: (1) Characterization Phase (2003-2005) to collect data on CO2 stationary sources and geologic formations and develop the human capital to support and enable future carbon storage field tests, (2) Validation Phase (2005-2011) to evaluate promising CO2 storage opportunities through a series of small-scale (<1 million metric tons of CO2) field tests, and (3) Development Phase (2008-2018+) that involves the injection of 1 million metric tons or more of CO2 by each RCSP into regionally significant geologic formations. In addition to working toward developing human capital, encouraging stakeholder networking, and enhancing public outreach and education on carbon capture and storage (CCS), the RCSPs are conducting extensive geologic characterization across all three project phases, as well as CO2 stationary source identification and re-evaluation over time.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dome storage field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Interim storage of recyclable materials. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to investigate long-term, economical, outdoor storage of a variety of postconsumer recyclable materials. Field investigations and laboratory analysis were performed to examine how protected and unprotected storage would affect marketability and product quality of baled plastics, papers, and other miscellaneous potentially recyclable materials. Baled materials were stored and evaluated over a period of approximately two years. Evaluation of the stored paper products was undertaken using handsheets to perform tests as published by the Technical Association of the Pulp and Paper Industry (TAPPI). A beater curve analysis of selected stored papers, a pilot-scale papermaking run on a Number 2 Fourdrinier Paper machine, and two microbial analysis of the paper materials were also undertaken. Plastic samples obtained from the field were evaluated for oxidation using an Infrared Spectrophotometer (IR), and a controlled `blackbox` IR study was completed. Liquid run-off from bales was analyzed on a quarterly basis. The authors` investigations show that inexpensive outdoor storage for some paper and plastic products is potentially viable as some postconsumer paper and plastic products can be stored outdoors for long periods of time, 300 days or more, without protection. Few potential negative environmental impacts of such storage were found.

NONE

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Storage Business Model White Paper  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Storage Business Model White Paper Storage Business Model White Paper Summary June 11 2013 Storage Business Model White Paper - Purpose  Identify existing business models for investors/operators, utilities, end users  Discuss alignment of storage "value proposition" with existing market designs and regulatory paradigms  Difficulties in realizing wholesale market product revenue streams for distributed storage - the "bundled applications" problem  Discuss risks/barriers to storage adoption and where existing risk mitigation measures fall down  Recommendations for policy/research steps - Alternative business models - Accelerated research into life span and failure modes

283

Spent-fuel-storage alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Spent Fuel Storage Alternatives meeting was a technical forum in which 37 experts from 12 states discussed storage alternatives that are available or are under development. The subject matter was divided into the following five areas: techniques for increasing fuel storage density; dry storage of spent fuel; fuel characterization and conditioning; fuel storage operating experience; and storage and transport economics. Nineteen of the 21 papers which were presented at this meeting are included in this Proceedings. These have been abstracted and indexed. (ATT)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Solar Energy Storage Methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar Energy Storage Methods ... Conducting polymers have superior specific energies to the carbon-based supercapacitors and have greater power capability, compared to inorganic battery material. ... The question of load redistribution for better energetic usage is of vital importance since these new renewable energy sources are often intermittent. ...

Yu Hou; Ruxandra Vidu; Pieter Stroeve

2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

285

Seed Cotton Handling & Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seed Cotton Handling & Storage #12;S.W. Searcy Texas A&M University College Station, Texas M) Lubbock, Texas E.M. Barnes Cotton Incorporated Cary, North Carolina Acknowledgements: Special thanks for the production of this document has been provided by Cotton Incorporated, America's Cotton Producers

Mukhtar, Saqib

286

Underground pumped hydroelectric storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground pumped hydroelectric energy storage was conceived as a modification of surface pumped storage to eliminate dependence upon fortuitous topography, provide higher hydraulic heads, and reduce environmental concerns. A UPHS plant offers substantial savings in investment cost over coal-fired cycling plants and savings in system production costs over gas turbines. Potential location near load centers lowers transmission costs and line losses. Environmental impact is less than that for a coal-fired cycling plant. The inherent benefits include those of all pumped storage (i.e., rapid load response, emergency capacity, improvement in efficiency as pumps improve, and capacity for voltage regulation). A UPHS plant would be powered by either a coal-fired or nuclear baseload plant. The economic capacity of a UPHS plant would be in the range of 1000 to 3000 MW. This storage level is compatible with the load-leveling requirements of a greater metropolitan area with population of 1 million or more. The technical feasibility of UPHS depends upon excavation of a subterranean powerhouse cavern and reservoir caverns within a competent, impervious rock formation, and upon selection of reliable and efficient turbomachinery - pump-turbines and motor-generators - all remotely operable.

Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.; Kannberg, L.D.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

NV Energy Electricity Storage Valuation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examines how grid-level electricity storage may benet the operations of NV Energy in 2020, and assesses whether those benets justify the cost of the storage system. In order to determine how grid-level storage might impact NV Energy, an hourly production cost model of the Nevada Balancing Authority (\\BA") as projected for 2020 was built and used for the study. Storage facilities were found to add value primarily by providing reserve. Value provided by the provision of time-of-day shifting was found to be limited. If regulating reserve from storage is valued the same as that from slower ramp rate resources, then it appears that a reciprocating engine generator could provide additional capacity at a lower cost than a pumped storage hydro plant or large storage capacity battery system. In addition, a 25-MW battery storage facility would need to cost $650/kW or less in order to produce a positive Net Present Value (NPV). However, if regulating reserve provided by storage is considered to be more useful to the grid than that from slower ramp rate resources, then a grid-level storage facility may have a positive NPV even at today's storage system capital costs. The value of having storage provide services beyond reserve and time-of-day shifting was not assessed in this study, and was therefore not included in storage cost-benefit calculations.

Ellison, James F.; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Samaan, Nader A.; Jin, Chunlian

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

288

Nanostructured Materials for Energy Generation and Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Electrochemical Energy Storage Nanostructured Electrodesof Electrode Design for Energy Storage and Generation .batteries and their energy storage efficiency. vii Contents

Khan, Javed Miller

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Recommendation 212: Evaluate additional storage and disposal...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

212: Evaluate additional storage and disposal options Recommendation 212: Evaluate additional storage and disposal options The ORSSAB encourages DOE to evaluate additional storage...

290

Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electricity Storage Handbook Published On July 31, 2013, in Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety, Grid Integration, Infrastructure...

291

Storage/Handling | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

StorageHandling StorageHandling Records Management Procedures for Storage, Transfer & Retrieval of Records from the Washington National Records Center (WNRC) or Legacy Management...

292

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withLow Temperature Thermal Energy Storage Program of Oak Ridgefor Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage: An Overview of the DOE-

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1974. Geothermal Storage of Solar Energy, in "Governors1976. "Geothermal Storage of Solar Energy for Electric PowerUnderground Longterm Storage of Solar Energy - An Overview,"

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Hydrogen Storage Challenges | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Current Technology Hydrogen Storage Challenges Hydrogen Storage Challenges For transportation, the overarching technical challenge for hydrogen storage is how to store the...

295

Chemical Hydrogen Storage Research and Development | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Chemical Hydrogen Storage Research and Development Chemical Hydrogen Storage Research and Development DOE's chemical hydrogen storage R&D is focused on developing low-cost...

296

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withconcept of thermal energy storage in aquifers was suggestedAnnual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors' Information

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Carbon-based Materials for Energy Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flexible, lightweight energy-storage devices are of greatstrategy to fabricate flexible energy-storage devices.Flexible, lightweight energy-storage devices (batteries and

Rice, Lynn Margaret

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

HYDROGEN STORAGE USINGHYDROGEN STORAGE USING COMPLEX HYDRIDESCOMPLEX HYDRIDES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Michael D. HamptonDarlene K. Slattery, Michael D. Hampton FL Solar Energy Center, U. of Central FLFL Solar Energy Center, U. of Central FL #12;Objective · Identify a hydrogen storage system that meets the DOEHYDROGEN STORAGE USINGHYDROGEN STORAGE USING COMPLEX HYDRIDESCOMPLEX HYDRIDES Darlene K. Slattery

299

Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research69 (1995) 105-l 16 Mount St. Helens and Santiaguito lava domes: The effect of short-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of silicic lava flows, we studied surface characteristics and obtained water content and hydrogen isotopic for these patterns is most clearly preserved in lavas erupted during early, rapid stages of dome growth. Petrologists to sample flows early in their emplacement while paying attention to surface texture, position relative

Rose, William I.

300

Growth of Dome-Shaped Carbon Nanoislands on Ir(111): The Intermediate between Carbidic Clusters and Quasi-Free-Standing Graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of hydrocarbon dissociation on transition metal (TM) sur- faces represents a challenging way to its synthesisGrowth of Dome-Shaped Carbon Nanoislands on Ir(111): The Intermediate between Carbidic Clusters coupled carbidic carbon and a quasi-free-standing graphene layer, can provide information for a rational

Alfè, Dario

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dome storage field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Enhanced Integrity LNG Storage Tanks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years close attention has been given to increasing the integrity of LNG storage tanks. The M.W. Kellogg Company is a participant in four major LNG projects that incorporate enhanced integrity LNG storag...

W. S. Jacobs; S. E. Handman

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Hydrogen storage in molecular compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...have application for energy storage. We synthesized...automobiles, is very energy intensive; up to 40% of the energy content must be spent...concerns and logistical obstacles. Other storage methods, including...satellites of the outer solar system...

Wendy L. Mao; Ho-kwang Mao

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Gaseous and Liquid Hydrogen Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Today's state of the art for hydrogen storage includes 5,000- and 10,000-psi compressed gas tanks and cryogenic liquid hydrogen tanks for on-board hydrogen storage.

304

Storage Systems for Solar Steam  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three different basic concepts (encapsulation, composite material and fins) for isothermal energy storage systems using phase change materials in the ... the most promising concept for the design of storage syste...

Wolf-Dieter Steinmann; Doerte Laing…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Hydrogen storage and distribution systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen storage and transportation or distribution is closely linked together. Hydrogen can be distributed continuously in pipelines or ... or airplanes. All batch transportation requires a storage system but al...

Andreas Züttel

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Thin Film Hydrogen Storage System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the last one decade the use of hydrogen as an energy carrier has attracted world ... on the technology involved for the production, storage and use of hydrogen. In this paper we discuss storage aspect of hydrogen

I. P. Jain; Y. K. Vijay

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Hydrogen Storage Technologies Hydrogen Delivery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Storage Technologies Roadmap Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team Roadmap June 2013 #12;This.................................................................................. 13 6. Hydrogen Storage). The Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team is one of 12 U.S. DRIVE technical teams ("tech teams") whose mission

308

Thermal Storage of Solar Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal storage is needed to improve the efficiency and usefulness of solar thermal systems. The paper indicates the main storage ... which would greatly increase the practical use of solar energy — is more diffi...

H. Tabor

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances Advances made in rechargeable solid hydrogen fuel storage tanks. March 21, 2012 Field experiments on the Alamosa Canyon How best to achieve the benchmark of 300 miles of travel without refueling? It may be to use the lightweight compound ammonia-borane to carry the hydrogen. With hydrogen accounting for almost 20 percent of its weight, this stable, non-flammable compound is one of the highest-capacity materials for storing hydrogen. In a car, the introduction of a chemical catalyst would release the hydrogen as needed, thus avoiding on-board storage of large quantities of flammable hydrogen gas. When the ammonia-borane fuel is depleted of hydrogen, it would be regenerated at a

310

Electromagnetic energy storage and power dissipation in nanostructures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The processes of storage and dissipation of electromagnetic energy in nanostructures depend on both the material properties and the geometry. In this paper, the distributions of local energy density and power dissipation in nanogratings are investigated using the rigorous coupled-wave analysis. It is demonstrated that the enhancement of absorption is accompanied by the enhancement of energy storage both for material at the resonance of its dielectric function described by the classical Lorentz oscillator and for nanostructures at the resonance induced by its geometric arrangement. The appearance of strong local electric field in nanogratings at the geometry-induced resonance is directly related to the maximum electric energy storage. Analysis of the local energy storage and dissipation can also help gain a better understanding of the global energy storage and dissipation in nanostructures for photovoltaic and heat transfer applications.

Zhao, J M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

A method of estimating time scales of atmospheric piston and its application at DomeC (Antarctica)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Temporal fluctuations of the atmospheric piston are critical for interferometers as they determine their sensitivity. We characterize an instrumental set-up, termed the piston scope, that aims at measuring the atmospheric time constant, tau0, through the image motion in the focal plane of a Fizeau interferometer. High-resolution piston scope measurements have been obtained at the observatory of Paranal, Chile, in April 2006. The derived atmospheric parameters are shown to be consistent with data from the astronomical site monitor, provided that the atmospheric turbulence is displaced along a single direction. Piston scope measurements, of lower temporal and spatial resolution, were for the first time recorded in February 2005 at the Antarctic site of DomeC. Their re-analysis in terms of the new data calibration sharpens the conclusions of a first qualitative examination.

A. Kellerer; M. Sarazin; T. Butterley; R. Wilson

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

312

Steerable BHAs drill storage wells with difficult trajectories. [Bottom Hole Assembly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of steerable downhole motor assemblies allows greater variation in well bore trajectory for drilling gas and oil storage wells in salt domes in areas with surface site restrictions. With modern directional drilling tools, the cavern wells are drilled vertically, kicked off in an S turn, and then finished with a vertical section. The last 100 m of a cavern well above the last cemented casing shoe must be vertical because of the technical demands of brining and completion. To date, Kavernen Bauund Betriebs-GmbH has successfully drilled and completed three directional cavern boreholes in Germany. These directional drilling techniques have also been used successfully for vertical boreholes with strict deviation limits. The paper describes this technology.

Gomm, H.; Peters, L. (Kavernen Bau- und Betriebs-GmbH, Hannover (Germany))

1993-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

313

Webinar: Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements, originally presented on June 25, 2013.

314

Compressed Air Energy Storage System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/expanders are crucial for the economical viability of a Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system such as the

Farzad A. Shirazi; Mohsen Saadat; Bo Yan; Perry Y. Li; Terry W. Simon

315

Horizontal natural gas storage caverns and methods for producing same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides caverns and methods for producing caverns in bedded salt deposits for the storage of materials that are not solvents for salt. The contemplated salt deposits are of the bedded, non-domed variety, more particularly salt found in layered formations that are sufficiently thick to enable the production of commercially usefully sized caverns completely encompassed by walls of salt of the formation. In a preferred method, a first bore hole is drilled into the salt formation and a cavity for receiving insolubles is leached from the salt formation. Thereafter, at a predetermined distance away from the first bore hole, a second bore hole is drilled towards the salt formation. As this drill approaches the salt, the drill assumes a slant approach and enters the salt and drills through it in a horizontal direction until it intersects the cavity for receiving insolubles. This produces a substantially horizontal conduit from which solvent is controlledly supplied to the surrounding salt formation, leaching the salt and producing a concentrated brine which is removed through the first bore hole. Insolubles are collected in the cavity for receiving insolubles. By controlledly supplying solvent, a horizontal cavern is produced with two bore holes extending therefrom.

Russo, Anthony (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Economic analysis of using above ground gas storage devices for compressed air energy storage system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Above ground gas storage devices for compressed air energy storage (CAES) have three types: air storage tanks, gas cylinders, and gas storage pipelines. A cost model of these gas storage devices is established on...

Jinchao Liu; Xinjing Zhang; Yujie Xu; Zongyan Chen…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Energy Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Energy & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Energy Storage Systems (ESS) Presentations Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Energy Storage Systems (ESS) Presentations The 2008 Peer Review Meeting for the DOE Energy Storage and Power Electronics Program (ESPE) was held in Washington DC on Sept. 29-30, 2008. Current and completed program projects were presented and reviewed by a group of industry professionals. The 2008 agenda was composed of 28 projects that covered a broad range of new and ongoing, state-of-the-art, energy storage and power electronics technologies, including updates on the collaborations among DOE/ESPE, CEC in California, and NYSERDA in New York. Energy Storage Systems (ESS) presentations are available below. ESPE 2008 Peer Review - EAC Energy Storage Subcommittee - Brad Roberts, S&C

318

FE Carbon Capture and Storage News | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

December 19, 2012 December 19, 2012 DOE's Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Billion Metric Tons of U.S. CO2 Storage Resource The United States has at least 2,400 billion metric tons of possible carbon dioxide storage resource in saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and unmineable coal seams, according to a new U.S. Department of Energy publication. November 20, 2012 DOE Approves Field Test for Promising Carbon Capture Technology A promising post combustion membrane technology that can separate and capture 90 percent of the carbon dioxide from a pulverized coal plant has been successfully demonstrated and received Department of Energy approval to advance to a larger-scale field test. November 19, 2012 Carbon Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Operations in

319

FE Carbon Capture and Storage News | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

August 24, 2011 August 24, 2011 Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction Construction activities have begun at an Illinois ethanol plant that will demonstrate carbon capture and storage. July 6, 2011 Confirming CCS Security and Environmental Safety Aim of Newly Selected Field Projects The U.S. Department of Energy's portfolio of field projects aimed at confirming that long-term geologic carbon dioxide storage is safe and environmentally secure has been expanded by three projects selected to collectively receive $34.5 million over four years. June 28, 2011 Redesigned CCS Website Offers Wealth of Information on Worldwide Technology, Projects A wealth of information about worldwide carbon capture and storage technologies and projects is available on the newly launched, updated and

320

FAQs about Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

about Storage Capacity about Storage Capacity How do I determine if my tanks are in operation or idle or non-reportable? Refer to the following flowchart. Should idle capacity be included with working capacity? No, only report working capacity of tanks and caverns in operation, but not for idle tanks and caverns. Should working capacity match net available shell in operation/total net available shell capacity? Working capacity should be less than net available shell capacity because working capacity excludes contingency space and tank bottoms. What is the difference between net available shell capacity in operation and total net available shell capacity? Net available shell capacity in operation excludes capacity of idle tanks and caverns. What do you mean by transshipment tanks?

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dome storage field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

gas cylinder storage guidelines  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Compressed Gas Cylinder Storage Guidelines Compressed Gas Cylinder Storage Guidelines All cylinders must be stored vertical, top up across the upper half the cylinder but below the shoulder. Small cylinder stands or other methods may be appropriate to ensure that the cylinders are secured from movement. Boxes, cartons, and other items used to support small cylinders must not allow water to accumulate and possible cause corrosion. Avoid corrosive chemicals including salt and fumes - keep away from direct sunlight and keep objects away that could fall on them. Use Gas pressure regulators that have been inspected in the last 5 years. Cylinders that contain fuel gases whether full or empty must be stored away from oxidizer cylinders at a minimum of 20 feet. In the event they are stored together, they must be separated by a wall 5 feet high with

322

Carbon Storage Review 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin - Phase III DE-FC26-05NT42588 Robert J. Finley and the MGSC Project Team Illinois State Geological Survey (University of Illinois) and Schlumberger Carbon Services U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 * The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) via the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program (contract number DE-FC26-05NT42588) and by a cost share agreement with the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, Office of Coal Development through the Illinois Clean Coal

323

NSLS VUV Storage Ring  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

VUV Storage Ring VUV Storage Ring VUV Normal Operations Operating Parameters (pdf) Insertion Devices Flux & Brightness Orbit Stability Lattice Information (pdf) Lattice : MAD Dataset Mechanical Drawing (pdf) VUV Operating Schedule Introduction & History The VUV Ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source was one of the first of the 2nd generation light sources to operate in the world. Initially designed in 1976 the final lattice design was completed in 1978 shortly after funding was approved. Construction started at the beginning of FY 1979 and installation of the magnets was well underway by the end of FY 1980. The first stored beam was achieved in December of 1981 at 600 MeV and the first photons were delivered to beamlines in May 1982, with routine beam line operations underway by the start of FY 1983. The number of beam

324

Solar energy storage: A demonstration experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar energy storage: A demonstration experiment ... A demonstration of a phase transition that can be used for heat storage. ...

Howard S. Kimmel; Reginald P. T. Tomkins

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Combinatorial Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Combinatorial Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Combinatorial Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Presentation on NIST Combinatorial...

326

Webinar: Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration |...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Storage Materials Database Demonstration Webinar: Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration Presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Hydrogen...

327

Grid Applications for Energy Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Applications for Energy Storage Applications for Energy Storage Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop Washington DC 7-8 March 2012 Joe Eto jheto@lbl.gov (510) 486-7284 Referencing a Recent Sandia Study,* This Talk Will: Describe and illustrate selected grid applications for energy storage Time-of-use energy cost management Demand charge management Load following Area Regulation Renewables energy time shift Renewables capacity firming Compare Sandia's estimates of the economic value of these applications to the Electricity Storage Association's estimates of the capital costs of energy storage technologies *Eyer, J. and G. Corey. Energy Storage for the Electricity Grid: Benefits and Market Potential Assessment Guide. February 2010. SAND2010-0815 A Recent Sandia Study Estimates the Economic

328

Energy Storage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Storage Storage Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Source information Contents 1 Introduction 2 Benefits 3 Technologies 4 References Introduction Energy storage is a tool that can be used by grid operators to help regulate the electrical grid and help meet demand. In its most basic form, energy storage "stores" excess energy that would otherwise be wasted so that it can be used later when demand is higher. Energy Storage can be used to balance microgrids, perform frequency regulation, and provide more reliable power for high tech industrial facilities.[1] Energy storage will also allow for the expansion of intermittent renewable energy, like wind and solar, to provide electricity around the clock. Some of the major issues concerning energy storage include cost, efficiency, and size.

329

Assessment of plutonium storage safety issues at Department of Energy facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) mission for utilization and storage of nuclear materials has recently changed as a result of the end of the ``Cold War`` era. Past and current plutonium storage practices largely reflect a temporary, in-process, or in-use storage condition which must now be changed to accommodate longer-term storage. This report summarizes information concerning current plutonium metal and oxide storage practices which was presented at the Office of Defense programs (DP) workshop in Albuquerque, New Mexico on May 26-27, 1993 and contained in responses to questions by DP-62 from the field organizations.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

NETL: Carbon Storage - NETL Carbon Capture and Storage Database  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CCS Database CCS Database Carbon Storage NETL's Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage Database - Version 4 Welcome to NETL's Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS) Database. The database includes active, proposed, canceled, and terminated CCUS projects worldwide. Information in the database regarding technologies being developed for capture, evaluation of sites for carbon dioxide (CO2) storage, estimation of project costs, and anticipated dates of completion is sourced from publically available information. The CCUS Database provides the public with information regarding efforts by various industries, public groups, and governments towards development and eventual deployment of CCUS technology. As of November 2012, the database contained 268 CCUS projects worldwide. The 268 projects include 68 capture, 61 storage, and 139 for capture and storage in more than 30 countries across 6 continents. While most of the projects are still in the planning and development stage, or have recently been proposed, 37 are actively capturing and injecting CO2

331

Testing efficiency of storage in the subsurface: frio brine pilot experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Can we demonstrate that subsurface storage is an effective method of reducing emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere? The Frio Brine Pilot Experiment is designed to test storage performance of a typical subsurface environment in an area where large-volume sources and sinks are abundant, near Houston, Texas, USA. We employed extensive pre-experiment characterization and modeling to identify significant factors that increase or decrease risk of leakage from the injection zone. We then designed the experiment to focus on those factors, as well as to test for presence or absence of events that are not expected. A fully developed reservoir model of heterogeneous reworked fluvial sandstones of the Frio Formation documents three-dimensional compartmentalization of the injection horizon by faulting associated with salt-dome intrusion and growth. Modeling using the TOUGH2 simulator showed that a significant source of uncertainty for subsurface performance of injected CO2 is residual CO2 saturation during storage. If initial displacement of water during injection is efficient and capillary effects create the expected residual saturation of 30 percent CO2, the volume occupied by the plume will be limited, and long-term storage can be expected even in an open system. If, however, during injection, CO2 moves out from the injection well along high-permeability pathways, it may not contact most pores, and residual saturation will have a smaller effect on storage. Our experiment is therefore designed to monitor plume geometry and CO2 saturation near the injection well and closely spaced observation well. Leakage out of the injection zone as a result of well engineering or other flaws in the seal is also monitored in the sandstone immediately overlying the injection zone and at the surface using multiple techniques. Permitting strategies include cooperation among two State agencies, as well as Federal NEPA assessment, because of the innovative aspects of the experiment.

Hovorka, Susan D.; Doughty, Christine; Holtz, Mark

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

332

NETL: Carbon Storage Best Practices Manuals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Best Practices Manuals Best Practices Manuals Developing best practices - or reliable and consistent standards and operational characteristics for CO2 collection, injection and storage - is essential for providing the basis for a legal and regulatory framework and encouraging widespread global CCS deployment. The lessons learned during the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships' (RCSP) Validation Phase small-scale field tests are being utilized to generate a series of Best Practices Manuals (BPMs) that serve as the basis for the design and implementation of both large-scale field tests and commercial carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects. NETL has released six BPMS: NETL's "Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) of CO2 Stored in Deep Geologic Formations - 2012 Update" BPM provides an overview of MVA techniques that are currently in use or are being developed; summarizes DOE's MVA R&D program; and presents information that can be used by regulatory organizations, project developers, and policymakers to ensure the safety and efficacy of carbon storage projects.

333

Groundwater contaminant interaction with aquifer thermal energy storage systems on the scale of a large urban area.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This research thesis attempts to answer the question if a pathline analysis can be applied to a transient flow field where aquifer thermal energy storage… (more)

Lieshout, R. van

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

A geochemical assessment of petroleum from underground oil storage caverns in relation to petroleum from natural reservoirs offshore Norway.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The aim of this study is to compare oils from known biodegraded fields offshore Norway to waxes and oils from an artificial cavern storage facility,… (more)

Østensen, Marie

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Heat storage with CREDA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principle of operation of ETS or Electric Thermal Storage is discussed in this book. As can be seen by the diagram presented, heating elements buried deep within the core are energized during off-peak periods or periods of lower cost energy. These elements charge the core to a per-determined level, then during the on-peak periods when the cost of electricity is higher or demand is higher, the heat is extracted from the core. The author discusses how this technology has progressed to the ETS equipment of today; this being the finer control of charging rates and extraction of heat from the core.

Beal, T. (Fostoria Industries, Fostoria, OH (US))

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

The thermal regime in the resurgent dome of Long Valley Caldera, California: Inferences from precision temperature logs in deep wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Long Valley Caldera in eastern California formed 0.76 Ma ago in a cataclysmic eruption that resulted in the deposition of 600 km3 of Bishop Tuff. The total current heat flow from the caldera floor is estimated to be ~ 290 MW, and a geothermal power plant in Casa Diablo on the flanks of the resurgent dome (RD) generates ~40 MWe. The RD in the center of the caldera was uplifted by ~ 80 cm between 1980 and 1999 and was explained by most models as a response to magma intrusion into the shallow crust. This unrest has led to extensive research on geothermal resources and volcanic hazards in the caldera. Here we present results from precise, high-resolution, temperature–depth profiles in five deep boreholes (327–1,158 m) on the RD to assess its thermal state, and more specifically 1) to provide bounds on the advective heat transport as a guide for future geothermal exploration, 2) to provide constraints on the occurrence of magma at shallow crustal depths, and 3) to provide a baseline for future transient thermal phenomena in response to large earthquakes, volcanic activity, or geothermal production. The temperature profiles display substantial non-linearity within each profile and variability between the different profiles. All profiles display significant temperature reversals with depth and temperature gradients Valley boreholes are at the approximate same elevation as the high-temperature unit in borehole M-1 in Casa Diablo indicating lateral or sub-lateral hydrothermal flow through the resurgent dome. Small differences in temperature between measurements in consecutive years in three of the wells suggest slow cooling of the shallow hydrothermal flow system. By matching theoretical curves to segments of the measured temperature profiles, we calculate horizontal groundwater velocities in the hydrothermal flow unit under the RD that range from 1.9 to 2.8 m/yr, which corresponds to a maximum power flowing through the RD of 3–4 MW. The relatively low temperatures and large isothermal segments at the bottom of the temperature profiles are inconsistent with the presence of magma at shallow crustal levels.

Shaul Hurwitz; Christopher D. Farrar; Colin F. Williams

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Magnetic-field-dosimetry system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device is provided for measuring the magnetic field dose and peak field exposure. The device includes three Hall-effect sensors all perpendicular to each other, sensing the three dimensional magnetic field and associated electronics for data storage, calculating, retrieving and display.

Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

1981-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

338

Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

| Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 4/25/2011 eere.energy.gov | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 4/25/2011 eere.energy.gov Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Ned Stetson Storage Tech Team Lead Fuel Cell Technologies Program U.S. Department of Energy 12/13/2011 Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Marni Lenahan December 13, 2011 Database Background * The Hydrogen Storage Materials Database was built to retain information from DOE Hydrogen Storage funded research and make these data more accessible. * Data includes properties of hydrogen storage materials investigated such as synthesis conditions, sorption and release conditions, capacities, thermodynamics, etc. http://hydrogenmaterialssearch.govtools.us Current Status * Data continues to be collected from DOE funded research.

339

Enabling Utility-Scale Electrical Energy Storage through Underground Hydrogen-Natural Gas Co-Storage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Energy storage technology is needed for the storage of surplus baseload generation and the storage of intermittent wind power, because it can increase the flexibility… (more)

Peng, Dan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Gas hydrate cool storage system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

1984-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dome storage field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

MAXIMIZING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE IN THE SOLAR CORONA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy that drives solar eruptive events such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs) almost certainly originates in coronal magnetic fields. Such energy may build up gradually on timescales of days or longer before its sudden release in an eruptive event, and the presence of free magnetic energy capable of rapid release requires nonpotential magnetic fields and associated electric currents. For magnetic energy to power a CME, that energy must be sufficient to open the magnetic field to interplanetary space, to lift the ejecta against solar gravity, and to accelerate the material to speeds of typically several hundred km s{sup -1}. Although CMEs are large-scale structures, many originate from relatively compact active regions on the solar surface-suggesting that magnetic energy storage may be enhanced when it takes place in smaller magnetic structures. This paper builds on our earlier work exploring energy storage in large-scale dipolar and related bipolar magnetic fields. Here we consider two additional cases: quadrupolar fields and concentrated magnetic bipoles intended to simulate active regions. Our models yield stored energies whose excess over that of the corresponding open field state can be greater than 100% of the associated potential field energy; this contrasts with maximum excess energies of only about 20% for dipolar and symmetric bipolar configurations. As in our previous work, energy storage is enhanced when we surround a nonpotential field with a strong overlying potential field that acts to 'hold down' the nonpotential flux as its magnetic energy increases.

Wolfson, Richard; Drake, Christina; Kennedy, Max, E-mail: wolfson@middlebury.edu [Department of Physics, Middlebury College, Middlebury, VT 05753 (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Maximizing Magnetic Energy Storage in the Solar Corona  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy that drives solar eruptive events such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs) almost certainly originates in coronal magnetic fields. Such energy may build up gradually on timescales of days or longer before its sudden release in an eruptive event, and the presence of free magnetic energy capable of rapid release requires nonpotential magnetic fields and associated electric currents. For magnetic energy to power a CME, that energy must be sufficient to open the magnetic field to interplanetary space, to lift the ejecta against solar gravity, and to accelerate the material to speeds of typically several hundred km s–1. Although CMEs are large-scale structures, many originate from relatively compact active regions on the solar surface—suggesting that magnetic energy storage may be enhanced when it takes place in smaller magnetic structures. This paper builds on our earlier work exploring energy storage in large-scale dipolar and related bipolar magnetic fields. Here we consider two additional cases: quadrupolar fields and concentrated magnetic bipoles intended to simulate active regions. Our models yield stored energies whose excess over that of the corresponding open field state can be greater than 100% of the associated potential field energy; this contrasts with maximum excess energies of only about 20% for dipolar and symmetric bipolar configurations. As in our previous work, energy storage is enhanced when we surround a nonpotential field with a strong overlying potential field that acts to "hold down" the nonpotential flux as its magnetic energy increases.

Richard Wolfson; Christina Drake; Max Kennedy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not described in the previous literature for electrochemical reduction of spent fuels, have been attempted. A quantitative analytical method for measuring the concentration of sodium borohydride in alkaline aqueous solution has been developed as part of this work and is described herein. Finally, findings from stability tests for sodium borohydride in aqueous solutions of several different compositions are reported. For aminoborane, other research institutes have developed regeneration schemes involving tributyltin hydride. In this report, electrochemical reduction experiments attempting to regenerate tributyltin hydride from tributyltin chloride (a representative by-product of the regeneration scheme) are described. These experiments were performed in the non-aqueous solvents acetonitrile and 1,2-dimethoxyethane. A non-aqueous reference electrode for electrolysis experiments in acetonitrile was developed and is described. One class of boron hydrides, called polyhedral boranes, became of interest to the DOE due to their ability to contain a sufficient amount of hydrogen to meet program goals and because of their physical and chemical safety attributes. Unfortunately, the research performed here has shown that polyhedral boranes do not react in such a way as to allow enough hydrogen to be released, nor do they appear to undergo hydrogenation from the spent fuel form back to the original hydride. After the polyhedral boranes were investigated, the project goals remained the same but the hydrogen storage material was switched by the DOE to ammonia borane. Ammonia borane was found to undergo an irreversible hydrogen release process, so a direct hydrogenation was not able to occur. To achieve the hydrogenation of the spent ammonia borane fuel, an indirect hydrogenation reaction is possible by using compounds called organotin hydrides. In this process, the organotin hydrides will hydrogenate the spent ammonia borane fuel at the cost of their own oxidation, which forms organotin halides. To enable a closed-loop cycle, our task was then to be able to hydrogenate the organotin halides back to th

Dr. Digby Macdonald

2010-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

344

Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

UNM On September 16, 2014, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Capabilities, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities, Materials Science, News, News & Events, Partnership, Research...

345

Underground Storage Tank Program (Vermont)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These rules are intended to protect public health and the environment by establishing standards for the design, installation, operation, maintenance, monitoring, and closure of underground storage...

346

Savannah River Hydrogen Storage Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Member of DOE Carbon Working Group - Developed novel method for forming doped carbon nanotubes as part of DOE Storage Program (patent pending) - Collaborated with universities and...

347

Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Simulations Reveal Ion Dynamics in Polymer Electrolyte On November 13, 2012, in Energy Storage, News, News & Events Improving battery electrolytes is highly desirable, particularly...

348

Energy storage in carbon nanoparticles.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Hydrogen (H2) and methane (CH4) are clean energy sources, and their storage in carbonaceous materials is a promising technology for safe and cost effective usage… (more)

Guan, Cong.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Powertech: Hydrogen Expertise Storage Needs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation by Angela Das of Powertech was given at the DOE Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Workshop in March 2013.

350

Energy Storage Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. At NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF), research focuses on the integration of energy storage systems (both stationary and vehicle-mounted) and interconnection with the utility grid. Focusing on battery technologies, but also hosting ultra-capacitors and other electrical energy storage technologies, the laboratory will provide all resources necessary to develop, test, and prove energy storage system performance and compatibility with distributed energy systems. The laboratory will also provide robust vehicle testing capability, including a drive-in environmental chamber, which can accommodate commercial-sized hybrid, electric, biodiesel, ethanol, compressed natural gas, and hydrogen fueled vehicles. The Energy Storage Laboratory is designed to ensure personnel and equipment safety when testing hazardous battery systems or other energy storage technologies. Closely coupled with the research electrical distribution bus at ESIF, the Energy Storage Laboratory will offer megawatt-scale power testing capability as well as advanced hardware-in-the-loop and model-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. Some application scenarios are: The following types of tests - Performance, Efficiency, Safety, Model validation, and Long duration reliability. (2) Performed on the following equipment types - (a) Vehicle batteries (both charging and discharging V2G); (b) Stationary batteries; (c) power conversion equipment for energy storage; (d) ultra- and super-capacitor systems; and (e) DC systems, such as commercial microgrids.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

00: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive 00: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste SUMMARY This EIS evaluates the potential environmental and cost impacts of strategic managment alternatives for managing five types of radioactive and hazardous wastes that have resulted and will continue to result from nuclear defense and research activities at a variety of sites around the United States. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 7, 2011 EIS-0200-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Treatment of Transuranic Waste at the Idaho National Laboratory, Carlsbad Field Office March 7, 2008 EIS-0200: Amendment to the Record of Decision Treatment and Storage of Transuranic Waste

352

Creating a programmable object storage stack  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The current file system and storage stack is restricted in the amount of information that flows from application to storage and from storage to application. This limits the ability of applications to tailor the storage system to particular needs of the ... Keywords: filesystems, object storage

Orko Momin, Cengiz Karakoyunlu, Michael T. Runde, John A. Chandy

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

:i" :i" _,, ' _~" ORISE 95/C-70 :E : i:; :' l,J : i.: RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY Op BUILDINGS 401, ' 403, AND ' m HITTMAN BUILDING $ <,' 2:. NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE I .~~ ; " LEWISTON, ' NEW YORK : f? j:,:i I ,.J- ;b f" /: Li _e.*. ~,, I ,,~, ,:,,;:, Prepared by T. .I. Vitkus i,c Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division ;>::; Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education .,:, "Oak Ridge, Temressee 37831-0117 .F P ., ? :_ &,d ,,,, ;<:x,, Prepared for the 3 I. Office of Environmental Restoration I, U.S. Department of Energy i gy i. ~: ,,, "! ? ' :' : "' ,//, FINAL REPORT ".$ :,a ,,, MARCH 1995 ; m L ,, ,, ,,,. ., ,,. ' 1 jq ,Ij:,., .,~ _,I_ 1 This report is based on work performed under contract number DE-AC05-760R00033 with the

354

Reversible hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In accordance with the present disclosure, a process for synthesis of a complex hydride material for hydrogen storage is provided. The process includes mixing a borohydride with at least one additive agent and at least one catalyst and heating the mixture at a temperature of less than about 600.degree. C. and a pressure of H.sub.2 gas to form a complex hydride material. The complex hydride material comprises MAl.sub.xB.sub.yH.sub.z, wherein M is an alkali metal or group IIA metal, Al is the element aluminum, x is any number from 0 to 1, B is the element boron, y is a number from 0 to 13, and z is a number from 4 to 57 with the additive agent and catalyst still being present. The complex hydride material is capable of cyclic dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation and has a hydrogen capacity of at least about 4 weight percent.

Ritter, James A. (Lexington, SC); Wang, Tao (Columbia, SC); Ebner, Armin D. (Lexington, SC); Holland, Charles E. (Cayce, SC)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

355

Core assembly storage structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A structure for the storage of core assemblies from a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The structure comprises an enclosed housing having a substantially flat horizontal top plate, a bottom plate and substantially vertical wall members extending therebetween. A plurality of thimble members extend downwardly through the top plate. Each thimble member is closed at its bottom end and has an open end adjacent said top plate. Each thimble member has a length and diameter greater than that of the core assembly to be stored therein. The housing is provided with an inlet duct for the admission of cooling air and an exhaust duct for the discharge of air therefrom, such that when hot core assemblies are placed in the thimbles, the heat generated will by convection cause air to flow from the inlet duct around the thimbles and out the exhaust duct maintaining the core assemblies at a safe temperature without the necessity of auxiliary powered cooling equipment.

Jones, Jr., Charles E. (Northridge, CA); Brunings, Jay E. (Chatsworth, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

The Silver Bullet: Storage!  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

West Philly High X-prize PHEV The Silver Bullet... Storage! Terry Boston President & CEO PJM Interconnection July 12, 2011 PJM©2011 2 United States PJM Eastern Interconnection PJM as Part of the Eastern Interconnection KEY STATISTICS PJM member companies 700+ millions of people served 58 peak load in megawatts 158,448 MWs of generating capacity 180,400 miles of transmission lines 61,200 GWh of annual energy 794,335 generation sources 1,365 square miles of territory 211,000 area served 13 states + DC Internal/external tie lines 142 * 24% of generation in Eastern Interconnection * 27% of load in Eastern Interconnection * 19% of transmission assets in Eastern Interconnection 20% of U.S. GDP produced in PJM www.pjm.com As of 6/1/2011 PJM©2011 3 43,623 0 5,000 10,000 15,000

357

Superconducting energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the status of energy storage involving superconductors and assesses what impact the recently discovered ceramic superconductors may have on the design of these devices. Our description is intended for R&D managers in government, electric utilities, firms, and national laboratories who wish an overview of what has been done and what remains to be done. It is assumed that the reader is acquainted with superconductivity, but not an expert on the topics discussed here. Indeed, it is the author`s aim to enable the reader to better understand the experts who may ask for the reader`s attention, support, or funding. This report may also inform scientists and engineers who, though expert in related areas, wish to have an introduction to our topic.

Giese, R.F.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Argonne leads hydrogen storage project  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new $1.88m research project on on-board hydrogen storage at the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois aims to develop a hydrogen storage system that can hold enough hydrogen for a driving range of 300 miles (480 km).

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Reversible Seeding in Storage Rings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose to generate steady-state microbunching in a storage ring with a reversible seeding scheme. High gain harmonic generation (HGHG) and echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) are two promising methods for microbunching linac electron beams. Because both schemes increase the energy spread of the seeded beam, they cannot drive a coherent radiator turn-by-turn in a storage ring. However, reversing the seeding process following the radiator minimizes the impact on the electron beam and may allow coherent radiation at or near the storage ring repetition rate. In this paper we describe the general idea and outline a proof-of-principle experiment. Electron storage rings can drive high average power light sources, and free-electron lasers (FELs) are now producing coherent light sources of unprecedented peak brightness While there is active research towards high repetition rate FELs (for example, using energy recovery linacs), at present there are still no convenient accelerator-based sources of high repetition rate, coherent radiation. As an alternative avenue, we recently proposed to establish steady-state microbunching (SSMB) in a storage ring. By maintaining steady-state coherent microbunching at one point in the storage ring, the beam generates coherent radiation at or close to the repetition rate of the storage ring. In this paper, we propose a method of generating a microbunched beam in a storage ring by using reversible versions of linac seeding schemes.

Ratner, Daniel; Chao, Alex; /SLAC

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

360

Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

Williamson, Andrew J. (Pleasanton, CA); Reboredo, Fernando A. (Pleasanton, CA)

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dome storage field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Inferences on the hydrothermal system beneath the resurgent dome in Long Valley Caldera, east-central California, USA, from recent pumping tests and geochemical sampling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Quaternary volcanic unrest has provided heat for episodic hydrothermal circulation in the Long Valley caldera, including the present-day hydrothermal system, which has been active over the past 40 kyr. The most recent period of crustal unrest in this region of east-central California began around 1980 and has included periods of intense seismicity and ground deformation. Uplift totaling more than 0.7 m has been centered on the caldera’s resurgent dome, and is best modeled by a near-vertical ellipsoidal source centered at depths of 6–7 km. Modeling of both deformation and microgravity data now suggests that (1) there are two inflation sources beneath the caldera, a shallower source 7–10 km beneath the resurgent dome and a deeper source ?15 km beneath the caldera’s south moat and (2) the shallower source may contain components of magmatic brine and gas. The Long Valley Exploration Well (LVEW), completed in 1998 on the resurgent dome, penetrates to a depth of 3 km directly above this shallower source, but bottoms in a zone of 100°C fluid with zero vertical thermal gradient. Although these results preclude extrapolations of temperatures at depths below 3 km, other information obtained from flow tests and fluid sampling at this well indicates the presence of magmatic volatiles and fault-related permeability within the metamorphic basement rocks underlying the volcanic fill. In this paper, we present recently acquired data from LVEW and compare them with information from other drill holes and thermal springs in Long Valley to delineate the likely flow paths and fluid system properties under the resurgent dome. Additional information from mineralogical assemblages in core obtained from fracture zones in LVEW documents a previous period of more vigorous and energetic fluid circulation beneath the resurgent dome. Although this system apparently died off as a result of mineral deposition and cooling (and/or deepening) of magmatic heat sources, flow testing and tidal analyses of LVEW water level data show that relatively high permeability and strain sensitivity still exist in the steeply dipping principal fracture zone penetrated at a depth of 2.6 km. The hydraulic properties of this zone would allow a pressure change induced at distances of several kilometers below the well to be observable within a matter of days. This indicates that continuous fluid pressure monitoring in the well could provide direct evidence of future intrusions of magma or high-temperature fluids at depths of 5–7 km.

Christopher D. Farrar; Michael L. Sorey; Evelyn Roeloffs; Devin L. Galloway; James F. Howle; Ronald Jacobson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrides for Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage George Thomas, Consultant Sandia National Laboratories G. J. Thomas Efficient onboard hydrogen storage is a critical enabling technology for the use of hydrogen in vehicles * The low volumetric density of gaseous fuels requires a storage method which densifies the fuel. - This is particularly true for hydrogen because of its lower energy density relative to hydrocarbon fuels. * Storage methods result in additional weight and volume above that of the fuel. How do we achieve adequate stored energy in an efficient, safe and cost-effective system? G. J. Thomas However, the storage media must meet certain requirements: - reversible hydrogen uptake/release - lightweight - low cost - cyclic stability - rapid kinetic properties - equilibrium properties (P,T) consistent

363

Grid Storage and the Energy Frontier Research Centers | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Grid Storage and the Energy Frontier Research Centers Grid Storage and the Energy Frontier Research Centers DOE: Grid Storage and the Energy Frontier Research Centers Grid Storage...

364

salt-water pumped-storage hydroelectric plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

salt-water pumped-storage hydroelectric plant, saltwater pumped-storage hydroelectric station, seawater pumped-storage hydroelectric plant, seawater pumped-storage hydroelectric station ? Salzwasser-...

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Sandia National Laboratories: DOE Energy Storage Systems program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Systems program 2013 Electricity Storage Handbook Published On July 31, 2013, in Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety,...

366

Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements to Meet the 2017 On Board...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Storage Materials Requirements to Meet the 2017 On Board Hydrogen Storage Technical Targets Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements to Meet the 2017 On Board Hydrogen Storage...

367

DOE Regional Partnership Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Storage Practices in Great Plains Region of U.S. and Canada DOE Regional Partnership Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Storage Practices in Great Plains Region of U.S. and Canada August 19, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A field test demonstrating the best approaches for terrestrial carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in the heartland of North America has been successfully completed by one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs). The Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership , a collaboration of over 80 U.S. and Canadian stakeholders, conducted the field test at sites in the Prairie Pothole Region, extending from central Iowa into Northern Alberta,

368

Carbon Capture and Storage | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Storage Carbon Capture and Storage Through Office of Fossil Energy R&D the United States has become a world leader in carbon capture and storage science and technology. Fossil...

369

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in floor tiles for thermal energy storage,” working paper,D. R. (2000). Thermal energy storage for space cooling,A simple model of thermal energy storage is developed as a

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersLow Temperature Thermal Energy Storage Program of Oak RidgeAquifers for Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage: An Overview of

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

NATURAL GAS STORAGE ENGINEERING Kashy Aminian  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURAL GAS STORAGE ENGINEERING Kashy Aminian Petroleum & Natural Gas Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA. Shahab D. Mohaghegh Petroleum & Natural Gas Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA. Keywords: Gas Storage, Natural Gas, Storage, Deliverability, Inventory

Mohaghegh, Shahab

372

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zakhidov, R. A. 8 1971, Storage of solar energy in a sandy-aquifers for heat storage, solar captors for heat productionthermal energy storage for cogeneration and solar systems,

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and R.A. Zakhidov, "Storage of Solar Energy in a Sandy-Heat as Related to the Storage of Solar Energy. Sharing the1974. Geothermal Storage of Solar Energy, in "Governors

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R. A. 8 1971, Storage of solar energy in a sandy-gravelthermal energy storage for cogeneration and solar systems,storage, solar captors for heat production 9 and heat pumps for energy

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Technical Assessment: Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Assessment: Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage for Vehicular Applications October 30, 2006 .....................................................................................................................................................................8 APPENDIX A: Review of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Systems ......................................................................................18 APPENDIX C: Presentation to the FreedomCAR & Fuel Hydrogen Storage Technical Team

376

Investigations in cool thermal storage: storage process optimization and glycol sensible storage enhancement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

device in order to meet the utility's mandate. The first part of this study looks at the effects of adding propylene glycol to a static-water ice thermal storage tank, in the pursuit of increasing storage capacity. The effects of glycol addition...

Abraham, Michaela Marie

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Structure Optimization of FePt Nanoparticles of Various Sizes for Magnetic Data Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to a modified reaction route based on Sun et al.[1] Hexane dispersions of nanoparticles were dried increases with particle size and with the temperature in the range 600 °C to 650 °C, being close to unity-assembly over large areas, and a narrow distribution of switching fields. The long storage time and high storage

Laughlin, David E.

378

Microporous Metal Organic Materials: Promising Candidates as Sorbents for Hydrogen Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microporous Metal Organic Materials: Promising Candidates as Sorbents for Hydrogen Storage Long Pan coordination structures represent a promising new entry to the field of hydrogen storage materials.2 To fully that effectively store hydrogen are needed for use in fuel cell powered vehicles. Among the various candidate

Li, Jing

379

Assessment of storage lipid accumulation patterns in eucalanoid copepods from the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Members of the copepod family Eucalanidae are widely distributed throughout the world?s oceans and have been noted for their accumulation of storage lipids in high- and low-latitude environments. However, little is known about the lipid composition of eucalanoid copepods in low-latitude environments. The purpose of this study was to examine fatty acid and alcohol profiles in the storage lipids (wax esters and triacylglycerols) of Eucalanus inermis, Rhincalanus rostrifrons, R. nasutus, Pareucalanus attenuatus, and Subeucalanus subtenuis, collected primarily in the eastern tropical north Pacific near the Tehuantepec Bowl and Costa Rica Dome regions, noted for its oxygen minimum zone, during fall 2007 and winter 2008/2009. Adult copepods and particulate material were collected in the upper 50 m and from 200 to 300 m in the upper oxycline. Lipid profiles of particulate matter were generated to help ascertain information on ecological strategies of these species and on differential accumulation of dietary and modified fatty acids in the wax ester and triacylglycerol storage lipid components of these copepods in relation to their vertical distributions around the oxygen minimum zone. Additional data on phospholipid fatty acid and sterol/fatty alcohol fractions were also generated to obtain a comprehensive lipid data set for each sample. Rhincalanus spp. accumulated relatively large amounts of storage lipids (31–80% of dry mass (DM)), while E. inermis had moderate amounts (2–9% DM), and P. attenuatus and S. subtenuis had low quantities of storage lipid (0–1% DM). E. inermis and S. subtenuis primarily accumulated triacylglycerols (>90% of storage lipids), while P. attenuatus and Rhincalanus spp. primarily accumulated wax esters (>84% of storage lipids). Based on previously generated molecular phylogenies of the Eucalanidae family, these results appear to support genetic predisposition as a major factor explaining why a given species accumulates primarily triacylglycerols or wax esters, and also potentially dictating major fatty acid and alcohol accumulation patterns within the more highly modified wax ester fraction. Comparisons of fatty acid profiles between triacylglycerol and wax ester components in copepods with that in available prey suggested that copepod triacylglycerols were more reflective of dietary fatty acids, while wax esters contained a higher proportion of modified or de novo synthesized forms. Sterols and phospholipid fatty acids were similar between species, confirming high levels of regulation within these components. Similarities between triacylglycerol fatty acid profiles of E. inermis collected in surface waters and at >200 m depth indicate little to no feeding during their ontogenetic migration to deeper, low-oxygen waters.

Christine J. Cass; Kendra L. Daly; Stuart G. Wakeham

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Energy Storage Computational Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Storage Computational Tool Energy Storage Computational Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Storage Computational Tool Agency/Company /Organization: Navigant Consulting Sector: Energy Focus Area: Grid Assessment and Integration Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.smartgrid.gov/recovery_act/program_impacts/energy_storage_computat Country: United States Web Application Link: www.smartgrid.gov/recovery_act/program_impacts/energy_storage_computat Cost: Free Northern America Language: English Energy Storage Computational Tool Screenshot References: Energy Storage Computational Tool[1] SmartGrid.gov[2] Logo: Energy Storage Computational Tool This tool is used for identifying, quantifying, and monetizing the benefits

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dome storage field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Systems New Liquid Salt Electrolytes Could Lead to Cost-Effective Flow Batteries On February 22, 2012, in Energy, Energy Storage Systems, Grid Integration, News,...

382

DRAFT "Energy Advisory Committee" - Energy Storage Subcommittee...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Report: Revision 2 DRAFT "Energy Advisory Committee" - Energy Storage Subcommittee Report: Revision 2 Energy storage plays a vital role in all forms of business and affects the...

383

Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collaboration On May 28, 2014, in Biofuels, CRF, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety, Facilities, Grid Integration,...

384

Agenda: Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage and Distribution ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage and Distribution Agenda: Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage and Distribution A Public Meeting on the Quadrennial Energy Review, Hosted by the...

385

Hydrogen Storage Basics | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

storing hydrogen include: Physical storage of compressed hydrogen gas in high pressure tanks (up to 700 bar) Physical storage of cryogenic liquid hydrogen (cooled to -253C, at...

386

Hydrogen for Energy Storage Analysis Overview (Presentation)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

competing technologies for utility- scale energy storage systems. Explore the cost and GHG emissions impacts of interaction of hydrogen storage and variable renewable resources...

387

California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun...

388

California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

389

Sandia National Laboratories: solar thermal energy storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

thermal energy storage Sandia Solar Energy Test System Cited in National Engineering Competition On May 16, 2013, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities,...

390

Permitted Mercury Storage Facility Notifications | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Services Waste Management Waste Disposition Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury is in the Planning Stages Permitted Mercury Storage Facility...

391

Structured Storage in ATLAS Distributed Data Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEP'12 Talk Structured Storage - Concepts - Technologies ATLAS DDM Use Cases - Storage facility - Data intensive analytics Operational Experiences - Software - Hardware Conclusions

Lassnig, M; The ATLAS collaboration; Molfetas, A; Beermann, T; Dimitrov, G; Canali, L; Zang, D

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scale Thermal Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solarsolar captors, thermal effluents, low cost energy duringSeale Thermal Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solar

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Overview of Gridscale Rampable Intermittent Dispatchable Storage...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rampable Intermittent Dispatchable Storage (GRIDS) Program Presentation by Mark Johnson, Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy, at the Flow Cells for Energy Storage...

394

Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2.1 Cloud Providers . . . . . . . . . . . .2.1.1 Cloud Storage . . . . . . . . .2.1.2 Cloud Computation . . . . . . 2.2 Enterprise Storage

Vrable, Michael Daniel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Prediction of Novel Hydrogen Storage Reactions  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Miwa Computational Physics Lab. Toyota Central R&D Labs., Inc. Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials, 18 MAY 2006 Prediction of Novel Hydrogen Storage Reactions 0...

396

Combinatorial Approach for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Combinatorial Approach for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Combinatorial Approach for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Presented at the U.S. Department of...

397

Agenda: Electricity Transmission, Storage and Distribution -...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electricity Transmission, Storage and Distribution - West Agenda: Electricity Transmission, Storage and Distribution - West A Public Meeting on the Quadrennial Energy Review,...

398

Sandia National Laboratories: Batteries & Energy Storage Publications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radioactive Waste Prioritized Safeguards and Security Issues for extended Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel Research to Improve Transportation Energy Storage Fact Sheet Sandia's Battery...

399

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Form EIA-912, "Weekly Underground Natural Gas Storage Report." The dashed vertical lines indicate current and year-ago weekly periods. More Storage Data History 5-Year...

400

Storage Gas Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Storage Gas Water Heaters Storage Gas Water Heaters The Department of Energy (DOE) develops standardized data templates for reporting the results of tests conducted in accordance...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dome storage field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Final Report for the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials...

402

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experiment at Teapot Dome, WY, NETL 3rd Annual Carbon Se-CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION DOE/NETL, 2005. Span, R. and W.Canada Grant Bromhal, NETL Mike Celia, Princeton University

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Conductive lithium storage electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001storage batteries.

Chiang, Yet-Ming; Chung, Sung-Yoon; Bloking, Jason T; Andersson, Anna M

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

404

Coal Storage and Transportation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal preparation, storage, and transportation are essential to coal use. Preparation plants, located near to the mine, remove some inorganic minerals associated with raw coal. Coal is transported from the mines to the point of consumption, often an electric generating plant, by rail, barge and trucks. Railroads are the predominant form of coal transportation within a country. Global coal trade, movement by large ocean-going vessels, continues to increase. At the end use site, the coal is crushed, ground, and the moisture content reduced to the proper specifications for end use. Coal is stored at various points in the supply chain. Processed coal will weather and oxidize, changing its properties; it can self-ignite, unless precautions are taken. Technology in use today is similar to that used in previous decades. Performance improvements have come from improved software and instruments that deliver real-time data. These improve management of sub-processes in the coal supply chain and reduce costs along the supply chain.

J.M. Ekmann; P.H. Le

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Part II Energy Storage Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

II. II. Energy Storage Technology Overview * Instructor - Haresh Kamath, EPRI PEAC * Short term - Flywheels, Cranking Batteries, Electrochemical Capacitors, SMES * Long term - Compressed Air, Pumped Hydro storage, Stationary, Flow Batteries 2 Overview * Technology Types - Batteries, flywheels, electrochemical capacitors, SMES, compressed air, and pumped hydro * Theory of Operation - Brief description of the technologies and the differences between them * State-of-the-art - Past demonstrations, existing hurdles and performance targets for commercialization * Cost and cost projections: - Prototype cost vs. fully commercialized targets Technology Choice for Discharge Time and Power Rating (From ESA) 4 Maturity Levels for Energy Storage Technologies * Mature Technologies - Conventional pumped hydro

406

Stratigraphic relationships in Woodbine-Eagleford and Sub-Clarksville sandstones, IDS field, Brazos County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF CONTENTS Page INTRODUCTION. Regional Geologic Setting. . Local Geologic Setting. . Environment of Deposition. Drilling History. Methods. . 2 7 12 19 21 CHARACTERISTICS OF WOODBINE-EAGLEFORD AND SUB- CLARKSVILLE SANDSTONES . . 23 Introduction... southeastward into Grimes County. The profile demonstrates the doming of the Woodbine-Eagleford interval. From Leethem (1984). . LIST OF FIGURES (Continued) Figure Page Depositional model interpreted for Woodbine- Eagleford sandstones at Kurten field...

Brogdon, Ron Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

407

Carbon Capture and Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SECARB's SECARB's Mississippi SalineTest Site: A Field Project Update Robert C. Trautz (rtrautz@epri.com) Electric Power Research Institute Senior Project Manager DOE Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Annual Review Meeting October 6-8, 2008 Pittsburgh, PA 2 1. Introduction 2. Well Drilling & Completion 3. Reservoir Characterization 4. CO 2 Injection Operations 5. Monitoring and Verification Outline 3 Key Organizations and Acknowledgments SOUTHERN STATES ENERGY BOARD Dr. Gerald (Jerry) R. Hill OTHER FIELD PROJECTS AND SUPPORTING ACTIVITIES * Advanced Resources * Alabama Geological Survey/ SCS * Gulf Coast Carbon Center (TXBEG) * EPRI * Virginia Tech University * Mississippi State University * Others Richard Esposito MISSISSIPPI POWER CO. Rick Berry Richard (Dick) Rhudy Robert (Rob) Trautz

408

"Technologies to Ensure Permanent Geologic Carbon Storage,"  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of carbon dioxide (CO of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). DE-FOA-0000652, titled, "Technologies to Ensure Permanent Geologic Carbon Storage," addresses key geologic storage challenges and uncertainties that include improving and validating containment, improving injection operations, increasing reservoir storage efficiency, and mitigating potential releases of CO 2 from the engineered containment system. The following four technical areas of interest are addressed: Area of Interest 1 - Studies of Existing Wellbores Exposed to CO 2 ; Area of Interest 2 - Advanced Wellbore Integrity Technologies; Area of Interest 3 - Field Methods to Optimize Capacity and Ensure Storage Containment; and Area of Interest 4 - Enhanced Simulation Tools to Improve Predictions and

409

Tensor electric polarizability of the deuteron in storage-ring experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The tensor electric polarizability of the deuteron gives important information about spin-dependent nuclear forces. If a resonant horizontal electric field acts on a deuteron beam circulating into a storage ring, the tensor electric polarizability stimulates the buildup of the vertical polarization of the deuteron (the Baryshevsky effect). General formulas describing this effect have been derived. Calculated formulas agree with the earlier obtained results. The problem of the influence of tensor electric polarizability on spin dynamics in such a deuteron electric-dipole-moment experiment in storage rings has been investigated. Doubling the resonant frequency used in this experiment dramatically amplifies the Baryshevsky effect and provides the opportunity to make high-precision measurements of the deuteron's tensor electric polarizability.

Alexander J. Silenko

2007-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

410

Tensor electric polarizability of the deuteron in storage-ring experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The tensor electric polarizability of the deuteron gives important information about spin-dependent nuclear forces. If a resonant horizontal electric field acts on a deuteron beam circulating into a storage ring, the tensor electric polarizability stimulates the buildup of the vertical polarization of the deuteron (the Baryshevsky effect). General formulas describing this effect have been derived. Calculated formulas agree with the earlier obtained results. The problem of the influence of tensor electric polarizability on spin dynamics in such a deuteron electric-dipole-moment experiment in storage rings has been investigated. Doubling the resonant frequency used in this experiment dramatically amplifies the Baryshevsky effect and provides the opportunity to make high-precision measurements of the deuteron's tensor electric polarizability.

Silenko, Alexander J. [Institute of Nuclear Problems, Belarusian State University, Minsk 220080 (Belarus)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

Introductory statistical mechanics for electron storage rings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These lectures introduce the beam dynamics of electron-positron storage rings with particular emphasis on the effects due to synchrotron radiation. They differ from most other introductions in their systematic use of the physical principles and mathematical techniques of the non-equilibrium statistical mechanics of fluctuating dynamical systems. A self-contained exposition of the necessary topics from this field is included. Throughout the development, a Hamiltonian description of the effects of the externally applied fields is maintained in order to preserve the links with other lectures on beam dynamics and to show clearly the extent to which electron dynamics in non-Hamiltonian. The statistical mechanical framework is extended to a discussion of the conceptual foundations of the treatment of collective effects through the Vlasov equation.

Jowett, J.M.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Energy Storage | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Energy Storage Energy Storage One of the distinctive characteristics of the electric power sector is that the amount of electricity that can be generated is relatively fixed over short periods of time, although demand for electricity fluctuates throughout the day. Developing technology to store electrical energy so it can be available to meet demand whenever needed would represent a major breakthrough in electricity distribution. Helping to try and meet this goal, electricity storage devices can manage the amount of power required to supply customers at times when need is greatest, which is during peak load. These devices can also help make renewable energy, whose power output cannot be controlled by grid operators, smooth and dispatchable. They can also balance microgrids to achieve a good match between generation

413

Energy Storage and Distributed Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

diagram of molecular structure, spectrocscopic data, low-swirl flame diagram of molecular structure, spectrocscopic data, low-swirl flame Energy Storage and Distributed Resources Energy Storage and Distributed Resources application/pdf icon esdr-org-chart-03-2013.pdf EETD researchers in the energy storage and distributed resources area conduct R&D and develops technologies that provide the electricity grid with significant storage capability for energy generated from renewable sources; real-time monitoring and response technologies for the "smart grid" to optimize energy use and communication between electricity providers and consumers; and technologies for improved electricity distribution reliability. Their goal is to identify and develop technologies, policies and strategies to enable a shift to renewable energy sources at $1 per watt for a

414

NREL: Energy Storage - Laboratory Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory Capabilities Laboratory Capabilities Photo of NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory. NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory. Welcome to our Energy Storage Laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado. Much of our testing is conducted at this state-of-the-art laboratory, where researchers use cutting-edge modeling and analysis tools to focus on thermal management systems-from the cell level to the battery pack or ultracapacitor stack-for electric, hybrid electric, and fuel cell vehicles (EVs, HEVs, and FCVs). In 2010, we received $2 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Energy under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) to enhance and upgrade the NREL Battery Thermal and Life Test Facility. The Energy Storage Laboratory houses two unique calorimeters, along with

415

NREL: Learning - Energy Storage Basics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Basics Energy Storage Basics The demand for electricity is seldom constant over time. Excess generating capacity available during periods of low demand can be used to energize an energy storage device. The stored energy can then be used to provide electricity during periods of high demand, helping to reduce power system loads during these times. Energy storage can improve the efficiency and reliability of the electric utility system by reducing the requirements for spinning reserves to meet peak power demands, making better use of efficient baseload generation, and allowing greater use of renewable energy technologies. A "spinning reserve" is a generator that is spinning and synchronized with the grid, ready for immediate power generation - like a car engine running with the gearbox

416

Hydrogen Storage "Think Tank" Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report is a compilation of information exchanged at a forum on March 14, 2003 in Washington, DC. The forum was assembled for innovative and non-conventional brainstorming on this issue of hydrogen storage technologies.

417

Production, Storage, and FC Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation on Production, Storage, and FC Analysis to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004 to discuss and define role of systems analysis in DOE Hydrogen Program.

418

A Successful Cool Storage Rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Houston Lighting & Power (HL&P) initiated design and development of its commercial cool storage program as part of an integrated resource planning process with a targeted 225 MW of demand reduction through DSM. Houston's extensive commercial air...

Ahrens, A. C.; Sobey, T. M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

CFES RESEARCH THRUSTS: Energy Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CFES RESEARCH THRUSTS: Energy Storage Wind Energy Solar Energy Smart Grids Smart Buildings For our on their progress and findings Along with the research advances, sponsors will benefit from the visibility

Lü, James Jian-Qiang

420

Efficient storage of versioned matrices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Versioned-matrix storage is increasingly important in scientific applications. Various computer-based scientific research, from astronomy observations to weather predictions to mechanical finite-element analyses, results ...

Seering, Adam B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dome storage field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshop Agenda  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Agenda for the first day of the R&D Strategies for Compressed, Cryo-Compressed and Cryo-Sorbent Hydrogen Storage Technologies Workshops on February 14 and 15, 2011.

422

Hydrogen Storage in Graphite Nanofibers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen Storage in Graphite Nanofibers ... Subsequent lowering of the pressure to nearly atmospheric conditions results in the release of a major fraction of the stored hydrogen at room temperature. ...

Alan Chambers; Colin Park; R. Terry K. Baker; Nelly M. Rodriguez

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

423

A Method for the High Energy Density SMES—Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy density of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES), 107 [J/m3] for the average magnetic field 5T is rather small compared with that of batteries which are estimated as 108 [J/m3...]. This paper ...

Y. Mitani; Y. Murakami

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Department of Energy, Shell Canada to Collaborate on CO2 Storage Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy (DOE) and Shell Canada announced today they intend to collaborate in field tests to validate advanced monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) technologies for underground storage of carbon dioxide (CO2).

425

Underground Storage Technology Consortium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

U U U N N D D E E R R G G R R O O U U N N D D G G A A S S S S T T O O R R A A G G E E T T E E C C H H N N O O L L O O G G Y Y C C O O N N S S O O R R T T I I U U M M R R & & D D P P R R I I O O R R I I T T Y Y R R E E S S E E A A R R C C H H N N E E E E D D S S WORKSHOP PROCEEDINGS February 3, 2004 Atlanta, Georgia U U n n d d e e r r g g r r o o u u n n d d G G a a s s S S t t o o r r a a g g e e T T e e c c h h n n o o l l o o g g y y C C o o n n s s o o r r t t i i u u m m R R & & D D P P r r i i o o r r i i t t y y R R e e s s e e a a r r c c h h N N e e e e d d s s OVERVIEW As a follow up to the development of the new U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored Underground Gas Storage Technology Consortium through Penn State University (PSU), DOE's National Energy Technology Center (NETL) and PSU held a workshop on February 3, 2004 in Atlanta, GA to identify priority research needs to assist the consortium in developing Requests for Proposal (RFPs). Thirty-seven

426

Investigating leaking underground storage tanks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVESTIGATING LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS A Thesis by DAVID THOMPSON UPTON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1989... Major Subject: Geology INVESTIGATING LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS A Thesis by DAVID THOMPSON UPTON Approved as to sty)e and content by: P. A, Domenico (Chair of Committee) jj K. W. Brown (Member) C. C Mathewson (Member) J. H. S ng Head...

Upton, David Thompson

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Compressed air energy storage system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An internal combustion reciprocating engine is operable as a compressor during slack demand periods utilizing excess power from a power grid to charge air into an air storage reservoir and as an expander during peak demand periods to feed power into the power grid utilizing air obtained from the air storage reservoir together with combustible fuel. Preferably the internal combustion reciprocating engine is operated at high pressure and a low pressure turbine and compressor are also employed for air compression and power generation.

Ahrens, Frederick W. (Naperville, IL); Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

The Storage of Shelled Pecans.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AGRIC - KPERIA .. -. STATIC t,4L EI rlENT ! C. H. MCUOSELL, Act~ng mrector Collegz Station. Texas 'LLETIN NO. 667 MARCH, THE STORAGE OF SHELLED PEC-4NS FRED R. BRISON Division of Horticulture . AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TE... Gibb Gilchrist, President [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] Shelled pecans may change in flavor, texture, and color, while in storage. They may also change as a result of insect or disease damage. Kernels change in flavor by becoming progressively...

Brison, Fred R. (Fred Robert)

1945-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

FAFCO Ice Storage test report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ice Storage Test Facility (ISTF) is designed to test commercial ice storage systems. FAFCO provided a storage tank equipped with coils designed for use with a secondary fluid system. The FAFCO ice storage system was tested over a wide range of operating conditions. Measured system performance during charging showed the ability to freeze the tank fully, storing from 150 to 200 ton-h. However, the charging rate showed significant variations during the latter portion of the charge cycle. During discharge cycles, the storage tank outlet temperature was strongly affected by the discharge rate and tank state of charge. The discharge capacity was dependent upon both the selected discharge rate and maximum allowable tank outlet temperature. Based on these tests, storage tank selection must depend on both charge and discharge conditions. This report describes FAFCO system performance fully under both charging and discharging conditions. While the test results reported here are accurate for the prototype 1990 FAFCO Model 200, currently available FAFCO models incorporate significant design enhancements beyond the Model 200. At least one major modification was instituted as a direct result of the ISTF tests. Such design improvements were one of EPRI`s primary goals in founding the ISTF.

Stovall, T.K.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Thermal storage module for solar dynamic receivers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal energy storage system comprising a germanium phase change material and a graphite container.

Beatty, Ronald L. (Farragut, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Energy Storage Management for VG Integration (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation describes how you economically manage integration costs of storage and variable generation.

Kirby, B.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Hydrogen Storage at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation from the Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting held June 19, 2003 in Washington, DC.

433

Addressing the Grand Challenges in Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The editorial summarizes the contents of the special issue for energy storage in Advanced Functional Materials.

Liu, Jun

2013-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

434

Energy Storage: Current landscape for alternative energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Storage: Current landscape for alternative energy storage technologies and what the future may hold for multi-scale storage applications Presented by: Dave Lucero, Director Alternative Energy · Industry initiatives · Technology · Energy Storage Market · EaglePicher initiatives · Summary #12

435

Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Centers of Excellence  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE's Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Centers of Excellence and partners, led by NREL, SNL, and LANL

436

Hydrogen Storage Technologies Roadmap, November 2005  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Document describing plan for research into and development of hydrogen storage technology for transportation applications.

437

Combining microseismic and geomechanical observations to interpret storage integrity at the In Salah CCS site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......several gas fields is separated from the production stream and...producing gas field at Krechba...operations in the oil and gas industry...shows the cumulative number of...H. A full field simulation...Salah gas production and CO2 storage......

Bettina P. Goertz-Allmann; Daniela Kühn; Volker Oye; Bahman Bohloli; Eyvind Aker

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Base Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

439

Conductive lithium storage electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, and have values such that x, plus y(1-a) times a formal valence or valences of M', plus ya times a formal valence or valence of M'', is equal to z times a formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7, or DXD.sub.4 group; or a compound comprising a composition (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z and have values such that (1-a).sub.x plus the quantity ax times the formal valence or valences of M'' plus y times the formal valence or valences of M' is equal to z times the formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7 or DXD.sub.4 group. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001storage batteries and can have a gravimetric capacity of at least about 80 mAh/g while being charged/discharged at greater than about C rate of the compound.

Chiang, Yet-Ming (Framingham, MA); Chung, Sung-Yoon (Incheon, KR); Bloking, Jason T. (Mountain View, CA); Andersson, Anna M. (Vasteras, SE)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

440

Conductive lithium storage electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, and have values such that x, plus y(1-a) times a formal valence or valences of M', plus ya times a formal valence or valence of M'', is equal to z times a formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7, or DXD.sub.4 group; or a compound comprising a composition (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z(A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).s- ub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z and have values such that (1-a).sub.x plus the quantity ax times the formal valence or valences of M'' plus y times the formal valence or valences of M' is equal to z times the formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7 or DXD.sub.4 group. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001storage batteries and can have a gravimetric capacity of at least about 80 mAh/g while being charged/discharged at greater than about C rate of the compound.

Chiang, Yet-Ming (Framingham, MA); Chung, Sung-Yoon (Seoul, KR); Bloking, Jason T. (Cambridge, MA); Andersson, Anna M. (Uppsala, SE)

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dome storage field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Storage Regulations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Biodiesel Storage Biodiesel Storage Regulations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Storage Regulations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Storage Regulations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Storage Regulations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Storage Regulations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Storage Regulations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Storage Regulations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Storage Regulations Underground storage tank regulations apply to all biodiesel blends with the exception of 100% biodiesel (B100). An owner changing the use of an

442

Relaxation of Hydrogen and Deuterium Atoms in Storage Cells B. Braun, G. Graw, H. Kolster, A. Metz, K.Reinmuller, P. Schiemenz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relaxation of Hydrogen and Deuterium Atoms in Storage Cells B. Braun, G. Graw, H. Kolster, A. Metz and nuclear polar­ ization of hydrogen as function of the magnetic field for a drifilm coated storage cell with test storage cells of mean wall collision numbers up to 3500. The HERMES experiment at the HERA

443

Building Trust in Storage Outsourcing: Secure Accounting of Utility Storage Vishal Kher and Yongdae Kim  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building Trust in Storage Outsourcing: Secure Accounting of Utility Storage Vishal Kher and Yongdae. While storage outsourcing is cost-effective, many compa- nies are hesitating to outsource their storage due to security concerns. The success of storage outsourcing is highly de- pendent on how well

Kim, Dae-Shik

444

Hydrogen Storage atHydrogen Storage at Lawrence Berkeley National LaboratoryLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Storage atHydrogen Storage at Lawrence Berkeley National LaboratoryLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Presentation at thePresentation at the Hydrogen Storage Grand ChallengeHydrogen Storage expertise to hydrogen storage, fuel cells, and system integration issues ­Novel membranes and other

445

Advanced Underground Gas Storage Concepts Refrigerated-Mined Cavern Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE CONCEPTS UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE CONCEPTS REFRIGERATED-MINED CAVERN STORAGE FINAL REPORT DOE CONTRACT NUMBER DE-AC26-97FT34349 SUBMITTED BY: PB-KBB INC. 11757 KATY FREEWAY, SUITE 600 HOUSTON, TX 77079 SEPTEMBER 1998 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily

446

Identification of parameters influencing the response of gas storage wells to hydraulic fracturing with the aid of a neural network  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performing hydraulic fractures on gas storage wells to improve their deliverability is a common practice in the eastern part of the United States. Most of the fields in this part of the country being used for storage are old. Reservoir characteristic data necessary for most reservoir studies and hydraulic fracture design and evaluation are scarce for these old fields. This paper introduces a new methodology by which parameters that influence the response of gas storage wells to hydraulic fracturing may be identified in the absence of sufficient reservoir data. Control and manipulation of these parameters, once identified correctly, could enhance the outcome of frac jobs in gas storage fields. The study was conducted on a gas storage field in the Clinton formation of Northeastern Ohio. It was found that well performance indicators prior to a hydraulic fracture play an important role in how good the well will respond to a new frac job. Several other important factors were also identified.

McVey, D.S.; Mohaghegh, S.; Aminian, K.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

447

EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste SUMMARY Final Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement examines the potential environmental and cost impacts of strategic managment alternatives for managing five types of radioactive and hazardous wastes that have resulted and will continue to result from nuclear defense and research activities at a variety of sites around the United States. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 7, 2011 EIS-0200-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Treatment of Transuranic Waste at the Idaho National Laboratory, Carlsbad Field Office March 7, 2008

448

Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques '02- Workshop Proceedings Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques '02- Workshop Proceedings Abstract Research into the practicality of digital mapping by Placer Dome Exploration identified hardware and software solutions to enhance the efficiency and accuracy of field work. The goal of the research was to find a lightweight hardware-software system that allows the user to build a digital map from field observations in much the same way as pen and paper methods. The focus of the research was to minimize the size and weight of computer systems. Systems identified consist of a wearable PC or handheld

449

DOE Study Monitors Carbon Dioxide Storage in Norway's Offshore Sleipner Gas  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Study Monitors Carbon Dioxide Storage in Norway's Offshore DOE Study Monitors Carbon Dioxide Storage in Norway's Offshore Sleipner Gas Field DOE Study Monitors Carbon Dioxide Storage in Norway's Offshore Sleipner Gas Field May 21, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- In a newly awarded project, researchers funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are partnering with European scientists to track injected carbon dioxide (CO2) in the world's first and longest running carbon storage operation located at the Sleipner gas field in the North Sea. The researchers--from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, and the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO) in New York--will conduct surveys on the seafloor to monitor injected CO2 in the 1 kilometer-deep reservoir, where more than

450

Effect of manganese addition on hydrogen storage performance of vanadium-based BCC hydrogen storage alloys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of manganese addition on hydrogen storage performance of vanadium-based BCC alloys was ... plateau pressure and a reverse effect on maximum hydrogen storage capacity. However, an effective hydrogen storage

Chan-Yeol Seo; Zhao-Liang Zhang; Jin-Ho Kim…

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

SGDP Storage System Performance Supplement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Analysis for the ARRA SGDP Analysis for the ARRA SGDP Energy Storage Projects Update Conference - DOE 2010 Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) November 3, 2010 Presenter: Jacquelyn Bean Organization: DOE-National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Funded in part by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy through National Energy Technology Laboratory 1 Background 2 Metrics and Benefits Data Flow 3 Contact Information Table of Contents 1 4 Appendix NETL's role in SGDP metrics and benefits reporting 2 NETL Energy Delivery Technologies Division SGDP Technical Project Officers (TPOs) SGDP Principal Investigators (PIs) Project Management and Performance Data Analysis NETL Project Management Center's Analysis & Support Team Data Analysis Team (DAT) Lead Contractors: Booz Allen

452

Energy Programs | Advanced Storage Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Storage Systems Advanced Storage Systems Tapping Into Fuel Cells and Batteries Page 1 of 2 Imagine being able to drive a forty-mile round-trip commute every day without ever going near a gas pump. As the United States moves towards an energy economy with reduced dependence on foreign oil and fewer carbon emissions, development of alternative fuel sources and transmission of the energy they provide is only part of the equation. An increase in energy generated from intermittent renewable sources and the growing need for mobile energy will require new, efficient means of storing it, and technological advancements will be necessary to support the nation's future energy storage needs. A change toward alternative transportation - hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid-electric vehicles and electric

453

NETL: Industrial Capture & Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Industrial Capture & Storage Industrial Capture & Storage Technologies Industrial Capture & Storage The United States Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL, or DOE) is currently implementing a program titled "Carbon Capture and Sequestration from Industrial Sources and Innovative Concepts for Beneficial CO2 Use." This CO2 Capture and Sequestration (CCS) and CO2 use program is a cost-shared collaboration between the Government and industry whose purpose is to increase investment in clean industrial technologies and sequestration projects. In accordance with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, and Section 703 of Public Law 110-140, DOE's two specific objectives are to demonstrate: (1) Large-Scale Industrial CCS projects from industrial sources, and (2) Innovative Concepts for beneficial CO2 use.

454

Hydrogen storage gets new hope  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen storage gets new hope Hydrogen storage gets new hope Hydrogen storage gets new hope A new method for "recycling" hydrogen-containing fuel materials could open the door to economically viable hydrogen-based vehicles. September 1, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact James E. Rickman

455

Natural gas cavern storage regulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Investigation of an incident at an LPG storage facility in Texas by U.S. Department of Transportation resulted in recommendation that state regulation of natural gas cavern storage might be improved. Interstate Oil & Gas Compact Commission has established a subcommittee to analyze the benefits and risks associated with natural gas cavern storage, and to draft a regulation model which will suggest engineering and performance specifications. The resulting analysis and regulatory language will be reviewed by I.O.G.C.C., and if approved, distributed to member states (including New York) for consideration. Should the states desire assistance in modifying the language to reflect local variables, such as policy and geology, I.O.G.C.C. may offer assistance. The proposed presentation will review the I.O.G.C.C. product (if published at that date), and discuss implications of its application in New York.

Heneman, H.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

pumped storage | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pumped storage pumped storage Dataset Summary Description These two datasets include energy statistics for the European Union (EU). The statistics are available from the European Commission. The data includes detailed information about: production, net imports, gross inland consumption, and electricity generation for the EU as a whole, as well as the individual member countries, for the period between 1990 and 2007. Source European Commission Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption biomass coal crude oil Electricity Generation EU gas geothermal Hydro pumped storage PV renewable energy generating capacity wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon EU Energy Figures 2010 (Excel file, multiple tabs) (xls, 2 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon EU Electricity Generation from Renewables (xls, 190.5 KiB)

457

National High Magnetic Field Laboratory: Metallic Superlattices  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Many years would pass, however, before thin films became a major focus in the field of physics. The introduction of computers and the search for practical methods of data storage...

458

PRACTICAL FIELD GUIDE FOR INVESTIGATING BREEDING ECOLOGY OF PENDULINE TITS REMIZ PENDULINUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) The Nest Penduline Tits build elaborate, domed nests mainly from the pappus of Reed Phragmites australis

Burton, Geoffrey R.

459

Storage Related News | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Storage Related News Storage Related News Storage Related News November 1, 2013 November 13 ESTAP Webinar: Duke Energy's Energy Storage Projects On Wednesday, November 13 from 1 - 2 p.m. ET, Clean Energy States Alliance will host a webinar on Duke Energy's battery energy storage systems. This webinar will be introduced by Dr. Imre Gyuk, Energy Storage Program Manager in the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability. August 30, 2013 September 16 ESTAP Webinar: Optimizing the Benefits of a PV with Battery Storage System On Monday, September 16 from 1 - 2 p.m. ET, Clean Energy States Alliance will host a webinar on optimizing the benefits of a photovoltaic (PV) storage system with a battery. This webinar will be introduced by Dr. Imre Gyuk, Energy Storage Program Manager in the Office of Electricity Delivery

460

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology DOE R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts On-board hydrogen storage for transportation applications continues to be

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dome storage field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Rigorous Screening Technology for Identifying Suitable CO2 Storage Sites II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report serves as the final technical report and users manual for the 'Rigorous Screening Technology for Identifying Suitable CO2 Storage Sites II SBIR project. Advanced Resources International has developed a screening tool by which users can technically screen, assess the storage capacity and quantify the costs of CO2 storage in four types of CO2 storage reservoirs. These include CO2-enhanced oil recovery reservoirs, depleted oil and gas fields (non-enhanced oil recovery candidates), deep coal seems that are amenable to CO2-enhanced methane recovery, and saline reservoirs. The screening function assessed whether the reservoir could likely serve as a safe, long-term CO2 storage reservoir. The storage capacity assessment uses rigorous reservoir simulation models to determine the timing, ultimate storage capacity, and potential for enhanced hydrocarbon recovery. Finally, the economic assessment function determines both the field-level and pipeline (transportation) costs for CO2 sequestration in a given reservoir. The screening tool has been peer reviewed at an Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI) technical meeting in March 2009. A number of useful observations and recommendations emerged from the Workshop on the costs of CO2 transport and storage that could be readily incorporated into a commercial version of the Screening Tool in a Phase III SBIR.

George J. Koperna Jr.; Vello A. Kuuskraa; David E. Riestenberg; Aiysha Sultana; Tyler Van Leeuwen

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Catalyzed borohydrides for hydrogen storage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hydrogen storage material and process is provided in which alkali borohydride materials are created which contain effective amounts of catalyst(s) which include transition metal oxides, halides, and chlorides of titanium, zirconium, tin, and combinations of the various catalysts. When the catalysts are added to an alkali borodydride such as a lithium borohydride, the initial hydrogen release point of the resulting mixture is substantially lowered. Additionally, the hydrogen storage material may be rehydrided with weight percent values of hydrogen at least about 9 percent.

Au, Ming (Augusta, GA)

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

463

Integrated heat exchanger design for a cryogenic storage tank  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field demonstrations of liquid hydrogen technology will be undertaken for the proliferation of advanced methods and applications in the use of cryofuels. Advancements in the use of cryofuels for transportation on Earth, from Earth, or in space are envisioned for automobiles, aircraft, rockets, and spacecraft. These advancements rely on practical ways of storage, transfer, and handling of liquid hydrogen. Focusing on storage, an integrated heat exchanger system has been designed for incorporation with an existing storage tank and a reverse Brayton cycle helium refrigerator of capacity 850 watts at 20 K. The storage tank is a 125,000-liter capacity horizontal cylindrical tank, with vacuum jacket and multilayer insulation, and a small 0.6-meter diameter manway opening. Addressed are the specific design challenges associated with the small opening, complete modularity, pressure systems re-certification for lower temperature and pressure service associated with hydrogen densification, and a large 8:1 length-to-diameter ratio for distribution of the cryogenic refrigeration. The approach, problem solving, and system design and analysis for integrated heat exchanger are detailed and discussed. Implications for future space launch facilities are also identified. The objective of the field demonstration will be to test various zero-loss and densified cryofuel handling concepts for future transportation applications.

Fesmire, J. E.; Bonner, T.; Oliveira, J. M.; Johnson, W. L.; Notardonato, W. U. [NASA Kennedy Space Center, Cryogenics Test Laboratory, NE-F6, KSC, FL 32899 (United States); Tomsik, T. M. [NASA Glenn Research Center, 21000 Brookpark Road, Cleveland, OH 44135 (United States); Conyers, H. J. [NASA Stennis Space Center, Building 3225, SSC, MS 39529 (United States)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

464

Integrated heat exchanger design for a cryogenic storage tank  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Field demonstrations of liquid hydrogen technology will be undertaken for the proliferation of advanced methods and applications in the use of cryofuels. Advancements in the use of cryofuels for transportation on Earth from Earth or in space are envisioned for automobiles aircraft rockets and spacecraft. These advancements rely on practical ways of storage transfer and handling of liquid hydrogen. Focusing on storage an integrated heat exchanger system has been designed for incorporation with an existing storage tank and a reverse Brayton cycle helium refrigerator of capacity 850 watts at 20 K. The storage tank is a 125 000-liter capacity horizontal cylindrical tank with vacuum jacket and multilayer insulation and a small 0.6-meter diameter manway opening. Addressed are the specific design challenges associated with the small opening complete modularity pressure systems re-certification for lower temperature and pressure service associated with hydrogen densification and a large 8:1 length-to-diameter ratio for distribution of the cryogenic refrigeration. The approach problem solving and system design and analysis for integrated heat exchanger are detailed and discussed. Implications for future space launch facilities are also identified. The objective of the field demonstration will be to test various zero-loss and densified cryofuel handling concepts for future transportation applications.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Thermal Storage Options for HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this method is based on the specific heat of water rather than the latent 'heat of fusion of ice as in ice storage, it requires about 4 times the storage capacity of an equivalent ice storage system. ? Salt Storage: This system utilizes eutectic salts... which freeze and melt around 47 o F. Exist ing chillers can be easily retrofitted for salt storage or chilled water storage. For ice stor age systems, a direct refrigerant system or glycol chillers are suitable. This paper discusses the details...

Weston, R. F.; Gidwani, B. N.

466

Tritium Handling and Safe Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1129-2007 March 2007 ____________________ DOE HANDBOOK TRITIUM HANDLING AND SAFE STORAGE U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1129-2007

467

Forecourt Storage and Compression Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capital costs and maximize utilization NATURAL GAS & HYDROGEN FUELING STATION SIZING SOFTWARE Developed and On-Board Storage Analysis Workshop DOE Headquarters 25 January 2006 Mark E. Richards Gas Technology Institute #12;2 Overview > Project objectives > Gaseous delivery configurations > Analysis tool: CASCADE H2

468

Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems Presentation by Stephen Lasher on cost analysis of hydrogen storage systems....

469

Modeling and simulations of electrical energy storage in electrochemical capacitors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electrochemical capacitor energy storage systems. 1.2 Energyto electrochemical energy storage in TiO 2 (anatase)3D nanoarchitec- tures for energy storage and conversion,”

Wang, Hainan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Activities Related to Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Activities Related to Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel Activities Related to Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel Activities Related to Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel More Documents &...

471

ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS - - A SURVEY OF RECENT THEORETICAL STUDIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperature underground thermal energy storage. In Proc. Th~al modeling of thermal energy storage in aquifers. In ~~-Mathematical modeling; thermal energy storage; aquifers;

Tsang, Chin Fu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ADVANCED THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE CONCEPT DEFINITION STUDY FORSchilling. F. E. , Thermal Energy Storage Using PrestressedNo ~cumulate thermal energy storage. Estimate ESTrof2(

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Commercial Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEANGas Electric Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling,"LBL--25393 DE91 ,THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR COOLING OF

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Rational Material Architecture Design for Better Energy Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy and power storage systems, Renewable and Sustainable Energyeconomical and sustainable energy storage devices. Moreover,performance and sustainable energy storage systems. Figure.

Chen, Zheng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For the ice storage system, during direct cooling, thethe building cooling load. In dynamic systems, ice is formedcooling/demand-limited storage / electric load management / full storage / ice

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with Sensible- Heat Storage Solar Power Plant with Sulfurof the Solar Power Plant Storage-Vessel Design, . . . . .System for Chemical Storage of Solar Energy. UC Berkeley,

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

additional resistance between the storage material and theWhen resistance to transport between storage materials andthe resistance to transport across the storage material, the

Sherman, Max H.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Planning Project Overview...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Fuel Storage and Transportation Planning Project Overview Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Planning Project Overview Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Planning Project...

479

Forecourt Storage and Compression Options | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Storage and Compression Options Forecourt Storage and Compression Options Presentation by Mark Richards on forecourt storage and compression options. wkshpstoragerichards.pdf...

480

Explorations of Novel Energy Conversion and Storage Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on-board automotive hydrogen storage. International JournalVehicular Hydrogen Storage http://www.hydrogen.energy.gov/et al. , Reversible hydrogen storage in calcium borohydride

Duffin, Andrew Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dome storage field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of...

482

Prediction of Novel Hydrogen Storage Reactions | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Prediction of Novel Hydrogen Storage Reactions Prediction of Novel Hydrogen Storage Reactions This presentation on the Prediction of Novel Hydrogen Storage Reactions was given at...

483

The U.S. National Hydrogen Storage Project Overview (presentation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The U.S. National Hydrogen Storage Project Overview (presentation) The U.S. National Hydrogen Storage Project Overview (presentation) Status of Hydrogen Storage Materials R&D...

484

Grand Challenge for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Grand Challenge for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage Presentation from the Hydrogen Storage...

485

Implementing a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

impact of improved hydrogen storage may be through makingand M. Gardiner, Hydrogen Storage Options: Technologies andscience related to hydrogen storage could change how a

Ogden, J; Yang, Christopher

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Virtual Center of Excellence for Hydrogen Storage - Chemical...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Virtual Center of Excellence for Hydrogen Storage - Chemical Hydrides Virtual Center of Excellence for Hydrogen Storage - Chemical Hydrides Presentation from the Hydrogen Storage...

487

Fundamental Studies of Diffusion and Reactions in Hydrogen Storage Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

novel reversible hydrogen storage materials”, J. Alloysrelationship to enhanced hydrogen storage properties”, J.on the reversi- ble hydrogen storage properties of the

Van de Walle, Chris G; Peles, Amra; Janotti, Anderson; Wilson-Short, Gareth

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Pumped Storage Hydropower (Detailed Analysis to Demonstrate Value...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pumped Storage Hydropower (Detailed Analysis to Demonstrate Value)-Modeling and Analysis of Value of Advanced Pumped Storage Hydropower in the U.S. Pumped Storage Hydropower...

489

Hydrogen Storage Testing and Analysis Research and Development...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

DOE R&D Activities Hydrogen Storage Testing and Analysis Research and Development Hydrogen Storage Testing and Analysis Research and Development DOE's hydrogen storage R&D...

490

Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Storage Water Heaters...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Storage Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Storage Water Heaters The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for gas storage...

491

PEDOT Nanowires for Energy Storage: Synthesis and Property  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

polymer and paper-based energy storage devices”, Adv. Mater.PEDOT Nanowires for Energy Storage: Synthesis and Property Aand Carbon Materials for Energy Storage Synthesized PEDOT

Ying, Wu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Results from Shallow Research Drilling at Inyo Domes, Long Valley Caldera, California and the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, Salton Trough, California  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A goal of the thermal regimes sector of the U.S. Continental Scientific Drilling Program is to understand the intrusion of magma into the crust, the release of heat and volatiles from these intrusions, and the...

L. W. Younker; J. C. Eichelberger; P. W. Kasameyer…

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Dolomite in Permian Paleosols of the Bravo Dome CO2 Field, U.S.A.: Permian Reflux Followed by Late Recrystallization at Elevated Temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...marine-nonmarine evaporite unit (Hylton 1988; Hovorka et al. 1993). The conditions that led to the deposition of the Cimmaron Anhydrite could have induced reflux of Mg-rich (marine or mixed marine-nonmarine) brines through the Abo-Tubb study...

Katherine A. Hartig; Gerilyn S. Soreghan; Robert H. Goldstein; Michael H. Engel

494

Storage Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Storage Water Heaters Storage Water Heaters Storage Water Heaters June 15, 2012 - 6:00pm Addthis Consider energy efficiency when selecting a conventional storage water heater to avoid paying more over its lifetime. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/JulNichols. Consider energy efficiency when selecting a conventional storage water heater to avoid paying more over its lifetime. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/JulNichols. Conventional storage water heaters remain the most popular type of water heating system for the home. Here you'll find basic information about how storage water heaters work; what criteria to use when selecting the right model; and some installation, maintenance, and safety tips. How They Work A single-family storage water heater offers a ready reservoir -- from 20 to

495

NETL: NATCARB - CO2 Storage Formations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storage Formations Storage Formations NATCARB CO2 Storage Formations CO2 Storage Resource Methodology NATCARB Viewer The NATCARB Viewer is available at: http://www.natcarbviewer.com. 2012 Atlas IV DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) were charged with providing a high-level, quantitative estimate of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage resource available in subsurface environments of their regions. Environments considered for CO2 storage were categorized into five major geologic systems: oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal areas, saline formations, shale, and basalt formations. Where possible, CO2 storage resource estimates have been quantified for oil and gas reservoirs, saline formations, and unmineable coal in the fourth edition of the United States Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas (Atlas IV). Shale and basalt

496

Carbon dioxide capture and geological storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Blundell and Fraser Armstrong Carbon dioxide capture and geological storage Sam...Nottingham NG12 5GG, UK Carbon dioxide capture and geological storage is a...80-90%. It involves the capture of carbon dioxide at a large industrial...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HAUSZ, W. , 1977. "Seasonal Storage in District Heating,"District Heating, July-August-September, 1977, pp. 5-11.aquifer storage for district heating and cooling. C. W.

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Energy Department Releases Grid Energy Storage Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Energy Department released its Grid Energy Storage report to the members of the U.S. Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, identifying the benefits and challenges of grid energy storage that must be addressed to enable broader use.

499

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FUTURE CONSIDERATIONS FOR CAVERN STORAGE Some of the topicsgravel or sand into the cavern in order to reduce the volumeAbove ground equipment for cavern storage opera- tions.

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Thermal Storage with Ice Harvesting Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Application of Harvesting Ice Storage Systems. Thermal storage systems are becoming widely accepted techniques for utility load management. This paper discusses the principles of ice harvesting equipment and their application to the multi...

Knebel, D. E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z