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Sample records for domain wall pinning

  1. Magnetic domain wall propagation in a submicron spin-valve stripe: influence of the pinned layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1/10 Magnetic domain wall propagation in a submicron spin-valve stripe: influence of the pinned ferromagnetic spin-valve stripe is investigated using giant magnetoresistance. A notch in the stripe efficiently generated in the vicinity of the notch by the pinned layer of the spin-valve. PACS: 72.25.Ba; 73.43.Qt; 75

  2. Pinning induced by inter-domain wall interactions in planar magnetic nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayward, T.J.; Bryan, M.T.; Fry, P.W.; Fundi, P.M.; Gibbs, M.R.J.; Allwood, D.A.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.

    2009-10-30

    We have investigated pinning potentials created by inter-domain wall magnetostatic interactions in planar magnetic nanowires. We show that these potentials can take the form of an energy barrier or an energy well depending on the walls' relative monopole moments, and that the applied magnetic fields required to overcome these potentials are significant. Both transverse and vortex wall pairs are investigated and it is found that transverse walls interact more strongly due to dipolar coupling between their magnetization structures. Simple analytical models which allow the effects of inter-domain wall interactions to be estimated are also presented.

  3. Control of domain wall pinning by localised focused Ga?{sup +} ion irradiation on Au capped NiFe nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burn, D. M. Atkinson, D.

    2014-10-28

    Understanding domain wall pinning and propagation in nanowires are important for future spintronics and nanoparticle manipulation technologies. Here, the effects of microscopic local modification of the magnetic properties, induced by focused-ion-beam intermixing, in NiFe/Au bilayer nanowires on the pinning behavior of domain walls was investigated. The effects of irradiation dose and the length of the irradiated features were investigated experimentally. The results are considered in the context of detailed quasi-static micromagnetic simulations, where the ion-induced modification was represented as a local reduction of the saturation magnetization. Simulations show that domain wall pinning behavior depends on the magnitude of the magnetization change, the length of the modified region, and the domain wall structure. Comparative analysis indicates that reduced saturation magnetisation is not solely responsible for the experimentally observed pinning behavior.

  4. Domain Wall Pinning and Dislocations: Investigating Magnetite Deformed Under Conditions Analogous to Nature Using Transmission Electron Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindquist, A. K.; Feinberg, J. M.; Harrison, R. J.; Loudon, J. C.; Newell, A. J.

    2015-03-19

    In this study, we deformed samples cut from a single magnetite octahedron and used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and magnetic measurements to experimentally verify earlier computational models of magnetic domain wall pinning by dislocations...

  5. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  6. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  7. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  8. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  9. Domain walls in gapped graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semenoff, G W; Zhou, Fei

    2015-01-01

    The electronic properties of a particular class of domain walls in gapped graphene are investigated. We show that they can support mid-gap states which are localized in the vicinity of the domain wall and propagate along its length. With a finite density of domain walls, these states can alter the electronic properties of gapped graphene significantly. If the mid-gap band is partially filled,the domain wall can behave like a one-dimensional metal embedded in a semi-conductor, and could potentially be used as a single-channel quantum wire.

  10. Domain walls in gapped graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. W. Semenoff; V. Semenoff; Fei Zhou

    2008-05-31

    The electronic properties of a particular class of domain walls in gapped graphene are investigated. We show that they can support mid-gap states which are localized in the vicinity of the domain wall and propagate along its length. With a finite density of domain walls, these states can alter the electronic properties of gapped graphene significantly. If the mid-gap band is partially filled,the domain wall can behave like a one-dimensional metal embedded in a semi-conductor, and could potentially be used as a single-channel quantum wire.

  11. Effective Supergravity for Supergravity Domain Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Cvetic; N. D. Lambert

    2002-05-23

    We discuss the low energy effective action for the Bosonic and Fermionic zero-modes of a smooth BPS Randall-Sundrum domain wall, including the induced supergravity on the wall. The result is a pure supergravity in one lower dimension. In particular, and in contrast to non-gravitational domain walls or domain walls in a compact space, the zero-modes representing transverse fluctuations of domain wall have vanishing action.

  12. Charm physics with Moebius Domain Wall Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Jüttner; Francesco Sanfilippo; Justus Tobias Tsang; Peter Boyle; Marina Marinkovic; Shoji Hashimoto; Takashi Kaneko; Yong-Gwi Cho

    2015-01-04

    We present results showing that Domain Wall fermions are a suitable discretisation for the simulation of heavy quarks. This is done by a continuum scaling study of charm quarks in a M\\"obius Domain Wall formalism using a quenched set-up. We find that discretisation effects remain well controlled by the choice of Domain Wall parameters preparing the ground work for the ongoing dynamical $2+1f$ charm program of RBC/UKQCD.

  13. Charm physics with Moebius Domain Wall Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jüttner, Andreas; Tsang, Justus Tobias; Boyle, Peter; Marinkovic, Marina; Hashimoto, Shoji; Kaneko, Takashi; Cho, Yong-Gwi

    2015-01-01

    We present results showing that Domain Wall fermions are a suitable discretisation for the simulation of heavy quarks. This is done by a continuum scaling study of charm quarks in a M\\"obius Domain Wall formalism using a quenched set-up. We find that discretisation effects remain well controlled by the choice of Domain Wall parameters preparing the ground work for the ongoing dynamical $2+1f$ charm program of RBC/UKQCD.

  14. Automotion of domain walls for spintronic interconnects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Young, Ian A.

    2014-06-07

    We simulate “automotion,” the transport of a magnetic domain wall under the influence of demagnetization and magnetic anisotropy, in nanoscale spintronic interconnects. In contrast to spin transfer driven magnetic domain wall motion, the proposed interconnects operate without longitudinal charge current transfer, with only a transient current pulse at domain wall creation and have favorable scaling down to the 20?nm dimension. Cases of both in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization are considered. Analytical dependence of the velocity of domain walls on the angle of magnetization are compared with full micromagnetic simulations. Deceleration, attenuation and disappearance, and reflection of domain walls are demonstrated through simulation. Dependences of the magnetization angle on the current pulse parameters are studied. The energy and delay analysis suggests that automotion is an attractive option for spintronic logic interconnects.

  15. Domain wall conduction in multiaxial ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eliseev, E. A.; Morozovska, A. N.; Svechnikov, S. V.; Maksymovych, Petro; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2012-01-01

    The conductance of domain wall structures consisting of either stripes or cylindrical domains in multiaxial ferroelectric-semiconductors is analyzed. The effects of the flexoelectric coupling, domain size, wall tilt, and curvature on charge accumulation are analyzed using the Landau-Ginsburg Devonshire theory for polarization vector combined with the Poisson equation for charge distributions. The proximity and size effect of the electron and donor accumulation/depletion by thin stripe domains and cylindrical nanodomains are revealed. In contrast to thick domain stripes and wider cylindrical domains, in which the carrier accumulation (and so the static conductivity) sharply increases at the domain walls only, small nanodomains of radii less than 5-10 correlation lengths appeared conducting across the entire cross-section. Implications of such conductive nanosized channels may be promising for nanoelectronics.

  16. Gravitational Effects in Supersymmetric Domain Wall Backgrounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Cvetic; S. Griffies

    1992-04-13

    A recent study of supersymmetric domain walls in $N=1$ supergravity theories revealed a new class of domain walls interpolating between supersymmetric vacua with different non-positive cosmological constants. We classify three classes of domain wall configurations and study the geodesic structure of the induced space-time. Motion of massive test particles in such space-times shows that these walls are always repulsive from the anti-deSitter (AdS) side, while on the Minkowski side test particles feel no force. Freely falling particles far away from a wall in an AdS vacuum experience a constant proper acceleration, \\ie\\ they are Rindler particles. A new coordinate system for discussing AdS space-time is presented which eliminates the use of a periodic time-like coordinate.

  17. Quantum Fusion of Domain Walls with Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Bolognesi; M. Shifman; M. B. Voloshin

    2009-07-20

    We study how fluxes on the domain wall world volume modify quantum fusion of two distant parallel domain walls into a composite wall. The elementary wall fluxes can be separated into parallel and antiparallel components. The parallel component affects neither the binding energy nor the process of quantum merger. The antiparallel fluxes, instead, increase the binding energy and, against naive expectations, suppress quantum fusion. In the small flux limit we explicitly find the bounce solution and the fusion rate as a function of the flux. We argue that at large (antiparallel) fluxes there exists a critical value of the flux (versus the difference in the wall tensions), which switches off quantum fusion altogether. This phenomenon of flux-related wall stabilization is rather peculiar: it is unrelated to any conserved quantity. Our consideration of the flux-related all stabilization is based on substantiated arguments that fall short of complete proof.

  18. Perforation of domain wall by point mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. V. Gal'tsov; E. Yu. Melkumova; P. A. Spirin

    2013-12-30

    We investigate collision of a point particle and an infinitely thin planar domain wall interacting gravitationally within the linearized gravity in Minkowski space-time of arbitrary dimension. In this setting we are able to describe analytically the perforation of the wall by an impinging particle, showing that it is accompanied by excitation of the spherical shock branon wave propagating outwards with the speed of light. Formally, the shock wave is a free solution of the branon wave equation which has to be added to ensure the validity of the retarded solution at the perforation point. Physically, the domain wall gets excited due to the shake caused by an instantaneous change of sign of the repulsive gravitational force. This effect is shown to hold, in particular, in four space-time dimensions, being applicable to the problem of cosmological domain walls.

  19. Perforation of domain wall by point mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gal'tsov, D V; Spirin, P A

    2013-01-01

    We investigate collision of a point particle and an infinitely thin planar domain wall interacting gravitationally within the linearized gravity in Minkowski space-time of arbitrary dimension. In this setting we are able to describe analytically the perforation of the wall by an impinging particle, showing that it is accompanied by excitation of the spherical shock branon wave propagating outwards with the speed of light. Formally, the shock wave is a free solution of the branon wave equation which has to be added to ensure the validity of the retarded solution at the perforation point. Physically, the domain wall gets excited due to the shake caused by an instantaneous change of sign of the repulsive gravitational force. This effect is shown to hold, in particular, in four space-time dimensions, being applicable to the problem of cosmological domain walls.

  20. Thermodynamics of free Domain Wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. V. Gavai; Sayantan Sharma

    2008-11-19

    Studying various thermodynamic quantities for the free domain wall fermions for both finite and infinite fifth dimensional extent N_5, we find that the lattice corrections are minimum for $N_T\\geq10$ for both energy density and susceptibility, for its irrelevant parameter M in the range 1.45-1.50. The correction terms are, however, quite large for small lattice sizes of $N_T\\leq8$. We propose modifications of the domain wall operator, as well as the overlap operator, to reduce the finite cut-off effects to within 10% of the continuum results of the thermodynamic quantities for the currently used N_T=6-8 lattices. Incorporating chemical potential, we show that \\mu^2 divergences are absent for a large class of such domain wall fermion actions although the chiral symmetry is broken for $\\mu\

  1. Standing gravitational waves from domain walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merab Gogberashvili; Shynaray Myrzakul; Douglas Singleton

    2009-07-19

    We construct a plane symmetric, standing gravitational wave for a domain wall plus a massless scalar field. The scalar field can be associated with a fluid which has the properties of `stiff' matter, i.e. matter in which the speed of sound equals the speed of light. Although domain walls are observationally ruled out in the present era the solution has interesting features which might shed light on the character of exact non-linear wave solutions to Einstein's equations. Additionally this solution may act as a template for higher dimensional 'brane-world' model standing waves.

  2. Ginzburg-Landau model with small pinning domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-10-04

    Oct 4, 2011 ... We consider a Ginzburg-Landau type energy with a piecewise constant pinning term a in the potential (a2 ? |u|2)2. The function a is different ...

  3. Solitons and Domain Walls in Odd Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. D. Lambert; G. W. Gibbons

    2000-07-04

    We discuss the existance of smooth soliton solutions which interpolate between supersymmetric vacua in odd-dimensional theories. In particular we apply this analysis to a wide class of supergravities to argue against the existence of smooth domain walls interpolating between supersymmetric vacua. We find that if the superpotential changes sign then any Goldstino modes will diverge.

  4. Depinning transition of a domain wall in ferromagnetic films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xi, Bin; Luo, Meng -Bo; Vinokur, Valerii M.; Hu, Xiao

    2015-09-14

    We report first principle numerical study of domain wall (DW) depinning in two-dimensional magnetic film, which is modeled by 2D random-field Ising system with the dipole-dipole interaction. We observe non-conventional activation-type motion of DW and reveal the fractal structure of DW near the depinning transition. We determine scaling functions describing critical dynamics near the transition and obtain universal exponents establishing connection between thermal softening of pinning potential and critical dynamics. In addition, we observe that tuning the strength of the dipole-dipole interaction switches DW dynamics between two different universality classes, corresponding to two distinct dynamic regimes characterized by non-Arrhenius andmore »conventional Arrhenius-type DW motions.« less

  5. Inflationary power asymmetry from primordial domain walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jazayeri, Sadra; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Solomon, Adam R; Wang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    We study the asymmetric primordial fluctuations in a model of inflation in which translational invariance is broken by a domain wall. We calculate the corrections to the power spectrum of curvature perturbations; they are anisotropic and contain dipole, quadrupole, and higher multipoles with non-trivial scale-dependent amplitudes. Inspired by observations of these multipole asymmetries in terms of two-point correlations and variance in real space, we demonstrate that this model can explain the observed anomalous power asymmetry of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky, including its characteristic feature that the dipole dominates over higher multipoles. We test the viability of the model and place approximate constraints on its parameters by using observational values of dipole, quadrupole, and octopole amplitudes of the asymmetry measured by a local-variance estimator. We find that a configuration of the model in which the CMB sphere does not intersect the domain wall during inflation provides a good fi...

  6. Light quark masses using domain wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Blum; Amarjit Soni; Matthew Wingate

    1998-09-10

    We compute the one-loop self-energy correction to the massive domain wall quark propagator. Combining this calculation with simulations at several gauge couplings, we estimate the strange quark mass in the continuum limit. The perturbative one-loop mass renormalization is comparable to that for Wilson quarks and considerably smaller than that for Kogut-Susskind quarks. Also, scaling violations appear mild in comparison to other errors at present. Given their good chiral behavior and these features, domain wall quarks are attractive for evaluating the light quark masses. Our preliminary quenched result is m_s(2 GeV) = 82(15) MeV in the ${\\bar{MS}}$ scheme.

  7. System and method for manipulating domain pinning and reversal in ferromagnetic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silevitch, Daniel M.; Rosenbaum, Thomas F.; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2013-10-15

    A method for manipulating domain pinning and reversal in a ferromagnetic material comprises applying an external magnetic field to a uniaxial ferromagnetic material comprising a plurality of magnetic domains, where each domain has an easy axis oriented along a predetermined direction. The external magnetic field is applied transverse to the predetermined direction and at a predetermined temperature. The strength of the magnetic field is varied at the predetermined temperature, thereby isothermally regulating pinning of the domains. A magnetic storage device for controlling domain dynamics includes a magnetic hard disk comprising a uniaxial ferromagnetic material, a magnetic recording head including a first magnet, and a second magnet. The ferromagnetic material includes a plurality of magnetic domains each having an easy axis oriented along a predetermined direction. The second magnet is positioned adjacent to the magnetic hard disk and is configured to apply a magnetic field transverse to the predetermined direction.

  8. Melting Instantons, Domain Walls, and Large N

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. B. Thacker

    2008-10-22

    Monte Carlo studies of $CP^{N-1}$ sigma models have shown that the structure of topological charge in these models undergoes a sharp transition at $N=N_c\\approx 4$. For $NN_c$ it is dominated by extended, thin, 1-dimensionally coherent membranes of topological charge, which can be interpreted as domain walls between discrete quasi-stable vacua. These vacua differ by a unit of background electric flux. The transition can be identified as the delocalization of topological charge, or "instanton melting," a phenomenon first suggested by Witten to resolve the conflict between instantons and large $N$ behavior. Implications for $QCD$ are discussed.

  9. Current-driven domain wall motion enhanced by the microwave field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xi-guang; Guo, Guang-hua Nie, Yao-zhuang; Wang, Dao-wei; Li, Zhi-xiong; Tang, Wei; Zeng, Zhong-ming

    2014-07-14

    The magnetic domain wall (DW) motion driven by a spin-polarized current opens a new concept for memory and logic devices. However, the critical current density required to overcome the intrinsic and/or extrinsic pinning of DW remains too large for practical applications. Here, we show, by using micromagnetic simulations and analytical approaches, that the application of a microwave field offers an effective solution to this problem. When a transverse microwave field is applied, the adiabatic spin-transfer torque (STT) alone can sustain a steady-state DW motion without the sign of Walker breakdown, meaning that the intrinsic pinning disappears. The extrinsic pinning can also be effectively reduced. Moreover, the DW velocity is increased greatly for the microwave-assisted DW motion. This provides a new way to manipulate the DW motion at low current densities.

  10. Inflationary power asymmetry from primordial domain walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadra Jazayeri; Yashar Akrami; Hassan Firouzjahi; Adam R. Solomon; Yi Wang

    2014-11-29

    We study the asymmetric primordial fluctuations in a model of inflation in which translational invariance is broken by a domain wall. We calculate the corrections to the power spectrum of curvature perturbations; they are anisotropic and contain dipole, quadrupole, and higher multipoles with non-trivial scale-dependent amplitudes. Inspired by observations of these multipole asymmetries in terms of two-point correlations and variance in real space, we demonstrate that this model can explain the observed anomalous power asymmetry of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky, including its characteristic feature that the dipole dominates over higher multipoles. We test the viability of the model and place approximate constraints on its parameters by using observational values of dipole, quadrupole, and octopole amplitudes of the asymmetry measured by a local-variance estimator. We find that a configuration of the model in which the CMB sphere does not intersect the domain wall during inflation provides a good fit to the data. We further derive analytic expressions for the corrections to the CMB temperature covariance matrix, or angular power spectra, which can be used in future statistical analysis of the model in spherical harmonic space.

  11. Inflationary power asymmetry from primordial domain walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jazayeri, Sadra; Akrami, Yashar; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Solomon, Adam R.; Wang, Yi E-mail: yashar.akrami@astro.uio.no E-mail: a.r.solomon@damtp.cam.ac.uk

    2014-11-01

    We study the asymmetric primordial fluctuations in a model of inflation in which translational invariance is broken by a domain wall. We calculate the corrections to the power spectrum of curvature perturbations; they are anisotropic and contain dipole, quadrupole, and higher multipoles with non-trivial scale-dependent amplitudes. Inspired by observations of these multipole asymmetries in terms of two-point correlations and variance in real space, we demonstrate that this model can explain the observed anomalous power asymmetry of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky, including its characteristic feature that the dipole dominates over higher multipoles. We test the viability of the model and place approximate constraints on its parameters by using observational values of dipole, quadrupole, and octopole amplitudes of the asymmetry measured by a local-variance estimator. We find that a configuration of the model in which the CMB sphere does not intersect the domain wall during inflation provides a good fit to the data. We further derive analytic expressions for the corrections to the CMB temperature covariance matrix, or angular power spectra, which can be used in future statistical analysis of the model in spherical harmonic space.

  12. Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies generated by domain wall networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sousa, L

    2015-01-01

    We develop a numerical tool for the fast computation of the temperature and polarization power spectra generated by domain wall networks, by extending the publicly available CMBACT code --- that calculates the CMB signatures generated by active sources --- to also describe domain wall networks. In order to achieve this, we adapt the Unconnected Segment model for cosmic strings to also describe domain wall networks, and use it to model the energy-momentum of domain wall networks throughout their cosmological history. We use this new tool to compute and study the TT, EE, TE and BB power spectra generated by standard domain wall networks, and derive a conservative constraint on the energy scale of the domain wall-forming phase transition of $\\upeta <0.92\\,\\,{\\rm MeV}$ (which is a slight improvement over the original Zel'dovich bound of $1\\,\\,{\\rm MeV}$).

  13. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of magnetic-domain walls and opens a path to further technological developments in spintronics applications. Magnetic Data Storage "Rats My disk drive has crashed. How will I...

  14. Hamilton-Jacobi method for Domain Walls and Cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostas Skenderis; Paul K. Townsend

    2006-12-07

    We use Hamiltonian methods to study curved domain walls and cosmologies. This leads naturally to first order equations for all domain walls and cosmologies foliated by slices of maximal symmetry. For Minkowski and AdS-sliced domain walls (flat and closed FLRW cosmologies) we recover a recent result concerning their (pseudo)supersymmetry. We show how domain-wall stability is consistent with the instability of adS vacua that violate the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound. We also explore the relationship to Hamilton-Jacobi theory and compute the wave-function of a 3-dimensional closed universe evolving towards de Sitter spacetime.

  15. Surface effect on domain wall width in ferroelectrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-10-26

    Oct 26, 2009 ... the domain wall thickness and gradient coefficients in typical ... phase transitions or u. 0 for the second ... tained from the surface energy in the form12. P3 ? 1 ..... Calculated width solid curves of domain wall at level. 0.76 as a ...

  16. Asymmetric domain walls of small angle in soft ferromagnetic films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lukas Döring; Radu Ignat

    2014-12-07

    We focus on a special type of domain walls appearing in the Landau-Lifshitz theory for soft ferromagnetic films. These domain walls are divergence-free $S^2$-valued transition layers that connect two directions in $S^2$ (differing by an angle $2\\theta$) and minimize the Dirichlet energy. Our main result is the rigorous derivation of the asymptotic structure and energy of such "asymmetric" domain walls in the limit $\\theta \\to 0$. As an application, we deduce that a supercritical bifurcation causes the transition from symmetric to asymmetric walls in the full micromagnetic model.

  17. Thermal effects on transverse domain wall dynamics in magnetic nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leliaert, J.; Van de Wiele, B.; Vandermeulen, J.; Coene, A.; Dupré, L.; Vansteenkiste, A.; Waeyenberge, B. Van; Laurson, L.; Durin, G.

    2015-05-18

    Magnetic domain walls are proposed as data carriers in future spintronic devices, whose reliability depends on a complete understanding of the domain wall motion. Applications based on an accurate positioning of domain walls are inevitably influenced by thermal fluctuations. In this letter, we present a micromagnetic study of the thermal effects on this motion. As spin-polarized currents are the most used driving mechanism for domain walls, we have included this in our analysis. Our results show that at finite temperatures, the domain wall velocity has a drift and diffusion component, which are in excellent agreement with the theoretical values obtained from a generalized 1D model. The drift and diffusion component are independent of each other in perfect nanowires, and the mean square displacement scales linearly with time and temperature.

  18. Contribution of domain wall networks to the CMB power spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lazanu, A; Shellard, E P S

    2015-01-01

    We use three domain wall simulations from the radiation era to the late time dark energy domination era based on the PRS algorithm to calculate the energy-momentum tensor components of domain wall networks in an expanding universe. Unequal time correlators in the radiation, matter and cosmological constant epochs are calculated using the scaling regime of each of the simulations. The CMB power spectrum of a network of domain walls is determined. The first ever quantitative constraint for the domain wall surface tension is obtained using a Markov chain Monte Carlo method; an energy scale of domain walls of 0.93 MeV, which is close but below the Zel'dovich bound, is determined.

  19. Collapse of Axionic Domain Wall and Axion Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michiyasu Nagasawa; Masahiro Kawasaki

    1994-05-09

    We examine the collapse of an axion domain wall bounded by an axionic string. It is found that the collapse proceeds quickly and axion domain walls disappear. However axions are emitted in the collapse and its energy density increases during radiation dominated era and contributes significantly to the present mass density of the universe. In particular the axion emitted from the wall can account for the dark matter in the universe for $F_a\\gsim 10^{10}\\GeV$.

  20. Domain wall QCD with physical quark masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RBC,; Blum, T; Boyle, P A; Christ, N H; Frison, J; Garron, N; Hudspith, R J; Izubuchi, T; Janowski, T; Jung, C; Juettner, A; Kelly, C; Kenway, R D; Lehner, C; Marinkovic, M; Mawhinney, R D; McGlynn, G; Murphy, D J; Ohta, S; Portelli, A; Sachrajda, C T; Soni, A

    2014-01-01

    We present results for several light hadronic quantities ($f_\\pi$, $f_K$, $B_K$, $m_{ud}$, $m_s$, $t_0^{1/2}$, $w_0$) obtained from simulations of 2+1 flavor domain wall lattice QCD with large physical volumes and nearly-physical pion masses at two lattice spacings. We perform a short, O(3)%, extrapolation in pion mass to the physical values by combining our new data in a simultaneous chiral/continuum `global fit' with a number of other ensembles with heavier pion masses. We use the physical values of $m_\\pi$, $m_K$ and $m_\\Omega$ to determine the two quark masses and the scale - all other quantities are outputs from our simulations. We obtain results with sub-percent statistical errors and negligible chiral and finite-volume systematics for these light hadronic quantities, including: $f_\\pi$ = 130.2(9) MeV; $f_K$ = 155.5(8) MeV; the average up/down quark mass and strange quark mass in the $\\overline {\\rm MS}$ scheme at 3 GeV, 2.997(49) and 81.64(1.17) MeV respectively; and the neutral kaon mixing parameter, ...

  1. Domain wall QCD with physical quark masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RBC; UKQCD collaborations; :; T. Blum; P. A. Boyle; N. H. Christ; J. Frison; N. Garron; R. J. Hudspith; T. Izubuchi; T. Janowski; C. Jung; A. Juettner; C. Kelly; R. D. Kenway; C. Lehner; M. Marinkovic; R. D. Mawhinney; G. McGlynn; D. J. Murphy; S. Ohta; A. Portelli; C. T. Sachrajda; A. Soni

    2014-11-25

    We present results for several light hadronic quantities ($f_\\pi$, $f_K$, $B_K$, $m_{ud}$, $m_s$, $t_0^{1/2}$, $w_0$) obtained from simulations of 2+1 flavor domain wall lattice QCD with large physical volumes and nearly-physical pion masses at two lattice spacings. We perform a short, O(3)%, extrapolation in pion mass to the physical values by combining our new data in a simultaneous chiral/continuum `global fit' with a number of other ensembles with heavier pion masses. We use the physical values of $m_\\pi$, $m_K$ and $m_\\Omega$ to determine the two quark masses and the scale - all other quantities are outputs from our simulations. We obtain results with sub-percent statistical errors and negligible chiral and finite-volume systematics for these light hadronic quantities, including: $f_\\pi$ = 130.2(9) MeV; $f_K$ = 155.5(8) MeV; the average up/down quark mass and strange quark mass in the $\\overline {\\rm MS}$ scheme at 3 GeV, 2.997(49) and 81.64(1.17) MeV respectively; and the neutral kaon mixing parameter, $B_K$, in the RGI scheme, 0.750(15) and the $\\overline{\\rm MS}$ scheme at 3 GeV, 0.530(11).

  2. Gapped Domain Walls, Gapped Boundaries and Topological Degeneracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian Lan; Juven Wang; Xiao-Gang Wen

    2014-11-26

    Gapped domain walls, as topological line defects between 2+1D topologically ordered states, are examined. We provide simple criteria to determine the existence of gapped domain walls, which apply to both Abelian and non-Abelian topological orders. Our criteria also determine which 2+1D topological orders must have gapless edge modes, namely which 1+1D global gravitational anomalies ensure gaplessness. Furthermore, we introduce a new mathematical object, the tunneling matrix $\\mathcal W$, whose entries are the fusion-space dimensions $\\mathcal W_{ia}$, to label different types of gapped domain walls. By studying many examples, we find evidence that the tunneling matrices are powerful quantities to classify different types of gapped domain walls. Since a gapped boundary is a gapped domain wall between a bulk topological order and the vacuum, regarded as the trivial topological order, our theory of gapped domain walls inclusively contains the theory of gapped boundaries. In addition, we derive a topological ground state degeneracy formula, applied to arbitrary orientable spatial 2-manifolds with gapped domain walls, including closed 2-manifolds and open 2-manifolds with gapped boundaries.

  3. Evidence for small-molecule-mediated loop stabilization in the structure of the isolated Pin1 WW domain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortenson, David E.; Kreitler, Dale F.; Yun, Hyun Gi; Gellman, Samuel H., E-mail: gellman@chem.wisc.edu; Forest, Katrina T., E-mail: gellman@chem.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Two structures of a small protein with a defined tertiary fold, the isolated Pin1 WW domain, have been determined via racemic crystallization with small-molecule additives. These additives, which are either racemic or achiral, appear to stabilize a dynamic loop region of the structure. The human Pin1 WW domain is a small autonomously folding protein that has been useful as a model system for biophysical studies of ?-sheet folding. This domain has resisted previous attempts at crystallization for X-ray diffraction studies, perhaps because of intrinsic conformational flexibility that interferes with the formation of a crystal lattice. Here, the crystal structure of the human Pin1 WW domain has been obtained via racemic crystallization in the presence of small-molecule additives. Both enantiomers of a 36-residue variant of the Pin1 WW domain were synthesized chemically, and the l- and d-polypeptides were combined to afford diffracting crystals. The structural data revealed packing interactions of small carboxylic acids, either achiral citrate or a d,l mixture of malic acid, with a mobile loop region of the WW-domain fold. These interactions with solution additives may explain our success in crystallization of this protein racemate. Molecular-dynamics simulations starting from the structure of the Pin1 WW domain suggest that the crystal structure closely resembles the conformation of this domain in solution. The structural data presented here should provide a basis for further studies of this important model system.

  4. Calculation of the strange quark mass using domain wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Blum; Amarjit Soni; Matthew Wingate

    2000-09-18

    We present a first calculation of the strange quark mass using domain wall fermions. This paper contains an overview of the domain wall discretization and a pedagogical presentation of the perturbative calculation necessary for computing the mass renormalization. We combine the latter with numerical simulations to estimate the strange quark mass. Our final result in the quenched approximation is 95(26) MeV in the ${\\bar{MS}}$ scheme at a scale of 2 GeV. We find that domain wall fermions have a small perturbative mass renormalization, similar to Wilson quarks, and exhibit good scaling behavior.

  5. Analytical and micromagnetic study of a Neel domain wall 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivkin, K.; Romanov, K.; Abanov, Artem; Adamov, Y.; Saslow, W. M.

    2008-01-01

    For ferromagnets with exchange, dipolar interaction, and uniaxial anisotropy, by both analytic methods and micromagnetic simulations we study Neel domain walls in thin ferromagnetic strips of finite width. Comparison of the numerical results...

  6. Domain wall displacement by remote spin-current injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skirdkov, P. N.

    We demonstrate numerically the ability to displace a magnetic domain wall (DW) by remote spin current injection. We consider a long and narrow magnetic nanostripe with a single DW. The spin-polarized current is injected ...

  7. Spherical Domain Wall Collapse in a Dust Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norihiro Tanahashi; Chul-Moon Yoo

    2015-05-13

    To clarify observational consequence of bubble nucleations in inflationary era, we analyse dynamics of a spherical domain wall in an expanding universe. We consider a spherical shell of the domain wall with tension $\\sigma$ collapsing in a spherically-symmetric dust universe, which is initially separated into the open Friedmann-Lema\\^itre-Robertson-Walker universe inside the shell and the Einstein-de Sitter universe outside. The domain wall shell collapses due to the tension, and sweeps the dust fluid. The universe after the collapse becomes inhomogeneous and is described by the Lema\\^itre-Tolman-Bondi model. We construct solutions describing this inhomogeneous universe by solving dynamical equations obtained from Israel's junction conditions applied to this system. We find that a black hole forms after the domain wall collapse for any initial condition, and that the black hole mass at the moment of its formation is universally given by $M_{\\rm BH}\\simeq 17 \\sigma/H_{\\rm hc}$, where $H_{\\rm hc}$ is the Hubble parameter at the time when the shell radius becomes equal to the Hubble radius. We also find that the dust fluid is distributed as $\\rho\\propto R^{3/2}$ near the central region after the collapse, where $R$ is the area radius. These features would provide observable signatures of a spherical domain wall generated in the early universe.

  8. Domain wall and isocurvature perturbation problems in axion models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Yoshino, Kazuyoshi; Yanagida, Tsutomu T. E-mail: tsutomu.tyanagida@ipmu.jp

    2013-11-01

    Axion models have two serious cosmological problems, domain wall and isocurvature perturbation problems. In order to solve these problems we investigate the Linde's model in which the field value of the Peccei-Quinn (PQ) scalar is large during inflation. In this model the fluctuations of the PQ field grow after inflation through the parametric resonance and stable axionic strings may be produced, which results in the domain wall problem. We study formation of axionic strings using lattice simulations. It is found that in chaotic inflation the axion model is free from both the domain wall and the isocurvature perturbation problems if the initial misalignment angle ?{sub a} is smaller than O(10{sup ?2}). Furthermore, axions can also account for the dark matter for the breaking scale v ? 10{sup 12?16} GeV and the Hubble parameter during inflation H{sub inf}?<10{sup 11?12} GeV in general inflation models.

  9. Nonlinear magnetoinductive waves and domain walls in composite metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nonlinear magnetoinductive waves and domain walls in composite metamaterials Ilya V. Shadrivov a-handed composite metamaterials. We derive the coupled equations for describing the propagation of magnetoinductive waves, and show that in the nonlinear regime the magnetic response of a metamaterial may become bistable

  10. A Domain Wall Model for Hysteresis in Piezoelectric Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Domain Wall Model for Hysteresis in Piezoelectric Materials Ralph C. Smith Center for Research to attain the full potential of the materials as sensors and actuators in high performance applications design. i #12; 1 Introduction Piezoelectric materials provide the capability for designing actuators

  11. Nonadiabatic Spin Torque Investigated Using Thermally Activated Magnetic Domain Wall Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Nonadiabatic Spin Torque Investigated Using Thermally Activated Magnetic Domain Wall Dynamics M microscopy, we investigate the thermally activated motion of domain walls (DWs) between two positions properly analyzed, thermally activated processes at tem- peratures even well below the Curie temperature

  12. Phenomenological theory of a single domain wall in uniaxial trigonal ferroelectrics: Lithium niobate and lithium tantalate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopalan, Venkatraman

    Phenomenological theory of a single domain wall in uniaxial trigonal ferroelectrics: Lithium niobate and lithium tantalate David A. Scrymgeour and Venkatraman Gopalan Department of Materials Science, lithium niobate and lithium tantalate. The contributions to the domain- wall energy from polarization

  13. Magnetic behavior of 360° domain walls in patterned magnetic thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mascaro, Mark Daniel

    2012-01-01

    360° transverse domain walls (360DWs), which form readily from transverse 180° domain walls (180DWs) of opposite sense, demonstrate qualitatively distinct behaviors from their constituent 180DWs and are therefore of interest ...

  14. Speeding up Domain Wall Fermion Algorithms using QCDLAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artan Borici

    2007-03-21

    Simulating lattice QCD with chiral fermions and indeed using Domain Wall Fermions continues to be challenging project however large are concurrent computers. One obvious bottleneck is the slow pace of prototyping using the low level coding which prevails in most, if not all, lattice projects. Recently, we came up with a new proposal, namely QCDLAB, a high level language interface, which we believe will boost our endeavours to rapidly code lattice prototype applications in lattice QCD using MATLAB/OCTAVE language and environment. The first version of the software, QCDLAB 1.0 offers the general framework on how to achieve this goal by simulating set of the lattice Schwinger model {\\tt http://phys.fshn.edu.al/qcdlab.html}. In this talk we introduce QCDLAB 1.1, which extends QCDLAB 1.0 capabilities for real world lattice computations with Wilson and Domain Wall fermions.

  15. End states, ladder compounds, and domain wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Creutz

    1999-09-01

    A magnetic field applied to a cross linked ladder compound can generate isolated electronic states bound to the ends of the chain. After exploring the interference phenomena responsible, I discuss a connection to the domain wall approach to chiral fermions in lattice gauge theory. The robust nature of the states under small variations of the bond strengths is tied to chiral symmetry and the multiplicative renormalization of fermion masses.

  16. Analysis of ultra-narrow ferromagnetic domain walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, Catherine; Paul, David

    2012-01-10

    New materials with high magnetic anisotropy will have domains separated by ultra-narrow ferromagnetic walls with widths on the order of a few unit cells, approaching the limit where the elastic continuum approximation often used in micromagnetic simulations is accurate. The limits of this approximation are explored, and the static and dynamic interactions with intrinsic crystalline defects and external driving #12;elds are modeled. The results developed here will be important when considering the stability of ultra-high-density storage media.

  17. Propagating and reflecting of spin wave in permalloy nanostrip with 360° domain wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Senfu; Mu, Congpu; Zhu, Qiyuan; Zheng, Qi; Liu, Xianyin; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Qingfang

    2014-01-07

    By micromagnetic simulation, we investigated the interaction between propagating spin wave (or magnonic) and a 360° domain wall in a nanostrip. It is found that propagating spin wave can drive a 360° domain wall motion, and the velocity and direction are closely related to the transmission coefficient of the spin wave of the domain wall. When the spin wave passes through the domain wall completely, the 360° domain wall moves toward the spin wave source. When the spin wave is reflected by the domain wall, the 360° domain wall moves along the spin wave propagation direction. Moreover, when the frequency of the spin wave is coincident with that of the 360° domain wall normal mode, the 360° domain wall velocity will be resonantly enhanced no matter which direction the 360 DW moves along. On the other hand, when the spin wave is reflected from the moving 360° domain wall, we observed the Doppler effect clearly. After passing through a 360° domain wall, the phase of the spin wave is changed, and the phase shift is related to the frequency. Nevertheless, phase shift could be manipulated by the number of 360° domain walls that spin wave passing through.

  18. Quantum Fusion of Strings (Flux Tubes) and Domain Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Bolognesi; M. Shifman; M. B. Voloshin

    2009-05-20

    We consider formation of composite strings and domain walls as a result of fusion of two elementary objects (elementary strings in the first case and elementary walls in the second) located at a distance from each other. The tension of the composite object T_2 is assumed to be less than twice the tension of the elementary object T_1, so that bound states are possible. If in the initial state the distance d between the fusing strings or walls is much larger than their thickness and satisfies the conditions T_1 d^2 >> 1 (in the string case) and T_1 d^3 >> 1 (in the wall case), the problem can be fully solved quasiclassically. The fusion probability is determined by the first, "under the barrier" stage of the process. We find the bounce configuration and its extremal action S_B. In the wall problem e^{-S_B} gives the fusion probability per unit time per unit area. In the string case, due to a logarithmic infrared divergence, the problem is well formulated only for finite-length strings. The fusion probability per unit time can be found in the limit in which the string length is much larger than the distance between two merging strings.

  19. Energy-momentum balance in particle - domain wall perforating collision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. V. Gal'tsov; E. Yu. Melkumova; P. A. Spirin

    2015-02-10

    We investigate the energy-momentum balance in the perforating collision of a point particle with an infinitely thin planar domain wall within the linearized gravity in arbitrary dimensions. Since the metric of the wall increases with distance, the wall and the particle are never free, and their energy-momentum balance involves not only the instantaneous kinetic momenta, but also the non-local contribution of gravitational stresses. However, careful analysis shows that the stresses can be unambiguously divided between the colliding objects leading to definition of the gravitationally dressed momenta. These take into account for gravity in the same way as the potential energy does in the non-relativistic theory, but our treatment is fully relativistic. Another unusual feature of our problem is the non-vanishing flux of the total energy-momentum tensor through the lateral surface of the world tube. In this case the zero divergence of the energy-momentum tensor does not imply conservation of the total momentum defined as the integral over the space-like section of the tube. But one can still define the conservation low infinitesimally, passing to time derivatives of the momenta. Using this definition we establish the momentum balance in terms of the dressed particle and wall momenta.

  20. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  1. Spatially resolved observation of domain-wall propagation in a submicron ferromagnetic NOT-gate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grütter, Peter

    , one head-to-head or tail-to-tail domain wall propagates in the structure. Magnetic fields above by the polarity of the adjacent wire magnetization directions as either head-to- head or tail-to-tail domain walls-wall propagation. MFM using low magnetic moment tips 30 nm CoPtCr was operated in the constant height mode

  2. Proton decay matrix elements with domain-wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Aoki; C. Dawson; J. Noaki; A. Soni

    2006-09-18

    Hadronic matrix elements of operators relevant to nucleon decay in grand unified theories are calculated numerically using lattice QCD. In this context, the domain-wall fermion formulation, combined with non-perturbative renormalization, is used for the first time. These techniques bring reduction of a large fraction of the systematic error from the finite lattice spacing. Our main effort is devoted to a calculation performed in the quenched approximation, where the direct calculation of the nucleon to pseudoscalar matrix elements, as well as the indirect estimate of them from the nucleon to vacuum matrix elements, are performed. First results, using two flavors of dynamical domain-wall quarks for the nucleon to vacuum matrix elements are also presented to address the systematic error of quenching, which appears to be small compared to the other errors. Our results suggest that the representative value for the low energy constants from the nucleon to vacuum matrix elements are given as |alpha| simeq |beta| simeq 0.01 GeV^3. For a more reliable estimate of the physical low energy matrix elements, it is better to use the relevant form factors calculated in the direct method. The direct method tends to give smaller value of the form factors, compared to the indirect one, thus enhancing the proton life-time; indeed for the pi^0 final state the difference between the two methods is quite appreciable.

  3. Scattering from a Domain Wall in a Spontaneously Broken Gauge Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glennys R. Farrar; John W. McIntosh, Jr

    1994-12-20

    We study the interaction of particles with a domain wall at a symmetry-breaking phase transition by perturbing about the domain wall solution. We find the particulate excitations appropriate near the domain wall and relate them to the particles present far from the wall in the uniform broken and unbroken phases. For a quartic Higgs potential we find analytic solutions to the equations of motion and derive reflection and transmission coefficients. We discover several bound states for particles near the wall. Finally, we apply our results to the electroweak phase transition in the standard model.

  4. Future of Chiral Extrapolations with Domain Wall Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen R. Sharpe

    2007-06-01

    I discuss the constraints on the lattice spacing, a, the quark masses, m, the box size, L, and particularly the residual mass, m_res, such that one can successfully calculate phenomenologically interesting quantities using Domain Wall fermions (DWF). The constraints on a, m, and L are largely common with other improved fermion discretizations, and I emphasize that the improved chiral symmetry of DWF does not remove the need for simulations with a significant range of lattice parameters. Concerning m_res, I compare the analysis of chiral symmetry breaking to that with Wilson fermions, emphasizing that DWF are better than simply Wilson fermions with each chiral symmetry breaking effect reduced by a common factor. I then discuss the impact of non-zero m_res both on generic hadronic quantities, and on matrix elements which involve mixing with lower dimension operators.

  5. Investigation of dominant spin wave modes by domain walls collision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramu, M.; Purnama, I.; Goolaup, S.; Chandra Sekhar, M.; Lew, W. S.

    2014-06-28

    Spin wave emission due to field-driven domain wall (DW) collision has been investigated numerically and analytically in permalloy nanowires. The spin wave modes generated are diagonally symmetric with respect to the collision point. The non-propagating mode has the highest amplitude along the middle of the width. The frequency of this mode is strongly correlated to the nanowire geometrical dimensions and is independent of the strength of applied field within the range of 0.1?mT to 1?mT. For nanowire with film thickness below 5?nm, a second spin wave harmonic mode is observed. The decay coefficient of the spin wave power suggests that the DWs in a memory device should be at least 300?nm apart for them to be free of interference from the spin waves.

  6. Cosmic bubble and domain wall instabilities II: Fracturing of colliding walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan Braden; J. Richard Bond; Laura Mersini-Houghton

    2015-06-09

    We study collisions between nearly planar domain walls including the effects of small initial nonplanar fluctuations. These perturbations represent the small fluctuations that must exist in a quantum treatment of the problem. In a previous paper, we demonstrated that at the linear level a subset of these fluctuations experience parametric amplification as a result of their coupling to the planar symmetric background. Here we study the full three-dimensional nonlinear dynamics using lattice simulations, including both the early time regime when the fluctuations are well described by linear perturbation theory as well as the subsequent stage of fully nonlinear evolution. We find that the nonplanar fluctuations have a dramatic effect on the overall evolution of the system. Specifically, once these fluctuations begin to interact nonlinearly the split into a planar symmetric part of the field and the nonplanar fluctuations loses its utility. At this point the colliding domain walls dissolve, with the endpoint of this being the creation of a population of oscillons in the collision region. The original (nearly) planar symmetry has been completely destroyed at this point and an accurate study of the system requires the full three-dimensional simulation.

  7. Phase diagram of magnetic domain walls in spin valve nano-stripes N. Rougemaille,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Phase diagram of magnetic domain walls in spin valve nano-stripes N. Rougemaille,1 V. Uhlí,2, 1 O walls in Co/Cu/Py spin valve nano-stripes (Py: Permalloy), in which the Co layer is mostly single domain Magneto- Resistance. These stacking are called spin valve for a metal spacer layer, and pseudo spin valve

  8. Charm physics with physical light and strange quarks using domain wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter A. Boyle; Luigi Del Debbio; Nicolas Garron; Andreas Juttner; Ava Khamseh; Marina Marinkovic; Francesco Sanfilippo; Justus T. Tsang

    2015-02-03

    We present a study of charm physics using RBC/UKQCD 2+1 flavour physical point domain wall fermion ensembles for the light quarks as well as for the valence charm quark. After a brief motivation of domain wall fermions as a suitable heavy quark discretisation we will show first results for masses and matrix elements.

  9. Charm physics with physical light and strange quarks using domain wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyle, Peter A; Garron, Nicolas; Juttner, Andreas; Khamseh, Ava; Marinkovic, Marina; Sanfilippo, Francesco; Tsang, Justus T

    2015-01-01

    We present a study of charm physics using RBC/UKQCD 2+1 flavour physical point domain wall fermion ensembles for the light quarks as well as for the valence charm quark. After a brief motivation of domain wall fermions as a suitable heavy quark discretisation we will show first results for masses and matrix elements.

  10. One-dimensional domain walls in thin ferromagnetic films with fourfold anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross G. Lund; Cyrill B. Muratov

    2015-09-23

    We study the properties of domain walls and domain patterns in ultrathin epitaxial magnetic films with two orthogonal in-plane easy axes, which we call fourfold materials. In these materials, the magnetization vector is constrained to lie entirely in the film plane and has four preferred directions dictated by the easy axes. We prove the existence of $90^\\circ$ and $180^\\circ$ domain walls in these materials as minimizers of a nonlocal one-dimensional energy functional. Further, we investigate numerically the role of the considered domain wall solutions for pattern formation in a rectangular sample.

  11. Domain walls and vortices in linearly coupled systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dror, Nir; Zeng, Jianhua

    2011-01-01

    We investigate 1D and 2D radial domain-wall (DW) states in the system of two nonlinear-Schr\\"{o}dinger/Gross-Pitaevskii equations, which are coupled by the linear mixing and by the nonlinear XPM (cross-phase-modulation). The system has straightforward applications to two-component Bose-Einstein condensates, and to the bimodal light propagation in nonlinear optics. In the former case, the two components represent different hyperfine atomic states, while in the latter setting they correspond to orthogonal polarizations of light. Conditions guaranteeing the stability of flat continuous wave (CW) asymmetric bimodal states are established, followed by the study of families of the corresponding DW patterns. Approximate analytical solutions for the DWs are found near the point of the symmetry-breaking bifurcation of the CW states. An exact DW solution is produced for ratio 3:1 of the XPM and SPM coefficients. The DWs between flat asymmetric states, which are mirror images to each other, are completely stable, and al...

  12. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic Vortices Print Soft magnetic, micron-sized thin-film structures with magnetic vortices are intriguing systems that may one day be used in...

  13. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  14. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  15. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  16. Influence of Domain Wall Pinning on the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  17. Domain Wall Model in the Galactic Bose-Einstein Condensate Halo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. C. de Souza; M. O. C. Pires

    2013-05-22

    We assume that the galactical dark matter halo, considered composed of an axionlike particles Bose-Einstein condensate \\cite{pir12}, can present topological defects, namely domain walls, arising as the dark soliton solution for the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in a self-graviting potential. We investigate the influence that such substructures would have in the gravitational interactions within a galaxy. We find that, for the simple domain wall model proposed, the effects are too small to be identified, either by means of a local measurement of the gradient of the gravitational field or by analysing galaxy rotation curves. In the first case, the gradient of the gravitational field in the vicinity of the domain wall would be $10^{-31}\\; (m/s^2)/m$. In the second case, the ratio of the tangential velocity correction of a star due to the presence of the domain wall to the velocity in the spherical symmetric case would be $10^{-8}$.

  18. Domain wall mobility in nanowires: transverse versus vortex walls R. Wieser, U. Nowak and K. D. Usadel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usadel, K. D.

    Arrays of magnetic nanowires are possible candidates for patterned magnetic storage media [1, 2]. For these nanowires and also for other future magneto­electronic devices the understanding of domain wall motion and mobility is important for the controlled switching of the nanostructure. In a recent experiment

  19. Substrate Clamping Effects on Irreversible Domain Wall Dynamics in Lead Zirconate Titanate Thin Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griggio, Flavio [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Kumar, Amit [ORNL; Ovchinnikov, Oleg S [ORNL; Kim, H. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Jackson, T. N. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Damjanovic, Dragan [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Trolier-Mckinstry, Susan E [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The role of long-range strain interactions on domain wall dynamics is explored through macroscopic and local measurements of nonlinear behavior in mechanically clamped and released polycrystalline lead zirconate-titanate (PZT) films. Released films show a dramatic change in the global dielectric nonlinearity and its frequency dependence as a function of mechanical clamping. Furthermore, we observe a transition from strong clustering of the nonlinear response for the clamped case to almost uniform nonlinearity for the released film. This behavior is ascribed to increased mobility of domain walls. These results suggest the dominant role of collective strain interactions mediated by the local and global mechanical boundary conditions on the domain wall dynamics. The work presented in this Letter demonstrates that measurements on clamped films may considerably underestimate the piezoelectric coefficients and coupling constants of released structures used in microelectromechanical systems, energy harvesting systems, and microrobots.

  20. Lattice QCD with domain wall quarks and applications to weak matrix elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Blum; A. Soni Brookhaven National Lab

    1997-10-13

    Using domain wall fermions, we estimate $B_K(\\mu\\approx 2 GeV)=0.628(47)$ in quenched QCD which is consistent with previous calculations. At $\\gbeta=6.0$ and 5.85 we find the ratio $f_K/m_\\rho$ in agreement with the experimental value, within errors. These results support expectations that $O(a)$ errors are exponentially suppressed in low energy ($E\\ll a^{-1}$) observables, and indicate that domain wall fermions have good scaling behavior at relatively strong couplings. We also demonstrate that the axial current numerically satisfies the lattice analog of the usual continuum axial Ward identity.

  1. The effect of thermal activation on the coercivity of domain walls L. LopezDiaz a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moro, Esteban

    The effect of thermal activation on the coercivity of domain walls L. Lopez­Diaz a) Departamento de of temperature was taken into account. However, it is well known that thermal activation over finite energy the inclusion and, consequently, the coercivity is low­ ered. In this article, the effect of thermal activation

  2. The effect of thermal activation on the coercivity of domain walls L. Lopez-Diaza)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moro, Esteban

    The effect of thermal activation on the coercivity of domain walls L. Lopez-Diaza) Departamento de of temperature was taken into account. However, it is well known that thermal activation over finite energy the inclusion and, consequently, the coercivity is low- ered. In this article, the effect of thermal activation

  3. Thermoelectric Effect across the Metal-Insulator Domain Walls in VO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Junqiao

    Thermoelectric Effect across the Metal-Insulator Domain Walls in VO2 Microbeams J. Cao,,, W. Fan-performance thermoelectric materials are currently one of the focuses in materials research for energy conversion technologies.1-4 A good thermoelectric material should have a relatively high thermopower (Seebeck coefficient

  4. Temperature dependence of carrier spin polarization determined from current-induced domain wall motion in a Co/Ni nanowire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueda, K.; Koyama, T.; Hiramatsu, R.; Kobayashi, K.; Ono, T.; Chiba, D.; Fukami, S.; Tanigawa, H.; Suzuki, T.; Ohshima, N.; Ishiwata, N.; Nakatani, Y.

    2012-05-14

    We have investigated the temperature dependence of the current-induced magnetic domain wall (DW) motion in a perpendicularly magnetized Co/Ni nanowire at various temperatures and with various applied currents. The carrier spin polarization was estimated from the measured domain wall velocity. We found that it decreased more with increasing temperature from 100 K to 530 K than the saturation magnetization did.

  5. In-situ observation of domain wall motion in Pb(In{sub 1/2}Nb{sub 1/2})O{sub 3}-Pb(Mg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Dabin; Cai, Changlong [Laboratory of Thin Film Techniques and Optical Test, Xi'an Technological University, Xi'an 710032 (China); Li, Zhenrong, E-mail: zhrli@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Li, Fei; Xu, Zhuo [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Education Ministry and International Center for Dielectric Research, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Zhang, Shujun, E-mail: soz1@psu.edu [Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Cheng, Yaojin [Science and Technology on Low-Light-Level Night Vision Laboratory, Xi'an 710065 (China)

    2014-07-21

    Various domain structures, including wave-like domains, mixed needle-like and laminar domains, typical embedded 90° and 180° domains, have been observed in unpoled rhombohedral, monoclinic, and tetragonal Pb(In{sub 1/2}Nb{sub 1/2})O{sub 3}-Pb(Mg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} (PIN-PMN-PT) crystals by polarizing light microscope; while in poled tetragonal crystals, the parallel 180° domains were reversed and only vertical 90° domain walls were observed. For 0.24PIN-0.42PMN-0.34PT crystals with morphotropic phase boundary composition, the domain wall motion was in-situ observed as a function of applied electric field along crystallographic [100] direction. With increasing the electric field from 0 to 12?kV/cm, the rhombohedral (R) domains were found to change to monoclinic (M) domains and then to tetragonal (T) domains. The electric field-induced phase transition was also confirmed by X-ray diffraction and the temperature-dependent dielectric behavior.

  6. B-physics with dynamical domain-wall light quarks and relativistic b-quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruth S. Van de Water; Oliver Witzel

    2011-01-24

    We report on our progress in calculating the B-meson decay constants and B^0-bar B^0 mixing parameters using domain-wall light quarks and relativistic b-quarks. We present our computational method and show some preliminary results obtained on the coarser (a approx 0.11fm) 24^3 lattices. This work is presented on behalf of the RBC and UKQCD collaborations.

  7. CP violation in the models of fermion localization on a domain wall (brane)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander A. Andrianov; Vladimir A. Andrianov; Oleg O. Novikov

    2013-03-31

    A brief survey of fermion localization mechanism on a domain wall ("thick brane") generated by a topologically nontrivial vacuum configuration of scalar fields is given. The extension of scalar fields interaction with fermions which supplies fermions with an axial mass is proposed. For several flavors and generations of fermions this extension can entail the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix of the Standard Model. As well the model with two scalar doublets which provide a supplementary CP violation mechanism is considered.

  8. Nucleon structure from mixed action calculations using 2+1 flavors of asqtad sea and domain wall valence fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bratt, Jonathan D.

    We present high statistics results for the structure of the nucleon from a mixed-action calculation using 2+1 flavors of asqtad sea and domain-wall valence fermions. We perform extrapolations of our data based on different ...

  9. One-Flavor Algorithms for Simulation of Lattice QCD with Domain-Wall Fermion: EOFA versus RHMC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu-Chih Chen; Ting-Wai Chiu

    2014-12-02

    We compare the performances of the exact one-flavor algorithm (EOFA) and the rational hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm (RHMC), for dynamical simulations of lattice QCD with domain-wall fermion.

  10. Direct Observation of Nanoscale Peltier and Joule Effects at Metal-Insulator Domain Walls in Vanadium Dioxide Nanobeams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Junqiao

    Direct Observation of Nanoscale Peltier and Joule Effects at Metal- Insulator Domain Walls localized alternating Peltier heating and cooling as well as Joule heating concentrated at the M-I domain the monoclinic phase identification. KEYWORDS: Vanadium dioxide, thermoreflectance microscopy, Peltier effect

  11. Magnetic domain wall manipulation in (Ga,Mn)As nanostructures for spintronic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wosinski, Tadeusz; Andrearczyk, Tomasz; Figielski, Tadeusz; Olender, Karolina; Wrobel, Jerzy

    2014-02-21

    Ring-shaped nanostructures have been designed and fabricated by electron-beam lithography patterning and chemical etching from thin epitaxial layers of the ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As. The nanostructures, in a form of planar rings with a slit, were supplied with four electrical terminals and subjected to magneto-transport studies under planar weak magnetic field. Magnetoresistive effects caused by manipulation of magnetic domain walls and magnetization reversal in the nanostructures have been investigated and possible applications of the nanostructures as four-terminal spintronic devices are discussed.

  12. The static quark potential in 2+1 flavour Domain Wall QCD from QCDOC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koichi Hashimoto; Taku Izubuchi; Jun Noaki; for the RBC-UKQCD Collaborations

    2005-10-14

    We report our present status of on-going project on the measurement of the static quark potential in 2+1 flavour domain wall QCD with various improved gauge actions and couplings. Lattice spacing determined from Sommer scale on these ensembles are from 1.6 GeV to 2.0 GeV for $16^3 \\times 32$ lattice with fifth dimension size 8. We also examine size of discretization error from scaling of a pair of dimensionless quantities, $(r_0 m_\\pi)^2$ and $r_0 m_\\rho$, and found small scaling violation.

  13. The relation between the waveguide and overlap implementations of Kaplan's domain wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maarten Golterman; Yigal Shamir

    1995-09-26

    Recently, Narayanan and Neuberger proposed that the fermion determinant for a lattice chiral gauge theory be defined by an overlap formula. The motivation for that formula comes from Kaplan's five dimensional lattice domain wall fermions. In the case that the target continuum theory contains $4n$ chiral families, we show that the effective action defined by overlap formula is identical to the effective action of a modified waveguide model that has extra bosonic ghost fields. This raises serious questions about the viability of the overlap formula for defining chiral gauge theories on the lattice.

  14. Domain wall fermion calculation of nucleon g_A/g_V

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Blum; Shigemi Ohta; Shoichi Sasaki

    2000-11-01

    We present a preliminary domain-wall fermion lattice-QCD calculation of isovector vector and axial charges, g_V and g_A, of the nucleon. Since the lattice renormalizations, Z_V and Z_A, of the currents are identical with DWF, the lattice ratio (g_A/g_V)^{lattice} directly yields the continuum value. Indeed Z_V determined from the matrix element of the vector current agrees closely with Z_A from a non-perturbative renormalization study of quark bilinears. We also obtain spin related quantities Delta-q/g_V and delta-q/g_V.

  15. Domain Walls and Anchoring Transitions Mimicking Nematic Biaxiality in the Oxadiazole Bent-Core Liquid Crystal C7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Young-ki; Xiang, Jie; Shin, Sung-Tae; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the origin of secondary disclinations that were recently described as a new evidence of a biaxial nematic phase in an oxadiazole bent-core thermotropic liquid crystal C7. With an assortment of optical techniques such as polarizing optical microscopy, LC PolScope, and fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy, we demonstrate that the secondary disclinations represent non-singular domain walls formed in an uniaxial nematic during the surface anchoring transition, in which surface orientation of the director changes from tangential (parallel to the bounding plates) to tilted. Each domain wall separates two regions with the director tilted in opposite azimuthal directions. At the centre of the wall, the director remains parallel to the bonding plates. The domain walls can be easily removed by applying a modest electric field. The anchoring transition is explained by the balance of (a) the intrinsic perpendicular surface anchoring produced by the polyimide aligning layer and (b) tangential alignme...

  16. Nucleon axial charge from quenched lattice QCD with domain wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoichi Sasaki; Kostas Orginos; Shigemi Ohta; Tom Blum; for the RBCK Collaboration

    2003-07-18

    We present a quenched lattice calculation of the nucleon isovector vector and axial-vector charges gV and gA. The chiral symmetry of domain wall fermions makes the calculation of the nucleon axial charge particularly easy since the Ward-Takahashi identity requires the vector and axial-vector currents to have the same renormalization, up to lattice spacing errors of order O(a^2). The DBW2 gauge action provides enhancement of the good chiral symmetry properties of domain wall fermions at larger lattice spacing than the conventional Wilson gauge action. Taking advantage of these methods and performing a high statistics simulation, we find a significant finite volume effect between the nucleon axial charges calculated on lattices with (1.2 fm)^3 and (2.4 fm)^3 volumes (with lattice spacing, a, of about 0.15 fm). On the large volume we find gA = 1.212 +/- 0.027(statistical error) +/- 0.024(normalization error). The quoted systematic error is the dominant (known) one, corresponding to current renormalization. We discuss other possible remaining sources of error. This theoretical first principles calculation, which does not yet include isospin breaking effects, yields a value of gA only a little bit below the experimental one, 1.2670 +/- 0.0030.

  17. Insights into substrate specificity of NlpC/P60 cell wall hydrolases containing bacterial SH3 domains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, Qingping; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Liu, Xueqian W.; Patin, Delphine; Farr, Carol L.; Grant, Joanna C.; Chiu, Hsiu -Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W.; Godzik, Adam; et al

    2015-09-15

    Bacterial SH3 (SH3b) domains are commonly fused with papain-like Nlp/P60 cell wall hydrolase domains. To understand how the modular architecture of SH3b and NlpC/P60 affects the activity of the catalytic domain, three putative NlpC/P60 cell wall hydrolases were biochemically and structurally characterized. In addition, these enzymes all have ?-d-Glu-A2pm (A2pm is diaminopimelic acid) cysteine amidase (ordl-endopeptidase) activities but with different substrate specificities. One enzyme is a cell wall lysin that cleaves peptidoglycan (PG), while the other two are cell wall recycling enzymes that only cleave stem peptides with an N-terminall-Ala. Their crystal structures revealed a highly conserved structure consisting ofmore »two SH3b domains and a C-terminal NlpC/P60 catalytic domain, despite very low sequence identity. Interestingly, loops from the first SH3b domain dock into the ends of the active site groove of the catalytic domain, remodel the substrate binding site, and modulate substrate specificity. Two amino acid differences at the domain interface alter the substrate binding specificity in favor of stem peptides in recycling enzymes, whereas the SH3b domain may extend the peptidoglycan binding surface in the cell wall lysins. Remarkably, the cell wall lysin can be converted into a recycling enzyme with a single mutation.Peptidoglycan is a meshlike polymer that envelops the bacterial plasma membrane and bestows structural integrity. Cell wall lysins and recycling enzymes are part of a set of lytic enzymes that target covalent bonds connecting the amino acid and amino sugar building blocks of the PG network. These hydrolases are involved in processes such as cell growth and division, autolysis, invasion, and PG turnover and recycling. To avoid cleavage of unintended substrates, these enzymes have very selective substrate specificities. Our biochemical and structural analysis of three modular NlpC/P60 hydrolases, one lysin, and two recycling enzymes, show that they may have evolved from a common molecular architecture, where the substrate preference is modulated by local changes. These results also suggest that new pathways for recycling PG turnover products, such as tracheal cytotoxin, may have evolved in bacteria in the human gut microbiome that involve NlpC/P60 cell wall hydrolases.« less

  18. Steady-state domain wall motion driven by adiabatic spin-transfer torque with assistance of microwave field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xi-guang; Guo, Guang-hua Nie, Yao-zhuang; Xia, Qing-lin; Tang, Wei; Wang, D.; Zeng, Zhong-ming

    2013-12-23

    We have studied the current-induced displacement of a 180° Bloch wall by means of micromagnetic simulation and analytical approach. It is found that the adiabatic spin-transfer torque can sustain a steady-state domain wall (DW) motion in the direction opposite to that of the electron flow without Walker Breakdown when a transverse microwave field is applied. This kind of motion is very sensitive to the microwave frequency and can be resonantly enhanced by exciting the domain wall thickness oscillation mode. A one-dimensional analytical model was established to account for the microwave-assisted wall motion. These findings may be helpful for reducing the critical spin-polarized current density and designing DW-based spintronic devices.

  19. Fuel pin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Leggett, R.D.; Baker, R.B.

    1987-11-24

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  20. Fuel pin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Karnesky, Richard A. (Richland, WA); Leggett, Robert D. (Richland, WA); Baker, Ronald B. (Richland, WA)

    1989-01-01

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  1. A Parallel Multi-Domain Solution Methodology Applied to Nonlinear Thermal Transport Problems in Nuclear Fuel Pins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philip, Bobby; Berrill, Mark A; Allu, Srikanth; Hamilton, Steven P; Sampath, Rahul S; Clarno, Kevin T; Dilts, Gary

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an efficient and nonlinearly consistent parallel solution methodology for solving coupled nonlinear thermal transport problems that occur in nuclear reactor applications over hundreds of individual 3D physical subdomains. Efficiency is obtained by leveraging knowledge of the physical domains, the physics on individual domains, and the couplings between them for preconditioning within a Jacobian Free Newton Krylov method. Details of the computational infrastructure that enabled this work, namely the open source Advanced Multi-Physics (AMP) package developed by the authors are described. Details of verification and validation experiments, and parallel performance analysis in weak and strong scaling studies demonstrating the achieved efficiency of the algorithm are presented. Furthermore, numerical experiments demonstrate that the preconditioner developed is independent of the number of fuel subdomains in a fuel rod, which is particularly important when simulating different types of fuel rods. Finally, we demonstrate the power of the coupling methodology by considering problems with couplings between surface and volume physics and coupling of nonlinear thermal transport in fuel rods to an external radiation transport code.

  2. GPU-Based Conjugate Gradient Solver for Lattice QCD with Domain-Wall Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ting-Wai Chiu; Tung-Han Hsieh; Yao-Yuan Mao; Kenji Ogawa

    2011-01-02

    We present the first GPU-based conjugate gradient (CG) solver for lattice QCD with domain-wall fermions (DWF). It is well-known that CG is the most time-consuming part in the Hybrid Monte Carlo simulation of unquenched lattice QCD, which becomes even more computational demanding for lattice QCD with exact chiral symmetry. We have designed a CG solver for the general 5-dimensional DWF operator on NVIDIA CUDA architecture with mixed-precision, using the defect correction as well as the reliable updates algorithms. We optimize our computation by even-odd preconditioning in the 4D space-time lattice, plus several innovative techniques for CUDA kernels. For NVIDIA GeForce GTX 285/480, our CG solver attains 180/233 Gflops (sustained).

  3. GPU-Based Conjugate Gradient Solver for Lattice QCD with Domain-Wall Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiu, Ting-Wai; Mao, Yao-Yuan; Ogawa, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    We present the first GPU-based conjugate gradient (CG) solver for lattice QCD with domain-wall fermions (DWF). It is well-known that CG is the most time-consuming part in the Hybrid Monte Carlo simulation of unquenched lattice QCD, which becomes even more computational demanding for lattice QCD with exact chiral symmetry. We have designed a CG solver for the general 5-dimensional DWF operator on NVIDIA CUDA architecture with mixed-precision, using the defect correction as well as the reliable updates algorithms. We optimize our computation by even-odd preconditioning in the 4D space-time lattice, plus several innovative techniques for CUDA kernels. For NVIDIA GeForce GTX 285/480, our CG solver attains 180/233 Gflops (sustained).

  4. Nucleon form factors with 2+1 flavor dynamical domain-wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takeshi Yamazaki; Yasumichi Aoki; Tom Blum; Huey-Wen Lin; Shigemi Ohta; Shoichi Sasaki; Robert Tweedie; James Zanotti

    2009-04-14

    We report our numerical lattice QCD calculations of the isovector nucleon form factors for the vector and axialvector currents: the vector, induced tensor, axialvector, and induced pseudoscalar form factors. The calculation is carried out with the gauge configurations generated with N_f=2+1 dynamical domain wall fermions and Iwasaki gauge actions at beta = 2.13, corresponding to a cutoff 1/a = 1.73 GeV, and a spatial volume of (2.7 fm)^3. The up and down quark masses are varied so the pion mass lies between 0.33 and 0.67 GeV while the strange quark mass is about 12% heavier than the physical one. We calculate the form factors in the range of momentum transfers, 0.2 6 is required to ensure that finite volume effects are below 1%.

  5. Spin torque and heating effects in current-induced domain wall motion probed by transmission electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Spin torque and heating effects in current-induced domain wall motion probed by transmission are reported. Heating on membranes leads to thermally activated random behavior at low current densities and by backcoating the SiN membranes with Al, heating effects are significantly reduced. A set of indicators

  6. Domain Walls and Anchoring Transitions Mimicking Nematic Biaxiality in the Oxadiazole Bent-Core Liquid Crystal C7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young-ki Kim; Greta Cukrov; Jie Xiang; Sung-Tae Shin; Oleg D. Lavrentovich

    2015-03-23

    We investigate the origin of secondary disclinations that were recently described as a new evidence of a biaxial nematic phase in an oxadiazole bent-core thermotropic liquid crystal C7. With an assortment of optical techniques such as polarizing optical microscopy, LC PolScope, and fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy, we demonstrate that the secondary disclinations represent non-singular domain walls formed in an uniaxial nematic during the surface anchoring transition, in which surface orientation of the director changes from tangential (parallel to the bounding plates) to tilted. Each domain wall separates two regions with the director tilted in opposite azimuthal directions. At the centre of the wall, the director remains parallel to the bonding plates. The domain walls can be easily removed by applying a modest electric field. The anchoring transition is explained by the balance of (a) the intrinsic perpendicular surface anchoring produced by the polyimide aligning layer and (b) tangential alignment caused by ionic impurities forming electric double layers. The model is supported by the fact that the temperature of the tangential-tilted anchoring transition decreases as the cell thickness increases and as the concentration of ionic species (added salt) increases. We also demonstrate that the surface alignment is strongly affected by thermal degradation of the samples. The study shows that C7 exhibits only a uniaxial nematic phase and demonstrate yet another mechanism (formation of secondary disclinations) by which a uniaxial nematic can mimic a biaxial nematic behaviour.

  7. The finite temperature QCD using 2+1 flavors of domain wall fermions at Nt = 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, M; Christ, N H; Li, M; Mawhinney, R D; Renfrew, D; Hegde, P; Karsch, F; Lin, M; Vranas, P

    2009-11-30

    We study the region of the QCD phase transition using 2+1 flavors of domain wall fermions (DWF) and a 16{sup 3} x 8 lattice volume with a fifth dimension of L{sub s} = 32. The disconnected light quark chiral susceptibility, quark number susceptibility and the Polyakov loop suggest a chiral and deconfining crossover transition lying between 155 and 185 MeV for our choice of quark mass and lattice spacing. In this region the lattice scale deduced from the Sommer parameter r{sub 0} is a{sup -1} {approx} 1.3 GeV, the pion mass is {approx} 300 MeV and the kaon mass is approximately physical. The peak in the chiral susceptibility implies a pseudo critical temperature T{sub c} = 171(10)(17) MeV where the first error is associated with determining the peak location and the second with our unphysical light quark mass and non-zero lattice spacing. The effects of residual chiral symmetry breaking on the chiral condensate and disconnected chiral susceptibility are studied using several values of the valence L{sub s}.

  8. Finite Temperature QCD Using 2 þ 1 Flavors of Domain Wall Fermions at Nt ¼ 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karsch, F.; Lim, M; Cheng, M; Christ, N; Hegde, P.; Li, L.; Mawhinney, R.; Renfrew, D.; Vranas, P.

    2010-03-30

    We study the region of the QCD phase transition using 2 + 1 flavors of domain wall fermions and a 16{sup 3} x 8 lattice volume with a fifth dimension of L{sub s} = 32. The disconnected light quark chiral susceptibility, quark number susceptibility, and the Polyakov loop suggest a chiral and deconfining crossover transition lying between 155 and 185 MeV for our choice of quark mass and lattice spacing. In this region the lattice scale deduced from the Sommer parameter r{sub 0} is a{sup -1} {approx} 1.3 GeV, the pion mass is {approx} 300 MeV, and the kaon mass is approximately physical. The peak in the chiral susceptibility implies a pseudocritical temperature T{sub c} = 171(10)(17) MeV where the first error is associated with determining the peak location and the second with our unphysical light quark mass and nonzero lattice spacing. The effects of residual chiral symmetry breaking on the chiral condensate and disconnected chiral susceptibility are studied using several values of the valence L{sub s}.

  9. A Lattice Study of the Nucleon Excited States with Domain Wall Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoichi Sasaki; Tom Blum; Shigemi Ohta

    2002-01-16

    We present results of our numerical calculation of the mass spectrum for isospin one-half and spin one-half non-strange baryons, i.e. the ground and excited states of the nucleon, in quenched lattice QCD. We use a new lattice discretization scheme for fermions, domain wall fermions, which possess almost exact chiral symmetry at non-zero lattice spacing. We make a systematic investigation of the negative-parity $N^*$ spectrum by using two distinct interpolating operators at $\\beta=6/g^2=6.0$ on a $16^3 \\times 32 \\times 16$ lattice. The mass estimates extracted from the two operators are consistent with each other. The observed large mass splitting between this state, $N^*(1535)$, and the positive-parity ground state, the nucleon N(939), is well reproduced by our calculations. We have also calculated the mass of the first positive-parity excited state and found that it is heavier than the negative-parity excited state for the quark masses studied.

  10. Heat Exchanger With Internal Pin Elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerstmann, Joseph (Framingham, MA); Hannon, Charles L. (Arlington, MA)

    2004-01-13

    A heat exchanger/heater comprising a tubular member having a fluid inlet end, a fluid outlet end and plurality of pins secured to the interior wall of the tube. Various embodiments additionally comprise a blocking member disposed concentrically inside the pins, such as a core plug or a baffle array. Also disclosed is a vapor generator employing an internally pinned tube, and a fluid-heater/heat-exchanger utilizing an outer jacket tube and fluid-side baffle elements, as well as methods for heating a fluid using an internally pinned tube.

  11. Continuum limit physics from 2+1 flavor domain wall QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aoki, Y.; Izubuchi, T.; Arthur, R.; Blum, T.; Boyle, P.A.; Brommel, D.; Christ, N.H.; Dawson, C.; Flynn, J.M.; Jin, X.Y.; Jung, C.; Kelly, C.; Li, M.; Lichtl, A.; Lightman, M.; Lin, M.F.; Mawhinney, R.D.; Maynard,C.M.; Ohta, S.; Pendleton, B.J.; Sachrajda, C.T.; Scholz, E.E.; Soni, A.; Wennekers, J.; Zanotti, J.M.; Zhou, R.

    2011-04-22

    We present physical results obtained from simulations using 2+1 flavors of domain wall quarks and the Iwasaki gauge action at two values of the lattice spacing a, [a{sup -1} = 1.73(3) GeV and a{sup -1} = 2.28(3) GeV]. On the coarser lattice, with 24{sup 3} x 64 x 16 points (where the 16 corresponds to L{sub s}, the extent of the 5th dimension inherent in the domain wall fermion formulation of QCD), the analysis of C. Allton et al. Phys. Rev. D 78 is extended to approximately twice the number of configurations. The ensembles on the finer 32{sup 3} x 64 x 16 lattice are new. We explain in detail how we use lattice data obtained at several values of the lattice spacing and for a range of quark masses in combined continuum-chiral fits in order to obtain results in the continuum limit and at physical quark masses. We implement this procedure for our data at two lattice spacings and with unitary pion masses in the approximate range 290-420 MeV (225-420 MeV for partially quenched pions). We use the masses of the {pi} and K mesons and the {Omega} baryon to determine the physical quark masses and the values of the lattice spacing. While our data in the mass ranges above are consistent with the predictions of next-to-leading order SU(2) chiral perturbation theory, they are also consistent with a simple analytic ansatz leading to an inherent uncertainty in how best to perform the chiral extrapolation that we are reluctant to reduce with model-dependent assumptions about higher order corrections. In some cases, particularly for f{sub {pi}}, the pion leptonic decay constant, the uncertainty in the chiral extrapolation dominates the systematic error. Our main results include f{sub {pi}} = 124(2){sub stat}(5){sub syst} MeV, f{sub K}/f{sub {pi}} = 1.204(7)(25) where f{sub K} is the kaon decay constant, m{sub s}{sup MS} (2 GeV) = (96.2 {+-} 2.7) MeV and m{sub ud}{sup MS} (2 GeV) = (3.59 {+-} 0.21) MeV (m{sub s}/m{sub ud} = 26.8 {+-} 1.4) where m{sub s} and m{sub ud} are the mass of the strange quark and the average of the up and down quark masses, respectively, [{Sigma}{sup MS} (2 GeV)]{sup 1/3} = 256(6) MeV, where {Sigma} is the chiral condensate, the Sommer scale r{sub 0} = 0.487(9) fm and r{sub 1} = 0.333(9) fm.

  12. Nucleon isovector structure functions in (2+1)-flavor QCD with domain wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasumichi Aoki; Tom Blum; Huey-Wen Lin; Shigemi Ohta; Shoichi Sasaki; Robert Tweedie; Takeshi Yamazaki; James Zanotti

    2010-03-17

    We report on numerical lattice QCD calculations of some of the low moments of the nucleon structure functions. The calculations are carried out with gauge configurations generated by the RBC and UKQCD collaborations with (2+1)-flavors of dynamical domain wall fermions and the Iwasaki gauge action ($\\beta = 2.13$). The inverse lattice spacing is $a^{-1} = 1.73$ GeV, and two spatial volumes of ((2.7{\\rm fm})^3) and ((1.8 {\\rm fm})^3) are used. The up and down quark masses are varied so the pion mass lies between 0.33 and 0.67 GeV while the strange mass is about 12 % heavier than the physical one. The structure function moments we present include fully non-perturbatively renormalized iso-vector quark momentum fraction, (_{u-d}), helicity fraction, (_{\\Delta u - \\Delta d}), and transversity, (_{\\delta u - \\delta d}), as well as an unrenormalized twist-3 coefficient, (d_1). The ratio of the momentum to helicity fractions, (_{u-d}/_{\\Delta u - \\Delta d}), does not show dependence on the light quark mass and agrees well with the value obtained from experiment. Their respective absolute values, fully renormalized, show interesting trends toward their respective experimental values at the lightest quark mass. A prediction for the transversity, (0.7 _{\\delta u -\\delta d} < 1.1), in the (\\bar{\\rm MS}) scheme at 2 GeV is obtained. The twist-3 coefficient, (d_1), though yet to be renormalized, supports the perturbative Wandzura-Wilczek relation.

  13. Nucleon structure with two flavors of dynamical domain-wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huey-Wen Lin; Tom Blum; Shigemi Ohta; Shoichi Sasaki; Takeshi Yamazaki

    2008-02-06

    We present a numerical lattice quantum chromodynamics calculation of isovector form factors and the first few moments of the isovector structure functions of the nucleon. The calculation employs two degenerate dynamical flavors of domain-wall fermions, resulting in good control of chiral symmetry breaking. Non-perturbative renormalization of the relevant quark currents is performed where necessary. The inverse lattice spacing, $a^{-1}$, is about 1.7 GeV. We use degenerate up and down dynamical quark masses around 1, 3/4 and 1/2 the strange quark mass. The physical volume of the lattice is about $(1.9{fm})^3$. The ratio of the isovector vector to axial charges, $g_A/g_V$, trends a bit lower than the experimental value as the quark mass is reduced toward the physical point. We calculate the momentum-transfer dependences of the isovector vector, axial, induced tensor and induced pseudoscalar form factors. The Goldberger-Treiman relation holds at low momentum transfer and yields a pion-nucleon coupling, $g_{\\pi NN} = 15.5(1.4)$, where the quoted error is only statistical. We find that the flavor non-singlet quark momentum fraction $_{u-d}$ and quark helicity fraction $_{\\Delta u-\\Delta d}$ overshoot their experimental values after linear chiral extrapolation. We obtain the transversity, $_{\\delta u-\\delta d} = 0.93(6)$ in $\\bar{\\rm MS}$ at 2 GeV and a twist-3 polarized moment, $d_1$, appears small, suggesting that the Wandzura-Wilczek relation holds approximately. We discuss the systematic errors in the calculation, with particular attention paid to finite-volume effects, excited-state contamination, and chiral extrapolations.

  14. Power-law Behavior of Strings Scattered from Domain-wall at High Energies and Breakdown of their Linear Relations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuan Tsung Chan; Jen-Chi Lee; Yi Yang

    2007-05-18

    In contrast to the common wisdom, we discover that, instead of the exponential fall-off of the form factors with Regge-pole structure, the high-energy scattering amplitudes of string scattered from Domain-wall behave as power-law with Regge-pole structure. This is to be compared with the well-known power-law form factors without Regge-pole structure of the D-instanton scatterings. This discovery makes Domain-wall scatterings an unique example of a hybrid of string and field theory scatterings. The calculation is done for bosonic string scatterings of arbitrary massive string states from D-24 brane. Moreover, we discover that the usual linear relations of high-energy string scattering amplitudes at each fixed mass level break down for the Domain-wall scatterings. This result gives a strong evidence that the existence of the infinite linear relations, or stringy symmetries, of high-energy string scattering amplitudes is responsible for the softer, exponential fall-off high-energy string scatterings than the power-law field theory scatterings.

  15. Fuel pin cladding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vaidyanathan, S.; Adamson, M.G.

    1983-12-16

    An improved fuel pin cladding, particularly adapted for use in breeder reactors, is described which consist of composite tubing with austenitic steel on the outer portion of the thickness of the tube wall and with nickel an/or ferritic material on the inner portion of the thickness of the tube wall. The nickel forms a sacrificial barrier as it reacts with certain fission products thereby reducing fission product activity at the austenitic steel interface. The ferritic material forms a preventive barrier for the austenitic steel as it is immune to liquid metal embrittlement. The improved cladding permits the use of high density fuel which in turn leads to a better breeding ratio in breeder reactors, and will increase the threshold at which failure occurs during temperature transients.

  16. Fuel pin cladding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vaidyanathan, S.; Adamson, M.G.

    1986-01-28

    Disclosed is an improved fuel pin cladding, particularly adapted for use in breeder reactors, consisting of composite tubing with austenitic steel on the outer portion of the thickness of the tube wall and with nickel and/or ferritic material on the inner portion of the thickness of the tube wall. The nickel forms a sacrificial barrier as it reacts with certain fission products thereby reducing fission product activity at the austenitic steel interface. The ferritic material forms a preventive barrier for the austenitic steel as it is immune to liquid metal embrittlement. The improved cladding permits the use of high density fuel which in turn leads to a better breeding ratio in breeder reactors, and will increase the threshold at which failure occurs during temperature transients. 2 figs.

  17. Time-resolved observation of fast domain-walls driven by vertical spin currents in short tracks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sampaio, Joao; Lequeux, Steven; Chanthbouala, Andre; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie; Matsumoto, Rie; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nagamine, Yoshinori; Maehara, Hiroki; Tsunekawa, Koji

    2013-12-09

    We present time-resolved measurements of the displacement of magnetic domain-walls (DWs) driven by vertical spin-polarized currents in track-shaped magnetic tunnel junctions. In these structures, we observe very high DW velocities (600?m/s) at current densities below 10{sup 7}?A/cm{sup 2}. We show that the efficient spin-transfer torque combined with a short propagation distance allows avoiding the Walker breakdown process and achieving deterministic, reversible, and fast (?1?ns) DW-mediated switching of magnetic tunnel junction elements, which is of great interest for the implementation of fast DW-based spintronic devices.

  18. The Static Approximation to B Meson Mixing using Light Domain-Wall Fermions: Perturbative Renormalization and Ground State Degeneracies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norman H. Christ; Thomas T. Dumitrescu; Taku Izubuchi; Oleg Loktik

    2007-10-28

    We discuss the theoretical input into the current RBC-UKQCD calculation of $f_{B_{d, s}}$ and $B_{B_{d, s}}$ using a smeared static heavy quark propagator, light domain-wall quarks and the Iwasaki gauge action. We present the complete one-loop, mean-field improved matching of heavy-light current and four-fermion lattice operators onto the static continuum theory renormalized in $\\bar{\\text{MS}}$(NDR). The large degeneracies present in a static calculation are addressed, and a method for extracting $f_B$ and $B_B$ using only box sources is described; implications for future calculations are discussed.

  19. Fast Domain Wall Switching in a Thin Ferroelectric Polymer Jong Yeog Son,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, EokKyun

    such as nonvolatile memories.8 Meanwhile, scanning probe microscopy SPM on ferroelectric domains has exhibited- namics in PbTiO3 thin films.10,11 Various applications of the SPM method such as piezoresponse force

  20. Direct observation of domain walls in NiFe films using high-resolution Lorentz microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, David E.

    . Wong and David E. Laughlin Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University that the thickness dependence has a similar profile to the theoretically predicted trend but the actual wall with the interactive data language IDL image processing software so that the interference between magnetic

  1. Domain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    charlotb

    2010-08-31

    Fish. Dog. Chicken. Shark. Man. Tiger. Dog. Domain. Correspondence. Range. 3. Members of a an instrument the a set of. Rock Band member can play.

  2. One-loop operator matching in the static heavy and domain-wall light quark system with O(a) improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomomi Ishikawa; Yasumichi Aoki; Jonathan M. Flynn; Taku Izubuchi; Oleg Loktik

    2011-05-16

    We discuss perturbative O(g^2a) matching with static heavy quarks and domain-wall light quarks for lattice operators relevant to B-meson decays and $B^0$-$\\bar{B}^0$ mixing. The chiral symmetry of the light domain-wall quarks does not prohibit operator mixing at O(a) for these operators. The O(a) corrections to physical quantities are non-negligible and must be included to obtain high-precision simulation results for CKM physics. We provide results using plaquette, Symanzik, Iwasaki and DBW2 gluon actions and applying APE, HYP1 and HYP2 link-smearing for the static quark action.

  3. Non-perturbative renormalization of overlap quark bilinears on 2+1-flavor domain wall fermion configurations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhaofeng Liu; Ying Chen; Shao-Jing Dong; Michael Glatzmaier; Ming Gong; Anyi Li; Keh-Fei Liu; Yi-Bo Yang; Jian-Bo Zhang

    2014-08-19

    We present renormalization constants of overlap quark bilinear operators on 2+1-flavor domain wall fermion configurations. This setup is being used by the chiQCD collaboration in calculations of physical quantities such as strangeness in the nucleon and the strange and charm quark masses. The scale independent renormalization constant for the axial vector current is computed using the Ward Identity. The renormalization constants for scalar, pseudoscalar and vector current are calculated in the RI-MOM scheme. Results in the MS-bar scheme are also given. The step scaling function of quark masses in the RI-MOM scheme is computed as well. The analysis uses, in total, six different ensembles of three sea quarks each on two lattices with sizes 24^3x64 and 32^3x64 at spacings a=(1.73 GeV)^{-1} and (2.28 GeV)^{-1}, respectively.

  4. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    characterized by the competition between a pinned orbital domain topology that remains static and mobile domain boundaries that exhibit slow, temporal fluctuations. Speckles in...

  5. Cosmic bubble and domain wall instabilities I: parametric amplification of linear fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan Braden; J. Richard Bond; Laura Mersini-Houghton

    2014-12-17

    This is the first paper in a series where we study collisions of nucleated bubbles taking into account the effects of small initial (quantum) fluctuations in a fully 3+1-dimensional setting. In this paper, we consider the evolution of linear fluctuations around highly symmetric though inhomogeneous backgrounds. We demonstrate that a large degree of asymmetry develops over time from tiny fluctuations superposed upon planar and SO(2,1) symmetric backgrounds. These fluctuations arise from zero-point vacuum oscillations, so excluding them by enforcing a spatial symmetry is inconsistent in a quantum treatment. We consider the limit of two colliding planar walls, with fluctuation mode functions characterized by the wavenumber transverse to the collision direction and a longitudinal shape along the collision direction $x$, which we solve for. Initially, the fluctuations obey a linear wave equation with a time- and space-dependent mass $m_{eff}(x,t)$. When the walls collide multiple times, $m_{eff}$ oscillates in time. We use Floquet theory to study the fluctuations and generalize techniques familiar from preheating to the case with many coupled degrees of freedom. This inhomogeneous case has bands of unstable transverse wavenumbers $k_\\perp$ with exponentially growing mode functions. From the detailed spatial structure of the mode functions in $x$, we identify both broad and narrow parametric resonance generalizations of the homogeneous $m_{eff}(t)$ case of preheating. The unstable $k_\\perp$ modes are longitudinally localized, yet can be described as quasiparticles in the Bogoliubov sense. We define an effective occupation number to show they are created in bursts for the case of well-defined collisions in the background. The transverse-longitudinal coupling accompanying nonlinearity radically breaks this localized particle description, with nonseparable 3D modes arising.

  6. Nonlinear Spin-Polarized Transport through a Ferromagnetic Domain Wall Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65211

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flatte, Michael E.

    of a p-n junction, while two consecutive domain walls correspond to a p-n-p transistor. In a recent paper current is, indeed, possible in the ``p-n-p'' configuration, and can be controlled by a magnetic field

  7. Valve for fuel pin loading system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, D.W.

    1984-01-01

    A cyclone valve surrounds a wall opening through which cladding is projected. An axial valve inlet surrounds the cladding. Air is drawn through the inlet by a cyclone stream within the valve. An inflatable seal is included to physically engage a fuel pin subassembly during loading of fuel pellets.

  8. Valve for fuel pin loading system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA)

    1985-01-01

    A cyclone valve surrounds a wall opening through which cladding is projected. An axial valve inlet surrounds the cladding. Air is drawn through the inlet by a cyclone stream within the valve. An inflatable seal is included to physically engage a fuel pin subassembly during loading of fuel pellets.

  9. Magnetic domain structure and domain-wall energy in UFe{sub 8}Ni{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and UFe{sub 6}Ni{sub 4}Si{sub 2} intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyslocki, J.J.; Suski, W.; Wochowski, K.

    1994-03-01

    Magnetic domain structures in the UFe{sub 8}Ni{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and UFe{sub 6}Ni{sub 4}Si{sub 2} compounds were studied using the powder pattern method. The domain structure observed is typical for uniaxial materials. The domain-wall energy density {gamma} was determined from the average surface domain width D{sub s} observed on surfaces perpendicular to the easy axis as equal to 16 erg/cm{sup 2} for UFe{sub 8}Ni{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and 10 erg/cm{sup 2} for UFe{sub 6}Ni{sub 4}Si{sub 2}. Moreover, the critical diameter for single domain particle D{sub c} was calculated for the studied compounds.

  10. Contributions of domain wall motion to complex electromechanical coefficients of 0.62Pb,,Mg1/3Nb2/3...O30.38PbTiO3 crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    Contributions of domain wall motion to complex electromechanical coefficients of 0.62Pb,,Mg1/3Nb2 electromechanical coefficients and loss factors change dramatically at the coercive field Ec around 250 V, the imaginary parts of the electromechanical coefficients can be used to study the degree of domain wall motions

  11. Domain wall freezing in KDP-type ferroelectrics V.H. Schmidt*, G. Bohannan, D. Arbogast, G. Tuthill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    temperatures, the effect of this interaction is to "flatten" the wall, making it energe- tically unfavorable

  12. Finite temperature QCD using 2+1 flavors of domain wall fermions at N{sub t}=8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Michael; Christ, Norman H.; Li, Min; Mawhinney, Robert D.; Renfrew, Dwight; Hegde, Prasad; Karsch, Frithjof; Lin Meifeng; Vranas, Pavlos [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, SUNY, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3800 (United States); Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA and Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld, D-33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2010-03-01

    We study the region of the QCD phase transition using 2+1 flavors of domain wall fermions and a 16{sup 3}x8 lattice volume with a fifth dimension of L{sub s}=32. The disconnected light quark chiral susceptibility, quark number susceptibility, and the Polyakov loop suggest a chiral and deconfining crossover transition lying between 155 and 185 MeV for our choice of quark mass and lattice spacing. In this region the lattice scale deduced from the Sommer parameter r{sub 0} is a{sup -1{approx_equal}}1.3 GeV, the pion mass is {approx_equal}300 MeV, and the kaon mass is approximately physical. The peak in the chiral susceptibility implies a pseudocritical temperature T{sub c}=171(10)(17) MeV where the first error is associated with determining the peak location and the second with our unphysical light quark mass and nonzero lattice spacing. The effects of residual chiral symmetry breaking on the chiral condensate and disconnected chiral susceptibility are studied using several values of the valence L{sub s}.

  13. Neutral $B$ meson mixings and $B$ meson decay constants with static heavy and domain-wall light quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasumichi Aoki; Tomomi Ishikawa; Taku Izubuchi; Christoph Lehner; Amarjit Soni

    2015-06-29

    Neutral $B$ meson mixing matrix elements and $B$ meson decay constants are calculated. Static approximation is used for $b$ quark and domain-wall fermion formalism is employed for light quarks. The calculations are carried out on $2+1$ flavor dynamical ensembles generated by RBC/UKQCD Collaborations with lattice spacings $0.086$fm ($a^{-1}\\sim 2.3$GeV) and $0.11$fm ($1.7$GeV), and a fixed physical spatial volume of about $(2.7{\\rm fm})^3$. In the static quark action, link-smearings are used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. We employ two kinds of link-smearings, HYP1 and HYP2, and their results are combined in taking the continuum limit. For the matching between the lattice and the continuum theory, one-loop perturbative $O(a)$ improvements are made to reduce discretization errors. As the most important quantity of this work, we obtain SU(3) breaking ratio $\\xi=1.208(60)$, where the error includes statistical and systematic one. (Uncertainty from infinite $b$ quark mass is not included.) We also find other neutral $B$ meson mixing quantities $f_B\\sqrt{\\hat{B}_B}=240(22)$MeV, $f_{B_s}\\sqrt{\\hat{B}_{B_s}}=290(22)$MeV, $\\hat{B}_B=1.17(22)$, $\\hat{B}_{B_s}=1.22(13)$ and $B_{B_s}/B_B=1.028(74)$, $B$ meson decay constants $f_B=219(17)$MeV, $f_{B_s}=264(19)$MeV and $f_{B_s}/f_B=1.193(41)$, in the static limit of $b$ quark, which do not include infinite $b$ quark mass uncertainty.

  14. Neutral B-meson mixing from unquenched lattice QCD with domain-wall light quarks and static b-quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrado Albertus; Yasumichi Aoki; Peter A. Boyle; Norman H. Christ; Thomas T. Dumitrescu; Jonathan M. Flynn; Tomomi Ishikawa; Taku Izubuchi; Oleg Loktik; Christopher T. Sachrajda; Amarjit Soni; Ruth S. Van de Water; Jan Wennekers; Oliver Witzel

    2010-01-12

    We demonstrate a method for calculating the neutral B-meson decay constants and mixing matrix elements in unquenched lattice QCD with domain-wall light quarks and static b-quarks. Our computation is performed on the "2+1" flavor gauge configurations generated by the RBC and UKQCD Collaborations with a lattice spacing of a approx 0.11 fm (a^-1 = 1.729 GeV) and a lattice spatial volume of approximately (1.8 fm)^3. We simulate at three different light sea quark masses with pion masses down to approximately 430 MeV, and extrapolate to the physical quark masses using a phenomenologically-motivated fit function based on next-to-leading order heavy-light meson SU(2) chiral perturbation theory. For the b-quarks, we use an improved formulation of the Eichten-Hill action with static link-smearing to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. We also improve the heavy-light axial current used to compute the B-meson decay constant to O(alpha_s p a) using one-loop lattice perturbation theory. We present initial results for the SU(3)-breaking ratios f_{B_s}/f_{B_d} and xi = f_{B_s} sqrt{B_{B_s}}/f_{B_d} sqrt{B_{B_d}}, thereby demonstrating the viability of the method. For the ratio of decay constants, we find f_{B_s}/f_{B_d} = 1.15(12) and for the ratio of mixing matrix elements, we find xi = 1.13(12), where in both cases the errors reflect the combined statistical and systematic uncertainties, including an estimate of the size of neglected O(1/m_b) effects.

  15. Pyrotechnic Modelling for the NSI Driven Pin Puller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Puller tests: Bement, Schimmel, et al. · Pyrotechnics chemistry: McLain, Conklin · NSI ignition study: Varghese), · Constant temperature vessel wall, · No wall friction, · Constant density solid pyrotechnic, · ConstantPyrotechnic Modelling for the NSI Driven Pin Puller Joseph M. Powers and Keith A. Gonthier

  16. PINS Spectrum Identification Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.J. Caffrey

    2012-03-01

    The Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy—PINS, for short—system identifies the chemicals inside munitions and containers without opening them, a decided safety advantage if the fill chemical is a hazardous substance like a chemical warfare agent or an explosive. The PINS Spectrum Identification Guide is intended as a reference for technical professionals responsible for the interpretation of PINS gamma-ray spectra. The guide is divided into two parts. The three chapters that constitute Part I cover the science and technology of PINS. Neutron activation analysis is the focus of Chapter 1. Chapter 2 explores PINS hardware, software, and related operational issues. Gamma-ray spectral analysis basics are introduced in Chapter 3. The six chapters of Part II cover the identification of PINS spectra in detail. Like the PINS decision tree logic, these chapters are organized by chemical element: phosphorus-based chemicals, chlorine-based chemicals, etc. These descriptions of hazardous, toxic, and/or explosive chemicals conclude with a chapter on the identification of the inert chemicals, e.g. sand, used to fill practice munitions.

  17. High efficiency of the spin-orbit torques induced domain wall motion in asymmetric interfacial multilayered Tb/Co wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bang, Do; Awano, Hiroyuki

    2015-05-07

    We investigated current-induced DW motion in asymmetric interfacial multilayered Tb/Co wires for various thicknesses of magnetic and Pt-capping layers. It is found that the driving mechanism for the DW motion changes from interfacial to bulk effects at much thick magnetic layer (up to 19.8?nm). In thin wires, linearly depinning field dependence of critical current density and in-plane field dependence of DW velocity suggest that the extrinsic pinning governs field-induced DW motion and injecting current can be regarded as an effective field. It is expected that the high efficiency of spin-orbit torques in thick magnetic multilayers would have important implication for future spintronic devices based on in-plane current induced-DW motion or switching.

  18. PINS-3X Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.H. Seabury

    2013-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL’s) Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy System (PINS) non-intrusively identifies the chemical fill of munitions and sealed containers. The PINS-3X variant of the system is used to identify explosives and uses a deuterium-tritium (DT) electronic neutron generator (ENG) as the neutron source. Use of the system, including possession and use of the neutron generator and shipment of the system components requires compliance with a number of regulations. This report outlines some of these requirements as well as some of the requirements in using the system outside of INL.

  19. Temperature dependent nucleation, propagation, and annihilation of domain walls in all-perpendicular spin-valve nanopillars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gopman, D. B. Kent, A. D.; Bedau, D.; Mangin, S.; Fullerton, E. E.; Katine, J. A.

    2014-03-21

    We present a study of the temperature dependence of the switching fields in Co/Ni-based perpendicularly magnetized spin-valves. While magnetization reversal of all-perpendicular Co/Ni spin valves at ambient temperatures is typically marked by a single sharp step change in resistance, low temperature measurements can reveal a series of resistance steps, consistent with non-uniform magnetization configurations. We propose a model that consists of domain nucleation, propagation, and annihilation to explain the temperature dependence of the switching fields. Interestingly, low temperature (<30?K) step changes in resistance that we associate with domain nucleation have a bimodal switching field and resistance step distribution, attributable to two competing nucleation pathways.

  20. Pyrotechnic Modeling for the NSI and Pin Puller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Bement, Schimmel, et al. · Pyrotechnics chemistry: McLain, Conklin · NSI ignition study: Varghese of pyrotechnic · linear pyrotechnic burn rate known · constant temperature wall · simple convective heat transferPyrotechnic Modeling for the NSI and Pin Puller Joseph M. Powers1 and Keith A. Gonthier2 Department

  1. Domain wall assisted magnetization switching in (111) oriented L1{sub 0} FePt grown on a soft magnetic metallic glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaushik, Neelam; Sharma, Parmanand; Yubuta, Kunio; Makino, Akihiro; Inoue, Akihisa

    2010-08-16

    We report on growth and magnetic properties of exchange-coupled (111)-L1{sub 0} FePt hard/CoFeTaB soft magnetic metallic glass bilayered structure processed at lower temperature ({approx}400 deg. C). Single phaselike hysteresis loops with tailorable coercivity (<8.2 kOe) in out of plane direction are obtained. The magnetization switching mechanism is identified as domain wall assisted. In views of excellent nanofabrication abilities of metallic glass thin film and the ability to grow preferred oriented L1{sub 0} FePt, the present bilayered structure is very promising for the fabrication of high density bit--patterned magnetic recording media and other spintronic devices.

  2. The Low Energy Constants of $SU(2)$ Partially Quenched Chiral Perturbation Theory from $N_{f}=2+1$ Domain Wall QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyle, P A; Garron, N; Jung, C; Jüttner, A; Kelly, C; Mawhinney, R D; McGlynn, G; Murphy, D J; Ohta, S; Portelli, A; Sachrajda, C T

    2015-01-01

    We have performed fits of the pseudoscalar masses and decay constants, from a variety of RBC-UKQCD domain wall fermion ensembles, to $SU(2)$ partially quenched chiral perturbation theory at next-to leading order (NLO) and next-to-next-to leading order (NNLO). We report values for 9 NLO and 8 linearly independent combinations of NNLO partially quenched low energy constants, which we compare to other lattice and phenomenological determinations. We discuss the size of successive terms in the chiral expansion and use our large set of low energy constants to make predictions for mass splittings due to QCD isospin breaking effects and the S-wave $\\pi \\pi$ scattering lengths. We conclude that, for the range of pseudoscalar masses explored in this work, $115~\\mathrm{MeV} \\lesssim m_{\\rm PS} \\lesssim 430~\\mathrm{MeV}$, the NNLO $SU(2)$ expansion is quite robust and can fit lattice data with percent-scale accuracy.

  3. B-meson decay constants from 2+1-flavor lattice QCD with domain-wall light quarks and relativistic heavy quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norman H. Christ; Jonathan M. Flynn; Taku Izubuchi; Taichi Kawanai; Christoph Lehner; Amarjit Soni; Ruth S. Van de Water; Oliver Witzel

    2015-02-02

    We calculate the B-meson decay constants f_B, f_Bs, and their ratio in unquenched lattice QCD using domain-wall light quarks and relativistic b-quarks. We use gauge-field ensembles generated by the RBC and UKQCD collaborations using the domain-wall fermion action and Iwasaki gauge action with three flavors of light dynamical quarks. We analyze data at two lattice spacings of a ~ 0.11, 0.086 fm with unitary pion masses as light as M_pi ~ 290 MeV; this enables us to control the extrapolation to the physical light-quark masses and continuum. For the b-quarks we use the anisotropic clover action with the relativistic heavy-quark interpretation, such that discretization errors from the heavy-quark action are of the same size as from the light-quark sector. We renormalize the lattice heavy-light axial-vector current using a mostly nonperturbative method in which we compute the bulk of the matching factor nonperturbatively, with a small correction, that is close to unity, in lattice perturbation theory. We also improve the lattice heavy-light current through O(alpha_s a). We extrapolate our results to the physical light-quark masses and continuum using SU(2) heavy-meson chiral perturbation theory, and provide a complete systematic error budget. We obtain f_B0 = 199.5(12.6) MeV, f_B+ = 195.6(14.9) MeV, f_Bs = 235.4(12.2) MeV, f_Bs/f_B0 = 1.197(50), and f_Bs/f_B+ = 1.223(71), where the errors are statistical and total systematic added in quadrature. These results are in good agreement with other published results and provide an important independent cross check of other three-flavor determinations of $B$-meson decay constants using staggered light quarks.

  4. Influence of topography and Co domain walls on the magnetization reversal of the FeNi layer in FeNi/Al2O3/Co magnetic tunnel junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuch, Wolfgang

    Influence of topography and Co domain walls on the magnetization reversal of the FeNi layer in Fe situated on and situated be- tween steps is large. To test the influence of the topography microscopic view of the influence of the substrate-induced layer topography on the magnetization reversal

  5. Thermoacoustics in pin-array stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, G.W. ); Keolian, R.M. )

    1993-08-01

    A new thermoacoustic stack geometry, the pin array, is described. Analytical expressions for velocity and temperature in the pin array are derived, and potential advantages of the pin stack are demonstrated. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Automated fuel pin loading system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Brown, William F. (West Richland, WA); Steffen, Jim M. (Richland, WA)

    1985-01-01

    An automated loading system for nuclear reactor fuel elements utilizes a gravity feed conveyor which permits individual fuel pins to roll along a constrained path perpendicular to their respective lengths. The individual lengths of fuel cladding are directed onto movable transports, where they are aligned coaxially with the axes of associated handling equipment at appropriate production stations. Each fuel pin can be reciprocated axially and/or rotated about its axis as required during handling steps. The fuel pins are inserted as a batch prior to welding of end caps by one of two disclosed welding systems.

  7. Differential pressure pin discharge apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oakley, D.J.

    1984-05-30

    Disclosed is a discharge assembly for allowing elongate pins to be discharged from an area of relatively low pressure to an area of relatively greater pressure. The discharge assembly includes a duck valve having a lip piece made of flexible material. The flexible lip piece responds to a fluctuating pressure created downstream by an aspirator. The aspirator reduces the downstream pressure sensed by the duck valve when the discharge assembly is in the open position. This allows elongate pins to be moved through the duck valve with no backflow because the aspirator pressure is less than the pressure in the low pressure area from which the pins originate. Closure of the assembly causes the aspirator static pressure to force the flexible duck valve lip piece into a tightly sealed position also preventing backflow. The discharge assembly can be easily controlled using a single control valve which blocks the flow of aspirator gas and closes the pins passageway extending through the assembly.

  8. PinBus Interface Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Adgerson, Jewel D.; Sastry, Chellury; Pratt, Richard M.; Pratt, Robert G.

    2009-12-30

    On behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, PNNL has explored and expanded upon a simple control interface that might have merit for the inexpensive communication of smart grid operational objectives (demand response, for example) to small electric end-use devices and appliances. The approach relies on bi-directional communication via the electrical voltage states of from one to eight shared interconnection pins. The name PinBus has been suggested and adopted for the proposed interface protocol. The protocol is defined through the presentation of state diagrams and the pins’ functional definitions. Both simulations and laboratory demonstrations are being conducted to demonstrate the elegance and power of the suggested approach. PinBus supports a very high degree of interoperability across its interfaces, allowing innumerable pairings of devices and communication protocols and supporting the practice of practically any smart grid use case.

  9. Thermoacoustic pin stacks. Summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keolian, R.M.

    1994-07-06

    The construction and testing of a new stack geometry for thermoacoustic engines, called a pin stack, has been started. The stack is at the heart of a class of heat engines that use sound to deliver refrigeration, or use a temperature difference to generate sound. Calculations show that the pin stack should make useful improvements in engine efficiency. About 2000 wires will be hand sewn in a hexagonal lattice between the hot and cold heat exchangers in a sound source using low pressure neon gas between 300 K and 77 K. Thermoacoustics, Refrigeration, Acoustic source, Heat pump.

  10. Pin-to-Pin Electrostatic Discharge Protection for Semiconductor Bridges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KING, TONY L.; TARBELL, WILLIAM W.

    2002-07-01

    The lack of protection for semiconductor bridges (SCBs) against human electrostatic discharge (ESD) presents an obstacle to widespread use of this device. The goal of this research is to protect SCB initiators against pin-to-pin ESD without affecting their performance. Two techniques were investigated. In the first, a parallel capacitor is used to attenuate high frequencies. The second uses a parallel zener diode to limit the voltage amplitude. Both the 1 {micro}F capacitor and the 14 V zener diode protected the SCBs from ESD. The capacitor provided the best protection. The protection circuits had no effect on the SCB's threshold voltage. The function time for the CP-loaded SCBs with capacitors was about 11 {micro}s when fired by a firing set charged to 40 V. The SCBs failed to function when protected by the 6 V and 8 V zeners. The 51 V zener did not provide adequate protection against ESD. The parallel capacitor succeeded in protecting SCB initiators against pin-to-pin ESD without affecting their performance. Additional experiments should be done on SCBs and actual detonators to further quantify the effectiveness of this technique. Methods for retrofitting existing SCB initiators and integrating capacitors into future devices should also be explored.

  11. Pinning of polymers and interfaces by random potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenneth S. Alexander; Vladas Sidoravicius

    2006-07-05

    We consider a polymer, with monomer locations modeled by the trajectory of a Markov chain, in the presence of a potential that interacts with the polymer when it visits a particular site 0. Disorder is introduced by, for example, having the interaction vary from one monomer to another, as a constant $u$ plus i.i.d. mean-0 randomness. There is a critical value of $u$ above which the polymer is pinned, placing a positive fraction of its monomers at 0 with high probability. This critical point may differ for the quenched, annealed and deterministic cases. We show that self-averaging occurs, meaning that the quenched free energy and critical point are nonrandom, off a null set. We evaluate the critical point for a deterministic interaction ($u$ without added randomness) and establish our main result that the critical point in the quenched case is strictly smaller. We show that, for every fixed $u\\in\\mathbb{R}$, pinning occurs at sufficiently low temperatures. If the excursion length distribution has polynomial tails and the interaction does not have a finite exponential moment, then pinning occurs for all $u\\in\\mathbb{R}$ at arbitrary temperature. Our results apply to other mathematically similar situations as well, such as a directed polymer that interacts with a random potential located in a one-dimensional defect, or an interface in two dimensions interacting with a random potential along a wall.

  12. Pin loosening in external skeletal fixation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vittal, Bamini

    1993-01-01

    should maximize the axial pull out strength, or holding power, once inserted. Threaded pins dramatically improve holding power over nonthreaded pins. This is particularly true after the pins are subjected to 8 weeks of fracture/osteotomy stabilization... of the fracture, the accuracy of reduction, and the amount of physiologic loading. Comparative experiments using a canine tibial osteotomy model have been performed to study the effects of mechanical environment on healing of fractures stabilized by external...

  13. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is shown in purple and red, emphasizing the anti-phase domain wall. Any points where the wave functions are out of phase with each other can act as an orbital domain boundary. To...

  14. Power-reactor fuel-pin thermomechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tutnov, A.A.; Ul'yanov, A.I.

    1987-11-01

    The authors describe a method for determining the creep and elongation and other aspects of mechanical behavior of fuel pins and cans under the effects of irradiation and temperature encountered in reactors under loading and burnup conditions. An exhaustive method for testing for fuel-cladding interactions is described. The methodology is shown to be applicable to the design, fabrication, and loading of pins for WWER, SGHWR, and RBMK type reactors, from which much of the experimental data were derived.

  15. Scroll Waves Pinned to Moving Heterogeneities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua Ke; Zhihui Zhang; Oliver Steinbock

    2014-12-04

    Three-dimensional excitable systems can selforganize vortex patterns that rotate around one-dimensional phase singularities called filaments. In experiments with the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction and numerical simulations, we pin these scroll waves to moving heterogeneities and demonstrate the controlled repositioning of their rotation centers. If the pinning site extends only along a portion of the filament, the phase singularity is stretched out along the trajectory of the heterogeneity which effectively writes the singularity into the system. Its trailing end point follows the heterogeneity with a lower velocity. This velocity, its dependence on the placement of the anchor, and the shape of the filament are explained by a curvature flow model.

  16. NIST ITL submits PINS form to ANSI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 NIST ITL submits PINS form to ANSI for initiation of project to draft new or revised ANS. ANSI consensus body, starting with pre- canvass notice and invitation, which is posted on the ANSI/ NIST and develops canvass list. NIST ITL issues 45-day ballot and submits to ANSI for concurrent 45- day public

  17. Timing analysis of PWR fuel pin failures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, K.R.; Wade, N.L.; Katsma, K.R.; Siefken, L.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Straka, M. (Halliburton NUS, Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

    1992-09-01

    This report discusses research conducted to develop and demonstrate a methodology for calculation of the time interval between receipt of the containment isolation signals and the first fuel pin failure for loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). Demonstration calculations were performed for a Babcock and Wilcox (B W) design (Oconee) and a Westinghouse (W) four-loop design (Seabrook). Sensitivity studies were performed to assess the impacts of fuel pin burnup, axial peaking factor, break size, emergency core cooling system availability, and main coolant pump trip on these times. The analysis was performed using the following codes: FRAPCON-2, for the calculation of steady-state fuel behavior; SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 and TRACPF1/MOD1, for the calculation of the transient thermal-hydraulic conditions in the reactor system; and FRAP-T6, for the calculation of transient fuel behavior. In addition to the calculation of fuel pin failure timing, this analysis provides a comparison of the predicted results of SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 and TRAC-PF1/MOD1 for large-break LOCA analysis. Using SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 thermal-hydraulic data, the shortest time intervals calculated between initiation of containment isolation and fuel pin failure are 10.4 seconds and 19.1 seconds for the B W and W plants, respectively. Using data generated by TRAC-PF1/MOD1, the shortest intervals are 10.3 seconds and 29.1 seconds for the B W and W plants, respectively. These intervals are for a double-ended, offset-shear, cold leg break, using the technical specification maximum peaking factor and applied to fuel with maximum design burnup. Using peaking factors commensurate with actual burnups would result in longer intervals for both reactor designs. This document provides appendices K and L of this report which provide plots for the timing analysis of PWR fuel pin failures for Oconee and Seabrook respectively.

  18. Timing analysis of PWR fuel pin failures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, K.R.; Wade, N.L.; Katsma, K.R.; Siefken, L.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Straka, M. (Halliburton NUS, Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

    1992-09-01

    Research has been conducted to develop and demonstrate a methodology for calculation of the time interval between receipt of the containment isolation signals and the first fuel pin failure for loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). Demonstration calculations were performed for a Babcock and Wilcox (B W) design (Oconee) and a Westinghouse (W) four-loop design (Seabrook). Sensitivity studies were performed to assess the impacts of fuel pin bumup, axial peaking factor, break size, emergency core cooling system availability, and main coolant pump trip on these times. The analysis was performed using the following codes: FRAPCON-2, for the calculation of steady-state fuel behavior; SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 and TRACPF1/MOD1, for the calculation of the transient thermal-hydraulic conditions in the reactor system; and FRAP-T6, for the calculation of transient fuel behavior. In addition to the calculation of fuel pin failure timing, this analysis provides a comparison of the predicted results of SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 and TRAC-PFL/MOD1 for large-break LOCA analysis. Using SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 thermal-hydraulic data, the shortest time intervals calculated between initiation of containment isolation and fuel pin failure are 10.4 seconds and 19.1 seconds for the B W and W plants, respectively. Using data generated by TRAC-PF1/MOD1, the shortest intervals are 10.3 seconds and 29.1 seconds for the B W and W plants, respectively. These intervals are for a double-ended, offset-shear, cold leg break, using the technical specification maximum peaking factor and applied to fuel with maximum design bumup. Using peaking factors commensurate widi actual bumups would result in longer intervals for both reactor designs. This document also contains appendices A through J of this report.

  19. Renewal sequences, disordered potentials, and pinning phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giambattista Giacomin

    2008-07-27

    We give an overview of the state of the art of the analysis of disordered models of pinning on a defect line. This class of models includes a number of well known and much studied systems (like polymer pinning on a defect line, wetting of interfaces on a disordered substrate and the Poland-Scheraga model of DNA denaturation). A remarkable aspect is that, in absence of disorder, all the models in this class are exactly solvable and they display a localization-delocalization transition that one understands in full detail. Moreover the behavior of such systems near criticality is controlled by a parameter and one observes, by tuning the parameter, the full spectrum of critical behaviors, ranging from first order to infinite order transitions. This is therefore an ideal set-up in which to address the question of the effect of disorder on the phase transition,notably on critical properties. We will review recent results that show that the physical prediction that goes under the name of Harris criterion is indeed fully correct for pinning models. Beyond summarizing the results, we will sketch most of the arguments of proof.

  20. Retractable pin dual in-line package test clip

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bandzuch, Gregory S. (Washington, PA); Kosslow, William J. (Jefferson Boro, PA)

    1996-01-01

    This invention is a Dual In-Line Package (DIP) test clip for use when troubleshooting circuits containing DIP integrated circuits. This test clip is a significant improvement over existing DIP test clips in that it has retractable pins which will permit troubleshooting without risk of accidentally shorting adjacent pins together when moving probes to different pins on energized circuits or when the probe is accidentally bumped while taking measurements.

  1. Semiconducting glasses with flux pinning inclusions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA); Poon, Siu-Joe (Palo Alto, CA); Duwez, Pol E. (Pasadena, CA)

    1981-01-01

    A series of amorphous superconducting glassy alloys containing 1% to 10% by volume of flux pinning crystalline inclusions have been found to have potentially useful properties as high field superconducting magnet materials. The alloys are prepared by splat cooling by the piston and anvil technique. The alloys have the composition (TM).sub.90-70 (M).sub.10-30 where TM is a transition metal selected from at least one metal of Groups IVB, VB, VIB, VIIB or VIIIB of the Periodic Table such as Nb, Mo, Ru, Zr, Ta, W or Re and M is at least one metalloid such as B, P, C, N, Si, Ge or Al.

  2. The Pin Groups in Physics: C, P, and T

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Berg; C. DeWitt-Morette; S. Gwo; E. Kramer

    2000-12-06

    We review the role in physics of the Pin groups, double covers of the full Lorentz group. Pin(1,3) is to O(1,3) what Spin(1,3) is to SO(1,3). The existence of two Pin groups offers a classification of fermions based on their properties under space or time reversal finer than the classification based on their properties under orientation preserving Lorentz transformations -- provided one can design experiments that distinguish the two types of fermions. Many promising experimental setups give, for one reason or another, identical results for both types of fermions. Two notable positive results show that the existence of two Pin groups is relevant to physics: 1) In a neutrinoless double beta decay, the neutrino emitted and reabsorbed in the course of the interaction can only be described in terms of Pin(3,1). 2) If a space is topologically nontrivial, the vacuum expectation values of Fermi currents defined on this space can be totally different when described in terms of Pin(1,3) and Pin(3,1). Possibly more important than the two above predictions, the Pin groups provide a simple framework for the study of fermions; they make possible clear definitions of intrinsic parities and time reversal. A section on Pin groups in arbitrary spacetime dimensions is included.

  3. The Blue Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milano, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The  Blue  Wall   A  Documentary  Film  by     Michael  talking   about,  The  Blue  Wall.   Your  Honor,  as  the  

  4. Pin: Building Customized Program Analysis Tools with Dynamic Instrumentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazelwood, Kim

    Pin: Building Customized Program Analysis Tools with Dynamic Instrumentation Chi-Keung Luk Robert.project@intel.com Abstract Robust and powerful software instrumentation tools are essential for program analysis tasks instrumentation system called Pin. Our goals are to pro- vide easy-to-use, portable, transparent, and efficient

  5. Anisotropy of strong pinning in multi-band superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    pinning in multi-band superconductors 2 1. Introduction The multi-band nature of superconductivity in iron the anisotropy of superconducting parameters in the iron-based superconductors. In particular, Kidzun et al. [23Anisotropy of strong pinning in multi-band superconductors C.J. van der Beek, M. Konczykowski

  6. Creation and pinning of vortex-antivortex pairs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sangbum; Hu, Chia-Ren; Andrews, Malcolm J.

    2006-01-01

    in a superconducting thin film, due to the magnetic field of a vertical magnetic dipole above the film, and two antidot pins inside the film. For film thickness =0.1 xi, kappa=2, and no pins, we find the film carries two V-AV pairs at steady state...

  7. SPATIAL CHAOS, BREATHERS AND PHONOBREATHERS IN A PINNED MECHANICAL LATTICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheichl, Robert

    of a finite, pinned lattice system of interest in structural mechanics. We see that of all the many static, the multitude of static solutions mentioned above Centre for Nonlinear Mechanics, University of Bath, Bath, BA2SPATIAL CHAOS, BREATHERS AND PHONOBREATHERS IN A PINNED MECHANICAL LATTICE S.C.GREEN, C

  8. Vortex pinning by inhomogeneities in type-II superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Jon

    Vortex pinning by inhomogeneities in type-II superconductors S.J. Chapman #3;y G. Richardson zx of a curvilinear vortex in an inhomogeneous type-II superconducting material in the limit as the vortex core radius of the superconducting electrons acts as a pinning potential for the vortex, so that vortices will be attracted

  9. Optical fuel pin scanner. [Patent application; for reading identifications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirchner, T.L.; Powers, H.G.

    1980-12-09

    This patent relates to an optical identification system developed for post-irradiation disassembly and analysis of fuel bundle assemblies. The apparatus is designed to be lowered onto a stationary fuel pin to read identification numbers or letters imprinted on the circumference of the top fuel pin and cap. (DLC)

  10. Design and development of an automated pinning machine for the surface mount electronics industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Daniel J., M. Eng. (Daniel James). Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of a concept for a pinning process and the associated machinery to handle odd-form pins specific to a company in the surface mount electronics industry. The developed pinning machine ...

  11. Retrievable fuel pin end member for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rosa, Jerry M. (Los Gatos, CA)

    1982-01-01

    A bottom end member (17b) on a retrievable fuel pin (13b) secures the pin (13b) within a nuclear reactor (12) by engaging on a transverse attachment rail (18) with a spring clip type of action. Removal and reinstallation if facilitated as only axial movement of the fuel pin (13b) is required for either operation. A pair of resilient axially extending blades (31) are spaced apart to define a slot (24) having a seat region (34) which receives the rail (18) and having a land region (37), closer to the tips (39) of the blades (31) which is normally of less width than the rail (18). Thus an axially directed force sufficient to wedge the resilient blades (31) apart is required to emplace or release the fuel pin (13b) such force being greater than the axial forces on the fuel pins (13b) which occur during operation of the reactor (12).

  12. Pin stack array for thermoacoustic energy conversion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keolian, Robert M. (Monterey, CA); Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1995-01-01

    A thermoacoustic stack for connecting two heat exchangers in a thermoacoustic energy converter provides a convex fluid-solid interface in a plane perpendicular to an axis for acoustic oscillation of fluid between the two heat exchangers. The convex surfaces increase the ratio of the fluid volume in the effective thermoacoustic volume that is displaced from the convex surface to the fluid volume that is adjacent the surface within which viscous energy losses occur. Increasing the volume ratio results in an increase in the ratio of transferred thermal energy to viscous energy losses, with a concomitant increase in operating efficiency of the thermoacoustic converter. The convex surfaces may be easily provided by a pin array having elements arranged parallel to the direction of acoustic oscillations and with effective radial dimensions much smaller than the thicknesses of the viscous energy loss and thermoacoustic energy transfer volumes.

  13. An Accelerated Method for Testing Soldering Tendency of Core Pins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Qingyou [ORNL; Xu, Hanbing [ORNL; Ried, Paul [Ried, Engineering; Olson, Paul [Balzers, Inc.

    2010-01-01

    An accelerated method for testing die soldering has been developed. High intensity ultrasonic vibrations has been used to simulate the die casting conditions such as high pressure and high impingement speed of molten metal on the pin. Soldering tendency of steels and coated pins has been examined. The results indicate that in the low carbon steel/Al system, the onset of soldering is 60 times faster with ultrasonic vibration than that without ultrasonic vibration. In the H13/A380 system, the onset of soldering reaction is accelerated to 30-60 times. Coating significantly reduces the soldering tendency of the core pins.

  14. Procedure of recovery of pin-by-pin fields of energy release in the core of VVER-type reactor for the BIPR-8 code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordienko, P. V., E-mail: gorpavel@vver.kiae.ru; Kotsarev, A. V.; Lizorkin, M. P. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15

    The procedure of recovery of pin-by-pin energy-release fields for the BIPR-8 code and the algorithm of the BIPR-8 code which is used in nodal computation of the reactor core and on which the recovery of pin-by-pin fields of energy release is based are briefly described. The description and results of the verification using the module of recovery of pin-by-pin energy-release fields and the TVS-M program are given.

  15. Equilibrium ultrastable glasses produced by random pinning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glen M Hocky; Ludovic Berthier; David R. Reichman

    2014-12-08

    Ultrastable glasses have risen to prominence due to their potentially useful material properties and the tantalizing possibility of a general method of preparation via vapor deposition. Despite the importance of this novel class of amorphous materials, numerical studies have been scarce because achieving ultrastability in atomistic simulations is an enormous challenge. Here we bypass this difficulty and establish that randomly pinning the position of a small fraction of particles inside an equilibrated supercooled liquid generates ultrastable configurations at essentially no numerical cost, while avoiding undesired structural changes due to the preparation protocol. Building on the analogy with vapor-deposited ultrastable glasses, we study the melting kinetics of these configurations following a sudden temperature jump into the liquid phase. In homogeneous geometries, we find that enhanced kinetic stability is accompanied by large scale dynamic heterogeneity, while a competition between homogeneous and heterogeneous melting is observed when a liquid boundary invades the glass at constant velocity. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of large-scale, atomistically resolved, and experimentally relevant simulations of the kinetics of ultrastable glasses.

  16. Multi-pin chemiresistors for microchemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ho, Clifford K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-02-20

    A multi-pin chemiresistor for use in microchemical sensors. A pair of free-standing, bare wires is supported by an electrically insulating support, and are oriented parallel to each other and spaced closely together. A free-standing film of a chemically sensitive polymer that swells when exposed to vapors of a volatile chemical is formed in-between the pair of closely-spaced wires by capillary action. Similar in construction to a thermocouple, this "chemicouple" is relatively inexpensive and easy to fabricate by dipping the pair of bare wires into a bath of well-mixed chemiresistor ink. Also, a chemiresistor "stick" is formed by dipping an electrically insulating rod with two or more linear or spiral-wrapped electrical traces into the bath of well-mixed chemiresistor ink, which deposits a uniform coating of the chemically sensitive polymer on the rod and the electrical traces. These "sticks" can be easily removed and replaced from a multi-chemiresistor plug.

  17. Pinning Susceptibility: The effect of dilute, quenched disorder on jamming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amy L. Graves; Samer Nashed; Elliot Padgett; Carl P. Goodrich; Andrea J. Liu; James P. Sethna

    2015-09-02

    We study the effect of dilute pinning on the jamming transition. Pinning reduces the average contact number needed to jam unpinned particles and shifts the jamming threshold to lower densities, leading to a pinning susceptibility, $\\chi_p$. This susceptibility diverges in the thermodynamic limit as $\\chi_p \\propto |\\phi - \\phi_c^\\infty|^{-\\gamma_p}$ where $\\phi_c^\\infty$ is the jamming threshold in the absence of pins. Finite-size scaling arguments yield $\\gamma_p = 1.018 \\pm 0.026$ in $2d$ and $\\gamma_p =1.329 \\pm 0.308$ in $3d$. Error bounds do not rule out a $d$-independent value for this exponent; an average over the two values gives $\\gamma_p=1.17 \\pm 0.17$.

  18. Criteria for stochastic pinning control of networks of chaotic maps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mwaffo, Violet; Porfiri, Maurizio; DeLellis, Pietro

    2014-03-15

    This paper investigates the controllability of discrete-time networks of coupled chaotic maps through stochastic pinning. In this control scheme, the network dynamics are steered towards a desired trajectory through a feedback control input that is applied stochastically to the network nodes. The network controllability is studied by analyzing the local mean square stability of the error dynamics with respect to the desired trajectory. Through the analysis of the spectral properties of salient matrices, a toolbox of conditions for controllability are obtained, in terms of the dynamics of the individual maps, algebraic properties of the network, and the probability distribution of the pinning control. We demonstrate the use of these conditions in the design of a stochastic pinning control strategy for networks of Chirikov standard maps. To elucidate the applicability of the approach, we consider different network topologies and compare five different stochastic pinning strategies through extensive numerical simulations.

  19. Pin and roller attachment system for ceramic blades

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaffer, J.E.

    1995-07-25

    In a turbine, a plurality of blades are attached to a turbine wheel by way of a plurality of joints which form a rolling contact between the blades and the turbine wheel. Each joint includes a pin and a pair of rollers to provide rolling contact between the pin and an adjacent pair of blades. Because of this rolling contact, high stress scuffing between the blades and the turbine wheel reduced, thereby inhibiting catastrophic failure of the blade joints. 3 figs.

  20. Pin and roller attachment system for ceramic blades

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL)

    1995-01-01

    In a turbine, a plurality of blades are attached to a turbine wheel by way of a plurality of joints which form a rolling contact between the blades and the turbine wheel. Each joint includes a pin and a pair of rollers to provide rolling contact between the pin and an adjacent pair of blades. Because of this rolling contact, high stress scuffing between the blades and the turbine wheel reduced, thereby inhibiting catastrophic failure of the blade joints.

  1. Wall surveyor project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullenhoff, D.J.; Johnston, B.C.; Azevedo, S.G.

    1996-02-22

    A report is made on the demonstration of a first-generation Wall Surveyor that is capable of surveying the interior and thickness of a stone, brick, or cement wall. LLNL`s Micropower Impulse Radar is used, based on emitting and detecting very low amplitude and short microwave impulses (MIR rangefinder). Six test walls were used. While the demonstrator MIR Wall Surveyor is not fieldable yet, it has successfully scanned the test walls and produced real-time images identifying the walls. It is planned to optimize and package the evaluation wall surveyor into a hand held unit.

  2. Permissible symmetries of multi-domain configurations in perovskite ferroelectric crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    Permissible symmetries of multi-domain configurations in perovskite ferroelectric crystals Jiri through domain engineering are specified for perovskite ferroelectric crystals having tetragonal walls . Many useful ferroelectric materials have the so-called perovskite structure, which contains

  3. Dynamics of Glass Forming Liquids with Randomly Pinned Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saurish Chakrabarty; Smarajit Karmakar; Chandan Dasgupta

    2015-05-12

    It is frequently assumed that in the limit of vanishing cooling rate, the glass transition phenomenon becomes a thermodynamic transition at a temperature $T_{K}$. However, with any finite cooling rate, the system falls out of equilibrium at temperatures near $T_g(>T_{K})$, implying that the very existence of the putative thermodynamic phase transition at $T_{K}$ can be questioned. Recent studies of systems with randomly pinned particles have hinted that the thermodynamic glass transition may be observed in simulations and experiments carried out for liquids with randomly pinned particles. This expectation is based on the results of approximate calculations that suggest that the temperature of the thermodynamic glass transition increases as the concentration of pinned particles is increased and it may be possible to equilibrate the system at temperatures near the increased transition temperature. We test the validity of this prediction through extensive molecular dynamics simulations of two model glass-forming liquids in the presence of random pinning. We fit the temperature-dependence of the structural relaxation time to the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann form that predicts a divergence of the relaxation time at a temperature $T_{VFT}$ and identify this temperature with the thermodynamic transition temperature $T_K$. We find that $T_{VFT}$ does not show any sign of increasing with increasing concentration of pinned particles. The main effect of pinning is found to be a rapid decrease in the kinetic fragility of the system with increasing pin concentration. Implications of these observations for current theories of the glass transition are discussed.

  4. DMBC: Domain Names & Web Hosting Domain Names

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stowell, Michael

    DMBC: Domain Names & Web Hosting Domain Names Top Level Domains .com .net .org .edu .gov .mil professional or personal life Always aim for a .com Top Level Domain as it is what 99.9% of the web or underscores in the domain name unless there is no other option Web Hosting Web Hosting Providers Web

  5. Transverse commensurability effect for vortices on periodic pinning arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia J

    2008-01-01

    Using computer simulations, we demonstrate a type of commensurability that occurs for vortices moving longitudinally through periodic pinning arrays in the presence of an additional transverse driving force. As a function of vortex density, there is a series of broad maxima in the transverse critical depinning force that do not fall at the matching fields where the number of vortices equals an integer multiple of the number of pinning sites. The commensurability effects are associated with dynamical states in which evenly spaced structures consisting of one or more moving rows of vortices form between rows of pinning sites. Remarkably, the critical transverse depinning force can be more than an order of magnitude larger than the longitudinal depinning force.

  6. Axial clad strain behavior of sphere-pac fuel pins 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, James Kelly

    1986-01-01

    d (Head of Depar trnent) May 1986 ABSTRACT Axial Clad Str ain Behavior of Spher e-Pac Fuel Pins (May 1986) James Kelly Thomas, B. S. , Texas AAM Univer sity Chairman of Advisor y Committee: Dn. K. L. Peddicor d Advanced nuclear f'uels ar e... being investigated to extend the lifetime and oper ating f'lexibility of fuel pins. An alter native to pellet f'uel that might satisfy these goals is spher e-pac nuclear fuel. Spher e-pac ir radiations have been per formed in the U. S. , Switzer land...

  7. Domain pinning near a single-grain boundary in tetragonal and rhombohedral

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Discrimination ofDynamics ModelPorous Media?lead

  8. Development of control system to automate the PCB pin insertion process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaac, Rejin

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of the control system that runs the automated pin insertion machine in a surface mount technology assembly line. The control system is divided into 2 subsystems viz. pin sorting and ...

  9. Assemblies with both target and fuel pins in an isotope-production reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

    1982-08-19

    A method is described for producing tritium in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target material is placed in pins adjacent to fuel pins in order to increase the tritium production rate.

  10. DMBC: Domain Names & Web Hosting Domain Names

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stowell, Michael

    DMBC: Domain Names & Web Hosting Domain Names Top Level Domains · .com · .net · .org · .edu · .gov.9% of the web-viewing audience is used to typing in. Chances are, a visitor will type in ".com" even if you tell and simple · Try to avoid dashes or underscores in the domain name unless there is no other option Web

  11. Image analysis for remote examination of fuel pins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, J.H.; Nayak, U.P.

    1982-01-01

    An image analysis system operating in the Wing 9 Hot Cell Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory provides quantitative microstructural analyses of irradiated fuels and materials. With this system, fewer photomicrographs are required during postirradiation microstructural examination and data are available for analysis much faster. The system has been used successfully to examine Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division experimental fuel pins.

  12. Model Formulation and Predictions for a Pyrotechnically Actuated Pin Puller*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the simulated firing of an NSI into 1) a pin puller device, 2) a 10 cm3 closed vessel, and 3) an apparatus known as the Dynamic Test Device. The predictions are compared with experiments. The pressure magnitudes and time scales of pressure rise and decay are predicted well by the model. Introduction Pyrotechnically actuated

  13. Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maniscalco, James A. (Danville, CA); Meier, Wayne R. (Livermore, CA)

    1982-01-01

    Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithium-ceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

  14. Superlubric-Pinned Transition in Sliding Incommensurate Colloidal Monolayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davide Mandelli; Andrea Vanossi; Michele Invernizzi; S. V. Paronuzzi Ticco; Nicola Manini; Erio Tosatti

    2015-08-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) crystalline colloidal monolayers sliding over a laser-induced optical lattice recently emerged as a new tool for the study of friction between ideal crystal surfaces. Here we focus in particular on static friction, the minimal sliding force necessary to depin one lattice from the other. If the colloid and the optical lattices are mutually commensurate, the colloid sliding is always pinned by static friction; but when they are incommensurate the presence or absence of pinning can be expected to depend upon the system parameters. If a 2D analogy to the mathematically established Aubry transition of one-dimensional systems were to hold, an increasing periodic corrugation strength $U_0$ should turn an initially free-sliding monolayer into a pinned state through a well-defined dynamical phase transition. We address this problem by the simulated sliding of a realistic model 2D colloidal lattice, confirming the existence of a clear and sharp superlubric-pinned transition for increasing corrugation strength. Unlike the 1D Aubry transition which is continuous, the 2D transition exhibits a definite first-order character. With no change of symmetry, the transition entails a structural character, with a sudden increase of the colloid-colloid interaction energy, accompanied by a compensating downward jump of the colloid-corrugation energy. The transition value for the corrugation amplitude $U_0$ depends upon the misalignment angle $\\theta$ between the optical and the colloidal lattices, superlubricity surviving until larger corrugations for angles away from the energetically favored orientation, which is itself generally slightly misaligned, as shown in recent work. The observability of the superlubric-pinned colloid transition is proposed and discussed.

  15. Domain Bubbles of Extra Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, J R

    2003-01-01

    ``Dimension bubbles'' of the type previously studied by Blau and Guendelman [S.K. Blau and E.I. Guendelman, Phys. Rev. D40, 1909 (1989)], which effectively enclose a region of 5d spacetime and are surrounded by a region of 4d spacetime, can arise in a 5d theory with a compact extra dimension that is dimensionally reduced to give an effective 4d theory. These bubbles with thin domain walls can be stabilized against total collapse in a rather natural way by a scalar field which, as in the case with ``ordinary'' nontopological solitons, traps light scalar particles inside the bubble.

  16. Domain Bubbles of Extra Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Morris

    2002-11-19

    ``Dimension bubbles'' of the type previously studied by Blau and Guendelman [S.K. Blau and E.I. Guendelman, Phys. Rev. D40, 1909 (1989)], which effectively enclose a region of 5d spacetime and are surrounded by a region of 4d spacetime, can arise in a 5d theory with a compact extra dimension that is dimensionally reduced to give an effective 4d theory. These bubbles with thin domain walls can be stabilized against total collapse in a rather natural way by a scalar field which, as in the case with ``ordinary'' nontopological solitons, traps light scalar particles inside the bubble.

  17. Radiative transfer in decomposed domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Heinemann; W. Dobler; A. Nordlund; A. Brandenburg

    2005-11-09

    An efficient algorithm for calculating radiative transfer on massively parallel computers using domain decomposition is presented. The integral formulation of the transfer equation is used to divide the problem into a local but compute-intensive part for calculating the intensity and optical depth integrals, and a nonlocal part for communicating the intensity between adjacent processors. The waiting time of idle processors during the nonlocal communication part does not have a severe impact on the scaling. The wall clock time thus scales nearly linearly with the inverse number of processors.

  18. PH domains, FYVE domains, ENTH domains, C2 do-mains, Tubby domains, and PX domains, and the list

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    domain and the second SH3 domain (yellow), while the Selected Reading C-terminal tail interacts with the first SH3 domain. Phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues in the C-terminal tail liberates., Tempst, P., Thuring, J.W., Cooper,space and time, and thereby prevent inadvertent dam- M.A., Lim, Z

  19. Tokamak reactor first wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Creedon, R.L.; Levine, H.E.; Wong, C.; Battaglia, J.

    1984-11-20

    This invention relates to an improved first wall construction for a tokamak fusion reactor vessel, or other vessels subjected to similar pressure and thermal stresses.

  20. Renewal convergence rates and correlation decay for homogeneous pinning models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giambattista Giacomin

    2007-06-03

    A class of discrete renewal processes with super-exponentially decaying inter-arrival distributions coincides with the infinite volume limit of general homogeneous pinning models in their localized phase. Pinning models are statistical mechanics systems to which a lot of attention has been devoted both for their relevance for applications and because they are solvable models exhibiting a non-trivial phase transition. The spatial decay of correlations in these systems is directly mapped to the speed of convergence to equilibrium for the associated renewal processes. We show that close to criticality, under general assumptions, the correlation decay rate, or the renewal convergence rate, coincides with the inter-arrival decay rate. We also show that, in general, this is false away from criticality. Under a stronger assumption on the inter-arrival distribution we establish a local limit theorem, capturing thus the sharp asymptotic behavior of correlations.

  1. On the irrelevant disorder regime of pinning models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giacomin, G

    2007-01-01

    Recent results have lead to substantial progress in understanding the role of disorder in the (de)localization transition of polymer pinning models. Notably, there is an understanding of the crucial issue of disorder relevance and irrelevance that, albeit still partial, is now rigorous. In this work we exploit interpolation and replica coupling methods to get sharper results on the irrelevant disorder regime of pinning models. In particular, we compute in this regime the first order term in the expansion of the free energy close to criticality, which coincides with the first order of the formal expansion obtained by field theory methods. We also show that the quenched and the quenched averaged correlation length exponents coincide, while in general they are expected to be different. Interpolation and replica coupling methods in this class of models naturally lead to studying the behavior of the intersection of certain renewal sequences and one of the main tools in this work is precisely renewal theory and the...

  2. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ferromagnetic wires of nanometer sizes are considered to be key components in future spintronic applications for novel classes of magnetic storage devices. One example is the...

  3. On new maximal supergravity and its BPS domain-walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adolfo Guarino

    2015-03-20

    We revise the SU(3)-invariant sector of $\\mathcal{N}=8$ supergravity with dyonic SO(8) gaugings. By using the embedding tensor formalism, analytic expressions for the scalar potential, superpotential(s) and fermion mass terms are obtained as a function of the electromagnetic phase $\\omega$ and the scalars in the theory. Equipped with these results, we explore non-supersymmetric AdS critical points at $\\omega \

  4. The static quark potential for dynamical domain wall fermion simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min Li

    2006-10-18

    We present preliminary results for the static quark potential computed on some of the DWF lattice configurations generated by the RBC-UKQCD collaborations. Most of these results were obtained using Wilson lines joining spatial planes fixed into the Coulomb gauge. We compare the results from this method with the earlier ones on $16^3 \\times 32$ lattices using Bresenham spatial paths with APE smeared link variables. Some preliminary results on $24^3 \\times 64$ lattices are also presented.

  5. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveApril 2,BL4-2StefanLightsource StimulatedStochastic

  6. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveApril 2,BL4-2StefanLightsource

  7. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3X-rays3 Prepared by:'! I ,StimulusConnectStochastic

  8. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3X-rays3 Prepared by:'! I

  9. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3X-rays3 Prepared by:'! IStochastic

  10. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3X-rays3 Prepared by:'! IStochasticStochastic

  11. Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3X-rays3 Prepared by:'! IStochasticStochasticStochastic

  12. In situ measurement of increased ferroelectric/ferroelastic domain wall

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street LightingFrom theHighI _ _1motion in declamped

  13. Nucleon transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions from domain wall

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech Connect Nanomechanical switchFlue Gas StreamsConnectArticle) | SciTechfermion

  14. Nucleon transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions from domain wall

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech Connect Nanomechanical switchFlue Gas StreamsConnectArticle) |

  15. Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600 Charged Domain Walls in Ferroelectrics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATIONIntroducing the RichardBudgetIowaOctober 5,December 10,

  16. Optical coherence domain reflectometry guidewire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colston, Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Everett, Matthew (Pleasanton, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Matthews, Dennis (Moss Beach, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A guidewire with optical sensing capabilities is based on a multiplexed optical coherence domain reflectometer (OCDR), which allows it to sense location, thickness, and structure of the arterial walls or other intra-cavity regions as it travels through the body during minimally invasive medical procedures. This information will be used both to direct the guidewire through the body by detecting vascular junctions and to evaluate the nearby tissue. The guidewire contains multiple optical fibers which couple light from the proximal to distal end. Light from the fibers at the distal end of the guidewire is directed onto interior cavity walls via small diameter optics such as gradient index lenses and mirrored corner cubes. Both forward viewing and side viewing fibers can be included. The light reflected or scattered from the cavity walls is then collected by the fibers, which are multiplexed at the proximal end to the sample arm of an optical low coherence reflectometer. The guidewire can also be used in nonmedical applications.

  17. Connection stiffness and dynamical docking process of flux pinned spacecraft modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Yong; Zhang, Mingliang, E-mail: niudun12@126.com; Gao, Dong [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China)

    2014-02-14

    This paper describes a novel kind of potential flux pinned docking system that consists of guidance navigation and control system, the traditional extrusion type propulsion system, and a flux pinned docking interface. Because of characteristics of passive stability of flux pinning, the docking control strategy of flux pinned docking system only needs a series of sequential control rather than necessary active feedback control, as well as avoidance of hazardous collision accident. The flux pinned force between YBaCuO (YBCO) high temperature superconductor bulk and permanent magnet is able to be given vent based on the identical current loop model and improved image dipole model, which can be validated experimentally. Thus, the connection stiffness between two flux pinned spacecraft modules can be calculated based on Hooke's law. This connection stiffness matrix at the equilibrium position has the positive definite performance, which can validate the passively stable connection of two flux pinned spacecraft modules theoretically. Furthermore, the relative orbital dynamical equation of two flux pinned spacecraft modules can be established based on Clohessy-Wiltshire's equations and improved image dipole model. The dynamical docking process between two flux pinned spacecraft modules can be obtained by way of numerical simulation, which suggests the feasibility of flux pinned docking system.

  18. Tuning of Pectin Methylesterification: Consequences for Cell Wall Biomechanics and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levesque-Tremblay, Gabriel; Pelloux, Jerome; Braybrook, Siobhan A.; Müller, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    residue in the arabinogalactan domain of the arabinogalactan protein ARABINOXYLAN PECTIN ARABINOGALACTAN PROTEIN1 (APAP1) was linked to RG-I and HG (Tan et al., 2013). Mutants lacking this protein and the corresponding wall structure showed...

  19. Method for forming precision clockplate with pivot pins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wild, Ronald L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-06-01

    Methods are disclosed for producing a precision clockplate with rotational bearing surfaces (e.g. pivot pins). The methods comprise providing an electrically conductive blank, conventionally machining oversize features comprising bearing surfaces into the blank, optionally machining of a relief on non-bearing surfaces, providing wire accesses adjacent to bearing surfaces, threading the wire of an electrical discharge machine through the accesses and finishing the bearing surfaces by wire electrical discharge machining. The methods have been shown to produce bearing surfaces of comparable dimension and tolerances as those produced by micro-machining methods such as LIGA, at reduced cost and complexity.

  20. Welding fixture for nuclear fuel pin cladding assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oakley, D.J.; Feld, S.H.

    1984-02-22

    A welding fixture is described for locating a driver sleeve about the open end of a nuclear fuel pin cladding. The welding fixture includes a holder provided with an open cavity having shoulders for properly positioning the driver sleeve, the end cap, and a soft, high temperature resistant plastic protective sleeve that surrounds a portion of the end cap stem. Ejected contaminant particles spewed forth by closure of the cladding by pulsed magnetic welding techniques are captured within a contamination trap formed in the holder for ultimate removal and disposal of contaminating particles along with the holder.

  1. Welding fixture for nuclear fuel pin cladding assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oakley, David J. (Richland, WA); Feld, Sam H. (West Richland, WA)

    1986-01-01

    A welding fixture for locating a driver sleeve about the open end of a nuclear fuel pin cladding. The welding fixture includes a holder provided with an open cavity having shoulders for properly positioning the driver sleeve, the end cap, and a soft, high temperature resistant plastic protective sleeve that surrounds a portion of the end cap stem. Ejected contaminant particles spewed forth by closure of the cladding by pulsed magnetic welding techniques are captured within a contamination trap formed in the holder for ultimate removal and disposal of contaminating particles along with the holder.

  2. Thermoacoustic relaxation in a pin-array stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayden, M.E.; Swift, G.W.

    1997-11-01

    The pressure response p{sub 1} of a fixed quantity of {sup 4}He gas subjected to sinusoidal volume perturbations is studied experimentally. Thermal diffusion near solid boundaries causes the gas response to be neither adiabatic nor isothermal. The data are interpreted in terms of the thermal relaxation function f{sub {kappa}} which relates p{sub 1} to the spatial average of the acoustic temperature profile. Comparison of a number of geometries allows us to accurately determine f{sub {kappa}} for a thermoacoustic pin-array stack. {copyright} {ital 1997 Acoustical Society of America.}

  3. Comment on "Analysis of quantum coherent semiconductor quantum dot p-i-n junction photovoltaic cells"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scully, Marlan O

    2010-01-01

    This is a comment on PRL paper by A.P. Kirk "Analysis of quantum coherent semiconductor quantum dot p-i-n junction photovoltaic cells"

  4. Polarization reversal and domain kinetics in magnesium doped stoichiometric lithium tantalate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shur, V. Ya., E-mail: vladimir.shur@urfu.ru; Akhmatkhanov, A. R.; Baturin, I. S. [Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Labfer Ltd., 620014 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Chuvakova, M. A. [Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-13

    The polarization reversal process has been studied in 1?mol.?% MgO doped stoichiometric lithium tantalate (LT) single crystal. The revealed stages of domain structure evolution represent (1) continuous nucleation and growth of isolated hexagonal domains with walls oriented along Y directions and (2) continuous motion of the plane domain walls stimulated by merging with isolated domains. The activation field dependence of the switching time has been revealed. The coercive field for quasi-static switching is about 150?V/mm. The bulk screening process has been analyzed. The main parameters of the switching process have been compared with other representatives of LT family.

  5. Disordered pinning models and copolymers: beyond annealed bounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabio Lucio Toninelli

    2008-08-22

    We consider a general model of a disordered copolymer with adsorption. This includes, as particular cases, a generalization of the copolymer at a selective interface introduced by Garel et al. [Europhys. Lett. 8 (1989) 9--13], pinning and wetting models in various dimensions, and the Poland--Scheraga model of DNA denaturation. We prove a new variational upper bound for the free energy via an estimation of noninteger moments of the partition function. As an application, we show that for strong disorder the quenched critical point differs from the annealed one, for example, if the disorder distribution is Gaussian. In particular, for pinning models with loop exponent $0model, under a (restrictive) condition on the law of the underlying renewal, we show that the critical point coincides with the one predicted via renormalization group arguments in the theoretical physics literature. A stronger result holds for a "reduced wetting model" introduced by Bodineau and Giacomin [J. Statist. Phys. 117 (2004) 801--818]: without restrictions on the law of the underlying renewal, the critical point coincides with the corresponding renormalization group prediction.

  6. Vortex Molecular Crystal and Vortex Plastic Crystal States in Honeycomb and Kagome Pinning Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Reichhardt; C. J. Olson Reichhardt

    2007-07-26

    Using numerical simulations, we investigate vortex configurations and pinning in superconductors with honeycomb and kagome pinning arrays. We find that a variety of novel vortex crystal states can be stabilized at integer and fractional matching field densities. The honeycomb and kagome pinning arrays produce considerably more pronounced commensuration peaks in the critical depinning force than triangular pinning arrays, and also cause additional peaks at noninteger matching fields where a portion of the vortices are located in the large interstitial regions of the pinning lattices. For the honeycomb pinning array, we find matching effects of equal strength at most fillings B/B_\\phi=n/2 for n>2, where n is an integer, in agreement with recent experiments. For kagome pinning arrays, pronounced matching effects generally occur at B/B_\\phi=n/3 for n>3, while for triangular pinning arrays pronounced matching effects are observed only at integer fillings B/B_\\phi=n. At the noninteger matching field peaks in the honeycomb and kagome pinning arrays, the interstitial vortices are arranged in dimer, trimer, and higher order n-mer states that have an overall orientational order. We call these n-mer states "vortex molecular crystals" and "vortex plastic crystals" since they are similar to the states recently observed in colloidal molecular crystal systems. We argue that the vortex molecular crystals have properties in common with certain spin systems such as Ising and n-state Potts models. We show that kagome and honeycomb pinning arrays can be useful for increasing the critical current above that of purely triangular pinning arrays.

  7. Domain Nucleation and Annihilation in Uniformly Magnetized State under Current Pulses in Narrow Ferromagnetic Wires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otani, Yoshichika

    of possible applications in hard disk drives, magnetic random access memory, and other spintronic devices.1 to nucleate a domain wall.10) This idea will be the use of the spintronic magnetization control. Experimental

  8. Thermal treatment wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Livermore, CA); Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

  9. Effect of surface roughness on magnetic domain wall thickness, domain size, and coercivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Gwo-Ching

    , Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180-3590 G. Palasantzas and J. Th. M. De Hosson Department nm thick deposited on plasma etched Si 100 substrates showed that, by increasing surface rough- ness nearly linearly with film thickness. Such an increase of the thickness fluctuations5 was attributed

  10. Covering Walls With Fabrics. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1979-01-01

    , grasscloth and many other textures and weaves are available in this type of wall covering. When selecting fabrics to apply to interior walls, consider pattern, color, amount of shrink age and weight. Check to see if the design is printed with the grain... several times over a 12-inch length until fabric is cut through and can be pulled away easily (see Figure 5) . Figure 5 To cover raw edges at top or bottom when . there is no molding, attach an attractive gimp, flat braid or decorative molding...

  11. Boiling heat transfer in a hydrofoil-based micro pin fin heat sink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peles, Yoav

    Boiling heat transfer in a hydrofoil-based micro pin fin heat sink Ali Kosßar, Yoav Peles-based micro pin fin heat sink was investigated. Average two-phase heat transfer coefficients were obtained intermittent and spray-annular flows. Heat transfer coefficient trends and flow morphologies were used to infer

  12. Heat transfer from multiple row arrays of low aspect ratio pin fins Seth A. Lawson a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thole, Karen A.

    Heat transfer from multiple row arrays of low aspect ratio pin fins Seth A. Lawson a, , Alan A 18 March 2011 Available online 5 May 2011 Keywords: Pin fins Heat transfer augmentation Array to enhance heat transfer. In modern gas turbines, for exam- ple, airfoils are designed with sophisticated

  13. PHYSICAL REVIEW E 87, 012901 (2013) Pinning-depinning transition of fronts between standing waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gavilan, Marcel G. Clerc

    2013-01-01

    PHYSICAL REVIEW E 87, 012901 (2013) Pinning-depinning transition of fronts between standing waves behaviors of fronts connecting standing waves, such as the locking phenomenon, pinning-depinning transitions between standing waves. In the driven pendulum chain, using a Galerkin expansion we characterize

  14. An experimental study of endwall heat transfer enhancement for flow past staggered non-conducting pin fin arrays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achanta, Vamsee Satish

    2004-09-30

    In this work, we study the enhanced endwall heat transfer for flow past non conducting pin fin arrays. The aim is to resolve the controversy over the heat transfer that is taking place from the endwall and the pin ...

  15. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arena, Lois; Mantha, Pallavi

    2013-05-01

    In this project, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) team evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls. Wall assemblies evaluated included code minimum walls using spray foam insulation and fiberglass batts, high R-value walls at least 12 in. thick (R-40 and R-60 assemblies), and brick walls with interior insulation.

  16. Using Pin as a Memory Reference Generator for Multiprocessor Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCurdy, C

    2005-10-22

    In this paper we describe how we have used Pin to generate a multithreaded reference stream for simulation of a multiprocessor on a uniprocessor. We have taken special care to model as accurately as possible the effects of cache coherence protocol state, and lock and barrier synchronization on the performance of multithreaded applications running on multiprocessor hardware. We first describe a simplified version of the algorithm, which uses semaphores to synchronize instrumented application threads and the simulator on every memory reference. We then describe modifications to that algorithm to model the microarchitectural features of the Itanium2 that affect the timing of memory reference issue. An experimental evaluation determines that while cycle-accurate multithreaded simulation is possible using our approach, the use of semaphores has a negative impact on the performance of the simulator.

  17. Sharp critical behavior for pinning model in random correlated environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quentin Berger; Hubert Lacoin

    2011-04-26

    This article investigates the effect for random pinning models of long range power-law decaying correlations in the environment. For a particular type of environment based on a renewal construction, we are able to sharply describe the phase transition from the delocalized phase to the localized one, giving the critical exponent for the (quenched) free-energy, and proving that at the critical point the trajectories are fully delocalized. These results contrast with what happens both for the pure model (i.e. without disorder) and for the widely studied case of i.i.d. disorder, where the relevance or irrelevance of disorder on the critical properties is decided via the so-called Harris Criterion.

  18. Statistical mechanics of homogeneous partly pinned fluid systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent Krakoviack

    2010-12-05

    The homogeneous partly pinned fluid systems are simple models of a fluid confined in a disordered porous matrix obtained by arresting randomly chosen particles in a one-component bulk fluid or one of the two components of a binary mixture. In this paper, their configurational properties are investigated. It is shown that a peculiar complementarity exists between the mobile and immobile phases, which originates from the fact that the solid is prepared in presence of and in equilibrium with the adsorbed fluid. Simple identities follow, which connect different types of configurational averages, either relative to the fluid-matrix system or to the bulk fluid from which it is prepared. Crucial simplifications result for the computation of important structural quantities, both in computer simulations and in theoretical approaches. Finally, possible applications of the model in the field of dynamics in confinement or in strongly asymmetric mixtures are suggested.

  19. PinBus Interface for Interoperable, Grid-Responsive Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.

    2009-12-02

    A very simple appliance interface was suggested by this author and his co-authors during Grid-Interop 2007. The approach was based on a successful collaboration between utilities, a major appliance manufacture, and the manufacturer of a load control module during the U.S. Department of Energy’s Grid Friendly Appliance project. The suggested approach was based on the assumption that demand-response objectives could be effectively communicated to and from many small electrical loads like appliances by simply agreeing on the meaning of the binary states of several shared connector pins. It was argued that this approach could pave the way for a wave of demand-response-ready appliances and greatly reduced expenses for utilities’ future demand-response programs. The approach could be supported by any of the many competing serial communication protocols and would be generally applicable to most end-use devices.

  20. Local waiting time fluctuations along a randomly pinned crack front Knut Jrgen Maly, 1 Stephane Santucci, 1 Jean Schmittbuhl, 2 and Renaud Toussaint 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toussaint, Renaud

    that the fracture front dynamics is governed by local and irregular avalanches with very large size and velocity) # S -# with # = 1.7±0.1. Above a characteristic length scale of disorder Ld # 15µm, the avalanche clusters become], magnetic domain walls [12], or wet­ ting contact lines [13--15], where elasticity and disorder compete

  1. High-R Walls for Remodeling: Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  2. High-R Walls for Remodeling. Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  3. Cooling system having reduced mass pin fins for components in a gas turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Marra, John J

    2014-03-11

    A cooling system having one or more pin fins with reduced mass for a gas turbine engine is disclosed. The cooling system may include one or more first surfaces defining at least a portion of the cooling system. The pin fin may extend from the surface defining the cooling system and may have a noncircular cross-section taken generally parallel to the surface and at least part of an outer surface of the cross-section forms at least a quartercircle. A downstream side of the pin fin may have a cavity to reduce mass, thereby creating a more efficient turbine airfoil.

  4. Time Domain Reflectometry Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palermo, Sam

    Time Domain Reflectometry Theory Application Note 1304-2 For Use with Agilent 86100 Infiniium DCA #12;2 The most general approach to evaluating the time domain response of any electromagnetic system a concise presentation of the fundamentals of TDR and then relates these fundamentals to the parameters

  5. Selective p-i-n photodetector with resonant tunneling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mil'shtein, S.; Wilson, S.; Pillai, A.

    2014-05-15

    There are different fundamental approaches to designing selective photodetectors, where the selectivity of optical spectra is produced by a filtering aperture. However, manufacturing of multilayered filters is cumbersome for epitaxial technology. In the current study, we offer a novel approach in design of selective photodetectors. A p-i-n photodetector with superlattices in top n-layer becomes transparent for photons where h?<>E{sub ng}+E{sub n1}, the light will be absorbed, simultaneously producing high energy (hot) electrons. The designed thickness of the structure does prevent thermal relaxation of high energy electrons by thus enhancing the selectivity of the photodetector. However the most important selectivity element is the resonant tunneling which does happen only for electrons occupying E{sub n1} energy levels as they transfer to levels E{sub i1}aligned under reverse biasing.

  6. Seal assembly with anti-rotation pin for high pressure supercritical fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Steven A.; Fuller, Robert L.

    2014-08-05

    A seal assembly for sealing a machine with a first chamber and a second chamber is provided. A rotating shaft extends through the first and second chambers, and rotates therein. The seal assembly has a seal housing, a seal ring and a seal pin. The seal housing is positionable in the machine housing. The seal housing has a seal pocket extending into a fluid side thereof, and a housing receptacle extending into an inner diameter thereof at the seal pocket. The seal ring is positionable in the seal pocket of the seal housing for forming a seal therewith. The seal ring has a ring receptacle extending into an outer diameter thereof. The ring receptacle is positionable adjacent to the housing receptacle for defining a pin hole therebetween. The seal pin is loosely positionable in the pin hole whereby movement about the seal ring is accommodated while preventing rotation thereof.

  7. Water balance of Pin-Point and Flush-Flood irrigated rice 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roel Dellazoppa, Alvaro

    1996-01-01

    . Three plots were subjected to the PinPoint irrigation technique and three to the Flush-Flood method. Nine non-weighing lysimeters per plot were installed to measure infiltration, transpiration and evapotranspiration. Three pots containing soil and three...

  8. Press fit design : force and torque testing of steel dowel pins in brass and nylon samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Alexandra T

    2006-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine the accuracy of current press fit theory when applied to press fit design. Brass and nylon hex samples were press fitted with hardened steel dowel pins. Press fit force and ...

  9. VALVE FUNNEL SPRING PIN PRESS PERFORMANCE AND FUNCTIONAL REQUIREMENTS EVALUATION FOR SPECIAL TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WITHERSPOON JT

    2009-12-30

    This evaluation allows use of the valve funnel spring pin press and describes appropriate handling instructions for the tool. The engineering evaluation is required for operations and field use of special tools and equipment.

  10. Wave-pinned filaments of scroll waves Tams Bnsgi, Jr., Kevin J. Meyer, and Oliver Steinbocka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinbock, Oliver

    -pinned filaments are related to the coexistence of rotating and translating wave defects in two dimensions slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum,6 the interior of fertilized egg cells,7 the retina of chicken,8

  11. Tunable Substrate Integrated Waveguide Filters Implemented with PIN Diodes and RF MEMS Switches 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armendariz, Marcelino

    2012-02-14

    This thesis presents the first fully tunable substrate integrated waveguide (SIW) filter implemented with PIN diodes and RF MEMS switches. The methodology for tuning SIW filters is explained in detail and is used to create three separate designs...

  12. Design of an automated sorting and orienting machine for electronic pins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Michelle Sueway

    2012-01-01

    At the power electronics manufacturer SynQor, the printed circuit board (PCB) assembly line is fully automated with the exception of the step which inserts electronic pins into the PCBs. Past attempts to automate this ...

  13. The Critical Curve of the Random Pinning and Copolymer Models at Weak Coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quentin Berger; Francesco Caravenna; Julien Poisat; Rongfeng Sun; Nikos Zygouras

    2013-06-19

    We study random pinning and copolymer models, when the return distribution of the underlying renewal process has a polynomial tail with finite mean. We compute the asymptotic behavior of the critical curves of the models in the weak coupling regime, showing that it is universal. This proves a conjecture of Bolthausen, den Hollander and Opoku for copolymer models (ref. [8]), which we also extend to pinning models.

  14. Improved thermal stability of oxide-supported naked gold nanoparticles by ligand-assisted pinning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno, C; Divins, N. J.; Gazquez, Jaume; Varela, Maria; Angurell, I; Llorca, J

    2012-01-01

    We report a method to improve the thermal stability, up to 900 C, of bare-metal (naked) gold nanoparticles supported on top of SiO{sub 2} and SrTiO{sub 3} substrates via ligand-assisted pinning. This approach leads to monodisperse naked gold nanoparticles without significant sintering after thermal annealing in air at 900 C. The ligand-assisted pinning mechanism is described.

  15. A replica-coupling approach to disordered pinning models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabio Lucio Toninelli

    2007-10-12

    We consider a renewal process \\tau={\\tau_0,\\tau_1,...} on the integers, where the law of \\tau_i-\\tau_{i-1} has a power-like tail P(\\tau_i-\\tau_{i-1}=n)=n^{-(\\alpha+1)}L(n) with \\alpha\\ge0 and L(.) slowly varying. We then assign a random, n-dependent reward/penalty to the occurrence of the event that the site n belongs to tau. This class of problems includes, among others, (1+d)-dimensional models of pinning of directed polymers on a one-dimensional random defect, (1+1)-dimensional models of wetting of disordered substrates, and the Poland-Scheraga model of DNA denaturation. By varying the average of the reward, the system undergoes a transition from a localized phase where \\tau occupies a finite fraction of N to a delocalized phase where the density of \\tau vanishes. In absence of disorder the transition is of first order for \\alpha>1 and of higher order for \\alpha1/2. In physical terms, disorder is relevant in this situation, in agreement with the heuristic Harris criterion. On the other hand, for 0<\\alpha<1/2 it has been proven recently by K. Alexander that, if disorder is sufficiently weak, critical exponents are not modified by randomness: disorder is irrelevant. In this work, generalizing techniques which in the framework of spin glasses are known as replica coupling and interpolation, we give a new, simpler proof of the main results of [2]. Moreover, we (partially) justify a small-disorder expansion worked out in [9] for \\alpha<1/2, showing that it provides a free energy upper bound which improves the annealed one.

  16. Liquid Walls Innovative Concepts for First Walls and Blankets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    for an attractive fusion energy system 2. Lower the cost and time for R&D · APEX was initiated in November 1997Liquid Walls Innovative Concepts for First Walls and Blankets Mohamed Abdou Professor, Mechanical as part of the US Restructured Fusion Program Strategy to enhance innovation · Natural Questions

  17. Oven wall panel construction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellison, Kenneth (20 Avondale Cres., Markham, CA); Whike, Alan S. (R.R. #1, Caledon East, both of Ontario, CA)

    1980-04-22

    An oven roof or wall is formed from modular panels, each of which comprises an inner fabric and an outer fabric. Each such fabric is formed with an angle iron framework and somewhat resilient tie-bars or welded at their ends to flanges of the angle irons to maintain the inner and outer frameworks in spaced disposition while minimizing heat transfer by conduction and permitting some degree of relative movement on expansion and contraction of the module components. Suitable thermal insulation is provided within the module. Panels or skins are secured to the fabric frameworks and each such skin is secured to a framework and projects laterally so as slidingly to overlie the adjacent frame member of an adjacent panel in turn to permit relative movement during expansion and contraction.

  18. Catheter guided by optical coherence domain reflectometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Everett, Matthew (Pleasanton, CA); Colston, Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Matthews, Dennis (Moss Beach, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A guidance and viewing system based on multiplexed optical coherence domain reflectometry is incorporated into a catheter, endoscope, or other medical device to measure the location, thickness, and structure of the arterial walls or other intra-cavity regions at discrete points on the medical device during minimally invasive medical procedures. The information will be used both to guide the device through the body and to evaluate the tissue through which the device is being passed. Multiple optical fibers are situated along the circumference of the device. Light from the distal end of each fiber is directed onto the interior cavity walls via small diameter optics (such as gradient index lenses and mirrored corner cubes). Both forward viewing and side viewing fibers can be included. The light reflected or scattered from the cavity walls is then collected by the fibers and multiplexed at the proximal end to the sample arm of an optical low coherence reflectometer. The system may also be implemented in a nonmedical inspection device.

  19. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arena, L.; Mantha, P.

    2013-05-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls.

  20. Environment-based pin-power reconstruction method for homogeneous core calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leroyer, H.; Brosselard, C.; Girardi, E.

    2012-07-01

    Core calculation schemes are usually based on a classical two-step approach associated with assembly and core calculations. During the first step, infinite lattice assemblies calculations relying on a fundamental mode approach are used to generate cross-sections libraries for PWRs core calculations. This fundamental mode hypothesis may be questioned when dealing with loading patterns involving several types of assemblies (UOX, MOX), burnable poisons, control rods and burn-up gradients. This paper proposes a calculation method able to take into account the heterogeneous environment of the assemblies when using homogeneous core calculations and an appropriate pin-power reconstruction. This methodology is applied to MOX assemblies, computed within an environment of UOX assemblies. The new environment-based pin-power reconstruction is then used on various clusters of 3x3 assemblies showing burn-up gradients and UOX/MOX interfaces, and compared to reference calculations performed with APOLLO-2. The results show that UOX/MOX interfaces are much better calculated with the environment-based calculation scheme when compared to the usual pin-power reconstruction method. The power peak is always better located and calculated with the environment-based pin-power reconstruction method on every cluster configuration studied. This study shows that taking into account the environment in transport calculations can significantly improve the pin-power reconstruction so far as it is consistent with the core loading pattern. (authors)

  1. Building wall construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulford, C.E.

    1987-04-21

    A building wall construction is described comprising, in combination: (a) an elongated top plate; (b) an elongated bottom plate extending in spaced, horizontal, parallel relation to the top plate; (c) elongated studs arranged in spaced, vertical, parallel relation and affixed at their upper and lower ends to the top and bottom plates, respectively; (d) each of the studs, top plates and bottom plates comprises a pair of spaced wooden members of equal length having a substantially rectangular groove centrally disposed in one face thereof extending for the entire length of the wooden members, and at least one web member of fire-rated gypsum board having opposite, marginal edge portions secured in the grooves; (e) sheathing layers affixed to both sides of the stud members and extending vertically between the bottom and top plates, and horizontally between the studs to enclose the space therebetween; and (f) at least one panel member of fire-rated gypsum board extending horizontally between each successive pair of studs parallel to and spaced from each of the sheathing layers, thus providing at least two, separated spaces between the sheathing layers.

  2. pi-N charge exchange and pi(+)-pi(0) scattering at low energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Pocanic; E. Frlez

    1997-06-30

    pi-N and pi-pi interactions near threshold are uniquely sensitive to the chiral symmetry breaking part of the strong interaction. The pi-N sigma-term value with its implications for nucleon quark structure and the recent controversy concerning the size of the scalar quark condensate have renewed the experimental interest in these two fundamental systems. We report new differential cross sections for the reaction $pi^-p \\to \\pi^0n$ at 27.5 MeV pion incident kinetic energy, measured between $\\theta_{CM} = 0^\\circ$ and $55^\\circ$. Our results are in excellent agreement with the existing comprehensive pi-N phase shift analysis. We also report on a Chew-Low analysis of exclusive $\\pi^+ p \\to \\pi^+\\pi^0p$ data at 260 MeV pion incident energy.

  3. Loss of particles through a clad breach in a simulated sphere-pac fuel pin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sunderland, Dion Julian

    1985-01-01

    Sunder land, B, S. , Texas AAi'1 Univ r sity Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr . K. L. Peddicord A set of exper irrents r. anacter izing the loss cf fuel pant cles through a clad breach in a spher e-pac fuel pin is discussed. Nonnadio- a, tive...-pac fuel pins. It has been found that completely fresh, unr estr uctur ed sph. . r e will be lost if tne bneach is wider than a Cr itical Cr ack Width. For any situation which deviates from completely unnestructured par ricles, for example srntcr ing...

  4. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy (Davis, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  5. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  6. Hot Pin Welding of Thin Poly(vinyl chloride) Sheet James D. Van de Ven, Arthur G. Erdman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van de Ven, James D.

    Hot Pin Welding of Thin Poly(vinyl chloride) Sheet James D. Van de Ven, Arthur G. Erdman Mechanical of welding two thin sheets of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) with a heated pin, thus allowing construction of a relationship between the weld temperature and weld strength. Constructing a relationship between weld strength

  7. Stability of winding cosmic wall lattices with X type junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandon Carter

    2009-11-30

    This work confirms the stability of a class of domain wall lattice models that can produce accelerated cosmological expansion, with pressure to density ratio $w=-1/3$ at early times, and with $w=-2/3$ at late times when the lattice scale becomes large compared to the wall thickness. For walls of tension $T_{I}$, the relevant X type junctions could be unstable (for a sufficiently acute intersection angle $\\alpha$) against separation into a pair of Y type junctions joined by a compound wall, only if the tension $T_{II}$ of the latter were less than $2T_{I}$ (and for an approximately right-angled intersection if it were less that $\\sqrt{2} T_{I}$) which can not occur in the class considered here. In an extensive category of multicomponent scalar field models of forced harmonic (linear or non-linear) type it is shown how the relevant tension -- which is the same as the surface energy density $U$ of the wall -- can be calculated as the minimum (geodesic) distance between the relevant vacuum states as measured on the space of field values $\\Phi^i$ using a positive definite (Riemannian) energy metric $dU^2=\\tilde G_{ij} d\\Phi^i d\\Phi^j$ that is obtained from the usual kinetic metric (which is flat for a model with ordinary linear kinetic part) by application of a conformal factor proportional to the relevant potential function $V$. For suitably periodic potential functions there will be corresponding periodic configurations -- with parallel walls characterised by incrementation of a winding number -- in which the condition for stability of large scale bunching modes is shown to be satisfied automatically. It is suggested that such a configuration -- with a lattice lengthscale comparable to intergalactic separation distances -- might have been produced by a late stage of cosmological inflation.

  8. SuperPin: Parallelizing Dynamic Instrumentation for Real-Time Performance Steven Wallace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazelwood, Kim

    SuperPin: Parallelizing Dynamic Instrumentation for Real-Time Performance Steven Wallace Intel Corporation Kim Hazelwood University of Virginia Abstract Dynamic instrumentation systems have proven to be ex drawback of modern instrumentation systems is that the instrumented applications often execute several

  9. A Comparative Analysis of Architecture Frameworks Antony Tang Jun Han Pin Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jun

    A Comparative Analysis of Architecture Frameworks Antony Tang Jun Han Pin Chen School of Information Technology DSTO C3 Research Centre Swinburne University of Technology Department of Defence.Chen@dsto.defence.gov.au Abstract Architecture frameworks are methods used in architecture modeling. They provide a structured

  10. Single and Tandem Axial p-i-n Nanowire Photovoltaic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    Single and Tandem Axial p-i-n Nanowire Photovoltaic Devices Thomas J. Kempa,, Bozhi Tian,, Dong Rip-i-n+-p+-i-n silicon nanowire (SiNW) photovoltaic elements. Scanning electron microscopy images of selectively etched. Finally, a novel single SiNW tandem solar cell consisting of synthetic integration of two photovoltaic

  11. Choked Flow Effects in the NSI Driven Pin Puller* Keith A. Gonthiertand Joseph M. Powerst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    reactor is simulated; also, the combustion product composition is typically predicted using principles Initiator (NSI) actuated pin puller. The conservation principles and constitutive relations for a multi is based upon principles of mixture theory. Though this ap- proach still requires that simplifying

  12. Controlling flow in microfluidic channels with a manually actuated pin valve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eddington, David T.

    Controlling flow in microfluidic channels with a manually actuated pin valve Marie-Elena Brett to be placed within the microchannel to obstruct flow. This new valve design can attain on/off control of fluid flow without an external power source using readily-available, low-cost materials. The valve consists

  13. Enhanced pinning in YBCO films with BaZrO.sub.3 nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Driscoll, Judith L.; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2010-06-15

    A process and composition of matter are provided and involve flux pinning in thin films of high temperature superconductive oxides such as YBCO by inclusion of particles including barium and a group 4 or group 5 metal, such as zirconium, in the thin film.

  14. Determination of pi-N scattering lengths from pionic hydrogen and pionic deuterium data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Deloff

    2001-04-23

    The pi-N s-wave scattering lengths have been inferred from a joint analysis of the pionic hydrogen and the pionic deuterium x-ray data using a non-relativistic approach in which the pi-N interaction is simulated by a short-ranged potential. The pi-d scattering length has been calculated exactly by solving the Faddeev equations and also by using a static approximation. It has been shown that the same very accurate static formula for pi-d scattering length can be derived (i) from a set of boundary conditions; (ii) by a reduction of Faddeev equations; and (iii) through a summation of Feynman diagrams. By imposing the requirement that the pi-d scattering length, resulting from Faddeev-type calculation, be in agreement with pionic deuterium data, we obtain bounds on the pi-N scattering lengths. The dominant source of uncertainty on the deduced values of the pi-N scattering lengths are the experimental errors in the pionic hydrogen data.

  15. Automated Design of Pin-Constrained Digital Microfluidic Arrays for Lab-on-a-Chip Applications*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    Automated Design of Pin-Constrained Digital Microfluidic Arrays for Lab-on-a-Chip Applications-dimensional array [6,7]. Droplet motion in such devices is typically controlled by a system clock, which is similar". The level of system integration and design complexity of such mixed-technology devices are expected

  16. 2006 Nature Publishing Group Lgl, Pins and aPKC regulate neuroblast self-renewal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doe, Chris

    © 2006 Nature Publishing Group Lgl, Pins and aPKC regulate neuroblast self-renewal versus or to differentiate is an important issue in stem cell and cancer biology. Drosophila neuroblasts undergo self-renewal- nisms controlling the self-renewal/differentiation decision are poorly understood. Here we tested

  17. Electroabsorption measurements and built-in potentials in amorphous silicon pin solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    Electroabsorption measurements and built-in potentials in amorphous silicon p­i­n solar cells Lin 13244-1130 S. Guha and J. Yang United Solar Systems Corporation, 1100 West Maple Road, Troy, Michigan electroabsorption measurements to determine the built-in potential in semiconductor heterojunction devices

  18. Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

    2013-08-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

  19. Green Wall Technologies Objective: Compile a comprehensive and up-to-date assessment of green wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    Green Wall Technologies Objective: Compile a comprehensive and up-to-date assessment of green wall technologies that can be used to jump-start design and engineering proposals for green walls in a variety of urban conditions. Background: Green walls--otherwise referred to as living walls or biowalls

  20. Thermal breaking systems for metal stud walls -- Can metal stud walls perform as well as wood stud walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosny, J.; Christian, J.E.; Desjarlais, A.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Buildings Technology Center

    1997-12-31

    Metal stud wall systems for residential buildings are gaining in popularity. Strong thermal bridges caused by highly conductive metal studs degrade the thermal performance of such walls. Several wall configurations have been developed to improve their thermal performance. The authors tried to evaluate some of these wall systems. The thermal performance of metal stud walls is frequently compared with that of wood stud walls. A reduction of the in-cavity R-value caused by the wood studs is about 10% in wood stud walls. In metal stud walls, thermal bridges generated by the metal components reduce their thermal performance by up to 55%. Today, metal stud walls are believed to be considerably less thermally effective than similar systems made of wood because steel has much higher thermal conductivity than wood. Relatively high R-values may be achieved by installing insulating sheathing, which is now widely recommended as the remedy for weak thermal performance of metal stud walls. A series of promising metal stud wall configurations was analyzed. Some of these walls were designed and tested by the authors, some were tested in other laboratories, and some were developed and forgotten a long time ago. Several types of thermal breaking systems were used in these walls. Two- and three-dimensional finite-difference computer simulations were used to analyze 20 metal stud wall configurations. Also, a series of hot-box tests were conducted on several of these walls. Test results for 22 additional metal stud walls were analyzed. Most of these walls contained conventional metal studs. Commonly used fiberglass and EPS were used as insulation materials. The most promising metal stud wall configurations have reductions in the center-of-cavity R-values of less than 20%.

  1. Steel-framed buildings: Impacts of wall detail configurations on the whole wall thermal performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosny, J.; Desjarlais, A.O.; Christian, J.E.

    1998-06-01

    The main objective of this paper is the influence of architectural wall details on the whole wall thermal performance. Whole wall thermal performance analysis was performed for six light gage steel-framed wall systems (some with wood components). For each wall system, all wall details were simulated using calibrated 3-D finite difference computer modeling. The thermal performance of the six steel-framed wall systems included various system details and the whole wall system thermal performance for a typical single-story ranch house. Currently, predicted heat losses through building walls are typically based on measurements of the wall system clear wall area using test methods such as ASTM C 236 or are calculated by one of the procedures recommended in the ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals that often is carried out for the clear wall area exclusively. In this paper, clear wall area is defined as the part of the wall system that is free of thermal anomalies due to building envelope details or thermally unaffected by intersections with other surfaces of the building envelope. Clear wall experiments or calculations normally do not include the effects of building envelope details such as corners, window and door openings, and structural intersections with roofs, floors, ceilings, and other walls. In steel-framed wall systems, these details typically consist of much more structural components than the clear wall. For this situation, the thermal properties measured or calculated for the clear wall area do not adequately represent the total wall system thermal performance. Factors that would impact the ability of today`s standard practice to accurately predict the total wall system thermal performance are the accuracy of the calculation methods, the area of the total wall that is clear wall, and the quantity and thermal performance of the various wall system details.

  2. In-situ TEM observation of the interaction between magnetic domain walls and twin domain walls below the Verwey transition in magnetite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    transition is first-order in character and proceeds by the rapid movement of an abrupt phase interface of the monoclinic phase. On cooling through the transition, the [001] easy axis of the monoclinic phase may have performed an in-situ study of the cubic to monoclinic phase transition in synthetic multi

  3. Shear wall ultimate drift limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffey, T.A.; Goldman, A.; Farrar, C.R.

    1994-04-01

    Drift limits for reinforced-concrete shear walls are investigated by reviewing the open literature for appropriate experimental data. Drift values at ultimate are determined for walls with aspect ratios ranging up to a maximum of 3.53 and undergoing different types of lateral loading (cyclic static, monotonic static, and dynamic). Based on the geometry of actual nuclear power plant structures exclusive of containments and concerns regarding their response during seismic (i.e.,cyclic) loading, data are obtained from pertinent references for which the wall aspect ratio is less than or equal to approximately 1, and for which testing is cyclic in nature (typically displacement controlled). In particular, lateral deflections at ultimate load, and at points in the softening region beyond ultimate for which the load has dropped to 90, 80, 70, 60, and 50 percent of its ultimate value, are obtained and converted to drift information. The statistical nature of the data is also investigated. These data are shown to be lognormally distributed, and an analysis of variance is performed. The use of statistics to estimate Probability of Failure for a shear wall structure is illustrated.

  4. Flux pinning characteristics in cylindrical ingot niobium used in superconducting radio frequency cavity fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhavale Ashavai, Pashupati Dhakal, Anatolii A Polyanskii, Gianluigi Ciovati

    2012-04-01

    We present the results of from DC magnetization and penetration depth measurements of cylindrical bulk large-grain (LG) and fine-grain (FG) niobium samples used for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The surface treatment consisted of electropolishing and low temperature baking as they are typically applied to SRF cavities. The magnetization data were fitted using a modified critical state model. The critical current density Jc and pinning force Fp are calculated from the magnetization data and their temperature dependence and field dependence are presented. The LG samples have lower critical current density and pinning force density compared to FG samples which implies a lower flux trapping efficiency. This effect may explain the lower values of residual resistance often observed in LG cavities than FG cavities.

  5. Optimization of vortex pinning by nanoparticles using simulations of time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. E. Koshelev; I. A. Sadovskyy; C. L. Phillips; A. Glatz

    2015-10-01

    Introducing nanoparticles into superconducting materials has emerged as an efficient route to enhance their current-carrying capability. We address the problem of optimizing vortex pinning landscape for randomly distributed metallic spherical inclusions using large-scale numerical simulations of time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations. We found the size and density of particles for which the highest critical current is realized in a fixed magnetic field. For each particle size and magnetic field, the critical current reaches a maximum value at a certain particle density, which typically corresponds to 15-23% of the total volume being replaced by nonsuperconducting material. For fixed diameter, this optimal particle density increases with the magnetic field. Moreover, we found that the optimal particle diameter slowly decreases with the magnetic field from 4.5 to 2.5 coherence lengths at a given temperature. This result shows that pinning landscapes have to be designed for specific applications taking into account relevant magnetic field scales.

  6. Indium phosphide-based monolithically integrated PIN waveguide photodiode readout for resonant cantilever sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siwak, N. P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Institute for Systems Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Laboratory for the Physical Sciences, 8050 Greenmead Drive, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States); Fan, X. Z.; Ghodssi, R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Institute for Systems Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Kanakaraju, S.; Richardson, C. J. K. [Laboratory for the Physical Sciences, 8050 Greenmead Drive, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States)

    2014-10-06

    An integrated photodiode displacement readout scheme for a microelectromechanical cantilever waveguide resonator sensing platform is presented. III-V semiconductors are used to enable the monolithic integration of passive waveguides with active optical components. This work builds upon previously demonstrated results by measuring the displacement of cantilever waveguide resonators with on-chip waveguide PIN photodiodes. The on-chip integration of the readout provides an additional 70% improvement in mass sensitivity compared to off-chip photodetector designs due to measurement stability and minimized coupling loss. In addition to increased measurement stability, reduced packaging complexity is achieved due to the simplicity of the readout design. We have fabricated cantilever waveguides with integrated photodetectors and experimentally characterized these cantilever sensors with monolithically integrated PIN photodiodes.

  7. Preliminary evaluation of a nondestructive ultrasonic technique for assessing stability of external skeletal fixation pins 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickens, James Robert

    1992-01-01

    and then return to their original (equilibrium) positions soon after the stress wave passes. In the course of propagation, energy is gradually dissipated from the pulse. This can be due to material properties, geometric constraints, or abnormalities which... relationship was observed between extraction forces of fixation pins implanted in cadaveric femur and an acoustic attenuation parameter obtained with a simple ultrasonic pulsed-wave excitation technique. Statistical analysis verified this relationship while...

  8. A Rotary PIN Entry Scheme Resilient to Shoulder-Surfing Peipei Shi, Bo Zhu and Amr Youssef

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Youssef, Amr M.

    A Rotary PIN Entry Scheme Resilient to Shoulder-Surfing Peipei Shi, Bo Zhu and Amr Youssef Concordia Institute for Information Systems Engineering Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada {pe

  9. Joining aluminum to titanium alloy by friction stir lap welding with cutting pin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Yanni [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China); Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China); Li, Jinglong, E-mail: lijinglg@nwpu.edu.cn [Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China)] [Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China); Xiong, Jiangtao [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China); Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China); Huang, Fu; Zhang, Fusheng; Raza, Syed Hamid [Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China)] [Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Aluminum 1060 and titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V plates were lap joined by friction stir welding. A cutting pin of rotary burr made of tungsten carbide was employed. The microstructures of the joining interface were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Joint strength was evaluated by a tensile shear test. During the welding process, the surface layer of the titanium plate was cut off by the pin, and intensively mixed with aluminum situated on the titanium plate. The microstructures analysis showed that a visible swirl-like mixed region existed at the interface. In this region, the Al metal, Ti metal and the mixed layer of them were all presented. The ultimate tensile shear strength of joint reached 100% of 1060Al that underwent thermal cycle provided by the shoulder. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FSW with cutting pin was successfully employed to form Al/Ti lap joint. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Swirl-like structures formed due to mechanical mixing were found at the interface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-strength joints fractured at Al suffered thermal cycle were produced.

  10. Method for sputtering a PIN amorphous silicon semi-conductor device having partially crystallized P and N-layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moustakas, Theodore D. (Annandale, NJ); Maruska, H. Paul (Annandale, NJ)

    1985-07-09

    A high efficiency amorphous silicon PIN semiconductor device having partially crystallized (microcrystalline) P and N layers is constructed by the sequential sputtering of N, I and P layers and at least one semi-transparent ohmic electrode. The method of construction produces a PIN device, exhibiting enhanced electrical and optical properties, improved physical integrity, and facilitates the preparation in a singular vacuum system and vacuum pump down procedure.

  11. Reliable reduction of Fermi-level pinning at atomically matched metal/Ge interfaces by sulfur treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasahara, K.; Yamada, S.; Miyao, M. [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Sakurai, T.; Sawano, K.; Nohira, H. [Advanced Research Laboratories, Tokyo City University, 8-15-1 Todoroki, Tokyo 158-0082 (Japan); Hamaya, K., E-mail: hamaya@ee.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2014-04-28

    This study demonstrates that by using a sulfur (S) treatment on the Ge surface, a reduction in Fermi level pinning can reproducibly be achieved at atomically matched metal/Ge(111) interfaces. The Schottky barrier height for p-type Ge can be controlled by changing the metal work function despite the metal/Ge junctions. The results indicate that the combination of atomic-arrangement matching and S treatment can remove extrinsic factors influencing Fermi level pinning at metal/Ge interfaces.

  12. Promising Technology: Cool Paints for Exterior Walls

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cool Paints increase the solar reflectance of exterior walls. By reflecting more sunlight, the wall surface maintains a cooler temperature. This decrease in temperature leads to less heat transfer through the walls into the building. During the cooling season, the addition of cool paints can decrease the cooling load of the building.

  13. Influence of wall thickness on the stability of the resistive wall mode in tokamak Richard Fitzpatrick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    Influence of wall thickness on the stability of the resistive wall mode in tokamak plasmas Richard.1063/1.2446041 Nonlinear evolution of resistive wall mode in a cylindrical tokamak with poloidal rotation Phys. Plasmas 13); 10.1063/1.1943347 Control of resistive wall modes in a cylindrical tokamak with radial and poloidal

  14. Mechanism of bubble detachment from vibrating walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Dongjun; Park, Jun Kwon Kang, Kwan Hyoung; Kang, In Seok

    2013-11-15

    We discovered a previously unobserved mechanism by which air bubbles detach from vibrating walls in glasses containing water. Chaotic oscillation and subsequent water jets appeared when a wall vibrated at greater than a critical level. Wave forms were developed at water-air interface of the bubble by the wall vibration, and water jets were formed when sufficiently grown wave-curvatures were collapsing. Droplets were pinched off from the tip of jets and fell to the surface of the glass. When the solid-air interface at the bubble-wall attachment point was completely covered with water, the bubble detached from the wall. The water jets were mainly generated by subharmonic waves and were generated most vigorously when the wall vibrated at the volume resonant frequency of the bubble. Bubbles of specific size can be removed by adjusting the frequency of the wall's vibration.

  15. Statistical analysis of the velocity and scalar fields in reacting turbulent wall-jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Pouransari; L. Biferale; A. V. Johansson

    2015-02-21

    The concept of local isotropy in a chemically reacting turbulent wall-jet flow is addressed using direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Different DNS databases with isothermal and exothermic reactions are examined. The chemical reaction and heat release effects on the turbulent velocity, passive scalar and reactive species fields are studied using their probability density functions (PDF) and higher order moments for velocities and scalar fields, as well as their gradients. With the aid of the anisotropy invariant maps for the Reynolds stress tensor the heat release effects on the anisotropy level at different wall-normal locations are evaluated and found to be most accentuated in the near-wall region. It is observed that the small-scale anisotropies are persistent both in the near-wall region and inside the jet flame. Two exothermic cases with different Damkohler number are examined and the comparison revealed that the Damkohler number effects are most dominant in the near-wall region, where the wall cooling effects are influential. In addition, with the aid of PDFs conditioned on the mixture fraction, the significance of the reactive scalar characteristics in the reaction zone is illustrated. We argue that the combined effects of strong intermittency and strong persistency of anisotropy at the small scales in the entire domain can affect mixing and ultimately the combustion characteristics of the reacting flow.

  16. Perceptual Affordances of Wall-Sized Displays for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isenberg, Petra

    .g., HCI)]: Miscellaneous. Introduction Wall-sized displays (PowerWalls) engulf viewers in very large high

  17. POROUS WALL, HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sexton, W.

    2012-06-30

    Hollow Glass Microspheres (HGM) is not a new technology. All one has to do is go to the internet and Google{trademark} HGM. Anyone can buy HGM and they have a wide variety of uses. HGM are usually between 1 to 100 microns in diameter, although their size can range from 100 nanometers to 5 millimeters in diameter. HGM are used as lightweight filler in composite materials such as syntactic foam and lightweight concrete. In 1968 a patent was issued to W. Beck of the 3M{trademark} Company for 'Glass Bubbles Prepared by Reheating Solid Glass Particles'. In 1983 P. Howell was issued a patent for 'Glass Bubbles of Increased Collapse Strength' and in 1988 H. Marshall was issued a patent for 'Glass Microbubbles'. Now Google{trademark}, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), the key words here are Porous Wall. Almost every article has its beginning with the research done at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The Savannah River Site (SRS) where SRNL is located has a long and successful history of working with hydrogen and its isotopes for national security, energy, waste management and environmental remediation applications. This includes more than 30 years of experience developing, processing, and implementing special ceramics, including glasses for a variety of Department of Energy (DOE) missions. In the case of glasses, SRS and SRNL have been involved in both the science and engineering of vitreous or glass based systems. As a part of this glass experience and expertise, SRNL has developed a number of niches in the glass arena, one of which is the development of porous glass systems for a variety of applications. These porous glass systems include sol gel glasses, which include both xerogels and aerogels, as well as phase separated glass compositions, that can be subsequently treated to produce another unique type of porosity within the glass forms. The porous glasses can increase the surface area compared to 'normal glasses of a 1 to 2 order of magnitude, which can result in unique properties in areas such as hydrogen storage, gas transport, gas separations and purifications, sensors, global warming applications, new drug delivery systems and so on. One of the most interesting porous glass products that SRNL has developed and patented is Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs) that are being studied for many different applications. The European Patent Office (EPO) just recently notified SRS that the continuation-in-part patent application for the PW-HGMs has been accepted. The original patent, which was granted by the EPO on June 2, 2010, was validated in France, Germany and the United Kingdom. The microspheres produced are generally in the range of 2 to 100 microns, with a 1 to 2 micron wall. What makes the SRNL microspheres unique from all others is that the team in Figure 1 has found a way to induce and control porosity through the thin walls on a scale of 100 to 3000 {angstrom}. This is what makes the SRNL HW-HGMs one-of-a-kind, and is responsible for many of their unique properties and potential for various applications, including those in tritium storage, gas separations, H-storage for vehicles, and even a variety of new medical applications in the areas of drug delivery and MRI contrast agents. SRNL Hollow Glass Microspheres, and subsequent, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres are fabricated using a flame former apparatus. Figure 2 is a schematic of the apparatus.

  18. Comparative Study of High Triangularity H-mode Plasma Performance in JET with Be/W Wall and CFC Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comparative Study of High Triangularity H-mode Plasma Performance in JET with Be/W Wall and CFC Wall

  19. NREL: Energy Analysis - Anna Wall

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on771/6/14 Contact:NewsWebmasterWorking With UsAnna Wall Photo of

  20. Low-energy beta spectroscopy using pin diodes to monitor tritium surface contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wampler, W.R.; Doyle, B.L.

    1994-06-01

    We show that tritium betas emitted from a surface can be counted using a pin photodiode as a solid state charged particle detector. Furthermore, we show that the range of tritium betas through air is sufficient to allow measurement of tritium on samples in air by this method. These two findings make possible a new method to survey tritium surface contamination which has advantages over existing methods. We have built and tested several prototype instruments which use this method to measure tritium surface contamination, including a compact portable unit. The design of these instruments and results from tests and calibrations are described. Potential applications of this new method to monitor tritium are discussed.

  1. PIN Photodiodes for Radiation Monitoring and Protection in the BaBar Silicon Vertex Tracker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babar Collaboration; T. I. Meyer

    2000-10-23

    We discuss the design, implementation and performance of the radiation monitoring and protection system used by the Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) in the BaBar detector. Using 12 reverse-biased PIN photodiodes mounted around the beampipe near the IP, we are able to provide instantaneous radiation dose rates, absorbed dose integrals, and active protection that aborts the circulating beams in the PEP-II storage ring when radiation levels exceed user-defined thresholds. The system has reliably protected the SVT from excessive radiation damage and has also served as a key diagnostic tool in understanding radiation backgrounds at PEP-II.

  2. P_11 Resonance Extracted from pi-N Data and Its Stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satoshi Nakamura

    2012-04-01

    We study the stability of resonance poles in {pi}N P{sub 11} partial wave, particularly the Roper resonance, by varying parameters significantly within the EBAC dynamical coupled-channels model, keeping a good fit to the empirical amplitude. We find that two Roper poles are stable against the variation. However, for higher energies, the number of poles can change depending on how the parameters are fitted within error bars. We also developed a model with a bare nucleon which forms the physical nucleon by being dressed by the meson-cloud. We still find a good stability of the Roper poles.

  3. On the Equivalence of Trapped Colloids, Pinned Vortices, and Spin Ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nisoli, Cristiano

    2014-04-23

    We investigate the recently reported analogies between pinned vortices in nano-structured superconductors or colloids in optical traps, and spin ice materials. The frustration of the two models, one describing colloids and vortices, the other describing spin ice, differs essentially. However, their effective energetics is made identical by the contribution of an emergent field associated to a topological charge. This equivalence extends to the local low-energy dynamics of the ice manifold, yet breaks down in lattices of mixed coordination, because of topological charge transfer between sub-latices.

  4. Strong vortex core pinning and Barkhausen-free magnetization response in thin Permalloy disks induced by implantation of 1 × 10{sup 4} Ga{sup +} ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fani Sani, F., E-mail: fanisani@ualberta.ca, E-mail: mark.freeman@ualberta.ca; Losby, J. E.; Diao, Z.; Parsons, L. C.; Burgess, J. A. J.; Hiebert, W. K.; Freeman, M. R., E-mail: fanisani@ualberta.ca, E-mail: mark.freeman@ualberta.ca [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada); National Institute for Nanotechnology (NINT), Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Vick, D. [National Institute for Nanotechnology (NINT), Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada)

    2014-05-07

    Artificial vortex core pinning sites are induced in thin Permalloy disks by point exposure to as few as 10?000 ions from a focused Ga{sup +} beam. These pinning sites yield a first-order change in the magnetization response of the disk. A single site can keep the vortex core pinned over an applied field range comparable to the vortex annihilation field of the unaltered disk. Several widely separated sites can work together to keep the core pinned in one place, while the Barkhausen effect is eliminated from the magnetization curve over a range approaching the saturation moment of the disk.

  5. SRNL POROUS WALL GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wicks, G; Leung Heung, L; Ray Schumacher, R

    2008-04-15

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed a new medium for storage of hydrogen and other gases. This involves fabrication of thin, Porous Walled, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), with diameters generally in the range of 1 to several hundred microns. What is unique about the glass microballons is that porosity has been induced and controlled within the thin, one micron thick walls, on the scale of 10 to several thousand Angstroms. This porosity results in interesting properties including the ability to use these channels to fill the microballons with special absorbents and other materials, thus providing a contained environment even for reactive species. Gases can now enter the microspheres and be retained on the absorbents, resulting in solid-state and contained storage of even reactive species. Also, the porosity can be altered and controlled in various ways, and even used to filter mixed gas streams within a system. SRNL is involved in about a half dozen different programs involving these PW-HGMs and an overview of some of these activities and results emerging are presented.

  6. Identification of new functions for BRCT domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad, Duaa H

    2008-01-01

    Our lab identified the tandem BRCT domains of PTIP function as a DNA damage responsive phospho binding domain that recognizes proteins phosphorylated by ATM and ATR after DNA damage. The PTIP tandem BRCT domains are ...

  7. Cross-domain self organizing maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fidelholtz, Estanislao L

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, I present a method for organizing and relating events represented in two domains: the transition-space domain, which focuses on change and the trajectory-space domain, which focuses on movement along paths. ...

  8. Cross Domain Mathematical Concept Formation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steel, Graham; Colton, Simon; Bundy, Alan; Walsh, Toby

    2000-01-01

    Many interesting concepts in mathematics are essentially "cross-domain" in nature, relating objects from more than one area of mathematics, e.g. prime order groups. These concepts are often vital to the formation of a ...

  9. Membrane adhesion and domain formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas R. Weikl; Reinhard Lipowsky

    2007-09-23

    We review theoretical results for the adhesion-induced phase behavior of biomembranes. The focus is on models in which the membranes are represented as discretized elastic sheets with embedded adhesion molecules. We present several mechanism that lead to the formation of domains during adhesion, and discuss the time-dependent evolution of domain patterns obtained in Monte-Carlo simulations. The simulated pattern dynamics has striking similarities to the pattern evolution observed during T cell adhesion.

  10. Textural break foundation wall construction modules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Steven J. (Kennewick, WA)

    1990-01-01

    Below-grade, textural-break foundation wall structures are provided for inhibiting diffusion and advection of liquids and gases into and out from a surrounding hydrogeologic environment. The foundation wall structure includes a foundation wall having an interior and exterior surface and a porous medium disposed around a portion of the exterior surface. The structure further includes a modular barrier disposed around a portion of the porous medium. The modular barrier is substantially removable from the hydrogeologic environment.

  11. NEUTRON WALL LOADING OF TOKAMAK REACTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    GA­A23223 NEUTRON WALL LOADING OF TOKAMAK REACTORS by C.P.C. WONG OCTOBER 1999 #12;DISCLAIMER Government or any agency thereof. #12;GA­A23223 NEUTRON WALL LOADING OF TOKAMAK REACTORS by C.P.C. WONG by General Atomics IR&D Funds GA PROJECT 4437 OCTOBER 1999 #12;C.P.C. WONG NEUTRON WALL LOADING OF TOKAMAK

  12. First wall for polarized fusion reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenside, Henry S. (Cranbury, NJ); Budny, Robert V. (Princeton, NJ); Post, Jr., Douglass E. (Buttonwood, CT)

    1988-01-01

    Depolarization mechanisms arising from the recycling of the polarized fuel at the limiter and the first-wall of a fusion reactor are greater than those mechanisms in the plasma. Rapid depolarization of the plasma is prevented by providing a first-wall or first-wall coating formed of a low-Z, non-metallic material having a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec.sup.-1.

  13. Low-rise shear wall failure modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrar, C.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Hashimoto, P.S. (EQE Engineering, Inc., Costa Mesa, CA (USA)); Reed, J.W. (Benjamin (J.R.) and Associates, Inc., Mountain View, CA (USA))

    1991-01-01

    A summary of the data that are available concerning the structural response of low-rise shear walls is presented. This data will be used to address two failure modes associated with the shear wall structures. First, data concerning the seismic capacity of the shear walls with emphasis on excessive deformations that can cause equipment failure are examined. Second, data concerning the dynamic properties of shear walls (stiffness and damping) that are necessary to compute the seismic inputs to attached equipment are summarized. This case addresses the failure of equipment when the structure remains functional. 23 refs.

  14. Multiple moving wall dry coal extrusion pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2013-05-14

    A pump for transporting particulate material includes a passageway defined on each side between an inlet and an outlet by a moving wall.

  15. Fillability of Thin-Wall Steel Castings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert C. Voigt; Joseph Bertoletti; Andrew Kaley; Sandi Ricotta; Travis Sunday

    2002-07-30

    The use of steel components is being challenged by lighter nonferrous or cast iron components. The development of techniques for enhancing and ensuring the filability of thin-wall mold cavities is most critical for thinner wall cast steel production. The purpose of this research was to develop thin-wall casting techniques that can be used to reliably produce thin-wall castings from traditional gravity poured sand casting processes. The focus of the research was to enhance the filling behavior to prevent misrunds. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of various foundry variables on the filling of thin section steel castings. These variables include casting design, heat transfer, gating design, and metal fluidity. Wall thickness and pouring temperature have the greatest effect on casting fill. As wall thickness increases the volume to surface area of the casting increases, which increases the solidification time, allowing the metal to flow further in thicker sect ions. Pouring time is another significant variable affecting casting fill. Increases or decreases of 20% in the pouring time were found to have a significant effect on the filling of thin-wall production castings. Gating variables, including venting, pouring head height, and mold tilting also significantly affected thin-wall casting fill. Filters offer less turbulent, steadier flow, which is appropriate for thicker castings, but they do not enhance thin-wall casting fill.

  16. First wall for polarized fusion reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenside, H.S.; Budny, R.V.; Post, D.E. Jr.

    1985-01-29

    A first-wall or first-wall coating for use in a fusion reactor having polarized fuel may be formed of a low-Z non-metallic material having slow spin relaxation, i.e., a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec/sup -1/. Materials having these properties include hydrogenated and deuterated amorphous semiconductors. A method for preventing the rapid depolarization of a polarized plasma in a fusion device may comprise the step of providing a first-wall or first-wall coating formed of a low-Z, non-metallic material having a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec/sup -1/.

  17. A Validation Study of Pin Heat Transfer for MOX Fuel Based on the IFA-597 Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillippe, Aaron M; Clarno, Kevin T; Banfield, James E; Ott, Larry J; Philip, Bobby; Berrill, Mark A; Sampath, Rahul S; Allu, Srikanth; Hamilton, Steven P

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The IFA-597 (Integrated Fuel Assessment) experiments from the International Fuel Performance Experiments (IFPE) database were designed to study the thermal behavior of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and the effects of an annulus on fission gas release in light-water-reactor fuel. An evaluation of nuclear fuel pin heat transfer in the FRAPCON-3.4 and Exnihilo codes for MOX fuel systems was performed, with a focus on the first 20 time steps ( 6 GWd/MT(iHM)) for explicit comparison between the codes. In addition, sensitivity studies were performed to evaluate the effect of the radial power shape and approximations to the geometry to account for the thermocouple hole, dish, and chamfer. The analysis demonstrated relative agreement for both solid (rod 1) and annular (rod 2) fuel in the experiment, demonstrating the accuracy of the codes and their underlying material models for MOX fuel, while also revealing a small energy loss artifact in how gap conductance is currently handled in Exnihilo for chamfered fuel pellets. The within-pellet power shape was shown to significantly impact the predicted centerline temperatures. This has provided an initial benchmarking of the pin heat transfer capability of Exnihilo for MOX fuel with respect to a well-validated nuclear fuel performance code.

  18. Beetle Kill Wall at NREL

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    When it comes to designing an interior decorative feature for one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world, very few would consider bringing in a beetle to do the job. But thats what happened at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus.In June, the RSF will become home to more than 800 workers from DOE and NREL and building visitors will be greeted with a soaring, two-story high wall entirely covered with wood harvested from the bark beetle infestation that has killed millions of pine trees in the Western U.S. But, the use of beetle kill wood is just one example of the resources being leveraged to make the RSF a model for sustainability and one more step toward NRELs goal to be a net zero energy campus.

  19. Virtual gap dielectric wall accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caporaso, George James; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Nelson, Scott; Sullivan, Jim; Hawkins, Steven A

    2013-11-05

    A virtual, moving accelerating gap is formed along an insulating tube in a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) by locally controlling the conductivity of the tube. Localized voltage concentration is thus achieved by sequential activation of a variable resistive tube or stalk down the axis of an inductive voltage adder, producing a "virtual" traveling wave along the tube. The tube conductivity can be controlled at a desired location, which can be moved at a desired rate, by light illumination, or by photoconductive switches, or by other means. As a result, an impressed voltage along the tube appears predominantly over a local region, the virtual gap. By making the length of the tube large in comparison to the virtual gap length, the effective gain of the accelerator can be made very large.

  20. Magnetic domain walls for on-chip transport and detection of superparamagnetic beads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapoport, Elizabeth Ashera

    2014-01-01

    Surface-functionalized superparamagnetic (SPM) microbeads are of great interest in biomedical research and diagnostic device engineering for tagging, manipulating, and detecting chemical and biological species in a fluid ...

  1. Barkhausen avalanches in anisotropic ferromagnets with 180 # domain walls Bosiljka Tadic 1,# and Ulrich Nowak 2,##

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usadel, K. D.

    with recently observed behavior in amorphous Metglas and Fe­Co­B ribbons when the applied anisotropic stress of the amorphous Metglas Fe­B­Si [1,7,9] and Fe­Co­B alloys [5,6] which are annealed in a paral­ lel field [9

  2. Self-localized domain walls at -conjugated branching junctions Yongwoo Shin and Xi Lin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xi

    's Fermi liquid theory.1 These quasi-particles in conducting polymers, however, are subject to intrinsic, leading to the formation of self- localized charge carriers.2 These phonon-screened charge car- riers the translationally invariant Goldstone mode,5 the am- plitude oscillation mode,3 and a series of other higher order

  3. Droplet Nucleation and Domain Wall Motion in a Bounded Interval Robert S. Maier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Robert S.

    magnetization. In the weak-noise limit, noise-activated magnetization reversals become exponentially rare, the reversal rate being given by the Kramers formula "!$#&% ')(1032547698 . Here 6 is the noise strength, 0 study a spatially extended model of noise-induced magne- tization reversal: a classical Ginzburg

  4. Domain-Wall Lattices in the Te-W(211) System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STOLZENBERG, M.; Lyuksyutov, Igor F.; BAUER, E.

    1990-01-01

    Knowledge of energy dissipation and relaxation in electron, spin, and lattice degrees of freedom is of fundamental importance from both a technological and scientific point of view. In this dissertation, the electronic and magnetization dynamics...

  5. 2+1 Flavour Domain Wall QCD: light meson spectrum, leptonic decays and neutral kaon mixing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio, David J

    2008-01-01

    We study light hadron phenomenology using Lattice QCD. We focus on the calculations of the light pseudoscalar quantities: masses, decay constants and B-parameters; in particular the calculation of the Kaon B-parameter, ...

  6. Kinks from Dynamical Systems: Domain Walls in a Deformed O(N) Linear Sigma Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Alonso Izquierdo; M. A. Gonzalez Leon; J. Mateos Guilarte

    2000-03-24

    It is shown how a integrable mechanical system provides all the localized static solutions of a deformation of the linear O(N)-sigma model in two space-time dimensions. The proof is based on the Hamilton-Jacobi separability of the mechanical analogue system that follows when time-independent field configurations are being considered. In particular, we describe the properties of the different kinds of kinks in such a way that a hierarchical structure of solitary wave manifolds emerges for distinct N.

  7. Scaling behavior of domain walls at the T =0 ferromagnet to spin-glass transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    ) Disordered model systems, governed by Edwards-Anderson Hamiltonian for Ising spins i =±1: H() = - i,j Jijij Quenched disorder: Jij > 0 : Jij -J2 /2 / 2 + (J -1) =0: SG with Gaussian disorder =1: Ferromagnet Ground states (GSs) Spin

  8. A Domain Wall Model for SMA Characterization Jordan E. Massad 1 and Ralph C. Smith 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    earthquake-proof structures [1, 21]. More recently, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices have used

  9. Current-driven Domain Wall Dynamics And Its Electric Signature In Ferromagnetic Nanowires 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yang

    2012-10-19

    dramatic reduction in heating power thus greatly expanding the range of materials which can be used for spintronic devices. [10, 14] We also note that DMI suppresses critical current jc and a ects parameter a. For vd < vrc, the optimal current coincides...

  10. Nucleon axial charge from quenched lattice QCD with domain wall fermions and improved gauge action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoichi Sasaki; Tom Blum; Shigemi Ohta; Kostas Orginos

    2001-10-12

    In our previous DWF calculation with the Wilson gauge action at $\\beta=6.0$ ($a^{-1}\\simeq$ 1.9 GeV) on a $16^3 \\times 32 \\times 16$ lattice, we found that $\\Ga$ had a fairly strong dependence on the quark mass. A simple linear extrapolation of $\\Ga$ to the chiral limit yielded a value that was almost a factor of two smaller than the experimental one. Here we report our recent study of this issue. In particular, we investigate possible errors arising from finite lattice volume, especially in the lighter quark mass region. We employ a RG-improved gauge action (DBW2), which maintains very good chiral behavior even on a coarse lattice ($a^{-1}\\simeq$ 1.3 GeV), in order to perform simulations at large physical volume ($> (2{\\rm fm})^3$). Our preliminary results suggest that the finite volume effect is significant.

  11. DOMAIN WALL MOTION IN R. WIESER # , U. NOWAK and K. D. USADEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usadel, K. D.

    nanowires are possible candidates for patterned magnetic storage media (Ross et al. (2000); Nielsch et al. (2002)). For these nanowires and also for other future magneto­electronic devices the understanding.: +49 203 379 2969, fax: +49 203 379 3665, email: robert@thp.uni­duisburg.de 1 #12; of the nanostructure

  12. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0PhotosPresentationsWorld's largest singleX-RayX-Ray

  13. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0PhotosPresentationsWorld's largest

  14. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0PhotosPresentationsWorld's largestX-Ray Imaging

  15. Domain walls as dark energy (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Discrimination ofDynamics ModelPorous

  16. Domain walls in a Born-Infeld-dilaton background (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Discrimination ofDynamics ModelPorousSciTech

  17. Dynamic domain walls in a Maxwell-dilaton background (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Discriminationquenchedwithimpact on

  18. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWind Power

  19. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWind PowerX-Ray Imaging

  20. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWind PowerX-Ray ImagingX-Ray

  1. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWind PowerX-Ray

  2. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWind PowerX-RayX-Ray Imaging

  3. Critical current density and mechanism of vortex pinning in KxFe2-ySe? doped with S

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lei, Hechang; Petrovic, C.

    2011-08-01

    We report the critical current density Jc in KxFe2-ySe2-zSz crystals. The Jc can be enhanced significantly with optimal S doping (z=0.99). For K0.70(7)Fe1.55(7)Se1.01(2)S0.99(2), the weak fishtail effect is found for H II c. The normalized vortex pinning forces follow the scaling law with a maximum position at 0.41 of the reduced magnetic field. These results demonstrate that the small size normal point defects dominate the vortex pinning mechanism.

  4. 7/1/08 14:51Chemical & Engineering News | Reel Science --WALL-E Page 1 of 2http://pubs.acs.org/cen/reelscience/reviews/walle/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arizona, University of

    that WALL-E and EVE show are the holy grails for robotics researchers, he adds. Living on Axiom may seem

  5. Near-wall serpentine cooled turbine airfoil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ching-Pang

    2014-10-28

    A serpentine coolant flow path is formed by inner walls in a cavity between pressure and suction side walls of a turbine airfoil, the cavity partitioned by one or more transverse partitions into a plurality of continuous serpentine cooling flow streams each having a respective coolant inlet.

  6. How wood waters down wall insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunde, P.J.

    1984-02-01

    Wood framing in walls can lower the actual insulating values, since the R-value of wood is only one per inch of thickness. A chart is presented that shows how wood in the stud space reduces insulating values. Several wall systems and the nominal R-value of insulation for each is presented.

  7. Risk Assessment of Energy-Efficient Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pallin, Simon B.; Hun, Diana E.; Jackson, Roderick K.; Kehrer, Manfred

    2014-12-01

    This multi-year project aims to provide the residential construction industry with energy-efficient wall designs that are moisture durable. The present work focused on the initial step of this project, which is to develop a moisture durability protocol that identifies energy efficient wall designs that have a low probability of experiencing moisture problems.

  8. Metal stud wall systems -- Thermal disaster, or modern wall systems with highly efficient thermal insulation?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosny, J.; Christian, J.E.; Desjarlais, A.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Buildings Technology Center

    1997-11-01

    Because steel has higher thermal conductivity than wood and intense heat transfer occurs through the metal wall components, thermal performances of a metal stud wall are significantly lower than for similar wood stud walls. A reduction of the in-cavity R-value caused by the wood studs is about 10% in wood stud walls. That is why metal stud walls are believed to be considerably less thermally effective than similar made of wood. However, properly designed metal stud walls can be as thermally effective as wood stud walls. Relatively high R-values may be achieved by installing insulating sheathing, which is widely used as a remedy for a weak thermal performance of metal stud walls. A series of the promising metal stud wall configurations is analyzed using results of finite difference computer modeling and guarded hotbox tests. Some of these walls were designed and tested in the ORNL Building Technology Center, some were tested in other laboratories, and some walls were developed and forgotten long time ago. Also, a novel concept of combined foam-metal studs is considered. The main aim of the present paper is to prove that it is possible to build metal stud walls which perform as well as wood stud walls. The key lies in designing; metal stud wall systems have to be treated in a special way with particular consideration to the high thermal conduction of metal components. In the discussed collection of the efficient metal stud wall configurations, reductions of the in-cavity R-value caused by metal studs are between 10 and 20%.

  9. External Insulation of Masonry Walls and Wood Framed Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, P.

    2013-01-01

    The use of exterior insulation on a building is an accepted and effective means to increase the overall thermal resistance of the assembly that also has other advantages of improved water management and often increased air tightness of building assemblies. For thin layers of insulation (1" to 1 1/2"), the cladding can typically be attached directly through the insulation back to the structure. For thicker insulation layers, furring strips have been added as a cladding attachment location. This approach has been used in the past on numerous Building America test homes and communities (both new and retrofit applications), and has been proven to be an effective and durable means to provide cladding attachment. However, the lack of engineering data has been a problem for many designers, contractors, and code officials. This research project developed baseline engineering analysis to support the installation of thick layers of exterior insulation on existing masonry and frame walls. Furthermore, water management details necessary to integrate windows, doors, decks, balconies and roofs were created to provide guidance on the integration of exterior insulation strategies with other enclosure elements.

  10. External Insulation of Masonry Walls and Wood Framed Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, P.

    2013-01-01

    The use of exterior insulation on a building is an accepted and effective means to increase the overall thermal resistance of the assembly that also has other advantages of improved water management and often increased air tightness of building assemblies. For thin layers of insulation (1” to 1 ½”), the cladding can typically be attached directly through the insulation back to the structure. For thicker insulation layers, furring strips have been added as a cladding attachment location. This approach has been used in the past on numerous Building America test homes and communities (both new and retrofit applications), and has been proven to be an effective and durable means to provide cladding attachment. However, the lack of engineering data has been a problem for many designers, contractors, and code officials. This research project developed baseline engineering analysis to support the installation of thick layers of exterior insulation on existing masonry and frame walls. Furthermore, water management details necessary to integrate windows, doors, decks, balconies and roofs were created to provide guidance on the integration of exterior insulation strategies with other enclosure elements.

  11. Ads-Portal Domains: Identification and Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Xiaowei

    4 Ads-Portal Domains: Identification and Measurements MISHARI ALMISHARI University of California, Irvine and XIAOWEI YANG Duke University An ads-portal domain refers to a Web domain that shows only develop a machine-learning- based classifier to identify ads-portal domains, which has 96% accuracy. We

  12. Final Report for "Stabilization of resistive wall modes using moving metal walls"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forest, Cary B.

    2014-02-05

    The UW experiment used a linear pinch experiment to study the stabilization of MHD by moving metal walls. The methodology of the experiment had three steps. (1) Identify and understand the no-wall MHD instability limits and character, (2) identify and understand the thin-wall MHD instabilities (re- sistive wall mode), and then (3) add the spinning wall and understand its impact on stability properties. During the duration of the grant we accomplished all 3 of these goals, discovered new physics, and completed the experiment as proposed.

  13. WIKIPEDIA AS DOMAIN KNOWLEDGE NETWORKS: Domain Extraction and Statistical Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Benyuan

    networks on, respectively, mathematics, physics, biology, and chemistry. We compare the mathematics domain, has developed and evolved rapidly into the most comprehensive online encyclopedia. While people enjoy of the target knowledge network with a trusted knowledge source, such as paper-based encyclopedia. Restricted

  14. Two-phase pressure drop across a hydrofoil-based micro pin device using R-123

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosar, Ali [Mechatronics Engineering Program, Sabanci University, Orhanli, Tuzla, 34956 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2008-05-15

    The two-phase pressure drop in a hydrofoil-based micro pin fin heat sink has been investigated using R-123 as the working fluid. Two-phase frictional multipliers have been obtained over mass fluxes from 976 to 2349 kg/m{sup 2} s and liquid and gas superficial velocities from 0.38 to 1.89 m/s and from 0.19 to 24 m/s, respectively. It has been found that the two-phase frictional multiplier is strongly dependent on flow pattern. The theoretical prediction using Martinelli parameter based on the laminar fluid and laminar gas flow represented the experimental data fairly well for the spray-annular flow. For the bubbly and wavy-intermittent flow, however, large deviations from the experimental data were recorded. The Martinelli parameter was successfully used to determine the flow patterns, which were bubbly, wavy-intermittent, and spray-annular flow in the current study. (author)

  15. Effect of tool pin features on process response variables during friction stir welding of dissimilar aluminum alloys

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rabby, Reza; Tang, Wei; Reynolds, A. P.

    2015-07-01

    In this article, the effect of pin features and orientation/placement of the materials on advancing side were investigated for friction stir welding (FSW) of dissimilar aluminum alloys AA2050 and AA6061. Pins for FSW were produced with a 2.12 mm pitch thread having three flats/flutes. Three sets of rotational speed/welding speed were used to perform a series of welds in a butt joint arrangement. The results show that, joint quality, process response variables and welding temperature are highly affected by pin features and material orientation in FSW. Defect free joints with effective material transportation in the weld nugget zone were obtainedmore »when welding was performed with AA2050 on the advancing side. The tool also encounters less in-plane reaction force for welding with 2050 on the advancing side. Pin with thread+3 flats produces quality welds at low rotational and travel speed regardless of the location of alloys on advancing or retreating side.« less

  16. Stationary Vortex Loops Induced by Filament Interaction and Local Pinning in a Chemical Reaction-Diffusion System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinbock, Oliver

    Stationary Vortex Loops Induced by Filament Interaction and Local Pinning in a Chemical Reaction rings are three-dimensional excitation waves rotating around one-dimensional filament loops but curved filaments. The absence of filament motion can be explained by repulsive interaction

  17. Droplet-Trace-Based Array Partitioning and a Pin Assignment Algorithm for the Automated Design of Digital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    of a system clock; this microfludic system is similar in operation to a digital microprocessor. Thus assays for drug discovery [8], design tools are needed to map and execute them on the digital micofludicDroplet-Trace-Based Array Partitioning and a Pin Assignment Algorithm for the Automated Design

  18. Why Walls Don't Work, by Michael Dear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Leo, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    the role of the wall as a power device does not allow for anat that. Walls work by serving as devices of power—devicessense, the wall can be understood as a device of power that

  19. Seismic design, testing and analysis of reinforced concrete wall buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panagiotou, Marios

    2008-01-01

    In Phase II the main load bearing wall was reconfigured as aIn Phase II the main load bearing wall was reconfigured as aa rectangular load bearing wall acting as the main lateral

  20. Improving Glass Walls Thermal Resistance In Air-Conditioned Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galal, T.; Kulaib, A. M.; Alajmi, R.; Al-Ansary. A; Abuzaid, M.

    2010-01-01

    walls; as one of envelope surfaces; has an important impact on solar radiation. Design and construction of glass walls have significant effects on building comfort and energy consumption. This paper describes methods of improving glass walls thermal...

  1. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  2. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  3. Advanced High Porosity Ceramic Honeycomb Wall Flow Filters |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Porosity Ceramic Honeycomb Wall Flow Filters Advanced High Porosity Ceramic Honeycomb Wall Flow Filters 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007)....

  4. Building America Special Research Project: High-R Walls Case...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Building America Special Research Project: High-R Walls Case Study Analysis Building America Special Research Project: High-R Walls Case Study Analysis This report considers a...

  5. Transglucosylation of cell wall polysaccharides in equisetum fluviatile. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohler, Kyle Edward

    2012-06-22

    Plant cell walls determine cellular shape and provide structural support for the entire plant. Polysaccharides, comprising the major components of the wall, are actively remodelled throughout development. Xyloglucan ...

  6. Sorted Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Transparent Electrodes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sorted Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Transparent Electrodes in Organic Solar Cells Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > Sorted Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube...

  7. A SURVEY OF WALL'S FINITENESS OBSTRUCTION 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferry, Steve; Ranicki, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    Wall's finiteness obstruction is an algebraic K-theory invariant which decides if a finitely dominated space is homotopy equivalent to a finite CW complex. The invariant was originally formulated in the context of surgery ...

  8. Wall Drying in Hot and Humid Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boone, K.; Weston, T.; Pascual, X.

    2004-01-01

    's ability to dry is not considered during the design or material selection process. No cladding system or installation is perfect, therefore wall systems should be designed with the assumption that some moisture will enter and then consider the effects...

  9. Electric and Magnetic Walls on Dielectric Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Changbiao Wang

    2010-07-20

    Sufficient conditions of the existence of electric or magnetic walls on dielectric interfaces are given for a multizone uniform dielectric waveguiding system. If one of two adjacent dielectric zones supports a TEM field distribution while the other supports a TM (TE) field distribution, then the common dielectric interface behaves as an electric (magnetic) wall, that is, the electric (magnetic) field line is perpendicular to the interface while the magnetic (electric) field line is parallel to the interface.

  10. Thin Wall Cast Iron: Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doru M. Stefanescu

    2005-07-21

    The development of thin-wall technology allows the designers of energy consuming equipment to select the most appropriate material based on cost/material properties considerations, and not solely on density. The technology developed in this research project will permit the designers working for the automotive industry to make a better informed choice between competing materials and thin wall cast iron, thus decreasing the overall cost of the automobile.

  11. Chaotic Transitions in Wall Following Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harry W. Bullen IV; Priya Ranjan

    2009-08-25

    In this paper we examine how simple agents similar to Braitenberg vehicles can exhibit chaotic movement patterns. The agents are wall following robots as described by Steve Mesburger and Alfred Hubler in their paper "Chaos in Wall Following Robots". These agents uses a simple forward facing distance sensor, with a limited field of view "phi" for navigation. An agent drives forward at a constant velocity and uses the sensor to turn right when it is too close to an object and left when it is too far away. For a flat wall the agent stays a fixed distance from the wall and travels along it, regardless of the sensor's capabilities. But, if the wall represents a periodic function, the agent drives on a periodic path when the sensor has a narrow field of view. The agent's trajectory transitions to chaos when the sensor's field of view is increased. Numerical experiments were performed with square, triangle, and sawtooth waves for the wall, to find this pattern. The bifurcations of the agents were analyzed, finding both border collision and period doubling bifurcations. Detailed experimental results will be reported separately.

  12. Structure and Dynamics of Domains in Ferroelectric Nanostructures – In-situ TEM Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Xiaoqing

    2015-06-30

    The goal of this project was to explore the structure and dynamic behaviors of ferroelectric domains in ferroelectric thin films and nanostructures by advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques in close collaboration with phase field modeling. The experimental techniques used include aberration-corrected sub-Å resolution TEM and in-situ TEM using a novel scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) - TEM holder that allows the direct observation of nucleation and dynamic evolution of ferroelectric domains under applied electric field. Specifically, this project was aimed to (1) to study the roles of static electrical boundary conditions and electrical charge in controlling the equilibrium domain structures of BiFeO3 thin films with controlled substrate constraints, (2) to explore the fundamental mechanisms of ferroelectric domain nucleation, growth, and switching under an applied electric field in both uniform thin films and nanostructures, and to understand the roles of crystal defects such as dislocations and interfaces in these processes, (3) to understand the physics of ferroelectric domain walls and the influence of defects on the electrical switching of ferroelectric domains.

  13. Acoustic Attenuation Employing Variable Wall Admittance H. T. Banks K. M. Furati y K. Ito N. S. Luke C. J. Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    satis#12;es the acoustic wave equation p #28;#28; c 2 r 2 p = 0; (2.1) and pressure and velocity: An acoustic array in half plane acoustic domain. The interaction of waves with the boundary is describedAcoustic Attenuation Employing Variable Wall Admittance H. T. Banks #3; K. M. Furati #3;y K. Ito #3

  14. Performance Assessment Report Domain CHP System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Performance Assessment Report for the Domain CHP System November 2005 By Burns & McDonnell Engineering #12;Domain CHP System Performance Assessment Report for the Packaged Cooling, Heating and Power

  15. Poster: Measuring the Lifecycles of Malicious Domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Kang

    the lifecycles of malicious domain names will provide insight into the many classes of criminal networks- measures such as blacklisting. Fast-flux is characterized by domain name records with low (time other types of criminal networks abuse the DNS and leverage domain names to provide agility

  16. Domain embedding preconditioners for mixed systems 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winther, Ragnar

    Domain embedding preconditioners for mixed systems 1 Torgeir Rusten SINTEF, P. O. Box 124 Blindern preconditioners for the corresponding discrete linear systems where an embedding of the domain papers discussing domain embedding as a tool for solving discrete systems we refer to Astrakhantsev [4

  17. Labelling Heuristics for CSP Application Domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossi, Francesca

    Labelling Heuristics for CSP Application Domains Zeynep K#16;z#16;ltan Computer Science Division an application domain as a family of CSP models, so as to exhibit the generic constraint store for all models store and the domain propagation during search is analysed, so as to infer | before modelling any CSP

  18. 2007,KevinSkadron Implications of the Power Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    ©2007,KevinSkadron Implications of the Power Wall in a Manycore Era Sustaining Growth in Computing cost #12;5 ©2007,KevinSkadron Barriers to Performance Growth (2) · Power wall, ILP wall, and slow is a paradigm shift for parallel programming · Power wall will eventually constrain multicore too ­ If power per

  19. Single-vortex pinning and penetration depth in superconducting NdFeAsO1-xFx

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Jessie T.; Kim, Jeehoon; Huefner, Magdalena; Ye, Cun; Kim, Stella; Canfield, Paul C.; Prozorov, Ruslan; Auslaender, Ophir M.; Hoffman, Jennifer E.

    2015-10-12

    We use a magnetic force microscope (MFM) to investigate single vortex pinning and penetration depth in NdFeAsO1-xFx, one of the highest-Tc iron-based superconductors. In fields up to 20 Gauss, we observe a disordered vortex arrangement, implying that the pinning forces are stronger than the vortex-vortex interactions. We measure the typical force to depin a single vortex, Fdepin ? 4.5 pN, corresponding to a critical current up to Jc ? 7×105 A/cm2. As a result, our MFM measurements allow the first local and absolute determination of the superconducting in-plane penetration depth in NdFeAsO1-xFx, ?ab = 320 ± 60 nm, which ismore »larger than previous bulk measurements.« less

  20. Pausing and activating thread state upon pin assertion by external logic monitoring polling loop exit time condition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Dong; Giampapa, Mark; Heidelberger, Philip; Ohmacht, Martin; Satterfield, David L; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard; Sugavanam, Krishnan

    2013-05-21

    A system and method for enhancing performance of a computer which includes a computer system including a data storage device. The computer system includes a program stored in the data storage device and steps of the program are executed by a processer. The processor processes instructions from the program. A wait state in the processor waits for receiving specified data. A thread in the processor has a pause state wherein the processor waits for specified data. A pin in the processor initiates a return to an active state from the pause state for the thread. A logic circuit is external to the processor, and the logic circuit is configured to detect a specified condition. The pin initiates a return to the active state of the thread when the specified condition is detected using the logic circuit.

  1. Alleviation of fermi-level pinning effect at metal/germanium interface by the insertion of graphene layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baek, Seung-heon Chris; Seo, Yu-Jin; Oh, Joong Gun; Albert Park, Min Gyu; Bong, Jae Hoon; Yoon, Seong Jun; Lee, Seok-Hee, E-mail: seokheelee@ee.kaist.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Minsu; Park, Seung-young [Division of Materials Science, Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI), 169-148 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Byong-Guk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-18

    In this paper, we report the alleviation of the Fermi-level pinning on metal/n-germanium (Ge) contact by the insertion of multiple layers of single-layer graphene (SLG) at the metal/n-Ge interface. A decrease in the Schottky barrier height with an increase in the number of inserted SLG layers was observed, which supports the contention that Fermi-level pinning at metal/n-Ge contact originates from the metal-induced gap states at the metal/n-Ge interface. The modulation of Schottky barrier height by varying the number of inserted SLG layers (m) can bring about the use of Ge as the next-generation complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor material. Furthermore, the inserted SLG layers can be used as the tunnel barrier for spin injection into Ge substrate for spin-based transistors.

  2. Direct-bandgap electroluminescence from a horizontal Ge p-i-n ridge waveguide on Si(001) substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Zhi; Li, Yaming; He, Chao; Li, Chuanbo; Xue, Chunlai; Zuo, Yuhua; Cheng, Buwen Wang, Qiming

    2014-05-12

    Horizontal injection Ge p-i-n ridge waveguide light emitting diodes (LEDs) were fabricated on n{sup ?}-Si(001) substrates by ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition. The direct-bandgap electroluminescence (EL) of Ge waveguide LEDs under a continuous/pulse electrical pump was studied. The heating effect from a continuous electrical pump was found to significantly enhance the emission of devices. The top surface EL intensity of the Ge waveguide LEDs significantly depended on the position. Most direct-bandgap radiative recombination of Ge p-i-n waveguide LEDs occurred near the N{sup +} region of the junction. This interesting phenomenon could be explained by the carrier distribution in the junction and the pseudo-direct bandgap of Ge.

  3. Domain architecture evolution of pattern-recognition receptors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Qing; Zmasek, Christian M.; Godzik, Adam

    2010-01-01

    1 ORIGINAL PAPER Domain architecture evolution of pattern-in the same domain architectures evolving independentlythe choices of domain architectures for new members in the

  4. Nonlinear Time Domain Modeling and Simulation of Surface and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nonlinear Time Domain Modeling and Simulation of Surface and Embedded NPPS Nonlinear Time Domain Modeling and Simulation of Surface and Embedded NPPS Nonlinear Time Domain Modeling...

  5. Reduction of Fermi level pinning and recombination at polycrystalline CdTe surfaces by laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simonds, Brian J.; Kheraj, Vipul; Palekis, Vasilios; Ferekides, Christos; Scarpulla, Michael A.

    2015-06-14

    Laser processing of polycrystalline CdTe is a promising approach that could potentially increase module manufacturing throughput while reducing capital expenditure costs. For these benefits to be realized, the basic effects of laser irradiation on CdTe must be ascertained. In this study, we utilize surface photovoltage spectroscopy (SPS) to investigate the changes to the electronic properties of the surface of polycrystalline CdTe solar cell stacks induced by continuous-wave laser annealing. The experimental data explained within a model consisting of two space charge regions, one at the CdTe/air interface and one at the CdTe/CdS junction, are used to interpret our SPS results. The frequency dependence and phase spectra of the SPS signal are also discussed. To support the SPS findings, low-temperature spectrally-resolved photoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence were also measured. The data show that a modest laser treatment of 250?W/cm{sup 2} with a dwell time of 20?s is sufficient to reduce the effects of Fermi level pinning at the surface due to surface defects.

  6. The scaling limit of polymer pinning dynamics and a one dimensional Stefan freezing problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubert Lacoin

    2013-04-26

    We consider the stochastic evolution of a 1+1-dimensional interface (or polymer) in presence of a substrate. This stochastic process is a dynamical version of the homogeneous pinning model. We start from a configuration far from equilibrium: a polymer with a non-trivial macroscopic height profile, and look at the evolution of a space-time rescaled interface. In two cases, we prove that this rescaled interface has a scaling limit on the diffusive scale (space rescaled by $L$ in both dimensions and time rescaled by $L^2$ where $L$ denotes the length of the interface) which we describe: when the interaction with the substrate is such that the system is unpinned at equilibrium, then the scaling limit of the height profile is given by the solution of the heat equation with Dirichlet boundary condition ; when the attraction to the substrate is infinite, the scaling limit is given a free-boundary problem which belongs to the class of Stefan problems with contracting boundary, also referred to as Stefan freezing problems. In addition, we prove the existence and regularity of the solution to this problem until a maximal time, where the boundaries collide.

  7. The rounding of the phase transition for disordered pinning with stretched exponential tails

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubert Lacoin

    2014-11-13

    The presence of frozen-in or quenched disorder in a system can often modify the nature of its phase transition. A particular instance of this phenomenon is the so-called rounding effect: it has been shown in many cases that the free-energy curve of the disordered system at its critical point is smoother than that of the homogenous one. In particular some disordered systems do not allow first-order transitions. We study this phenomenon for the pinning of a renewal with stretched-exponential tails on a defect line (the distribution $K$ of the renewal increments satisfies $K(n) \\sim c_K\\exp(-n^{\\alpha}),$ $\\alpha\\in (0,1)$) which has a first order transition when disorder is not present. We show that the critical behavior of the disordered system depends on the value of $\\alpha$: when $\\alpha>1/2$ the transition remains first order, whereas the free-energy diagram is smoothed for $\\alpha\\le 1/2$. Furthermore we show that the rounding effect is getting stronger when $\\alpha$ diminishes.

  8. Assessment of SFR fuel pin performance codes under advanced fuel for minor actinide transmutation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouineau, V.; Lainet, M.; Chauvin, N.; Pelletier, M.

    2013-07-01

    Americium is a strong contributor to the long term radiotoxicity of high activity nuclear waste. Transmutation by irradiation in nuclear reactors of long-lived nuclides like {sup 241}Am is, therefore, an option for the reduction of radiotoxicity and residual power packages as well as the repository area. In the SUPERFACT Experiment four different oxide fuels containing high and low concentrations of {sup 237}Np and {sup 241}Am, representing the homogeneous and heterogeneous in-pile recycling concepts, were irradiated in the PHENIX reactor. The behavior of advanced fuel materials with minor actinide needs to be fully characterized, understood and modeled in order to optimize the design of this kind of fuel elements and to evaluate its performances. This paper assesses the current predictability of fuel performance codes TRANSURANUS and GERMINAL V2 on the basis of post irradiation examinations of the SUPERFACT experiment for pins with low minor actinide content. Their predictions have been compared to measured data in terms of geometrical changes of fuel and cladding, fission gases behavior and actinide and fission product distributions. The results are in good agreement with the experimental results, although improvements are also pointed out for further studies, especially if larger content of minor actinide will be taken into account in the codes. (authors)

  9. Dead layer on silicon p-i-n diode charged-particle detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, B. L.; Amsbaugh, John F.; Beglarian, A.; Bergmann, T.; Bichsel, H. C.; Bodine, L. I.; Boyd, N. M.; Burritt, Tom H.; Chaoui, Z.; Corona, T. J.; Doe, Peter J.; Enomoto, S.; Harms, F.; Harper, Gregory; Howe, M. A.; Martin, E. L.; Parno, D. S.; Peterson, David; Petzold, Linda; Renschler, R.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Schwarz, J.; Steidl, M.; Van Wechel, T. D.; VanDevender, Brent A.; Wustling, S.; Wierman, K. J.; Wilkerson, J. F.

    2014-04-21

    Abstract Semiconductor detectors in general have a dead layer at their surfaces that is either a result of natural or induced passivation, or is formed during the process of making a contact. Charged particles passing through this region produce ionization that is incompletely collected and recorded, which leads to departures from the ideal in both energy deposition and resolution. The silicon p-i-n diode used in the KATRIN neutrinomass experiment has such a dead layer. We have constructed a detailed Monte Carlo model for the passage of electrons from vacuum into a silicon detector, and compared the measured energy spectra to the predicted ones for a range of energies from 12 to 20 keV. The comparison provides experimental evidence that a substantial fraction of the ionization produced in the "dead" layer evidently escapes by discussion, with 46% being collected in the depletion zone and the balance being neutralized at the contact or by bulk recombination. The most elementary model of a thinner dead layer from which no charge is collected is strongly disfavored.

  10. Enhanced Flux-Pinning Properties in Superconducting YBa2Cu3O7-? Thin Films with Nanoengineering Methods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Chen-Fong

    2013-05-01

    thin films. The 0-D ferromagnetic Fe2O3 and CoFe2O4 nanoparticles, 2-D CeO2 multilayers, and tunable vertically aligned nanocomposites (VAN) of (Fe2O3)x:(CeO2)1-x and (CoFe2O4)x:(CeO2)1-x systems are introduced into the YBCO matrix as artificial pinning...

  11. Fast Computational GPU Design with GT-Pin Melanie Kambadur, Sunpyo Hong, Juan Cabral, Harish Patil, Chi-Keung Luk, Sohaib Sajid, Martha A. Kim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fast Computational GPU Design with GT-Pin Melanie Kambadur, Sunpyo Hong, Juan Cabral, Harish Patil,martha}@cs.columbia.edu Intel Corporation, Hudson, MA {sunpyo.hong,juan.r.cabral,harish

  12. Word Domain Disambiguation via Word Sense Disambiguation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2006-06-04

    Word subject domains have been widely used to improve the perform-ance of word sense disambiguation al-gorithms. However, comparatively little effort has been devoted so far to the disambiguation of word subject do-mains. The few existing approaches have focused on the development of al-gorithms specific to word domain dis-ambiguation. In this paper we explore an alternative approach where word domain disambiguation is achieved via word sense disambiguation. Our study shows that this approach yields very strong results, suggesting that word domain disambiguation can be ad-dressed in terms of word sense disam-biguation with no need for special purpose algorithms.

  13. Broad Temperature Pinning Study of 15 mol.% Zr-Added (Gd, Y)-Ba-Cu-O MOCVD Coated Conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, AX; Khatri, N; Liu, YH; Majkic, G; Galstyan, E; Selvamanickam, V; Chen, YM; Lei, CH; Abraimov, D; Hu, XB; Jaroszynski, J; Larbalestier, D

    2015-06-01

    BaZrO3 (BZO) nanocolumns have long been shown to be very effective for raising the pinning force F-p of REBa2Cu3Ox (REBCO, where RE = rare earth) films at high temperatures and recently at low temperatures too. We have successfully incorporated a high density of BZO nanorods into metal organic chemical vapor deposited (MOCVD) REBCO coated conductors via Zr addition. We found that, compared to the 7.5% Zr-added coated conductor, dense BZO nanorod arrays in the 15% Zr-added conductor are effective over the whole temperature range from 77 K down to 4.2 K. We attribute the substantially enhanced J(c) at 30 K to the weak uncorrelated pinning as well as the strong correlated pinning. Meanwhile, by tripling the REBCO layer thickness to similar to 2.8 mu m, the engineering critical current density J(e) at 30 K exceeds J(e) of optimized Nb-Ti wires at 4.2 K.

  14. Pattern-Oriented Application Frameworks for Domain Experts to Effectively Utilize Highly Parallel Manycore Microprocessors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chong, Jike

    2010-01-01

    scaling challenges: 1. “Power Wall”: Although power is ato mitigate the “Power Wall”. The manycore architecturelimited. Summary The “Power Wall”, “Memory Wall” and “ILP

  15. Turbine airfoil with a compliant outer wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Christian X. (Oviedo, FL); Morrison, Jay A. (Oviedo, FL)

    2012-04-03

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation in the outer layer is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a support structure. The outer layer may be a compliant layer configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand and thereby reduce the stress within the outer layer. The outer layer may be formed from a nonplanar surface configured to thermally expand. In another embodiment, the outer layer may be planar and include a plurality of slots enabling unrestricted thermal expansion in a direction aligned with the outer layer.

  16. Wall thickness measuring method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzer, L.J.; Bergren, D.A.

    1987-10-06

    An apparatus for measuring the wall thickness of a nonmagnetic article having a housing supporting a magnet and a contiguous supporting surface. The tubular article and the housing are releasably secured to the supporting surface and a support member of an optical comparator, respectively. To determine the wall thickness of the article at a selected point, a magnetically responsive ball is positioned within the tubular article over said point and retained therein by means of a magnetic field produced by the magnet. Thereafter, an optical comparator is employed to project a magnified image of the ball on a screen and the wall thickness at the selected point is calculated by using a ball surface measurement taken with the comparator in conjunction with a previously determined base line measurement.

  17. Enhancement of wall jet transport properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Claunch, S.D.; Farrington, R.B.

    1997-02-04

    By enhancing the natural instabilities in the boundary layer and in the free shear layer of a wall jet, the boundary is minimized thereby increasing the transport of heat and mass. Enhancing the natural instabilities is accomplished by pulsing the flow of air that creates the wall jet. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct. 17 figs.

  18. Cell Wall Recipe: A Lesson on Biofuels

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Students will investigate how changes in the DNA sequence that codes for cell wall formation can have a favorable outcome in producing plants that have higher levels of cellulose than the parent plant. The cellulose yield is most important in the production of ethanol: the greater the amount of cellulose within the cell wall, the greater the amount of ethanol that can be produced. To engage students, the first part of this lesson has students participating in a discovery activity where they will extract DNA from wheat germ.

  19. Enhancement of wall jet transport properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Claunch, Scott D. (Broomfield, CO); Farrington, Robert B. (Golden, CO)

    1997-01-01

    By enhancing the natural instabilities in the boundary layer and in the free shear layer of a wall jet, the boundary is minimized thereby increasing the transport of heat and mass. Enhancing the natural instabilities is accomplished by pulsing the flow of air that creates the wall jet. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct.

  20. Ionic field effect and memristive phenomena in single-point ferroelectric domain switching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ievlev, Anton; Morozovska, A. N.; Eliseev, E. A.; Shur, Vladimir Ya.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2014-01-01

    Electric field induced polarization switching underpins most functional applications of ferroelectric materials in information technology, materials science, and optoelectronics. In the last 20 years, much attention has been focused on the switching of individual domains using scanning probe microscopy, both as model of ferroelectric data storage and approach to explore fundamental physics of ferroelectric switching. The classical picture of tip induced switching includes formation of cylindrical domain oriented along the tip field, with the domain size is largely determined by the tip-induced field distribution and domain wall motion kinetics. The polarization screening is recognized as a necessary precondition to the stability of ferroelectric phase; however, screening processes are generally considered to be uniformly efficient and not leading to changes in switching behavior. Here, we demonstrate that single-point tip-induced polarization switching can give rise to a surprisingly broad range of domain morphologies, including radial and angular instabilities. These behaviors are traced to the surface screening charge dynamics, which in some cases can even give rise to anomalous switching against the electric field (ionic field effect). The implications of these behaviors for ferroelectric materials and devices are discussed.

  1. Fermi level pinning in Fe-doped PbTe under pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skipetrov, E. P. Kruleveckaya, O. V.; Skipetrova, L. A.; Slynko, E. I.; Slynko, V. E.

    2014-07-14

    We synthesize an iron-doped PbTe single-crystal ingot and investigate the phase and the elemental composition as well as galvanomagnetic properties in weak magnetic fields (4.2?K?T?300?K, B???0.07?T) of Pb{sub 1?y}Fe{sub y}Te alloys upon varying the iron content, at atmospheric pressure and under hydrostatic compression up to 10 kilobars. We find an increase of iron concentration along the length of the ingot and the appearance of microscopic inclusions enriched with iron in the heavily doped samples. Lightly doped alloys are characterized by the p-type metal conductivity. An increase of the iron impurity content leads to a decrease in the free hole concentration, a stabilization of galvanomagnetic parameters, indicating the pinning of the Fermi energy by the iron resonant impurity level lying under the bottom of the valence band, and to the p-n inversion of the conductivity type. Under pressure, the free hole concentration in the sample, in which the stabilization of galvanomagnetic parameters takes place, increases by approximately a factor of four due to the flow of electrons from the valence band to the iron-induced resonant level. Using the two-band Kane and the six-band Dimmock dispersion relations, the pressure dependence of the Fermi energy is calculated. The model of the electronic structure rearrangement of Pb{sub 1?y}Fe{sub y}Te under pressure is proposed. The energy position and the pressure coefficient of the resonant iron impurity level are determined.

  2. Hot wire production of single-wall and multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dillon, Anne C. (Boulder, CO); Mahan, Archie H. (Golden, CO); Alleman, Jeffrey L. (Lakewood, CO)

    2010-10-26

    Apparatus (210) for producing a multi-wall carbon nanotube (213) may comprise a process chamber (216), a furnace (217) operatively associated with the process chamber (216), and at least one filament (218) positioned within the process chamber (216). At least one power supply (220) operatively associated with the at least one filament (218) heats the at least one filament (218) to a process temperature. A gaseous carbon precursor material (214) operatively associated with the process chamber (216) provides carbon for forming the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213). A metal catalyst material (224) operatively associated with the process (216) catalyzes the formation of the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213).

  3. Single-walled carbon nanotube, SWNT(2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Technology Roadmap, Journal of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers, Vol. 110, No. 1067 (2007). (2 1 c-e 97 % (5) *1 *1 *2 *2 *2 *2 *2 *2 Scattering Process of Transmitted Gas Molecules through process of gas molecules on vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube (VA-SWNT) films

  4. 2004 11 -2-(Single-Walled Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    ~~ 2004 11 -2- 1. (Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes, SWNTs) 13 nm [1] SWNT van Hove [1 SWNT TEM 0.83 nm 2.0 nm SWNT MWNT SWNT 5(a) [11] 5(b) SWNT 1 nm SWNT [12] #12; 2004., Physical Properties of Carbon Nanotubes, Imperial College Press, London, 1998. (2004). [2] S. Maruyama et

  5. Liquid Walls Innovative High Power Density Concepts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    erosion as limiting factors -Results in smaller and lower cost components (chambLiquid Walls Innovative High Power Density Concepts (Based on the APEX Study) http for the Chamber Technology that can: 1. Improve the vision for an attractive fusion energy system 2. Lower

  6. Program Induction: Building a Wall Dan Ashlock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashlock, Dan

    moving off of the grid are lost. A s a wall out of blocks that impede progress in one direction across a grid of squares. Specifically, two at a time in a fixed location on the grid. The robot must move the currently presented block to enable

  7. CHALLENGE 2015 WALL OF WIND MITIGATION CHALLENGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shu-Ching

    with the development of the building model. Is wind mitigation being addressed by your solution? What is wind science, sociology, and urban planning when discussing wind mitigation and your solution. WrittenW W! CHALLENGE 2015 WALL OF WIND MITIGATION CHALLENGE Competition at FIU's Engineering & Computing

  8. Time domain electromagnetic metal detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoekstra, P.

    1996-04-01

    This presentation focuses on illustrating by case histories the range of applications and limitations of time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) systems for buried metal detection. Advantages claimed for TDEM metal detectors are: independent of instrument response (Geonics EM61) to surrounding soil and rock type; simple anomaly shape; mitigation of interference by ambient electromagnetic noise; and responsive to both ferrous and non-ferrous metallic targets. The data in all case histories to be presented were acquired with the Geonics EM61 TDEM system. Case histories are a test bed site on Molokai, Hawaii; Fort Monroe, Virginia; and USDOE, Rocky Flats Plant. The present limitations of this technology are: discrimination capabilities in terms of type of ordnance, and depth of burial is limited, and ability of resolving targets with small metallic ambient needs to be improved.

  9. Detecting Networks Employing Algorithmically Generated Domain Names 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashwath Kumar Krishna Reddy

    2011-10-21

    , current botnets use simple pseudo-random generators which may not preserve the distribution of alphabets or bigrams (two consecutive alphabets) as usually occur in legitimate domain name strings. In this regards, we propose several metrics to classify a... generates. For instance, in the extreme scenario that a botnet generates 50 domains mapped to the same TLD, we show that KL-divergence over unigrams achieves 100% detection accuracy albeit at 15% false positive rate (legitimate domain groups clas- 7 si ed...

  10. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    California, San Diego, have recently used coherent soft x-ray scattering with angular Fourier analysis to discover that the disordered domain patterns do, in fact, exhibit...

  11. Development of Nonlinear SSI Time Domain Methodology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of Nonlinear SSI Time Domain Methodology Justin Coleman, P.E. Nuclear Science and Technology Idaho National Laboratory October 22, 2014

  12. Integral Domains Inside Noetherian Power Series Rings ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-05-21

    Another theme is an analysis of extensions of integral domains R ?? S ...... TOOLS. Flatness is preserved by several standard ring constructions as we record in.

  13. Regional characteristics, tilt domains, and extensional history...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Report Number 303 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Regional characteristics, tilt domains, and extensional history of the...

  14. Interaction between Drilled Shaft and Mechanically Stabilized Earth (MSE) Wall 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aghahadi Forooshani, Mohammad

    2014-08-28

    Drilled shafts under horizontal loads are being constructed within Mechanically Stabled Earth (MSE) walls in the reinforced zone especially in overpass bridges and traffic signs. The interaction between the drilled shafts and the MSE wall...

  15. Electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotube reinforced polyimide composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ounaies, Zoubeida

    Electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotube reinforced polyimide composites Z. Ounaiesa of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) reinforced polyimide composites were investigated as a function nanotube; Composites 1. Introduction Polyimides are widely used in applications ranging from

  16. After Exodus : re-occupation of the metropolitan wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allison, Jordan Lloyd Norman

    2012-01-01

    The title "Exodus alludes to a restricted exclave encircled by a forbidding wall -- effect, a prison on the scale of a metropolis, and one in which people sought refuge voluntarily. Over the past forty years, similar walls ...

  17. Double Diffusion in Enclosure Bounded by Massive and Volatilizing Walls 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, D.; Tang, G.; Zhao, F.

    2006-01-01

    Hazard volatilization emitted from walls enters into airflow in the room, making the indoor air quality worse. An exterior wall of some thickness is affected on its surface by the outdoor air environment. In this paper, ...

  18. DESIGN OF A TOKAMAK FUSION REACTOR FIRST WALL ARMOR AGAINST NEUTRAL BEAM IMPINGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Richard Allen

    2011-01-01

    exceed that of fusion power reactors for wall loadings up toplasma. The vessel wall temperatures in power reactors isfor· the first wall of fusion power reactors. However, for

  19. Progress on a Cavity with Beryllium Walls for Muon Ionization Cooling Channel R&D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowring, D.L.

    2014-01-01

    ON A CAVITY WITH BERYLLIUM WALLS FOR MUON IONIZATION COOLINGFabricating a cavity with beryllium walls would mitigatepillbox RF cavity with beryllium walls, in order to evaluate

  20. High Performance Walls in Hot-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoeschele, M.; Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

    2015-01-01

    High performance walls represent a high priority measure for moving the next generation of new homes to the Zero Net Energy performance level. The primary goal in improving wall thermal performance revolves around increasing the wall framing from 2x4 to 2x6, adding more cavity and exterior rigid insulation, achieving insulation installation criteria meeting ENERGY STAR's thermal bypass checklist, and reducing the amount of wood penetrating the wall cavity.

  1. Development of Superconducting Materials for Use in Magnet Applications: Nb3Sn Flux Pinning and Bi-2212 Magnetic Texturing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahmani, David G.

    2010-07-14

    Density MeOH Methanol MJR Modified Jellyroll PIT Powder-in-Tube ppm Parts Per Million RGA Residual Gas Analysis SEM Scanning Electron Microscopy SPD Severe Plastic Deformation T Tesla XRD X-Ray Diffraction vii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page... increased the J c at medium level magnetic fields of approximately 5 Tesla (T); however, the magnetic field at which the peak in J c occurs has not shifted considerably by reducing the grain size [6]. The pinning force for Nb 3 Sn and NbTi are shown...

  2. Diary of a domain analyst: a domain analysis case-study from avionics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Tim

    . In this paper, we describe a domain analysis case-study in the domain of aero-engine systems. The principle-STUDY: AERO-ENGINE STARTING SYSTEMS We chose aero-engine starting systems as the domain to be analysed, taking

  3. Enhanced reactive metal wall for dehalogenation of hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howson, P.E.; Mackenzie, P.D.; Horney, D.P.

    1996-08-06

    A method is provided for remediation of contaminated solutions using a tiered metal wall or column. The tiered metal wall or column has at least three zones with graduated sizes of reducing metal particles. Contaminated solutions pass through the tiered wall or column to dehalogenate contaminant halogenated hydrocarbons. 3 figs.

  4. Proposal on Lithium Wall Experiment (LWX) on PBXM 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakharov, Leonid E.

    Proposal on Lithium Wall Experiment (LWX) on PBX­M 1 Leonid E. Zakharov, Princeton University; OUTLINE 1. Mini­conference on Lithium walls and low recycling regime. 2. PBX­M Capabilities. 3. Motivation "Lithium covered walls and low recycling regimes in toka­ maks". APS meeting, October 23­27, 2000, Quebec

  5. NATIONAL PLAN TO ACHIEVE MARITIME DOMAIN AWARENESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    NATIONAL PLAN TO ACHIEVE MARITIME DOMAIN AWARENESS FOR THE NATIONAL STRATEGY FOR MARITIME SECURITY OCTOBER 2005 #12;National Strategy for Maritime Security: National Plan to Achieve Maritime Domain Awareness i FOREWORD By signing National Security Presidential Directive-41/Homeland Security Presidential

  6. Enhanced dielectric-wall linear accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayan, S.E.; Caporaso, G.J.; Kirbie, H.C.

    1998-09-22

    A dielectric-wall linear accelerator is enhanced by a high-voltage, fast e-time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators. A high voltage is placed between the electrodes sufficient to stress the voltage breakdown of the insulator on command. A light trigger, such as a laser, is focused along at least one line along the edge surface of the laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators extending between the electrodes. The laser is energized to initiate a surface breakdown by a fluence of photons, thus causing the electrical switch to close very promptly. Such insulators and lasers are incorporated in a dielectric wall linear accelerator with Blumlein modules, and phasing is controlled by adjusting the length of fiber optic cables that carry the laser light to the insulator surface. 6 figs.

  7. Enhanced dielectric-wall linear accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayan, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA); Caporaso, George J. (Livermore, CA); Kirbie, Hugh C. (Dublin, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A dielectric-wall linear accelerator is enhanced by a high-voltage, fast e-time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators. A high voltage is placed between the electrodes sufficient to stress the voltage breakdown of the insulator on command. A light trigger, such as a laser, is focused along at least one line along the edge surface of the laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators extending between the electrodes. The laser is energized to initiate a surface breakdown by a fluence of photons, thus causing the electrical switch to close very promptly. Such insulators and lasers are incorporated in a dielectric wall linear accelerator with Blumlein modules, and phasing is controlled by adjusting the length of fiber optic cables that carry the laser light to the insulator surface.

  8. Soft wall model for a holographic superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. S. Afonin; I. V. Pusenkov

    2015-06-17

    We apply the soft wall holographic model from hadron physics to a description of the high-$T_c$ superconductivity. In comparison with the existing bottom-up holographic superconductors, the proposed approach is more phenomenological. On the other hand, it is much simpler and has more freedom for fitting the conductivity properties of the real high-$T_c$ materials. We demonstrate some examples of emerging models and discuss a possible origin of the approach.

  9. Hollow clay tile wall program summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, R.C.; Jones, W.D. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Beavers, J.E. [MS Technology, Inc. (United States)

    1995-07-30

    Many of the Y-12 Plant buildings, constructed during the 1940s and 1950s, consist of steel ed concrete framing infilled with hollow clay tile (HCT). The infill was intended to provide for building enclosure and was not designed to have vertical or lateral load-carrying capacity. During the late 1970s and early 1980s, seismic and wind evaluations were performed on many of these buildings in conjunction with the preparation of a site-wide safety analysis report. This analytical work, based on the best available methodology, considered lateral load-carrying capacity of the HCT infill on the basis of building code allowable shear values. In parallel with the analysis effort, DOE initiated a program to develop natural phenomena capacity and performance criteria for existing buildings, but these criteria did not specify guidelines for determining the lateral force capacity of frames infilled with HCT. The evaluation of infills was, therefore, based on the provisions for the design of unreinforced masonry as outlined in standard masonry codes. When the results of the seismic and wind evaluations were compared with the new criteria, the projected building capacities fell short of the requirements. Apparently, if the buildings were to meet the new criteria, many millions of dollars would be required for building upgrades. Because the upgrade costs were significant, the assumptions and approaches used in the analyses were reevaluated. Four issues were identified: (1) Once the infilled walls cracked, what capacity (nonlinear response), if any, would the walls have to resist earthquake or wind loads applied in the plane of the infill (in-plane)? (2) Would the infilled walls remain within the steel or reinforced concrete framing when subjected to earthquake or high wind loads applied perpendicular to the infill (out-of-plane)? (3) What was the actual shear capacity of the HCT infill? (4) Was modeling the HCT infill as a shear wall the best approach?

  10. Soft wall model for a holographic superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afonin, S S

    2015-01-01

    We apply the soft wall holographic model from hadron physics to a description of the high-$T_c$ superconductivity. In comparison with the existing bottom-up holographic superconductors, the proposed approach is more phenomenological. On the other hand, it is much simpler and has more freedom for fitting the conductivity properties of the real high-$T_c$ materials. We demonstrate some examples of emerging models and discuss a possible origin of the approach.

  11. Cutting assembly including expanding wall segments of auger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Treuhaft, Martin B. (San Antonio, TX); Oser, Michael S. (San Antonio, TX)

    1983-01-01

    A mining auger comprises a cutting head carried at one end of a tubular shaft and a plurality of wall segments which in a first position thereof are disposed side by side around said shaft and in a second position thereof are disposed oblique to said shaft. A vane projects outwardly from each wall segment. When the wall segments are in their first position, the vanes together form a substantially continuous helical wall. A cutter is mounted on the peripheral edge of each of the vanes. When the wall segments are in their second position, the cutters on the vanes are disposed radially outward from the perimeter of the cutting head.

  12. Ordered Mesoporous CMK-5 Carbon with Ultra-Thin Pore Walls and Highly Dispersed Nickel Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fulvio, Pawquale F; Liang, Chengdu; Dai, Sheng; Jaroniec, Mietek

    2009-01-01

    Ordered mesoporous CMK-5 carbons with ultra-thin carbon pore walls and highly dispersed Ni nanoparticles have been successfully prepared by using two different SBA-15 silicas as hard templates and 2, 3-di-hydroxynaphtalene (DHN) as a carbon precursor. The nickel precursor was a concentrated nickel nitrate hexahydrate [Ni(NO3)2.6H2O] solution in isopropanol added to the carbon-silica nanocomposites prior to thermal treatments. The samples studied were analyzed by thermogravimetry (TG), nitrogen adsorption at -196 C, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and in situ electron diffraction X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). While TG revealed carbon contents lower than 30 wt%, nitrogen adsorption provided information about homogeneity of carbon thin film deposited onto mesopore walls of ordered silica templates, SBA-15. The templates, carbon-silica nanocomposites and carbon inverse replicas with nickel nanoparticles exhibited uniform pores, high surface areas and large pore volumes. Graphitic carbon was identified by the presence of a characteristic G band on Raman spectra, whereas the diffraction peak attributed to the stacking of graphene planes was not observed by powder XRD.The presence of ordered domains in the carbon materials studied was confirmed by small angle XRD and STEM imaging. In addition, the STEM images revealed that the nickel nanoparticles were uniform in size, ~3nm, and were homogeneously dispersed within ordered tubular carbon walls. A few larger clusters of nickel, ~60nm, present on the external surface, were identified by powder XRD as metallic Ni. The in situ EDX revealed that the small nanoparticles were largely composed of Ni with traces of NiO. Similar nanoparticles dispersions have been reported only for Ni-containing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs), whereas previously reported ordered mesoporous carbons possessed larger Ni/NiO nanoparticles within CMK-3 nanostructure.

  13. Pinning on a defect line: characterization of marginal disorder relevance and sharp asymptotics for the critical point shift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quentin Berger; Hubert Lacoin

    2015-04-08

    The effect of disorder for pinning models is a subject which has attracted much attention in theoretical physics and rigorous mathematical physics. A peculiar point of interest is the question of coincidence of the quenched and annealed critical point for a small amount of disorder. The question has been mathematically settled in most cases in the last few years, giving in particular a rigorous validation of the Harris Criterion on disorder relevance. However, the marginal case, where the return probability exponent is equal to $1/2$, i.e. where the inter-arrival law of the renewal process is given by $K(n)=n^{-3/2}\\phi(n)$ where $\\phi$ is a slowly varying function, has been left partially open. In this paper, we give a complete answer to the question by proving a simple necessary and sufficient criterion on the return probability for disorder relevance, which confirms earlier predictions from the literature. Moreover, we also provide sharp asymptotics on the critical point shift: in the case of the pinning (or wetting) of a one dimensional simple random walk, the shift of the critical point satisfies the following high temperature asymptotics $$ \\lim_{\\beta\\rightarrow 0}\\beta^2\\log h_c(\\beta)= - \\frac{\\pi}{2}. $$ This gives a rigorous proof to a claim of B. Derrida, V. Hakim and J. Vannimenus (Journal of Statistical Physics, 1992).

  14. A Validation Study of Pin Heat Transfer for UO2 Fuel Based on the IFA-432 Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillippe, Aaron M; Clarno, Kevin T; Banfield, James E; Ott, Larry J; Philip, Bobby; Berrill, Mark A; Sampath, Rahul S; Allu, Srikanth; Hamilton, Steven P

    2014-01-01

    The IFA-432 (Integrated Fuel Assessment) experiments from the International Fuel Performance Experiments (IFPE) database were designed to study the effects of gap size, fuel density, and fuel densification on fuel centerline temperature in light-water-reactor fuel. An evaluation of nuclear fuel pin heat transfer in the FRAPCON-3.4 and Exnihilo codes for uranium dioxide (UO$_2$) fuel systems was performed, with a focus on the densification stage (2.2 \\unitfrac{GWd}{MT(UO$_{2}$)}). In addition, sensitivity studies were performed to evaluate the effect of the radial power shape and approximations to the geometry to account for the thermocouple hole. The analysis demonstrated excellent agreement for rods 1, 2, 3, and 5 (varying gap thicknesses and density with traditional fuel), demonstrating the accuracy of the codes and their underlying material models for traditional fuel. For rod 6, which contained unstable fuel that densified an order of magnitude more than traditional, stable fuel, the magnitude of densification was over-predicted and the temperatures were outside of the experimental uncertainty. The radial power shape within the fuel was shown to significantly impact the predicted centerline temperatures, whereas modeling the fuel at the thermocouple location as either annular or solid was relatively negligible. This has provided an initial benchmarking of the pin heat transfer capability of Exnihilo for UO$_2$ fuel with respect to a well-validated nuclear fuel performance code.

  15. Localized Domains of Disoriented Chiral Condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. K. Nandi; T. K. Nayak; B. Mohanty; D. P. Mahapatra; Y. P. Viyogi

    1999-03-12

    A new method to search for localized domains of disoriented chiral condensates (DCC) has been proposed by utilising the (eta-phi) phase space distributions of charged particles and photons. Using the discrete wavelet transformation (DWT) analysis technique, it has been found that the presence of DCC domains broadens the distribution of wavelet coefficients in comparison to that of normal events. Strength contours have been derived from the differences in rms deviations of these distributions by taking into account the size of DCC domains and the probability of DCC production in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. This technique can be suitably adopted to experiments measuring multiplicities of charged particles and photons.

  16. Learning Energy Demand Domain Knowledge via Feature Transformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Povinelli, Richard J.

    -- Domain knowledge is an essential factor for forecasting energy demand. This paper introduces a method knowledge substantially improves energy demand forecasting accuracy. However, domain knowledge may differ. The first stage automatically captures energy demand forecasting domain knowledge through nonlinear

  17. Gas turbine bucket wall thickness control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stathopoulos, Dimitrios (Glenmont, NY); Xu, Liming (Greenville, SC); Lewis, Doyle C. (Greer, SC)

    2002-01-01

    A core for use in casting a turbine bucket including serpentine cooling passages is divided into two pieces including a leading edge core section and a trailing edge core section. Wall thicknesses at the leading edge and the trailing edge of the turbine bucket can be controlled independent of each other by separately positioning the leading edge core section and the trailing edge core section in the casting die. The controlled leading and trailing edge thicknesses can thus be optimized for efficient cooling, resulting in more efficient turbine operation.

  18. Living Walls | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EAInvervarLeeds, UnitedLibertyLite On TechnologyCornLiuzhouLiving Walls

  19. Domain Decomposition Methods for a Complementarity Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Xiao-Chuan

    Domain Decomposition Methods for a Complementarity Problem Haijian Yang1 and Xiao-Chuan Cai2 1 under grants CCF-0634894 and CNS-0722023. 1 #12;2 Haijian Yang and Xiao-Chuan Cai with partial

  20. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technique with photons of light that have wavelengths a billion times smaller than radio waves in order to study their domain motion. By using these soft x rays generated at...

  1. Transmission eigenvalues for strictly concave domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgi Vodev

    2015-01-05

    We prove that for strictly concave domains much larger transmission eigenvalue-free regions exist. As a consequence, we get Weyl asymptotics for the total counting function with an almost optimal remainder term.

  2. Antiferromagnetic domain size and exchange bias 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Lederman, D.; Cheon, M.; Shi, H.; Olamit, J.; Roshchin, Igor V.; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2008-01-01

    Using neutron diffraction, we measured the sizes of antiferromagnetic domains in three ferromagnet/antiferromagnet bilayer samples as a function of the magnitude and sign of exchange bias, temperature, and antiferromagnet composition. Neutron...

  3. Thermal performance of steel-framed walls. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbour, E. [NAHB Research Center, Inc., Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Goodrow, J. [Holometrix, Inc., Bedford, MA (United States); Kosny, J.; Christian, J.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-11-21

    In wall construction, highly conductive members spaced along the wall, which allow higher heat transfer than that through less conductive areas, are referred to as thermal bridges. Thermal bridges in walls tend to increase heat loss and, under certain adverse conditions, can cause dust streaking (``ghosting``) on interior walls over studs due to temperature differentials, as well as condensation in and on walls. Although such adverse conditions can be easily avoided by proper thermal design of wall systems, these effects have not been well understood and thermal data has been lacking. Therefore, the present study was initiated to provide (1) a better understanding of the thermal behavior of steel-framed walls, (2) a set of R-values for typical wall constructions, and (3) information that could be used to develop improved methods of predicting R-values. An improved method for estimating R-value would allow an equitable comparison of thermal performance with other construction types and materials. This would increase the number of alternative materials for walls available to designers, thus allowing them to choose the optimum choice for construction. Twenty-three wall samples were tested in a calibrated hot box (ASTM C9761) to measure the thermal performance of steel-framed wall systems. The tests included an array of stud frame configurations, exterior sheathing and fiberglass batt insulations. Other studies have not included the use of insulating sheathing, which reduces the extent of the thermal bridges and improves total thermal performance. The purpose of the project was to provide measured R-values for commonly used steel-framed wall configurations and to improve R-value estimating methods. Test results were compared to R-value estimates using the parallel path method, the isothermal planes method and the ASHRAE Zone method. The comparison showed that the known procedures do not fully account for the three-dimensional effects created by steel framing in a wall.

  4. Frequency domain design of interval controller 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Wunyong

    1993-01-01

    Subject: Electrical Engineering FREQUENCY DOMAIN DFSIGN OF INTERVAL CONTROLLER A Thesis by WUNYONG PARK Approved as to style and content by: S. P. Bhattacharyyd (Chair of Committee) C. N. Georghiades (Member) A. Datta (Member) S. Jayasuriya... (Member) . H. Keel (Member) A. Patton (Head of Department) May 1993 111 ABSTRACT Frequency Domain Design of Interval Controller. (May 1993) Wunyong Park, B. S. , Yon Sei University; M. S. , Yon Sei University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. S...

  5. Structured hints : extracting and abstracting domain expertise.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hereld, M.; Stevens, R.; Sterling, T.; Gao, G. R.; Mathematics and Computer Science; California Inst. of Tech.; Louisiana State Univ.; Univ. of Delaware

    2009-03-16

    We propose a new framework for providing information to help optimize domain-specific application codes. Its design addresses problems that derive from the widening gap between the domain problem statement by domain experts and the architectural details of new and future high-end computing systems. The design is particularly well suited to program execution models that incorporate dynamic adaptive methodologies for live tuning of program performance and resource utilization. This new framework, which we call 'structured hints', couples a vocabulary of annotations to a suite of performance metrics. The immediate target is development of a process by which a domain expert describes characteristics of objects and methods in the application code that would not be readily apparent to the compiler; the domain expert provides further information about what quantities might provide the best indications of desirable effect; and the interactive preprocessor identifies potential opportunities for the domain expert to evaluate. Our development of these ideas is progressing in stages from case study, through manual implementation, to automatic or semi-automatic implementation. In this paper we discuss results from our case study, an examination of a large simulation of a neural network modeled after the neocortex.

  6. Direct Visualization of Magnetoelectric Domains | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    image of ferroelectric domains in hexagonal erbium manganite. Image size: 16 x 16 m2. Blue (red) color denotes domains with up (down) electric polarization. Right:...

  7. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Glass Mountain Area (Cumming...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Glass Mountain Area (Cumming And Mackie, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain...

  8. OPERATIONAL WINDOWS FOR DRY-WALL AND WETTED-WALL IFE CHAMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    subsystems was performed parametrically to uncover key physics/technology uncertainties and to iden- tify be necessary that may preclude propagation of the laser driver and require assisted pinch transport issue for wetted-wall concepts. KEYWORDS: inertial fusion, fusion technology, IFE chambers *E

  9. Intense Magnetized Plasma-Wall Interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Bruno S.; Fuelling, Stephan

    2013-11-30

    This research project studied wall-plasma interactions relevant to fusion science. Such interactions are a critical aspect of Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) because flux compression by a pusher material, in particular the metal for the liner approach to MIF, involves strong eddy current heating on the surface of the pusher, and probably interactions and mixing of the pusher with the interior fuel during the time when fusion fuel is being burned. When the pusher material is a metal liner, high-energy-density conditions result in fascinating behavior. For example, "warm dense matter" is produced, for which material properties such as resistivity and opacity are not well known. In this project, the transformation into plasma of metal walls subjected to pulsed megagauss magnetic fields was studied with an experiment driven by the UNR 1 MA Zebra generator. The experiment was numerically simulated with using the MHRDR code. This simple, fundamental high-energy-density physics experiment, in a regime appropriate to MIF, has stimulated an important and fascinating comparison of numerical modeling codes and tables with experiment. In addition, we participated in developing the FRCHX experiment to compress a field-reversed-configuration (FRC) plasma with a liner, in collaboration with researchers from Air Force Research Laboratory and Los Alamos National Lab, and we helped develop diagnostics for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at LANL. Last, but not least, this project served to train students in high-energy-density physics.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF A QUANTITATIVE MEASURE OF THE FUNCTIONALITY OF FRAME WALLS ENHANCED WITH PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS USING A DYNAMIC WALL SIMULATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evers, Angela C.

    2008-07-25

    Frame walls enhanced with phase change materials (paraffin-based, hydrated salt-based, and eutectic) mixed in cellulose insulation were developed and tested. The frame walls were heated and allowed to cool in a dynamic wall simulator that replicated...

  11. Thermal Performance of Uninsulated and Partially Filled Wall Cavities: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridouane, E. H.; Bianchi, M.

    2011-08-01

    Low-rise, wood-framed homes are the most common type of residential structures in the United States. Wood wall construction supports roofs efficiently and provides a stable frame for attaching interior and exterior wall coverings. Wall cavities are prevalent and increase thermal resistance, particularly when they are filled with insulating material. This paper describes detailed computational fluid dynamics modeling to evaluate the thermal performance of uninsulated or partially filled wall cavities and accounts for conduction through framing, convection, and radiation. Parameters are ambient outdoor temperature, cavity surface emissivity, cavity aspect ratio, and insulation height. Understanding the thermal performance of uninsulated or partially insulated wall cavities is essential for conserving energy in residential buildings. The results can serve as input for building energy simulation tools such as DOE2 and EnergyPlus for modeling the temperature dependent energy performance of new and older homes with uninsulated or partially insulated walls.

  12. Hollow porous-wall glass microspheres for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC); Schumacher, Ray F. (Aiken, SC); Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

    2010-02-23

    A porous wall hollow glass microsphere is provided having a diameter range of between 1 to 200 microns, a density of between 1.0 to 2.0 gm/cc, a porous-wall structure having wall openings defining an average pore size of between 10 to 1000 angstroms, and which contains therein a hydrogen storage material. The porous-wall structure facilitates the introduction of a hydrogen storage material into the interior of the porous wall hollow glass microsphere. In this manner, the resulting hollow glass microsphere can provide a membrane for the selective transport of hydrogen through the porous walls of the microsphere, the small pore size preventing gaseous or liquid contaminants from entering the interior of the hollow glass microsphere.

  13. Effects of Be acceptors on the spin polarization of carriers in p-i-n resonant tunneling diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Awan, I. T.; Galvão Gobato, Y.; Galeti, H. V. A.; Brasil, M. J. S. P.; Taylor, D.; Henini, M.

    2014-08-07

    In this paper, we have investigated the effect of Be acceptors on the electroluminescence and the spin polarization in GaAs/AlAs p-i-n resonant tunneling diodes. The quantum well emission comprise two main lines separated by ?20?meV attributed to excitonic and Be-related transitions, which intensities show remarkably abrupt variations at critical voltages, particularly at the electron resonant peak where it shows a high-frequency bistability. The circular-polarization degree of the quantum-well electroluminescence also shows strong and abrupt variations at the critical bias voltages and it attains relatively large values (of ??75% at 15?T). These effects may be explored to design novel devices for spintronic applications such as a high-frequency spin-oscillators.

  14. GaAs nanowire array solar cells with axial p-i-n Maoqing Yao, Ningfeng Huang, Sen Cong, Chun-Yung Chi, M. Ashkan Seyedi,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    interconnecting scheme. Figure S1. Multi-junction solar cells. (a) Multi-junction solar cells consist of materials1 GaAs nanowire array solar cells with axial p-i-n junctions Maoqing Yao, Ningfeng Huang, Sen CongH3 are 7.56×10-7 atm and 2.14×10-4 atm. Solar cells fabrication. Transparent insulating polymer BCB

  15. Perspective Systems in Roman Second Style Wall-painting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stinson, Philip T.

    2011-07-01

    Perspective Systems in Roman Second Style Wall Painting PHILIP STINSON Abstract There is still much to be learned about architectural perspective from the study of Roman wall paintings dat- ing to the first century B.C.E. This article... demonstrates that Second Style wall paintings of houses and villas in Rome and Campania hold evidence for different types of perspective: convergence perspective and parallel perspective. A special variation involves multiple systems of convergence...

  16. BIOLOGICAL HYDROGEN FROM FUEL GASES Gary F. Vanzin, Jie Huang, Sharon Smolinski, Karen Kronoveter and Pin-Ching Maness*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is widespread among the domains of Bacteria and Archaea (Vignais et al., 2001). The use of waste biomass as feedstock for H2 production is an attractive choice. However, due to its heterogeneous nature, biomass

  17. Dual-domain point diffraction interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Naulleau, Patrick P. (5239 Miles Ave., Apt. A, Oakland, CA 94618); Goldberg, Kenneth Alan (1195 Keeler Ave., Berkeley, CA 94708)

    2000-01-01

    A hybrid spatial/temporal-domain point diffraction interferometer (referred to as the dual-domain PS/PDI) that is capable of suppressing the scattered-reference-light noise that hinders the conventional PS/PDI is provided. The dual-domain PS/PDI combines the separate noise-suppression capabilities of the widely-used phase-shifting and Fourier-transform fringe pattern analysis methods. The dual-domain PS/PDI relies on both a more restrictive implementation of the image plane PS/PDI mask and a new analysis method to be applied to the interferograms generated and recorded by the modified PS/PDI. The more restrictive PS/PDI mask guarantees the elimination of spatial-frequency crosstalk between the signal and the scattered-light noise arising from scattered-reference-light interfering with the test beam. The new dual-domain analysis method is then used to eliminate scattered-light noise arising from both the scattered-reference-light interfering with the test beam and the scattered-reference-light interfering with the "true" pinhole-diffracted reference light. The dual-domain analysis method has also been demonstrated to provide performance enhancement when using the non-optimized standard PS/PDI design. The dual-domain PS/PDI is essentially a three-tiered filtering system composed of lowpass spatial-filtering the test-beam electric field using the more restrictive PS/PDI mask, bandpass spatial-filtering the individual interferogram irradiance frames making up the phase-shifting series, and bandpass temporal-filtering the phase-shifting series as a whole.

  18. Evaluation of wall boundary condition parameters for gas-solids...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    predictions of various gas-solids fluidized beds. Several models for the granular flow wall boundary condition are available in the open literature for numerical modeling of...

  19. Fracture of welded aluminum thin-walled structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Li, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive methodology was developed in the thesis for damage prediction of welded aluminum thin-walled structures, which includes material modeling, calibration, numerical simulation and experimental verification. ...

  20. Moisture Management of High-R Walls (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-12-01

    The following report explains the moisture-related concerns for High R-value wall assemblies and discusses past Building America research work that informs this study. Hygrothermal simulations were prepared for several common approaches to High R-value wall construction in six cities (Houston, Atlanta, Seattle, St. Louis, Chicago, and International Falls) representing a range of climate zones (2, 3, 4C, 4, 5A, and 7, respectively). The simulations are informed by experience gained from past research in this area and validated by field measurement and forensic experience. The modeling program was developed to assess the moisture durability of the wall assemblies based on three primary sources of moisture: construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leakage. The peak annual moisture content of the wood based exterior sheathing was used to comparatively analyze the response to the moisture loads for each of the walls in each given city. Walls which experienced sheathing moisture contents between 20% and 28% were identified as risky, whereas those exceeding 28% were identified as very high risk. All of the wall assemblies perform well under idealized conditions. However, only the walls with exterior insulation, or cavity insulation which provides a hygrothermal function similar to exterior insulation, perform adequately when exposed to moisture loads. Walls with only cavity insulation are particularly susceptible to air leakage condensation. None of the walls performed well when a precipitation based bulk water leak was introduced to the backside of the sheathing, emphasizing the importance of proper flashing details.

  1. Wall and laser spot motion in cylindrical hohlraums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huser, G.; Courtois, C.; Monteil, M.-C.

    2009-03-15

    Wall and laser spot motion measurements in empty, propane-filled and plastic (CH)-lined gold coated cylindrical hohlraums were performed on the Omega laser facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Wall motion was measured using axial two-dimensional (2D) x-ray imaging and laser spot motion was perpendicularly observed through a thinned wall using streaked hard x-ray imaging. Experimental results and 2D hydrodynamic simulations show that while empty targets exhibit on-axis plasma collision, CH-lined and propane-filled targets inhibit wall expansion, corroborated with perpendicular streaked imaging showing a slower motion of laser spots.

  2. Moisture Management for High R-Value Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepage, R.; Schumacher, C.; Lukachko, A.

    2013-11-01

    The following report explains the moisture-related concerns for High R-value wall assemblies and discusses past Building America research work that informs this study. Hygrothermal simulations were prepared for several common approaches to High R-value wall construction in six cities (Houston, Atlanta, Seattle, St. Louis, Chicago, and International Falls) representing a range of climate zones (2, 3, 4C, 4, 5A, and 7, respectively). The simulations are informed by experience gained from past research in this area and validated by field measurement and forensic experience. The modeling program was developed to assess the moisture durability of the wall assemblies based on three primary sources of moisture: construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leakage. The peak annual moisture content of the wood based exterior sheathing was used to comparatively analyze the response to the moisture loads for each of the walls in each given city. Walls which experienced sheathing moisture contents between 20% and 28% were identified as risky, whereas those exceeding 28% were identified as very high risk. All of the wall assemblies perform well under idealized conditions. However, only the walls with exterior insulation, or cavity insulation which provides a hygrothermal function similar to exterior insulation, perform adequately when exposed to moisture loads. Walls with only cavity insulation are particularly susceptible to air leakage condensation. None of the walls performed well when a precipitation based bulk water leak was introduced to the backside of the sheathing, emphasizing the importance of proper flashing details.

  3. The temperature dependence of ultra-cold neutron wall losses...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: The temperature dependence of ultra-cold neutron wall losses in material bottles coated with deuterated polystryene Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The...

  4. Building America Special Research Project: High-R Walls Case...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    building science.com 2009 Building Science Press All rights of reproduction in any form reserved. Building America Special Research Project: High-R Walls Case Study Analysis...

  5. Seismic design, testing and analysis of reinforced concrete wall buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panagiotou, Marios

    2008-01-01

    combined elements of structural design, testing andcontrol and design of structural and nonstructural response.for Seismic Design of Structural Walls. ACI Structural

  6. arXiv:0907.4194v1[hep-lat]24Jul2009 MIT-CTP-4032 Nucleon Electromagnetic Form Factors from Lattice QCD using 2+1 Flavor Domain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weise, Wolfram

    Electromagnetic form factors characterize fundamental aspects of the structure of protons and neutronsarXiv:0907.4194v1[hep-lat]24Jul2009 MIT-CTP-4032 Nucleon Electromagnetic Form Factors from Lattice QCD using 2+1 Flavor Domain Wall Fermions on Fine Lattices and Chiral Perturbation Theory S. N

  7. Upgrade of the Power Deposition and Thermal Models for the First Wall Protection of JET with an ITER-like Be Combination of Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Upgrade of the Power Deposition and Thermal Models for the First Wall Protection of JET with an ITER-like Be Combination of Wall

  8. Quantum Dynamics of Spin Wave Propagation through Domain Walls S. YUAN, H. DE RAEDT and S. MIYASHITA1;2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as a concept for a new generation of nonvolatile memory storage and logical devices.8) On the other hand nanostructures which is treated as a kind of soliton in a continuous medium. Such structure can be created of storing information or even performing logic functions, and to offer new types of electronics devices1

  9. Cosmic bubble and domain wall instabilities III: The role of oscillons in three-dimensional bubble collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Richard Bond; Jonathan Braden; Laura Mersini-Houghton

    2015-06-09

    We study collisions between pairs of bubbles nucleated in an ambient false vacuum. For the first time, we include the effects of small initial (quantum) fluctuations around the instanton profiles describing the most likely initial bubble profile. Past studies of this problem neglect these fluctuations and work under the assumption that the collisions posess an exact SO(2,1) symmetry. We use three-dimensional lattice simulations to demonstrate that for double-well potentials, small initial perturbations to this symmetry can be amplified as the system evolves. Initially the amplification is well-described by linear perturbation theory around the SO(2,1) background, but the onset of strong nonlinearities amongst the fluctuations quickly leads to a drastic breaking of the original SO(2,1) symmetry and the production of oscillons in the collision region. We explore several single-field models, and we find it is hard to both realize inflation inside of a bubble and produce oscillons in a collision. Finally, we extend our results to a simple two-field model. The additional freedom allowed by the second field allows us to construct viable inflationary models that allow oscillon production in collisions. The breaking of the SO(2,1) symmetry allows for a new class of observational signatures from bubble collisions that do not posess azimuthal symmetry, including the production of gravitational waves which cannot be supported by an SO(2,1) spacetime.

  10. f{sub K}/f{sub {pi}} in full QCD with domain wall valence quarks (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaonfor DirectSciTechConnectXOP:(Journal Article) |CapArticle) |

  11. Light-shining-through-walls with lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friederike Januschek

    2014-10-07

    Light-shining-through-walls experiments are the search experiments for weakly interacting slim particles (WISPs) with the smallest model dependence. They have the advantage that not only the detection, but also the production of the WISPs takes place in the laboratory and can thus be controlled. Using lasers is the preferred option for most of the mass region and has led to the world's most stringent laboratory limits (ALPS I) there. At CERN, OSQAR promises to surpass these and at DESY ALPS II is currently set up, which is planning to probe the axion-like particle to photon coupling down to $|g_{a\\gamma}|\\gtrsim 2\\cdot10^{-11}$ GeV$^{-1}$, which is in a region favored by many astrophysical hints.

  12. The height of watermelons with wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Feierl

    2012-04-11

    We derive asymptotics for the moments as well as the weak limit of the height distribution of watermelons with p branches with wall. This generalises a famous result of de Bruijn, Knuth and Rice on the average height of planted plane trees, and results by Fulmek and Katori et al. on the expected value, respectively the higher moments, of the height distribution of watermelons with two branches. The asymptotics for the moments depend on the analytic behaviour of certain multidimensional Dirichlet series. In order to obtain this information we prove a reciprocity relation satisfied by the derivatives of one of Jacobi's theta functions, which generalises the well known reciprocity law for Jacobi's theta functions.

  13. Domain Assignment to Transcription FactorsDomain Assignment to Transcription Factors 412 Proteins with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babu, M. Madan

    Domain Assignment to Transcription FactorsDomain Assignment to Transcription Factors 412 Proteins with at least one SCOP DBD assignment 412 Proteins with at least one SCOP DBD assignment 7 proteins with PFAM DBD assignment 7 proteins with PFAM DBD assignment 419 proteins with DBD assignment419 proteins

  14. The thermal performance of steel-framed walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbour, C.E. [NAHB Research Center, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States). Building Systems Div.; Goodrow, J. [Holometrix, Bedford, MA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Thermal bridges are areas in constructions that have highly conductive materials, allowing higher heat transfer through less conductive areas. In a wall, thermal bridges can increase heat loss, cause dust to accumulate on the studs (ghosting) due to temperature distribution, and cause condensation to form in and on the walls. The effects of thermal bridges are often misunderstood by engineers, buildings, and manufacturers of construction products. This study attempts to provide a better understanding of the effects of thermal bridges in steel-framed walls, as well as information leading to improved methods of predicting R-value of walls containing thermal bridges. An improved method for estimating R-value would allow an equitable comparison of thermal performance with other construction types and materials. This would increase the number of alternative materials for walls available to designers, thus allowing them the freedom to correctly choose the optimum choice for construction. In order to arrive at an improved method, experimental data on the heat transfer characteristics of steel-framed walls were collected. Twenty-three wall samples were tested in a calibrated hot box (ASTM C976) to measure the thermal performance of steel-framed wall systems. The tests included an array of stud frame configurations, exterior sheathing, and fiberglass batt insulations. Other studies of thermal bridging in steel-framed walls have not included the use of insulating sheathing, which reduces the extent of the thermal bridges and improves total thermal performance. The purpose of the project was to provide measured R-values for commonly used steel-framed wall configurations and to improve R-value estimating methods. Also, detailed monitoring of temperature gradients in the test walls combined with numerical analysis provided new insights into heat transfer phenomena concerning thermal bridges.

  15. Rings & Arithmetic 2: Integral domains Thursday, 13 October 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flynn, E. Victor

    Rings & Arithmetic 2: Integral domains and fields Thursday, 13 October 2005 Lectures for Part A of Oxford FHS in Mathematics and Joint Schools · Units in a ring · Integral domains; examples · Fields; examples · Characteristic of an integral domain · Field of fractions of an integral domain 0 #12;Units

  16. A domain-specific analysis system for examining nuclear reactor simulation data for light-water and sodium-cooled fast reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billings, Jay Jay; Hull, S Forest; Lingerfelt, Eric J; Wojtowicz, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Building a new generation of fission reactors in the United States presents many technical and regulatory challenges. One important challenge is the need to share and present results from new high-fidelity, high-performance simulations in an easily usable way. Since modern multiscale, multi-physics simulations can generate petabytes of data, they will require the development of new techniques and methods to reduce the data to familiar quantities of interest (e.g., pin powers, temperatures) with a more reasonable resolution and size. Furthermore, some of the results from these simulations may be new quantities for which visualization and analysis techniques are not immediately available in the community and need to be developed. This paper describes a new system for managing high-performance simulation results in a domain-specific way that naturally exposes quantities of interest for light water and sodium-cooled fast reactors. It describes requirements to build such a system and the technical challenges faced...

  17. Vectorial Growth of Metallic and Semiconducting Single-Wall Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joselevich, Ernesto

    obstacles toward nanotube-based electronic technology. Vectorial growth of SWNTs is a new approach wherebyVectorial Growth of Metallic and Semiconducting Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Ernesto Joselevich growth of single-wall carbon nanotube arrays is presented. The origin of growth is defined by patterning

  18. Laser-produced plasma-wall interaction O. RENNER,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liska, Richard

    Laser-produced plasma-wall interaction O. RENNER,1 R. LISKA,2 AND F.B. ROSMEJ3,4 1 Institute, France (RECEIVED 30 August 2009; ACCEPTED 21 September 2009) Abstract Jets of laser­generated plasma surfaces (walls). The pilot experiments carried out on the iodine laser system (5­200 J, 0.44 mm, 0

  19. Technology Solutions Case Study: Moisture Management of High-Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-12-01

    Moisture management of high-R walls is important to ensure optimal performance. This case study, developed by Building America team Building Science Corporation, focuses on how eight high-R walls handle the three main sources of moisture—construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leaks.

  20. Doctoral Defense "Feasibility Study of High Performance Cutoff Walls for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    for a candidate ECC mix. Also, revisions to existing levee seismic design guidelines are proposed, basedDoctoral Defense "Feasibility Study of High Performance Cutoff Walls for Levees in Seismic Regions state or length of their cutoff walls, and 2) seismic activity poses serious risks to many existing

  1. Disruption of cell walls for enhanced lipid recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knoshaug, Eric P; Donohoe, Bryon S; Gerken, Henri; Laurens, Lieve; Van Wychen, Stefanie Rose

    2015-03-24

    Presented herein are methods of using cell wall degrading enzymes for recovery of internal lipid bodies from biomass sources such as algae. Also provided are algal cells that express at least one exogenous gene encoding a cell wall degrading enzyme and methods for recovering lipids from the cells.

  2. Ultrathin Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Network Framed Graphene Hybrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wikswo, John

    Ultrathin Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Network Framed Graphene Hybrids Rui Wang, Tu Hong, and Ya ABSTRACT: Graphene and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have shown superior potential in electronics method is developed to synthesize ultrathin SWNT-graphene films through chemical vapor deposition

  3. technology offer HPC/UHPC double wall elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Anton

    buildings and towers like wind turbines, power plants or cooling towers. Fig. 1: UHPC double wall element to 20-45 mm in an easy and cost efficient way. Background Double wall elements are precast reinforced · Savings in material and weight · Savings in transport and crane costs · Dense structure of the precast

  4. TERMINATION OF THE POROUS WALL CONCEPT To: APEX GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    TERMINATION OF THE POROUS WALL CONCEPT To: APEX GROUP From: Anter El-Azab (anter@seas.ucla.edu) Re with Lithium will can not work and this concept should be terminated. For the case of vanadium alloy on this concept should be terminated. #12;TERMINATION OF THE POROUS WALL CONCEPT Best Regards, Anter #12;

  5. Controlled Multistep Purification of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wikswo, John

    Controlled Multistep Purification of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Ya-Qiong Xu,,§ Haiqing Peng materials from raw single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) produced in the HiPco (high-pressure CO) process at increasing temperatures. To avoid catalytic oxidation by iron oxide of carbon nanotubes, the exposed

  6. Modeling Left Ventricle Wall Motion Using Tagged Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alenezy, Mohammed D.

    2009-04-17

    A two-parameter computational model is proposed for the study of the regional motion of the left ventricle (LV) wall using tagged magnetic resonance imaging (tMRI) data. In this model, the LV wall motion is mathematically decomposed into two...

  7. The prospects for highbeta tokamaks with Li walls 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakharov, Leonid E.

    . Why Li walls ? 2. Magnetic propulsion of liquid Li. 3. Plasma profiles in the non­recycling regime. 4 can be magnetically propulsed along the plasma facing surfaces in the tokamak chamber. This allows the stabilizing wall right at the plasma boundary. 2. Intense (V ' 20 m=sec) magnetic propulsion allows to keep Li

  8. Liquid Lithium Wall Experiments in CDX-U R. Majeski,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liquid Lithium Wall Experiments in CDX-U R. Kaita, a R. Majeski, a S. Luckhardt, b R. Doerner, b M ABSTRACT The concept of a flowing lithium first wall for a fusion reactor may lead to a significant advance is intensely heated and well diagnosed, and an extensive liquid lithium plasma-facing surface will be used

  9. October 24, 2001 1. Remaining Action Items on Dry Chamber Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    and chamber wall design · Power to chamber wall · Coolant outlet temperature · Cycle efficiency · Thermal-hydraulic parameters · Maximum temperature of chamber wall - Chamber wall power assumed to be spread over the completeOctober 24, 2001 1 1. Remaining Action Items on Dry Chamber Wall 2. "Overlap" Design Regions 3

  10. Methods for degrading or converting plant cell wall polysaccharides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berka, Randy (Davis, CA); Cherry, Joel (Davis, CA)

    2008-08-19

    The present invention relates to methods for converting plant cell wall polysaccharides into one or more products, comprising: treating the plant cell wall polysaccharides with an effective amount of a spent whole fermentation broth of a recombinant microorganism, wherein the recombinant microorganism expresses one or more heterologous genes encoding enzymes which degrade or convert the plant cell wall polysaccharides into the one or more products. The present invention also relates to methods for producing an organic substance, comprising: (a) saccharifying plant cell wall polysaccharides with an effective amount of a spent whole fermentation broth of a recombinant microorganism, wherein the recombinant microorganism expresses one or more heterologous genes encoding enzymes which degrade or convert the plant cell wall polysaccharides into saccharified material; (b) fermenting the saccharified material of step (a) with one or more fermenting microoganisms; and (c) recovering the organic substance from the fermentation.

  11. Resistive and ferritic-wall plasma dynamos in a sphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalzov, I. V.; Brown, B. P.; Kaplan, E. J.; Katz, N.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Rahbarnia, K.; Forest, C. B. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Center for Magnetic Self Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas (United States); Spence, E. J. [Center for Magnetic Self Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas (United States); Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    We numerically study the effects of varying electric conductivity and magnetic permeability of the bounding wall on a kinematic dynamo in a sphere for parameters relevant to Madison plasma dynamo experiment. The dynamo is excited by a laminar, axisymmetric flow of von Karman type. The flow is obtained as a solution to the Navier-Stokes equation for an isothermal fluid with a velocity profile specified at the sphere's boundary. The properties of the wall are taken into account as thin-wall boundary conditions imposed on the magnetic field. It is found that an increase in the permeability of the wall reduces the critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm{sub cr}. An increase in the conductivity of the wall leaves Rm{sub cr} unaffected but reduces the dynamo growth rate.

  12. A simple method for predicting bulk temperature from tube wall temperature with uniform outside wall heat flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zhixiong "James"

    in laminar flow condition. When air is considered as the working fluid, natural convection is negligible Available online 5 April 2012 Keywords: Bulk temperature Wall temperature Axial wall conduction Laminar flow on conjugate heat transfer in a tube with internal laminar flow have been performed using analytical

  13. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1996-03-05

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 15 figs.

  14. Large power grid analysis using domain decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanram, Kartik

    Large power grid analysis using domain decomposition Quming Zhou, Kai Sun, Kartik Mohanram, Danny C referred to as the power grid. The power grid for a modern integrated circuit may consist of several grid is traditionally described as a large-scale linear system. Simulation of power grids usually

  15. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  16. Domain switching in polycrystalline ferroelectric ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jiangyu

    ARTICLES Domain switching in polycrystalline ferroelectric ceramics J. Y. LI1, R. C. ROGAN2,3, E:10.1038/nmat1485 Ferroelectric ceramics are widely used as sensors and actuators for their electro collective process in commercially used polycrystalline ceramics that are agglomerations of a very large

  17. Reduction of Economic Inequality in Combinatorial Domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koolen, Marijn

    for assessing the fairness of a mechanism is the level of economic equality it can ensure. If it producesReduction of Economic Inequality in Combinatorial Domains Ulle Endriss Institute for Logic economic inequality, such as the Lorenz curve and the Gini index, are widely used in the social sciences

  18. Transmittance of single wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, W.; Hone, J.; Richards, P.L.; Zettl, A.

    2001-07-31

    The authors have measured the far infrared absorption of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) ropes at 1.5K and SWNT ropes in polyethylene (PE) over the range 1.5 < T < 300 K. A weak peak is observed at 28 cm{sup -1} at 1.5K for free standing SWNT samples. The frequency and temperature dependence of the peak is consistent with absorption by an E{sub 2g} symmetric, ''squash mode'', SWNT phonon, which is infrared active due to an adsorbate or disorder. The peak frequency for SWNT ropes in PE is at 40 cm{sup -1} and temperature dependent. They attribute the increase in the frequency of the peak for SWNT in PE to the effect of {approx} 0.2GPa of hydrostatic pressure exerted on the SWNT ropes due to the thermal contraction of PE when cooled to low temperatures. Using two independent methods, they estimate that the SWNT may radially buckle at this pressure. The buckling distortion may cause the pressure dependence of the peak frequency. They cannot rule out the possibility that the peak is an absorption onset from adsorbate modes extrinsic to the SWNT or from interband transitions at a small electronic band gap. An effective medium calculation of Drude metal grains in polyethylene gives a frequency dependence consistent with their data, but the model underestimates the strength of scattering by orders of magnitude.

  19. Pneumatic wall-locking geophone system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuhlman, Harland L. (Minneapolis, MN); Cumerlato, Calvin L. (Minneapolis, MN); Tweeton, Daryl R. (Apple Valley, MN)

    1991-01-01

    A seismic signal receiving system is provided for use in boreholes to receive seismic waves in carrying out geophysical investigations. The system includes three pairs of opposed plates, each of the pairs of plates including oppositely facing outer surfaces for engagement with opposite sides of a borehole. A seismic receiver is mounted on the inner surface of each of the plates for receiving seismic signals. A double-acting, fluid-operated actuator selectively causes relative movement of the plates of the pairs of plates away from each other to provide expansion thereof so as to enable the plates to engage the walls of a borehole and selectively causes relative movement of the plates of the pairs of plates toward each other to provide retraction thereof so as to enable the system to be removed from a borehole. The pairs of plates each comprise a relatively long plate and a relatively short plate. An expandable linkage interconnects the long plates at the distal ends thereof. The plates are mechanically biassed into the retracted state so that the plates return to this state in the event of a system failure.

  20. Advanced Metal Fiber Wall-Flow DPF For Diesel Emission Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Metal Fiber Wall-Flow DPF For Diesel Emission Control Advanced Metal Fiber Wall-Flow DPF For Diesel Emission Control A new metal fiber wall-flow DPF with up to 99% efficiency and...