Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "doe atmospheric radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

DOE/ER-0441 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Plan - February 1990  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Plan ARM Program Plan Forward In 1978 the Department of Energy initiated the Carbon Dioxide Research Program to address climate change from the increasing concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Over the years the Program has studied the many facets of the issue, from the carbon cycle, the climate diagnostics, the vegetative effects, to the societal impacts. The Program is presently the Department's principal entry in the U.S. Global Change Research Program coordinated by the Committee on Earth Sciences (CES) of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). The recent heightened concern about global warming from an enhanced greenhouse effect has prompted the Department to accelerate the research to improve predictions of climate change. The emphasis is on

2

DOE/SC-ARM-020 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20 20 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1-September 30, 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

3

DOE/SC-ARM-12-021 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1-September 30, 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

4

DOE/SC-ARM-13-020 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1-September 30, 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

5

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ARM Status - Science ARM Status - Science * Steadily increasing productivity - Poster session - over 220 posters (may need to do something about submissions next year) - Peer-reviewed articles: 2.5 to 3 per year per

6

ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Integrated Column Description An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The "other" Washington ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Credits to Credits to * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Outline Outline * A little philosophy

7

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science and Infrastructure Steering Committee CHARTER June 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

8

DOE/EA-1193: Finding of No Significant Impact for the Atmospheric...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed (ARMCART), North Slope of Alaska and...

9

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Observatory (UAO) Pilot Experiment at NYC" - Michael Reynolds, BNL 17:30 "EML Pilot Studies for the Urban Atmospheric Observatory" - Hsi-Na (Sam) Lee, EML 17:40 "A...

10

Atmospheric attenuation of solar radiation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The attenuation of solar radiation by the atmosphere between the heliostat and receiver of a Central Receiver solar energy system has been computed for a number of atmospheric conditions and tower-heliostat distances. The most important atmospheric variable is found to be the atmospheric aerosol content. No dependence of atmospheric water vapor is found and only a weak dependence on solar zenith angle. For a 500 m heliostat-tower distance two to four percent reductions are expected under typical desert conditions (50 to 120 km visibility). The reduction is approximately linear with heliostat-tower distance. A representative value of the attenuation coefficient is 0.051 km/sup -1/.

Randall, C.M.

1977-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

11

DOE/EA-1193: Environmental Assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Artic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site (February 1997)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

u. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY u. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT - The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed (ARM/CART), North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean. The purpose of the ARM/CART program is to collect and analyze atmospheric data for the development and validation of global climate change models. The program involves construction of several small facilities and operation of sensing equipment. The EA analyzes the impacts on land use, tundra, air quality, cultura.l resources, socioeconomics, and wildlife. Separate studies (summarized in the EA) were also conducted to ensure that the operation of the facilities would not

12

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Argonne scientists study climate change 1 of 22 Argonne scientists study climate change The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science provided $60 million in ARRA funding for climate research to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, a DOE national user facility that has been operating climate observing sites around the world for nearly two decades. These sites help scientists study clouds and their influence on the sun's radiant energy, which heats our planet. Above is one of the purchases: the Vaisala Present Weather Detector. It optically measures visibility, present weather, precipitation intensity, and precipitation type. It provides a measure of current weather conditions by combining measurements from three

13

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Cloud Radars: Operational Modes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past decade, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), through the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, has supported the development of several millimeter-wavelength radars for the study of clouds. This effort has culminated in ...

Eugene E. Clothiaux; Kenneth P. Moran; Brooks E. Martner; Thomas P. Ackerman; Gerald G. Mace; Taneil Uttal; James H. Mather; Kevin B. Widener; Mark A. Miller; Daniel J. Rodriguez

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

12.815 Atmospheric Radiation, Fall 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction to the physics of atmospheric radiation and remote sensing including use of computer codes. Radiative transfer equation including emission and scattering, spectroscopy, Mie theory, and numerical solutions. ...

Prinn, Ronald G.

15

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Convective and Orographically...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Induced Precipitation Study The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is providing the ARM Mobile Facility...

16

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1-December 31, 2010 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of...

17

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1-June 30, 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work...

18

A U. S. Department of Energy User Facility Atmospheric Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

S. Department of Energy User Facility Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program DOESC-ARM...

19

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: • The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and • The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

LR Roeder

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Development of a 3D atmospheric radiative transfer model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 3D atmospheric radiative transfer model is established based on MODTRAN4. Moreover, the methods of calculating the ratio of atmospheric transmission, path radiation and single scattering solar radiation are presented. This 3D model is running by ... Keywords: MODTRAN4, atmospheric radiative transfer model, infrared radiation

Zhifeng Lu; Ge Li; Gang Guo; Kedi Huang

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "doe atmospheric radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Science Plan for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Plan is to articulate the scientific issues driving the ARM Program, and to relate them to DOE`s programmatic objectives for ARM, based on the experience and scientific progress gained over the past five years. ARM programmatic objectives are to: (1) Relate observed radiative fluxes and radiances in the atmosphere, spectrally resolved and as a function of position and time, to the temperature and composition of the atmosphere, specifically including water vapor and clouds, and to surface properties, and sample sufficient variety of situations so as to span a wide range of climatologically relevant possibilities; (2) develop and test parameterizations that can be used to accurately predict the radiative properties and to model the radiative interactions involving water vapor and clouds within the atmosphere, with the objective of incorporating these parameterizations into general circulation models. The primary observational methods remote sending and other observations at the surface, particularly remote sensing of clouds, water vapor and aerosols.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Cloud Profiling Radars: An Evaluation of Signal Processing and Sampling Strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program operates millimeter-wavelength cloud radars (MMCRs) in several specific locations within different climatological regimes. These vertically pointing cloud ...

Pavlos Kollias; Bruce A. Albrecht; Eugene E. Clothiaux; Mark A. Miller; Karen L. Johnson; Kenneth P. Moran

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Does an accelerated electron radiate Unruh radiation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An accelerated particle sees the Minkowski vacuum as thermally excited, and the particle moves stochastically due to an interaction with the thermal bath. This interaction fluctuates the particle's transverse momenta like the Brownian motion in a heat bath. Because of this fluctuating motion, it has been discussed that the accelerated charged particle emits extra radiation (the Unruh radiation) in addition to the classical Larmor radiation, and experiments are under planning to detect such radiation by using ultrahigh intensity lasers constructed in near future. There are, however, counterarguments that the radiation is canceled by an interference effect between the vacuum fluctuation and the fluctuating motion. In fact, in the case of an internal detector where the Heisenberg equation of motion can be solved exactly, there is no additional radiation after the thermalization is completed. In this paper, we revisit the issue in the case of an accelerated charged particle in the scalar QED. We first prove the e...

Iso, Satoshi; Zhang, Sen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Structure of the Atmosphere in Radiative–Convective Equilibrium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To investigate water vapor transport in an atmosphere in radiative–convective equilibrium, a simplified dynamical convection model (DCM) was constructed that explicitly models moist convection and longwave radiation in a gray atmosphere. In the ...

Yoshiharu Iwasa; Yutaka Abe; Hiroshi Tanaka

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Rainfall and Radiative Heating Rates from TOGA COARE Atmospheric Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric heat and moisture budgets are used to determine rainfall and radiative heating rates over the western Pacific warm pool during the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE). Results are ...

Richard H. Johnson; Paul E. Ciesielski

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

ORISE: DOE's Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring System (REMS) Monitoring System (REMS) ORISE maintains large database of radition exposure records for the U.S. Department of Energy ORISE staff monitoring radiation data for DOE Rule 10 CFR 835 establishes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) occupational protection rule and requires assessment and recording of radiation doses to individuals who are exposed to sources of radiation or contamination. The Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) database is the radiation exposure data repository for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors and members of the public. REMS maintains dose records for all monitored individuals dating back to 1969. Aggregated, site-specific data are available on the Radiation Exposure Monitoring System website for all years since 1986. Currently,

27

DOE occupational radiation exposure 1996 report  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its radiological operations to ensure the health and safety of all DOE employees including contractors and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures and releases to levels that are ``As Low As Reasonably Achievable`` (ALARA). The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1996 provides summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE and precursor agency sites, and energy research. Collective exposure at DOE has declined by 80% over the past decade due to a cessation in opportunities for exposure during the transition in DOE mission from weapons production to cleanup, deactivation and decommissioning, and changes in reporting requirements and dose calculation methodology. In 1996, the collective dose decreased by 10% from the 1995 value due to decreased doses at five of the seven highest-dose DOE sites. For 1996, these sites attributed the reduction in collective dose to the completion of several decontamination and decommissioning projects, reduced spent fuel storage activities, and effective ALARA practices. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for managers in their management of radiological safety programs and commitment of resources.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

28

DOE Openess: Human Radiation Experiments - Roadmap to the Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Experiments: Roadmap to the Project DOE Shield DOE Openness: Human Radiation Experiment Roadmap to the Project Roadmap to the Project Home Roadmap What's New Search HREX...

29

Influences of atmospheric conditions and air mass on the ratio of ultraviolet to total solar radiation  

SciTech Connect

The technology to detoxify hazardous wastes using ultraviolet (UV) solar radiation is being investigated by the DOE/SERI Solar Thermal Technology Program. One of the elements of the technology evaluation is the assessment and characterization of UV solar radiation resources available for detoxification processes. This report describes the major atmospheric variables that determine the amount of UV solar radiation at the earth's surface, and how the ratio of UV-to-total solar radiation varies with atmospheric conditions. These ratios are calculated from broadband and spectral solar radiation measurements acquired at SERI, and obtained from the literature on modeled and measured UV solar radiation. The following sections discuss the atmospheric effects on UV solar radiation and provide UV-to-total solar radiation ratios from published studies, as well as measured values from SERI's data. A summary and conclusions are also given.

Riordan, C.J.; Hulstrom, R.L.; Myers, D.R.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

An Iterative Radiative Transfer Code For Ocean-Atmosphere Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the details of an iterative radiative transfer code for computing the intensity and degree of polarization of diffuse radiation in models of the ocean-atmosphere system. The present code neglects the upwelling radiation from below the ...

Ziauddin Ahmad; Robert S. Fraser

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1-March 31, 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

32

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1-March 31, 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

33

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1-December 31, 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

34

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Science Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has matured into one of the key programs in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. The ARM Program has achieved considerable scientific success in a broad range of activities, including site and instrument development, atmospheric radiative transfer, aerosol science, determination of cloud properties, cloud modeling, and cloud parameterization testing and development. The focus of ARM science has naturally shifted during the last few years to an increasing emphasis on modeling and parameterization studies to take advantage of the long time series of data now available. During the next 5 years, the principal focus of the ARM science program will be to: Maintain the data record at the fixed ARM sites for at least the next five years. Improve significantly our understanding of and ability to parameterize the 3-D cloud-radiation problem at scales from the local atmospheric column to the global climate model (GCM) grid square. Continue developing techniques to retrieve the properties of all clouds, with a special focus on ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds. Develop a focused research effort on the indirect aerosol problem that spans observations, physical models, and climate model parameterizations. Implement and evaluate an operational methodology to calculate broad-band heating rates in the atmospheric columns at the ARM sites. Develop and implement methodologies to use ARM data more effectively to test atmospheric models, both at the cloud-resolving model scale and the GCM scale. Use these methodologies to diagnose cloud parameterization performance and then refine these parameterizations to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations. In addition, the ARM Program is actively developing a new ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) that will be available for short deployments (several months to a year or more) in climatically important regions. The AMF will have much of the same instrumentation as the remote facilities at ARM's Tropical Western Pacific and the North Slope of Alaska sites. Over time, this new facility will extend ARM science to a much broader range of conditions for model testing.

Ackerman, T

2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major priority of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to ensure the health, safety, and security of DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) provides the corporate-level leadership and strategic vision necessary to better coordinate and integrate health, safety, environment, security, enforcement, and independent oversight programs. One function that supports this mission is the DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program that provides collection, analysis, and dissemination of performance indicators, such as occupational radiation exposure information. This analysis supports corporate decision-making and synthesizes operational information to support continuous environment, safety, and health improvement across the DOE complex.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2013  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. As an indicator of the overall amount of radiation dose received during the conduct of operations at DOE, the report includes information on collective total effective dose (TED). The TED is comprised of the effective dose (ED) from external sources, which includes neutron and photon radiation, and the internal committed effective dose (CED), which results from the intake of radioactive material into the body. The collective ED from photon exposure decreased by 23% between 2011 and 2012, while the neutron dose increased by 5%. The internal dose components of the collective TED decreased by 7%. Over the past 5-year period, 99.99% of the individuals receiving measurable TED have received doses below the 2 roentgen equivalent in man (rems) (20 millisievert [mSv]) TED administrative control level (ACL), which is well below the DOE regulatory limit of 5 rems (50 mSv) TED annually. The occupational radiation exposure records show that in 2012, DOE facilities continued to comply with DOE dose limits and ACLs and worked to minimize exposure to individuals. The DOE collective TED decreased 17.1% from 2011 to 2012. The collective TED decreased at three of the five sites with the largest collective TED. u Idaho Site – Collective dose reductions were achieved as a result of continuing improvements at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) through the planning of drum movements that reduced the number of times a container is handled; placement of waste containers that created highradiation areas in a centralized location; and increased worker awareness of high-dose rate areas. In addition, Idaho had the largest decrease in the total number of workers with measurable TED (1,143 fewer workers). u Hanford Site (Hanford) – An overall reduction of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and Transuranic (TRU) retrieval activities resulted in collective dose reductions. u Savannah River Site (SRS) – Reductions were achieved through ALARA initiatives employed site wide. The Solid Waste Management Facility used extended specialty tools, cameras and lead shield walls to facilitate removal of drums. These tools and techniques reduce exposure time through improved efficiency, increase distance from the source of radiation by remote monitoring, shield the workers to lower the dose rate, and reduce the potential for contamination and release of material through repacking of waste. Overall, from 2011 to 2012, there was a 19% decrease in the number of workers with measurable dose. Furthermore, due to a slight decrease in both the DOE workforce (7%) and monitored workers (10%), the ratio of workers with measurable doses to monitored workers decreased to 13%. Another primary indicator of the level of radiation exposure covered in this report is the average measurable dose, which normalizes the collective dose over the population of workers who actually received a measurable dose. The average measurable TED in

none,

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

37

A Simulated Climatology of Spectrally Decomposed Atmospheric Infrared Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simulation experiment is conducted to inquire into the mean climate state and likely trends in atmospheric infrared radiation spectra. Upwelling and downwelling spectra at five vertical levels from the surface to the top of the atmosphere (TOA) ...

Yi Huang

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

An Accurate and Efficient Radiation Algorithm for Middle Atmosphere Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An accurate, efficient, and user-friendly radiation algorithm is developed for calculating net radiative heating rate in middle atmosphere models. The Curtis matrix interpolation scheme originally developed by Zhu is adopted with explicit ...

Xun Zhu

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Infrared Radiative Properties Of the Maritime Antarctic Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The longwave radiation environment of the Antarctic Peninsula and Southern Ocean has been investigated using radiometric Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) measurements of atmospheric emission in conjunction with detailed radiative transfer ...

Dan Lubin

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

ARM - PI Product - Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & Radiative Flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsAtmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & ProductsAtmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & Radiative Flux Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & Radiative Flux 1997.01.01 - 2010.12.31 Site(s) NSA SGP TWP General Description This data product contains atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "doe atmospheric radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Style Guide Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility March 2013 Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility March 2013 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research March 2013 ii Contents 1.0 Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Acronyms and Abbreviations ............................................................................................................... 1 2.1 Usage ............................................................................................................................................ 1

42

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1993 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3: Atmospheric and climate research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) atmospheric sciences and carbon dioxide research programs provide the DOE with scientifically defensible information on the local, regional, and global distributions of energy-related pollutants and their effects on climate. PNL has had a long history of technical leadership in the atmospheric sciences research programs within OHER. Within the Environmental Sciences Division of OHER, the Atmospheric Chemistry Program continues DOE`s long-term commitment to understanding the local, regional, and global effects of energy-related air pollutants. Research through direct measurement, numerical modeling, and analytical studies in the Atmospheric Chemistry Program emphasizes the long-range transport, chemical transformation, and removal of emitted pollutants, photochemically produced oxidant species, nitrogen-reservoir species, and aerosols. The atmospheric studies in Complex Terrain Program applies basic research on atmospheric boundary layer structure and evolution over inhomogeneous terrain to DOE`s site-specific and generic mission needs in site safety, air quality, and climate change. Research at PNL provides basic scientific underpinnings to DOE`s program of global climate research. Research projects within the core carbon dioxide and ocean research programs are now integrated with those in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements, the Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics, and Quantitative Links program to form DOE`s contribution to the US Global Change Research Program. The description of ongoing atmospheric and climate research at PNL is organized in two broad research areas: atmospheric research; and climate research. This report describes the progress in fiscal year 1993 in each of these areas. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

An Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Measurements in Siberia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Measurements in Siberia S. M. Sakerin, F. V. Dorofeev, D. M. Kabanov, V. S. Kozlov, M. V. Panchenko, Yu. A. Pkhalagov, V. V. Polkin, V. P. Shmargunov, S. A. Terpugova, S. A. Turchinovich, and V. N. Uzhegov Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction The instrumentation complex is described, which has been prepared for radiative experiments in the region of Tomsk (West Siberia). The complex consists of three groups of devices to measure (a) the characteristics of the total downward radiation; (b) the most variable components of the atmospheric transparency directly affecting the income of radiation (aerosol optical depth [AOD], total content of water vapor, ozone, etc.); and (c) aerosol and meteorological parameters of the near-ground layer of the

44

Absorption of Solar Radiation by Atmospheric O4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spectroscopic measurements of the atmospheric solar radiation attenuation reveal that the near ultraviolet–visible–near-infrared absorption of the oxygen collision complex (O2)2, thus far omitted from models, is important for the direct heating ...

Klaus Pfeilsticker; Frank Erle; Ulrich Platt

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Radiative Heating and Cooling Rates in the Middle Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the limitations to the accurate calculation of radiative heating and cooling rates in the stratosphere and mesosphere has been the lack of accurate data on the atmospheric temperature and composition. Data from the LIMS experiment on ...

John C. Gille; Lawrence V. Lyjak

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Central U.S. Atmospheric Water and Energy Budgets Adjusted for Diurnal Sampling Biases Using Top-of-Atmosphere Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water and energy budgets of the atmospheric column over the Mississippi River basin are estimated using 18 yr (1976–93) of twice-daily radiosonde observations, top-of-atmosphere net radiation estimates from the Earth Radiation Budget ...

Hideki Kanamaru; Guido D. Salvucci; Dara Entekhabi

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

DOE occupational radiation exposure. Report 1992--1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1992-1994 reports occupational radiation exposures incurred by individuals at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities from 1992 through 1994. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. This information is analyzed and trended over time to provide a measure of the DOE`s performance in protecting its workers from radiation. Occupational radiation exposure at DOE has been decreasing over the past 5 years. In particular, doses in the higher dose ranges are decreasing, including the number of doses in excess of the DOE limits and doses in excess of the 2 rem Administrative Control Level (ACL). This is an indication of greater attention being given to protecting these individuals from radiation in the workplace.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Top-of-atmosphere radiative cooling with white roofs: experimental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Top-of-atmosphere radiative cooling with white roofs: experimental Top-of-atmosphere radiative cooling with white roofs: experimental verification and model-based evaluation Title Top-of-atmosphere radiative cooling with white roofs: experimental verification and model-based evaluation Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Salamanca, Francisco, Shaheen R. Tonse, Surabi Menon, Vishal Garg, Krishna P. Singh, Manish Naja, and Marc L. Fischer Journal Environmental Research Letters Volume 7 Issue 4 Abstract We evaluate differences in clear-sky upwelling shortwave radiation reaching the top of the atmosphere in response to increasing the albedo of roof surfaces in an area of India with moderately high aerosol loading. Treated (painted white) and untreated (unpainted) roofs on two buildings in northeast India were analyzed on five cloudless days using radiometric imagery from the IKONOS satellite. Comparison of a radiative transfer model (RRTMG) and radiometric satellite observations shows good agreement (R2 = 0.927). Results show a mean increase of ~50 W m-2 outgoing at the top of the atmosphere for each 0.1 increase of the albedo at the time of the observations and a strong dependence on atmospheric transmissivity.

49

AN ANALYTIC RADIATIVE-CONVECTIVE MODEL FOR PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an analytic one-dimensional radiative-convective model of the thermal structure of planetary atmospheres. Our model assumes that thermal radiative transfer is gray and can be represented by the two-stream approximation. Model atmospheres are assumed to be in hydrostatic equilibrium, with a power-law scaling between the atmospheric pressure and the gray thermal optical depth. The convective portions of our models are taken to follow adiabats that account for condensation of volatiles through a scaling parameter to the dry adiabat. By combining these assumptions, we produce simple, analytic expressions that allow calculations of the atmospheric-pressure-temperature profile, as well as expressions for the profiles of thermal radiative flux and convective flux. We explore the general behaviors of our model. These investigations encompass (1) worlds where atmospheric attenuation of sunlight is weak, which we show tend to have relatively high radiative-convective boundaries; (2) worlds with some attenuation of sunlight throughout the atmosphere, which we show can produce either shallow or deep radiative-convective boundaries, depending on the strength of sunlight attenuation; and (3) strongly irradiated giant planets (including hot Jupiters), where we explore the conditions under which these worlds acquire detached convective regions in their mid-tropospheres. Finally, we validate our model and demonstrate its utility through comparisons to the average observed thermal structure of Venus, Jupiter, and Titan, and by comparing computed flux profiles to more complex models.

Robinson, Tyler D. [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Catling, David C., E-mail: robinson@astro.washington.edu [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Washington, Box 351310, Seattle, WA 98195-1310 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

50

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1992 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3, Atmospheric and climate research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the atmospheric sciences and carbon dioxide research programs are part of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD). One of the central missions of the division is to provide the DOE with scientifically defensible information on the local, regional, and global distributions of energy-related pollutants and their effects on climate. This information is vital to the definition and implementation of a sound national energy strategy. This volume reports on the progress and status of all OHER atmospheric science and climate research projects at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). PNL has had a long history of technical leadership in the atmospheric sciences research programs within OHER. Within the ESD, the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP) continues DOE`s long-term commitment to study the continental and oceanic fates of energy-related air pollutants. Research through direct measurement, numerical modeling, and laboratory studies in the ACP emphasizes the long-range transport, chemical transformation, and removal of emitted pollutants, oxidant species, nitrogen-reservoir species, and aerosols. The Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program continues to apply basic research on density-driven circulations and on turbulent mixing and dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer to the micro- to mesoscale meteorological processes that affect air-surface exchange and to emergency preparedness at DOE and other facilities. Research at PNL provides basic scientific underpinnings to DOE`s program of global climate research. Research projects within the core carbon dioxide and ocean research programs are now integrated with those in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM), the Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics (CHAMMP), and Quantitative Links programs to form DOE`s contribution to the US Global Change Research Program.

Schrempf, R.E. [ed.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Stochastic Radiative Transfer in Partially Cloudy Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radiation treatment of the broken-cloud problem is presented, based upon various stochastic models of the equation of radiative transfer that consider the clouds and clear sky as a two-component mixture. These models, recently introduced in the ...

F. Malvagi; R. N. Byrne; G. C. Pomraning; R. C. J. Somerville

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

DOE Research Contributions to Radiation and Cancer Therapy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Research Contributions to Radiation and Cancer Therapy Resources with Additional Information Planned radiation treatment Peregrine calculation from Mission Possible: DOE Advanced Biomedical Technology Research, page 10 Over the time span of many years, DOE's research has made many contributions to radiation and cancer therapy, including PEREGRINE and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). 'PEREGRINE, a hardware and software system that addresses the problem of radiation therapy dosage using fundamental physics principles, is a revolutionary new tool for analyzing and planning radiation treatment for cancer patients. About 90 percent of radiation treatment patients receive photon therapy, which is PEREGRINE's principal application. PEREGRINE may also be applied to the less frequently used electron-beam therapy and to brachytherapy, which is radiation therapy from an internally planted radiation source. It is effective for radiography, which predicts the pattern of radiation that is transmitted through a patient or other object.'1

53

Improved Atmospheric Solar Radiation Budget Pyranometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solar radiation budget is investigated with seven pyranometers. Three of these instruments have horizontally aligned sensors. The sensors of the remaining four instruments are vertically aligned in such a way that their normals point to the ...

Gottfried Hänel; Karin Kastner

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Spectrally Invariant Approximation within Atmospheric Radiative Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Certain algebraic combinations of single scattering albedo and solar radiation reflected from, or transmitted through, vegetation canopies do not vary with wavelength. These “spectrally invariant relationships” are the consequence of wavelength ...

A. Marshak; Y. Knyazikhin; J. C. Chiu; W. J. Wiscombe

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

An Indirect Effect of Ice Nuclei on Atmospheric Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional cloud-resolving model (CRM) with observed large-scale forcing is used to study how ice nuclei (IN) affect the net radiative flux at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). In all the numerical experiments carried out, the cloud ice ...

Xiping Zeng; Wei-Kuo Tao; Minghua Zhang; Arthur Y. Hou; Shaocheng Xie; Stephen Lang; Xiaowen Li; David O’C. Starr; Xiaofan Li; Joanne Simpson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

The NCEP–NCAR, NCEP–DOE, and TRMM Tropical Atmosphere Hydrologic Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimates for the tropical atmospheric hydrologic cycle from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction–National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP–NCAR) reanalysis I (RI), the NCEP–Department of Energy (NCEP–DOE) reanalysis II (RII), ...

John Roads

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure November 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2010 occupational radiation dose data trended over the past 5 years, and includes instructions to submit successful ALARA projects.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Analysis

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

58

A Study of the Incoming Longwave Atmospheric Radiation from a Clear Sky  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A band model for atmospheric absorption is used to calculate the incoming longwave atmospheric radiative flux for some typical clear sky conditions. The sky radiation is also measured using a specially-designed calorimetric apparatus over a wide ...

J. W. Ramsey; H. D. Chiang; R. J. Goldstein

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Interactions between Vegetation and Climate: Radiative and Physiological Effects of Doubled Atmospheric CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiative and physiological effects of doubled atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) on climate are investigated using a coupled biosphere–atmosphere model. Five 30-yr climate simulations, designed to assess the radiative and physiological effects ...

L. Bounoua; G. J. Collatz; P. J. Sellers; D. A. Randall; D. A. Dazlich; S. O. Los; J. A. Berry; I. Fung; C. J. Tucker; C. B. Field; T. G. Jensen

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

On the application of the MODTRAN4 atmospheric radiative transfer code to optical remote sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quantification of atmospheric effects on the solar radiation measured by a spaceborne or airborne optical sensor is required for some key tasks in remote sensing, such as atmospheric correction, simulation of realistic scenarios or retrieval of atmospheric ...

Luis Guanter; Rudolf Richter; Hermann Kaufmann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "doe atmospheric radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Radiative Forcing of Climate By Ice-Age Atmospheric Dust  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During glacial periods, dust deposition rates and inferred atmospheric concentrations were globally much higher than present. According to recent model results, the large enhancement of atmospheric dust content at the last glacial maximum (LGM) can be explained only if increases in the potential dust source areas are taken into account. Such increases are to be expected, due to e#ects of low precipitation and low atmospheric (CO 2 ) on plant growth. Here the modelled three-dimensional dust fields from Mahowald et al. and modelled seasonally varying surface-albedo fields derived in a parallel manner, are used to quantify the mean radiative forcing due to modern (non-anthropogenic) and LGM dust. The e#ect of mineralogical provenance on the radiative properties of the dust is taken into account, as is the range of optical properties associated with uncertainties about the mixing state of the dust particles. The high-latitude (poleward of 45#) mean change in forcing (LGM minus modern) is estimated to be small (--0.9 to +0.2 W m ), especially when compared to nearly --20 W m due to reflection from the extended ice sheets. Although the net e#ect of dust over ice sheets is a positive forcing (warming), much of the simulated high-latitude dust was not over the ice sheets, but over unglaciated regions close to the expanded dust source region in central Asia. In the tropics the change in forcing is estimated to be overall negative, and of similarly large magnitude (--2.2 to --3.2 W m ) to the radiative cooling e#ect of low atmospheric (CO 2 ). Thus, the largest long-term climatic e#ect of the LGM dust is likely to have been a cooling of the tropics. Low tropical sea-surface temperatures, low atmospheric (CO 2 ) and high atmospheric dust loading may be mutually reinforcin...

T. Claquin; C. Roelandt; K.E. Kohfeld; S.P. Harrison; I. Tegen; I.C. Prentice; Y. Balkanski; Prentice Æ Y. Balkanski; G. Bergametti; Æ N. Mahowald; Æ M. Schulz; M. Schulz; Æ K. E. Kohfeld; Æ K. E. Kohfeld; C. Roelandt; C. Roelandt; Æ S. P. Harrison; Æ S. P. Harrison; Æ S. P. Harrison; G. Bergametti; H. Rodhe; Æ H. Rodhe; M. Hansson; M. Hansson; N. Mahowald; N. Mahowald

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

2011 DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Summary poster  

SciTech Connect

This poster graphically presents data pertaining to occupational radiation exposure in terms of total effective dose (TED), primarily, but also collective dose and average measureable dose.

ORAU

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

63

JOINT EPA/DOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No Radiation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EPA/DOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No EPA/DOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No Radiation Levels of Concern Have Reached the United States JOINT EPA/DOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No Radiation Levels of Concern Have Reached the United States March 18, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - The United States Government has an extensive network of radiation monitors around the country and no radiation levels of concern have been detected. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency RadNet system is designed to protect the public by notifying scientists, in near real time, of elevated levels of radiation so they can determine whether protective action is required. The EPA's system has not detected any radiation levels of concern. In addition to EPA's RadNet system, the U.S. Department of Energy has

64

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, July 2001.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global Warming and Methane--Global warming, an increase in Earth's near-surface temperature, is believed to result from the buildup of what scientists refer to as ''greenhouse gases.'' These gases include water vapor, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, perfluorocarbons, hydrofluoro-carbons, and sulfur hexafluoride. Greenhouse gases can absorb outgoing infrared (heat) radiation and re-emit it back to Earth, warming the surface. Thus, these gases act like the glass of a greenhouse enclosure, trapping infrared radiation inside and warming the space. One of the more important greenhouse gases is the naturally occurring hydrocarbon methane. Methane, a primary component of natural gas, is the second most important contributor to the greenhouse effect (after carbon dioxide). Natural sources of methane include wetlands, fossil sources, termites, oceans, fresh-waters, and non-wetland soils. Methane is also produced by human-related (or anthropogenic) activities such as fossil fuel production, coal mining, rice cultivation, biomass burning, water treatment facilities, waste management operations and landfills, and domesticated livestock operations (Figure 1). These anthropogenic activities account for approximately 70% of the methane emissions to the atmosphere. Methane is removed naturally from the atmosphere in three ways. These methods, commonly referred to as sinks, are oxidation by chemical reaction with tropospheric hydroxyl ion, oxidation within the stratosphere, and microbial uptake by soils. In spite of their important role in removing excess methane from the atmosphere, the sinks cannot keep up with global methane production. Methane concentrations in the atmosphere have increased by 145% since 1800. Increases in atmospheric methane roughly parallel world population growth, pointing to anthropogenic sources as the cause (Figure 2). Increases in the methane concentration reduce Earth's natural cooling efficiency by trapping more of the outgoing terrestrial infrared radiation, increasing the near-surface temperature.

Holdridge, D. J.

2001-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

65

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Warm Pool Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment General Description The Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) was a collaborative effort led by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. Beginning January 21 and ending February 14, 2006, the experiment was conducted in the region near the ARM Climate Research Facility in Darwin, Northern Australia. This permanent facility is fully equipped with sophisticated instruments for measuring cloud and other atmospheric properties to provide a long-term record of continuous observational data. Measurements obtained from the other experiment components (explained below) will complement this dataset to provide a detailed description of the tropical atmosphere.

66

DOE Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure_2011 pamphlet  

SciTech Connect

This pamphlet focusses on two HSS activities that help ensure radiation exposures are accurately assessed and recorded, namely: 1) the quality and accuracy of occupational radiation exposure monitoring, and 2) the recording, reporting, analysis, and dissemination of the monitoring results. It is intended to provide a short summary of two specific HSS programs that aid in the oversight of radiation protection activities at DOE. The Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) is in place to ensure that radiation exposure monitoring at all DOE sites is precise and accurate, and conforms to national and international performance and quality assurance standards. The DOE Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems (REMS) program provides for the collection, analysis, and dissemination of occupational radiation exposure information. The annual REMS report is a valuable tool for managing radiological safety programs and for developing policies to protect individuals from occupational exposure to radiation. In tandem, these programs provide DOE management and workers an assurance that occupational radiation exposures are accurately measured, analyzed, and reported.

ORAU

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

67

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: DOE / NASA Joint Funded Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE/NASA Joint Funded Projects DOE/NASA Joint Funded Projects NASA Source Photo Space explorers are subject to exposure to low dose ionizing radiation. Research that helps determine health risks from this exposure is funded by NASA and DOE. Source: NASA DOE's Low Dose Program and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) jointly fund new research to develop a better scientific basis for understanding risks to humans from exposures to low doses or low fluences of ionizing radiation. Research must focus on elucidating molecular mechanisms and pathways involved in normal radiobiological responses to low dose exposure, and must have the potential to ultimately increase understanding of health outcomes from radiation exposures that are at or near current workplace exposure

68

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: DOE Lowdose Radiation Program Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Authors: William F. Morgan1 and Marianne B. Sowa2 Institutions: 1Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, University of Maryland, Baltimore MD 21201 2 Chemical Structure and Dynamics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 We have recently installed a low LET electron microbeam that generates energetic electrons to mimic radiation damage from gamma and x-ray sources. It has been designed such that high-energy electrons deposit energy in a pre-selected subset of cells leaving neighboring cells unirradiated (Figure 1). In this way it is possible to examine non-targeted effects associated with low dose radiation exposure including induced genomic instability and

69

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: Programmatic Background and Design of the Cloud and Radiation Test Bed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, is a major new program of atmospheric measurement and modeling. The program is intended to improve the understanding of processes that affect ...

Gerald M. Stokes; Stephen E. Schwartz

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

DOE-STD-1107-97; DOE Standard Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities For Key Radiation Protection Positions at DOE Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STANDARD STANDARD KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES FOR KEY RADIATION PROTECTION POSITIONS AT DOE FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1107-97 January 1997 Reaffirmed June 2005 This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (423) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. Order No. DE97003656 Reaffirmation with Errata DOE-HDBK-1107-97 Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities for Key Radiation Protection Positions at DOE

71

Application of the adjoint method in atmospheric radiative transfer calculations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The transfer of solar radiation through a standard mid-latitude summer atmosphere including different amounts of aerosols (from clear to hazy) has been computed. The discrete-ordinates (S/sub N/) method, which has been developed to a high degree of computational efficiency and accuracy primarily for nuclear radiation shielding applications, is employed in a forward as well as adjoint mode. In the adjoint mode the result of a transfer calculation is an importance function (adjoint intensity) which allows the calculation of transmitted fluxes, or other radiative responses, for any arbitrary source distribution. The theory of the adjoint method is outlined in detail and physical interpretations are developed for the adjoint intensity. If, for example, the downward directed solar flux at ground level, F/sub lambda/ (z = 0), is desired for N different solar zenith angles, a regular (forward) radiative transfer calculation must be repeated for each solar zenith angle. In contrast, only 1 adjoint transfer calculation gives F/sub lambda/ (z = 0) for all solar zenith angles in a hazy aerosol atmosphere, for 1 wavelength interval, in 2.3 seconds on a CDC-7600 computer. A total of 155 altitude zones were employed between 0 and 70 km, and the convergence criterion for the ratio of fluxes from successive iterations was set at 2 x 10/sup -3/. Our results demonstrate not only the applicability of the highly efficient modern S/sub N/ codes, but indicate also conceptual and computational advantages when the adjoint formulation of the radiative transfer equation is used.

Gerstl, S.A.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Atmospheric radiation measurement program facilities newsletter, September 2001.  

SciTech Connect

Our Changing Climate--Is our climate really changing? How do we measure climate change? How can we predict what Earth's climate will be like for generations to come? One focus of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is to improve scientific climate models enough to achieve reliable regional prediction of future climate. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the global mean surface temperature has increased by 0.5-1.0 F since the late 19th century. The 20th century's 10 warmest years all occurred in the last 15 years of the century, with 1998 being the warmest year of record. The global mean surface temperature is measured by a network of temperature-sensing instruments distributed around the world, including ships, ocean buoys, and weather stations on land. The data from this network are retrieved and analyzed by various organizations, including the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the World Meteorological Organization. Worldwide temperature records date back to 1860. To reconstruct Earth's temperature history before 1860, scientists use limited temperature records, along with proxy indicators such as tree rings, pollen records, and analysis of air frozen in ancient ice. The solar energy received from the sun drives Earth's weather and climate. Some of this energy is reflected and filtered by the atmosphere, but most is absorbed by Earth's surface. The absorbed solar radiation warms the surface and is re-radiated as heat energy into the atmosphere. Some atmospheric gases, called greenhouse gases, trap some of the re-emitted heat, keeping the surface temperature regulated and suitable for sustaining life. Although the greenhouse effect is natural, some evidence indicates that human activities are producing increased levels of some greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. Scientists believe that the combustion of fossil fuels is responsible for the increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. According to the EPA, the burning of fossil fuels for cars and trucks, the heating of homes and businesses, and the operation of power plants account for approximately 98% of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions. The increase of greenhouse gases will, theoretically, enhance the greenhouse effect by trapping more of the heat energy emitted by Earth's surface, thus increasing the surface temperatures on a global scale. Scientists expect that the global average surface temperature could rise 1-4.5 F in the next 50 years and as much as 10 F in the next century. Global warming could potentially have harmful effects on human health, water resources, forests, agriculture, wildlife, and coastal areas. A few degrees of warming might lead to more frequent and severe heat waves, worsened air pollution with adverse effects on human respiratory health, and wider spread of tropical disease such as malaria. The world's hydrologic cycle might be affected by an increase in evaporation and, thus, in precipitation. An increase in evaporation will increase atmospheric water vapor, a significant natural greenhouse gas. The increase in water vapor might further enhance the global warming caused by the greenhouse effect. This is known as a positive feedback. The increase in water vapor could also change the amount of clouds present in the atmosphere, which could reduce temperatures in a negative feedback. Many interrelated factors affect the global climate and are responsible for climate change. Predicting the outcome of the interactions among the many factors is not easy, but it must be addressed. The ARM Program is taking a lead in this effort by collecting vast amounts of data whose analysis will improve our forecasting models for both daily weather and long-term climate. For more information on the ARM Program, please visit our web site at www.arm.gov.

Holdridge, D. J.

2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

73

Atmospheric radiation measurement program facilities newsletter, September 2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our Changing Climate--Is our climate really changing? How do we measure climate change? How can we predict what Earth's climate will be like for generations to come? One focus of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is to improve scientific climate models enough to achieve reliable regional prediction of future climate. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the global mean surface temperature has increased by 0.5-1.0 F since the late 19th century. The 20th century's 10 warmest years all occurred in the last 15 years of the century, with 1998 being the warmest year of record. The global mean surface temperature is measured by a network of temperature-sensing instruments distributed around the world, including ships, ocean buoys, and weather stations on land. The data from this network are retrieved and analyzed by various organizations, including the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the World Meteorological Organization. Worldwide temperature records date back to 1860. To reconstruct Earth's temperature history before 1860, scientists use limited temperature records, along with proxy indicators such as tree rings, pollen records, and analysis of air frozen in ancient ice. The solar energy received from the sun drives Earth's weather and climate. Some of this energy is reflected and filtered by the atmosphere, but most is absorbed by Earth's surface. The absorbed solar radiation warms the surface and is re-radiated as heat energy into the atmosphere. Some atmospheric gases, called greenhouse gases, trap some of the re-emitted heat, keeping the surface temperature regulated and suitable for sustaining life. Although the greenhouse effect is natural, some evidence indicates that human activities are producing increased levels of some greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. Scientists believe that the combustion of fossil fuels is responsible for the increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. According to the EPA, the burning of fossil fuels for cars and trucks, the heating of homes and businesses, and the operation of power plants account for approximately 98% of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions. The increase of greenhouse gases will, theoretically, enhance the greenhouse effect by trapping more of the heat energy emitted by Earth's surface, thus increasing the surface temperatures on a global scale. Scientists expect that the global average surface temperature could rise 1-4.5 F in the next 50 years and as much as 10 F in the next century. Global warming could potentially have harmful effects on human health, water resources, forests, agriculture, wildlife, and coastal areas. A few degrees of warming might lead to more frequent and severe heat waves, worsened air pollution with adverse effects on human respiratory health, and wider spread of tropical disease such as malaria. The world's hydrologic cycle might be affected by an increase in evaporation and, thus, in precipitation. An increase in evaporation will increase atmospheric water vapor, a significant natural greenhouse gas. The increase in water vapor might further enhance the global warming caused by the greenhouse effect. This is known as a positive feedback. The increase in water vapor could also change the amount of clouds present in the atmosphere, which could reduce temperatures in a negative feedback. Many interrelated factors affect the global climate and are responsible for climate change. Predicting the outcome of the interactions among the many factors is not easy, but it must be addressed. The ARM Program is taking a lead in this effort by collecting vast amounts of data whose analysis will improve our forecasting models for both daily weather and long-term climate. For more information on the ARM Program, please visit our web site at www.arm.gov.

Holdridge, D. J.

2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

74

Adjustment to Radiative Forcing in a Simple Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study calculates the adjustment to radiative forcing in a simple model of a mixed layer ocean coupled to the overlying atmosphere. One application of the model is to calculate how dust aerosols perturb the temperature of the atmosphere and ...

R. L. Miller

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

A Global Atmospheric Analysis Dataset Downscaled from the NCEP–DOE Reanalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global atmospheric analysis dataset is constructed via a spectral nudging technique. The 6-hourly National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)–Department of Energy (DOE) reanalysis from January 1979 to February 2011 is utilized to force ...

Jung-Eun Kim; Song-You Hong

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Atmospheric Circulation Trends, 1950–2000: The Relative Roles of Sea Surface Temperature Forcing and Direct Atmospheric Radiative Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relative roles of direct atmospheric radiative forcing (due to observed changes in well-mixed greenhouse gases, tropospheric and stratospheric ozone, sulfate and volcanic aerosols, and solar output) and observed sea surface temperature (SST) ...

Clara Deser; Adam S. Phillips

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

DOE Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) Data Update  

SciTech Connect

This slide show presents the 2011 draft data for DOE occupational radiation exposure.Clarification is given on Reporting Data regarding: reporting Total Organ Dose (TOD); reporting Total Skin Dose (TSD), and Total Extremity Dose (TExD) ; and Special individuals reporting.

Rao, Nimi; Hagemeyer, Derek

2012-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

78

An Improved Parameterization for Estimating Effective Atmospheric Emissivity for Use in Calculating Daytime Downwelling Longwave Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved parameterization is presented for estimating effective atmospheric emissivity for use in calculating downwelling longwave radiation based on temperature, humidity, pressure, and solar radiation observations. The first improvement is ...

Todd M. Crawford; Claude E. Duchon

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Radiative Effects of Airborne Dust on Regional Energy Budgets at the Top of the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of dust on the radiative energy budget at the top of the atmosphere were investigated using model calculations and measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). Estimates of the dust optical depth were made from ...

Steven A. Ackerman; Hyosang Chung

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

A Coupled Atmosphere–Ocean Radiative Transfer System Using the Analytic Four-Stream Approximation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled atmosphere–ocean radiative transfer model based on the analytic four-stream approximation has been developed. It is shown that this radiation model is computationally efficient and at the same time can achieve acceptable accuracy for ...

Wei-Liang Lee; K. N. Liou

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "doe atmospheric radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Two-Dimensional Radiative Transfer in Cloudy Atmospheres: The Spherical Harmonic Spatial Grid Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new two-dimensional monochromatic method that computes the transfer of solar or thermal radiation through atmospheres with arbitrary optical properties is described. The model discretizes the radiative transfer equation by expanding the angular ...

K. Franklin Evans

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Environmental assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is aimed at supplying improved predictive capability of climate change, particularly the prediction of cloud-climate feedback. The objective will be achieved by measuring the atmospheric radiation and physical and meteorological quantities that control solar radiation in the earth`s atmosphere and using this information to test global climate and related models. The proposed action is to construct and operate a Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) research site in the southern Great Plains as part of the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program whose objective is to develop an improved predictive capability of global climate change. The purpose of this CART research site in southern Kansas and northern Oklahoma would be to collect meteorological and other scientific information to better characterize the processes controlling radiation transfer on a global scale. Impacts which could result from this facility are described.

Policastro, A.J.; Pfingston, J.M.; Maloney, D.M.; Wasmer, F.; Pentecost, E.D.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Proceedings of the sixth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team meeting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains the summaries of papers presented at the 1996 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team meeting held at San Antonio, Texas. The history and status of the ARM program at the time of the meeting helps to put these papers in context. The basic themes have not changed. First, from its beginning, the Program has attempted to respond to the most critical scientific issues facing the US Global Change Research Program. Second, the Program has been strongly coupled to other agency and international programs. More specifically, the Program reflects an unprecedented collaboration among agencies of the federal research community, among the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) national laboratories, and between DOE`s research program and related international programs, such as Global Energy and Water Experiment (GEWEX) and the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) program. Next, ARM has always attempted to make the most judicious use of its resources by collaborating and leveraging existing assets and has managed to maintain an aggressive schedule despite budgets that have been much smaller than planned. Finally, the Program has attracted some of the very best scientific talent in the climate research community and has, as a result, been productive scientifically.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE G 441.1-1C Radiation Protection Programs Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41.1-1C 41.1-1C RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS GUIDE NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION LEARNING AND CAREER DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT Change No: 1 DOE G 441.1-1C Level: Familiar Date: 12/1/08 1 DOE G 441.1-1C, RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS GUIDE FAMILIAR LEVEL _________________________________________________________________________ OBJECTIVES Given the familiar level of this module and the resources listed below, you will be able to 1. Match radiation protection-related terms to their definitions; 2. Discuss the elements that should be taken into consideration to determine the likelihood of an individual receiving a dose in excess of a regulatory monitoring threshold; 3. Give three examples of criteria that should trigger a formal as-low-as-is-

85

DOE/ER-0441 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Plan - February...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

43 15 An artist's conception of the radiometric calibration facility at the Solar Energy Research Institute......

86

Surface shortwave aerosol radiative forcing during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Mobile Facility deployment in Niamey, Niger  

SciTech Connect

This study presents ground-based remote sensing measurements of aerosol optical properties and corresponding shortwave surface radiative effect calculations for the deployment of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program’s Mobile Facility (AMF) to Niamey, Niger during 2006. Aerosol optical properties including aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA), and asymmetry parameter (AP) were derived from multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) measurements during the two dry seasons (Jan-Apr and Oct-Dec) at Niamey. The vertical distribution of aerosol extinction was derived from the collocated micropulse lidar (MPL). The aerosol optical properties and vertical distribution of extinction varied significantly throughout the year, with higher AOD, lower SSA, and deeper aerosol layers during the Jan-Apr time period, when biomass burning aerosol layers were more frequent. Using the retrieved aerosol properties and vertical extinction profiles, broadband shortwave surface fluxes and atmospheric heating rate profiles were calculated. Corresponding calculations with no aerosol were used to estimate the aerosol direct radiative effect at the surface. Comparison of the calculated surface fluxes to observed fluxes for non-cloudy periods indicated that the remote sensing retrievals provided a reasonable estimation of the optical properties, with mean differences between calculated and observed fluxes of less than 5 W/m2 and RMS differences less than 25 W/m2. Sensitivity tests for a particular case study showed that the observed fluxes could be matched with variations of < 10% in the inputs to the radiative transfer model. We estimated the daily-averaged aerosol radiative effect at the surface by subtracting the clear calculations from the aerosol calculations. The average daily SW aerosol radiative effect over the study period was -27 W/m2, which is comparable to values estimated from satellite data and from climate models with sophisticated dust parameterizations.

McFarlane, Sally A.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

87

DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Workshop I November 1999  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Dose Radiation Research Program Low Dose Radiation Research Program U.S. Department of Energy Office of Biological and Environmental Research David G. Thomassen, Ph.D. Program Coordinator Office of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy, SC-72 19901 Germantown Road Germantown, MD 20874-1290 Phone: 301-903-9817 Fax: 301-903-8521 Email: david.thomassen@science.doe.gov Arthur Katz, Ph.D. Life Sciences Division Office of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy, SC-72 19901 Germantown Road Germantown, MD 20874-1290 Phone: 301-903-4932 Fax: 301-903-8521 Email: arthur.katz@science.doe.gov Marvin E. Frazier, Ph.D. Director, Life Sciences Division Office of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy, SC-72 19901 Germantown Road

88

Entropy Budget of an Atmosphere in Radiative–Convective Equilibrium. Part I: Maximum Work and Frictional Dissipation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The entropy budget of an atmosphere in radiative–convective equilibrium is analyzed here. The differential heating of the atmosphere, resulting from surface heat fluxes and tropospheric radiative cooling, corresponds to a net entropy sink. In ...

Olivier Pauluis; Isaac M. Held

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

An Update on Radiative Transfer Model Development at Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Update on Radiative Transfer Model Development at Update on Radiative Transfer Model Development at Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. J. S. Delamere, S. A. Clough, E. J. Mlawer, Sid-Ahmed Boukabara, K. Cady-Pereira, and M. Shepard Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Maine Introduction Over the last decade, a suite of radiative transfer models has been developed at Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) with support from the Atmospheric and Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. These models span the full spectral regime from the microwave to the ultraviolet, and range from monochromatic to band calculations. Each model combines the latest spectroscopic advancements with radiative transfer algorithms to efficiently compute radiances, fluxes, and cooling

90

Anthropogenic NO2 in the Atmosphere: Estimates of the Column Content and Radiative Forcing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Anthropogenic NO Anthropogenic NO 2 in the Atmosphere: Estimates of the Column Content and Radiative Forcing A. N. Rublev Institution of Molecular Physics Russian Research Center Kurchatov Institute Moscow, Russia N Chubarova Meteorological Observatory of Moscow State University Moscow, Russia G. Gorchakov Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics Russian Academy of Sciences Moscow, Russia Introduction The work summarizes the different methodical aspects, firstly, the use of atmosphere optical depths presented in Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data for NO 2 column retrievals, and, secondly, its radiative forcing calculated as difference between integral solar fluxes absorbed in the atmosphere with and without NO 2 under given air mass or the sun zenith angle.

91

A Three-Dimensional Radiative Transfer Model to Investigate the Solar Radiation within a Cloudy Atmosphere. Part I: Spatial Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new Monte Carlo–based three-dimensional (3D) radiative transfer model of high spectral and spatial resolution is presented. It is used to investigate the difference in broadband solar radiation absorption, top-of-the-atmosphere upwelling, and ...

William O’Hirok; Catherine Gautier

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Computational study of atmospheric transfer radiation on an equatorial tropical desert (La Tatacoa, Colombia)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiative transfer models explain and predict interaction between solar radiation and the different elements present in the atmosphere, which are responsible for energy attenuation. In Colombia there have been neither measurements nor studies of atmospheric components such as gases and aerosols that can cause turbidity and pollution. Therefore satellite images cannot be corrected radiometrically in a proper way. When a suitable atmospheric correction is carried out, loss of information is avoided, which may be useful for discriminating image land cover. In this work a computational model was used to find radiative atmospheric attenuation (300 1000nm wavelength region) on an equatorial tropical desert (La Tatacoa, Colombia) in order to conduct an adequate atmospheric correction.

Delgado-Correal, Camilo; Castaño, Gabriel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Full-Spectrum Correlated-k Distribution for Shortwave Atmospheric Radiative Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The full-spectrum correlated k-distribution (FSCK) method, originally developed for applications in combustion systems, is adapted for use in shortwave atmospheric radiative transfer. By weighting k distributions by the solar source function, the ...

Daniel T. Pawlak; Eugene E. Clothiaux; Michael F. Modest; Jason N. S. Cole

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Parameterization of Atmospheric Radiative Transfer. Part I: Validity of Simple Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper outlines a radiation parameterization method for deriving broadband fluxes that is currently being implemented in a number of global and regional atmospheric models. The rationale for the use of the 2-stream method as a way of solving ...

Graeme L. Stephens; Philip M. Gabriel; Philip T. Partain

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

On the Correlated k-Distribution Method for Radiative Transfer in Nonhomogeneous Atmospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The correlated k-distribution method for radiative transfer in nonhomogeneous atmospheres is discussed in terms of the physical and mathematical conditions under which this method is valid. Two correlated conditions are necessary and sufficient ...

Qiang Fu; K. N. Liou

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Radiation Budget Parameters at the Top of the Earth's Atmosphere from METEOSAT Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a method to derive radiation budget parameters (albedo and emitted longwave flux) at the top of the atmosphere from the three-band METEOSAT images. Model calculations are used to correct for the anisotropic radiance ...

Marianne Gube

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Signal Postprocessing and Reflectivity Calibration of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program 915-MHz Wind Profilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has recently initiated a new research avenue toward a better characterization of the transition from cloud to precipitation. Dual-wavelength techniques applied to millimeter-...

Frédéric Tridon; Alessandro Battaglia; Pavlos Kollias; Edward Luke; Christopher R. Williams

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Field Experiment for Measurement of the Radiative Characteristics of a Hazy Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical two-and three-dimensional solutions to the radiative transfer equation have been applied to the earth-atmosphere system. A field experiment was conducted to test this theory. in the experiment the upward radiance was measured above ...

Y. J. Kaufman; T. W. Brakke; E. Eloranta

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Toward Optimal Closure of the Earth's Top-of-Atmosphere Radiation Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite recent improvements in satellite instrument calibration and the algorithms used to determine reflected solar (SW) and emitted thermal (LW) top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes, a sizeable imbalance persists in the average global net ...

Norman G. Loeb; Bruce A. Wielicki; David R. Doelling; G. Louis Smith; Dennis F. Keyes; Seiji Kato; Natividad Manalo-Smith; Takmeng Wong

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Shear Excitation of Atmospheric Gravity Waves. Part II: Nonlinear Radiation from a Free Shear Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the efficiency and characteristics of two mechanisms that have been proposed to account for the excitation of radiating gravity waves by Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities at a free shear layer in a stratified atmosphere. ...

David C. Fritts

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "doe atmospheric radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Can Top Of Atmosphere Radiation Measurements Constrain Climate Predictions? Part 1: Tuning.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Perturbed physics configurations of the HadAM3 atmospheric model driven with observed sea surface temperatures (SST) and sea ice were tuned to outgoing radiation observations using a Gauss-Newton line-search optimisation algorithm to adjust the ...

Simon F. B. Tett; Michael J. Mineter; Coralia Cartis; Daniel J. Rowlands; Ping Liu

102

Simulation of the Diurnal Cycle of Outgoing Longwave Radiation with an Atmospheric GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented from an integration of the U.K. Meteorological Office 11-Layer Atmospheric General Circulation Model, with emphasis on the simulation of the diurnal cycle of the outgoing longwave radiation. The model reproduces many of the ...

A. Slingo; R. C. Wilderspin; S. J. Brentnall

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Potential Aerosol Indirect Effects on Atmospheric Circulation and Radiative Forcing through Deep Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol indirect effects, i.e., the interactions of aerosols with clouds by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nuclei (IN), constitute the largest uncertainty in climate forcing and projection. Previous IPCC reported aerosol indirect forcing is negative, which does not account for aerosol-convective cloud interactions because the complex processes involved are poorly understood and represented in climate models. Here we report that aerosol indirect effect on deep convective cloud systems can lead to enhanced regional convergence and a strong top-of atmosphere (TOA) warming. Aerosol invigoration effect on convection can result in a strong radiative warming in the atmosphere (+5.6 W m-2) due to strong night-time warming, a lofted latent heating, and a reduced diurnal temperature difference, all of which could remarkably impact regional circulation and modify weather systems. We further elucidated how aerosols change convective intensity, diabatic heating, and regional circulation under different environmental conditions and concluded that wind shear and cloud base temperature play key roles in determining the significance of aerosol invigoration effect for convective systems.

Fan, Jiwen; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Ding, Yanni; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Li, Zhanqing

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

104

Validation of the ARchived CERES Surface and Atmosphere Radiation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rutledge, T. P. Charlock, N. G. Loeb, and S. Kato, 2001: Atmospheric corrections using MODTRAN for TOA and surface BRDF characteristics from high resolution spectroradiometeric...

105

International RADAGAST Experiment in Niamey, Niger: Changes and Drivers of Atmospheric Radiation Balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sahara desert is notorious as a source of massive dust storms. This dust dramatically influences the Earth-atmosphere energy budget through reflecting and absorbing the incoming sunlight. However, this budget is poorly understood, and in particular, we lack quantitative understanding of how the diurnal and seasonal variation of meteorological variables and aerosol properties influence the propagation of solar irradiance through the desert atmosphere. To improve our understanding of these influences, coincident and collocated observations of fluxes, measured from both space and the surface, are highly desirable. Recently, the unique capabilities of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) Experiment, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF), the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) instrument, and the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) were combined effectively as part of a large international project: the Radiative Atmospheric Divergence using AMF, GERB data and AMMA Stations (RADAGAST), which took place in Niamey, Niger, in 2006. The RADAGAST objectives, instrumentation, and scientific background are presented in [1]. Initial results from RADAGAST documented the strong radiative impact of a major Saharan dust storm on the Earth’s radiation budget [2]. A special issue of the Journal of Geophysical Research will include a collection of papers with the more complete results from RADAGAST (e.g., [1,3], and references therein). In particular, a year-long time series from RADAGAST are used to investigate (i) the factors that control the radiative fluxes and the divergence of radiation across the atmosphere [3-5], (ii) seasonal changes in the surface energy balance and associated variations in atmospheric constituents (water vapor, clouds, aerosols) [6], and (iii) sensitivity of microphysical, chemical and optical properties of aerosols to their sources and the atmospheric conditions [7]. Here we show retrievals of the aerosol properties from spectrally resolved solar measurements, the simulated and observed radiative fluxes at the surface, and outline factors that control the magnitude and variability of aerosol and radiative properties [8].

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Slingo, A.; Bharmal, N.; Robinson, G. J.; Turner, David D.; Miller, Mark; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Miller, R.

2009-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

106

Why does the Unruh effect rely on Lorentz invariance, while Hawking radiation does not ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that without Lorentz invariance, the Unruh effect does not exist. We use modified dispersion relations and describe in turn: the non-thermal nature of the vacuum (defined in the preferred frame) restricted to the Rindler wedge, the loss of the KMS property of the Wigthman function, the transition amplitudes and transition rates of a uniformaly accelerated detector. This situation seems to contrast with the Hawking radiation of acoustic black holes, which under certain assumptions has been shown to be robust to a breaking of Lorentz symmetry. We explain this discrepancy.

Campo, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility was established in 1990 to improve...

108

Effects of Atmospheric Absorption of Incoming Radiation on the Radiation Limit of the Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The limit of the planetary radiation (longwave radiation) of a planet with oceans on its surface is determined by various mechanisms called “radiation limits,” which can be classified as the Komabayashi–Ingersoll limit and the radiation limit of ...

Hiroyuki Kurokawa; Taishi Nakamoto

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Temporal Variations of Land Surface Microwave Emissivities over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Southern Great Plains Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land surface microwave emissivities are important geophysical parameters for atmospheric, hydrological, and biospheric studies. This study estimates land surface microwave emissivity using an atmospheric microwave radiative transfer model and a ...

Bing Lin; Patrick Minnis

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

A Surface Solar Radiation Model for Cloudy Atmospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical solar radiation model based on standard meteorological data was revised for clouds using data from the GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE). Climatic-mean transmittance functions were revised for low and convective clouds ...

Marshall A. Atwater; John T. Ball

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE O 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

58.1 58.1 RADIATION PROTECTION OF THE PUBLIC AND THE ENVIRONMENT DOE O 458.1 Familiar Level August 2011 1 DOE O 458.1 RADIATION PROTECTION OF THE PUBLIC AND THE ENVIRONMENT FAMILIAR LEVEL OBJECTIVES Given the familiar level of this module and the resources listed below, you will be able to answer the following questions: 1. What are the objectives of DOE O 458.1? 2. What are the definitions for the following terms?  Residual radioactive material  Public dose  ALARA  Soil column ( in the context of radiation protection of the environment) 3. What are three basic considerations that should be observed in an ALARA process for DOE radioactive activities? 4. What are four elements that must be included in dose evaluations to demonstrate

112

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data Plots and Figures  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOE's Office of Science is responsible for the ARM Program. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

113

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data Products from Principal Investigators  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOE's Office of Science is responsible for the ARM Program. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

114

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from ARM's Specific Measurement Categories  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOE's Office of Science is responsible for the ARM Program. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

115

Modeling the Global Solar Radiation on the Earth’s Surface Using Atmospheric Deterministic and Intelligent Data-Driven Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three methods for analyzing and modeling the global shortwave radiation reaching the earth’s surface are presented in this study. Solar radiation is a very important input for many aspects of climatology, hydrology, atmospheric sciences, and ...

M. Santamouris; G. Mihalakakou; B. Psiloglou; G. Eftaxias; D. N. Asimakopoulos

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Niamey, Niger for the Radiative Atmospheric Divergence using AMF, GERB and AMMA Stations (RADAGAST)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOE's Office of Science is responsible for the ARM Program. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

117

Theory of Equilibrium Temperatures in Radiative-Turbulent Atmospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a thermodynamic model for the determination of the temperature profile based on the balance of radiative and turbulent fluxes. In the context of a one-dimensional case, we show that the temperature field is governed by a first-...

Kuo-Nan Liou; Szu-Cheng S. Ou

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Best Estimate (CSSEFARMBE)  

SciTech Connect

The Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future (CSSEF) project is working to improve the representation of the hydrological cycle in global climate models, critical information necessary for decision-makers to respond appropriately to predictions of future climate. In order to accomplish this objective, CSSEF is building testbeds to implement uncertainty quantification (UQ) techniques to objectively calibrate and diagnose climate model parameterizations and predictions with respect to local, process-scale observations. In order to quantify the agreement between models and observations accurately, uncertainty estimates on these observations are needed. The DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program takes atmospheric and climate related measurements at three permanent locations worldwide. The ARM VAP called the ARM Best Estimate (ARMBE) [Xie et al., 2010] collects a subset of ARM observations, performs quality control checks, averages them to one hour temporal resolution, and puts them in a standard format for ease of use by climate modelers. ARMBE has been widely used by the climate modeling community as a summary product of many of the ARM observations. However, the ARMBE product does not include uncertainty estimates on the data values. Thus, to meet the objectives of the CSSEF project and enable better use of this data with UQ techniques, we created the CSSEFARMBE data set. Only a subset of the variables contained in ARMBE is included in CSSEFARMBE. Currently only surface meteorological observations are included, though this may be expanded to include other variables in the future. The CSSEFARMBE VAP is produced for all extended facilities at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site that contain surface meteorological equipment. This extension of the ARMBE data set to multiple facilities at SGP allows for better comparison between model grid boxes and the ARM point observations. In the future, CSSEFARMBE may also be created for other ARM sites. As each site has slightly different instrumentation, this will require additional development to understand the uncertainty characterization associated with instrumentation at those sites. The uncertainty assignment process is implemented into the ARM program’s new Integrated Software Development Environment (ISDE) so that many of the key steps can be used in the future to screen data based on ARM Data Quality Reports (DQRs), propagate uncertainties when transforming data from one time scale into another, and convert names and units into NetCDF Climate and Forecast (CF) standards. These processes are described in more detail in the following sections.

Riihimaki, Laura D.; Gaustad, Krista L.; McFarlane, Sally A.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

119

Asymmetry in the Diurnal Cycle of Atmospheric Downwelling Radiation at the ARM SGP CF Site Over 1995-2001 Period  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Asymmetry in the Diurnal Cycle of Atmospheric Asymmetry in the Diurnal Cycle of Atmospheric Downwelling Radiation at the ARM SGP CF Site Over 1995-2001 Period A. P. Trishchenko Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Introduction The shape of the diurnal cycle of atmospheric downwelling radiation is an important climatic feature of cloud-radiation interactions and atmospheric properties. Adequate characterization of this diurnal cycle is critical for accurate determination of monthly and seasonal radiation budgets from a limited data sampling. This is especially important for establishing the optimal sampling and temporal interpolation schemes employed in satellite radiation budget missions, such as Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), Scanner for Radiation Budget (ScaRaB), and Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System

120

JOINT EPA/DOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No Radiation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

JOINT EPADOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No Radiation Levels of Concern Have Reached the United States JOINT EPADOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "doe atmospheric radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Observations of the impact of a major Saharan dust storm on the atmospheric radiation balance  

SciTech Connect

Saharan dust storms transport large quantities of material across the African continent and beyond, causing widespread disruption and hazards to health. The dust may be deposited into the Atlantic Ocean, where it provides an important source of nutrients1, and may be carried as far as the West Indies. Such events may also influence the growth of Atlantic tropical cyclones. Satellite observations have enabled estimates to be made of the effect of the dust on the radiation budget seen from space, but only limited in situ observations have hitherto been made at the surface. Here we present the first simultaneous and continuous observations of the effect of a major dust storm in March 2006 on the radiation budget both at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and at the surface. We combine data from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) broadband radiometer and the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) on the Meteosat-8 weather satellite with remote sensing and in situ measurements from a new Mobile Facility located in Niamey, Niger (13{sup o} 29'N, 2{sup o} 10'E), operated by the US Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. We show that the dust produced major perturbations to the radiation budget seen from space and from the surface. By combining the two datasets, we estimate the impact on the radiation budget of the atmosphere itself. Using independent data from the Mobile Facility, we derive the optical properties of the dust and input these and other information into radiation codes to simulate the radiative fluxes. Comparisons with the observed fluxes provides a stringent test of the ability of the codes to represent the radiative properties of this important component of the global aerosol burden.

Slingo, A.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Allan, R. P.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Robinson, G. J.; Barnard, James C.; Miller, Mark; Harries, J. E.; Russell, J. E.; Dewitte, S.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

The Ocean–Land–Atmosphere Model: Optimization and Evaluation of Simulated Radiative Fluxes and Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work continues the presentation and evaluation of the Ocean–Land–Atmosphere Model (OLAM), focusing on the model’s ability to represent radiation and precipitation. OLAM is a new, state-of-the-art earth system model, capable of user-specified ...

David Medvigy; Robert L. Walko; Martin J. Otte; Roni Avissar

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Proceedings of the third Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) science team meeting  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the summaries of papers presented at the 1993 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team meeting held in Morman, Oklahoma. To put these papers in context, it is useful to consider the history and status of the ARM Program at the time of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Defining Top-of-the-Atmosphere Flux Reference Level for Earth Radiation Budget Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To estimate the earth's radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) from satellite-measured radiances, it is necessary to account for the finite geometry of the earth and recognize that the earth is a solid body surrounded by a ...

Norman G. Loeb; Seiji Kato; Bruce A. Wielicki

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Can Top-of-Atmosphere Radiation Measurements Constrain Climate Predictions? Part II: Climate Sensitivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large number of perturbed-physics simulations of version 3 of the Hadley Centre Atmosphere Model (HadAM3) were compared with the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) estimates of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and reflected ...

Simon F. B. Tett; Daniel J. Rowlands; Michael J. Mineter; Coralia Cartis

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Radiative Damping Revisited: Parameterization of Damping Rate in the Middle Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative damping rates of temperature perturbations are calculated by CO2 and O3 Curtis matrices extending from the surface to 120 km in the earth's atmosphere with the eigenvalue and scale-dependent Newtonian cooling methods at 0.5 km of ...

Xun Zhu

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Analytic Green’s Function for Radiative Transfer in Plane-Parallel Atmospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green’s function is a widely used approach for boundary value problems. In problems related to radiative transfer, Green’s function has been found to be useful in land, ocean, and atmosphere remote sensing. It is also a key element in higher ...

Yi Qin; Michael A. Box

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Low Dose Radiation | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Radiobiology: Low Dose Radiation Radiobiology: Low Dose Radiation Research Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Genomic Science DOE Bioenergy Research Centers Radiochemistry & Imaging Instrumentation Radiobiology: Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Human Subjects Protection Program Structural Biology DOE Joint Genome Institute Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301)

129

Non-linear Evolution of Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in a Radiation Supported Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The non-linear regime of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in a radiation supported atmosphere, consisting of two uniform fluids with different densities, is studied numerically. We perform simulations using our recently developed numerical algorithm for multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics based on a variable Eddington tensor as implemented in Athena, focusing on the regime where scattering opacity greatly exceeds absorption opacity. We find that the radiation field can reduce the growth and mixing rate of RTI, but this reduction is only significant when radiation pressure significantly exceeds gas pressure. Small scale structures are also suppressed in this case. In the non-linear regime, dense fingers sink faster than rarefied bubbles can rise, leading to asymmetric structures about the interface. By comparing the calculations that use a variable Eddington tensor (VET) versus the Eddington approximation, we demonstrate that anisotropy in the radiation field can affect the non-linear development of RTI...

Jiang, Yan-Fei; Stone, James

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Contributions of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the ARM Climate Research Facility to the U.S. Climate Change Science Program  

SciTech Connect

The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. The 2007 assessment (AR4) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports a substantial range among GCMs in climate sensitivity to greenhouse gas emissions. The largest contributor to this range lies in how different models handle changes in the way clouds absorb or reflect radiative energy in a changing climate (Solomon et al. 2007). In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To address this problem, BER has adopted a unique two-pronged approach: * The ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF), a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes. * The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report describes accomplishments of the BER ARM Program toward addressing the primary uncertainties related to climate change prediction as identified by the IPCC.

SA Edgerton; LR Roeder

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

131

Full-Time, Eye-Safe Cloud and Aerosol Lidar Observation at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Sites: Instruments and Data Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric radiative forcing, surface radiation budget, and top-of-the-atmosphere radiance interpretation involve knowledge of the vertical height structure of overlying cloud and aerosol layers. During the last decade, the U.S. Department of ...

James R. Campbell; Dennis L. Hlavka; Ellsworth J. Welton; Connor J. Flynn; David D. Turner; James D. Spinhirne; V. Stanley Scott III; I. H. Hwang

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Atmosphere–Land Surface Interactions over the Southern Great Plains: Characterization from Pentad Analysis of DOE ARM Field Observations and NARR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site data are analyzed to provide insight into atmosphere–land surface interactions generating summertime precipitation variability. Pentad-...

Alfredo Ruiz-Barradas; Sumant Nigam

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Order Module--DOE O 458.1, RADIATION PROTECTION OF THE PUBLIC AND THE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

58.1, RADIATION PROTECTION OF THE PUBLIC AND 58.1, RADIATION PROTECTION OF THE PUBLIC AND THE ENVIRONMENT Order Module--DOE O 458.1, RADIATION PROTECTION OF THE PUBLIC AND THE ENVIRONMENT The familiar level of this module is divided into two sections. In the first section, we will discuss the objectives and definitions related to the Order. In the second section, we will discuss the requirements in section four of the Order and the responsibilities of the field element managers for compliance with DOE O 458.1. We have provided examples and practices throughout the module to help familiarize you with the material. The practice will also help prepare you for the criterion test. DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE O 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment More Documents & Publications

134

Atmospheric Longwave Irradiance Uncertainty: Pyrgeometers Compared to an Absolute Sky-Scanning Radiometer, Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer, and Radiative Transfer Model Calculations  

SciTech Connect

Because atmospheric longwave radiation is one of the most fundamental elements of an expected climate change, there has been a strong interest in improving measurements and model calculations in recent years. Important questions are how reliable and consistent are atmospheric longwave radiation measurements and calculations and what are the uncertainties? The First International Pyrgeometer and Absolute Sky-scanning Radiometer Comparison, which was held at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's Souther Great Plains site in Oklahoma, answers these questions at least for midlatitude summer conditions and reflects the state of the art for atmospheric longwave radiation measurements and calculations. The 15 participating pyrgeometers were all calibration-traced standard instruments chosen from a broad international community. Two new chopped pyrgeometers also took part in the comparison. And absolute sky-scanning radiometer (ASR), which includes a pyroelectric detector and a reference blackbody source, was used for the first time as a reference standard instrument to field calibrate pyrgeometers during clear-sky nighttime measurements. Owner-provided and uniformly determined blackbody calibration factors were compared. Remarkable improvements and higher pyrgeometer precision were achieved with field calibration factors. Results of nighttime and daytime pyrgeometer precision and absolute uncertainty are presented for eight consecutive days of measurements, during which period downward longwave irradiance varied between 260 and 420 W m-2. Comparisons between pyrgeometers and the absolute ASR, the atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer, and radiative transfer models LBLRTM and MODTRAN show a surprisingly good agreement of <2 W m-2 for nighttime atmospheric longwave irradiance measurements and calculations.

Philipona, J. R.; Dutton, Ellsworth G.; Stoffel, T.; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Reda, I.; Stifter, Armin; Wendling, Peter; Wood, Norm; Clough, Shepard A.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Anderson, Gail; Revercomb, Henry E.; Shippert, Timothy R.

2001-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

135

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Graciosa Island, Azores  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

From May 2009 through December 2010, the ARM Mobile Facility is obtaining data from a location near the airport on Graciosa Island to support the Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) field campaign. Led by principal investigator Robert Wood, scientists involved in the campaign will use data from the AMF to study processes controlling the radiative properties and microphysics of marine boundary layer clouds, a high priority science question. Marine boundary layer clouds are particularly important in the global climate system, not only as passive modulators of solar energy, but as interactive systems that influence and modulate sea surface temperature and the strength of the trade winds on seasonal-interannual timescales. Their microphysical properties are important, strongly sensitive to manmade aerosol, and poorly understood, especially over remote oceans. Data from the prolonged AMF deployment will result in the first climatology of detailed vertical structure of cloud and precipitation properties of low clouds at a remote subtropical marine site.[Copied and edited from http://www.arm.gov/sites/amf/grw/

Wood, Robert (PI)

136

DOE TEC Radiation Monitoring Subtopic Group Conference Call 10...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Monitoring Subtopic Group Conference Call Thursday, October 11, 2007, 3:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. EDT Conference Call Minutes Participants: Chair: Cort Richardson (CSGNE)...

137

DOE/SC-ARM-0903  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

r.effects.on.the.Earth's.energy.balance.. In.1989,.the.U.S..Department.of.Energy.(DOE).Office.of. Science.created.the.Atmospheric.Radiation.Measurement. (ARM).Program.to.address.sc...

138

Cloud-radiative effects on implied oceanic energy transports as simulated by atmospheric general circulation models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reports on energy fluxes across the surface of the ocean as simulated by fifteen atmospheric general circulation models in which ocean surface temperatures and sea-ice boundaries are prescribed. The oceanic meridional energy transport that would be required to balance these surface fluxes is computed, and is shown to be critically sensitive to the radiative effects of clouds, to the extent that even the sign of the Southern Hemisphere ocean energy transport can be affected by the errors in simulated cloud-radiation interactions.

Gleckler, P.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Randall, D.A. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Boer, G. [Canadian Climate Centre, Victoria (Canada)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Posters Objective Analysis Schemes to Monitor Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Data in Near Real-Time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Posters Objective Analysis Schemes to Monitor Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Data in Near Real-Time M. Splitt University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma Recent work in this area by Charles Wade (1987) lays out the groundwork for monitoring data quality for projects with large networks of instruments such as the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Wade generated objectively analyzed fields of meteorological variables (temperature, pressure, humidity, and wind) and then compared the objectively analyzed value at the sensor location with the value produced by the sensor. Wade used a Barne's objective analysis scheme to produce objective data values for a given meteorological variable (q) in two- dimensional space. The objectively analyzed value should

140

TAU: A 1D radiative transfer code for transmission spectroscopy of extrasolar planet atmospheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The TAU code is a 1D line-by-line radiative transfer code, which is generally applicable for modelling transmission spectra of close-in extrasolar planets. The inputs are the assumed pressure-temperature profile of the planetary atmosphere, the continuum absorption coefficients and the absorption cross-sections for the trace molecular absorbers present in the model, as well as the fundamental system parameters taken from the published literature. The program then calculates the optical path through the planetary atmosphere of the radiation from the host star, and quantifies the absorption due to the modelled composition in a transmission spectrum of transit depth as a function of wavelength. The code is written in C++, parallelised using OpenMP, and is available for public download and use from http://www.ucl.ac.uk/exoplanets/.

Hollis, M D J; Tinetti, G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "doe atmospheric radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Radiation Applications Inc - NY 57  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Applications Inc - NY 57 Radiation Applications Inc - NY 57 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: RADIATION APPLICATIONS, INC. ( NY.57 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: RAI NY.57-1 Location: 370 Lexington Avenue , New York , New York NY.57-3 Evaluation Year: 1991 NY.57-4 Site Operations: Developed foam separation techniques and proposed investigations to remove cesium and strontium from fission product waste solutions. No indication that a substantial quantity of radioactive material was involved. NY.57-3 NY.57-5 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote NY.57-4 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated NY.57-1 Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated

142

Effects of Reflection by Natural Surfaces on the Radiation Emerging from the Top of the Earth's Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiation emerging from the top of the earth's atmosphere is affected by the reflection characteristics of the underlying surface. Laboratory-gathered bidirectional reflectance data were used to characterize the reflection matrix for three ...

Bruce W. Fitch

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

A Simple Method to Compute the Change in Earth-Atmosphere Radiative Balance Due to a Stratospheric Aerosol Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple three-layer model of the earth-atmosphere system, including the ground, troposphere and stratosphere, with their interactions, is developed. The model permits the radiative characteristics of both the troposphere and stratosphere to be ...

J. Lenoble; D. Tanre; P. Y. Deschamps; M. Herman

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Implementing the Delta-Four-Stream Approximation for Solar Radiation Computations in an Atmosphere General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proper quantification of the solar radiation budget and its transfer within the atmosphere is of utmost importance in climate modeling. The delta-four-stream (DFS) approximation has been demonstrated to offer a more accurate computational method ...

Tarek Ayash; Sunling Gong; Charles Q. Jia

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

The Impact of Clouds on the Shortwave Radiation Budget of the Surface-Atmosphere System: Interfacing Measurements and Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two datasets have been combined to demonstrate how the availability of more comprehensive datasets could serve to elucidate the shortwave radiative impact of clouds on both the atmospheric column and the surface. These datasets consist of two ...

Robert D. Cess; Seth Nemesure; Ellsworth G. Dutton; John J. Deluisi; Gerald L. Potter; Jean-Jacques Morcrette

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Relationships between Net Radiation at the Surface and the Top of the Atmosphere Derived from a General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relationships between the net radiation at the surface and the top of the atmosphere in the UCLA general circulation model are investigated. These suggest that it may be possible to formulate statistical models from limited observations ...

Bryan C. Weare

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Short-Term Climate Variability and Atmospheric Teleconnections from Satellite-Observed Outgoing Longwave Radiation. Part I: Simultaneous Relationships  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite-inferred short-term climate variability and atmospheric teleconnections are studied using seven years (1974–81) of Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR) data from NOAA polar orbiters. This study utilizes composite, partition-of-variance and ...

Ka-Ming Lau; Paul H. Chan

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Application of an Artificial Neural Network Simulation for Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Flux Estimation from CERES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) provides top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative flux estimates from shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiance measurements by applying empirical angular distribution models (ADMs) for scene ...

Konstantin Loukachine; Norman G. Loeb

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Cloud Profiling Radars: Second-Generation Sampling Strategies, Processing, and Cloud Data Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program operates millimeter-wavelength cloud radars in several climatologically distinct regions. The digital signal processors for these radars were recently upgraded and ...

Pavlos Kollias; Mark A. Miller; Edward P. Luke; Karen L. Johnson; Eugene E. Clothiaux; Kenneth P. Moran; Kevin B. Widener; Bruce A. Albrecht

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Observational Characterization of the Downward Atmospheric Longwave Radiation at the Surface in the City of São Paulo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work describes the seasonal and diurnal variations of downward longwave atmospheric irradiance (LW) at the surface in São Paulo, Brazil, using 5-min-averaged values of LW, air temperature, relative humidity, and solar radiation observed ...

Eduardo Barbaro; Amauri P. Oliveira; Jacyra Soares; Georgia Codato; Maurício J. Ferreira; Primož Mlakar; Marija Z. Božnar; João F. Escobedo

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

The Full-Spectrum Correlated-k Method for Longwave Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Using an Effective Planck Function  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The correlated-k-distribution (CKD) method is widely used in the radiative transfer schemes of atmospheric models; it involves dividing the spectrum into a number of bands and then reordering the gaseous absorption coefficients within each one. ...

Robin J. Hogan

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Short-Term Climate Variability and Atmospheric Teleconnections from Satellite-Observed Outgoing Longwave Radiation. Part II: Lagged Correlations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a sequel to Part I of this study, lagged relationships in atmospheric teleconnections associated with outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) are investigated using Lagged Cross Correlations (LCC). The feasibility of extratropical seasonal-to-...

Ka-Ming Lau; Paul H. Chan

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Toward the Influence of Clouds on the Shortwave Radiation Budget of the Earth?Atmosphere System Estimated from Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of cloudiness on the shortwave radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere, at the surface, and, as a residual, for the atmosphere itself. The data used for this study are derived ...

M. Rieland; R. Stuhlmann

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Radiation Therapy: Does Breast Size Matter?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the effects of breast size on dose-volume histogram parameters and clinical toxicity in whole-breast hypofractionated radiation therapy using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, all patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy between 2005 and 2009 were screened, and qualifying consecutive patients were included in 1 of 2 cohorts: large-breasted patients (chest wall separation >25 cm or planning target volume [PTV] >1500 cm{sub 3}) (n=97) and small-breasted patients (chest wall separation <25 cm and PTV <1500 cm{sub 3}) (n=32). All patients were treated prone or supine with hypofractionated IMRT to the whole breast (42.4 Gy in 16 fractions) followed by a boost dose (9.6 Gy in 4 fractions). Dosimetric and clinical toxicity data were collected and analyzed using the R statistical package (version 2.12). Results: The mean PTV V95 (percentage of volume receiving >= 95% of prescribed dose) was 90.18% and the mean V105 percentage of volume receiving >= 105% of prescribed dose was 3.55% with no dose greater than 107%. PTV dose was independent of breast size, whereas heart dose and maximum point dose to skin correlated with increasing breast size. Lung dose was markedly decreased in prone compared with supine treatments. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 0, 1, and 2 skin toxicities were noted acutely in 6%, 69%, and 25% of patients, respectively, and at later follow-up (>3 months) in 43%, 57%, and 0% of patients, respectively. Large breast size contributed to increased acute grade 2 toxicity (28% vs 12%, P=.008). Conclusions: Adequate PTV coverage with acceptable hot spots and excellent sparing of organs at risk was achieved by use of IMRT regardless of treatment position and breast size. Although increasing breast size leads to increased heart dose and maximum skin dose, heart dose remained within our institutional constraints and the incidence of overall skin toxicity was comparable to that reported in the literature. Taken together, these data suggest that hypofractionated radiation therapy using IMRT is a viable and appropriate therapeutic modality in large-breasted patients.

Hannan, Raquibul, E-mail: Raquibul.Hannan@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Thompson, Reid F.; Chen Yu; Bernstein, Karen; Kabarriti, Rafi; Skinner, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States); Chen, Chin C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Landau, Evan; Miller, Ekeni; Spierer, Marnee; Hong, Linda; Kalnicki, Shalom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Hawking-like radiation does not require a trapped region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the issue of quasi-particle production by ``analogue black holes'' with particular attention to the possibility of reproducing Hawking radiation in a laboratory. By constructing simple geometric acoustic models, we obtain a somewhat unexpected result: We show that in order to obtain a stationary and Planckian emission of quasi-particles, it is not necessary to create a trapped region in the acoustic spacetime (corresponding to a supersonic regime in the fluid flow). It is sufficient to set up a dynamically changing flow asymptotically approaching a sonic regime with sufficient rapidity in laboratory time.

Carlos Barcelo; Stefano Liberati; Sebastiano Sonego; Matt Visser

2006-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

156

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1994 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2: Atmospheric and climate research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) occurs in conjunction with the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP) and with the Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) Program. Solicitations for proposals and peer review were used to select research projects for funding in FY 1995. Nearly all ongoing projects were brought to a close in FY 1994. Therefore, the articles in this volume include a summary of the long-term accomplishments as well as the FY 1994 progress made on these projects. The following articles present summaries of the progress in FY 1994 under these research tasks: continental and oceanic fate of pollutants; research aircraft operations; ASCOT program management; coupling/decoupling of synoptic and valley circulations; interactions between surface exchange processes and atmospheric circulations; and direct simulations of atmospheric turbulence. Climate change research at PNL is aimed at reducing uncertainties in the fundamental processes that control climate systems that currently prevent accurate predictions of climate change and its effects. PNL is responsible for coordinating and integrating the field and laboratory measurement programs, modeling studies, and data analysis activities of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program. In FY 1994, PNL scientists conducted 3 research projects under the ARM program. In the first project, the sensitivity of GCM grid-ad meteorological properties to subgrid-scale variations in surface fluxes and subgrid-scale circulation patterns is being tested in a single column model. In the second project, a new and computationally efficient scheme has been developed for parameterizing stratus cloud microphysics in general circulation models. In the last project, a balloon-borne instrument package is being developed for making research-quality measurements of radiative flux divergence profiles in the lowest 1,500 meters of the Earth`s atmosphere.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

An Accurate Radiative Heating and Cooling Algorithm for Use in a Dynamical Model of the Middle Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An infrared radiative heating and cooling algorithm designed to be used with dynamical models of the middle atmosphere is described. A Curtis matrix is used to compute cooling by the 15 and 10 ?m bands of carbon dioxide. Escape of radiation to ...

W. M. Wehrbein; C. B. Leovy

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Science Plan Current Status and Future Directions of the ARM Science Program  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has matured into one of the key programs in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. The ARM Program has achieved considerable scientific success in a broad range of activities, including site and instrument development, atmospheric radiative transfer, aerosol science, determination of cloud properties, cloud modeling, and cloud parameterization testing and development. The focus of ARM science has naturally shifted during the last few years to an increasing emphasis on modeling and parameterization studies to take advantage of the long time series of data now available. During the next 5 years, the principal focus of the ARM science program will be to: • Maintain the data record at the fixed ARM sites for at least the next five years. • Improve significantly our understanding of and ability to parameterize the 3-D cloud-radiation problem at scales from the local atmospheric column to the global climate model (GCM) grid square. • Continue developing techniques to retrieve the properties of all clouds, with a special focus on ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds. • Develop a focused research effort on the indirect aerosol problem that spans observations, physical models, and climate model parameterizations. • Implement and evaluate an operational methodology to calculate broad-band heating rates in the atmospheric columns at the ARM sites. • Develop and implement methodologies to use ARM data more effectively to test atmospheric models, both at the cloud-resolving model scale and the GCM scale. • Use these methodologies to diagnose cloud parameterization performance and then refine these parameterizations to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations. In addition, the ARM Program is actively developing a new ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) that will be available for short deployments (several months to a year or more) in climatically important regions. The AMF will have much of the same instrumentation as the remote facilities at ARM’s Tropical Western Pacific and the North Slope of Alaska sites. Over time, this new facility will extend ARM science to a much broader range of conditions for model testing.

TP Ackerman; AD Del Genio; RG Ellingson; RA Ferrare; SA Klein; GM McFarquhar; PJ Lamb; CN Long; J Verlinde

2004-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

159

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1–September 30, 2012  

SciTech Connect

Individual datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile research sites are collected and routed to the Data Management Facility (DMF) for processing in near-real-time. Instrument and processed data are then delivered approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made freely available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Voyles, JW

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

160

Surface Solar Radiation Flux and Cloud Radiative Forcing for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP): A Satellite, Surface Observations, and Radiative Transfer Model Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents surface solar radiation flux and cloud radiative forcing results obtained by using a combination of satellite and surface observations interpreted by means of a simple plane-parallel radiative transfer model called 2001. This ...

Catherine Gautier; Martin Landsfeld

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "doe atmospheric radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

DOE-STD-1174-2003; Radiation Protection Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4-2003 4-2003 December 2003 DOE STANDARD RADIATION PROTECTION FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ii This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1174-2003 iii APPROVAL The Federal Technical Capability Panel consists of senior U.S. Department of Energy managers

162

Evaluation of the Surface Radiation Budget in the Atmospheric Component of the Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model (HadGEM1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The partitioning of the earth radiation budget (ERB) between its atmosphere and surface components is of crucial interest in climate studies as it has a significant role in the oceanic and atmospheric general circulation. An analysis of the ...

A. Bodas-Salcedo; M. A. Ringer; A. Jones

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Does the Surface Pressure Equal the Weight per Unit Area of a Hydrostatic Atmosphere?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The common statement that the surface pressure in a hydrostatic atmosphere is equal to the weight per unit area of the air aloft is shown to be true only for a Cartesian world. Here the unit area is the surface area of the base of the atmospheric ...

Peter R. Bannon; Craig H. Bishop; James B. Kerr

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Data systems for science integration within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program was developed by the US Department of Energy to support the goals and mission of the US Global Change Research Program. The purpose of the ARM program is to improve the predictive capabilities of General Circulation Models (GCMs) in their treatment of clouds and radiative transfer effects. Three experimental testbeds were designed for the deployment of instruments to collect atmospheric data used to drive the GCMs. Each site, known as a Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART), consists of a highly available, redundant data system for the collection of data from a variety of instrumentation. The first CART site was deployed in April 1992 in the Southern Great Plains (SGP), Lamont, Oklahoma, with the other two sites to follow in early 1996 in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) and in 1997 on the North Slope of Alaska (NSA). Approximately 1.5 GB of data are transferred per day via the Internet from the CART sites, and external data sources to the ARM Experiment Center (EC) at Pacific Northwest Laboratory in Richland, Washington. The Experimental Center is central to the ARM data path and provides for the collection, processing, analysis and delivery of ARM data. Data from the CART sites from a variety of instrumentation, observational systems and from external data sources are transferred to the Experiment Center. The EC processes these data streams on a continuous basis to provide derived data products to the ARM Science Team in near real-time while maintaining a three-month running archive of data.

Gracio, D.K.; Hatfield, L.D.; Yates, K.R.; Voyles, J.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Tichler, J.L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Cederwall, R.T.; Laufersweiler, M.J.; Leach, M.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Singley, P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

165

Modification of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) sytem of radiation protection requirements and guidance  

SciTech Connect

DOE has undertaken a major modification of its system of radiation protection guidance and requirements. The objectives of this modification are to (1) eliminate unnecessary and redundant requirements, (2) clearly delineate requirements from guidance, (3) codify all radiation protection requirements, and (4) move from a compliance based approach towards a performance based approach. To achieve these objectives DOE has (1) canceled DOE Order 5480.11, {open_quotes}Radiation Protection for DOE Workers,{close_quotes} DOE Order 5480.15, {open_quotes}Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) for Personnel Dosimetry,{close_quotes} and DOE Notice 5400.13, {open_quotes}Sealed Radioactive Source Accountability,{close_quotes} (2) converted the DOE Radiological Control (RadCon) Manual from mandatory to non mandatory status, and (3) issued DOE Notice 441.1 to maintain those requirements (not in 10 CFR 835) considered necessary for radiation protection of workers. DOE has initiated actions to (1) amend 10 CFR 835 (the Federal rule on occupational radiation protection in the DOE complex) to incorporate the requirements, or their equivalent, in DOE Notice 441.1, (2) issue a technical standard containing guidance on DOELAP, (3) reissue the DOE RadCon Manual as a non mandatory technical standard that reflects the amendments to 10 CFR 835, and (4) revise the implementation guides on radiation protection for consistency with 10 CFR 835 and the RadCon Manual. As a result of these modifications, the system of radiation protection in the DOE will become more comparable with the system of radiation protection used by commercial industry and with the system of protection applied to other areas of worker health and safety.

O`Connell, P.V.; Rabovsky, J.L.; Zobel, S.G. [Department of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Nasa Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Nasa Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) Nasa Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Nasa Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/Instrumentation: NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) Developed at: Brookhaven National Laboratory, Collider-Accelerator Department (C-AD)

167

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report. October 1 - December 31, 2010.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near-real time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY2010 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1987.20 hours (0.90 x 2208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1876.80 hours (0.85 x 2208). The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continued through this quarter, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208). The second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) began deployment this quarter to Steamboat Springs, Colorado. The experiment officially began November 15, but most of the instruments were up and running by November 1. Therefore, the OPSMAX time for the AMF2 was 1390.80 hours (.95 x 1464 hours) for November and December (61 days). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or datastream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous datastreams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Summary. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1-December 31, 2010, for the fixed sites. Because the AMFs operate episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. This first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 possible hours for the fixed sites and the AMF1 and 1,464 possible hours for the AMF2. The average of the fixed sites exceeded our goal this quarter. The AMF1 has essentially completed its mission and is shutting down to pack up for its next deployment to India. Although all the raw data from the operational instruments are in the Archive for the AMF2, only the processed data are tabulated. Approximately half of the AMF2 instruments have data that was fully processed, resulting in the 46% of all possible data made available to users through the Archive for this first quarter. Typically, raw data is not made available to users unless specifically requested.

Sisterson, D. L.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

» Atmospheric System Research (ASR) » Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

169

Twenty-Four-Hour Raman Lidar Water Vapor Measurements during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program’s 1996 and 1997 Water Vapor Intensive Observation Periods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prior to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program’s first water vapor intensive observation period (WVIOP) at the Cloud and Radiation Testbed site near Lamont, Oklahoma, an automated 24-h Raman lidar was delivered to the site. This ...

D. D. Turner; J. E. M. Goldsmith

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Does the Madden–Julian Oscillation Influence Wintertime Atmospheric Rivers and Snowpack in the Sierra Nevada?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relationships between the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO), activities of atmospheric rivers (ARs), and the resulting snowpack accumulation in the California Sierra Nevada, are analyzed based on 13 yr of observations for water years 1998–2010 ...

Bin Guan; Duane E. Waliser; Noah P. Molotch; Eric J. Fetzer; Paul J. Neiman

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Conformal Null Infinity Does Not Exist for Radiating Solutions in Odd Spacetime Dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that for general relativity in odd spacetime dimensions greater than 4, all components of the unphysical Weyl tensor for arbitrary smooth, compact spatial support perturbations of Minkowski spacetime fail to be smooth at null infinity at leading nonvanishing order. This implies that for nearly flat radiating spacetimes, the non-smoothness of the unphysical metric at null infinity manifests itself at the same order as it describes deviations from flatness of the physical metric. Therefore, in odd spacetime dimensions, it does not appear that conformal null infinity can be in any way useful for describing radiation.

Stefan Hollands; Robert M. Wald

2004-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

172

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1–December 31, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Voyles, JW

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

173

ARMlUnmanned Air VehiclelSatelites The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARMlUnmanned Air VehiclelSatelites ARMlUnmanned Air VehiclelSatelites The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle Program: An Overview P. A. Crowley Environmental Sciences Division U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. J. Vitko, Jr. Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, CA 94550 Introduction for leased UA V operation over the next year. Examples include, but are not limited to, the existing Gnat 750-45, with its 7-8 km ceiling, as well as the planned FY93 demonstration of two 20 km capable UA Vs-the Perseus- B and the Raptor. Thus the funding of some initial flights and the availability of leased UAVs will enable us to start up the ARM-UAV program. Additional funding will be required to continue this program. Interim Science Team This paper and the one that follows describe the start-up

174

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1–March 31, 2012  

SciTech Connect

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Voyles, JW

2012-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

175

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1–September 30, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Voyles, JW

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

176

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1–March 31, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Sisterson, DL

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

177

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1–June 30, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Voyles, JW

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

178

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report: October 1 - December 31, 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Sisterson, DL

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

179

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 - September 30, 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

DL Sisterson

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 – September 30, 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998.

DL Sisterson

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "doe atmospheric radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Radiation Imaging Detectors for Plant Photosynthesis Research | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

» Radiation Imaging Detectors for Plant Photosynthesis Research » Radiation Imaging Detectors for Plant Photosynthesis Research Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » June 2012 Radiation Imaging Detectors for Plant Photosynthesis Research Imaging tools aid research in global climate change, plant genetics, biofuels, agriculture, and carbon sequestration. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Image courtesy of Jefferson Lab The PhytoPET plant imaging system.

182

DOE-STD-1153-2002; A Graded Approach for Evaluating Radiation Doses to Aquatic and Terrestrial Biota  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATION MODULE 1: PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATION DOE-STD-1153-2002 INTENTIONALLY BLANK DOE-STD-1153-2002 M1-1 1 Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is accountable to Congress and the public for the safe conduct of its activities, including facility operation, waste management and disposal activities, and remediation of environmental contamination. These routine activities may result in releases of radionuclides to the air and water, accumulation of radionuclides in soil and sediment, and the potential for plants, animals, and members of the public to be exposed to radiation. DOE Order 5400.5, "Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment" (1990a), lists the environmental radiation protection requirements that DOE and DOE- contractor employees must meet to protect aquatic animals. In addition, dose limits below

183

A Discrete Ordinate, Multiple Scattering, Radiative Transfer Model of the Venus Atmosphere from 0.1 to 260 ?m  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors describe a new radiative transfer model of the Venus atmosphere (RTM) that includes optical properties from nine gases and four cloud modes between 0.1 and 260 ?m. A multiple-stream discrete ordinate flux solver is used to calculate ...

Christopher Lee; Mark Ian Richardson

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

The Effect of Changes in Cloud Amount on the Net Radiation at the Top of the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the opposing albedo and greenhouse effects of clouds, the possibility exists that the net radiation at the top of the earth-atmosphere system is, in the mean, insensitive to changes in cloud amount. If so, this would have important ...

George Ohring; Philip Clapp

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

A multi-sensor approach for assessing the impacts of ultraviolet-absorbing aerosols on top of atmosphere radiative fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One year (June 2006-May 2007) of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) top of atmosphere (TOA) shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) fluxes are used with Ozone Monitoring Instrument-Aerosol Index (OMI-AI) data to assess the direct radiative ...

Thomas A. Jones; Sundar A. Christopher

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

DOE contractors' workshop: Cellular and molecular aspects of radiation induced DNA damage and repair  

SciTech Connect

For four decades the US Department of Energy and its predecessors have been the lead federal agency in supporting radiation biology research. Over the years emphasis in this program has gradually shifted from dose-effect studies on animals to research on the effects of radiations of various qualities on cells and molecules. Mechanistic studies on the action of radiation at the subcellular level are few in number and there is a need for more research in this area if we are to gain a better understanding of how radiation affects living cells. The intent of this workshop was to bring together DOE contractors and grantees who are investigating the effects of radiation at the cellular and molecular levels. The aims were to foster the exchange of information on research projects and experimental results, promote collaborative research efforts, and obtain an overview of research currently supported by the Health Effects Research Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research. The latter is needed by the Office for program planning purposes. This report on the workshop which took place in Albuquerque, New Mexico on March 10-11, 1987, includes an overview with future research recommendations, extended abstracts of the plenary presentations, shorter abstracts of each poster presentation, a workshop agenda and the names and addresses of the attendees.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

The Role of Radiation and Other Renascent Subfields in Atmospheric Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The horizons of atmospheric science are undergoing a considerable expansion as a result of intense interest in problems of climate. This has caused somewhat of a renaissance in hitherto-neglected subfields of atmospheric science. Focusing on ...

W. J. Wiscombe; V. Ramanathan

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

DOE/SC-ARM-12-015 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

all data are in final processing at the Archive. The AMF1 system is now deployed at Cape Cod, Massachusetts, to support the Two-Column Aerosol Campaign (TCAP). The TCAP campaign...

189

DOE/SC-ARM-13-013 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sites. The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) is in the teardown and packing phase at Cape Cod, Massachusetts, after having completed the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). The TCAP...

190

DOE/SC-ARM-13-001 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nauru, and Darwin sites. The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) is now deployed at Cape Cod, Massachusetts, to support the Two-Column Aerosol Campaign (TCAP). The TCAP campaign...

191

DOE/SC-ARM-13-007 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nauru, and Darwin sites. The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) is now deployed at Cape Cod, Massachusetts, to support the Two-Column Aerosol Campaign (TCAP). The TCAP campaign...

192

BNL | Atmospheric Systems Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric System Research is a DOE observation-based research program Atmospheric System Research is a DOE observation-based research program created to advance process-level understanding of the key interactions among aerosols, clouds, precipitation, radiation, dynamics, and thermodynamics, with the ultimate goal of reducing the uncertainty in global and regional climate simulations and projections. General areas of research at BNL under this program include studies of aerosol and cloud lifecycles, and cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions. Contact Robert McGraw, 631.344.3086 aerosols Aerosol Life Cycle The strategic focus of the Aerosol Life Cycle research is observation-based process science-examining the properties and evolution of atmospheric aerosols. Observations come from both long-term studies conducted by the

193

he Impact of Primary Marine Aerosol on Atmospheric Chemistry, Radiation and Climate: A CCSM Model Development Study  

SciTech Connect

This project examined the potential large-scale influence of marine aerosol cycling on atmospheric chemistry, physics and radiative transfer. Measurements indicate that the size-dependent generation of marine aerosols by wind waves at the ocean surface and the subsequent production and cycling of halogen-radicals are important but poorly constrained processes that influence climate regionally and globally. A reliable capacity to examine the role of marine aerosol in the global-scale atmospheric system requires that the important size-resolved chemical processes be treated explicitly. But the treatment of multiphase chemistry across the breadth of chemical scenarios encountered throughout the atmosphere is sensitive to the initial conditions and the precision of the solution method. This study examined this sensitivity, constrained it using high-resolution laboratory and field measurements, and deployed it in a coupled chemical-microphysical 3-D atmosphere model. First, laboratory measurements of fresh, unreacted marine aerosol were used to formulate a sea-state based marine aerosol source parameterization that captured the initial organic, inorganic, and physical conditions of the aerosol population. Second, a multiphase chemical mechanism, solved using the Max Planck Institute for Chemistryâ??s MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) system, was benchmarked across a broad set of observed chemical and physical conditions in the marine atmosphere. Using these results, the mechanism was systematically reduced to maximize computational speed. Finally, the mechanism was coupled to the 3-mode modal aerosol version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.6.33). Decadal-scale simulations with CAM v.3.6.33, were run both with and without reactive-halogen chemistry and with and without explicit treatment of particulate organic carbon in the marine aerosol source function. Simulated results were interpreted (1) to evaluate influences of marine aerosol production on the microphysical properties of aerosol populations and clouds over the ocean and the corresponding direct and indirect effects on radiative transfer; (2) atmospheric burdens of reactive halogen species and their impacts on O3, NOx, OH, DMS, and particulate non-sea-salt SO42-; and (3) the global production and influences of marine-derived particulate organic carbon. The model reproduced major characteristics of the marine aerosol system and demonstrated the potential sensitivity of global, decadal-scale climate metrics to multiphase marine-derived components of Earthâ??s troposphere. Due to the combined computational burden of the coupled system, the currently available computational resources were the limiting factor preventing the adequate statistical analysis of the overall impact that multiphase chemistry might have on climate-scale radiative transfer and climate.

Keene, William C. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia; Long, Michael S. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

194

DOE Workshop; Pan-Gass Conference on the Representation of Atmospheric Processes in Weather and Climate Models  

SciTech Connect

This is the first meeting of the whole new GEWEX (Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment) Atmospheric System Study (GASS) project that has been formed from the merger of the GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) Project and the GEWEX Atmospheric Boundary Layer Studies (GABLS). As such, this meeting will play a major role in energizing GEWEX work in the area of atmospheric parameterizations of clouds, convection, stable boundary layers, and aerosol-cloud interactions for the numerical models used for weather and climate projections at both global and regional scales. The representation of these processes in models is crucial to GEWEX goals of improved prediction of the energy and water cycles at both weather and climate timescales. This proposal seeks funds to be used to cover incidental and travel expenses for U.S.-based graduate students and early career scientists (i.e., within 5 years of receiving their highest degree). We anticipate using DOE funding to support 5-10 people. We will advertise the availability of these funds by providing a box to check for interested participants on the online workshop registration form. We will also send a note to our participants' mailing lists reminding them that the funds are available and asking senior scientists to encourage their more junior colleagues to participate. All meeting participants are encouraged to submit abstracts for oral or poster presentations. The science organizing committee (see below) will base funding decisions on the relevance and quality of these abstracts, with preference given to under-represented populations (especially women and minorities) and to early career scientists being actively mentored at the meeting (e.g. students or postdocs attending the meeting with their advisor).

Morrison, PI Hugh

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

195

Anthropogenic Aerosol Radiative Forcing in Asia Derived From Regional Models With Atmospheric and Aerosol Data Assimilation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high-resolution estimate of monthly 3D aerosol solar heating rates and surface solar fluxes in Asia from 2001 to 2004 is described here. This product stems from an Asian aerosol assimilation project, in which a) the PNNL regional model bounded by the NCEP reanalyses was used to provide meteorology, b) MODIS and AERONET data were integrated for aerosol observations, c) the Iowa aerosol/chemistry model STEM-2K1 used the PNNL meteorology and assimilated aerosol observations, and d) 3D (X-Y-Z) aerosol simulations from the STEM-2K1 were used in the Scripps Monte-Carlo Aerosol Cloud Radiation (MACR) model to produce total and anthropogenic aerosol direct solar forcing for average cloudy skies. The MACR model and STEM both used the PNNL model resolution of 0.45º×0.4º in the horizontal and of 23 layers in the troposphere. The 2001–2004 averaged anthropogenic all-sky aerosol forcing is ?1.3 Wm-2 (TOA), +7.3 Wm-2 (atmosphere) and ?8.6 Wm-2 (surface) averaged in Asia (60?138°E & Eq. ?45°N). In the absence of AERONET SSA assimilation, absorbing aerosol concentration (especially BC aerosol) is much smaller, giving ?2.3 Wm-2 (TOA), +4.5 Wm-2 (atmosphere) and ?6.8 Wm-2 (surface), averaged in Asia. In the vertical, monthly forcing is mainly concentrated below 600hPa with maxima around 800hPa. Seasonally, low-level forcing is far larger in dry season than in wet season in South Asia, whereas the wet season forcing exceeds the dry season forcing in East Asia. The anthropogenic forcing in the present study is similar to that in Chung et al.’s [2005] in overall magnitude but the former offers fine-scale features and simulated vertical profiles. The interannual variability of the computed anthropogenic forcing is significant and extremely large over major emission outflow areas. In view of this, the present study’s estimate is within the implicated range of the 1999 INDOEX result. However, NCAR/CCSM3’s anthropogenic aerosol forcing is much smaller than the present study’s estimate at the surface, and is outside of what the INDOEX findings can support.

Chung, Chul Eddy; Ramanathan, V.; Carmichael, Gregory; Kulkarni, S.; Tang, Youhua; Adhikary, Bhupesh; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Qian, Yun

2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

196

Liquid and Ice Cloud Microphysics in the CSU General Circulation Model. Part II: Impact on Cloudiness, the Earth's Radiation Budget, and the General Circulation of the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A prognostic equation for the mass of condensate associated with large-scale cloudiness introduces a direct coupling between the atmospheric moisture budget and the radiation budget through interactive cloud amounts and cloud optical properties. ...

Laura D. Fowler; David A. Randall

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

A Three-Dimensional Radiative Transfer Model to Investigate the Solar Radiation within a Cloudy Atmosphere. Part II: Spectral Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this second part of a two-part paper, the spectral response of the interaction between gases, cloud droplets, and solar radiation is investigated using a Monte Carlo-based three-dimensional (3D) radiative transfer model with a spectral ...

William O’Hirok; Catherine Gautier

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Interpretation of AIRS Data in Thin Cirrus Atmospheres Based on a Fast Radiative Transfer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A thin cirrus cloud thermal infrared radiative transfer model has been developed for application to cloudy satellite data assimilation. This radiation model was constructed by combining the Optical Path Transmittance (OPTRAN) model, developed for ...

Qing Yue; K. N. Liou; S. C. Ou; B. H. Kahn; P. Yang; G. G. Mace

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Spectral Absorption of Solar Radiation in Cloudy Atmospheres: A 20 cm?1 Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spectral of solar radiation in typical water clouds is determined using a radiative transfer model based on LOWTRAN transmission functions at a 20 cm?1 resolution and Monte Carlo simulations of photon pathlength distributions. Relative ...

Roger Davies; William L. Ridgway; Kyung-Eak Kim

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

3D Atmospheric Radiative Transfer for Cloud System-Resolving Models: Forward Modelling and Observations  

SciTech Connect

Utilization of cloud-resolving models and multi-dimensional radiative transfer models to investigate the importance of 3D radiation effects on the numerical simulation of cloud fields and their properties.

Howard Barker; Jason Cole

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "doe atmospheric radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-097 Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE): An ARM Value-Added Product S McFarlane T Shippert J Mather June 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

202

DOE/SC-ARM-10-018 CARES: Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 CARES: Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study Operations Plan June 2010 RA Zaveri Principal Investigator WJ Shaw DJ Cziczo DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

203

DOE-STD-1153-2002; A Graded Approach for Evaluating Radiation Doses to Aquatic and Terrestrial Biota  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1153-2002 1153-2002 July 2002 DOE STANDARD A GRADED APPROACH FOR EVALUATING RADIATION DOSES TO AQUATIC AND TERRESTRIAL BIOTA U.S. Department of Energy AREA ENVR Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1153-2002 iii Foreword 1. Department of Energy (DOE) activities may expose populations of plants and animals to radioactive materials in environmental media, or to radioactive materials released in waste streams. This DOE voluntary

204

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Point Reyes, California for the Marine Stratus, Radiation, Aerosol, and Drizzle (MASRAD) Project  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOE's Office of Science is responsible for the ARM Program. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

205

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1989 to the DOE (Department of Energy) Office of Energy Research - Part 3: Atmospheric Sciences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This 1989 Annual Report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) describes research in environment, safety, and health conducted during fiscal year 1989. The report again consists of five parts, each in a separate volume. This volume contains research in the atmospheric sciences. Currently, the broad goals of atmospheric research at PNL are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, continental, and global scales in the air, in clouds, and on the surface. The redistribution and long-range transport of transformed contaminants passing through clouds is recognized as a necessary extension of our research to even larger scales in the future. Eventually, large-scale experiments on cloud processing and redistribution of contaminants will be integrated into the national program on global change, investigating how energy pollutants affect aerosols and clouds and the transfer of radiant energy through them. As the significance of this effect becomes clear, its global impact on climate will be studied through experimental and modeling research. The description of ongoing atmospheric research at PNL is organized in terms of the following study areas: atmospheric studies in complex terrain, large-scale atmospheric transport and processing of emissions, and climate change. This report describes the progress in FY 1989 in each of these areas. A divider page summarizes the goals of each area and lists project titles that support research activities. 9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Absorption of Visible Radiation by Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Fog and Cloud Water Residues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Light absorption by samples of atmospheric aerosol particles as a function of size was studied using the integrating sphere method. In addition, the optical properties of fog and cloud-water residues were determined. The samples were taken at two ...

Karl Andre; Ralph Dlugi; Gottfried Schnatz

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Using the Radiative Kernel Technique to Calculate Climate Feedbacks in NCAR’s Community Atmospheric Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate models differ in their responses to imposed forcings, such as increased greenhouse gas concentrations, due to different climate feedback strengths. Feedbacks in NCAR’s Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) are separated into two components: ...

Karen M. Shell; Jeffrey T. Kiehl; Christine A. Shields

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

A Midlatitude Cirrus Cloud Climatology from the Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing. Part III: Radiative Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part III of a series of papers describing the extended time high-cloud observations from the University of Utah Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (FARS) supporting the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) ...

Kenneth Sassen; Jennifer M. Comstock

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Evaluation of the Multiscale Modeling Framework Using Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a recently developed approach to climate modeling, called the multiscale modeling framework (MMF), a two-dimensional cloud-resolving model (CRM) is embedded into each grid column of the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM), replacing traditional ...

Mikhail Ovtchinnikov; Thomas Ackerman; Roger Marchand; Marat Khairoutdinov

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Does  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Does Does the cellulose-binding module move on the cellulose surface? Yu-San Liu Æ Yining Zeng Æ Yonghua Luo Æ Qi Xu Æ Michael E. Himmel Æ Steve J. Smith Æ Shi-You Ding Received: 26 November 2008 / Accepted: 11 May 2009 / Published online: 19 June 2009 Ó Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009 Abstract Exoglucanases are key enzymes required for the efficient hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose. It has been proposed that exoglucanases hydrolyze cellulose chains in a processive manner to produce primarily cellobiose. Usually, two functional modules are involved in the processive mechanism: a catalytic module and a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM). In this report, single molecule tracking techniques were used to analyze the molecular motion of CBMs labeled with quantum dots (QDs) and bound to cellulose crystals. By tracking the single QD, we observed that the family 2 CBM from

211

An Atmospheric Radiation and Cloud Station in the Tropical Western Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of clouds and radiation is a particularly difficult issue in the study of climate change. Clouds have a large impact on the earth's radiation budget but the range of spatial and temporal scales and the complexity of the physical ...

J. H. Mather; T. P. Ackerman; W. E. Clements; F. J. Barnes; M. D. Ivey; L. D. Hatfield; R. M. Reynolds

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Validation and Sensitivity Analysis of a New Atmosphere–Soil–Vegetation Model. Part II: Impacts on In-Canopy Latent Heat Flux over a Winter Wheat Field Determined by Detailed Calculation of Canopy Radiation Transmission and Stomatal Resistance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the validation and sensitivity analysis of an atmosphere–soil–vegetation model. The model consists of one-dimensional multilayer submodels for the atmosphere, soil, and vegetation and a radiation scheme for the transmission ...

Haruyasu Nagai

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Organizations Conducting Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program DoReMi Integrating Low Dose Research High Level Expert Group (HLEG) on European Low Dose Risk Research Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI) RISC-RAD Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by Ionizing Radiation United States Transuranium & Uranium Registries Organizations Conducting other Radiation Research Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Armed Forces Radiology Research Institute (AFRRI) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) Colorado State University Columbia University

214

DOE  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

DOE DOE /E/A- 0202( 83//Q J Sh or t-T er m En er gy O ut lo ok a to m Quar terly Proje ction s Febru ary 1983 Ene rgy Info rma tion Adm inist ratio n Was hing ton, D.C. t rt jrt .or t lor t lor t .lor t- ior t- ior t <.o rt ort . m .er m -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -T erm -T erm -T erm Nrm ue rgy En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y ^n erg y Ou tlo ok Ou tlo ok Ou tlo ok Ou tlo ok Ou tlo ok Ou tlo ok Ou tlo ok Ou tlo ok Ou tlo ok Ou tlo ok Ou tlo ok Ou tlo ok Ou tlo ok Ou tlo ok Ou tlo ok Ou tlo ok Ou tlo ok Ou tlo ok Ou tlo ok Ou tlo ok Ou tlo ok Ou tlo ok Ou tlo ok Ou tlo ok Ou tlo ok Sh ort -T erm 1 Sh ort -T erm Sh ort -T erm Sh ort -T erm Sh ort -T erm Sh ort -T erm Sh ort -T erm Sh ort -T erm Sh ort -T erm Sh ort -T erm Sh ort -T erm Sh ort -T erm

215

Polarization of Thermal Microwave Atmospheric Radiation Due to Scattering by Ice Particles in Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The polarization difference ?Tb between the vertical and horizontal components of thermal radiation emitted by clouds was studied using 37- and 85-GHz radiometers. The measurements were conducted during the Alliance Icing Research Project in ...

A. V. Troitsky; A. M. Osharin; A. V. Korolev; J. W. Strapp

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

The Spherical Harmonics Discrete Ordinate Method for Three-Dimensional Atmospheric Radiative Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new algorithm for modeling radiative transfer in inhomogeneous three-dimensional media is described. The spherical harmonics discrete ordinate method uses a spherical harmonic angular representation to reduce memory use and time computing the ...

K. Franklin Evans

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

A Parameterization of Scale-Dependent Radiative Damping Rates in the Middle Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of the radiative damping of slowly modulated sinusoidal wave disturbances is presented. It is shown that it is possible to incorporate scale-dependent effects in a manner no more difficult than that used in the usual “Newtonian ...

Stephen B. Fels

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Hadley Circulations in Radiative–Convective Equilibrium in an Axially Symmetric Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hadley circulations in radiative–convective equilibrium are investigated using an idealistic axially symmetric model. Calculations show that the distribution of temperature in the Hadley cell is controlled by the moist process; the vertical ...

Masaki Satoh

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

A New Look at the Discrete Ordinate Method for Radiative Transfer Calculations in Anisotropically Scattering Atmospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The difficulties inherent in the conventional numerical implementation of the discrete ordinate method (following Chandrasekhar's prescription) for solving the radiative transfer equation are discussed. A matrix formulation is developed to ...

Knut Stamnes; Roy A. Swanson

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Assessing 1D Atmospheric Solar Radiative Transfer Models: Interpretation and Handling of Unresolved Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this study is to assess the performance of 1D solar radiative transfer codes that are used currently both for research and in weather and climate models. Emphasis is on interpretation and handling of unresolved clouds. ...

H. W. Barker; G. L. Stephens; P. T. Partain; J. W. Bergman; B. Bonnel; K. Campana; E. E. Clothiaux; S. Clough; S. Cusack; J. Delamere; J. Edwards; K. F. Evans; Y. Fouquart; S. Freidenreich; V. Galin; Y. Hou; S. Kato; J. Li; E. Mlawer; J.-J. Morcrette; W. O'Hirok; P. Räisänen; V. Ramaswamy; B. Ritter; E. Rozanov; M. Schlesinger; K. Shibata; P. Sporyshev; Z. Sun; M. Wendisch; N. Wood; F. Yang

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "doe atmospheric radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Comparison of Energy Source Estimates Derived from Atmospheric Circulation Data with Satellite Measurements of Net Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The distributions of the net sources of atmospheric dry and latent energy are evaluated by the residual technique using the reanalyzed ECMWF FGGE level IIIb data for February and July 1979. Their sum (i.e., the residual estimate of the source of ...

Carl Fortelius; Eero Holopainen

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Parameterizations for Water Vapor IR Radiative Transfer in Both the Middle and Lower Atmospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water vapor contributes a maximum of 1°C/day to the middle atmospheric thermal infrared (IR) cooling. This magnitude is small but not negligible. Because of the small amount of mass involved and the extremely narrow molecular absorption lines at ...

Ming-Dah Chou; William L. Ridgway; Michael M-H. Yan

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

PNNL: FCSD: Atmospheric Sciences & Global Change: Programs &...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programs & Facilities Atmospheric Measurements Laboratory Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and ARM Climate Research Facility ARM Aerial Facility Environmental...

224

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Site  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOE's Office of Science is responsible for the ARM Program. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. (Specialized Interface) (Registration Required)

225

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from ARM's Aerial Vehicles Program (AVP)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOE's Office of Science is responsible for the ARM Program. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

226

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Specific Instruments Used in the ARM Program  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOE's Office of Science is responsible for the ARM Program. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

227

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Field Campaigns or Intensive Operational Periods (IOP)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOE's Office of Science is responsible for the ARM Program. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

228

DOE O 458.1 Admin Chg 3, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order establishes requirements to protect the public and the environment against undue risk from radiation associated with radiological activities ...

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

229

THE I3RC: Bringing Together the Most Advanced Radiative Transfer Tools for Cloudy Atmospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of clouds with solar and terrestrial radiation is one of the most important topics of climate research. In recent years it has been recognized that only a full three-dimensional (3D) treatment of this interaction can provide ...

Robert F. Cahalan; Lazaros Oreopoulos; Alexander Marshak; K. Franklin Evans; Anthony B. Davis; Robert Pincus; Ken H. Yetzer; Bernhard Mayer; Roger Davies; Thomas P. Ackerman; Howard W. Barker; Eugene E. Clothiaux; Robert G. Ellingson; Michael J. Garay; Evgueni Kassianov; Stefan Kinne; Andreas Macke; William O'Hirok; Philip T. Partain; Sergei M. Prigarin; Alexei N. Rublev; Graeme L. Stephens; Frederic Szczap; Ezra E. Takara; Támas Várnai; Guoyong Wen; Tatiana B. Zhuravleva

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Videos from the ARM Channel on YouTube  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM Climate Research Facility now has its own channel on YouTube, having joined in late June of 2010. Twenty-six video clips are now available to provide quick views of the work of this DOE scientific user facility for the study of global climate change.

231

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1980 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment. Part 3. Atmospheric sciences.  

SciTech Connect

Separate absracts were prepared for the 15 sections of this progress report which is a description of atmospheric research at PNL organized in terms of the following energy technologies: coal, gas and oil; fission and fusion; and oil shale. (KRM)

Elderkin, C.E.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Radiative Atmospheric Divergence...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the generation of monsoons. Because the dust can block incoming solar energy, and because solar energy drives weather and climate, scientists around the world are looking for ways...

233

DOE-STD-1153-2002; A Graded Approach for Evaluating Radiation Doses to Aquatic and Terrestrial Biota  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 DETAILED GUIDANCE MODULE 2: DETAILED GUIDANCE DOE-STD-1153-2002 INTENTIONALLY BLANK DOE-STD-1153-2002 M2-1 1 The Graded Approach, Ecological Risk Assessment, and Guidance on Their Implementation in Evaluating Radiation Doses to Biota The graded approach was made available to DOE field and program elements and to external users for a trial use period beginning in July 2000 as an interim version of this technical standard. The purpose of the trial period was to give users an opportunity to become familiar with and implement the graded approach at their sites, and to have an opportunity to provide suggestions and lessons learned to the BDAC regarding any refinements and associated guidance that needed to be incorporated into the graded approach prior to finalizing the technical standard. During this trial period the graded approach received strong interest and requests from

234

Radiation Resistant Foams | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

dimensions, defect migration to the ligament surface happens faster than damage production during irradiation ensuring radiation resistance for a given dose-rate. Resistant...

235

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1987 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 3, Atmospheric sciences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, the broad goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, and continental scales in the air, in clouds, and on the surface. For several years, studies of transport and diffusion have been extended to mesoscale areas of complex terrain. Atmospheric cleansing research has expanded to a regional scale, multilaboratory investigation of precipitation scavenging processes involving the transformation and wet deposition of chemicals composing ''acid rain.'' In addition, the redistribution and long-range transport of transformed contaminants passing through clouds is recognized as a necessary extension of our research to even larger scales in the future. A few long-range tracer experiments conducted in recent years and the special opportunity for measuring the transport and removal of radioactivity following the Chernobyl reactor accident of April 1986 offer important initial data bases for studying atmospheric processes at these super-regional scales.

Elderkin, C.E.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

SOAR Data: Data from Shipboard Oceanographic and Atmospheric Radiation (SOAR)1999 through 2001  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

SOAR is a global network of research and volunteer ships that carry global change instrumentation. The primary emphasis for SOAR is solar and IR radiation but some ships cary ceilometers, meteorological instruments, and related equipment. All data are collected in a central data collection computer and the flexible data collection software can be adapted to any other user instrumentation. Currently SOAR is installed pas permanent instrumentation on four ships operating in the western Pacific, eastern tropical Pacific, West Indies, and an oceanographic ship that operates around the world. In addition, six other system are used on cruises of opportunity. [Taken from SOAR homepage at http://www.gim.bnl.gov/soar/index.html

237

Mechanical Behavior and Radiation Effects | U.S. DOE Office of...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

issues is important to the DOE mission areas of robust energy storage systems; fossil, fusion, and nuclear energy conversion; radioactive waste storage; environmental...

238

Does Unruh radiation accelerate the universe? A novel approach to dark energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In braneworld scenario, the brane accelerates in the bulk, and hence it perceives a thermal bulk filled with Unruh radiation. We put forward that there may be an energy exchange between Unruh radiation in the bulk and the dark matter confined to the brane, which accelerates the universe.

Hongsheng Zhang; Zong-Hong Zhu

2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

239

Radiation Resistant Foams | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Radiation Resistant Foams Radiation Resistant Foams Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights Highlight Archives News & Events Publications Contact BES Home 04.27.12 Radiation Resistant Foams Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Scientific Achievement Experiments and computer simulations demonstrate that nanoscale gold foams can be designed for radiation resistanceSignificance and Impact May lead to the design of new radiation resistant materials that extend the lifetime and increase the safety of nuclear reactors.Research Details The optimal nanostructural design appears to be the consequence of the combined effect of two length scales dependent on the irradiation conditions: (i) foams with ligament diameters below a minimum value melt

240

DOE Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) Data Update Presented at the 32nd Annual International Dosimetry and Records Symposium, June 3-6, Scottsdale, AZ  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This slide-show presents the 2012 draft data for DOE occupational radiation exposure, compares those data with last year and the last five years, and clarifies reporting data.

none,

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "doe atmospheric radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

DOE Order Self Study Modules - 10 CFR 835 Occupational Radiation Protection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 CFR 835 10 CFR 835 OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION LEARNING AND CAREER DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT Change No: 1 10 CFR 835 Level: Familiar Date:11/1/08 1 10/1/08 10 CFR 835 OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION FAMILIAR LEVEL ___________________________________________________________________________ OBJECTIVES Given the familiar level of this module and the resources, you will be able to perform the following: 1. State the scope of 10 CFR 835. 2. Define the following terms. annual limit on intake bioassay contamination area derived air concentration high contamination area radiation weighting factor 3. State the requirements of the general rule. 4. State the radiation protection program requirements. 5. State the requirements of the internal audit.

242

Nasa Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

with heavy ions was carried out at the AGS accelerator. To simulate the less than 1-GeV energy spectrum of galactic cosmic rays and solar radiation better, NASA and Brookhaven...

243

Nasa Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

To simulate the less than 1-GeV energy spectrum of galactic cosmic rays and solar radiation better, NASA and Brookhaven have worked together to build the NSRL based at...

244

DOE-STD-1153-2002; A Graded Approach for Evaluating Radiation Doses to Aquatic and Terrestrial Biota  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 METHODS DERIVATION MODULE 3: METHODS DERIVATION DOE-STD-1153-2002 INTENTIONALLY BLANK DOE-STD-1153-2002 M3-1 1 Introduction and Basis for the Approach The Department of Energy (DOE) currently has in place a radiation dose limit of 1 rad/d (10 mGy/d) for the protection of aquatic organisms (DOE Order 5400.5), and has proposed dose limits for both aquatic and terrestrial organisms. These limits are: 1 rad/d (10 mGy/d) for aquatic animals; 1 rad/d (10 mGy/d) for terrestrial plants; and 0.1 rad/d (1 mGy/d) for terrestrial animals. Because the biota protection limits are dose-based, a calculational method is needed to demonstrate compliance. In theory, derived radionuclide concentration limits for environmental media (e.g., Biota Concentration Guides, BCGs, for water, sediment, or soil) provide a relatively straightforward and simple means to do so. However, because of the

245

Evaluation of the Atmospheric Transport Model in the MACCS2 Code and its Impact on Decision Making at DOE Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Atmospheric the Atmospheric Transport Model in the MACCS2 Code and its Impact on Decision Making at Department of Energy Sites John E. Till and Arthur S. Rood June 5, 2012 RAC Historical Dose Reconstruction Projects Environmental Risk Assessment "Understanding and communicating the movement of radionuclides and chemicals released to the environment, resulting exposure to humans, and the subsequent dose or risk from exposure." Types of Dose/Risk  Medical  Occupational  Public Dose/Risk Can Be Estimated for  Real people  Hypothetical people Purpose of Assessments  Compliance  Decision making  Epidemiology  Emergency response Approaches to Estimating Risk  In certain situations, and depending upon the decisions to be made, if the results of relatively

246

DOE TEC Radiation Monitoring Subtopic Group Conference Call 10_11_07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Monitoring Subtopic Group Conference Call Radiation Monitoring Subtopic Group Conference Call Thursday, October 11, 2007, 3:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. EDT Conference Call Minutes Participants: Chair: Cort Richardson (CSG/NE) Members: Mel Massaro (DOT/FRA), Ed Wilds (State of Connecticut), Vernon Jensen (Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska), Sean Kice (SSEB), Ralph Hail (Norfolk Southern), Pat Edwards (CSG/NE), Kevin Blackwell (DOT/FRA), Larry Stern (CVSA), Sarah Wochos (CSG/MW), Tim Runyon (CSG/MW), Christina Nelson (NCSL), Tony Dimond (BLET), Matt Dennis & Doug Osborn (SNL), Jim Williams (WIEB), Ralph Best & Steve Schmid (BSC) Contractor Support: John Smegal (Legin) Summary: Cort Richardson welcomed the participants to the inaugural Radiation Monitoring Subtopic Group conference call and thanked them for their interest. He indicated that his

247

Where does "space" really begin? The Earth's atmosphere begins to thin out as we ascend to higher altitudes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gravity, high solar illumination levels, cosmic rays or radiation, natural micrometeoroid particles or fragments, and human-made debris--called "orbital debris"--from space missions. Thus, the space environment that, on average, one human-made object falls back to Earth from space each day. The good news

248

Radiative and Dynamical Forcing of the Surface and Atmospheric Temperature Anomalies Associated with the Northern Annular Mode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On the basis of the total energy balance within an atmosphere–surface column, an attribution analysis is conducted for the Northern Hemisphere (NH) atmospheric and surface temperature response to the northern annular mode (NAM) in boreal winter. ...

Yi Deng; Tae-Won Park; Ming Cai

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Top-of-Atmosphere Direct Radiative Effect of Aerosols over Global Oceans from Merged CERES and MODIS Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The direct radiative effect of aerosols (DREA) is defined as the difference between radiative fluxes in the absence and presence of aerosols. In this study, the direct radiative effect of aerosols is estimated for 46 months (March 2000–December ...

Norman G. Loeb; Natividad Manalo-Smith

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Does nitrate deposition following astrophysical ionizing radiation events pose an additional threat to amphibians?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is known that amphibians are especially susceptible to the combination of heightened UVB radiation and increased nitrate concentrations. Various astrophysical events have been suggested as sources of ionizing radiation that could pose a threat to life on Earth, through destruction of the ozone layer and subsequent increase in UVB, followed by deposition of nitrate. In this study, we investigate whether the nitrate deposition following an ionizing event is sufficiently large to cause an additional stress beyond that of the heightened UVB previously considered. We have converted predicted nitrate depositions to concentration values, utilizing data from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Acid Rain Monitoring Network web site. Our results show that the increase in nitrate concentration in bodies of water following the most intense ionization event likely in the last billion years would not be sufficient to cause a serious additional stress on amphibian populations and may actually provide some benefit by acting as fertilizer.

Brian C. Thomas; Michelle D. Honeyman

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

251

A General Strategy for Physics-Based Model Validation Illustrated with Earthquake Phenomenology, Atmospheric Radiative Transfer, and Computational Fluid Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Validation is often defined as the process of determining the degree to which a model is an accurate representation of the real world from the perspective of its intended uses. Validation is crucial as industries and governments depend increasingly on predictions by computer models to justify their decisions. In this article, we survey the model validation literature and propose to formulate validation as an iterative construction process that mimics the process occurring implicitly in the minds of scientists. We thus offer a formal representation of the progressive build-up of trust in the model, and thereby replace incapacitating claims on the impossibility of validating a given model by an adaptive process of constructive approximation. This approach is better adapted to the fuzzy, coarse-grained nature of validation. Our procedure factors in the degree of redundancy versus novelty of the experiments used for validation as well as the degree to which the model predicts the observations. We illustrate the new methodology first with the maturation of Quantum Mechanics as the arguably best established physics theory and then with several concrete examples drawn from some of our primary scientific interests: a cellular automaton model for earthquakes, an anomalous diffusion model for solar radiation transport in the cloudy atmosphere, and a computational fluid dynamics code for the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. This article is an augmented version of Sornette et al. [2007] that appeared in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in 2007 (doi: 10.1073/pnas.0611677104), with an electronic supplement at URL http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/0611677104/DC1. Sornette et al. [2007] is also available in preprint form at physics/0511219.

Didier Sornette; Anthony B. Davis; James R. Kamm; Kayo Ide

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Black Forest Germany for the Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study (COPS)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

ARM maintains three major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. In 2007 the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) operated in the Black Forest region of Germany as part of the Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study (COPS). Scientists studied rainfall resulting from atmospheric uplift (convection) in mountainous terrain, otherwise known as orographic precipitation. This was part of a six -year duration of the German Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting (QPF) Program. See the COPS home at https://www.uni-hohenheim.de/spp-iop/index.htm and the QPF homepage at http://www.meteo.uni-bonn.de/projekte/SPPMeteo/ Information obtained during COPS will not only aid regional weather forecasts to help protect people and land, but will also help scientists determine how clouds affect the climate in complex terrain around the world. Because of its relevance to society, COPS has been endorsed as a Research and Development Project by the World Weather Research Program. This program was established by the World Meteorological Organization to develop improved and cost-effective forecasting techniques, with an emphasis on high-impact weather. [Taken from http://www.arm.gov/sites/amf/blackforest/] A large collection of data plots based on data streams from specific instruments used at Black Forest are available via a link from ARM's Black Forest site information page. Users will be requested to create a password, but the plots and the data files in the ARM Archive are free for viewing and downloading. The URL to go directly to the ARM Archive, bypassing the information pages, is http://www.archive.arm.gov/ The Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOE's Office of Science is responsible for the ARM Program. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

253

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1988 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 3, Atmospheric sciences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disposal of spent fuel or high level nuclear waste into marine sediments would create high temperature-high gamma radiation environments adjacent to waste canisters. Under these conditions sediments will react producing pore waters that differ significantly from those occurring naturally. These changes may enhance canister corrosion or facilitate transport of radionuclides through unreacted sediments beyond the heated zone. In addition, the term ''near field'' needs clarification, as it is used widely without having a precise meaning. Research in three areas was undertaken to improve our understanding of near field chemical processes. Initially, isothermal experiments were carried out in ''Dickson'' hydrothermal systems. These were followed by an experimental program directed at understanding the chemical effects of temperature-gradient induced transport. Finally, additional experimentation was done to study the combined effects of hydrothermal conditions and intense gamma radiation. Having completed this body of experimental work, it was concluded that near field conditions are not an obstacle to the safe use of abyssal marine sediments for the disposal of spent fuel or high level nuclear wastes. 41 refs., 6 figs., 17 tabs.

Not Available

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Angular Distribution Models for Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Flux Estimation from the Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System Instrument on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Satellite. Part I: Methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) investigates the critical role that clouds and aerosols play in modulating the radiative energy flow within the Earth–atmosphere system. CERES builds upon the foundation laid by previous ...

Norman G. Loeb; Natividad Manalo-Smith; Seiji Kato; Walter F. Miller; Shashi K. Gupta; Patrick Minnis; Bruce A. Wielicki

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Angular Distribution Models for Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Flux Estimation from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System Instrument on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Satellite. Part II: Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) are estimated from empirical angular distribution models (ADMs) that convert instantaneous radiance measurements to TOA fluxes. This paper ...

Norman G. Loeb; Konstantin Loukachine; Natividad Manalo-Smith; Bruce A. Wielicki; David F. Young

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Angular Distribution Models for Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Flux Estimation from the Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System Instrument on the Terra Satellite. Part II: Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Errors in top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes from the Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument due to uncertainties in radiance-to-flux conversion from CERES Terra angular distribution models (ADMs) are evaluated ...

Norman G. Loeb; Seiji Kato; Konstantin Loukachine; Natividad Manalo-Smith; David R. Doelling

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U U r r b b a a n n A A t t m m o o s s p p h h e e r r i i c c O O b b s s e e r r v v a a t t o o r r y y ( ( U U A A O O ) ) F F i i r r s s t t P P l l a a n n n n i i n n g g W W o o r r k k s s h h o o p p - - A A t t t t e e n n d d e e e e s s 2 2 7 7 - - 2 2 8 8 J J a a n n u u a a r r y y , , 2 2 0 0 0 0 3 3 ****************************************************************** Sean Ahearn Hunter College North Bldg., 10 th Floor New York City, NY sca@everest.hunter.cuny.edu (W) 212-772-5327 Robert Bornstein San Jose State University Dept. of Meteorology San Jose, CA 951920-0104 pblmodel@hotmail.com (W) 408-924-5205 (F) 408-924-5191 David Brown Argonne National Lab 9700 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 dbrown@anl.gov (W) 608-442-1249 Michael Brown LANL, Drop Point 19S, SM-30 Bikini Atoll Road Group D4-MS F604 Los Alamos, NM 87545 mbrown@lanl.gov (W) 505- 667-1788

258

The Influence of Radiative Transfer on the Mass and Heat Budgets of Ice Crystals Failing in the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theoretical study was carried out to investigate the effect of radiative heating and cooling on the mass and heat budgets of an ice crystal. Equations describing the radiative budget of an ice crystal were derived and particle absorption ...

Graeme L. Stephens

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Does Axillary Boost Increase Lymphedema Compared With Supraclavicular Radiation Alone After Breast Conservation?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine independent predictors of lymphedema (LE) after breast radiotherapy and to quantify added risks of LE from regional node irradiation (RNI). Materials and Methods: A total of 2,579 women with T1-2, N 0-3, M0 breast cancer treated with breast conservation between 1970 and 2005 were studied. A total of 2,169 patients (84%) received radiation to the breast (B), 226 (8.8%) to the breast and supraclavicular LNs (B+SC), and 184 (7.1%) to the breast, supraclavicular LNs, and a posterior axillary boost (B+SC+PAB). Median follow-up was 81 months (range, 3-271). Results: Eighteen percent of patients developed LE. LE risks were as follows: 16% (B), 23% (B+SC), and 31% (B+SC+PAB) (p < 0.0001). LE severity was greater in patients who had RNI (p = 0.0002). On multivariate analysis, RT field (p < 0.0001), obesity index (p = 0.0157), systemic therapy (p = 0.0013), and number of LNs dissected (p < 0.0001) independently predicted for LE. In N1 patients, the addition of a SC to tangents (p < 0.0001) and the addition of a PAB to tangents (p = 0.0017) conferred greater risks of LE, but adding a PAB to B+SC RT did not (p = 0.8002). In the N2 patients, adding a PAB increased the risk of LE 4.5-fold over B+SC RT (p = 0.0011). Conclusions: LE predictors included number of LNs dissected, RNI, obesity index, and systemic therapy. LE risk increased when a SC or PAB were added in the N1 subgroup. In the N2 patients, a PAB increased the risk over B+SC. The decision to boost the axilla must be weighed against the increased risk of LE that it imposes.

Hayes, Shelly B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)], E-mail: shelly_hayes@fccc.edu; Freedman, Gary M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Li Tianyu [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Anderson, Penny R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ross, Eric [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Entropy Budget of an Atmosphere in Radiative–Convective Equilibrium. Part II: Latent Heat Transport and Moist Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In moist convection, atmospheric motions transport water vapor from the earth's surface to the regions where condensation occurs. This transport is associated with three other aspects of convection: the latent heat transport, the expansion work ...

Olivier Pauluis; Isaac M. Held

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "doe atmospheric radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Equilibrium Response of an Atmosphere–Mixed Layer Ocean Model to Different Radiative Forcing Agents: Global and Zonal Mean Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The equilibrium response to various forcing agents, including CO2, solar irradiance, tropospheric ozone, black carbon, organic carbon, sulfate, and volcanic aerosols, is investigated using an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a ...

Masakazu Yoshimori; Anthony J. Broccoli

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Posters Scanning Raman Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Water Vapor and Aerosols  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Posters Scanning Raman Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Water Vapor and Aerosols R. A. Ferrare and K. D. Evans (a) Hughes STX Corporation Lanham, Maryland S. H. Melfi and D. N. Whiteman NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland The principal objective of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) is to develop a better understanding of the atmospheric radiative balance in order to improve the parameterization of radiative processes in general circulation models (GCMs) which are used to study climate change. Meeting this objective requires detailed measurements of both water vapor and aerosols since these atmospheric constituents affect the radiation balance directly, through scattering and absorption of solar and

263

Atmospheric Correction Algorithm for Hyperspectral Imagery  

SciTech Connect

In December 1997, the US Department of Energy (DOE) established a Center of Excellence (Hyperspectral-Multispectral Algorithm Research Center, HyMARC) for promoting the research and development of algorithms to exploit spectral imagery. This center is located at the DOE Remote Sensing Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada, and is operated for the DOE by Bechtel Nevada. This paper presents the results to date of a research project begun at the center during 1998 to investigate the correction of hyperspectral data for atmospheric aerosols. Results of a project conducted by the Rochester Institute of Technology to define, implement, and test procedures for absolute calibration and correction of hyperspectral data to absolute units of high spectral resolution imagery will be presented. Hybrid techniques for atmospheric correction using image or spectral scene data coupled through radiative propagation models will be specifically addressed. Results of this effort to analyze HYDICE sensor data will be included. Preliminary results based on studying the performance of standard routines, such as Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption and Nonlinear Least Squares Spectral Fit, in retrieving reflectance spectra show overall reflectance retrieval errors of approximately one to two reflectance units in the 0.4- to 2.5-micron-wavelength region (outside of the absorption features). These results are based on HYDICE sensor data collected from the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site during overflights conducted in July of 1997. Results of an upgrade made in the model-based atmospheric correction techniques, which take advantage of updates made to the moderate resolution atmospheric transmittance model (MODTRAN 4.0) software, will also be presented. Data will be shown to demonstrate how the reflectance retrieval in the shorter wavelengths of the blue-green region will be improved because of enhanced modeling of multiple scattering effects.

R. J. Pollina

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

The Parameterization of Radiation for Numerical Weather Prediction and Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a review of the various methods used to compute both the fluxes and the rate of heating and/or cooling due to atmospheric radiation for use in numerical models of atmospheric circulation. The paper does not follow, step by ...

Graeme L. Stephens

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

3D atmospheric modeling based on MODTRAN4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All the factors of atmospheric environment that influence the transmission of infrared radiation were analyzed in detail in the paper. Taking horizontally varying atmospheric property into consideration, a 3D model of atmospheric transmission of infrared ... Keywords: MODTRAN4, infrared radiation, model, path radiation, ratio of atmospheric transmission, simulation, single scatter solar radiation

Ge Li; Zhifeng Lu; Gang Guo; Kedi Huang

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Two-Stream Approximations to Radiative Transfer in Planetary Atmospheres: A Unified Description of Existing Methods and a New Improvement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Existing two-stream approximations to radiative transfer theory for particulate media are shown to be represented by identical forms of coupled differential equations if the intensity is replaced by integrals of the intensity over hemispheres. ...

W. E. Meador; W. R. Weaver

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Modeling Ultraviolet Radiation at the Earth's Surface. Part I: The Sensitivity of Ultraviolet Irradiances to Atmospheric Changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A discrete-ordinate radiative transfer model is employed for the prediction of surface UV irradiances. A wide-ranging sensitivity study is undertaken to show how changes to the model input parameters aged UV irradiances at the surface. The ...

Piers M. De F. Forster

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Indirect Impact of Atmospheric Aerosols in Idealized Simulations of Convective–Radiative Quasi Equilibrium. Part II: Double-Moment Microphysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper extends the previous cloud-resolving modeling study concerning the impact of cloud microphysics on convective–radiative quasi equilibrium (CRQE) over a surface with fixed characteristics and prescribed solar input, both mimicking the ...

Wojciech W. Grabowski; Hugh Morrison

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program: Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program -- Final Report. Part 1: The lower atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents work done between FY91 and FY95 for the lower atmospheric portion of the joint Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program (ARSAP) within the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). The work focused on (1) developing new measurement capabilities and (2) measuring atmospheric heating in a well-defined layer and then relating it to cloud properties an water vapor content. Seven new instruments were develop3ed for use with Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles (UAVs) as the host platform for flux, radiance, cloud, and water vapor measurements. Four major field campaigns were undertaken to use these new as well as existing instruments to make critically needed atmospheric measurements. Scientific results include the profiling of clear sky fluxes from near surface to 14 km and the strong indication of cloudy atmosphere absorption of solar radiation considerably greater than predicted by extant models.

Tooman, T.P. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Exploratory Systems Technology Dept.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Radiators  

SciTech Connect

A heat-exchange radiator is connected to a fluid flow circuit by a connector which provides one member of an interengageable spigot and socket pair for push-fit, fluid-tight, engagement between the connector and the radiator, with latching formations at least one of which is resilient. Preferably the connector carries the spigot which tapers and engages with a socket of corresponding shape, the spigot carrying an O-ring seal and either latching fingers or a resilient latching circlip.

Webster, D. M.

1985-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

271

Darwin: The Third DOE ARM TWP ARCS Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Darwin: The Third DOE ARM TWP ARCS Site Darwin: The Third DOE ARM TWP ARCS Site W. E. Clements and L. Jones Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico T. Baldwin Special Services Unit Australian Bureau of Meteorology Melbourne, Australia K. Nitschke South Pacific Regional Environment Programme Apia, Samoa Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program began operations in its Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale in October 1996 when the first Atmospheric Radiation and Cloud Station (ARCS) began collecting data on Manus Island in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Two years later, in November 1998 a second ARCS began operations on the island of Nauru in the Central Pacific. Now a third ARCS has begun collecting data in Darwin, Australia. See Figure 1 for

272

Atmospheric Aerosols  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

measuring equipment Atmospheric Aerosols Atmospheric aerosol research at Berkeley Lab seeks to understand the air quality and climate impacts of particles in the atmosphere. On...

273

Microsoft Word - DOE-ER-0670T_6.09_Final.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ER-0670T ER-0670T UC-402 Science Plan for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) February 1996 United States Department of Energy Office of Energy Research Office of Health and Environmental Research Environmental Sciences Division Washington, DC 20585 ARM Science Plan iii Executive Summary The purpose of this Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Plan is to articulate the scientific issues driving the ARM Program, and to relate them to DOE's programmatic objectives for ARM, based on the experience and scientific progress gained over the past five years. ARM programmatic objectives are to: 1. Relate observed radiative fluxes and radiances in the atmosphere, spectrally resolved and as a function of position and time, to the temperature and composition of the atmosphere, specifically including

274

Final report for the project "Improving the understanding of surface-atmosphere radiative interactions by mapping surface reflectance over the ARM CART site" (award DE-FG02-02ER63351)  

SciTech Connect

Surface spectral reflectance (albedo) is a fundamental variable affecting the transfer of solar radiation and the Earth’s climate. It determines the proportion of solar energy absorbed by the surface and reflected back to the atmosphere. The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) identified surface albedo among key factors influencing climate radiative forcing. Accurate knowledge of surface reflective properties is important for advancing weather forecasting and climate change impact studies. It is also important for determining radiative impact and acceptable levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, which makes this work strongly linked to major scientific objectives of the Climate Change Research Division (CCRD) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Most significant accomplishments of eth project are listed below. I) Surface albedo/BRDF datasets from 1995 to the end of 2004 have been produced. They were made available to the ARM community and other interested users through the CCRS public ftp site ftp://ftp.ccrs.nrcan.gc.ca/ad/CCRS_ARM/ and ARM IOP data archive under “PI data Trishchenko”. II) Surface albedo properties over the ARM SGP area have been described for 10-year period. Comparison with ECMWF data product showed some deficiencies in the ECMWF surface scheme, such as missing some seasonal variability and no dependence on sky-conditions which biases surface energy budget and has some influence of the diurnal cycle of upward radiation and atmospheric absorption. III) Four surface albedo Intensive Observation Period (IOP) Field Campaigns have been conducted for every season (August, 2002, May 2003, February 2004 and October 2004). Data have been prepared, documented and transferred to ARM IOP archive. Nine peer-reviewed journal papers and 26 conference papers have been published.

Alexander P. Trishchenko; Yi Luo; Konstantin V. Khlopenkov, William M. Park; Zhanqing Li; Maureen Cribb

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

275

Evaluation of Model-Predicted Top-of-Atmosphere Radiation and Cloud Parameters over Africa with Observations from GERB and SEVIRI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study compared the Regional Atmospheric Climate Model version 2 (RACMO) with satellite data by simultaneously looking at cloud properties and top-of-atmosphere (TOA) fluxes. This study used cloud properties retrieved from Spinning Enhanced ...

Wouter Greuell; Erik van Meijgaard; Nicolas Clerbaux; Jan Fokke Meirink

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

[Treatment of cloud radiative effects in general circulation models  

SciTech Connect

This is a renewal proposal for an on-going project of the Department of Energy (DOE)/Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The objective of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of radiation-cloud in GCMs so that reliable predictions of the timing and magnitude of greenhouse gas-induced global warming and regional responses can be made. The ARM Program supports two research areas: (I) The modeling and analysis of data related to the parameterization of clouds and radiation in general circulation models (GCMs); and (II) the development of advanced instrumentation for both mapping the three-dimensional structure of the atmosphere and high accuracy/precision radiometric observations. The present project conducts research in area (I) and focuses on GCM treatment of cloud life cycle, optical properties, and vertical overlapping. The project has two tasks: (1) Development and Refinement of GCM Radiation-Cloud Treatment Using ARM Data; and (2) Validation of GCM Radiation-Cloud Treatment.

Wang, W.C.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 - September 30, 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research July 1 - September 30, 2007, DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-013 Contents 1. Data Availability ....................................................................................................................... 1 2. Site Visit Requests, Archive Accounts, and Research Computer Accounts ............................. 2 3. Safety ........................................................................................................................................ 4 Tables

278

Estimation and Model Validation of Surface Solar Radiation and Cloud Radiative Forcing Using TOGA COARE Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE) radiation measurements in the western Pacific warm pool are used to estimate surface solar radiation budgets and to validate radiation model ...

Ming-Dah Chou; Wenzhong Zhao

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Atmospheric Aerosols  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tom Kirchstetter with aerosol measurement instrument Atmospheric Aerosols Atmospheric aerosol research at LBNL seeks to understand the air quality and climate impacts of particles...

280

Estimating the Meridional Energy Transports in the Atmosphere and Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The poleward energy transports in the atmosphere–ocean system are estimated for the annual mean and the four seasons based on satellite measurements of the net radiation balance at the top of the atmosphere, atmospheric transports of energy at ...

B. C. Carissimo; A. H. Oort; T. H. Vonder Haar

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "doe atmospheric radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Radiation and Ozone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation is the driving force for the general circulation of the atmosphere and controls the Earth's climate. Ozone is responsible for the warm stratosphere and protects life on Earth from harmful solar ultraviolet radiation. In July 1959, the ...

G. Ohring; R. D. Bojkov; H-J. Bolle; R. D. Hudson; H. Volkert

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

DOE-STD-1153-2002; A Graded Approach for Evaluating Radiation Doses to Aquatic and Terrestrial Biota  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

M3-19 M3-19 3 Equations and Models for Calculating Dose to Biota and Deriving BCGs Based on the potential pathways of exposure, BCGs were derived for surface water, sediment, and soil. Calculated using conservative assumptions, the BCGs are intended to preclude the relevant biota from being exposed to radiation levels in excess of established or recommended biota dose limits. Determination of compliance with the dose limits requires that all organism- relevant environmental media be evaluated at the same time. This is done by using the "sum of fractions" approach commonly used in evaluating radionuclide discharges to the environment. 3.1 An Important Note on Estimating Internal Tissue Concentrations for Use in Dose Equations: The Lumped Parameter For most radionuclides, the single most important predictor of biota dose is the method used to estimate internal tissue concentrations.

283

Radiation Therapy After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Does Hospital Surgical Volume Matter? A Population-Based Study in Taiwan  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To examine the association between hospital surgical volume and the use of radiation therapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in Taiwan. Methods and Materials: We used claims data from the National Health Insurance program in Taiwan (1997-2005) in this retrospective population-based study. We identified patients with breast cancer, receipt of BCS, use of radiation, and the factors that could potentially associated with the use of RT from enrollment records, and the ICD-9 and billing codes in claims. We conducted logistic regression to examine factors associated with RT use after BCS, and performed subgroup analyses to examine whether the association differs by medical center status or hospital volumes. Results: Among 5,094 patients with newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer who underwent BCS, the rate of RT was significantly lower in low-volume hospitals (74% vs. 82%, p < 0.01). Patients treated in low-volume hospitals were less likely to receive RT after BCS (odds ratio = 0.72, 95% confidence interval = 0.62-0.83). In addition, patients treated after the implementation of the voluntary pay-for-performance policy in 2001 were more likely to receive RT (odds ratio = 1.23; 95% confidence interval = 1.05-1.45). Subgroup analyses indicated that the high-volume effect was limited to hospitals accredited as non-medical centers, and that the effect of the pay-for-performance policy was most pronounced among low-volume hospitals. Conclusions: Using population-based data from Taiwan, our study concluded that hospital surgical volume and pay-for-performance policy are positively associated with RT use after BCS.

Chien, Chun-Ru [Section of Health Services Research, Department of Biostatistics, Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, China Medical University Hospital, and School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Pan, I-Wen [Section of Health Services Research, Department of Biostatistics, Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tsai, Yi-Wen [Center of Health Policy Research and Development, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China); Institute of Health and Welfare Policy, National Yang-Ming University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Teressa [Center of Health Policy Research and Development, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China); Liang, Ji-An [Department of Radiation Oncology, China Medical University Hospital, and School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Shih, Ya-Chen Tina, E-mail: yashih@mdanderson.org [Section of Health Services Research, Department of Biostatistics, Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

understanding and representation, in climate and earth system models, of clouds and aerosols as well as their interactions and coupling with the Earth's surface. BNL is actively...

285

FINAL REPORT FOR THE DOE/ARM PROJECT TITLED Representation of the Microphysical and Radiative Properties of Ice Clouds in SCMs and GCMs  

SciTech Connect

The broad goal of this research is to improve climate prediction through better representation of cirrus cloud microphysical and radiative properties in global climate models (GCMs). Clouds still represent the greatest source of uncertainty in climate prediction, and the representation of ice clouds is considerably more challenging than liquid water clouds. While about 40% of cloud condensate may be in the form of ice by some estimates, there have been no credible means of representing the ice particle size distribution and mass removal rates from ice clouds in GCMs. Both factors introduce large uncertainties regarding the global net flux, the latter factor alone producing a change of 10 W/m2 in the global net flux due to plausible changes in effective ice particle fallspeed. In addition, the radiative properties of ice crystals themselves are in question. This research provides GCMs with a credible means of representing the full (bimodal) ice particle size distribution (PSD) in ice clouds, including estimates of the small crystal (D < 65 microns) mode of the PSD. It also provides realistic estimates of mass sedimentation rates from ice clouds, which have a strong impact on their ice contents and radiative properties. This can be done through proper analysis of ice cloud microphysical data from ARM and other field campaigns. In addition, this research tests the ice cloud radiation treatment developed under two previous ARM projects by comparing it against laboratory measurements of ice cloud extinction efficiency and by comparing it with explicit theoretical calculations of ice crystal optical properties. The outcome of this project includes two PSD schemes for ice clouds; one appropriate for mid-latitude cirrus clouds and another for tropical anvil cirrus. Cloud temperature and ice water content (IWC) are the inputs for these PSD schemes, which are based on numerous PSD observations. The temperature dependence of the small crystal mode of the PSD for tropical anvils is opposite to that of mid-latitude cirrus, and this results in very different radiative properties for these two types of cirrus at temperatures less than about 50 C for a given ice water path. In addition, the representative PSD fall velocity is strongly influenced by the small crystal mode, and for temperatures less than 52 C, this fall velocity for mid-latitude cirrus is 2-8 times greater than for tropical anvil cirrus. Finally, the treatment of ice cloud optical properties was found to agree with laboratory measurements and exact theory within 15% for any given wavelength, PSD and ice particle shape. This treatment is analytical, formulated in terms of the PSD and ice particle shape properties. It thus provides the means for explicitly coupling the ice cloud microphysical and radiative properties, and can treat any combination of ice particle shape. It is very inexpensive regarding computer time. When these three deliverables were incorporated into the GCM at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) under another project, it was found that the sunlight reflected and the amount of upwelling heat absorbed by cirrus clouds depended strongly on the PSD scheme used (i.e. mid-latitude or tropical anvil). This was largely due to the fall velocities associated with the two PSD schemes, although the PSD shape was also important.

Mitchell, David L.

2005-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

286

Response of the Middle Atmosphere to CO2 Doubling: Results from the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM) has been used to examine the middle atmosphere response to CO2 doubling. The radiative-photochemical response induced by doubling CO2 alone and the response produced by changes in prescribed SSTs are ...

V. I. Fomichev; A. I. Jonsson; J. de Grandpré; S. R. Beagley; C. McLandress; K. Semeniuk; T. G. Shepherd

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Does oxygen enhance the radiation-induced inactivation of penicillinase. Progress report, December 1, 1979-November 30, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The radiation-induced inactivation of penicillinase in dilute aqueous solutions buffered with phosphate was studied, by examining enzyme radiosensitivity in the presence of various gases (He, O/sub 2/, H/sub 2/, N/sub 2/O, N/sub 2/O + O/sub 2/). The introduction of either N/sub 2/O or O/sub 2/ was found to reduce the radiodamage. On the other hand H/sub 2/ or N/sub 2/O + O/sub 2/ gas-mixture enhanced the radiosensitivity. In the presence of formate and oxygen, no enzyme inactivation was detected. The results indicated that the specific damaging efficiency of H atoms is almost four-fold higher than that of OH radical; therefore in phosphate buffer, where more than half of the free radicals are H atoms, it is the H radicals that are responsible for the majority of the damage. The superoxide radicals appeared to be completely inactive and did not contribute toward enzyme inactivation. Oxygen was shown to affect the radiosensitivity in two ways. On one side, it protected by converting e/sup -//sub aq/ and H radicals into harmless O/sub 2//sup -/ radicals. On the other side it increased the inactivation by enhancing the damage brought about by OH radicals (OER = 2.8). In the present case the oxygen effect of protection exceeded that of sensitization, thus giving rise to a moderate overall protection effect.

Samuni, A.; Kalkstein, A.; Czapski, G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Nucleation and Growth of Atmospheric Particles  

SciTech Connect

New particle formation (NPF) in the atmospheric is a two-step process: Nucleation leads to the birth of stable nuclei that subsequently grow to sizes that can be detected and affect the atmosphere’s radiative properties. Our group is studying both of these processes. Our nucleation research is largely supported by NSF and involves measurements of neutral molecular clusters formed by nucleation with a new custom-designed mass spectrometer (the Cluster-CIMS) and measurements of nanoparticle size distributions as small as 1 nm with a new aerosol spectrometer (the DEG SMPS). These measurements are providing new insights into aspects of cluster behavior that affect nucleation rates. The U.S. DOE supports our research on nanoparticle growth rates. This research couples physical and chemical measurements of aerosol properties and behavior. The TDCIMS, which enables real-time measurements of composition for freshly nucleated particles as small as 8 nm and was developed with support from DOE, is the most important tool in this work. Our most important discoveries about processes that affect growth rates are summarized in a recent PNAS article (doi:10.1073/pnas.0912127107). In short, this work has shown that alkylammonium-carboxylate salts, formed, for example, by reactions between amines and carboxylic acids, account for 20–50% of the mass of freshly nucleated particles in locations that include Atlanta, Mexico City, Boulder, and Hyytiälä, while sulfates account for only about 10%. These newly discovered compounds help to explain the high growth rates of freshly nucleated particles that have been observed around the globe and help to explain why nucleation is an important atmospheric process, not just a scientific curiosity. Our poster will provide an overview of this work.

McMurry, P.; Kuang, C.; Barsanti, K.; Eisele, F.; Friedli, H.; Scheckman, J.; Titcombe, M.; Williams, B.; Zhao, J.; Smith, J.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

High Precision Long-Term Monitoring of Radiatively Active and Related Trace Gases at Surface Sites and from Aircraft in the Southern Hemisphere Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Routine high precision measurements of atmospheric CO2, CH4, CO, H2, N2O, and CO2 stable isotopes are conducted by CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Australia). Of particular relevance to global monitoring of ...

R. J. Francey; L. P. Steele; R. L. Langenfelds; B. C. Pak

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

New Approach to Calculation of Atmospheric Model Physics: Accurate and Fast Neural Network Emulation of Longwave Radiation in a Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new approach based on a synergetic combination of statistical/machine learning and deterministic modeling within atmospheric models is presented. The approach uses neural networks as a statistical or machine learning technique for an accurate ...

Vladimir M. Krasnopolsky; Michael S. Fox-Rabinovitz; Dmitry V. Chalikov

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1992 to the DOE Office of Energy Research  

SciTech Connect

Within the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the atmospheric sciences and carbon dioxide research programs are part of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD). One of the central missions of the division is to provide the DOE with scientifically defensible information on the local, regional, and global distributions of energy-related pollutants and their effects on climate. This information is vital to the definition and implementation of a sound national energy strategy. This volume reports on the progress and status of all OHER atmospheric science and climate research projects at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). PNL has had a long history of technical leadership in the atmospheric sciences research programs within OHER. Within the ESD, the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP) continues DOE's long-term commitment to study the continental and oceanic fates of energy-related air pollutants. Research through direct measurement, numerical modeling, and laboratory studies in the ACP emphasizes the long-range transport, chemical transformation, and removal of emitted pollutants, oxidant species, nitrogen-reservoir species, and aerosols. The Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program continues to apply basic research on density-driven circulations and on turbulent mixing and dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer to the micro- to mesoscale meteorological processes that affect air-surface exchange and to emergency preparedness at DOE and other facilities. Research at PNL provides basic scientific underpinnings to DOE's program of global climate research. Research projects within the core carbon dioxide and ocean research programs are now integrated with those in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM), the Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics (CHAMMP), and Quantitative Links programs to form DOE's contribution to the US Global Change Research Program.

Schrempf, R.E. (ed.)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

EMSL: Science: Atmospheric Aerosol Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Atmospheric Aerosol Systems atmospheric logo Nighttime enhancement of nitrogen-containing organic compounds, or NOC Observed nighttime enhancement of nitrogen-containing organic compounds, or NOC, showed evidence of being formed by reactions that transform carbonyls into imines. The Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Science Theme focuses on understanding the chemistry, physics and molecular-scale dynamics of aerosols for model parameterization to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations and develop a predictive understanding of climate. By elucidating the role of natural and anthropogenic regional and global climate forcing mechanisms, EMSL can provide DOE and others with the ability to develop cost-effective strategies to monitor, control and mitigate them.

293

Parameterization of Outgoing Infrared Radiation Derived from Detailed Radiative Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art radiative transfer models can calculate outgoing infrared (IR) irradiance at the top of the atmosphere (F) to an accuracy suitable for climate modeling given the proper atmospheric profiles of temperature and absorbing gases and ...

Starley L. Thompson; Stephen G. Warren

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

A study of longwave radiation codes for climate studies: Validation with ARM observations and tests in general circulation models. Final report, September 15, 1990--October 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

DOE has launched a major initiative -- the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program -- directed at improving the parameterization of the physics governing cloud and radiative processes in general circulation models (GCMs). One specific goal of ARM is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in GCMs under clear-sky, general overcast and broken cloud conditions. In 1990, the authors proposed to contribute to this goal by attacking major problems connected with one of the dominant radiation components of the problem -- longwave radiation. In particular, their long-term research goals are to: develop an optimum longwave radiation model for use in GCMs that has been calibrated with state-of-the-art observations, assess the impact of the longwave radiative forcing in a GCM, determine the sensitivity of a GCM to the radiative model used in it, and determine how the longwave radiative forcing contributes relatively when compared to shortwave radiative forcing, sensible heating, thermal advection and expansion.

Ellingson, R.G.; Baer, F.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

temperature temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric temperature The temperature indicated by a thermometer exposed to the air in a place sheltered from direct solar radiation. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AERI : Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

296

DOE 2011 Occupational Radiation Exposure report, _Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security. December 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2011 occupational radiation dose data along with trends over the past 5 years, and provides instructions to submit successful as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) projects.

Derek Hagemeyer, Yolanda McCormick

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

297

Short-Term Basin-Scale Streamflow Forecasting Using Large-Scale Coupled Atmospheric–Oceanic Circulation and Local Outgoing Longwave Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the use of large-scale circulation patterns (El Niño–Southern Oscillation and the equatorial Indian Ocean Oscillation), local outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), and previous streamflow information for short-term (weekly) ...

Rajib Maity; S. S. Kashid

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

A Rapid Radiative Transfer Model for Reflection of Solar Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A rapid analytical radiative transfer model for reflection of solar radiation in plane-parallel atmospheres is developed based on the Sobolev approach and the delta function transformation technique. A distinct advantage of this model over ...

X. Xiang; E. A. Smith; C. G. Justus

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: ARM Radiative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Radiative Transfer Modeling and Remote Sensing Clough, Shepard Atmospheric and Environmental Research Shephard, Mark Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Mlawer, Eli...

300

The Earth's radiation budget and its relation to atmospheric hydrology 3. Comparison of observations over the oceans with a GCM  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on a study that seeks to examine a very limited set of interactions between the hydrological cycle and the radiative processes that take place on Earth and attempt to test how well these interactions are simulated by a general circulation model. Two broad types of tests of the model are introduced in this paper. The first focuses on comparing various sensitivity relationships established by the model with those observed on Earth. The specific relationships examined in this paper include the sensitivities of column-integrated water vapor, the clear sky greenhouse effect, cloud albedo, and cloud radiative forcing to sea surface temperature. The second type of test focuses on comparison of simulated and observed seasonal cycles of the greenhouse effect and cloud radiative forcing. The main results of this study suggest that the model studied, which the authors take to be representative of the current generation of global climate models, is able to simulate some aspects of the observed sensitivities fairly well. Qualitative successes of the simulations include realistic variations of column vapor with sea surface temperature, the clear sky greenhouse parameter and its variation with both column vapor and sea surface temperature, and cloud longwave radiative forcing with sea surface temperature, as well as the seasonal changes of the greenhouse effect and the cloud radiative forcing. However, there exist many serious quantitative differences between the model and the observations. These include problems in the simulations of the column vapor in the tropics and an excessively strong clear-sky greenhouse effect in the mid-latitudes. Significant differences between the simulated and the observed radiative properties of clouds include the overprediction of the longwave cloud radiative forcing over warm tropical oceans and a significant underestimate of the cloud reflection in mid-latitudes during the summer season. 20 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

Stephens, G.L.; Randall, D.A.; Wittmeyer, I.L.; Dazlich, D.A. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins (United States)); Tjemkes, S. (State University, Utrecht (Netherlands))

1993-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "doe atmospheric radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Magnetic Scaling Laws for the Atmospheres of Hot Giant Exoplanets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present scaling laws for advection, radiation, magnetic drag and ohmic dissipation in the atmospheres of hot giant exoplanets. In the limit of weak thermal ionization, ohmic dissipation increases with the planetary equilibrium temperature (T_eq >~ 1000 K) faster than the insolation power does, eventually reaching values >~ 1% of the insolation power, which may be sufficient to inflate the radii of hot Jupiters. At higher T_eq values still, magnetic drag rapidly brakes the atmospheric winds, which reduces the associated ohmic dissipation power. For example, for a planetary field strength B=10G, the fiducial scaling laws indicate that ohmic dissipation exceeds 1% of the insolation power over the equilibrium temperature range T_eq ~ 1300-2000 K, with a peak contribution at T_eq ~ 1600 K. Evidence for magnetically dragged winds at the planetary thermal photosphere could emerge in the form of reduced longitudinal offsets for the dayside infrared hotspot. This suggests the possibility of an anticorrelation betwe...

Menou, Kristen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Radiation Budgets in the Western Tropical Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The usefulness of the radiances measured by operational satellites in deriving radiation budgets is demonstrated by comparing the model calculations with the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) fluxes. The radiation budgets in the atmosphere ...

Mino-Dah Chou

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Atmospheric Solar Heating Rate in the Water Vapor Bands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The total absorption of solar radiation by water vapor in clear atmosphere is parameterized as a simple function of the scaled water vapor amount. For applications to cloudy and hazy atmospheres, the flux-weighted k-distribution functions are ...

Ming-Dah Chou

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

A Numerical Study of Climatic Oscillations Using a Coupled Atmosphere–Ocean Primitive Equation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled atmosphere-ocean primitive equation model is developed. It is a free-dimensional general circulation model, with two layers in the atmosphere and two layers in the ocean and includes solar radiation, longwave radiation, sensible heating,...

Xiong-Shan Chen

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Near-Continuous Profiling of Temperature, Moisture, and Atmospheric Stability Using the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) has funded the development and installation of five ground-based atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI) systems at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The ...

W. F. Feltz; W. L. Smith; H. B. Howell; R. O. Knuteson; H. Woolf; H. E. Revercomb

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Spectral Reflectance and Atmospheric Energetics in Cirrus-like Clouds. Part II: Applications of a Fourier-Riccati Approach to Radiative Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the major sources of uncertainty in climate studies is the detection of cirrus clouds and characterization of their radiative properties. Combinations of water vapor absorption channels (e.g., 1.38 µm), ice-water absorption channels (e.g., ...

Si-Chee Tsay; Philip M. Gabriel; Michael D. King; Graeme L. Stephens

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

GFDL ARM Project Technical Report: Using ARM Observations to Evaluate Cloud and Convection Parameterizations & Cloud-Convection-Radiation Interactions in the GFDL Atmospheric General Circulation Model  

SciTech Connect

This report briefly summarizes the progress made by ARM postdoctoral fellow, Yanluan Lin, at GFDL during the period from October 2008 to present. Several ARM datasets have been used for GFDL model evaluation, understanding, and improvement. This includes a new ice fall speed parameterization with riming impact and its test in GFDL AM3, evaluation of model cloud and radiation diurnal and seasonal variation using ARM CMBE data, model ice water content evaluation using ARM cirrus data, and coordination of the TWPICE global model intercomparison. The work illustrates the potential and importance of ARM data for GCM evaluation, understanding, and ultimately, improvement of GCM cloud and radiation parameterizations. Future work includes evaluation and improvement of the new dynamicsPDF cloud scheme and aerosol activation in the GFDL model.

V. Ramaswamy; L. J. Donner; J-C. Golaz; S. A. Klein

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

308

DOE-STD-1174-2003 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4-2003 DOE-STD-1174-2003 January 13, 2004 Radiation Protection Functional Area Qualification Standard The Radiation Protection Functional Area Qualification Standard establishes...

309

A study of longwave radiation codes for climate studies: Validation with ARM observations and tests in general circulation models  

SciTech Connect

Research by the US Department of Energy (DOE) has shown that cloud radiative feedback is the single most important effect determining the magnitude of possible climatic responses to human activity. However, these effects are still not known at the levels needed for climate prediction. Consequently, DOE has launched a major initiative-- the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program -- directed at improving the parameterization of the physics governing cloud and radiative processes in general circulation models (GCM's). One specific goal of ARM is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in GCM's under clear-sky, general overcast and broken cloud conditions. Our approach to developing the radiation model will be to test existing models in an iterative, predictive fashion. We will supply the Clouds and Radiative Testbed (CART) with a set of models to be compared with operationally observed data. The differences we find will lead to the development of new models to be tested with new data. Similarly, our GCM studies will use existing GCM's to study the radiation sensitivity problem. We anticipate that the outcome of this approach will provide both a better longwave radiative forcing algorithm and a better understanding of how longwave radiative forcing influences the equilibrium climate of the atmosphere.

Ellingson, R.G.; Baer, F.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Program Abstracts: Formation and Growth of Atmospheric Aerosols  

SciTech Connect

DOE provided $11,000 to sponsor the Workshop on New Particle Formation in the Atmosphere, which was held at The Riverwood Inn and Conference Center near Minneapolis, MN from September 7 to 9, 2006. Recent work has shown that new particle formation is an important atmospheric process that must be better understood due to its impact on cloud cover and the Earth's radiation balance. The conference was an informal gathering of atmospheric and basic scientists with expertise pertinent to this topic. The workshop included discussions of: • atmospheric modeling; • computational chemistry pertinent to clustering; • ions and ion induced nucleation; • basic laboratory and theoretical studies of nucleation; • studies on neutral molecular clusters; • interactions of organic compounds and sulfuric acid; • composition of freshly nucleated particles. Fifty six scientists attended the conference. They included 27 senior scientists, 9 younger independent scientists (assistant professor or young associate professor level), 7 postdocs, 13 graduate students, 10 women, 35 North Americans (34 from the U.S.), 1 Asian, and 20 Europeans. This was an excellent informal workshop on an important topic. An effort was made to include individuals from communities that do not regularly interact. A number of participants have provided informal feedback indicating that the workshop led to research ideas and possible future collaborations.

Peter H. McMurry; Markku Kulmala

2006-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

311

Atmospheric Temperature Measurement Biases on the Antarctic Plateau  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of atmospheric temperature made on the Antarctic Plateau with thermistors housed in naturally (wind) ventilated radiation shields are shown to be significantly warm biased by solar radiation. High incoming solar flux and high surface ...

Christophe Genthon; Delphine Six; Vincent Favier; Matthew Lazzara; Linda Keller

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Observed Impact of Atmospheric Aerosols on the Surface Energy Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosols scatter and potentially absorb incoming solar radiation, thereby reducing the total amount of radiation reaching the surface and increasing the fraction that is diffuse. The partitioning of incoming energy at the surface into ...

Allison L. Steiner; Dori Mermelstein; Susan J. Cheng; Tracy E. Twine; Andrew Oliphant

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Observed impact of atmospheric aerosols on the surface energy budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosols scatter and potentially absorb incoming solar radiation, thereby reducing the total amount of radiation reaching the surface and increasing the fraction that is diffuse. The partitioning of incoming energy at the surface into ...

Allison L. Steiner; Dori Mermelstein; Susan J. Cheng; Tracy E. Twine; Andrew Oliphant

314

10 CFR 835- Occupational Radiation Protection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities.

315

Code of Federal Regulations OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities.

316

24/11/2010 10:22AGU: Radiation belt electron precipitation due to geomagnetic storms: Significance to middle atmosphere ozone chemistry Page 1 of 2http://europa.agu.org/?view=article&uri=/journals/ja/ja1011/2010JA015599/2010JA015599.xml  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

24/11/2010 10:22AGU: Radiation belt electron precipitation due to geomagnetic storms: Significance precipitation due to geomagnetic storms: Significance to middle atmosphere ozone chemistry Craig J. Rodger Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory, University of Oulu, Sodankylä, Finland Geomagnetic storms triggered

Ulich, Thomas

317

The Role of Relative Humidity in Radiative–Convective Equilibrium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following conditions are derived for the existence of a radiation limit of tropospheric origin in a nongray atmosphere, extending the work on a gray atmosphere by Nakajima et al.: 1) the atmosphere must become sufficiently optically thick, ...

Masahiro Sugiyama; Peter H. Stone; Kerry A. Emanuel

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Technical Standards, DOE-STD-1107-97- July 24, 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE-STD-1107-97: Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities for Key Radiation Protection Positions at DOE Facilities; Replaced by DOE-STD-1107

319

Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) project is a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored real-time emergency response service available for use by both federal and state agencies in case of a potential or actual atmospheric release of nuclear material. The project, initiated in 1972, is currently evolving from the research and development phase to full operation. Plans are underway to expand the existing capability to continuous operation by 1984 and to establish a National ARAC Center (NARAC) by 1988. This report describes the ARAC system, its utilization during the past two years, and plans for its expansion during the next five to six years. An integral part of this expansion is due to a very important and crucial effort sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency to extend the ARAC service to approximately 45 Department of Defense (DOD) sites throughout the continental US over the next three years.

Dickerson, M.H.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Sullivan, T.J.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

DOE standard: Radiological control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ``Occupational Radiation Protection``. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835.

Not Available

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "doe atmospheric radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Final Report for DOE Grant DE-FG02-06ER64160 Retrieval of Cloud Properties and Direct Testing of Cloud and Radiation Parameterizations using ARM Observations.  

SciTech Connect

This report briefly summaries the work performed at KNMI under DOE Grant DE-FG02-06ER64160 which, in turn was conducted in support of DOE Grant DE-FG02-90ER61071 lead by E. Clothieux of Penn. State U. The specific work at KNMI revolved around the development and application of the EarthCARE simulator to ground-based multi-sensor simulations.

Donovan, David Patrick [KNMI

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

322

Radiation Therapy in the Management of Head-and-Neck Cancer of Unknown Primary Origin: How Does the Addition of Concurrent Chemotherapy Affect the Therapeutic Ratio?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine how the addition of cisplatin-based concurrent chemotherapy to radiation therapy influences outcomes among a cohort of patients treated for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 60 consecutive patients treated by radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck presenting as cervical lymph node metastasis of occult primary origin were reviewed. Thirty-two patients (53%) were treated by concurrent chemoradiation, and 28 patients (47%) were treated by radiation therapy alone. Forty-five patients (75%) received radiation therapy after surgical resection, and 15 patients (25%) received primary radiation therapy. Thirty-five patients (58%) were treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Results: The 2-year estimates of overall survival, local-regional control, and progression-free survival were 89%, 89%, and 79%, respectively, among patients treated by chemoradiation, compared to 90%, 92%, and 83%, respectively, among patients treated by radiation therapy alone (p > 0.05, for all). Exploratory analysis failed to identify any subset of patients who benefited from the addition of concurrent chemotherapy to radiation therapy. The use of concurrent chemotherapy was associated with a significantly increased incidence of Grade 3+ acute and late toxicity (p < 0.001, for both). Conclusions: Concurrent chemoradiation is associated with significant toxicity without a clear advantage to overall survival, local-regional control, and progression-free survival in the treatment of head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Although selection bias cannot be ignored, prospective data are needed to further address this question.

Chen, Allen M., E-mail: allen.chen@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States); Farwell, D. Gregory [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lau, Derick H. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States); Li Baoqing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States); Luu, Quang; Donald, Paul J. [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Technical Standards, DOE STD-1153-2002- August 14, 2002  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE STD-1153-2002: A Graded Approach for Evaluating Radiation Doses to Aquatic and Terrestrial Biota - Front Matter

324

Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 - Ionizing Radiation 4 - Ionizing Radiation Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation Lesson Three showed that unstable isotopes emit energy as they become more stable. This energy is known as radiation. This lesson explores forms of radiation, where radiation is found, how we detect and measure radiation, what sources of radiation people are exposed to, whether radiation is harmful, and how we can limit our exposure. Specific topics covered in this lesson include: Types of radiation Non-ionizing Ionizing Forms of ionizing radiation Alpha particles Beta particles Gamma rays Radiation Decay chain Half-life Dose Radiation measurements Sources of radiation Average annual exposure Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation.pptx More Documents & Publications DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 DOE-HDBK-1130-2007

325

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effects of Radiation History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms Majority from NRC Contacts Comments & Questions Emergency Planning, Preparedness, and Response DOE Transportation...

326

Entropy in Climate Models. Part I: Vertical Structure of Atmospheric Entropy Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical atmospheric entropy structure has been investigated using one-dimensional radiative–convective models. A method for evaluating radiation entropy is proposed. In the models, the entropy radiation is dealt with in a way parallel to the ...

J. Li; Petr Chýlek; G. B. Lesins

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Tropical Convection and the Energy Balance at the Top of the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) and International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) data are used in conjunction with a radiative transfer model to estimate the effect of various cloud types on the top-of-atmosphere radiation ...

Dennis L. Hartmann; Leslie A. Moy; Qiang Fu

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

DOE Roadmap: Chapter 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3. Human Radiation Experiments Associated With DOE and Its Predecessors 3. Human Radiation Experiments Associated With DOE and Its Predecessors Introduction This section contains a listing, description, and selected references for documented human radiation experiments sponsored, supported, or performed by the Department of Energy or its predecessors. The list represents work completed by the Office of Human Radiation Experiments through December 1994, and is a work in progress. Additional experiments will be added as they are identified, documented, and confirmed. The experiment list is available on the Internet and will be updated over time. This list includes experiments released at Secretary O'Leary's June 1994 press conference, as well as additional studies identified during the six months that followed. Cross-references are provided for experiments originally released at the press conference. Some of the 48 experiments released in June 1994 are not listed here, as continuing research is necessary. In the interest of assembling the most comprehensive information possible, a list of experiments described in the 1986 congressional report entitled American Nuclear Guinea Pigs: Three Decades of Radiation Experiments on U.S. Citizens is provided as an appendix. It should be noted that information about some studies in American Nuclear Guinea Pigs has been updated and included in the current DOE list; further update efforts are ongoing.

329

The Seasonal Cycle of Atmospheric Heating and Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonal cycle of the heating of the atmosphere is divided into a component due to direct solar absorption in the atmosphere and a component due to the flux of energy from the surface to the atmosphere via latent, sensible, and radiative heat ...

Aaron Donohoe; David S. Battisti

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

DOE Issues Request for Proposals Seeking a Contractor to Manage...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Neutron Source, Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System, Center for Nanoscale Materials; Electron Microscope Center; Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility;...

331

A study of longwave radiation codes for climate studies: Validation with ARM observations and tests in general circulation models. Technical report, 16 March 1991--15 March 1992  

SciTech Connect

Research by the US Department of Energy (DOE) has shown that cloud radiative feedback is the single most important effect determining the magnitude of possible climatic responses to human activity. However, these effects are still not known at the levels needed for climate prediction. Consequently, DOE has launched a major initiative-- the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program -- directed at improving the parameterization of the physics governing cloud and radiative processes in general circulation models (GCM`s). One specific goal of ARM is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in GCM`s under clear-sky, general overcast and broken cloud conditions. Our approach to developing the radiation model will be to test existing models in an iterative, predictive fashion. We will supply the Clouds and Radiative Testbed (CART) with a set of models to be compared with operationally observed data. The differences we find will lead to the development of new models to be tested with new data. Similarly, our GCM studies will use existing GCM`s to study the radiation sensitivity problem. We anticipate that the outcome of this approach will provide both a better longwave radiative forcing algorithm and a better understanding of how longwave radiative forcing influences the equilibrium climate of the atmosphere.

Ellingson, R.G.; Baer, F.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Direct and Indirect Shortwave Radiative Effects of Sea Salt Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sea salt aerosols play a dual role in affecting the atmospheric radiative balance. Directly, sea salt particles scatter the incoming solar radiation and absorb the outgoing terrestrial radiation. By acting as cloud condensation nuclei, sea salt ...

Tarek Ayash; Sunling Gong; Charles Q. Jia

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Cloud Identification for ERBE Radiative Flux Retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Derivation of top of atmosphere radiative fluxes requires the use of measured satellite radiances and assumptions about the anisotropy of the Earth's radiation field. The primary modification of the Earth's anisotropy is caused by variations in ...

Bruce A. Wielicki; Richard N. Green

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Radiation Budget of the Tropical Intraseasonal Oscillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the relationship between precipitation and radiative heating on intraseasonal time scales in the Tropics using collocated top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and surface radiative flux measurements from special field program data [...

Jia-Lin Lin; Brian E. Mapes

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Solar Radiation Atlas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This atlas provides a record of monthly mean solar radiation generated by a Climatological Solar Radiation model, using quasi-climatological inputs of cloud cover, aerosol optical depth, precipitable water vapor, ozone, surface albedo, and atmospheric pressure.

NREL

1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

336

DOE/SC-ARM-XXXX DOE/SC-ARM-0706 DOE/SC-ARM-0805  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

XXXX XXXX DOE/SC-ARM-0706 DOE/SC-ARM-0805 3 Table of Contents Program Overview ............................................................................................................................................................ 4 The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change .................................................................................... 4 ARM Climate Research Facility ................................................................................................................................... 4 Sites Around the World Enable Real Observations ......................................................................................................... 5 Setting the Standard for Ground-Based Climate Observations ........................................................................................

337

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases, Fiscal Year 2002 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including atmospheric concentrations and atmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels.

Cushman, R.M.

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

338

DOE Online  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fermilab's Science Adventures! Fermilab's Science Adventures! DOE Online K-12 Instructional Resources ed.fnal.gov/doe/ The U.S. Department of Energy is committed to helping educate our nation's next generation of scientists. The following resources help teachers integrate the Internet into K-12 classroom instruction. DOE Labs General Instructional Units Online Resources Lesson Plans General References DOE Laboratory and Facility Education Home Pages (www-ed.fnal.gov/doe/doe_labs.html) Direct links for 27 education Websites at DOE national laboratories and facilities. Online Catalog (www-ed.fnal.gov/trc/library) Fermilab's Teacher Resource Center collection of 10,000+ PreK-12 instructional materials in science, mathematics and technology. Materials include tradebooks, curriculum materials, educational

339

DOE-MIRMISBWG  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

FEE-13-1998 14:45 FEE-13-1998 14:45 . . - . DOE-MIRMISBWG 7 2 . r i-.1 I-' ? * \,, ? / :' , 2' .' 513 I365 4489 P. 02/11 .1??y 7 -- RADIOLOGICAL SCOPING SURVEY OF FO,RMER MONSANTO FACILITIES (Unit III and Warehouse) DAYTON, OHIO Report Date: 4 September 1997 Survey Date: 27 Ahgust 1997 Prepared by: Mark L, Mays, Chief Radiation Safety Branch Sponsored by: Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Office Ohio Field Office U.S. Department of Energy Conducted by: Radiation Safety Branch Offke of Environmental Management ggth Air Base Wing U.S. Department of the Air Force In Cooperation With: Southwest District Office Ohio Environmental Protection Agency UaEKi Ohio Environmedal Protection Agency Bureau of Radiological Health Ohio Department of Health FEB-13-1998 14:46 DOE-MIFIMISBURG 513 865 4489 P.03111

340

Does Local Recurrence of Prostate Cancer After Radiation Therapy Occur at the Site of Primary Tumor? Results of a Longitudinal MRI and MRSI Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine if local recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation therapy occurs at the same site as the primary tumor before treatment, using longitudinal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging to assess dominant tumor location. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study was HIPAA compliant and approved by our Committee on Human Research. We identified all patients in our institutional prostate cancer database (1996 onward) who underwent endorectal MR imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging before radiotherapy for biopsy-proven prostate cancer and again at least 2 years after radiotherapy (n = 124). Two radiologists recorded the presence, location, and size of unequivocal dominant tumor on pre- and postradiotherapy scans. Recurrent tumor was considered to be at the same location as the baseline tumor if at least 50% of the tumor location overlapped. Clinical and biopsy data were collected from all patients. Results: Nine patients had unequivocal dominant tumor on both pre- and postradiotherapy imaging, with mean pre- and postradiotherapy dominant tumor diameters of 1.8 cm (range, 1-2.2) and 1.9 cm (range, 1.4-2.6), respectively. The median follow-up interval was 7.3 years (range, 2.7-10.8). Dominant recurrent tumor was at the same location as dominant baseline tumor in 8 of 9 patients (89%). Conclusions: Local recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation usually occurs at the same site as the dominant primary tumor at baseline, suggesting supplementary focal therapy aimed at enhancing local tumor control would be a rational addition to management.

Arrayeh, Elnasif; Westphalen, Antonio C. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, California (United States); Kurhanewicz, John [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, California (United States); Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, California (United States); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, California (United States); Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, California (United States); Jung, Adam J. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, California (United States); Carroll, Peter R. [Department of Urology, University of California San Francisco, California (United States); Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, California (United States); Coakley, Fergus V., E-mail: fergus.coakley@radiology.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, California (United States); Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, California (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "doe atmospheric radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

DOE/ER-0442  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Executive Summary: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Plan ARM Program Plan Foreword In 1978 the Department of Energy initiated the Carbon Dioxide Research Program to address climate change from the increasing concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Over the years the Program has studied the many facets of the issue, from the carbon cycle, the climate diagnostics, the vegetative effects, to the societal impacts. The Program is presently the Department's principal entry in the U.S. Global Change Research Program coordinated by the Committee on Earth Sciences (CES) of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). The recent heightened concern about global warming from an enhanced greenhouse effect has prompted

342

Low Dose Radiation Program: Radiation Biology and the Radiation Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology and the Radiation Research Program Biology and the Radiation Research Program The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor organizations, Energy Research and Development Agency (ERDA) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), always have been concerned about the health effects of ionizing radiation. Extensive research has been conducted under their sponsorship at all levels of biological organization from molecules to man. Over the past 60 years, studies using every type of radiation source have included exposure to both external radiation sources and to internally deposited radioactive materials. These exposures used different dose patterns and distributions delivered over a wide range of experimental times. This extensive research provided the basis for the new Low Dose Radiation Research Program, linking

343

Top-of-Atmosphere Albedo Estimation from Angular Distribution Models Using Scene Identification from Satellite Cloud Property Retrievals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The next generation of earth radiation budget satellite instruments will routinely merge estimates of global top-of-atmosphere radiative fluxes with cloud properties. This information will offer many new opportunities for validating radiative ...

Norman G. Loeb; Frédéric Parol; Jean-Claude Buriez; Claudine Vanbauce

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

DOE-STD-1107-97 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7-97 7-97 DOE-STD-1107-97 November 08,2007 DOE-STD-1107-97: Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities for Key Radiation Protection Positions at DOE Facilities Change Notice No. 1 (November 2007) This document provides detailed qualification criteria for contractor key radiation protection personnel. Although federal key radiation protection positions are also identified in Table 1, qualification standards for federal positions are provided in DOE O 360.1B, October 2001 and the DOE Technical Qualifications Program. DOE-STD-1107-97: Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities for Key Radiation Protection Positions at DOE Facilities More Documents & Publications DOE-STD-1107-97 Technical Standards, DOE Orders and Applicable CFRs/DEAR Crosswalk - February 2, 2002 Technical Standards,DOE Standards and Corresponding Directives Crosswalk -

345

Regional Climate Change in East Asia Simulated by an Interactive Atmosphere–Soil–Vegetation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A regional coupled soil–vegetation–atmosphere model is used to study changes and interactions between climate and the ecosystem in East Asia due to increased atmospheric CO2. The largest simulated climate changes are due to the radiative ...

Ming Chen; David Pollard; Eric J. Barron

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Estimating Meridional Energy Transports by the Atmospheric and Oceanic General Circulations Using Boundary Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual-mean meridional energy transport in the atmosphere–ocean system (total transport) is estimated using 4-yr mean net radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) calculated from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology ...

Y-C. Zhang; W. B. Rossow

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

W.-C. Wang X.-Z. Liang M. D. Dudek S. Cox Atmospheric Sciences...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X.-Z. Liang M. D. Dudek S. Cox Atmospheric Sciences Research Center State University of New York 100 Fuller Road Albany, NY 12205 We participate in the Atmospheric Radiation...

348

Validation and Sensitivity Analysis of a New Atmosphere–Soil–Vegetation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes details, validation, and sensitivity analysis of a new atmosphere–soil–vegetation model. The model consists of one-dimensional multilayer submodels for atmosphere, soil, and vegetation and radiation schemes for the ...

Haruyasu Nagai

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Ice–Ice Collisions: An Ice Multiplication Process in Atmospheric Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ice in atmospheric clouds undergoes complex physical processes, interacting especially with radiation, which leads to serious impacts on global climate. After their primary production, atmospheric ice crystals multiply extensively by secondary ...

J.-I. Yano; V. T. J. Phillips

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

How Does Solar Attenuation Depth Affect the Ocean Mixed Layer? Water Turbidity and Atmospheric Forcing Impacts on the Simulation of Seasonal Mixed Layer Variability in the Turbid Black Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fine-resolution (?3.2 km) Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) is used to investigate the impact of solar radiation attenuation with depth on the predictions of monthly mean sea surface height (SSH), mixed layer depth (MLD), buoyancy and heat ...

A. Birol Kara; Alan J. Wallcraft; Harley E. Hurlburt

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

General. The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities.

352

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research July 1-September 30, 2010, DOESC-ARM-10-029 iii Contents 1.0 Data Availability......

353

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research July 1-September 30, 2011, DOESC-ARM-11-022 iii Contents 1.0 Data Availability......

354

DOE Roadmap: Chapter 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2. Narratives and Records Series Descriptions 2. Narratives and Records Series Descriptions Introduction This chapter contains two kinds of information. The first consists of brief narrative histories that discuss the involvement of the Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies with human radiation experiments. These histories cover agency headquarters elements and the various field sites that had significant involvement in experiment activities. The second category of information is series descriptions for groups of original records that are pertinent to either individual experiments or to the organizational context in which they took place. Since many of these records still reside at DOE sites, series descriptions are appended to the narrative for each facility. Where records are not in the custody of DOE, they are listed under their custodial organization (such as the National Archives).

355

Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities for Key Radiation Protection...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Notice No. 1 November 2007 DOE STANDARD KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES FOR KEY RADIATION PROTECTION POSITIONS AT DOE FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910...

356

Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION The familiar level of this module is designed to provide the basic information to meet the requirements that are related to 10 CFR 835, "Occupational Radiation Protection," in the following DOE Functional Area Qualification Standards: DOE-STD-1177-2004, Emergency Management DOE-STD-1151-2002, Facility Representative DOE-STD-1146-2007, General Technical Base DOE-STD-1138-2007, Industrial Hygiene DOE-STD-1183-2007, Nuclear Safety Specialist DOE-STD-1174-2003, Radiation Protection DOE-STD-1175-2006, Senior Technical Safety Manager DOE-STD-1178-2004, Technical Program Manager DOE-STD-1155-2002, Transportation and Traffic Management DOE Order Self Study Modules - 10 CFR 835 Occupational Radiation Protection

357

Measuring Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement Activity SI Units and Prefixes Conversions Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration...

358

Sustainable Energy Science and Engineering Center Solar Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainable Energy Science and Engineering Center Solar Radiation The objectives of this Lecture;Sustainable Energy Science and Engineering Center Atmospheric Effects on Incoming Solar Radiation of this energy is lost to space. The third process in the atmosphere that modifies incoming solar radiation

Krothapalli, Anjaneyulu

359

Lookup tables to compute high energy cosmic ray induced atmospheric ionization and changes in atmospheric chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A variety of events such as gamma-ray bursts and supernovae may expose the Earth to an increased flux of high-energy cosmic rays, with potentially important effects on the biosphere. Existing atmospheric chemistry software does not have the capability of incorporating the effects of substantial cosmic ray flux above 10 GeV . An atmospheric code, the NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center two-dimensional (latitude, altitude) time-dependent atmospheric model (NGSFC), is used to study atmospheric chemistry changes. Using CORSIKA, we have created tables that can be used to compute high energy cosmic ray (10 GeV - 1 PeV) induced atmospheric ionization and also, with the use of the NGSFC code, can be used to simulate the resulting atmospheric chemistry changes. We discuss the tables, their uses, weaknesses, and strengths.

Dimitra Atri; Adrian L. Melott; Brian C. Thomas

2008-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

360

DOE017-0153  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5525 5525 DOE017-0153 ,-.or/ N"( - ./,'-'S MaryBeth Zimmerman 02/14/2001 11:08AM / -- T ' ,44 L - ( _w _1_'- _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ - .I f . J To: Kenneth Friedman/EE/DOE@DOE, Peggy Podolak/EE/DOE@DOE, Linda Silverman/EE/DOE@DOE, Ed Wall/EE/DOE@DOE, David RodgerslEE/DOE@DOE, Jerry DionlEE/DOE@DOE, Gail McKinley/EE/DOE@DOE. Lawrence MansuetifEE/DOE@DOE cc: John Sullivan/EE/DOE@DOE. Darrell Beschen/EEIDOE@DOE, Michael York/EE/DOE@DOE, Buddy GarlandlEEIDOE@DOE, Nancy Jefferv/EEIDOE@DOE, Joel Rubin/EE/DOE@DOE. Sam Baldwin/EE/DOE@DOE, IEE-ADAS Subject: FW: NEP Draft outline Directions on NEP Assessment paper. Please read all of this very carefully before proceeding: Product Schedule: * Inputs due from sectors to Planning: COB on Thursday (sorry) o Due from EERE to Policy Office: noon on Friday

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "doe atmospheric radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Atmospheric Modes of Variability in a Changing Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of the atmospheric circulation to an enhanced radiative greenhouse gas forcing in a transient integration with a coupled global climate model is investigated. The spatial patterns of the leading modes of Northern Hemisphere ...

Jenny Brandefelt

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Nitrogen trifluoride global emissions estimated from updated atmospheric measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogen trifluoride (NF[subscript 3]) has potential to make a growing contribution to the Earth’s radiative budget; however, our understanding of its atmospheric burden and emission rates has been limited. Based on a ...

Ivy, Diane J.

363

Further Studies of the Circulation of the Venus Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have extended our previous calculations of zonally averaged temperature, circulation, and eddy source requirements for the Venus atmosphere to include the region from the surface to 95 km, using a Curtis matrix method for the radiation ...

Arthur Y. Hou; Richard M. Goody

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Reflectivity of the Atmosphere-Inhomogeneous Surfaces System: Laboratory Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical two- and three-dimensional solutions of the radiative transfer equation have been applied to the earth-atmosphere system. Such solutions have not been verified experimentally. A laboratory experiment simulates such a system to test ...

Yuri Mekler; Yoram J. Kaufman; Robert S. Fraser

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Radiation Energy Budget Studies Using Collocated AVHRR and ERBE Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in the energy balance at the top of the atmosphere are specified as a function of atmospheric and surface properties using observations from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVURR) and the Earth Radiation budget Experiment (...

Steven A. Ackerman; Toshiro Inoue

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Runaway Greenhouse Effect in a Semigray Radiative–Convective Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of the nongray absorption (i.e., atmospheric opacity varying with wavelength) on the possible upper bound of the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) emitted by a planetary atmosphere have been examined. This analysis is based on the ...

T. Pujol; G. R. North

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

DOE-2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

standards in the U.S. and other countries. DOE-2 is also the basis of numerous handbooks on energy-efficient buildings and building components. Many design and consulting...

368

Passive-solar directional-radiating cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiative cooling system for use with an ice-making system having a radiating surface aimed at the sky for radiating energy at one or more wavelength bands for which the atmosphere is transparent and a cover thermally isolated from the radiating surface and transparent at least to the selected wavelength or wavelengths, the thermal isolation reducing the formation of condensation on the radiating surface and/or cover and permitting the radiation to continue when the radiating surface is below the dewpoint of the atmosphere, and a housing supporting the radiating surface, cover and heat transfer means to an ice storage reservoir.

Hull, J.R.; Schertz, W.W.

1985-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

369

Passive-solar directional-radiating cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiative cooling system for use with an ice-making system having a radiating surface aimed at the sky for radiating energy at one or more wavelength bands for which the atmosphere is transparent and a cover thermally isolated from the radiating surface and transparent at least to the selected wavelength or wavelengths, the thermal isolation reducing the formation of condensation on the radiating surface and/or cover and permitting the radiation to continue when the radiating surface is below the dewpoint of the atmosphere, and a housing supporting the radiating surface, cover and heat transfer means to an ice storage reservoir.

Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Schertz, William W. (Batavia, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Program Contacts | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Program Program Contacts Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Staff Program Contacts Organization Chart .pdf file (172KB) BER Budget BER Committees of Visitors Directions Jobs Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301) 903-5051 E: sc.ber@science.doe.gov More Information » Staff Program Contacts Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Program Program Manager Telephone Email Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Wanda Ferrell, Ph.D.

371

DOE Roadmap: Chapter 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chapter 1. Overview of the DOE Project Chapter 1. Overview of the DOE Project Introduction On April 10, 1945, medical staff of the U.S. Manhattan Engineer District in Oak Ridge, TN, injected plutonium into the victim of a car accident. American scientists had only recently begun producing plutonium, and thousands of workers were laboring to produce the quantities required for the first atomic bombs. While aware that plutonium was hazardous, project officials were uncertain how much exposure would cause harm. Desire for information about human metabolism and retention of plutonium led to this first injection in Oak Ridge. Over the next 2 years, 17 other people also received plutonium injections. The Manhattan Project and its postwar successor, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), also carried out human experiments with uranium, polonium, americium, and other radioactive substances. Radiation tests continued after the war; some of these studies took place under AEC supervision and had direct defense-related applications. The agency also sponsored substantial programs in the medical applications of radiation and in basic biomedical research. In addition, independent physicians and researchers at universities and hospitals conducted many postwar human radiation studies to develop the techniques of present-day nuclear medicine.

372

Heat Budget of Tropical Ocean and Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat budget estimates for the global tropics are derived from recent calculations of the oceanic heat budget and satellite measurements of net radiation at the top of the atmosphere. Annual mean heat export from the zone 30°N–30°S amounts to 101 ...

Stefan Hastenrath

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Roadmap to the Project: DOE Roadmap  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiments List Experiments List Oral Histories Records Series Descriptions Overview Documents Declassified Documents Project Events ACHRE Report Uranium Miners Resources Building Public Trust Department of Defense Report HUMAN RADIATION EXPERIMENTS: The Department of Energy Roadmap to the Story and the Records United States Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health February 1995 Contents Foreword Acknowledgments List of Photographs Chapter 1. Overview of the DOE Project Introduction Background DOE Archives and Records DOE Strategy for Finding Experiment Information Information as an Engine for Democratic Government Looking Forward Chapter 2. Narratives and Records Series Descriptions Introduction DOE Predecessor Agencies and Human Radiation Experimentsation: A Headquarters Overview

374

Radiation coloration resistant glass  

SciTech Connect

A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency.

Tomozawa, Minoru (Troy, NY); Watson, E. Bruce (Troy, NY); Acocella, John (Troy, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

A Comparison of MERRA and NARR Reanalyses with the DOE ARM SGP Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric states from the Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) are compared with data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great ...

Aaron D. Kennedy; Xiquan Dong; Baike Xi; Shaocheng Xie; Yunyan Zhang; Junye Chen

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Technical Standards, DOE-HDBK-1130-2008- December 11, 2008  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE-HDBK-1130-2008: Appendix C - Radiological Safety Training for Radiation - Producing (X-Ray) Devices

377

A Study on the “Runaway Greenhouse Effect” with a One-Dimensional Radiative–Convective Equilibrium Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple one-dimensional radiative–convective equilibrium model is used to investigate the relationship between the surface temperature and the outgoing infrared radiation at the top of the atmosphere. The model atmosphere has a gray infrared ...

Shinichi Nakajima; Yoshi-Yuki Hayashi; Yutaka Abe

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The Radiation Budget of the West African Sahel and Its Controls: A Perspective from Observations and Global Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous measurements of the shortwave (SW), longwave (LW), and net cross-atmosphere radiation flux divergence over the West African Sahel were made during the year 2006 using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) and ...

Mark A. Miller; Virendra P. Ghate; Robert K. Zahn

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Climate Forcing by Changing Solar Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By how much does changing radiation from the sun influence the earth’s climate, presently and in the recent past, compared with other natural and anthropogenic processes? Current knowledge of the amplitudes and timescales of solar radiative ...

Judith Lean; David Rind

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing: Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing: An Example from M-PACE Title Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing: An Example from M-PACE Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors de Boer, Gijs, William D. Collins, Surabi Menon, and Charles N. Long Journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Volume 11 Start Page 11937 Pagination 11937-11949 Abstract Measurements from ground-based cloud radar, high spectral resolution lidar and microwave radiometer are used in conjunction with a column version of the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTMG) and radiosonde measurements to derive the surface radiative properties under mixed-phase cloud conditions. These clouds were observed during the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Experiment (M-PACE) between September and November of 2004. In total, sixteen half hour time periods are reviewed due to their coincidence with radiosonde launches. Cloud liquid (ice) water paths are found to range between 11.0-366.4 (0.5-114.1) gm-2, and cloud physical thicknesses fall between 286-2075 m. Combined with temperature and hydrometeor size estimates, this information is used to calculate surface radiative flux densities using RRTMG, which are demonstrated to generally agree with measured flux densities from surface-based radiometric instrumentation. Errors in longwave flux density estimates are found to be largest for thin clouds, while shortwave flux density errors are generally largest for thicker clouds. A sensitivity study is performed to understand the impact of retrieval assumptions and uncertainties on derived surface radiation estimates. Cloud radiative forcing is calculated for all profiles, illustrating longwave dominance during this time of year, with net cloud forcing generally between 50 and 90 Wm-2.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "doe atmospheric radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

DOE HANDBOOK  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Handbook on Overseas Assignments Handbook on Overseas Assignments United States Department of Energy Office of Human Capital Management July 2013 2 Introduction This handbook covers all types of Federal employment overseas, including details, both within DOE as well as to other agencies; transfers to approved international organizations; assignments to permanent DOE positions; cost-free experts; and personal services agreements (PSAs). This handbook contains information, guidance, sample service agreements, and related documentation that are to be used to implement the following directives: a. Executive Order 11552, Providing for Details and Transfers of Federal Employees to International Organizations at http://www.archives.gov/federal-register/codification/executive-order/11552.html;

382

Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere by Anomalous/Lévy Diffusion: New Diagnostics Using FORTÉ Lightning Data A. B. Davis Los Alamos National Laboratory Space & Remote Sensing Sciences Group Los Alamos, New Mexico D. M. Suszcynsky Los Alamos National Laboratory Space & Atmospheric Sciences Group Los Alamos, New Mexico A. Marshak National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction Anomalous photon diffusion can be described as an ad hoc modification of the popular 2-stream approximation, specifically the δ-Eddington/diffusion version, for monochromatic radiative transfer in a scattering plane-parallel atmosphere. In the physical picture that describes the standard diffusion (hence

383

Radiation effects on humans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation effects on humans Radiation effects on humans Name: Joe Kemna Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am trying to find information on radiation. I need the effects on humans, the damage it causes to the environment, and any extra information you might have on the subject. Thank you for your time. Replies: Your library should be a good place to start, but first you need to narrow your question a bit. "Radiation" means radio waves, heat, light (including the ultraviolet light that causes suntan and sunburn), and what's called "ionizing radiation." By far the major source of the first three is the Sun, while the last I believe comes principally from cosmic rays and various naturally radioactive elements like uranium and radon. The most significant manmade sources of exposure would --- I think --- be household wiring and appliances (radio), engines and heating devices (heat), lamps (light), and X-ray machines, flying at high altitude in airplanes, and living in well-insulated homes built over radon sources (ionizing radiation). Heat, light and ionizing radiation play vital roles in the ecology of the Earth. Radio, light (in particular "tanning" ultraviolet), and ionizing radiation have all been widely assumed at different times to be particularly good or particularly bad for human health. Some recent issues of public concern have been the effect of radio waves from electric transmission lines, the effect on skin cancer incidence from tanning and sunburns, the depletion of the ultraviolet-light-produced ozone in the upper atmosphere by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), "global warming" from the increased absorption of heat radiation from the surface by atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane, and the effect of a long exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation as for example the people of Eastern Europe are experiencing from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

384

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases catalog of databases and reports  

SciTech Connect

Data products and reports made available by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Environmental Sciences Division, Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), and the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) provide coverage in a number of areas relevant to the greenhouse effect and global climate change. Such areas include records of the concentration of carbon dioxide and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated carbon dioxide on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea level. Currently, in its eighth revision, this catalog provides information about the data products and reports available through CDIAC.

Burtis, M.D. [comp.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Evaluation of Soil Moisture in the NCEP–NCAR and NCEP–DOE Global Reanalyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study compares soil moisture analyses from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction–National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP–NCAR) global reanalysis (R-1) and the later NCEP– Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Model ...

Cheng-Hsuan Lu; Masao Kanamitsu; John O. Roads; Wesley Ebisuzaki; Kenneth E. Mitchell; Dag Lohmann

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection', establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (onsite or offsite) DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration offsite projects.

Radiological Control Managers' Council, Nevada Test Site

2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

387

DOE Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Environmental Assessment for the Multipurpose Haul Road Within the Idaho National Laboratory Site August 2010 DOE/EA-1772 Environmental Assessment for the Multipurpose Haul Road Within the Idaho National Laboratory Site August 2010 CONTENTS ACRONYMS.............................................................................................................................................. vii GLOSSARY ................................................................................................................................................ ix 1. PURPOSE AND NEED ..................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Background ...........................................................................................................................

388

DOE Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

772 772 Environmental Assessment for the Multipurpose Haul Road Within the Idaho National Laboratory Site August 2010 DOE/EA-1772 Environmental Assessment for the Multipurpose Haul Road Within the Idaho National Laboratory Site August 2010 CONTENTS ACRONYMS.............................................................................................................................................. vii GLOSSARY ................................................................................................................................................ ix 1. PURPOSE AND NEED ..................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Background ...........................................................................................................................

389

Order Module--DOE STD-1098-2008, DOE STANDARD: RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STD-1098-2008, DOE STANDARD: RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL STD-1098-2008, DOE STANDARD: RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL Order Module--DOE STD-1098-2008, DOE STANDARD: RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL "The radiological control program discussed in DOE-STD-1098-2008 goes beyond the scope of, and includes more details than, the documented radiation protection program (RPP) required by 10 CFR 835, -Occupational Radiation Protection.‖ To ensure implementation of a comprehensive and coherent radiological control program that exceeds basic requirements and provides a substantial safety margin, DOE encourages its contractors to implement the provisions of DOE-STD-1098- 2008 to the extent appropriate to facility hazards and operations, consistent with DOE's integrated safety management program. Should any conflicts arise between the site-specific radiological control manual and the documented RPP, the

390

Four-Stream Isosector Approximation for Solar Radiative Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For radiative transfer in a thin atmosphere, an analytical four-stream isosector approximation for solar radiative transfer is presented. This approximation method is based on the assumption of four spherical sectors of isotropic intensities. ...

J. Li; J. S. Dobbie

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Solar Radiation Absorption due to Water Vapor: Advanced Broadband Parameterizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate parameterizations for calculating solar radiation absorption in the atmospheric column due to water vapor lines and continuum are proposed for use in broadband shortwave radiative transfer codes. The error in the absorption values is ...

Tatiana A. Tarasova; Boris A. Fomin

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Radiative Energy Budget in the Cloudy and Hazy Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radiation model is constructed that includes radiative interactions with atmospheric gases as well as parameterized treatments of scattering and absorption/emission by cloud droplets and haze particles. A unified treatment of solar and ...

Si-Chee Tsay; Knut Stamnes; Kolf Jayaweera

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

The Boulder Atmospheric Observatory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) is a unique research facility for studying the planetary boundary layer and for testing and calibrating atmospheric sensors. The facility includes a 300 m tower instrumented with fast- and slow-response ...

J. C. Kaimal; J. E. Gaynor

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

News & Resources | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Resources Resources Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources BER Timeline Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301) 903-5051 E: sc.ber@science.doe.gov More Information » News & Resources Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Brochures GOAmazon Summary .pdf file (407KB) GOAmazon Poster .jpg file (196KB) About the DOE Biological and Environmental Research Program Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program, Accomplishments from the Science Program and User Facility .pdf file (633KB)

395

The Upper Atmosphere of HD17156b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HD17156b is a newly-found transiting extrasolar giant planet (EGP) that orbits its G-type host star in a highly eccentric orbit (e~0.67) with an orbital semi-major axis of 0.16 AU. Its period, 21.2 Earth days, is the longest among the known transiting planets. The atmosphere of the planet undergoes a 27-fold variation in stellar irradiation during each orbit, making it an interesting subject for atmospheric modelling. We have used a three-dimensional model of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere for extrasolar gas giants in order to simulate the progress of HD17156b along its eccentric orbit. Here we present the results of these simulations and discuss the stability, circulation, and composition in its upper atmosphere. Contrary to the well-known transiting planet HD209458b, we find that the atmosphere of HD17156b is unlikely to escape hydrodynamically at any point along the orbit, even if the upper atmosphere is almost entirely composed of atomic hydrogen and H+, and infrared cooling by H3+ ions is negligible. The nature of the upper atmosphere is sensitive to to the composition of the thermosphere, and in particular to the mixing ratio of H2, as the availability of H2 regulates radiative cooling. In light of different simulations we make specific predictions about the thermosphere-ionosphere system of HD17156b that can potentially be verified by observations.

T. T. Koskinen; A. D. Aylward; S. Miller

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

396

DOE/SC-ARM-11-024 ARM Climate Research Facility ANNUAL REPORT...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2011 Recovery Act HIGHLIGHTS October 2010 * Doppler lidars tested at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. *...

397

Microsoft Word - 2009-08 Instrument Report_DOE-SC-ARM-P-09-004...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided...

398

Documenting the Life and Death of Clouds | U.S. DOE Office of...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

radar (X-SAPR). Today, researchers at the Office of Science's Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility presented findings from their...

399

Energy Transports by Ocean and Atmosphere Based on an Entropy Extremum Principle. Part 1: Zonal Averaged Transports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Required global energy transports determined from Nimbus-7 satellite net radiation measurements have been separated into atmospheric and oceanic components by applying a maximum entropy production principle to the atmospheric system. Strong ...

Byung-Ju Sohn; Eric A. Smith

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

A Radiation Fog Model with a Detailed Treatment of the Interaction between Radiative Transfer and Fog Microphysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional radiation fog model is presented which includes a detailed description of the interaction between atmospheric radiative transfer and the microphysical structure of the fog. Aerosol particles and activated cloud droplets are ...

A. Bott; U. Sievers; W. Zdunkowski

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "doe atmospheric radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Environmental Evaluation on Atmosphere Radioactive Pollution of Uranium Mine Shaft Ventilation Exhausts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study on calculation and evaluation on atmosphere radioactive pollution of uranium mine well ventilation exhaust gas is presented in this paper. Neutral atmosphere conditions were taken into consideration. Nuclear industry standards on safety protection ... Keywords: atmosphere pollution, radiation protection, environmental evaluation, control methods

Dong Xie; Zehua Liu; Jun Xiong; Jianxiang Liu

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Angular Distribution Models for Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Flux Estimation from the Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System Instrument on the Terra Satellite. Part I: Methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clouds and Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES) provides coincident global cloud and aerosol properties together with reflected solar, emitted terrestrial longwave, and infrared window radiative fluxes. These data are needed to improve the ...

Norman G. Loeb; Seiji Kato; Konstantin Loukachine; Natividad Manalo-Smith

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Short communication: A software component for estimating solar radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GSRad (global solar radiation) is a software component containing models to estimate extra-terrestrial and ground-level solar radiation (global and photosynthetically active; direct, diffuse, and reflected components) from alternative methods. Radiation ... Keywords: Atmospheric transmissivity, Component architecture, GSRad, Model extensibility, Solar radiation fractions

M. Donatelli; L. Carlini; G. Bellocchi

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

FAQS Reference Guide –Radiation Protection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This reference guide has been developed to address the competency statements in the December 2003 edition of DOE-STD-1174-2003, Radiation Protection Functional Area Qualification Standard.

405

Dynamics of Line-Driven Disk Winds in Active Galactic Nuclei II: Effects of Disk Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore consequences of a radiation driven disk wind model for mass outflows from active galactic nuclei (AGN). We performed axisymmetric time-dependent hydrodynamic calculations using the same computational technique as Proga, Stone and Kallman (2000). We test the robustness of radiation launching and acceleration of the wind for relatively unfavorable conditions. In particular, we take into account the central engine radiation as a source of ionizing photons but neglect its contribution to the radiation force. Additionally, we account for the attenuation of the X-ray radiation by computing the X-ray optical depth in the radial direction assuming that only electron scattering contributes to the opacity. Our new simulations confirm the main result from our previous work: the disk atmosphere can 'shield' itself from external X-rays so that the local disk radiation can launch gas off the disk photosphere. We also find that the local disk force suffices to accelerate the disk wind to high velocities in the radial direction. This is true provided the wind does not change significantly the geometry of the disk radiation by continuum scattering and absorption processes; we discuss plausibility of this requirement. Synthetic profiles of a typical resonance ultraviolet line predicted by our models are consistent with observations of broad absorption line (BAL) QSOs.

D. Proga; T. R. Kallman

2004-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

406

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: DOE Lowdose Radiation Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

inside the nuclear volume (5 m radius in our model) or in close proximity to chromatin fibers. As a stating point in these calculations we have considered six OH...

407

About Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from...

408

Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resitance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation.

Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

409

Radiation Impacts on Conditionally Unstable Moist Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present work analyzes the impacts of radiative cooling in three-dimensional high-resolution direct numerical simulations of moist Rayleigh–Bénard convection. An atmospheric slab is destabilized by imposing a warm, moist lower boundary and a ...

Olivier Pauluis; Jörg Schumacher

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

DOE/CF-0085  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki; 2. Assess radiation health effects of ionizing radiation; and 3. Publish analyses of radiation health...

411

Atmospheric Neutrinos in the MINOS Far Detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phenomenon of flavour oscillations of neutrinos created in the atmosphere was first reported by the Super-Kamiokande collaboration in 1998 and since then has been confirmed by Soudan 2 and MACRO. The MINOS Far Detector is the first magnetized neutrino detector able to study atmospheric neutrino oscillations. Although it was designed to detect neutrinos from the NuMI beam, it provides a unique opportunity to measure the oscillation parameters for neutrinos and anti-neutrinos independently. The MINOS Far Detector was completed in August 2003 and since then has collected 2.52 kton-years of atmospheric data. Atmospheric neutrino interactions contained within the volume of the detector are separated from the dominant background from cosmic ray muons. Thirty seven events are selected with an estimated background contamination of less than 10%. Using the detector's magnetic field, 17 neutrino events and 6 anti-neutrino events are identified, 14 events have ambiguous charge. The neutrino oscillation parameters for {nu}{sub {mu}} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} are studied using a maximum likelihood analysis. The measurement does not place constraining limits on the neutrino oscillation parameters due to the limited statistics of the data set analysed. However, this thesis represents the first observation of charge separated atmospheric neutrino interactions. It also details the techniques developed to perform atmospheric neutrino analyses in the MINOS Far Detector.

Howcroft, Caius L.F.; /Cambridge U.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Subpart A- General Provisions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities.

413

Isocurvature perturbations in extra radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent cosmological observations, including measurements of the CMB anisotropy and the primordial helium abundance, indicate the existence of an extra radiation component in the Universe beyond the standard three neutrino species. In this paper we explore the possibility that the extra radiation has isocurvatrue fluctuations. A general formalism to evaluate isocurvature perturbations in the extra radiation is provided in the mixed inflaton-curvaton system, where the extra radiation is produced by the decay of both scalar fields. We also derive constraints on the abundance of the extra radiation and the amount of its isocurvature perturbation. Current observational data favors the existence of an extra radiation component, but does not indicate its having isocurvature perturbation. These constraints are applied to some particle physics motivated models. If future observations detect isocurvature perturbations in the extra radiation, it will give us a hint to the origin of the extra radiation.

Kawasaki, Masahiro; Nakayama, Kazunori; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Alpha Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics of Radiation Basics of Radiation Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Basics of Radiation Characteristics of Alpha Radiation 1. Alpha radiation is not able to penetrate skin. 2. Alpha-emitting materials can be harmful to humans if the materials are inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through open wounds. 3. A variety of instruments have been designed to measure alpha radiation. Special training in use of these instruments is essential for making accurate measurements. 4. A civil defense instrument (CD V-700) cannot detect the presence of radioactive materials that produce alpha radiation unless the radioactive materials also produce beta and/or gamma radiation.

415

DOE-1 BDL SUMMARY. DOE-1 GROUP.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

may be this command. DOE~! Reference Manual. placed in BDL-3W-7405-EN ons c BDl, SUMMARY DOE~· I l.awrence , Californiaused in conjunction with other DOE~l documentation. Table of

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Diffuse solar radiation and associated meteorological  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Solar diffuse radiation data including global radiation, shortwave and longwave balances, net radiation and sunshine hours have been extensively analyzed to study the variation of diffuse radiation with turbidity and cloud discharges appearing in the form of atmospherics over the tropics. Results of surface radiation measurements at Calcutta, Poona, Delhi and Madras are presented together with some meteorological parameters. The monthly values of diffuse radiation and the monthly ratios of diffuse to global solar radiation have been examined, with a special emphasis in relation to the noise level of atmospherics at Calcutta in the very low frequency band. The results exhibit some definite seasonal changes which appear to be in close agreement with one another. 1

unknown authors

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Active DOE Technical Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Active DOE Technical Standards Active DOE Technical Standards Document Number Document Title Responsible SLM DOE-HDBK-1001-96 DOE-HDBK-1002-96 DOE-HDBK-1003-96 DOE-HDBK-1010-92 DOE-HDBK-1011/1-92 DOE-HDBK-1011/2-92 DOE-HDBK-1011/3-92 DOE-HDBK-1011/4-92 DOE-HDBK-1012/1-92 DOE-HDBK-1012/2-92 DOE-HDBK-1012/3-92 DOE-HDBK-1013/1-92 DOE-HDBK-1013/2-92 DOE-HDBK-1014/1-92 DOE-HDBK-1014/2-92 DOE-HDBK-1015/1-93

418

DOE Code:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

we1rbox installatiOn we1rbox installatiOn ____:....;...=.~;;....:..;=-+- DOE Code: - - !- Project Lead: Wes R1esland NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY J 3-24-10 1 Date: Project Information 1. Project Overview What are tne enwonmental mpacts? Contractor~~ _ _ _ _ ] 11 The purpose of this project is to prepare a pad for a 90 ton crane to get 1nto positiOn and ng up so we can 1 set our new weir box into position We will widen the existing road around 20 feet at the north end and taper our fill to about5 feet at the south end for a total of about 200 feeL and budd a near level pad for them tong up the crane on We will use the d1rt from the hill irnrnedJateiy north of the work to oe done 2. 3 4 What*s the legal location? What IS the durabon of the prOJed?

419

DOE F  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

420.2 420.2 All Other Editions Are Obsolete OMB Burden Disclosure Statement Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 30 minutes per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to Records Management Division, IM-11 GTN, Paperwork Reduction Project (1910-1000), U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20585; and to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), Paperwork Reduction Project (1910-1000), Washington, DC 20503. U.S. Department of Energy Personal Property Loan Agreement DOE-PMR 109-1.5103 1. CONTROL

420

DOE Onboarding  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

One-Year Passport to Success One-Year Passport to Success What is On-boarding? Orientation On-boarding  Transactional focus and goals  Less than one week  Executed by HR Office  Address new employee needs  Completed paperwork  Strategic focus and goals  Starts before first day through first year  Supervisor & Senior Leadership involvement  Integrate multiple offices, functions and individuals  Address employee needs  Maximizes employee engagement and retention 2 On-boarding Program Goals 3  Build and sustain high-performance culture by accelerating time for new employee to become productive  Create learning opportunities that allow new employees to successfully integrate into their new DOE organization  Provide employees with the tools and resources to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "doe atmospheric radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

DOE 11  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE A ward N o.: D E--NT0005665 Final T echnical R eport (October 2 008 - S eptember 2 012) Source c haracterization a nd t emporal variation o f m ethane s eepage f rom thermokarst l akes o n t he A laska N orth S lope in r esponse t o A rctic c limate c hange Submitted b y: University o f A laska Fairbanks, A K 9 9775 Prepared for: United S tates D epartment o f E nergy National E nergy T echnology L aboratory May 29 th 2013 Office of Fossil Energy 2 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

422

DOE Pulse  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

go! go! home about archives subscribe Profile Dr. Isaac Gamwo (left) works with Dr. Ward Burgess (right) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory. Photo Credit: NETL. The practical application of an elite researcher's life: Isaac K. Gamwo For a man whose expertise includes reactive multiphase fluid dynamics, complex fluid properties, and chemical looping combustion processes, Dr. Isaac Gamwo is surprisingly easy to comprehend. "The research we do in this lab is not confined to the world of academia," he notes, "it has tangible impacts on the way we produce energy." As senior research chemical engineer at DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Dr. Gamwo is currently focused on complex fluid properties at high temperatures and pressures. His recent work includes

423

A Study of the Solar Radiation Effect on the 4.3-?m Channels of the High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of infrared radiation from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration series of satellites are used to retrieve atmospheric temperature, moisture, and ozone. It is well known that the measurements from the 4.3-?m channels of ...

Larry M. McMillin; David S. Crosby

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

425

DOE Information Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Information Center The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Center provides citizens a consolidated facility to obtain information and records related to the DOE's...

426

DOE Mentoring Program Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

our employees have fulfilling and productive careers within the Department. DOE Strategic Plan (May 2011) DOE Mentoring Program Page 2 June 2012 Table of Contents DOE...

427

Protection Against Ionizing Radiation in Extreme Radiation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protection Against Ionizing Radiation in Extreme Radiation-resistant Microorganisms. ... Elucidated radiation protection by intracellular halides. ...

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Analyzing Surface Solar Flux Data in Oregon for Changes Due to Aerosols Laura D. Riihimaki1, Frank E. Vignola1, Charles N. Long2, James A. Coakley Jr.3 1 University of Oregon Solar Radiation Monitoring Lab 2 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 3 Oregon State University, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

76 76 1980 1984 1988 1992 1996 2000 2004 2008 100 150 200 250 Direct Normal Irradiance (W/m 2 ) Eugene Hermiston Burns 3. All-sky direct normal irradiance increases 5% per decade Eppley NIP Conclusions Annual average all-sky total and direct normal irradiance measurements show an overall increase in Oregon between 1980 and 2007. Two measurement sites show statistically significant increases in clear- sky direct normal irradiance in background periods before and after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo [6] (1987- 2008), consistent with the hypothesis that a reduction in anthropogenic aerosols may contribute to the increase in surface irradiance. References 1. Long, C.N. and T. P. Ackerman, 2000: J. Geophys. Res., 105(D12), 15,609-15,626. 2. Long, C.N., and K.L. Gaustad, 2004: Atmospheric Radiation

429

Measurements of the Infrared SpectraLines of Water Vapor at Atmospheric Temperatures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurements of the Infrared Spectral Lines Measurements of the Infrared Spectral Lines of Water Vapor at Atmospheric Temperatures P. Varanasi and Q. Zou Institute for Terrestrial and Planetary Atmospheres State University of New York at Stony Brook Stony Brook, New York Introduction Water vapor is undoubtedly the most dominant greenhouse gas in the terrestrial atmosphere. In the two facets of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program research, atmospheric remote sensing (air-borne as well as Cloud and Radiation Testbed [CART] site-based) and modeling of atmospheric radiation, the spectrum of water vapor, ranging from the microwave to the visible wavelengths, plays a significant role. Its spectrum has been the subject of many studies throughout the last century. Therefore, it is natural to presume it should be fairly well established by now. However, the need for a

430

DOE Joint Genome Institute | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Joint Genome Institute DOE Joint Genome Institute Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Genomic Science DOE Bioenergy Research Centers Radiochemistry & Imaging Instrumentation Radiobiology: Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Human Subjects Protection Program Structural Biology DOE Joint Genome Institute Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301)

431

High Resolution Aerosol Modeling: Decadal Changes in Radiative Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Science Division of LLNL has performed high-resolution calculations of direct sulfate forcing using a DOE-provided computer resource at NERSC. We integrated our global chemistry-aerosol model (IMPACT) with the LLNL high-resolution global climate model (horizontal resolution as high as 100 km) to examine the temporal evolution of sulfate forcing since 1950. We note that all previous assessments of sulfate forcing reported in IPCC (2001) were based on global models with coarse spatial resolutions ({approx} 300 km or even coarser). However, the short lifetime of aerosols ({approx} days) results in large spatial and temporal variations of radiative forcing by sulfate. As a result, global climate models with coarse resolutions do not accurately simulate sulfate forcing on regional scales. It requires much finer spatial resolutions in order to address the effects of regional anthropogenic SO{sub 2} emissions on the global atmosphere as well as the effects of long-range transport of sulfate aerosols on the regional climate forcing. By taking advantage of the tera-scale computer resources at NERSC, we simulated the historic direct sulfate forcing at much finer spatial resolutions than ever attempted before. Furthermore, we performed high-resolution chemistry simulations and saved monthly averaged oxidant fields, which will be used in subsequent simulations of sulfate aerosol formation and their radiative impact.

Bergmann, D J; Chuang, C C; Govindasamy, B; Cameron-Smith, P J; Rotman, D A

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Program Operations Plan. Atmospheric Chemistry Program  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP) was initiated in 1991 to coordinate DOE`s university and federal-laboratory atmospheric-chemistry research, and to focus these efforts on national and international information requirements in the atmospheric-chemistry field. This Program Operations Plan describes the structure and vision of the effort designed to fulfill these needs, and is divided into two major components. The first of these is a Strategic Plan, which outlines the ACP`s rationale, objectives, and vision, and describes its products that are anticipated over a future ten-year period. Although based on realistic appraisals of goals that are attainable given the financial, material, and intellectual resources of the ACP community, this Strategic Plan does not describe these resources themselves. The second component of the Program Operations Plan, the Implementation Plan, deals directly with these resource considerations. As such it focuses on practical implementation of Strategic-Plan elements at the individual research institutions, the anticipated scientific contributions of these groups, and their coordination within the ACP. In contrast to the Strategic Plan, this Implementation Plan extends only five years into the future.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Clear Skies S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

S. A. Clough S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, MA 02139 The objective of this research effort is to develop radiative transfer models that are consistent with Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program spectral radiance measurements for clear and cloudy atmospheres. Our approach is to develop the model physics and related databases with a line-by-line model in the context of available spectral radiance measurements. The line-by- line mode! then functions as an intermediate standard to both develop and validate rapid radiative transfer models appropriate to GCM applications. consistent with downlooking data taken with the high spectral resolution interferometer sounder (HIS) (Smith et al. 1983) from 20 km and with simultaneous data taken

434

Beta Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beta Radiation 1. Beta radiation may travel meters in air and is moderately penetrating. 2. Beta radiation can penetrate human skin to the "germinal layer," where new skin cells...

435

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Monitoring for Radiation Protection of Workers" in ICRPNo. 9, in "Advances in Radiation Protection and Dosimetry inDosimetry f o r Stray Radiation Monitoring on the CERN S i t

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

DOE handbook: Design considerations  

SciTech Connect

The Design Considerations Handbook includes information and suggestions for the design of systems typical to nuclear facilities, information specific to various types of special facilities, and information useful to various design disciplines. The handbook is presented in two parts. Part 1, which addresses design considerations, includes two sections. The first addresses the design of systems typically used in nuclear facilities to control radiation or radioactive materials. Specifically, this part addresses the design of confinement systems and radiation protection and effluent monitoring systems. The second section of Part 1 addresses the design of special facilities (i.e., specific types of nonreactor nuclear facilities). The specific design considerations provided in this section were developed from review of DOE 6430.1A and are supplemented with specific suggestions and considerations from designers with experience designing and operating such facilities. Part 2 of the Design Considerations Handbook describes good practices and design principles that should be considered in specific design disciplines, such as mechanical systems and electrical systems. These good practices are based on specific experiences in the design of nuclear facilities by design engineers with related experience. This part of the Design Considerations Handbook contains five sections, each of which applies to a particular engineering discipline.

NONE

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Radiative Heating Rates for Saharan Dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combined longwave and shortwave radiative transfer model was used to determine effects of Saharan dust on the radiative fluxes and heating/cooling rates in the atmosphere. Cases are treated for cloud-free and overcast conditions over the ocean ...

Toby N. Carlson; Stanley G. Benjamin

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Impacts of a New Solar Radiation Parameterization on the CPTEC AGCM Climatological Features  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of improved atmospheric absorption on radiative fluxes, atmospheric circulation, and hydrological cycle for long-term GCM integrations are investigated. For these runs the operational version of the Centro de Previsão de Tempo e ...

H. M. J. Barbosa; T. A. Tarasova; I. F. A. Cavalcanti

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

DOE Science Showcase - Carbon Capture research in DOE Databases...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Sciences Division, DOE Office of Science DOE Key R&D Programs and Initiatives, DOE DOE Fossil Energy Techline, DOE What is carbon sequestration? NETL 2010 Carbon Sequestration...

440

DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA In May 1995, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a policy in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "doe atmospheric radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

2010 Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science Team Meeting Summary  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the summaries of papers presented in poster format at the March 2010 Atmospheric System Research Science Team Meeting held in Bethesda, Maryland. More than 260 posters were presented during the Science Team Meeting. Posters were sorted into the following subject areas: aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions, aerosol properties, atmospheric state and surface, cloud properties, field campaigns, infrastructure and outreach, instruments, modeling, and radiation. To put these posters in context, the status of ASR at the time of the meeting is provided here.

Dupont, DL

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

442

NCEP–DOE AMIP-II Reanalysis (R-2)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NCEP–DOE Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP-II) reanalysis is a follow-on project to the “50-year” (1948-present) NCEP-NCAR Reanalysis Project. NCEP–DOE AMIP-II reanalysis covers the “20-year” satellite period of 1979 to the ...

Masao Kanamitsu; Wesley Ebisuzaki; Jack Woollen; Shi-Keng Yang; J. J. Hnilo; M. Fiorino; G. L. Potter

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

A Systematic Study of Longwave Radiative Heating and Cooling within Valleys and Basins Using a Three-Dimensional Radiative Transfer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Monte Carlo code for the physically correct tracing of photons in cloudy atmospheres (MYSTIC) three-dimensional radiative transfer model was used in a parametric study to determine the strength of longwave radiative heating and cooling in ...

Sebastian W. Hoch; C. David Whiteman; Bernhard Mayer

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Radiation Emergency Medicine Fact Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Global Response Improving Global Response to Radiation Emergencies Improving Radiation Emergency Response Through Education and Specialized Expertise In the event of a radiological or nuclear incident, first responders as well as hospital and emergency management personnel must call on their knowledge and training to provide immediate and effective care for victims. Through practical, hands-on education programs, Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) is improving global response to radiation emergencies. In addition, dedicated 24/7 deployable teams of physicians, nurses, and health physicists from the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS), which is managed by ORAU for DOE/NNSA, provide expert medical management of radiological incidents

445

Partially Ionized Atmospheres of Neutron Stars with Strong Magnetic Fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We construct hydrogen atmosphere models for strongly magnetized neutron stars in thermodynamic equilibrium, taking into account partial ionization. The presence of bound states affects the equation of state, absorption coefficients, and polarizability tensor of a strongly magnetized plasma. Therefore the partial ionization influences the polarization vectors and opacities of normal electromagnetic waves, and thus the spectra of outgoing radiation. Here we review a model suitable for the most typical neutron-star atmospheres and focus on the problems that remain to be solved for its extension to other atmospheric parameters.

Potekhin, A.

2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

446

ON THE STABILITY OF SUPER-EARTH ATMOSPHERES  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the stability of super-Earth atmospheres around M stars using a seven-parameter, analytical framework. We construct stability diagrams in the parameter space of exoplanetary radius versus semimajor axis and elucidate the regions in which the atmospheres are stable against the condensation of their major constituents, out of the gas phase, on their permanent nightside hemispheres. We find that super-Earth atmospheres that are nitrogen-dominated (Earth-like) occupy a smaller region of allowed parameter space, compared to hydrogen-dominated atmospheres, because of the dual effects of diminished advection and enhanced radiative cooling. Furthermore, some super-Earths which reside within the habitable zones of M stars may not possess stable atmospheres, depending on the mean molecular weight and infrared photospheric pressure of their atmospheres. We apply our stability diagrams to GJ 436b and GJ 1214b, and demonstrate that atmospheric compositions with high mean molecular weights are disfavored if these exoplanets possess solid surfaces and shallow atmospheres. Finally, we construct stability diagrams tailored to the Kepler data set, for G and K stars, and predict that about half of the exoplanet candidates are expected to harbor stable atmospheres if Earth-like conditions are assumed. We include 55 Cancri e and CoRoT-7b in our stability diagram for G stars.

Heng, Kevin [ETH Zuerich, Institute for Astronomy, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093, Zuerich (Switzerland); Kopparla, Pushkar [ETH Zuerich, Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science, Universitaetstrasse 16, CH-8092, Zuerich (Switzerland)

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

447

Simulation of Atmospheric Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spectral atmospheric circulation model is time-integrated for approximately 18 years. The model has a global computational domain and realistic geography and topography. The model undergoes an annual cycle as daily values of seasonally varying ...

Syukuro Manabe; Douglas G. Hahn

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Atmospheric Laser Communication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric laser communication, often referred to as free-space optics (FSO) or free-space laser (FSL) communication, is similar to fiber optic cable in terms of carrier wavelength and bandwidth capability, but data are transmitted directly ...

Kenneth W. Fischer*Michael R. Witiw; Jeffrey A. Baars+; T. R. Oke

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Atmospheric Available Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The total potential energy of the atmosphere is the sum of its internal and gravitational energies. The portion of this total energy available to be converted into kinetic energy is determined relative to an isothermal, hydrostatic, equilibrium ...

Peter R. Bannon

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Atmospheric optical calibration system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions.

Hulstrom, Roland L. (Bloomfield, CO); Cannon, Theodore W. (Golden, CO)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Atmospheric optical calibration system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

1988-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

452

Optical Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Optical Radiation Measurements. Fees for services are located directly below the technical contacts ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

453

Ionizing Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Ionizing Radiation Measurements. Fees for services are located directly below the technical contacts ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

454

Order Module--RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS GUIDE | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS GUIDE RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS GUIDE Order Module--RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS GUIDE The familiar level of this module is designed to provide the basic information related to DOE G 441.1-1C, Radiation Protection Programs Guide, as required in DOE-STD-1174-2003, Radiation Protection Functional Area Qualification Standard, December 2003. Completion of this module also meets certain requirements associated with the DOE Facility Representative Program and the DOE Intern Program. The information contained in this module addresses specific requirements and as such does not include the entire text of the source document. Before continuing, you should obtain a copy of the Order. Copies of the DOE Directives are available at http://www.directives.doe.gov/ or through the course manager. In March

455

DOE-STD-1121-2008 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1121-2008 DOE-STD-1121-2008 DOE-STD-1121-2008 November 14, 2013 DOE-STD-1121-2008, Internal Dosimetry Change Notice 1 October 2013 This technical standard is created to provide a resource for those engaged in the science and practice of internal dosimetry within the DOE complex. This standard defines minimum levels of acceptable performance and provides basic procedural guidelines for evaluating the internal radiation equivalent and effective dose that may be received by radiation workers from intakes of radionuclides. This set of defined internal dosimetry performance criteria meets the requirements set forth in 10 CFR 835 for monitoring the workplace, for assessing internal radiation doses to workers at DOE facilities, and for recording and reporting requirements as they

456

A GRID OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL STELLAR ATMOSPHERE MODELS OF SOLAR METALLICITY. I. GENERAL PROPERTIES, GRANULATION, AND ATMOSPHERIC EXPANSION  

SciTech Connect

Present grids of stellar atmosphere models are the workhorses in interpreting stellar observations and determining their fundamental parameters. These models rely on greatly simplified models of convection, however, lending less predictive power to such models of late-type stars. We present a grid of improved and more reliable stellar atmosphere models of late-type stars, based on deep, three-dimensional (3D), convective, stellar atmosphere simulations. This grid is to be used in general for interpreting observations and improving stellar and asteroseismic modeling. We solve the Navier Stokes equations in 3D and concurrent with the radiative transfer equation, for a range of atmospheric parameters, covering most of stellar evolution with convection at the surface. We emphasize the use of the best available atomic physics for quantitative predictions and comparisons with observations. We present granulation size, convective expansion of the acoustic cavity, and asymptotic adiabat as functions of atmospheric parameters.

Trampedach, Regner [JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Asplund, Martin; Collet, Remo [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mt. Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston ACT 2611 (Australia); Nordlund, Ake [Astronomical Observatory/Niels Bohr Institute, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark); Stein, Robert F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

457

ORISE: REAC/TS Medical Management of Radiation Incidents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Management of Radiation Incidents As part of its primary mission for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS)...

458

Temporal Variability of Aerosol Properties during TCAP: Impact on Radiative Forcing  

SciTech Connect

Ground-based remote sensing and in situ observations of aerosol microphysical and optical properties have been collected during summertime (June-August, 2012) as part of the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/), which was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (http://www.arm.gov/). The overall goal of the TCAP field campaign is to study the evolution of optical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosol transported from North America to the Atlantic and their impact on the radiation energy budget. During TCAP, the ground-based ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was deployed on Cape Cod, an arm-shaped peninsula situated on the easternmost portion of Massachusetts (along the east coast of the United States) and that is generally downwind of large metropolitan areas. The AMF site was equipped with numerous instruments for sampling aerosol, cloud and radiative properties, including a Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR), a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS), and a three-wavelength nephelometer. In this study we present an analysis of diurnal and day-to-day variability of the column and near-surface aerosol properties obtained from remote sensing (MFRSR data) and ground-based in situ measurements (SMPS, APS, and nephelometer data). In particular, we show that the observed diurnal variability of the MFRSR aerosol optical depth is strong and comparable with that obtained previously from the AERONET climatology in Mexico City, which has a larger aerosol loading. Moreover, we illustrate how the variability of aerosol properties impacts the direct aerosol radiative forcing at different time scales.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Lantz, K.; Hodges, G. B.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

DOE Science Showcase - DOE Advanced Robotics | OSTI, US Dept of Energy,  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DOE Science Showcase - DOE Advanced Robotics DOE Science Showcase - DOE Advanced Robotics Where creative vision and technical expertise meet From mine rescue operations to radiological survey for environmental hazards to mapping data for defense situations, read about the Department of Energy (DOE) innovative approaches to advanced robotics. Robotics Research Results from the DOE Databases DOepatents Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC) Information Bridge Energy Citations Database Science.gov WorldWideScience.gov multimedia Robotics at DOE Labs Sandia Labs' Gemini-Scout robot likely to reach trapped miners ahead of rescuers Tiny Terminators: New Micro-Robots Assemble, Repair Themselves and Are Surprisingly Strong 10 Questions for a Robotics Engineer: Lonnie Love Robot Reworked to Analyze Radiation in Japan

460

Posters Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer: Status and Water Vapor Continuum Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Posters Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer: Status and Water Vapor Continuum Results H. E. Revercomb, R. O. Knuteson, W. L. Smith, F. A. Best, and R. G. Dedecker University of Wisconsin Madison, Wisconsin H. B. Howell National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Systems Design and Applications Branch Madison, Wisconsin Introduction Accurate and spectrally detailed observations of the thermal emission from radiatively important atmospheric gases, aerosols, and clouds are now being provided to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) data base by the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) prototype at the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site. Spectra over the range from 520 to 3000 cm -1 (3 to 19 microns) with a resolution of 0.5 cm

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "doe atmospheric radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 2000 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO{sub 2} and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels.

Cushman, R.M.

2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy - Radiation Protection...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Posting and control of radioactive material, - Radiation dose reporting. 10 CFR 835 PolicyRegulations and Documents Any questions, contact: Joel.Rabovsky@hq.doe.gov...

463

Atomistic Simulations of Radiation Effects in Ceramics for Nuclear ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work is supported by the DOE Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and ... Simulations of Radiation Effects in Ceramics for Nuclear Waste Disposal.

464

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Gene Expression Profiles...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48 with funding from the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program...

465

NIST Ionizing Radiat. Div. - 2004: Strategic Focus 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... electronic radiation monitors ("pagers"), isotope identifier instruments ... 2003, DOE recognized this program as one of the top-ten programs relevant to ...

466

Radiation Physics Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Radiation Physics Portal. Radiation Physics Portal. ... more. >> see all Radiation Physics programs and projects ... ...

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

467

Advances in Radiative Transfer Modeling in Support of Satellite Data Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of fast and accurate radiative transfer models for clear atmospheric conditions has enabled direct assimilation of clear-sky radiances from satellites in numerical weather prediction models. In this article, fast radiative transfer ...

Fuzhong Weng

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

The Baseline Surface Radiation Network Pyrgeometer Round-Robin Calibration Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the aim of improving the consistency of terrestrial and atmospheric longwave radiation measurements within the Baseline Surface Radiation Network, five Eppley Precision Infrared Radiometer (PIR) pyrgeometers and one modified Meteorological ...

Rolf Philipona; Claus Fröhlich; Klaus Dehne; John DeLuisi; John Augustine; Ellsworth Dutton; Don Nelson; Bruce Forgan; Peter Novotny; John Hickey; Steven P. Love; Steven Bender; Bruce McArthur; Atsumu Ohmura; John H. Seymour; John S. Foot; Masataka Shiobara; Francisco P. J. Valero; Anthony W. Strawa

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Influence of a Tropical Island Mountain on Solar Radiation, Air Temperature and Vapor Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measured solar radiation, air temperature, and water vapor pressure at 17 stations on the northwest flank of Haleakala, Maui, Hawaii are compared with modeled clear day solar radiation and free atmosphere air temperature and water vapor pressure. ...

Dennis Nullet

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

The CERES/ARM/GEWEX Experiment (CAGEX) for the Retrieval of Radiative Fluxes with Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results from a temporally intensive, limited area, radiative transfer model experiment are on-line for investigating the vertical profile of shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes from the surface to the top of the atmosphere (TOA). The CERES/...

Thomas P. Charlock; Timothy L. Alberta

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

TURAC—A New Instrument Package for Radiation Budget Measurements and Cloud Detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric radiation flux measurements and the resulting surface radiation budget are important quantities for greenhouse effect and climate change investigations. Accurate net shortwave and longwave fluxes, in conjunction with numerical ...

C. Ruckstuhl; R. Philipona

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

A Climatology of Surface Cloud Radiative Effects at the ARM Tropical Western Pacific Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud radiative effects on surface downwelling fluxes are investigated using datasets from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) sites in the tropical western Pacific Ocean (TWP) region. The Nauru Island (Republic of Nauru) and ...

Sally A. McFarlane; Charles N. Long; Julia Flaherty

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Improved Simulation of Clear-Sky Shortwave Radiative Transfer in the CCC-GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The disposition of mean July clear-sky solar radiation in the Canadian Climate Centre second-generation general circulation model (CCC-GCMII) was analyzed by comparing top of the atmosphere (TOA) net fluxes with earth radiation budget experiment (...

Howard W. Barker; Zhanqing Li

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

The Contributions of Several Absorption Bands to Stratospheric Radiative Dissipation Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A narrowband (5 cm?1) radiation transfer scheme has been used to calculate scale-dependent radiative dissipation rates for finite-amplitude temperature disturbances. Eight bands of five atmospheric trace gases have been examined. As previously ...

Gerd Breßer; Steven Pawson

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Clouds, Radiation, and the Diurnal Cycle of Sea Surface Temperature in the Tropical Western Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relationship among clouds, surface radiation flux, and the sea surface temperature (SST) of the tropical western Pacific Ocean over the diurnal cycle is addressed in the context of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program ...

Peter J. Webster; Carol Anne Clayson; Judith A. Curry

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Assessment of the ECMWF Model Cloudiness and Surface Radiation Fields at the ARM SGP Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cloud and radiation fields produced by the operational ECMWF forecasts are assessed using observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site over the April–May 1999 period. Over the first 36 ...

Jean-Jacques Morcrette

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Observations and Modeling of Downward Radiative Fluxes (Solar and Infrared) in Urban/Rural Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pollutants (gaseous and aerosol) contained in urban atmospheres alter radiative fluxes at the surface.Numerous radiative models have been developed, and while few experimental data are available, results areoften contradictory. We have taken ...

Claude Estournel; Raoul Vehil; Daniel Guedalia; Jacques Fontan; Aimé Druilhet

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Impact of Ingesting Satellite-Derived Cloud Cover into the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the extent to which assimilating high-resolution remotely sensed cloud cover into the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) provides an improved regional diagnosis of downward short- and longwave surface radiation ...

Ismail Yucel; W. James Shuttleworth; R. T. Pinker; L. Lu; S. Sorooshian

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Climate Change and the Middle Atmosphere. Part III: The Doubled CO2 Climate Revisited  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of the troposphere–stratosphere system to doubled atmospheric CO2 is investigated in a series of experiments in which sea surface temperatures are allowed to adjust to radiation imbalances. The Goddard Institute for Space Studies (...

D. Rind; D. Shindell; P. Lonergan; N. K. Balachandran

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Atmospheric Turbidity at Tucson, Arizona, 1956–83: Variations and Their Causes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar radiation data collected over the last 27 years at the University of Arizona have been analyzed to determine the major causes of time variations in the local turbidity of the atmosphere. The most extreme perturbations have been associated ...

R. J. Szymber; W. D. Sellers

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "doe atmospheric radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.