Sample records for dnfsb defense nuclear

  1. Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Update - Dale...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Update - Dale Govan, Departmental Representative to the DNFSB Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Update - Dale Govan,...

  2. Interface with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual presents the process the Department of Energy will use to interface with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) and its staff. Cancels DOE M 140.1-1.

  3. Interface with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual presents the process the Department of Energy will use to interface with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) and its staff. Cancels DOE M 140.1-1A.

  4. Risk Assessment in Support of DOE Nuclear Safety, Risk Information Notice, June 2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On August 12, 2009, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board(DNFSB) issued Recommendation 2009?1, Risk Assessment Methodologies at Defense Nuclear Facilities. Thisrecommendation focused on the...

  5. Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Letters and Recommendations

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  6. Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Update - Dale Govan,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197 This workDayton:| Department of Energy

  7. National Nuclear Secutffy Admlnlsbrrtlon NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CPAF - Cost Plus Award Fee D&D - Decontamination and Decommission DEAR - Department of Energy Acquisition Regulation DNFSB - Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board DoD -...

  8. DNFSB recommendation 94-1 Hanford site integrated stabilization management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormack, R.L.

    1997-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 1994, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 (Conway 1994), which identified concerns related to US Department of Energy (DOE) management of legacy fissile materials remaining from past defense production activities. The DNFSB expressed concern about the existing storage conditions for these materials and the slow pace at which the conditions were being remediated. The DNFSB also expressed its belief that additional delays in stabilizing these fissile materials would be accompanied by further deterioration of safety and unnecessary increased risks to workers and the public. In February 1995, DOE issued the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Implementation Plan (O`Leary 1995) to address the concerns identified in DNFSB Recommendation 94-1. The Implementation Plan (IP) identifies several DOE commitments to achieve safe interim storage for the legacy fissile materials, and constitutes DOE`s baseline DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Integrated Program Plan (IPP). The IPP describes the actions DOE plans to implement within the DOE complex to convert its excess fissile materials to forms or conditions suitable for safe interim storage. The IPP was subsequently supplemented with an Integrated Facilities Plan and a Research and Development Plan, which further develop complex-wide research and development and long-range facility requirements and plans. The additions to the baseline IPP were developed based on a systems engineering approach that integrated facilities and capabilities at the various DOE sites and focused on attaining safe interim storage with minimum safety risks and environmental impacts. Each affected DOE site has developed a Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP) to identify individual site plans to implement the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 IPP. The SISMPs were developed based on the objectives, requirements, and commitments identified in the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 IP. The SISMPs also supported formulation of the initial versions of the Integrated Facilities Plan and the Research and Development Plan. The SISMPs are periodically updated to reflect improved integration between DOE sites as identified during the IPP systems engineering evaluations. This document is the fifth update of the Hanford SISMP.

  9. DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Hanford Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, E.W.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has developed an Integrated Program Plan (IPP) to address concerns identified in Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 94-1. The IPP describes the actions that DOE plans to implement at its various sites to convert excess fissile materials to forms or conditions suitable for safe interim storage. The baseline IPP was issued as DOE`s Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1 Implementation Plan (IP), which was transmitted to the DNFSB on February 28, 1995. The IPP is being further developed to include complex-wide requirements for research and development and a long-range facility requirements section. The planned additions to the baseline IPP are being developed based on a systems engineering approach that integrates facilities and capabilities at the various DOE sites and focuses on attaining safe interim storage with minimum safety risks and environmental impacts. Each affected DOE site has developed a Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP) to identify individual site plans to implement the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 and to provide a basis for formulating planned additions to the IPP. The SISMPs were developed based on the objectives, requirements, and commitments identified in the baseline DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 IPP. The SISMPs will be periodically updated to reflect improved integration between DOE sites as identified during the IPP systems engineering evaluations.

  10. DNFSB recommendation 94-1 Hanford site integrated stabilization management plan - VOLUMES 1-3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, E.W.

    1996-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has developed an Integrated Program Plan (IPP) to address concerns identified in Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1. The IPP describes the actions that DOE plans to implement at its various sites to convert excess fissile materials to forms or conditions suitable for safe interim storage. The baseline IPP was issued as DOE's DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Implementation Plan (IP), which was transmitted to the DNFSB on February 28, 1995. The IPP was subsequently supplemented with an Integrated Facilities Plan and a Research and Development Plan, which further develop complex-wide research and development and long-range facility requirements and plans. These additions to the baseline IPP were developed based on a systems engineering approach that integrated facilities and capabilities at the various DOE sites and focused on attaining safe interim storage with minimum safety risks and environmental impacts. Each affected DOE site has developed a Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP) to identify individual site plans to implement the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 IPP. The SISMPs were developed based on the objectives, requirements, and commitments identified in the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 IP. The SISMPs supported formulation of the initial versions of the Integrated Facilities Plan and the Research and Development Plan. The SISMPs are periodically updated to reflect improved integration between DOE sites as identified during the IPP systems engineering evaluations. This document constitutes the Hanford SISMP. This document includes the planned work scope, costs and schedules for activities at the Hanford site to implement the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 IPP.

  11. Cover letter, 10/29/03, re Nuclear Safety Technical Position, Deliverable 4.2.1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The enclosed Nuclear Safety Technical Position is Deliverable 4.2.1. under the Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilitises Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2002-3, Requirements for Design...

  12. Civil defense implications of nuclear winter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chester, C.V.; Broyles, A.A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Possible effects of Nuclear Winter on the world's population are summarized. The implications of these effects for strategic weapons planning and civil defense measures are discussed. (ACR)

  13. Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Health, Safety and Security (HSS) observed the public hearing of the DNFSB review of the UPF project status for integrating safety into design. The meeting was broken into three...

  14. defense | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  15. Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  16. NNSA and Defense Nuclear Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gif Directorate1, IssueThailand | National Nuclear Securityand

  17. Nuclear Weapon Surety Interface with the Department of Defense

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order establishes Department of Energy and National Nuclear Security Administration requirements and responsibilities for addressing joint nuclear weapon and nuclear weapon system surety activities in conjunction with the Department of Defense. Cancels DOE O 452.6.

  18. defense nuclear security | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14Russian NuclearNational5/%2A en Office ofcontractingcyber

  19. Nuclear winter: the implications for civil defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chester, C.V.; Perry, A.M.; Hobbs, B.F.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is generally believed possible for some range of heavy nuclear attacks directed against cities that significant but not lethal climate alteration will ensue for at least a few weeks. Three-dimensional global circulation models being developed and used at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and the National Center for Atmospheric Research for a reasonable attack size seem to be converging on a temperature depression of the order of 10 to 15/degree/C, averaged over all land areas of the temperate region of the northern hemisphere. Temperature depressions as large as 25/degree/C are predicted in the interiors of continents for attacks in the summertime. Winter wars produce temperature depressions of only a few degrees. The authors have drawn the following implications for civil defense of the possibility of nuclear winter: (1) Neither cold nor drought is likely to be a direct threat to human survival. (2) The principal threat of nuclear winter is to agriculture. (3) Nuclear winter does not present an entirely new threat from nuclear war to the United States or the Soviet Union. (4) The consequences of nuclear winter would fall more heavily on the Soviet Union.

  20. Progress in Addressing DNFSB Recommendation 2002-1 Issues: Improving Accident Analysis Software Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VINCENT, ANDREW

    2005-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2002-1 (''Quality Assurance for Safety-Related Software'') identified a number of quality assurance issues on the use of software in Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for analyzing hazards, and designing and operating controls to prevent or mitigate potential accidents. Over the last year, DOE has begun several processes and programs as part of the Implementation Plan commitments, and in particular, has made significant progress in addressing several sets of issues particularly important in the application of software for performing hazard and accident analysis. The work discussed here demonstrates that through these actions, Software Quality Assurance (SQA) guidance and software tools are available that can be used to improve resulting safety analysis. Specifically, five of the primary actions corresponding to the commitments made in the Implementation Plan to Recommendation 2002-1 are identified and discussed in this paper. Included are the web-based DOE SQA Knowledge Portal and the Central Registry, guidance and gap analysis reports, electronic bulletin board and discussion forum, and a DOE safety software guide. These SQA products can benefit DOE safety contractors in the development of hazard and accident analysis by precluding inappropriate software applications and utilizing best practices when incorporating software results to safety basis documentation. The improvement actions discussed here mark a beginning to establishing stronger, standard-compliant programs, practices, and processes in SQA among safety software users, managers, and reviewers throughout the DOE Complex. Additional effort is needed, however, particularly in: (1) processes to add new software applications to the DOE Safety Software Toolbox; (2) improving the effectiveness of software issue communication; and (3) promoting a safety software quality assurance culture.

  1. Interface with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The manual defines the process DOE will use to interface with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board and its staff. Canceled by DOE M 140.1-1A. Does not cancel other directives.

  2. Nuclear Weapon Surety Interface with the Department of Defense

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order prescribes how the Department of Energy participates with the Department of Defense (DoD) to ensure the surety (safety, security and control) of military nuclear weapon systems deployed around the world. The Order establishes National Nuclear Security Administration requirements and responsibilities for addressing joint nuclear weapon and nuclear weapon system surety activities in conjunction with the DoD. Cancels DOE O 5610.13. Canceled by DOE O 452.6A.

  3. analyses defense nuclear: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    analyses defense nuclear First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Global Analyses of Nuclear...

  4. Nuclear Winter: Implications for civil defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chester, C.V.; Perry, A.M.; Hobbs, B.F.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ''Nuclear Winter'' is the term given to the cooling hypothesized to occur in the Northern Hemisphere following a nuclear war as the result of the injection of smoke from burning cities into the atmosphere. The voluminous literature on this subject produced since the paper was published in 1983 by Turco, Toon, Ackerman, Pollack, and Sagen (TTAPS) has been reviewed. Three-dimensional global circulation models have resulted in reduced estimates of cooling---15 to 25/degree/C for a summer war and a few degrees for a winter war. More serious may be the possibility of suppression of convective precipitation by the altered temperature profiles in the atmosphere. However, very large uncertainties remain in input parameters, the models, and the results of calculations. We believe the state of knowledge about nuclear winter is sufficiently developed to conclude: Neither cold nor drought is likely to be a direct threat to human survival for populations with the wherewithal to survive normal January temperatures. The principal threat from nuclear winter is to food production, and this could present problems to third parties who are without food reserves. Loss of a crop year is neither a new nor an unexpected threat from nuclear war to the United States and the Soviet Union. Both have at least a year's food reserve at all times. Both face formidable organizational problems in distributing their reserves in a war-damaged environment. The consequences of nuclear winter could be expected to fall more heavily on the Soviet Union than the United States due to its higher latitude and less productive agriculture. This may be especially true if disturbances of rainfall amounts and distribution persist for more than a year.

  5. Nuclear Winter: The implications for civil defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chester, C.V.; Perry, A.M.; Hobbs, B.F.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ''Nuclear Winter'' is the term given to hypothesized cooling in the northern hemisphere following a nuclear war due to injection of smoke from burning cities into the atmosphere. The voluminous literature on this subject produced since the original paper in 1983 by Turco, Toon, Ackerman, Pollack, and Sagen (TTAPS) has been reviewed. The widespread use of 3-dimensional global circulation models have resulted in reduced estimates of cooling; 15 to 25/sup 0/C for a summer war and a few degrees for a winter war. More serious may be the possibility of suppression of convective precipitation by the altered temperature profiles in the atmosphere. However, very large uncertainties remain in input parameters, the models, and the results of calculations. We believe the state of knowledge about nuclear winter is sufficiently developed to conclude: Neither cold nor drought are likely to be direct threats to human survival for populations with the wherewithal to survive normal January temperatures; The principal threat from nuclear winter is to food production, and could present problems to third parties without food reserves; and Loss of a crop year is neither a new nor unexpected threat from nuclear war to the US and the Soviet Union. Both have at least a year's food reserve at all times. Both face formidable organizational problems in distributing their reserves in a war-damaged environment. The consequences of nuclear winter could be expected to fall more heavily on the Soviet Union than the US due to its higher latitude and less productive agriculture. This may be especially true if disturbances of rainfall amounts and distribution persist for more than a year. 6 refs.

  6. defense programs | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  7. Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  8. Defense Nuclear Material Stewardship Integrated Inventory Information Management System (IIIMS).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aas, Christopher A.; Lenhart, James E.; Bray, Olin H.; Witcher, Christina Jenkin

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories was tasked with developing the Defense Nuclear Material Stewardship Integrated Inventory Information Management System (IIIMS) with the sponsorship of NA-125.3 and the concurrence of DOE/NNSA field and area offices. The purpose of IIIMS was to modernize nuclear materials management information systems at the enterprise level. Projects over the course of several years attempted to spearhead this modernization. The scope of IIIMS was broken into broad enterprise-oriented materials management and materials forecasting. The IIIMS prototype was developed to allow multiple participating user groups to explore nuclear material requirements and needs in detail. The purpose of material forecasting was to determine nuclear material availability over a 10 to 15 year period in light of the dynamic nature of nuclear materials management. Formal DOE Directives (requirements) were needed to direct IIIMS efforts but were never issued and the project has been halted. When restarted, duplicating or re-engineering the activities from 1999 to 2003 is unnecessary, and in fact future initiatives can build on previous work. IIIMS requirements should be structured to provide high confidence that discrepancies are detected, and classified information is not divulged. Enterprise-wide materials management systems maintained by the military can be used as overall models to base IIIMS implementation concepts upon.

  9. NA 70 - Associate Administrator for Defense Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics NA 70 - Associate Administrator for Defense ... NA 70 - Associate Administrator...

  10. Feasibility of very deep borehole disposal of US nuclear defense wastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Frances Elizabeth

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis analyzes the feasibility of emplacing DOE-owned defense nuclear waste from weapons production into a permanent borehole repository drilled ~4 km into granite basement rock. Two canister options were analyzed ...

  11. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Defense-in-Depth Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward G. Wallace; Karl N. Fleming; Edward M. Burns

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to (1) document the definition of defense-in-depth and the pproach that will be used to assure that its principles are satisfied for the NGNP project and (2) identify the specific questions proposed for preapplication discussions with the NRC. Defense-in-depth is a safety philosophy in which multiple lines of defense and conservative design and evaluation methods are applied to assure the safety of the public. The philosophy is also intended to deliver a design that is tolerant to uncertainties in knowledge of plant behavior, component reliability or operator performance that might compromise safety. This paper includes a review of the regulatory foundation for defense-in-depth, a definition of defense-in-depth that is appropriate for advanced reactor designs based on High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology, and an explanation of how this safety philosophy is achieved in the NGNP.

  12. NNSA Defense Programs Announces Quarterly Awards | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Announces Quarterly Awards | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering...

  13. Los Alamos National Laboratory standard nuclear material container

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, Timothy A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The shut down of United States (U.S.) nuclear-weapons production activities in the early 1990s left large quantities of nuclear materials throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex in forms not intended for long-term storage. In May 1994, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued Recommendation 94-1, which called for the stabilization and disposition of 'thousands of containers of plutonium-bearing liquids and solids' in the DOE complex, including LANL in the nuclear-weapons-manufacturing pipeline when manufacturing ended. This resulted in the development of the 3013 standard with container requirements for long term storage (up to 50 years). A follow on was the Criteria For Interim Storage of Plutonium Bearing Materials, Charles B. Curtis, in 1996 to address storage other than the 3013 standard for shorter time frames. In January 2000, the DNFSB issued Recommendation 2000-1, which stated the need for LANL to repackage 'about one ton of plutonium metal and oxide,' declared excess to Defense Program (DP) needs. The DNFSB recommended that LANL 'stabilize and seal within welded containers with an inert atmosphere the plutonium oxides ... which are not yet in states conforming to the long-term storage envisaged by DOE-STD-3013,' and that they '... enclose existing and newly-generated legacy plutonium metal in sealed containers with an inert atmosphere,' and 'remediate and/or safely store the various residues.' Recommendation 2000-1, while adding to the number of items needing remediation, also reiterated the need to address remaining items from 1994-1 in a timely fashion. Since timetables slipped, the DNFSB recommended that the Complex 'prioritize and schedule tasks according to the consideration of risks.' In March 2005, the DNFSB issued Recommendation 2005-1. This recommendation addresses the need for a consistent set of criteria across the DOE complex for the interim storage of nuclear material packaged outside an engineered barrier. The Department of Energy (DOE) approved and issued on March 7, 2008, DOE M 441.1-1, Nuclear Material Packaging Manual [hereafter referred to as Manual] to address this recommendation, and a Prioritization Methodology as a complex-wide requirement for the packaging of nuclear material outside an engineered barrier. The Manual establishes 'technically justified criteria' for packages in order to ensure safe interim storage and handling outside an engineered barrier. The Prioritization Methodology establishes a risk-based procedure for identifying the order to repackage that would most efficiently reduce the overall risk. It is a logical extension of the work performed to meet the two earlier DNFSB recommendations to include all materials stored outside of engineered barriers, i.e., not just excess materials. LANL will continue to work all aspects of a comprehensive Implementation Plan to d monstrate all aspects of compliance with the Manual. Assessment of materials in nonstandard containers utilizing a risk based approach, repackaging up to 400 containers/year; activities include reprocessing of items to allow container consolidation and subsequent increase in vault capacity. Continued efforts in establishing and implementing a Surveillance and Maintenance Program for current Hagans and for the NG SNMCSs supported by a database for packaging and surveillance. Elastomer aging studies for the NG SNMCs will continue to justify extending the design life well beyond the currently specified five years. First production with containers available for use anticipated in June 2010. LANL will continue to define schedule and resources to meet these objectives.

  14. Commercial nuclear fuel from U.S. and Russian surplus defense inventories: Materials, policies, and market effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear materials declared by the US and Russian governments as surplus to defense programs are being converted into fuel for commercial nuclear reactors. This report presents the results of an analysis estimating the market effects that would likely result from current plans to commercialize surplus defense inventories. The analysis focuses on two key issues: (1) the extent by which traditional sources of supply, such as production from uranium mines and enrichment plants, would be displaced by the commercialization of surplus defense inventories or, conversely, would be required in the event of disruptions to planned commercialization, and (2) the future price of uranium considering the potential availability of surplus defense inventories. Finally, the report provides an estimate of the savings in uranium procurement costs that could be realized by US nuclear power generating companies with access to competitively priced uranium supplied from surplus defense inventories.

  15. NA 20 - Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  16. Y-12 defense programs: Nuclear Packaging Systems testing capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Packaging Systems (NPS) Department can manage/accomplish any packaging task. The NPS organization is responsible for managing the design, testing, certification, procurement, operation, refurbishment, maintenance, and disposal of packaging used to transport radioactive materials, other hazardous materials, and general cargoes on public roads and within the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Additionally, the NPS Department has developed a Quality Assurance plan for all packaging, design and procurement of nonweapon shipping containers for radioactive materials, and design and procurement of performance-oriented packaging for hazardous materials. Further, the NPS Department is responsible for preparation and submittal of Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging (SARP). The NPS Department coordinates shipping container procurement and safety certification activities that have lead-times of up to two years. A Packaging Testing Capabilities Table at the Oak Ridge complex is included as a table.

  17. Unconventional Nuclear Warfare Defense (UNWD) containment and mitigation subtask.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wente, William Baker

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this subtask of the Unconventional Nuclear Warfare Design project was to demonstrate mitigation technologies for radiological material dispersal and to assist planners with incorporation of the technologies into a concept of operations. The High Consequence Assessment and Technology department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has studied aqueous foam's ability to mitigate the effects of an explosively disseminated radiological dispersal device (RDD). These benefits include particle capture of respirable radiological particles, attenuation of blast overpressure, and reduction of plume buoyancy. To better convey the aqueous foam attributes, SNL conducted a study using the Explosive Release Atmospheric Dispersion model, comparing the effects of a mitigated and unmitigated explosive RDD release. Results from this study compared health effects and land contamination between the two scenarios in terms of distances of effect, population exposure, and remediation costs. Incorporating aqueous foam technology, SNL created a conceptual design for a stationary containment area to be located at a facility entrance with equipment that could minimize the effects from the detonation of a vehicle transported RDD. The containment design was evaluated against several criteria, including mitigation ability (both respirable and large fragment particle capture as well as blast overpressure suppression), speed of implementation, cost, simplicity, and required space. A mock-up of the conceptual idea was constructed at SNL's 9920 explosive test site to demonstrate the containment design.

  18. U.S. second line of defense: preventing nuclear smuggling across Russia's borders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, D. Y.

    1998-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Preventing the theft of weapons-usable highly enriched uranium and plutonium in Russia is one of the central security concerns facing the US today. The dissolution of the highly centralized USSR and the resulting societal crisis has endangered Russia's ability to protect its more than 200 metric tons of plutonium and 1000 tons of highly enriched uranium (roughly 8 kg Pu or 25 kg HEU is sufficient to make a bomb). Producing this fissile material is the most difficult and expensive part of nuclear weapons production and the US must make every effort to ensure that fissile material (and nuclear-related technologies) does not reach the hands of terrorist groups, rogue states or other potential proliferators. In response to this concern, the US has undertaken a number of initiatives in partnership with Russia and other FSU states to prevent the theft of fissile material. The Material Protection, Control and Accounting Program (MPC&A) was begun in 1993 to prevent the theft of nuclear materials from Russian civilian complexes, that is facilities not under control of the Ministry of Defense, which is largely responsible for possession and oversight of nuclear weapons. The MPC&A program is considered the first line of defense against theft of nuclear material because its goal is to prevent theft of material at production and storage facilities. This year the Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a new program called the Second Line of Defense (SLD), the goal of which is to assist Russia in preventing the smuggling of nuclear material and weapons at its borders, either by land, sea or air. The SLD program represents an important phase in the overall effort to ensure the security of nuclear material and weapons in Russia. However, as the US engages Russian customs officials in this important project, Americans should keep in mind that providing equipment--even indigenous equipment--is insufficient by itself; material aid must be accompanied by rigorous inspection and accounting procedures. In addition, the equipment must be assessed according to international standards to ensure a high degree of confidence in its nuclear detection capability.

  19. Stabilizing plutonium materials at Hanford: systems engineering for PFP transition project effort on DNFSB 94-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huber, T.E., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the basic objectives of the stabilization and packaging activities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant that satisfy the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 94-1 by transforming the plutonium materials at hanford into forms or conditions which are suitable for safe storage to appropriate storage criteria; or discard that meets appropriate waste acceptance criteria.

  20. Annual Report To Congress. Department of Energy Activities Relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Calendar Year 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2004-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (Department) submits an Annual Report to Congress each year detailing the Department’s activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board), which provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of Energy (Secretary) regarding public health and safety issues at the Department’s defense nuclear facilities. In 2003, the Department continued ongoing activities to resolve issues identified by the Board in formal recommendations and correspondence, staff issue reports pertaining to Department facilities, and public meetings and briefings. Additionally, the Department is implementing several key safety initiatives to address and prevent safety issues: safety culture and review of the Columbia accident investigation; risk reduction through stabilization of excess nuclear materials; the Facility Representative Program; independent oversight and performance assurance; the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP); executive safety initiatives; and quality assurance activities. The following summarizes the key activities addressed in this Annual Report.

  1. Annual report to Congress: Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Calendar Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the tenth Annual Report to the Congress describing Department of Energy activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board). The Board, an independent executive-branch agency established in 1988, provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of Energy regarding public health and safety issues at the Department's defense nuclear facilities. The Board also reviews and evaluates the content and implementation of health and safety standards, as well as other requirements, relating to the design, construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Department's defense nuclear facilities. During 1999, Departmental activities resulted in the closure of nine Board recommendations. In addition, the Department has completed all implementation plan milestones associated with three Board recommendations. One new Board recommendation was received and accepted by the Department in 1999, and a new implementation plan is being developed to address this recommendation. The Department has also made significant progress with a number of broad-based initiatives to improve safety. These include expanded implementation of integrated safety management at field sites, opening of a repository for long-term storage of transuranic wastes, and continued progress on stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

  2. Annual report to Congress: Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, calendar year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the ninth Annual Report to the Congress describing Department of Energy (Department) activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board). The Board, an independent executive-branch agency established in 1988, provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of energy regarding public health and safety issues at the Department`s defense nuclear facilities. The Board also reviews and evaluates the content and implementation of health and safety standards, as well as other requirements, relating to the design, construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Department`s defense nuclear facilities. The locations of the major Department facilities are provided. During 1998, Departmental activities resulted in the proposed closure of one Board recommendation. In addition, the Department has completed all implementation plan milestones associated with four other Board recommendations. Two new Board recommendations were received and accepted by the Department in 1998, and two new implementation plans are being developed to address these recommendations. The Department has also made significant progress with a number of broad-based initiatives to improve safety. These include expanded implementation of integrated safety management at field sites, a renewed effort to increase the technical capabilities of the federal workforce, and a revised plan for stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

  3. Program Management at the National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Defense Nuclear Security: A Review of Program Management Documents and Underlying Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madden, Michael S.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of this paper is to review the National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Defense Nuclear Security (DNS) program management documents and to examine the underlying processes. The purpose is to identify recommendations for improvement and to influence the rewrite of the DNS Program Management Plan (PMP) and the documentation supporting it. As a part of this process, over 40 documents required by DNS or its stakeholders were reviewed. In addition, approximately 12 other documents produced outside of DNS and its stakeholders were reviewed in an effort to identify best practices. The complete list of documents reviewed is provided as an attachment to this paper.

  4. Annual report to Congress. Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, calendar year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Annual Report to the Congress describes the Department of Energy's activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. During 2000, the Department completed its implementation and proposed closure of one Board recommendation and completed all implementation plan milestones associated with two additional Board recommendations. Also in 2000, the Department formally accepted two new Board recommendations and developed implementation plans in response to those recommendations. The Department also made significant progress with a number of broad-based safety initiatives. These include initial implementation of integrated safety management at field sites and within headquarters program offices, issuance of a nuclear safety rule, and continued progress on stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

  5. Manual

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    COnTenTs Independent Oversight abbrevIaTIOns | i abbreviations Used in This report CDNS NNSA Chief, Defense Nuclear Safety CFR Code of Federal Regulations DNFSB Defense Nuclear...

  6. Technical papers presented at the Defense Nuclear Agency Global Effects Review. Held at Moffett Field, California on 25-27 February 1986. Volume 3. Technical report, 25 February-12 May 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains technical papers presented at the Defense Nuclear Agency Review of Global Effects held at NASA Ames Research Center 25-027 February 1986.

  7. Technical papers presented at the Defense Nuclear Agency Global Effects Review. Held at Moffett Field, California on 25-29 February 1986. Volume 2. Technical report, 25 February-12 May 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains technical papers presented at the defense Nuclear Agency Review of Global Effects held at NASA Ames Research Center 25-27 February 1986.

  8. Linton Brooks Assumes Post as Deputy Administrator for NNSA Defense...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administrator for NNSA Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Office Press Release Oct 30, 2001 Linton Brooks Assumes Post as Deputy Administrator for NNSA Defense Nuclear...

  9. Defense Gallery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Defense Gallery Inside the Museum Exhibitions Norris Bradbury Museum Lobby Defense Gallery Research Gallery History Gallery TechLab Virtual Exhibits invisible utility element...

  10. DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Hanford Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormack, R.L.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the plans of the Hanford Site for the safe interim storage of fissile materials. Currently, spent nuclear fuels reside in storage basins that have leaked in the past and are projected to leak in the future. Other problems in the basins include; sludge from decomposition, degraded cladding of fuel elements, and construction defects which make the basins seismically unsafe. This management plan describes the time and cost that it will take to implement a safe interim storage plan for the fissile materials.

  11. defense nuclear security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich5 |0/%2A en6/%2A en2/%2A3/%2A en

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF DEFENSE NUCLEAR WASTE USING HAZARDOUS WASTE GUIDANCE. APPLICATIONS TO HANFORD SITE ACCELERATED HIGH-LEVEL WASTE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL MISSION0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamel, William; Huffman, Lori; Lerchen, Megan; Wiemers, Karyn

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal hazardous waste regulations were developed for management of industrial waste. These same regulations are also applicable for much of the nation's defense nuclear wastes. At the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeast Washington State, one of the nation's largest inventories of nuclear waste remains in storage in large underground tanks. The waste's regulatory designation and its composition and form constrain acceptable treatment and disposal options. Obtaining detailed knowledge of the tank waste composition presents a significant portion of the many challenges in meeting the regulatory-driven treatment and disposal requirements for this waste. Key in applying the hazardous waste regulations to defense nuclear wastes is defining the appropriate and achievable quality for waste feed characterization data and the supporting evidence demonstrating that applicable requirements have been met at the time of disposal. Application of a performance-based approach to demonstrating achievable quality standards will be discussed in the context of the accelerated high-level waste treatment and disposal mission at the Hanford Site.

  13. National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FROM: SUBJECT: USIUK Memorandum of Understanding between National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Associate Administrator for Defense Nuclear Security (AADNS)...

  14. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program - DOE Directives...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program by Angela Chambers Functional areas: Defense Nuclear Facility Safety and Health Requirement, Defense Programs, Nuclear Weapons...

  15. An alternative to present United States defense strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony, William Wallace

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - hower. Secretary of Defense McNamara adopted this strategio nuclear defense policy because the Dulles policy included brinkmanship, and did. not contain any flexibility in response. The McNamara plan was based on controlled escalation and response...

  16. Technical papers presented at the Defense Nuclear Agency global effects review - 7-9 April 1987. Volume 1. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alderson, D.M.

    1987-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Four years of research on nuclear winter has greatly improved our understanding of this complex phenomenon. Studies have confirmed the possibility of significant temperature decreases and other severe environmental perturbations following a nuclear war. Important uncertainties remain to be resolved: Fuel Inventories: Fuel burdens in rural and urban settings appear to be known to within a factor of about 2. Fuel Impaction: The quantities of fuels affected by nuclear explosions are sensitive to the scenario adopted. Smoke Emission Factor: Burning petroleum, plastics and related materials can emit 5% or more of their mass as soot. Wood, under restricted ventilation, can convert up to 2% to soot. Plume Heights: Simulations and observations indicate initial smoke injection as high as 15 kilometers. Prompt Scavenging: The immediate rainout of the sooty component of smoke emissions is probably less than 50% because of its poor nucleation properties relative to other materials.

  17. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Order is to establish facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation. The Order has Change 1 dated 11-16-95, Change 2 dated 10-24-96, and the latest Change 3 dated 11-22-00 incorporated. The latest change satisfies a commitment made to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) in response to DNFSB recommendation 97-2, Criticality Safety.

  18. Nuclear Explosive Safety Evaluation Processes - DOE Directives...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Admin Chg 1, Nuclear Explosive Safety Evaluation Processes by Carl Sykes Functional areas: Administrative Change, Defense Nuclear Facility Safety and Health Requirement, Defense...

  19. October 24, 2003, Criteria and Guidelines For the Assessment of Safety System Software and Firmware at Defense Nuclear Facilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of OrderSUBCOMMITTEE of the NUCLEAR ENERGY4.1

  20. Homeland Security and Defense Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Homeland Security and Defense Applications personnel are the best in the world at detecting and locating dirty bombs, loose nukes, and other radiological sources. The site trains the Nation's emergency responders, who would be among the first to confront a radiological or nuclear emergency. Homeland Security and Defense Applications highly training personnel, characterize the threat environment, produce specialized radiological nuclear detection equipment, train personnel on the equipment and its uses, test and evaluate the equipment, and develop different kinds of high-tech equipment to defeat terrorists. In New York City for example, NNSS scientists assisted in characterizing the radiological nuclear environment after 9/11, and produced specialized radiological nuclear equipment to assist local officials in their Homeland Security efforts.

  1. Homeland Security and Defense Applications

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Homeland Security and Defense Applications personnel are the best in the world at detecting and locating dirty bombs, loose nukes, and other radiological sources. The site trains the Nation's emergency responders, who would be among the first to confront a radiological or nuclear emergency. Homeland Security and Defense Applications highly training personnel, characterize the threat environment, produce specialized radiological nuclear detection equipment, train personnel on the equipment and its uses, test and evaluate the equipment, and develop different kinds of high-tech equipment to defeat terrorists. In New York City for example, NNSS scientists assisted in characterizing the radiological nuclear environment after 9/11, and produced specialized radiological nuclear equipment to assist local officials in their Homeland Security efforts.

  2. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program - DOE Directives...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1D Admin Chg 1, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program by Carl Sykes Functional areas: Administrative Change, Defense Nuclear Facility Safety and Health Requirement, Defense...

  3. Listing of Defense Nuclear Facilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plant Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, including the Oxnard Facility Savannah River Site Los Alamos National Laboratory Sandia National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore...

  4. Listing of Defense Nuclear Facilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomy and EmissionsDepartment ofEnergy3 Listing

  5. Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITIONPortal Decision Support forDeep Insights from8, 2014

  6. Safety Software Guide Perspectives for the Design of New Nuclear Facilities (U)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VINCENT, Andrew

    2005-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In June of this year, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued directives DOE O 414.1C and DOE G 414.1-4 to improve quality assurance programs, processes, and procedures among its safety contractors. Specifically, guidance entitled, ''Safety Software Guide for use with 10 CFR 830 Subpart A, Quality Assurance Requirements, and DOE O 414.1C, Quality Assurance, DOE G 414.1-4'', provides information and acceptable methods to comply with safety software quality assurance (SQA) requirements. The guidance provides a roadmap for meeting DOE O 414.1C, ''Quality Assurance'', and the quality assurance program (QAP) requirements of Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 830, Subpart A, Quality Assurance, for DOE nuclear facilities and software application activities. [1, 2] The order and guide are part of a comprehensive implementation plan that addresses issues and concerns documented in Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2002-1. [3] Safety SQA requirements for DOE as well as National Nuclear Security Administration contractors are necessary to implement effective quality assurance (QA) processes and achieve safe nuclear facility operations. DOE G 414.1-4 was developed to provide guidance on establishing and implementing effective QA processes tied specifically to nuclear facility safety software applications. The Guide includes software application practices covered by appropriate national and international consensus standards and various processes currently in use at DOE facilities. While the safety software guidance is considered to be of sufficient rigor and depth to ensure acceptable reliability of safety software at all DOE nuclear facilities, new nuclear facilities are well suited to take advantage of the guide to ensure compliant programs and processes are implemented. Attributes such as the facility life-cycle stage and the hazardous nature of each facility operations are considered, along with the category and level of importance of the software. The discussion provided herein illustrates benefits of applying the Safety Software Guide to work activities dependent on software applications and directed toward the design of new nuclear facilities. In particular, the Guide-based systematic approach with software enables design processes to effectively proceed and reduce the likelihood of rework activities. Several application examples are provided for the new facility.

  7. Defense Nuclear Security | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavid Turner David3 | NationalSUBSCRIBE:

  8. Quarterly report on the Ferrocyanide Safety Program for the period ending, March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cash, R.J.; Meacham, J.E.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly report provides a status of the activities underway on the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue at the Hanford Site, including actions in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990). In March 1991, a DNFSB implementation plan (Cash 1991) responding to the six parts of Recommendation 90-7 was prepared and sent to the DNFSB. A Ferrocyanide Safety Program Plan addressing the total Ferrocyanide Safety Program, including the six parts of DNFSB Recommendation 90-7, was released in October 1994 (DOE 1994b). Activities in the program plan are underway or have been completed, and the status of each is described in Sections 2.0 and 3.0 of this report.

  9. Nuclear Explosive Safety Manual - DOE Directives, Delegations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1A Admin Chg 1, Nuclear Explosive Safety Manual by Carl Sykes Functional areas: Administrative Change, Defense Nuclear Facility Safety and Health Requirement, Nuclear Safety,...

  10. Cyber Defense Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    infrastructure. New threats demand new defenses Page-3 SPIDERS Program Summary CAMP SMITH ENERGY ISLAND * Entire Installation Smart Microgrid * Islanded Installation * High...

  11. UNCLASSIFIHED DEFENSE DOCUMENTATION CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Block, Marco

    UNCLASSIFIHED AD 463473 DEFENSE DOCUMENTATION CENTER FOR SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL INFORMATION .... John Barton Head OR Analysis Group R. H. Krolick Manager Applied Science Laboratory Prepared for the .J

  12. Department of Defense INSTRUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staff, the Combatant Commands, the Office of the Inspector General of the Department of Defense (IG DoD automated export license system. 2. APPLICABILITY. This Instruction: a. Applies to Office of the Secretary of Defense, the Military Departments, the Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Joint

  13. Nuclear weapons and nuclear war

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassel, C.; McCally, M.; Abraham, H.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book examines the potential radiation hazards and environmental impacts of nuclear weapons. Topics considered include medical responsibility and thermonuclear war, the threat of nuclear war, nuclear weaponry, biological effects, radiation injury, decontamination, long-term effects, ecological effects, psychological aspects, the economic implications of nuclear weapons and war, ethics, civil defense, arms control, nuclear winter, and long-term biological consequences of nuclear war.

  14. Technical papers presented at the Defense Nuclear Agency Global Effects Review held in Santa Barbara, California on 7-9 April 1987. Volume 2. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies have confirmed the possibility of significant temperature decreases and other severe environmental perturbations following a nuclear war, with potentially critical implications for human survival. Nevertheless, important uncertainties remain to be resolved. Fuel Inventories; Fuel Impaction; The quantities of fuels affected by nuclear explosions are sensitive to the scenario adopted. Smoke Emission Factor: Burning petroleum, plastics, and related materials can emit 5% or more of their mass as soot; recent experiments reveal that the combustion of wood under restricted ventilation can convert up to 2% to soot; such emission factors imply blacker smoke than has been presumed in most existing studies. Plume Heights: Simulations and observations indicate initial smoke injection as high as 15 kilometers. Prompt Scavenging: The immediate rainout of the sooty component of smoke emissions is probably less than 50%, because of its poor nucleation properties relative to other materials, and because of the likely overseeding and reduced precipitation efficiencies of smoke clouds. Mesoscale Dispersion; Acute Climate Change: The extent of land surface cooling for a specific smoke injection can presently be estimated to within a factor of 2; Long-term Climate Change: Preliminary investigations show important couplings between smoke injections, oceanic responses, ice formation, and other processes that drive persistent climate fluctuations over periods of years; residual stabilized smoke layers could greatly enhance these effects; uncertainty about the long-term chemical interaction between soot and ozone must be resolved; Other Environmental Effects; Biological Impacts.

  15. China's Defense Electronics and Information Technology Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RAGLAND, LeighAnn; MCREYNOLDS, Joe; GEARY, Debra

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2013 China’s Defense Electronics and Information Technologythe Chinese defense electronics and information technology (is moving the defense electronics and IT industry toward

  16. Goals, Objectives, and Requirements (GOR) of the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team for the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Leslie A.

    2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal, objectives, and requirements (GOR) presented in this document define a framework for describing research directed specifically by the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The intent of this document is to provide a communication tool for the GNDD Team with NNSA management and with its stakeholder community. It describes the GNDD expectation that much of the improvement in the proficiency of nuclear explosion monitoring will come from better understanding of the science behind the generation, propagation, recording, and interpretation of seismic, infrasound, hydroacoustic, and radionuclide signals and development of "game-changer" advances in science and technology.

  17. Defense on the Move: Ant-Based Cyber Defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fink, Glenn A.; Haack, Jereme N.; McKinnon, Archibald D.; Fulp, Errin W.

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Many common cyber defenses (like firewalls and IDS) are as static as trench warfare allowing the attacker freedom to probe them at will. The concept of Moving Target Defense (MTD) adds dynamism to the defender side, but puts the systems to be defended themselves in motion, potentially at great cost to the defender. An alternative approach is a mobile resilient defense that removes attackers’ ability to rely on prior experience without requiring motion in the protected infrastructure itself. The defensive technology absorbs most of the cost of motion, is resilient to attack, and is unpredictable to attackers. The Ant-Based Cyber Defense (ABCD) is a mobile resilient defense providing a set of roaming, bio-inspired, digital-ant agents working with stationary agents in a hierarchy headed by a human supervisor. The ABCD approach provides a resilient, extensible, and flexible defense that can scale to large, multi-enterprise infrastructures like the smart electric grid.

  18. Assessing the nuclear age

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackland, L.; McGuire, S.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book presents papers on nuclear weapons and arms control. Topics considered include historical aspects, the arms race, nuclear power, flaws in the non-proliferation treaty, North-South issues, East-West confrontation, Soviet decision making with regard to national defense, US and Soviet perspectives on national security, ballistic missile defense (''Star Wars''), political aspects, nuclear winter, stockpiles, US foreign policy, and military strategy.

  19. Defense nuclear agency - global effects program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auton, D.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable progress has been made in the determination and analysis of fuel inventories and their distribution. Nonurban inventories are reasonably well documented and probably sufficient for most global effects analyses. Urban inventories are now in good shape for the United States. Work remains to be completed for European and Soviet urban areas. The largest single uncertainty and driving force for all subsequent analyses is the scenario. Knowing the fuel inventories and their distribution is critical and allows scenario assumptions to be played against the fuel bed data. The second largest uncertainty areas is the amount of smoke that would be produced for any given scenario. Much research is under way that contributes to resolving this issue, but there remain the following nagging problems: (1) dynamics of fire spreading and fire zone behavior; (2) scaling from laboratory and small-field measurements; and (3) relatability of materials burned in item 2 to the real case of interest.

  20. Defense Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavid Turner David3 | NationalSUBSCRIBE:| National

  1. Sandia Energy - Defense Waste Management Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesInApplied &ClimateContact Us HomeDefense

  2. Thesis / Dissertation Defense Announcement and Scheduling Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Thesis / Dissertation Defense Announcement and Scheduling Form Completed form must be received of the following: Thesis Defense Dissertation Defense Public Seminar Only Thesis/Dissertation Associate Dean Only Thesis/Dissertation/Seminar location and time listed above is: Confirmed

  3. Second Line of Defense Spares Program Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Dale L.; Muller, George; Mercier, Theresa M.; Brigantic, Robert T.; Perkins, Casey J.; Cooley, Scott K.

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of the Second Line of Defense (SLD) is part of the Department of Energy‘s (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The SLD Program accomplishes its critical global security mission by forming cooperative relationships with partner countries to install passive radiation detection systems that augment traditional inspection and law enforcement measures by alerting border officials to the presence of special nuclear or other radiological materials in cross-border traffic. An important tenet of the program is to work collaboratively with these countries to establish the necessary processes, procedures, infrastructure and conditions that will enable them to fully assume the financial and technical responsibilities for operating the equipment. As the number of operational deployments grows, the SLD Program faces an increasingly complex logistics process to promote the timely and efficient supply of spare parts.

  4. Security & Defense Licenses Available | Tech Transfer | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security and Defense SHARE Security and Defense 200401423 Synthesis Method for Stable Colloids of "Naked" Metal Nanocrystals 200501549 Enhanced Detection of Toxic Agents 200501614...

  5. Emergency Response | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    defense in the event of a nuclear terrorist incident or other types of radiological accident. Learn More Caption1 Planning for Emergencies Exercise Program Field Assistance and...

  6. Toward directed energy planetary defense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubin, Philip

    Asteroids and comets that cross Earth’s orbit pose a credible risk of impact, with potentially severe disturbances to Earth and society. We propose an orbital planetary defense system capable of heating the surface of ...

  7. Materials evaluation programs at the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, J.T.; Iverson, D.C.; Bickford, D.F.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950s to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. About 83 million gallons of high-level waste produced since operations began has been consolidated by evaporation into 33 million gallons at the waste tank farm. The Department of Energy authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the function of which is to immobilize the waste as a durable borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters prior to the placement of the canisters in a federal repository. The DWPF is now mechanically complete and is undergoing commissioning and run-in activities. A brief description of the DWPF process is provided.

  8. Materials evaluation programs at the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, J.T.; Iverson, D.C.; Bickford, D.F.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950s to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. About 83 million gallons of high-level waste produced since operations began has been consolidated by evaporation into 33 million gallons at the waste tank farm. The Department of Energy authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the function of which is to immobilize the waste as a durable borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters prior to the placement of the canisters in a federal repository. The DWPF is now mechanically complete and is undergoing commissioning and run-in activities. A brief description of the DWPF process is provided.

  9. Program to Prevent Accidental or Unauthorized Nuclear Explosive Detonations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1980-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes the DOE program to prevent accidental or unauthorized nuclear explosive detonations, and to define responsibilities for DOE participation in the Department of Defense program for nuclear weapon and nuclear weapon system safety. Does not cancel other directives.

  10. China’s Defense Electronics Industry: Innovation, Adaptation, and Espionage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mulvenon, James; Luce, Matthew

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2010 China’s Defense Electronics Industry: Innovation,of the Chinese defense electronics sector can be attributedAdvanced defense electronics components and systems play a

  11. B. Linzau, DNFSB R. G. Quirk, DNFSB A. B. Dunning, WRPS L. L. Eppler, WRPS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplex historian ... B&WBen Larson (2003)Mr.

  12. Building Stakeholder Trust: Defensible Government Decisions - 13110

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franklin, Victor A. [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Bldg. 705-1C, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Bldg. 705-1C, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Administrative decisions must be grounded in reasonable expectations, founded on sound principles, and bounded by societal norms. Without these first principles, attaining and retaining public trust is a Herculean task. Decisions made by governmental administrators must be both transparent and defensible: without the former the agency will lose the public's trust and support (possibly prompting a legal challenge to the decision) and without the latter the decision may fail to withstand judicial scrutiny. This presentation and accompanying paper delves into the process by which governmental decisions can achieve both defensibility and openness through building stakeholder trust with transparency. Achieving and maintaining stakeholder trust is crucial, especially in the environs of nuclear waste management. Proving confidence, stability, and security to the surrounding citizenry as well as those throughout the country is the goal of governmental nuclear waste remediation. Guiding administrative decision-making processes and maintaining a broad bandwidth of communication are of incalculable importance to all those charged with serving the public, but are especially essential to those whose decisional impacts will be felt for millennia. A strong, clear, and concise administrative record documenting discrete decisions and overarching policy choices is the strongest defense to a decisional challenge. However, this can be accomplished using transparency as the fundamental building block. This documentation allows the decision-makers to demonstrate the synthesis of legal and technical challenges and fortifies the ground from which challenges will be defended when necessary. Further, administrative actions which capture the public's interest and captivate that interest throughout the process will result in a better-informed, more deeply-involved, and more heavily-invested group of interested parties. Management of information, involvement, and investment on the front-end of the process reaps rewards far more efficiently than attempts to assuage and mitigate the concerns of those parties after the fact and there are a number of tools Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has deployed that render transparency an ally in this context. The makers, applicators, and beneficiaries of policies and decisions will all benefit from strong administrative records which document decisional choices in an open and transparent manner and from timely, up-front management of concerns of interested parties. The strongest defense to decisional challenges is an ability to demonstrate the basis of the decision and the reason(s) that the decision was chosen over other alternatives. Providing a sound basis for defending challenges rather than avoiding or fighting over them allows the deciding entity the greatest opportunity to produce value for its customer. Often, a transparent process that invites public participation and is open for public review and comment will thwart challenge genesis. An entity that has to devote resources to defending its choices obviously cannot utilize those resources to further its mission. (authors)

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Defense Mission (S&T)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tagged with: BATLab * batteries * Batteries & Energy Storage * Batteries and Energy Storage * Battery Abuse Testing Laboratory * Defense Mission * Department of Defense *...

  14. ORISE: Message Testing for a Nuclear Detonation | How ORISE is...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Department of Energy, Department of Defense, Department of...

  15. Nuclear waste management. Semiannual progress report, October 1983-March 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McElroy, J.L.; Powell, J.A.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in the following studies on radioactive waste management is reported: defense waste technology; Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center; waste isolation; and supporting studies. 58 figures, 22 tables.

  16. Four NNSA teams receive Secretarial Honor Awards | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Team, NNSA Production Office (NPO) Management & Operating (M&O) Contract Placement Team, Nuclear Regulatory Commission Review Support Team, and the USUK Mutual Defense Agreement...

  17. Nuclear Waste Management. Semiannual progress report, October 1984-March 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McElroy, J.L.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress reports are presented for the following studies on radioactive waste management: defense waste technology; nuclear waste materials characterization center; and supporting studies. 19 figs., 29 tabs.

  18. Y-12 employees receive awards recognizing excellence in nuclear...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    receive ... Y-12 employees receive awards recognizing excellence in nuclear weapons program Posted: October 6, 2014 - 9:09am Defense Programs 2013 Award of Excellence recipient...

  19. Technical papers presented at the Defense Nuclear Agency Global Effects Review. Held at Moffett Field, California on 25-27 February 1986. Volume 1. Technical report, 25 February-12 May 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Contents include: urban area analysis and smoke production; a critical examination of methods of estimating the spatial distribution and magnitudes of urban fuel loadings; estimates of total combustible material in NATO and Warsaw pact countries; smoke emission and properties; source-term research program at Sandia National Laboratories; measurements of the radiative properties of smoke emissions from vegetative fuels: relationship of this data to desired information on the properties of urban smoke emissions; wildland fires and nuclear-winters: selected reconstructions of historic large fires; progress in developing the smoke source term for nuclear winter studies: major uncertainties; supermicron wind suspended particles and firestorm plume coagulation; high-reliability fire-start mechanism; collision-formation kinetics and optical properties of sub-micrometer, post-detonation aerosols; radiative properties of dust for input to dust source terms for models of the global effects of a nuclear exchange; micro-analytical techniques for characterizing the optical properties of soil aerosols; overview of DNA's nuclear dust re-analysis program.

  20. defense

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich5 |0/%2A en6/%2A en2/%2A

  1. Defense programs industrial partnerships at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freese, K.B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Industrial Partnership Office

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy`s Defense Programs face unprecedented challenges of stewardship for an aging nuclear stockpile, cessation of nuclear testing, reduced federal budgets, and a smaller manufacturing complex. Partnerships with industry are essential in developing technology, modernizing the manufacturing complex, and maintaining the safety and reliability of the nation`s nuclear capability. The past decade of federal support for industrial partnerships has promoted benefits to US industrial competitiveness. Recent shifts in government policy have re-emphasized the importance of industrial partnerships in accomplishing agency missions. Nevertheless, abundant opportunities exist for dual-benefit, mission-driven partnerships between the national laboratories and industry. Experience at Los Alamos National Laboratory with this transition is presented.

  2. Dynamic defense workshop : from research to practice.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crosby, Sean Michael; Doak, Justin E.; Haas, Jason J.; Helinski, Ryan; Lamb, Christopher C.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 5th and 6th, 2012, the Dynamic Defense Workshop: From Research to Practice brought together researchers from academia, industry, and Sandia with the goals of increasing collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and external organizations, de ning and un- derstanding dynamic, or moving target, defense concepts and directions, and gaining a greater understanding of the state of the art for dynamic defense. Through the workshop, we broadened and re ned our de nition and understanding, identi ed new approaches to inherent challenges, and de ned principles of dynamic defense. Half of the workshop was devoted to presentations of current state-of-the-art work. Presentation topics included areas such as the failure of current defenses, threats, techniques, goals of dynamic defense, theory, foundations of dynamic defense, future directions and open research questions related to dynamic defense. The remainder of the workshop was discussion, which was broken down into sessions on de ning challenges, applications to host or mobile environments, applications to enterprise network environments, exploring research and operational taxonomies, and determining how to apply scienti c rigor to and investigating the eld of dynamic defense.

  3. Foundations of a defense digital platform : business systems governance in the Department of Defense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziegler, Dustin P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2010, the United States Department of Defense (DoD) spent more than $35 billion on information systems development and sustainment, with nearly $7 billion to defense business systems investments alone. It is not surprising ...

  4. Experts in Defense: How China’s Academicians Contribute to Its Defense Science and Technology Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WILSON, Jordan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    leader Nuclear propulsion and basic nuclear technology Groupmember Nuclear weapons technology Group leader Precisionrockets Information technology and computing Nuclear Medical

  5. Proceedings of a conference on nuclear war: The search for solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, T.L.; DeMille, D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book presents the proceedings of a conference on the problem of nuclear war. Topics include civil defense; nuclear winter; the psychological consequences of nuclear war, arms control and verification.

  6. Fiscal Year 1985 Congressional budget request. Volume 1. Atomic energy defense activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contents include: summaries of estimates by appropriation, savings from management initiatives, staffing by subcommittee, staffing appropriation; appropriation language; amounts available for obligation; estimates by major category; program overview; weapons activities; verification and control technology; materials production; defense waste and by-products management; nuclear safeguards and security; security investigations; and naval reactors development.

  7. U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Performance Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Addendum A Addendum A U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Performance Evaluation Fiscal Year 2005 The U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board The Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act nuclear fuel and defense high-level radioactive waste. The Act also estab lished the U.S. Nuclear Waste

  8. Research Associate Position Defense Analysis Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in analyzing social network data as well as geospatial, temporal, and standard statistical analysis of largeResearch Associate Position Defense Analysis Department Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA Research Associate The Department of Defense Analysis is home to the CORE (Common Operational Research

  9. SRS ES&H standards compliance program management plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hearn, W.H.

    1993-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    On March 8, 1990, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued Recommendation 90-2 to the Secretary of Energy. This recommendation, based upon the DNFSB`s initial review and evaluation of the content and implementation of standards relating to the design, construction, operations, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities of the Department of Energy (DOE), called for three actions: (1) identification of specific standards that apply to design, construction, operation and decommissioning of DOE facilities; (2) assessment of the adequacy of those standards for protecting public health and safety; and (3) determination of the extent to which they have and are being implemented. This document defines the elements of the SRS program required to support the HQ program in response to DNFSB Recommendation 90-2. The objective is to ensure a consistent approach for all sitewide ES and H Standards Compliance Program efforts that satisfied the intent of Recommendation 90-2 and the HQ 90-2 Implementation Plan in a cost-effective manner. The methodology and instructions for implementation of the SRS program are contained in the Standards Compliance Program Implementation Plan. The Management Plan shall be used in conjunction with the Implementation Plan.

  10. SECURITY MODELING FOR MARITIME PORT DEFENSE RESOURCE ALLOCATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, S.; Dunn, D.

    2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Redeployment of existing law enforcement resources and optimal use of geographic terrain are examined for countering the threat of a maritime based small-vessel radiological or nuclear attack. The evaluation was based on modeling conducted by the Savannah River National Laboratory that involved the development of options for defensive resource allocation that can reduce the risk of a maritime based radiological or nuclear threat. A diverse range of potential attack scenarios has been assessed. As a result of identifying vulnerable pathways, effective countermeasures can be deployed using current resources. The modeling involved the use of the Automated Vulnerability Evaluation for Risks of Terrorism (AVERT{reg_sign}) software to conduct computer based simulation modeling. The models provided estimates for the probability of encountering an adversary based on allocated resources including response boats, patrol boats and helicopters over various environmental conditions including day, night, rough seas and various traffic flow rates.

  11. Departments of Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup Power Units at Eight Military Installations Departments of Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup Power Units at...

  12. Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation Protection in Low Level Waste Disposal Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation Protection in...

  13. article defense department: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Description The Department of Defense (DoD) announces the Fiscal Year 2012 Defense University Research Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR). Funding Opportunity Title...

  14. Defense, Interior Departments Pursue Renewable Energy on Federal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Defense, Interior Departments Pursue Renewable Energy on Federal Lands Defense, Interior Departments Pursue Renewable Energy on Federal Lands August 8, 2012 - 1:22pm Addthis Solar...

  15. Consequences of nuclear winter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teller, E.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is to be expected that the predictable consequences of a nuclear war are more terrible than any of the indirect effects that have been discussed. Detailed calculations on the consequences of massive release of smoke seem to bear out this general expectation. This contrast may become ever more obvious if one takes into account the consequences of defense against a nuclear attack. One cannot expect that such defense will be 100% effective. A reduction of the direct casualties by a factor of 2 will almost certainly result in a substantial reduction in the amount of smoke emitted. In case of no defense, the direct effects of nuclear winter are hard to predict. In the case of defense, the climate changes may well be minor. If one assumes that there will be residual effects on the weather, this is apt to be more important in influencing precipitation rather than the surface temperature. Indeed, the main effect of smoke is to produce a temperature inversion and thereby suppress the convective rainfall. This is particularly true in many regions that produce crops in the norther hemisphere. It seems now well established that the most dangerous potential consequence of any smoke-induced climatic change will be reduction of crops. Fortunately, this danger can be greatly reduced by food storage. Such food storage could greatly reduce domestic shortages in the United States and could also be important in alleviating suffering abroad. The efforts spent on considering the consequence of nuclear winter are not wasted.

  16. Nuclear deterrence: New risks, new opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelleher, C.M.; Kerr, F.J.; Quester, G.H.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book presents papers on nuclear weapons strategy. Topics considered include new technologies, arms control, risk assessment, nuclear winter, nuclear deterrence, military strategy, ballistic missile defense, proliferation, global military balance, West European politics, the Chinese view, non-proliferation policy, and first-use.

  17. Defense Experimentation and Stockpile Stewardship

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A primary mission of the site is to help ensure that the nation's nuclear weapon stockpile remains safe, secure and reliable. The stockpile stewardship program, working with the national weapons laboratories conducts a wide range of experiments using advanced diagnostic technologies, many of which were developed right here at the NNSS.

  18. Defense Experimentation and Stockpile Stewardship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A primary mission of the site is to help ensure that the nation's nuclear weapon stockpile remains safe, secure and reliable. The stockpile stewardship program, working with the national weapons laboratories conducts a wide range of experiments using advanced diagnostic technologies, many of which were developed right here at the NNSS.

  19. Plutonium Vulnerability Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Plutonium Vulnerability Management Plan describes the Department of Energy`s response to the vulnerabilities identified in the Plutonium Working Group Report which are a result of the cessation of nuclear weapons production. The responses contained in this document are only part of an overall, coordinated approach designed to enable the Department to accelerate conversion of all nuclear materials, including plutonium, to forms suitable for safe, interim storage. The overall actions being taken are discussed in detail in the Department`s Implementation Plan in response to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1. This is included as Attachment B.

  20. Doctoral Defense "Thermal-hydro-mechanical model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Doctoral Defense "Thermal-hydro-mechanical model for freezing and thawing soils" Yao Zhang Date been implemented in a finite element system, with a thermal-hydro- mechanical framework being used

  1. A Dynamic Defense Force for Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TAKAHASHI, Sugio

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Japan Self-Defense Forces (SDF). Along with the new NDPG,set a direction for the SDF in the post-9/11 inter- nationalsituation also requires the SDF take on these “dynamic”

  2. 94-1 Research and Development Project lead laboratory support: Fiscal year 1997. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKee, S.D. [comp.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On May 26, 1994, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued Recommendation 94-1, which expressed the board`s concern about nuclear materials left in the manufacturing pipeline after the US halted its nuclear weapons production activities. The DNFSB emphasized the need for remediation of these materials. As part of Recommendation 94-1, the DNFSB defined research objectives as follows: that a research program be established to fill any gaps in the information base needed for choosing among the alternate processes to be used in safe conversion of various types of fissile materials to optimal forms for safe interim storage and the longer-term disposition. To achieve this objective a research and technology development program with two elements is needed: a technology-specific program that is focused on treating and storing materials safety, with concomitant development of storage criteria and surveillance requirements, centered around 3- and 8-year targets; and a core technology program to augment the knowledge base about general chemical and physical processing and storage behavior and to assure safe interim material storage until disposition policies are formulated. The paper reports the progress on the following: materials identification and surveillance; stabilization process development; surveillance and monitoring; core technologies; and project management.

  3. An approach to determine a defensible spent fuel ratio.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durbin, Samuel G.; Lindgren, Eric Richard

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sabotage of spent nuclear fuel casks remains a concern nearly forty years after attacks against shipment casks were first analyzed and has a renewed relevance in the post-9/11 environment. A limited number of full-scale tests and supporting efforts using surrogate materials, typically depleted uranium dioxide (DUO2), have been conducted in the interim to more definitively determine the source term from these postulated events. In all the previous studies, the postulated attack of greatest interest was by a conical shape charge (CSC) that focuses the explosive energy much more efficiently than bulk explosives. However, the validity of these large-scale results remain in question due to the lack of a defensible Spent Fuel Ratio (SFR), defined as the amount of respirable aerosol generated by an attack on a mass of spent fuel compared to that of an otherwise identical DUO2 surrogate. Previous attempts to define the SFR have resulted in estimates ranging from 0.42 to 12 and include suboptimal experimental techniques and data comparisons. Different researchers have suggested using SFR values of 3 to 5.6. Sound technical arguments exist that the SFR does not exceed a value of unity. A defensible determination of the SFR in this lower range would greatly reduce the calculated risk associated with the transport and dry storage of spent nuclear fuel. Currently, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is in possession of several samples of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) that were used in the original SFR studies in the 1980's and were intended for use in a modern effort at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in the 2000's. A portion of these samples are being used for a variety of research efforts. However, the entirety of SNF samples at ORNL is scheduled for disposition at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by approximately the end of 2015. If a defensible SFR is to be determined for use in storage and transportation security analyses, the need to begin this effort is urgent in order to secure the only known available SNF samples with a clearly defined path to disposal.

  4. Federal Technical Capability Policy for Defense Nuclear Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1998-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The policy regarding the Federal Technical Capability Program, which provides for the recruitment, deployment, development, and retention of Federal personnel with the demonstrated technical capability to safely accomplish the Department’s missions and responsibilities.

  5. second line of defense | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, ,Development ofrluyendiNeedModeling2010second line of

  6. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel visits Sandia | National Nuclear Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavid Turner David3 | NationalSUBSCRIBE:|

  7. Statement of Anne M. Harrington, Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City,Enriched UraniumPhysical| Nationaltechnical

  8. Statement on Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City,Enriched UraniumPhysical| Nationaltechnicalbefore the Housebefore

  9. 2013 NNSA Defense Programs Science Council | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City,EnrichedSupplemental DirectivesWorkNNSA News â—‹

  10. 2015 NNSA Defense Programs Science Council | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City,EnrichedSupplemental DirectivesWorkNNSA News

  11. Defense Programs lecture series continue | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTubahq.na.gov Office of

  12. NPO recognized by Defense Programs | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14 FEDERAL EMPLOYEEAdministration

  13. Senior Adviser, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector, Pacific

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14 FEDERALAmerica HighSTARTOperations /Senate Rejects

  14. Listing of Defense Nuclear Facilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas »ofMarketing | DepartmentComputing Center |List of

  15. Managing America's Defense Nuclear Waste | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas »ofMarketingSmart Windows SmarterMarchDepartmentManaging

  16. 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (NA-20) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of BadTHE U.S. DEPARTMENTTechnologies09 SPR ReportEnergyof(CRWM)

  17. Managing America's Defense Nuclear Waste | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1,(EAC) Richard Cowart, ChairReactor Concepts

  18. NA 10 - Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysis andB - H, Page i PARTSecurity

  19. NA 70 - Associate Administrator for Defense Nuclear Security | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysis andB - H, Page iSecurity

  20. NNSA Defense Programs Announces Quarterly Awards | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysis andB -Reports |Y-12

  1. Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),EnergyImprovement of theResponses to PublicHydrogenDepartment

  2. DOE Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation DNN | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.pngRoofs andCrops Ltd Jump to: navigation, Jump101GRAPHS

  3. Nuclear winter attracts additional scrutiny

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.J.

    1984-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Prodded by the Natural Resources Defense Council, Congress has asked the Pentagon to provide what amounts to an environmental impact statement on the potential for nuclear weapons explosions to create enough soot and dust to cause a nuclear winter. The request has implications for arms control and civil defense as well as for weapons procurement and deployment. Little attention was given to the atmospheric and climatic effects of nuclear war until the nuclear winter concept was introduced in October of 1983. Only the Navy and the DOE took steps to follow up until pressure was put on Congress and the Pentagon for further study. Pentagon criticism of the nuclear winter presentation argues that the scenario assumptions that cities will be targeted and that a conflict will involve 5000-6500 megatons are incorrect.

  4. Joint probability safety assessment for NPP defense infrastructure against extreme external natural hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guilin, L. [College of Engineering, Ocean Univ. ot China, Yushan Road No. 5, Qingdao 266003 (China); Defu, L. [Disaster Prevention Research Inst., Ocean Univ. ot China, Yushan Road No. 5, Qingdao 266003 (China); Huajun, L. [College of Engineering, Ocean Univ. ot China, Yushan Road No. 5, Qingdao 266003 (China); Fengqing, W. [Disaster Prevention Research Inst., Ocean Univ. of China, Songling Road No.238, Qingdao 266100 (China); Tao, Z. [College of Engineering, Ocean Univ. of China, Songling Road No.238, Qingdao 266100 (China)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the increasing tendency of natural hazards, the typhoon, hurricane and tropical Cyclone induced surge, wave, precipitation, flood and wind as extreme external loads menacing Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) in coastal and inland provinces of China. For all of planned, designed And constructed NPP the National Nuclear Safety Administration of China and IAEA recommended Probable Maximum Hurricane /Typhoon/(PMH/T), Probable Maximum Storm Surge (PMSS), Probable Maximum Flood (PMF), Design Basis Flood (DBF) as safety regulations for NPP defense infrastructures. This paper discusses the joint probability analysis of simultaneous occurrence typhoon induced extreme external hazards and compare with IAEA 2006-2009 recommended safety regulation design criteria for some NPP defense infrastructures along China coast. (authors)

  5. National Center for Nuclear Security: The Nuclear Forensics Project (F2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klingensmith, A. L.

    2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    These presentation visuals introduce the National Center for Nuclear Security. Its chartered mission is to enhance the Nation’s verification and detection capabilities in support of nuclear arms control and nonproliferation through R&D activities at the NNSS. It has three focus areas: Treaty Verification Technologies, Nonproliferation Technologies, and Technical Nuclear Forensics. The objectives of nuclear forensics are to reduce uncertainty in the nuclear forensics process & improve the scientific defensibility of nuclear forensics conclusions when applied to nearsurface nuclear detonations. Research is in four key areas: Nuclear Physics, Debris collection and analysis, Prompt diagnostics, and Radiochemistry.

  6. addressing dnfsb recommendation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    e-learning services, to deal with learners affective traits in educational scenarios. Olga C. Santos; Jesus G. Boticario 2012-01-01 24 Company Name Street Address Physics...

  7. Office of Departmental Representative to DNFSB | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732onMake YourDepartment ofC T O B EOff-GridCyberDepartmental

  8. Northwest Energy Coalition Renewable Northwest Project Natural Resources Defense Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Energy Coalition Renewable Northwest Project Natural Resources Defense Council December 9 Coalition [Nancy Hirsh] Renewable Northwest Project[Rachel Shimshak] Natural Resources Defense Council Power Administration in Power Supply The Northwest Energy Coalition, Renewable Northwest Project, Sierra

  9. Japan’s Approaches to DefenseTransparency: Perspectivesfrom the Japanese and Chinese Defense Establishments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fei, John

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Japanese Self Defense Forces (SDF). Features of the Japaneseissues arise—such as the deployment of the SDF forces toIraq or Maritime SDF to the In- dian Ocean—an ad hoc

  10. Japan’s Defense White Paper as a Tool for Promoting Defense Transparency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUKEGAWA, Yasushi

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and activities of the MOD/SDF (Part III). It is one of theof the Self-Defense Forces (SDF) came to be in- cluded inits coverage to include the SDF’s disaster respons- es and

  11. UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the overall system for managing spent fuel and defense high-level waste. The Board includes its findingsjlc029va UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD 2300 Clarendon Boulevard, Suite 1300, D.C. 20585 Dear Speaker Gingrich, Senator Thurmond, and Secretary Peña: The Nuclear Waste Technical

  12. Overview of Space Business Space & Integrated Defense Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overview of Space Business Space & Integrated Defense Systems Mitsubishi Corporation August 26 in Rio de Janeiro and Belo Horizonte #12;MC's Space Business Involved with aerospace business more than 40 years, covering civil/commercial space business, defense related space business and defense

  13. Control of Nuclear Weapon Data

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The directive establishes the policy, process and procedures for control of nuclear weapon data to ensure that dissemination of the information is restricted to individuals with appropriate clearances, approved authorization and valid need-to-know in keeping with the Atomic Energy Act (as amended) stipulation of ensuring common defense and security. Cancels DOE O 5610.2.

  14. Central Technical Authority Responsibilities Regarding Nuclear Safety Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes Central Technical Authority and Chief of Nuclear Safety/Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety responsibilities and requirements directed by the Secretary of Energy in the development and issuance of Department of Energy regulations and directives that affect nuclear safety. No cancellations.

  15. Out-of-Semester Dissertation Defenses In order for a student to have a dissertation defense between semesters (or when

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    Out-of-Semester Dissertation Defenses In order for a student to have a dissertation defense between semesters (or when the University is not in session), the student who is defending the dissertation must certain that all of the members on the dissertation committee agree to attend the defense on the agreed

  16. United States Nuclear Command and Control System Support Staff. Directive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, R.

    1988-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Directive establishes, pursuant to National Security Decision Directive, August 21, 1987, and the authority vested in the Secretary of Defense, the U.S. Nuclear Command and Control System Support Staff under the direction, authority, and control of the Secretary of Defense, who also serves as the Executive Agent for the Nuclear Command and Control System (NCCS) (hereafter referred to as Executive Agent). The Directive establishes the DoD NCCS Executive Review Committee (ERC) in support of the Secretary of Defense. It assigns the responsibilities, functions, relationships and authorities of the U.S. NCCS Support Staff (NSS) and its Director, and those of the ERC.

  17. Overview of the Defense Programs Research and Technology Development Program for fiscal year 1993. Appendix II research laboratories and facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains summaries of the research facilities that support the Defense Programs Research and Technology Development Program for FY 1993. The nine program elements are aggregated into three program clusters as follows: (1) Advanced materials sciences and technologies; chemistry and materials, explosives, special nuclear materials (SNM), and tritium. (2) Design sciences and advanced computation; physics, conceptual design and assessment, and computation and modeling. (3) Advanced manufacturing technologies and capabilities; system engineering science and technology, and electronics, photonics, sensors, and mechanical components. Section I gives a brief summary of 23 major defense program (DP) research and technology facilities and shows how these major facilities are organized by program elements. Section II gives a more detailed breakdown of the over 200 research and technology facilities being used at the Laboratories to support the Defense Programs mission.

  18. Progress of the High Level Waste Program at the Defense Waste Processing Facility - 13178

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bricker, Jonathan M.; Fellinger, Terri L.; Staub, Aaron V.; Ray, Jeff W.; Iaukea, John F. [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, South Carolina, 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, South Carolina, 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site treats and immobilizes High Level Waste into a durable borosilicate glass for safe, permanent storage. The High Level Waste program significantly reduces environmental risks associated with the storage of radioactive waste from legacy efforts to separate fissionable nuclear material from irradiated targets and fuels. In an effort to support the disposition of radioactive waste and accelerate tank closure at the Savannah River Site, the Defense Waste Processing Facility recently implemented facility and flowsheet modifications to improve production by 25%. These improvements, while low in cost, translated to record facility production in fiscal years 2011 and 2012. In addition, significant progress has been accomplished on longer term projects aimed at simplifying and expanding the flexibility of the existing flowsheet in order to accommodate future processing needs and goals. (authors)

  19. Cosmic bombardment V: Threat object-dispersing approaches to active planetary defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teller, E.; Wood, L. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Ishikawa, M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hyde, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth-impacting comets and asteroids with diameters {approx}0.03 - 10 km pose the greatest threats to the terrestrial biosphere in terms of impact frequency-weighted impact consequences, and thus are of most concern to designers of active planetary defenses. Specific gravitational binding energies of such objects range from 10{sup -7} to 10{sup -2} J/gm, and are small compared with the specific energies of 1x10{sup 3} to 3x10{sup 3} J/gm required to vaporize objects of typical composition or the specific energies required to pulverize them, which are 10{sup -1} to 10 J/gm. All of these are small compared to the specific kinetic energy of these objects in the Earth- centered frame, which is 2x10{sup 5} to 2x10{sup 6} J/gm. The prospect naturally arises of negating all such threats by deflecting, pulverizing or vaporizing the objects. Pulverization-with-dispersal is an attractive option of reasonable defensive robustness. Examples of such equipments - which employ no explosives of any type - are given. Vaporization is the maximally robust defensive option, and may be invoked to negate threat objects not observed until little time is left until Earth-strike, and pulverization-with-dispersal has proven inadequate. Physically larger threats may be vaporized with nuclear explosives. No contemporary technical means of any kind appear capable of directly dispersing the -100 km diameter scale Charon- class cometary objects recently observed in the outer solar system, although such objects may be deflected to defensively useful extents. Means of implementing defenses of each of these types are proposed for specificity, and areas for optimization noted. Biospheric impacts of threat object debris are briefly considered, for bounding purposes. Experiments are suggested on cometary and asteroidal objects.

  20. Toward a defense-dominated world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, L.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Maintaining the large-scale peace in a defense-dominated world necessarily will require not only passive but also active defenses against large-scale aggression that are technically feasible, practical and easy to employ -- and robust against perversion into support of aggression. Such peace maintenance tool-sets will feature means for effectively rebuking aggression as well as providing timely and very widely available seaming of aggression underway anywhere. This report discusses the technology base which currently exists to provide world-wide, high-quality imagery at moderate (5--10 meter) spatial resolution or imagery of 1% of the Earth`s land surface at high ({le} 1 meter) resolution no less frequently than daily, at a total cost of the order of $1 B, with operational capability in the later `90s. Such systems could provide timely warning of aggressive actions anywhere. Similarly, space-based means of defeating aggression conducted with even quite short-range ballistic missiles anywhere in the world could be brought into existence by the end of the `90s for a total cost of about $10 B, and small high-altitude, long flight-duration robotic aircraft carrying high-performance sensors and interceptor missilery could provide both seaming and active defenses against attacks conducted with very short range ballistic missiles, as well as attacks launched with air-breathing threats such as bombers and cruise missiles, for a cost per defended area of the order of $10/km{sup 2}. It appears that all of the associated sensors can find apt dual-use as high-performance systems for monitoring physical aspects of the human environment.

  1. ARM - Defensive Shotgun - Remington 870 Operator's Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m Documentation DataDatastreamsxsaprhsrhi Documentation DataAlaskaDefensive Shotgun -

  2. Biofuels in Defense, Aviation, and Marine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyandapproximately 10 wt%in Defense, Aviation, and

  3. The Salt Defense Disposal Investigations (SDDI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2Dand WaterThe FutureRiskSalt Defense Disposal

  4. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William [Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, 625 Indiana Ave., NW, Suite 700, Washington, DC 20004-2901 (United States)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  5. NA 10 - Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics NA 10 - Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs NA 10 - Deputy Administrator for...

  6. Legacy Management Work Progresses on Defense-Related Uranium...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    LM visited 84 defense-related legacy uranium mine sites located within 11 uranium mining districts in 6 western states. At these sites, photographs and global positioning...

  7. Energy and Defense Departments Announce Agreement to Enhance...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Agreement to Enhance Cooperation on Clean Energy and Strengthen Energy Security Energy and Defense Departments Announce Agreement to Enhance Cooperation on Clean Energy and...

  8. air defense warfare: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for FORCEnet Cruise Missile Defense by Juan G. Camacho; Lawrence F. Guest; Belen M. Hernandez; Thomas M in Systems Engineering (MSSE) Cohort 5 from the Naval Surface Warfare...

  9. Y-12 Successfully Meets and Exceeds Defense Programs Goals During...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Home Field Offices Welcome to the NNSA Production Office NPO News Releases Y-12 Successfully Meets and Exceeds Defense Programs ... Y-12 Successfully Meets and Exceeds...

  10. DOE weapons laboratories' contributions to the nation's defense technology base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hecker, S.S.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The question of how the Department of Energy (DOE) weapons laboratories can contribute to a stronger defense technology base is addressed in testimony before the Subcommittee on Defense Industry and Technology of the Senate Armed Services Committee. The importance of the defense technology base is described, the DOE technology base is also described, and some technology base management and institutional issues are discussed. Suggestions are given for promoting a more stable, long-term relationship between the DOE weapons laboratories and the Department of Defense. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  11. antibacterial host defense: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and to sustain a healthy pregnancy 2. Recent of these defenses by pathogens can lead to pregnancy complications such as preterm labor or vertical transmission Bakardjiev,...

  12. antimicrobial host defense: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and to sustain a healthy pregnancy 2. Recent of these defenses by pathogens can lead to pregnancy complications such as preterm labor or vertical transmission Bakardjiev,...

  13. Defense programs business practices re-engineering QFD exercise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, C.; Halbleib, L.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The end of the cold war has resulted in many changes for the Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC). We now work in a smaller complex, with reduced resources, a smaller stockpile, and no new phase 3 weapons development programs. This new environment demands that we re-evaluate the way we design and produce nuclear weapons. The Defense Program (DP) Business Practices Re-engineering activity was initiated to improve the design and production efficiency of the DP Sector. The activity had six goals: (1) to identify DP business practices that are exercised by the Product Realization Process (PRP); (2) to determine the impact (positive, negative, or none) of these practices on defined, prioritized customer criteria; (3) to identify business practices that are candidates for elimination or re-engineering; (4) to select two or three business practices for re-engineering; (5) to re-engineer the selected business practices; and (6) to exercise the re-engineered practices on three pilot development projects. Business practices include technical and well as administrative procedures that are exercised by the PRP. A QFD exercise was performed to address (1)-(4). The customer that identified, defined, and prioritized the criteria to rate the business practices was the Block Change Advisory Group. Five criteria were identified: cycle time, flexibility, cost, product performance/quality, and best practices. Forty-nine business practices were identified and rated per the criteria. From this analysis, the group made preliminary recommendations as to which practices would be addressed in the re-engineering activity. Sixteen practices will be addressed in the re-engineering activity. These practices will then be piloted on three projects: (1) the Electronic Component Assembly (ECA)/Radar Project, (2) the B61 Mod 11, and (3) Warhead Protection Program (WPP).

  14. A Systematic Approach to Developing and Evaluating Website Fingerprinting Defenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Ian

    A Systematic Approach to Developing and Evaluating Website Fingerprinting Defenses Xiang Cai1 security, or both. This paper (1) systematically analyzes existing attacks and de- fenses to understand-based analysis provides clear directions to defense designers on which features need to be hidden. Our lower

  15. Deception used for Cyber Defense of Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne F. Boyer; Miles A. McQueen

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control system cyber security defense mechanisms may employ deception to make it more difficult for attackers to plan and execute successful attacks. These deceptive defense mechanisms are organized and initially explored according to a specific deception taxonomy and the seven abstract dimensions of security previously proposed as a framework for the cyber security of control systems.

  16. Defense of Trust Management Vulnerabilities in Distributed Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yan Lindsay

    Defense of Trust Management Vulnerabilities in Distributed Networks Yan (Lindsay) Sun , Zhu Han into distributed networks, the vulnerabilities in trust establishment methods, and the defense mechanisms. Five networks inherently rely on cooper- ation among distributed entities. However, coopera- tion is fragile

  17. EIS-0082: Defense Waste Processing Facility, Savannah River Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Defense Waste and Byproducts Management developed this EIS to provide environmental input into both the selection of an appropriate strategy for the permanent disposal of the high-level radioactive waste currently stored at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) and the subsequent decision to construct and operate a Defense Waste Processing Facility at the SRP site.

  18. History of Hanford Site Defense Production (Brief)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GERBER, M S

    2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper acquaints the audience with the history of the Hanford Site, America's first full-scale defense plutonium production site. The paper includes the founding and basic operating history of the Hanford Site, including World War II construction and operations, three major postwar expansions (1947-55), the peak years of production (1956-63), production phase downs (1964-the present), a brief production spurt from 1984-86, the end of the Cold War, and the beginning of the waste cleanup mission. The paper also delineates historical waste practices and policies as they changed over the years at the Hanford Site, past efforts to chemically treat, ''fractionate,'' and/or immobilize Hanford's wastes, and resulting major waste legacies that remain today. This paper presents original, primary-source research into the waste history of the Hanford Site. Finally, the paper places the current Hanford Site waste remediation endeavors in the broad context of American and world history.

  19. Implications of the nuclear winter thesis. Technical report, 1 May 1984-1 June 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldbaum, C.B.; Bee, R.J.; Garrett, B.N.; Glasner, B.S.

    1985-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses the potential policy implications of new findings concerning the long-term atmospheric, climatic, and biological effects of nuclear war, commonly referred to as nuclear winter. A summary of the prominent study of these effects, The Global Atmospheric Consequences of Nuclear War by Turco, Toon, Ackerman, Pollack and Sagan (TTAPS) is provided. Potential policy implications are examined regarding nuclear weapons strategy and deterrence, extended deterrence, targeting, C3I and damage assessment, future RandD and force modernization, strategic defense systems, arms control, civil defense and the strategic implications of U.S. and Soviet perceptions of nuclear winter. Issues and questions for further research are addressed.

  20. Dissertation Defense Checklist Student: Schedule Prospectus Meeting. This should be done 4-6 months prior to defense.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    Dissertation Defense Checklist Student: Schedule Prospectus Meeting. This should be done 4-6 months prior to defense. Take Approval of Dissertation Prospectus form to meeting. Date of meeting_____________ Student: Submit Approval of Dissertation Prospectus form to SAA Office. SAA Office submits Dissertation

  1. H. R. 5051: a bill to authorize funding for research on the potential atmospheric, climatic, biological, health, and environmental consequences of nuclear explosions and nuclear exchanges. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, June 18, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Winter Research Act of 1986 authorizes funding to study the potential consequences of nuclear explosions. The research will cover possible atmospheric, climatic, biological, health, or environmental changes to see if the nuclear winter theory is plausible. The bill authorizes $8.5 million over a five-year period for the Department of Defense study. It also establishes a Nuclear Winter Study Commission to determine and evaluate what implications these potential effects have for defense policy.

  2. Bubblers Speed Nuclear Waste Processing at SRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding has supported installation of bubbler technology and related enhancements in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The improvements will accelerate the processing of radioactive waste into a safe, stable form for storage and permit expedited closure of underground waste tanks holding 37 million gallons of liquid nuclear waste.

  3. Managing nuclear weapons in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, G.

    1993-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the management and security of nuclear weapons in the post-cold war United States. The definition of what constitutes security is clearly changing in the US. It is now a much more integrated view that includes defense and the economy. The author tries to bring some semblance of order to these themes in this brief adaptation of a presentation.

  4. Bubblers Speed Nuclear Waste Processing at SRS

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding has supported installation of bubbler technology and related enhancements in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The improvements will accelerate the processing of radioactive waste into a safe, stable form for storage and permit expedited closure of underground waste tanks holding 37 million gallons of liquid nuclear waste.

  5. 2013 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Chief of Nuclear Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

  6. 2014 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Chief of Nuclear Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

  7. 2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Chief of Nuclear Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

  8. Defense Special Case Transuranic Waste Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, G.D. (Rockwell International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Joint Integration Office) [Rockwell International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Joint Integration Office; Carson, P.H. (Stoller (S.M.) Corp., Boulder, CO (United States)) [Stoller (S.M.) Corp., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Special Case Implementation Plan (SCIP) is to establish a comprehensive plan for the efficient long-term management and disposal of defense special case (SC) transuranic (TRU) waste. To fulfill this purpose, a review of SC waste management strategies (at both the site-specific and TRU program levels), waste characteristics and inventories, processing and transportation options, and disposal requirements was made. This review provides a plan for implementing policy decisions and useful information for making those decisions. The SCIP is intended to provide a baseline plant to which alternate plans can be compared. General potential alternatives are provided for future consideration when data concerning facility availability and costs are better defined. Milestones for the SC Implementation Plan are included which summarize each SC waste site. The cost of implementing the SC program has an upper limit of $89 million for the worst case scenario. The actual cost of implementation could be dramatically lower than the worst case figure. 15 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  9. Second Line of Defense Spares Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Dale L.; Holmes, Aimee E.; Muller, George; Mercier, Theresa M.; Brigantic, Robert T.; Perkins, Casey J.; Cooley, Scott K.; Thorsen, Darlene E.

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    During Fiscal Year 2012, a team from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted an assessment and analysis of the Second Line of Defense (SLD) Sustainability spare parts program. Spare parts management touches many aspects of the SLD Sustainability Program including contracting and integration of Local Maintenance Providers (LMP), equipment vendors, analyses and metrics on program performance, system state of health, and maintenance practices. Standardized spares management will provide better data for decisions during site transition phase and will facilitate transition to host country sustainability ownership. The effort was coordinated with related SLD Sustainability Program initiatives, including a configuration items baselining initiative, a metrics initiative, and a maintenance initiative. The spares study has also led to pilot programs for sourcing alternatives that include regional intermediate inventories and partnering agreements that leverage existing supply chains. Many partners from the SLD Sustainability program contributed to and were consulted in the course of the study. This document provides a description of the findings, recommendations, and implemented solutions that have resulted from the study.

  10. Toward a nuclear weapons free world?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maaranen, S.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Center for International Security Affairs

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Doubts about the wisdom of relying on nuclear weapons are as old as nuclear weapons themselves. But despite this questioning, nuclear weapons came to be seen as the indispensable element of American (indeed Western) security during the Cold War. By the 1970s and 1980s, however, discontent was growing about the intense US-Soviet nuclear arms competition, as it failed to provide any enduring improvement in security; rather, it was seen as creating ever greater risks and dangers. Arms control negotiations and limitations, adopted as a means to regulate the technical competition, may also have relieved some of the political pressures and dangers. But the balance of terror, and the fears of it, continued. The Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) under President Reagan was a very different approach to escaping from the precarious protection of nuclear weapons, in that it sought a way to continue to defend the US and the West, but without the catastrophic risks of mutual deterrence. As such, SDI connoted unhappiness with the precarious nuclear balance and, for many, with nuclear weapons in general. The disappearance of the Warsaw Pact, the disintegration of the Soviet Union, and the sudden end of the Cold War seemed to offer a unique opportunity to fashion a new, more peaceful world order that might allow for fading away of nuclear weapons. Scholars have foreseen two different paths to a nuclear free world. The first is a fundamental improvement in the relationships between states such that nuclear weapons are no longer needed. The second path is through technological development, e.g., missile defenses which could provide effective protection against nuclear attacks. The paper discusses nuclear weapon policy in the US, views of other nuclear states, the future of nuclear weapons, and issues in a less-nuclear world.

  11. Department of Defense Representatives Visit Hanford to Benchmark Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash., December 16, 2005, Representatives of the Department of Defense's (DoD's) Voluntary Protection Program Center of Excellence (VPP CX) working to reduce injuries at selected (DoD)...

  12. National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005, Information...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005" (Public Law 108-375 Oct. 28 2004) Transition20082009EMAdditionalMaterialMACopy.pdf PUBLIC LAW 108-375-OCT. 28, 2004...

  13. U.S. Department of Defense's Rebates and Incentives Regulations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Spring 2009 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers the U.S. Department of Defense's (DoD's) statuatory authority and financial management regulation for rebates and incentives.

  14. Identifying Enterprise Leverage Points in Defense Acquisition Program Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirthlin, Major Robb

    2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    *The views expressed in this talk are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the United States Air Force, the Department of Defense (DoD), or the U.S. Government.

  15. Identifying enterprise leverage points in Defense Acquisition Program performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirthlin, Joseph Robert, 1970-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large, complex systems development programs in the Department of Defense are finding it more difficult to deliver desired capabilities to the end user on time and on budget than ever before. Evidence exists that almost all ...

  16. Defense Energy Support Center: Installation Energy Commodity Business Unit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Spring 2009 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses the Defense Energy Support Center's (DESC's) Installation Energy Commodity Business Unit (CBU) including its intent, commitment, pilot project, lessons learned, and impending barriers.

  17. Psillos and Laudan Psillos's Defense of Scientific Realism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitelson, Branden

    defense of realism' (EDR), which argues that the best explanation of the empirical success of scientific theories is that they are approximately true. The EDR takes the NMA to represent an abductive inference

  18. The Office of Environmental Management Non-Defense Environmental...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Microsoft Word - PSRP Updates 6-25-10v2 The Office of Environmental Management (EM) Defense Environmental Cleanup The Office of Environmental Management Uranium Enrichment D&D...

  19. Department of Defense Benchmarks VPP in Visit to Hanford

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Representatives of the Department of Defense's (DoD's) Voluntary Protection Program Center of Excellence (VPP-CX) are working to meet a safety and health goal established by Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld to reduce injuries at DoD sites nationwide. In order to accomplish this goal, DoD visited the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in southeast Washington State on December 12, 2005, to learn about its exemplary safety programs and benchmark the site's VPP effort.

  20. Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    development, Nuclear Operations Division (NOD) waste management and storage activities and other laboratoryNuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety The Nuclear Engineering Division (NE) of Argonne National Laboratory is experienced in performing criticality safety and shielding evaluations for nuclear

  1. Nuclear Forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Podlesak, David W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steiner, Robert E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burns, Carol J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; LaMont, Stephen P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tandon, Lav [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The overview of this presentation is: (1) Introduction to nonproliferation efforts; (2) Scope of activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (3) Facilities for radioanalytical work at LANL; (4) Radiochemical characterization capabilities; and (5) Bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities. Some conclusions are: (1) Analytical chemistry measurements on plutonium and uranium matrices are critical to numerous defense and non-defense programs including safeguards accountancy verification measurements; (2) Los Alamos National Laboratory operates capable actinide analytical chemistry and material science laboratories suitable for nuclear material forensic characterization; (3) Actinide analytical chemistry uses numerous means to validate and independently verify that measurement data quality objectives are met; and (4) Numerous LANL nuclear facilities support the nuclear material handling, preparation, and analysis capabilities necessary to evaluate samples containing nearly any mass of an actinide (attogram to kilogram levels).

  2. Nuclear winter: implications for US and Soviet nuclear strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero, P.J.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In November 1983 Dr. Carl Sagan and his colleagues reported to press on the results of their study of the atmospheric consequences of nuclear war. The TTAPS study found that for a wide range of possible U.S. -Soviet nuclear exchanges, including relatively small ones, the fires from nuclear detonations would inject into the stratosphere quantities of dust and soot that would obscure sunlight for months. Under the cloud, which would spread over most of the Northern Hemisphere, temperatures might drop scores of degrees, well below the freezing point of water; thus, nuclear winter. The TTAPS team's findings suggested that the consequences of a nuclear war might be even more gruesome than previously supposed, and the long-term climatic and biological results might be nearly as severe for a war of 100 megatons as for 5,000. From the point of view of informing policymakers and the public concerning the consequences of wars involving nuclear weapons, the politicization of the nuclear winter issue is unfortunate. We can hope that in the next few years the criticism and defense of the initial TTAPS work will give rise to significant additional analyses, to illuminate the question. Realistically, further study will probably include both confirmations and contradictions of the original findings, without necessarily resolving the issue. Sadly, the surrounding political atmosphere may obstruct sober consideration of the policy implications of the possibility of nuclear winter.

  3. Defense programs beryllium good practice guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herr, M.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the DOE, it has recently become apparent that some contractor employees who have worked (or are currently working) with and around beryllium have developed chronic beryllium disease (CBD), an occupational granulomatous lung disorder. Respiratory exposure to aerosolized beryllium, in susceptible individuals, causes an immunological reaction that can result in granulomatous scarring of the lung parenchyma, shortness of breath, cough, fatigue, weight loss, and, ultimately, respiratory failure. Beryllium disease was originally identified in the 1940s, largely in the fluorescent light industry. In 1950, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) introduced strict exposure standards that generally curtailed both the acute and chronic forms of the disease. Beginning in 1984, with the identification of a CBD case in a DOE contractor worker, there was increased scrutiny of both industrial hygiene practices and individuals in this workforce. To date, over 100 additional cases of beryllium-specific sensitization and/or CBD have been identified. Thus, a disease previously thought to be largely eliminated by the adoption of permissible exposure standards 45 years ago is still a health risk in certain workforces. This good practice guide forms the basis of an acceptable program for controlling workplace exposure to beryllium. It provides (1) Guidance for minimizing worker exposure to beryllium in Defense Programs facilities during all phases of beryllium-related work, including the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities. (2) Recommended controls to be applied to the handling of metallic beryllium and beryllium alloys, beryllium oxide, and other beryllium compounds. (3) Recommendations for medical monitoring and surveillance of workers exposed (or potentially exposed) to beryllium, based on the best current understanding of beryllium disease and medical diagnostic tests available. (4) Site-specific safety procedures for all processes of beryllium that is likely to generate dusts, mists, fumes, or small particulates. A beryllium exposure control program should minimize airborne concentrations, the potential for and spread of contamination, the number of times individuals are exposed to beryllium, and the number of employees who may be potentially exposed.

  4. The science, technology, and politics of ballistic missile defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coyle, Philip E. [Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    America's missile defense systems are deployed at home and abroad. This includes the Groundbased Missile Defense (GMD) system in Alaska and California, the Phased Adaptive Approach in Europe (EPAA), and regional systems in the Middle East and Asia. Unfortunately these systems lack workable architectures, and many of the required elements either don't work or are missing. Major review and reconsideration is needed of all elements of these systems. GMD performance in tests has gotten worse with time, when it ought to be getting better. A lack of political support is not to blame as the DoD spends about $10 billion per year, and proposes to add about $5 billion over the next five years. Russia objects to the EPAA as a threat to its ICBM forces, and to the extensive deployment of U.S. military forces in countries such as Poland, the Czech Republic and Romania, once part of the Soviet Union. Going forward the U.S. should keep working with Russia whose cooperation will be key to diplomatic gains in the Middle East and elsewhere. Meanwhile, America's missile defenses face an enduring set of issues, especially target discrimination in the face of attacks designed to overwhelm the defenses, stage separation debris, chaff, decoys, and stealth. Dealing with target discrimination while also replacing, upgrading, or adding to the many elements of U.S. missiles defenses presents daunting budget priorities. A new look at the threat is warranted, and whether the U.S. needs to consider every nation that possesses even short-range missiles a threat to America. The proliferation of missiles of all sizes around the world is a growing problem, but expecting U.S. missile defenses to deal with all those missiles everywhere is unrealistic, and U.S. missile defenses, effective or not, are justifying more and more offensive missiles.

  5. The ignition hazard to urban interiors during nuclear attack due to burning curtain fragments transported by blast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodale, Thomas

    There exists some uncertainty at present, in the formulation of civil defense doctrine, as to whether it is advisable for window curtains to be closed or open during nuclear attack. Closed curtains would be in position to ...

  6. The future of nuclear deterrence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quester, G.H.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear deterrence has been in existence for almost four decades. Yet, analysts from the left and the right keep reemphasizing the dangers and problems with deterrence without always remembering its purpose-the prevention of nuclear war or the prevention of all war. In this book. George Quester analyzes the future of nuclear deterrence in light of its past, and discovers that the fundamental tenets of nuclear deterrence remain unchanged. George Quester considers the overwhelming tensions present in a society threatened by the prospect of a nuclear holocaust and a lingering nuclear winter. But he also acknowledges that nuclear deterrence has prevented a great deal of global and local warfare that otherwise would have occurred. He spotlights the basic military problems facing the world today, including the shadow cast on all levels of strategic planning by the threat of nuclear war. Quester warns against charging forth with radical new alternatives, such as the Strategic Defense Initiative and deep-cut disarmament. He argues that initiatives such as these reflect a return to traditional military thinking about waging and winning wars that pose serious possibilities for a breakdown in deterrence policy.

  7. The Nuclear Material Focus Area Roadmapping Process Utilizing Environmental Management Complex-Wide Nuclear Material Disposition Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sala, D. R.; Furhman, P.; Smith, J. D.

    2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the process that the Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) has developed and utilizes in working with individual Department of Energy (DOE) sites to identify, address, and prioritize research and development efforts in the stabilization, disposition, and storage of nuclear materials. By associating site technology needs with nuclear disposition pathways and integrating those with site schedules, the NMFA is developing a complex wide roadmap for nuclear material technology development. This approach will leverage technology needs and opportunities at multiple sites and assist the NMFA in building a defensible research and development program to address the nuclear material technology needs across the complex.

  8. Recommendations for a Department of Energy Nuclear Energy R and D Agenda Volume 2 Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current US nuclear energy policy is primarily formulated as part of the nation`s overall energy policy. In addition, nuclear energy policy is impacted by other US policies, such as those for defense and environment, and by international obligations through their effects on nuclear weapons dismantlement and stewardship, continued reliance on space and naval nuclear power sources, defense waste cleanup, and on nuclear nonproliferation. This volume is composed of the following appendices: Appendix 1--Objectives of the Federal Government Nuclear Energy Related Policies and Research and Development Programs; Appendix 2--Nuclear Energy and Related R and D in the US; Appendix 3--Summary of Issues That Drive Nuclear Energy Research and Development; Appendix 4: Options for Policy and Research and Development; Appendix 5--Pros and Cons of Objectives and Options; and Appendices 6--Recommendations.

  9. The Nuclear Posture Review (NPR) : are we safer?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brune, Nancy E.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Posture Review (NPR) is designed to make world safer by reducing the role of U.S. nuclear weapons and reducing the salience of nuclear weapons. U.S. also seeks to maintain a credible nuclear deterrent and reinforce regional security architectures with missile defenses and other conventional military capabilities. But recent studies suggest that nuclear proliferation is a direct response to the perceived threat of U.S. conventional capabilities not U.S. nuclear stockpile. If this is true, then the intent of the NPR to reduce the role and numbers of nuclear weapons and strengthen conventional military capabilities may actually make the world less safe. First stated objective of NPR is to reduce the role and numbers of U.S. nuclear weapons, reduce the salience of nuclear weapons and move step by step toward eliminating them. Second stated objective is a reaffirmation of U.S. commitment to maintaining a strong deterrent which forms the basis of U.S. assurances to allies and partners. The pathway - made explicit throughout the NPR - for reducing the role and numbers of nuclear weapons while maintaining a credible nuclear deterrent and reinforcing regional security architectures is to give conventional forces and capabilities and missile defenses (e.g. non-nuclear elements) a greater share of the deterrence burden.

  10. Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan Colon Container Terminal (CCT) Panama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newhouse, Robert N.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report on the Operational Testing and Evaluation to validate and baseline an operable system that meets the Second Line of Defense (SLD) mission requirements. An SLD system is defined as the detection technology and associated equipment, the system operators from the host country, the standard operating procedures (SOPs), and other elements such as training and maintenance which support long-term system sustainment. To this end, the activities conducted during the OT&E phase must demonstrate that the Megaports System can be operated effectively in real-time by Panama Direccion General de Aduanas (DGA Panama Customs) personnel to the standards of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA).

  11. DESIGN ANALYSIS FOR THE DEFENSE HIGH-LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL CONTAINER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Radulesscu; J.S. Tang

    2000-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of ''Design Analysis for the Defense High-Level Waste Disposal Container'' analysis is to technically define the defense high-level waste (DHLW) disposal container/waste package using the Waste Package Department's (WPD) design methods, as documented in ''Waste Package Design Methodology Report'' (CRWMS M&O [Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor] 2000a). The DHLW disposal container is intended for disposal of commercial high-level waste (HLW) and DHLW (including immobilized plutonium waste forms), placed within disposable canisters. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-managed spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in disposable canisters may also be placed in a DHLW disposal container along with HLW forms. The objective of this analysis is to demonstrate that the DHLW disposal container/waste package satisfies the project requirements, as embodied in Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System Description Document (SDD) (CRWMS M&O 1999a), and additional criteria, as identified in Waste Package Design Sensitivity Report (CRWMS M&Q 2000b, Table 4). The analysis briefly describes the analytical methods appropriate for the design of the DHLW disposal contained waste package, and summarizes the results of the calculations that illustrate the analytical methods. However, the analysis is limited to the calculations selected for the DHLW disposal container in support of the Site Recommendation (SR) (CRWMS M&O 2000b, Section 7). The scope of this analysis is restricted to the design of the codisposal waste package of the Savannah River Site (SRS) DHLW glass canisters and the Training, Research, Isotopes General Atomics (TRIGA) SNF loaded in a short 18-in.-outer diameter (OD) DOE standardized SNF canister. This waste package is representative of the waste packages that consist of the DHLW disposal container, the DHLW/HLW glass canisters, and the DOE-managed SNF in disposable canisters. The intended use of this analysis is to support Site Recommendation reports and to assist in the development of WPD drawings. Activities described in this analysis were conducted in accordance with the Development Plan ''Design Analysis for the Defense High-Level Waste Disposal Container'' (CRWMS M&O 2000c) with no deviations from the plan.

  12. Nuclear weapons and NATO-Russia relations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornwell, G.C.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the development of positive institutional arrangements such as Russian participation in the NATO-led peacekeeping force in Bosnia and the NATO- Russia Permanent Joint Council, the strategic culture of Russia has not changed in any fundamental sense. Russian strategic culture has not evolved in ways that would make Russian policies compatible with those of NATO countries in the necessary economic, social, technological, and military spheres. On the domestic side, Russia has yet to establish a stable democracy and the necessary legal, judicial, and regulatory institutions for a free-market economy. Russia evidently lacks the necessary cultural traditions, including concepts of accountability and transparency, to make these adaptations in the short-term. Owing in part to its institutional shortcomings, severe socioeconomic setbacks have afflicted Russia. Russian conventional military strength has been weakened, and a concomitant reliance by the Russians on nuclear weapons as their ultimate line of defense has increased. The breakdown in the infrastructure that supports Russian early warning and surveillance systems and nuclear weapons stewardship defense, coupled with a tendency towards has exacerbated Russian anxiety and distrust toward NATO. Russia`s reliance on nuclear weapons as the ultimate line of defense, coupled with a tendency toward suspicion and distrust toward NATO, could lead to dangerous strategic miscalculation and nuclear catastrophe.

  13. Development of Site-Specific Soil Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) Parameters for the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Payne, Suzette

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Horizontal and vertical PC 3 (2,500 yr) Soil Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) 5% damped spectra, corresponding time histories, and strain-compatible soil properties were developed for the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU). The IWTU is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Mean and 84th percentile horizontal DBE spectra derived from site-specific site response analyses were evaluated for the IWTU. The horizontal and vertical PC 3 (2,500 yr) Soil DBE 5% damped spectra at the 84th percentile were selected for Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) analyses at IWTU. The site response analyses were performed consistent with applicable Department of Energy (DOE) Standards, recommended guidance of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Standards, and recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Panel (BRP) and Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB).

  14. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quiter, Brian Joseph

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence . . . . . . . .2.9.1 Nuclear ThomsonSections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nuclear Resonance

  15. CPP-603 Underwater Fuel Storage Facility Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP), Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denney, R.D.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CPP-603 Underwater Fuel Storage Facility (UFSF) Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP) has been constructed to describe the activities required for the relocation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the CPP-603 facility. These activities are the only Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) actions identified in the Implementation Plan developed to meet the requirements of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1 to the Secretary of Energy regarding an improved schedule for remediation in the Defense Nuclear Facilities Complex. As described in the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Implementation Plan, issued February 28, 1995, an INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan is currently under development to direct the placement of SNF currently in existing INEL facilities into interim storage, and to address the coordination of intrasite SNF movements with new receipts and intersite transfers that were identified in the DOE SNF Programmatic and INEL Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement Record, of Decision. This SISMP will be a subset of the INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan and the activities described are being coordinated with other INEL SNF management activities. The CPP-603 relocation activities have been assigned a high priority so that established milestones will be meet, but there will be some cases where other activities will take precedence in utilization of available resources. The Draft INEL Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP), INEL-94/0279, Draft Rev. 2, dated March 10, 1995, is being superseded by the INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan and this CPP-603 specific SISMP.

  16. Are three-dimensional spider webs defensive adaptations?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackledge, Todd

    LETTER Are three-dimensional spider webs defensive adaptations? Todd A. Blackledge1 *, Jonathan A-mail: tab42@cornell.edu Abstract Spider webs result from complex behaviours that have evolved under many selective pressures. Webs have been primarily considered to be foraging adaptations, neglecting

  17. Doctoral Defense "Low-Temperature Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Doctoral Defense "Low-Temperature Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor for Energy Recovery from Domestic such as anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) are emerging as one option to recover energy during domestic highlighting microbial community shifts in the bioreactor and biofilm during changes in membrane fouling

  18. School of Industrial Engineering and Management Doctoral Dissertation Defense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    School of Industrial Engineering and Management Doctoral Dissertation Defense Objectives methodology and the results. · Provide the advisory committee with a means for assuring that the dissertation dissertation proposal. · Provide the advisory committee with a final data point for verification of the student

  19. BETAVOLTAIC BATTERIES Long-Life Power for Defense & Medical Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BETAVOLTAIC BATTERIES Long-Life Power for Defense & Medical Markets NREL Industry Growth Forum Jonathan W. Greene, CEO November 2, 2009 #12;·! Patented Betavoltaics ­ tiny, long life batteries targeting electronic and isotope powered batteries MS - 14 yrs management and engineering ·!Expert in patent

  20. RISK MANAGEMENT AND TORT DEFENSE Sub-Chapter 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    1 #12;2 RISK MANAGEMENT AND TORT DEFENSE 2.6.203 Sub-Chapter 2 State Vehicle Use 2.6.201 INTRODUCTION (1) The following rules define acceptable uses for state-owned or leased motor pool vehicles guidelines, policies, insurance coverage exclusions, or regulations for vehicle/equipment fleet operations

  1. Towards Attack-Agnostic Defenses David Brumley and Dawn Song

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brumley, David

    Towards Attack-Agnostic Defenses David Brumley and Dawn Song Carnegie Mellon University {dbrumley,dawnsong}@cs.cmu.edu Abstract Internet attackers control hundreds of thousands to per- haps millions of computers, which they can use for a va- riety of different attacks. Common attacks include spam delivery, phishing, and DDo

  2. Embedded Electrical and Computer Engineering MASTER ORAL DEFENSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahmoodi, Hamid

    of this research is to design a low power integrated system that can be used in vivo for scanning the electrode. A model created in Python provides input vectors and output comparison for the verification processEmbedded Electrical and Computer Engineering MASTER ORAL DEFENSE TITLE: Low Power Scanner for High

  3. A Cooperative Cyber Defense for Securing Critical Infrastructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulp, Errin W.

    .g., the numerous private companies that make up North America's electrical power grids) that share computationalA Cooperative Cyber Defense for Securing Critical Infrastructures Glenn A. Fink glenn networked relationships. At electrical substations, it is common to find equipment from several companies

  4. On Clinical Trials in Psychiatry In Defense of the Traditional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On Clinical Trials in Psychiatry In Defense of the Traditional EÆcacy Trial The randomized controlled clinical trial is still a relatively new technology for as- sessing the value of therapeutic interven- tions, yet innovations in the design and analysis of clinical trials in psychiatry have lagged

  5. Technology Readiness Levels for Advanced Nuclear Fuels and Materials Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon Carmack

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Technology Readiness Level (TRL) process is used to quantitatively assess the maturity of a given technology. The TRL process has been developed and successfully used by the Department of Defense (DOD) for development and deployment of new technology and systems for defense applications. In addition, NASA has also successfully used the TRL process to develop and deploy new systems for space applications. Advanced nuclear fuels and materials development is a critical technology needed for closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Because the deployment of a new nuclear fuel forms requires a lengthy and expensive research, development, and demonstration program, applying the TRL concept to the advanced fuel development program is very useful as a management and tracking tool. This report provides definition of the technology readiness level assessment process as defined for use in assessing nuclear fuel technology development for the Advanced Fuel Campaign (AFC).

  6. Inhabiting cycles of maritime obsolescence : redirecting the National Defense Reserve Fleet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polansky, Nicholas W. (Nicholas Wilkes)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Defense is in a state of obsolescence. The metrics of risk have changed from threat of military invasion to that of weather. Infrastructure is in a state of transition. The Maritime Administration's National Defense Reserve ...

  7. Practical matters for defense contractors converting DoD technology to commercial markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ting, Carina Maria

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis asks if and how the defense contractor can profitably transfer the technology and institutional learning obtained from DoD funded R&D to commercial markets. There are numerous examples of very successful defense ...

  8. Study of Medical Students’ Malpractice Fear and Defensive Medicine: A “Hidden Curriculum?”

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, William; Rodriguez, Robert; Suarez, David; Fortman, Jonathan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Emergency Medicine Volume XV, NO . 3 : May 2014WM, et al. Defensive medicine among high-risk specialist293:2609-2617. 3. Defensive Medicine and Medical Practice.

  9. DEFENSE THREAT REDUCTION AGENCY 8725 JOHN J . KINGMAN ROAD, STOP 620 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    DEFENSE THREAT REDUCTION AGENCY 8725 JOHN J . KINGMAN ROAD, STOP 620 1 FORT BELVOIR, VA 22060-6201 February 28, 2013 Industry and Academia Partners of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency and U.S. Strategic of unceltainty for the entire Department of Defense. The Def1 ns Threat Reduction Agency and U. S. Strategic

  10. A Taxonomy of DDoS Attack and DDoS Defense Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ruby B.

    A Taxonomy of DDoS Attack and DDoS Defense Mechanisms Jelena Mirkovic 449 Smith Hall Computer the attacks and the defense approaches is overwhelming. This paper presents two taxonomies for classifying attacks and defenses, and thus provides researchers with a better understanding of the problem

  11. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE LUNG CANCER RESEARCH PROGRAM FISCAL YEAR 2013 STRATEGIC PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von der Heydt, Rüdiger

    DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE LUNG CANCER RESEARCH PROGRAM FISCAL YEAR 2013 STRATEGIC PLAN The Fiscal Year 2013 (FY13) Defense Appropriations Act provides for $10.5 million to the Department of Defense Lung Cancer Research Program (LCRP) to support innovative, high- impact lung cancer research. This program

  12. MARQUETTE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL ANNOUNCEMENT OF PUBLIC DEFENSE OF THE DISSERTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Matthew

    MARQUETTE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL ANNOUNCEMENT OF PUBLIC DEFENSE OF THE DISSERTATION This form obligates you, your Dissertation Director, and your committee to a public defense of your dissertation community. The dissertation defense schedule is published on the Graduate School's Web site. You are solely

  13. Testing a Collaborative DDoS Defense in a Red Team/Blue Team Exercise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Testing a Collaborative DDoS Defense in a Red Team/Blue Team Exercise Jelena Mirkovic, Member, IEEE, and performed October 2002 to May 2003. The goal of the exercise was to evaluate a collaborative DDoS defense in DDoS defense systems (e.g., avoiding reliance on timing mechanisms), and taught us many lessons about

  14. Interaction of electromagnetic pulse with commercial nuclear-power-plant systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ericson, D.M. Jr.; Strawe, D.F.; Sandberg, S.J.; Jones, V.K.; Rensner, G.D.; Shoup, R.W.; Hanson, R.J.; Williams, C.B.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the interaction of the electromagnetic pulse from a high altitude nuclear burst with commercial nuclear power plant systems. The potential vulnerability of systems required for safe shutdown of a specific nuclear power plant are explored. EMP signal coupling, induced plant response and component damage thresholds are established using techniques developed over several decades under Defense Nuclear Agency sponsorship. A limited test program was conducted to verify the coupling analysis technique as applied to a nuclear power plant. The results are extended, insofar as possible, to other nuclear plants.

  15. Nuclear Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, which will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay. Strong Los Alamos programs in nuclear data and nuclear theory supports...

  16. Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M Colonna

    2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights on the recent research activity, carried out by the Italian Community involved in the "Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics" field, will be presented.

  17. Sequential Defense Against Random and Intentional Attacks in Complex Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Pin-Yu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Network robustness against attacks is one of the most fundamental researches in network science as it is closely associated with the reliability and functionality of various networking paradigms. However, despite the study on intrinsic topological vulnerabilities to node removals, little is known on the network robustness when network defense mechanisms are implemented, especially for networked engineering systems equipped with detection capabilities. In this paper, a sequential defense mechanism is firstly proposed in complex networks for attack inference and vulnerability assessment, where the data fusion center sequentially infers the presence of an attack based on the binary attack status reported from the nodes in the network. The network robustness is evaluated in terms of the ability to identify the attack prior to network disruption under two major attack schemes, i.e., random and intentional attacks. We provide a parametric plug-in model for performance evaluation on the proposed mechanism and valida...

  18. January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for National Defense | OSTI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Wright, B. Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States) Investigations into seismic discrimination between earthquakes, chemical explosions and nuclear explosions...

  19. SRS ES and H Standards Compliance Program Implementation Plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hearn, W.H.

    1993-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    On March 8, 1990, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued Recommendation 90-2 to the Secretary of Energy. This recommendation, based upon the DNFSB`s initial review and evaluation of the content and implementation of standards relating to the design, construction, operations, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), called for three actions: identification of specific standards that apply to design, construction, operation and decommissioning of DOE facilities; assessment of the adequacy of those standards for protecting public health and safety; and determination of the extent to which they have and are being implemented. The purpose of this Implementation Plan is to define the single program for all sitewide and facility 90-2 ES and H Standards Compliance efforts, which will satisfy the HQ Implementation Plan, avoid duplicate efforts, be as simple and achievable as possible, include cost-saving innovations, use a graded approach based on facility hazards and future needs of facilities, and support configuration control for facility requirements. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been designated a pilot facility for the 90-2 program and has progressed with their facility program ahead of the site-level program. The DWPF, and other Government-Owned Contractor-Operated (GOCO) facilities that progress on an enhanced schedule, will serve as pilot facilities for the site-level program. The lessons learned with their requirement identifications, and their assessments of the adequacy of and their compliance with these requirements will be used to improve the efficiency of the site-level and subsequent programs.

  20. Technologies for detection of nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVolpi, A.

    1996-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Detection of smuggled nuclear materials at transit points requires monitoring unknown samples in large closed packages. This review contends that high-confidence nuclear-material detection requires induced fission as the primary mechanism, with passive radiation screening in a complementary role. With the right equipment, even small quantities of nuclear materials are detectable with a high probability at transit points. The equipment could also be linked synergistically with detectors of other contrabond. For screening postal mail and packages, passive monitors are probably more cost-effective. When a suspicious item is detected, a single active probe could then be used. Until active systems become mass produced, this two-stage screening/interrogation role for active/passive equipment is more economic for cargo at border crossings. For widespread monitoring of nuclear smuggling, it will probably be necessary to develop a system for simultaneously detecting most categories of contraband, including explosives and illicit drugs. With control of nuclear materials at known storage sites being the first line of defense, detection capabilities at international borders could establish a viable second line of defense against smuggling.

  1. Defenses against Covert-Communications in Multimedia and Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jainsky, Julien Sebastien 1981-

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    subversive communications to a much greater extent. 3 Furthermore, the acquisition of highly correlated multimedia provides fertile ground for advanced steganographic approaches. Covert communications in multimedia networks is of special concern...DEFENSES AGAINST COVERT-COMMUNICATIONS IN MULTIMEDIA AND SENSOR NETWORKS A Dissertation by JULIEN SEBASTIEN JAINSKY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  2. Defense against common mode failures in protection system design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyman, R.H.; Johnson, G.L.

    1997-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The introduction of digital instrumentation and control into reactor safety systems creates a heightened concern about common-mode failure. This paper discusses the concern and methods to cope with the concern. Common-mode failures have been a ``fact-of-life`` in existing systems. The informal introduction of defense-in-depth and diversity (D-in-D&D)-coupled with the fact that hardware common-mode failures are often distributed in time-has allowed systems to deal with past common-mode failures. However, identical software operating in identical redundant systems presents the potential for simultaneous failure. Consequently, the use of digital systems raises the concern about common-mode failure to a new level. A more methodical approach to mitigating common-mode failure is needed to address these concerns. Purposeful introduction of D-in-D&D has been used as a defense against common-mode failure in reactor protection systems. At least two diverse systems are provided to mitigate any potential initiating event. Additionally, diverse displays and controls are provided to allow the operator to monitor plant status and manually initiate engineered safety features. A special form of conimon-mode failure analysis called ``defense-in-depth and diversity analysis`` has been developed to identify possible conimon-mode failure vulnerabilities in digital systems. An overview of this analysis technique is provided.

  3. TOTAL MEASUREMENT UNCERTAINTY IN HOLDUP MEASUREMENTS AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KEELE, B.D.

    2007-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An approach to determine the total measurement uncertainty (TMU) associated with Generalized Geometry Holdup (GGH) [1,2,3] measurements was developed and implemented in 2004 and 2005 [4]. This paper describes a condensed version of the TMU calculational model, including recent developments. Recent modifications to the TMU calculation model include a change in the attenuation uncertainty, clarifying the definition of the forward background uncertainty, reducing conservatism in the random uncertainty by selecting either a propagation of counting statistics or the standard deviation of the mean, and considering uncertainty in the width and height as a part of the self attenuation uncertainty. In addition, a detection limit is calculated for point sources using equations derived from summary equations contained in Chapter 20 of MARLAP [5]. The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2007-1 to the Secretary of Energy identified a lack of requirements and a lack of standardization for performing measurements across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The DNFSB also recommended that guidance be developed for a consistent application of uncertainty values. As such, the recent modifications to the TMU calculational model described in this paper have not yet been implemented. The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) is continuing to perform uncertainty calculations as per Reference 4. Publication at this time is so that these concepts can be considered in developing a consensus methodology across the complex.

  4. Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Joseph; Furnstahl, Richard; Horoi, Mihai; Lusk, Rusty; Nazarewicz, Witold; Ng, Esmond; Thompson, Ian; Vary, James

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An understanding of the properties of atomic nuclei is crucial for a complete nuclear theory, for element formation, for properties of stars, and for present and future energy and defense applications. During the period of Dec. 1 2006 – Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. Until recently such an undertaking was hard to imagine, and even at the present time such an ambitious endeavor would be far beyond what a single researcher or a traditional research group could carry out.

  5. Formic Acid Free Flowsheet Development To Eliminate Catalytic Hydrogen Generation In The Defense Waste Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, Dan P.; Stone, Michael E.; Newell, J. David; Fellinger, Terri L.; Bricker, Jonathan M.

    2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) processes legacy nuclear waste generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during production of plutonium and tritium demanded by the Cold War. The nuclear waste is first treated via a complex sequence of controlled chemical reactions and then vitrified into a borosilicate glass form and poured into stainless steel canisters. Converting the nuclear waste into borosilicate glass canisters is a safe, effective way to reduce the volume of the waste and stabilize the radionuclides. Testing was initiated to determine whether the elimination of formic acid from the DWPF's chemical processing flowsheet would eliminate catalytic hydrogen generation. Historically, hydrogen is generated in chemical processing of alkaline High Level Waste sludge in DWPF. In current processing, sludge is combined with nitric and formic acid to neutralize the waste, reduce mercury and manganese, destroy nitrite, and modify (thin) the slurry rheology. The noble metal catalyzed formic acid decomposition produces hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Elimination of formic acid by replacement with glycolic acid has the potential to eliminate the production of catalytic hydrogen. Flowsheet testing was performed to develop the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet as an alternative to the nitric-formic flowsheet currently being processed at the DWPF. This new flowsheet has shown that mercury can be reduced and removed by steam stripping in DWPF with no catalytic hydrogen generation. All processing objectives were also met, including greatly reducing the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product yield stress as compared to the baseline nitric/formic flowsheet. Ten DWPF tests were performed with nonradioactive simulants designed to cover a broad compositional range. No hydrogen was generated in testing without formic acid.

  6. Nuclear Weapons Complex reconfiguration study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shortly after assuming duties as Secretary of Energy, I reviewed the Nuclear Weapons Complex Modernization Report'' submitted to the Congress in January 1989 as required by the National Defense Authorization Act of 1988 and 1989. My review showed that several of the report's assumptions needed to be re-evaluated. During this eighteen-month review, dramatic world changes forced further reassessments of the future Nuclear Weapons Complex. These changes are reflected in the new report. The new report presents a plan to achieve a reconfigured complex, called Complex-21. Complex-21 would be smaller, less diverse, and less expensive to operated than the Complex of today. Complex-21 would be able to safely and reliability support nuclear deterrent stockpile objectives set forth by the President and funded by the Congress. It would be consistent with realities of the emerging international security environment and flexible enough to accommodate the likely range of deterrent contingencies. In addition, Complex-21 would be constructed and operated to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local laws, regulations, and orders. Achieving Complex-21 will require significant resources. This report provides and organized approach toward selecting the most appropriate configuration for Complex-21, satisfying environmental requirements, and minimizing costs. The alternative -- to continue to use piecemeal fixes to run an antiquated complex -- will be more expensive and provide a less reliable Nuclear Weapons Complex. As a consequence, implementation of the Complex-21 plan is considered necessary to ensure continued viability of our nuclear deterrent.

  7. A Uniform Framework of Global Nuclear Materials Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupree, S.A.; Mangan, D.L.; Sanders, T.L; Sellers, T.A.

    1999-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Global Nuclear Materials Management (GNMM) anticipates and supports a growing international recognition of the importance of uniform, effective management of civilian, excess defense, and nuclear weapons materials. We expect thereto be a continuing increase in both the number of international agreements and conventions on safety, security, and transparency of nuclear materials, and the number of U.S.-Russian agreements for the safety, protection, and transparency of weapons and excess defense materials. This inventory of agreements and conventions may soon expand into broad, mandatory, international programs that will include provisions for inspection, verification, and transparency, To meet such demand the community must build on the resources we have, including State agencies, the IAEA and regional organizations. By these measures we will meet the future expectations for monitoring and inspection of materials, maintenance of safety and security, and implementation of transparency measures.

  8. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quiter, Brian Joseph

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Journal of Nuclear Technology. [46] C.J. Hagmann and J.Library for Nuclear Science and Technology,” Nuclear Dataof Standards and Technology daughter nuclear data processing

  9. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Reasoner: PNNL FY12 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hohimer, Ryan E.; Pomiak, Yekaterina G.; Neorr, Peter A.; Gastelum, Zoe N.; Strasburg, Jana D.

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Building on previous internal investments and leveraging ongoing advancements in semantic technologies, PNNL implemented a formal reasoning framework and applied it to a specific challenge in nuclear nonproliferation. The Semantic Nonproliferation Analysis Platform (SNAP) was developed as a preliminary graphical user interface to demonstrate the potential power of the underlying semantic technologies to analyze and explore facts and relationships relating to the nuclear fuel cycle (NFC). In developing this proof of concept prototype, the utility and relevancy of semantic technologies to the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D) has been better understood.

  10. Most Viewed Documents for National Defense: September 2014 |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Kenneth C. (1955) 17 Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Technology Roadmap Casey, Leslie A. (2014) 17 Manual for the prediction of blast and fragment loadings...

  11. Microsoft Word - Defense Science Quarterly Nov 2007 final.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    processes that drive a nuclear weapon: 1) fission of uranium and plutonium, and 2) the thermonuclear fusion process. The calculation of neutron multiplication in the fission...

  12. Meeting Department of Defense non-hazardous solid waste goals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eakes, W.S.; Comstock, J.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will discuss the previous and present Department of Defense (DOD) non-hazardous solid waste goals and how Navy and Marine Corps installation collect solid waste data and measure the goals. The installation and central data collection systems used, data collection problems and solutions, data quality, and the yearly measure. The paper will also discuss the original solid waste reduction and diversion goal and how the Navy and Marine Corps performed. The new DOD landfill and incineration diversion goal will be discussed and some techniques the Navy will use to meet the new goals.

  13. The Smith plan, Texas frontier defense in the 1850's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frysinger, Victor Francis

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - bat the Indians from the annexation of Texas in 1845 up until the departure of General Persifor F . Smith in April, 1856. The early years of statehood were filled with confusion, dis- organization, and disunity as far as frontier defense.... General Smith in Texas, 1851-1856 IV. Aftermath and Evaluation 24 85 Appendix: Status of Forces in Texas, 1851-1856 . 93 Bibliography 105 Vita 113 LIST OF MAPS Map 1 ACTIVE MILITARY POSTS IN TEXAS, 1849 2 THE SMITH PLAN COMPLETED& 1852 3 ACT1VE...

  14. Ike Skelton Defense Authorization Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty, Texas:ITCSolidIdaho‎ |Idylwood,Ike Skelton Defense

  15. Defense Programs: the mission | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITIONPortal Decision Support forDeep Insights from8,Defense

  16. National Defense University (NDU) Application | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many DevilsForum | Department of EnergyInnovationNational Defense

  17. Nuclear Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Nuclear Safety Division which has specific responsibility for managing the development, analysis, review, and approval of non-reactor nuclear facility safety bases...

  18. Nuclear Navy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This video tells the story of the Navy's development of nuclear power and its application in long-range submarines and the growing nuclear surface force. Narrated by Frank Blair.

  19. Nuclear Navy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This video tells the story of the Navy`s development of nuclear power and its application in long-range submarines and the growing nuclear surface force. Narrated by Frank Blair.

  20. Nuclear Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Nuclear Safety Division (NSD) which has specific responsibility for managing the development, analysis, review, and approval of non-reactor nuclear facility safety...

  1. Toward US-Russian strategic defense: Ban the ABM Treaty now

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savelyev, A.

    1992-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Boris Yeltsin and George Bush agreed on June 17 to develop and deploy a jointly controlled global protection system against ballistic missile strikes. Three teams of Russian and American experts now are studying the Bush-Yeltsin idea, called the Joint Defense Program (JDP). The drive to develop a U.S.-Russian defense system, however, faces a formidable obstacle-the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM) Treaty, which prohibits not only the deployment of territorial defenses against strategic missiles but the creation of an infrastructure (or `base`) for such a defense. If America and Russia hope to build a common defense against ballistic missiles, they first will have to remove ABM Treaty obstacles to expanded U.S.-Russian cooperation and missile defense.

  2. Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan - Kingston Container Terminal, Port of Kingston, Jamaica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deforest, Thomas J.; VanDyke, Damon S.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan - Kingston Container Terminal, Port of Kingston, Jamaica was written for the Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative. The purpose of the Operational Testing and Evaluation (OT&E) phase of the project is to prepare for turnover of the Megaports system supplied by U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) located at the Kingston Container Terminal (KCT) of the Port of Kingston, Jamaica to the Government of Jamaica (GOJ). Activities conducted during the OT&E phase must demonstrate that the Megaports system can be operated effectively in real time by Jamaica Customs and KCT personnel to the satisfaction of the DOE/NNSA. These activities will also determine if the Megaports system, as installed and accepted, is performing according to the Megaports Program objectives such that the system is capable of executing the mission of the Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative. The OT&E phase of the project also provides an opportunity to consider potential improvements to the system and to take remedial action if performance deficiencies are identified during the course of evaluation. Changes to the system should be considered under an appropriate change-control process. DOE/NNSA will determine that OT&E is complete by examining whether the Megaports system is performing as intended and that the GOJ is fully capable of operating the system independently without continued onsite support from the U.S. team.

  3. NNSA and Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board certifications free up $47

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLoveReferenceAgendaSecurityAbout Us / OurEnriched Uranium |million

  4. General Technical Base Qualification Standard (DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologiesNATIONAL003Not Measurement SENSITIVE

  5. 2012 Annual Planning Summary for NNSA Defense Nuclear NonProliferation |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment ofCBFO-13-3322(EE) | Department1The ongoing and

  6. Linton Brooks Assumes Post as Deputy Administrator for NNSA Defense Nuclear

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatestCenter (LMI-EFRC) -Choices toLeeLinearb A By

  7. Sabotage at Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purvis, James W.

    1999-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently there has been a noted worldwide increase in violent actions including attempted sabotage at nuclear power plants. Several organizations, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, have guidelines, recommendations, and formal threat- and risk-assessment processes for the protection of nuclear assets. Other examples are the former Defense Special Weapons Agency, which used a risk-assessment model to evaluate force-protection security requirements for terrorist incidents at DOD military bases. The US DOE uses a graded approach to protect its assets based on risk and vulnerability assessments. The Federal Aviation Administration and Federal Bureau of Investigation conduct joint threat and vulnerability assessments on high-risk US airports. Several private companies under contract to government agencies use formal risk-assessment models and methods to identify security requirements. The purpose of this paper is to survey these methods and present an overview of all potential types of sabotage at nuclear power plants. The paper discusses emerging threats and current methods of choice for sabotage--especially vehicle bombs and chemical attacks. Potential consequences of sabotage acts, including economic and political; not just those that may result in unacceptable radiological exposure to the public, are also discussed. Applicability of risk-assessment methods and mitigation techniques are also presented.

  8. Nuclear threats from small states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahan, J.H.

    1994-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    What are the policy implications regarding proliferation and counter proliferation of nuclear weapons among Third World states. How does deterrence operate outside the parameters of superpower confrontation as defined by the cold war elaborate system of constraints enforced by concepts like mutual assured destruction, and counter-value and counter-force targeting. How can US policymakers devise contingencies for dealing with nuclear threats posed by countries like North Korea, Libya, Iraq, Iran, and Syria. These are some of the unsettling but nevertheless important questions addressed by the author in this monograph. In his analysis, Mr. Jerome Kahan examines the likelihood that one or more of these countries will use nuclear weapons before the year 2000. He also offers a framework that policymakers and planners might use in assessing US interests in preempting the use of nuclear weapons or in retaliating for their use. Ironically, with the end of the cold war, it is imperative that defense strategists, policymakers, and military professionals think about the `unthinkable`. In the interest of fostering debate on this important subject, the Strategic Studies Institute commends this insightful monograph.

  9. Mercury Reduction and Removal from High Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility - 12511

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behrouzi, Aria [Savannah River Remediation, LLC (United States); Zamecnik, Jack [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina, 29808 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility processes legacy nuclear waste generated at the Savannah River Site during production of enriched uranium and plutonium required by the Cold War. The nuclear waste is first treated via a complex sequence of controlled chemical reactions and then vitrified into a borosilicate glass form and poured into stainless steel canisters. Converting the nuclear waste into borosilicate glass is a safe, effective way to reduce the volume of the waste and stabilize the radionuclides. One of the constituents in the nuclear waste is mercury, which is present because it served as a catalyst in the dissolution of uranium-aluminum alloy fuel rods. At high temperatures mercury is corrosive to off-gas equipment, this poses a major challenge to the overall vitrification process in separating mercury from the waste stream prior to feeding the high temperature melter. Mercury is currently removed during the chemical process via formic acid reduction followed by steam stripping, which allows elemental mercury to be evaporated with the water vapor generated during boiling. The vapors are then condensed and sent to a hold tank where mercury coalesces and is recovered in the tank's sump via gravity settling. Next, mercury is transferred from the tank sump to a purification cell where it is washed with water and nitric acid and removed from the facility. Throughout the chemical processing cell, compounds of mercury exist in the sludge, condensate, and off-gas; all of which present unique challenges. Mercury removal from sludge waste being fed to the DWPF melter is required to avoid exhausting it to the environment or any negative impacts to the Melter Off-Gas system. The mercury concentration must be reduced to a level of 0.8 wt% or less before being introduced to the melter. Even though this is being successfully accomplished, the material balances accounting for incoming and collected mercury are not equal. In addition, mercury has not been effectively purified and collected in the Mercury Purification Cell (MPC) since 2008. A significant cleaning campaign aims to bring the MPC back up to facility housekeeping standards. Two significant investigations are being undertaken to restore mercury collection. The SMECT mercury pump has been removed from the tank and will be functionally tested. Also, research is being conducted by the Savannah River National Laboratory to determine the effects of antifoam addition on the behavior of mercury. These path forward items will help us better understand what is occurring in the mercury collection system and ultimately lead to an improved DWPF production rate and mercury recovery rate. (authors)

  10. Nuclear weapons, nuclear effects, nuclear war

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bing, G.F.

    1991-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a brief and mostly non-technical description of the militarily important features of nuclear weapons, of the physical phenomena associated with individual explosions, and of the expected or possible results of the use of many weapons in a nuclear war. Most emphasis is on the effects of so-called ``strategic exchanges.``

  11. INSTALLATION OF BUBBLERS IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITED DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.; Iverson, D.

    2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC assumed the liquid waste contract at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the summer of 2009. The main contractual agreement was to close 22 High Level Waste (HLW) tanks in eight years. To achieve this aggressive commitment, faster waste processing throughout the SRS liquid waste facilities will be required. Part of the approach to achieve faster waste processing is to increase the canister production rate of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) from approximately 200 canisters filled with radioactive waste glass per year to 400 canisters per year. To reach this rate for melter throughput, four bubblers were installed in the DWPF Melter in the late summer of 2010. This effort required collaboration between SRR, SRR critical subcontractor EnergySolutions, and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, including the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The tasks included design and fabrication of the bubblers and related equipment, testing of the bubblers for various technical issues, the actual installation of the bubblers and related equipment, and the initial successful operation of the bubblers in the DWPF Melter.

  12. Predictive Fallout Composition Modeling: Improvements and Applications of the Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooper, David A [ORNL; Jodoin, Vincent J [ORNL; Lee, Ronald W [ORNL; Monterial, Mateusz [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper outlines several improvements to the Particle Activity Module of the Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code (DELFIC). The modeling of each phase of the fallout process is discussed within DELFIC to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations with the code for modeling and simulation. Expansion of the DELFIC isotopic library to include actinides and light elements is shown. Several key features of the new library are demonstrated, including compliance with ENDF/B-VII standards, augmentation of hardwired activated soil and actinide decay calculations with exact Bateman calculations, and full physical and chemical fractionation of all material inventories. Improvements to the radionuclide source term are demonstrated, including the ability to specify heterogeneous fission types and the ability to import source terms from irradiation calculations using the Oak Ridge Isotope Generation (ORIGEN) code. Additionally, the dose, kerma, and effective dose conversion factors are revised. Finally, the application of DELFIC for consequence management planning and forensic analysis is presented. For consequence management, DELFIC is shown to provide disaster recovery teams with simulations of real-time events, including the location, composition, time of arrival, activity rates, and dose rates of fallout, accounting for site-specific atmospheric effects. The results from DELFIC are also demonstrated for use by nuclear forensics teams to plan collection routes (including the determination of optimal collection locations), estimate dose rates to collectors, and anticipate the composition of material at collection sites. These capabilities give mission planners the ability to maximize their effectiveness in the field while minimizing risk to their collectors.

  13. An army for the people : the self- defense forces and society in postwar Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sasaki, Tomoyuki

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    saiban kankei shiry?. SDF-related Newspapers Akashiya.Containing Protest: Anti-SDF Litigation and the Defensethe Self-Defense Forces (SDF), established close ideological

  14. Defense Program Equivalencies for Technical Qualification Standard Competencies12/12/1995

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Defense Programs has undertaken an effort to compare the competencies in the GeneralTechnical Base Qualification Standard and the Functional Area Qualification Standards withvarious positions in...

  15. Defense Science and Technology Innovation Teams: Mechanisms and Indicators for Indigenous Innovation in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WRIGHT, Darren J.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STUDY OF INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY IN CHINA RESEARCH BRIEFThe Study of Innovation and Technology in China (SITC) is aDefense Science and Technology Innovation Teams: Mechanisms

  16. ALERTEES PAR LA MORT CELLULAIRE, NOS DEFENSES ANTIVIRALES METTENT LE TURBO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loewith, Robbie

    MORT CELLULAIRE, NOS DEFENSES ANTIVIRALES METTENT LE TURBO Genève, le 9 février 2012 SOUS EMBARGO JUSQU

  17. An army for the people : the self- defense forces and society in postwar Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sasaki, Tomoyuki

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    purpose of defense. ” Judge Fukushima, however, stated thatof the base. Judge Fukushima Shigeo argued that tree fellingfiled their lawsuit. Judge Fukushima Shigeo, the same judge

  18. Tomato-Potato Aphid Interactions: Insights into Plant Defense and the Aphid Pest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atamian, Hagop Sarkis

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    induced defenses in tomato on the potato aphid, Macrosiphumin arbuscular mycorrhizal potato root colonization. Funct.and behavior of the potato aphid, Macrosiphum euphorbiae.

  19. Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendel, J.E. (compiler)

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program brought six major US laboratories together for three years of cooperative research. The participants reached a consensus that solubility of the leached glass species, particularly solubility in the altered surface layer, is the dominant factor controlling the leaching behavior of defense waste glass in a system in which the flow of leachant is constrained, as it will be in a deep geologic repository. Also, once the surface of waste glass is contacted by ground water, the kinetics of establishing solubility control are relatively rapid. The concentrations of leached species reach saturation, or steady-state concentrations, within a few months to a year at 70 to 90/sup 0/C. Thus, reaction kinetics, which were the main subject of earlier leaching mechanisms studies, are now shown to assume much less importance. The dominance of solubility means that the leach rate is, in fact, directly proportional to ground water flow rate. Doubling the flow rate doubles the effective leach rate. This relationship is expected to obtain in most, if not all, repository situations.

  20. Defense waste vitrification studies during FY-1981. Summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjorklund, W.J. (comp.)

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both simulated alkaline defense wastes and simulated acidic defense wastes (formed by treating alkaline waste with formic acid) were successfully vitrified in direct liquid-fed melter experiments. The vitrification process was improved while using the formate-treated waste. Leach resistance was essentially the same. Off-gas entrainment was the primary mechanism for material exiting the melter. When formate waste was vitrified, the flow behavior of the off gas from the melter changed dramatically from an erratic surging behavior to a more quiet, even flow. Hydrogen and CO were detectable while processing formate feed; however, levels exceeding the flamability limits in air were never approached. Two types of melter operation were tested during the year, one involving boost power. Several boosting methods located within the melter plenum were tested. When lid heating was being used, water spray cooling in the off gas was required. Countercurrent spray cooling was more effective than cocurrent spray cooling. Materials of construction for the off-gas system were examined. Inconel-690 is preferred in the plenum area. Inspection of the pilot-scale melter found that corrosion of the K-3 refractory and Inconel-690 electrodes was minimal. An overheating incident occurred with the LFCM in which glass temperatures up to 1480/sup 0/C were experienced. Lab-scale vitrification tests to study mercury behavior were also completed this year. 53 figures, 63 tables.

  1. Unmanned and Unattended Response Capability for Homeland Defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BENNETT, PHIL C.

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis was conducted of the potential for unmanned and unattended robotic technologies for forward-based, immediate response capabilities that enables access and controlled task performance. The authors analyze high-impact response scenarios in conjunction with homeland security organizations, such as the NNSA Office of Emergency Response, the FBI, the National Guard, and the Army Technical Escort Unit, to cover a range of radiological, chemical and biological threats. They conducted an analysis of the potential of forward-based, unmanned and unattended robotic technologies to accelerate and enhance emergency and crisis response by Homeland Defense organizations. Response systems concepts were developed utilizing new technologies supported by existing emerging threats base technologies to meet the defined response scenarios. These systems will pre-position robotic and remote sensing capabilities stationed close to multiple sites for immediate action. Analysis of assembled systems included experimental activities to determine potential efficacy in the response scenarios, and iteration on systems concepts and remote sensing and robotic technologies, creating new immediate response capabilities for Homeland Defense.

  2. Reevaluation of Vitrified High-Level Waste Form Criteria for Potential Cost Savings at the Defense Waste Processing Facility - 13598

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, J.W. [Savannah River Remediation (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation (United States); Marra, S.L.; Herman, C.C. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS) the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been immobilizing SRS's radioactive high level waste (HLW) sludge into a durable borosilicate glass since 1996. Currently the DWPF has poured over 3,500 canisters, all of which are compliant with the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Acceptance Product Specifications for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms (WAPS) and therefore ready to be shipped to a federal geologic repository for permanent disposal. Due to DOE petitioning to withdraw the Yucca Mountain License Application (LA) from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2010 and thus no clear disposal path for SRS canistered waste forms, there are opportunities for cost savings with future canister production at DWPF and other DOE producer sites by reevaluating high-level waste form requirements and compliance strategies and reducing/eliminating those that will not negatively impact the quality of the canistered waste form. (authors)

  3. Status Update on Action 1b: Analysis of WP&C Deficiencies Identified by the DNFSB

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Stephen L. Domotor, Office of Analysis, Office of Health, Safety and Security. Office of Analysis, Office of Health, Safety and Security. Analysis of Integrated Safety Management at the Activity Level: Work Planning and Control-Final Report,, U.S. Department of Energy, August 1, 2013.

  4. Action 1b: Analysis of WP&C Deficiencies Identified by the DNFSB

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    performing was, in fact, part of the work package. 35 Example from ORPS Reports HEPA Vacuum Sludge Removal Performed without a Radiation Work Permit This occurrence highlights...

  5. DOE Response to the DNFSB Technical Report Task 2B | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout »Department of2Violating Minimum ApplianceEnergy

  6. Action 1b: Analysis of WP&C Deficiencies Identified by the DNFSB

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'s Reply Comments AT&T, SENSI NOT27 Acquisition Letter

  7. Comments of the Renewable Northwest Project And the Natural Resources Defense Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comments of the Renewable Northwest Project And the Natural Resources Defense Council, 2004 The Renewable Northwest Project (RNP) and the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) appreciate to the recommendations on renewable resources. We agree with many of the comments submitted by the NW Energy coalition

  8. Cross-Layer Attack and Defense in Cognitive Radio Networks Wenkai Wang and Yan (Lindsay) Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yan Lindsay

    Cross-Layer Attack and Defense in Cognitive Radio Networks Wenkai Wang and Yan (Lindsay) Sun ECE research on security issues in cognitive radio networks mainly focuses on attack and defense in individual network layers. However, the attackers do not necessarily restrict themselves within the boundaries

  9. Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense-in-Depth Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Fabro

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information infrastructures across many public and private domains share several common attributes regarding IT deployments and data communications. This is particularly true in the control systems domain. A majority of the systems use robust architectures to enhance business and reduce costs by increasing the integration of external, business, and control system networks. However, multi-network integration strategies often lead to vulnerabilities that greatly reduce the security of an organization, and can expose mission-critical control systems to cyber threats. This document provides guidance and direction for developing ‘defense-in-depth’ strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a multi-tier information architecture that requires: • Maintenance of various field devices, telemetry collection, and/or industrial-level process systems • Access to facilities via remote data link or modem • Public facing services for customer or corporate operations • A robust business environment that requires connections among the control system domain, the external Internet, and other peer organizations.

  10. Control Systems Cyber Security:Defense in Depth Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Kuipers; Mark Fabro

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information infrastructures across many public and private domains share several common attributes regarding IT deployments and data communications. This is particularly true in the control systems domain. A majority of the systems use robust architectures to enhance business and reduce costs by increasing the integration of external, business, and control system networks. However, multi-network integration strategies often lead to vulnerabilities that greatly reduce the security of an organization, and can expose mission-critical control systems to cyber threats. This document provides guidance and direction for developing ‘defense-in-depth’ strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a multi-tier information architecture that requires: Maintenance of various field devices, telemetry collection, and/or industrial-level process systems Access to facilities via remote data link or modem Public facing services for customer or corporate operations A robust business environment that requires connections among the control system domain, the external Internet, and other peer organizations.

  11. 2013 Nuclear Workforce Development ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Workforce Development Day Tuesday, October 22, 2013 Nuclear Medicine Topics: Pathways of Practice in Nuclear Medicine Radiopharmacy Patient Care ...

  12. Nuclear Counterterrorism

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order defines requirements for the protection of sensitive improvised nuclear device information and provides a framework to support DOE activities related to nuclear counterterrorism. (A supplemental DOE Manual, Control of and Access to Improvised Nuclear Device Information, provides requirements and procedures for protecting Sigma 20 information.) Appendices A and B are Official Use Only. Point of contact is Adam Boyd (NA-82), 202-586-0010. Cancels DOE O 457.1 and DOE M 457.1-1.

  13. Nuclear Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilhena and Bardo E.J. Bodmann Carbon-#1;? in Terrestrial and Aquatic Environment of Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant: Sources of Production, Releases and Dose Estimates #3;?? Jonas Mazeika Impact of radionuclide discharges from Temel?n Nuclear Power... (chapter 5), ? Instrumentation and control (chapter 6), ? Diagnostics (chapter 7), ? Safety evaluation methods (chapters 6, 8, 9 and 10), ? Environment and nuclear power plants (chapters 11 - 15), ? Human factors (chapter 16), ? Software development...

  14. Active, Non-Intrusive Inspection Technologies for Homeland Defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James L. Jones

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Active, non-intrusive inspection or interrogation technologies have been used for 100 years - with the primary focus being radiographic imaging. During the last 50 years, various active interrogation systems have been investigated and most have revealed many unique and interesting capabilities and advantages that have already benefited the general public. Unfortunately, except for medical and specific industrial applications, these unique capabilities have not been widely adopted, largely due to the complexity of the technology, the overconfident reliance on passive detection systems to handle most challenges, and the unrealistic public concerns regarding radiation safety issues for a given active inspection deployment. The unique homeland security challenges facing the United States today are inviting more "out-of-the-box" solutions and are demanding the effective technological solutions that only active interrogation systems can provide. While revolutionary new solutions are always desired, these technology advancements are rare, and when found, usually take a long time to fully understand and implement for a given application. What's becoming more evident is that focusing on under-developed, but well-understood, active inspection technologies can provide many of the needed "out-of-the-box" solutions. This paper presents a brief historical overview of active interrogation. It identifies some of the major homeland defense challenges being confronted and the commercial and research technologies presently available and being pursued. Finally, the paper addresses the role of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and its partner, the Idaho Accelerator Center at Idaho State University, in promoting and developing active inspection technologies for homeland defense.

  15. Natlonal Nuclear Security Admlnlstratlon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Defense Programs and 1 all believe that the management system proposed by Honeywell, together with the relief fiom DOE Directive requirements discussed below, will...

  16. Nuclear Data Verification and Standardization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karam, Lisa R.; Arif, Muhammad; Thompson, Alan K.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this interagency program is to provide accurate neutron interaction verification and standardization data for the U.S. Department of Energy Division of Nuclear Physics programs which include astrophysics, radioactive beam studies, and heavy-ion reactions. The measurements made in this program are also useful to other programs that indirectly use the unique properties of the neutron for diagnostic and analytical purposes. These include homeland security, personnel health and safety, nuclear waste disposal, treaty verification, national defense, and nuclear based energy production. The work includes the verification of reference standard cross sections and related neutron data employing the unique facilities and capabilities at NIST and other laboratories as required; leadership and participation in international intercomparisons and collaborations; and the preservation of standard reference deposits. An essential element of the program is critical evaluation of neutron interaction data standards including international coordinations. Data testing of critical data for important applications is included. The program is jointly supported by the Department of Energy and the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

  17. PROBING DENSE NUCLEAR MATTER VIA NUCLEAR COLLISIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, H.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    University of California. LBL-12095 Probing Dense NuclearMatter Nuclear Collisions* v~a H. Stocker, M.Gyulassy and J. Boguta Nuclear Science Division Lawrence

  18. Ed. D Dissertation Defense Report Recommendation for Award of the Doctor of Education (Ed.D) Degree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Ed. D Dissertation Defense Report And Recommendation for Award of the Doctor of Education (Ed: ______________________ Concentration (Check One): Ed.D ­ Curriculum Studies Ed.D ­ Educational Administration Dissertation Defense Date: _______________________________________ Members of the Dissertation Committee

  19. Defensive Investments and the Demand for Air Quality: Evidence from the NOx Budget Program and Ozone Reductions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deschênes, Olivier

    Willingness to pay for air quality is a function of health and the costly defensive investments that contribute to health, but there is little research assessing the empirical importance of defensive investments. The setting ...

  20. Changes in Russia's Military and Nuclear Doctrine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolkov, Benjamin M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Balatsky, Galya I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1993, the Russian Federation set out a new military doctrine that would determine the direction of its armed forces until President Putin set out the next doctrine in 2000. The Russian Federation creating the doctrine was new; the USSR had recently collapsed, Gorbachev - the creator of the predecessor to this doctrine in 1987 - was out of office, and the new Russian military had only been formed in May, 1992.1 The analysis of the 1993 doctrine is as follows: a definition of how doctrine is defined; a short history of Russian military doctrine leading up to the 1993 doctrine (officially the Basic Provisions of the Military Doctrine of the Russian Federation); and finally, what the doctrine established. An overview of the 1993 doctrine is: (1) Russia's 1993 doctrine was a return to older, more aggressive doctrine as a result of stability concerns surrounding the recent collapse of the USSR; (2) Russia turned from Gorbachev's 'defensive defense' in the 1987 doctrine to aggressive defense with the option of preempting or striking back against an aggressor; (3) Russia was deeply concerned about how nationalism would affect the former Soviet Republics, particularly in respect to the ethnic Russians still living abroad; and (4) Nuclear doctrine pledged to not be the first to use nuclear weapons but provided for the potential for escalation from a conventional to a nuclear war. The 2000 doctrine (officially the Russian Federation Military Doctrine) was created in a more stable world than the 1993 doctrine was. The Russian Federation had survived independence and the 'threat of direct military aggression against the Russian Federation and its allies' had diminished. It had secured all of the nuclear weapons from its neighbors Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan, and had elected a new president, Vladimir Putin, to replace Boris Yeltsin. Yet, even as the doctrine took more defensive tones than the 1993 doctrine, it expanded its nuclear options. Below are a new definition of what doctrine meant in 2000 and an outline of the 2000 doctrine. An overview of the 2000 doctrine is: (1) The 2000 doctrine was a return to a more defensive posture; the threat of nuclear retaliation, rather than that of preemptive force, would be its deterrence; (2) In order to strengthen its nuclear deterrence, Russia extended and redefined the cases in which nuclear weapons could be used to include a wider range of conflict types and a larger spectrum of attackers; and (3) Russia's threats changed to reflect its latest fear of engaging in a limited conflict with no prospect of the use of nuclear deterrence. In 2006, the defense minister and deputy prime minister Sergei Ivanov announced that the government was starting on a draft of a future doctrine. Four years later, in 2010, the Military Doctrine of the Russian Federation was put into effect with the intent of determining Russian doctrine until 2020. The 2010 doctrine, like all previous doctrines, was a product of the times in which it was written. Gone were many of the fears that had followed Russia for the past two decades. Below are an examination of the 2010 definition of doctrine as well as a brief analysis of the 2010 doctrine and its deviations from past doctrines. An overview of the 2010 doctrine is: (1) The new doctrine emphasizes the political centralization of command both in military policy and the use of nuclear weapons; (2) Nuclear doctrine remains the same in many aspects including the retention of first-use; (3) At the same time, doctrine was narrowed to using nuclear weapons only when the Russian state's existence is in danger; to continue strong deterrence, Russia also opted to follow the United States by introducing precision conventional weapons; (4) NATO is defined as Russia's primary external threat because of its increased global presence and its attempt to recruit states that are part of the Russian 'bloc'; and (5) The 2000 doctrine's defensive stance was left out of the doctrine; rumored options for use of nuclear weapons in local wars and in preemptive strikes were also left out.

  1. In Defense of the National Labs and Big-Budget Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodwin, J R

    2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to present the unofficial and unsanctioned opinions of a Visiting Scientist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on the values of LLNL and the other National Labs. The basic founding value and goal of the National Labs is big-budget scientific research, along with smaller-budget scientific research that cannot easily be done elsewhere. The most important example in the latter category is classified defense-related research. The historical guiding light here is the Manhattan Project. This endeavor was unique in human history, and might remain so. The scientific expertise and wealth of an entire nation was tapped in a project that was huge beyond reckoning, with no advance guarantee of success. It was in many respects a clash of scientific titans, with a large supporting cast, collaborating toward a single well-defined goal. Never had scientists received so much respect, so much money, and so much intellectual freedom to pursue scientific progress. And never was the gap between theory and implementation so rapidly narrowed, with results that changed the world, completely. Enormous resources are spent at the national or international level on large-scale scientific projects. LLNL has the most powerful computer in the world, Blue Gene/L. (Oops, Los Alamos just seized the title with Roadrunner; such titles regularly change hands.) LLNL also has the largest laser in the world, the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) has the most powerful microscope in the world. Not only is it beyond the resources of most large corporations to make such expenditures, but the risk exceeds the possible rewards for those corporations that could. Nor can most small countries afford to finance large scientific projects, and not even the richest can afford largess, especially if Congress is under major budget pressure. Some big-budget research efforts are funded by international consortiums, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, and the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) in Cadarache, France, a magnetic-confinement fusion research project. The postWWII histories of particle and fusion physics contain remarkable examples of both international competition, with an emphasis on secrecy, and international cooperation, with an emphasis on shared knowledge and resources. Initiatives to share sometimes came from surprising directions. Most large-scale scientific projects have potential defense applications. NIF certainly does; it is primarily designed to create small-scale fusion explosions. Blue Gene/L operates in part in service to NIF, and in part to various defense projects. The most important defense projects include stewardship of the national nuclear weapons stockpile, and the proposed redesign and replacement of those weapons with fewer, safer, more reliable, longer-lived, and less apocalyptic warheads. Many well-meaning people will consider the optimal lifetime of a nuclear weapon to be zero, but most thoughtful people, when asked how much longer they think this nation will require them, will ask for some time to think. NIF is also designed to create exothermic small-scale fusion explosions. The malapropos 'exothermic' here is a convenience to cover a profusion of complexities, but the basic idea is that the explosions will create more recoverable energy than was used to create them. One can hope that the primary future benefits of success for NIF will be in cost-effective generation of electrical power through controlled small-scale fusion reactions, rather than in improved large-scale fusion explosions. Blue Gene/L also services climate research, genomic research, materials research, and a myriad of other computational problems that become more feasible, reliable, and precise the larger the number of computational nodes employed. Blue Gene/L has to be sited within a security complex for obvious reasons, but its value extends to the nation and the world. There is a duality here between large-scale scientific research machines and the supercomputers used

  2. Deputy Secretary Poneman Discusses Nuclear Safety at the IAEA | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJunetrack graphics4 VolumeAgua Caliente(DNFSB)ofSelected toof

  3. National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  4. Nuclear war, nuclear proliferation, and their consequences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aga Khan, S.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book presents papers on nuclear weapons proliferation. Topics considered include the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and its future, the spread of nuclear weapons among nations, the link between horizontal and vertical proliferation, national security, nuclear disarmament, the impact of nuclear weapons on Third World regional conflicts, the global effects of a nuclear war, medical effects on human populations, the nuclear winter, the nuclear arms race, and arms control.

  5. NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: neutron flux, cur- rent noise, vibration diagnostics: Swedish Nuclear Powe

  6. Nuclear Counterterrorism

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order defines requirements for the protection of sensitive improvised nuclear device information and provides a framework to support DOE activities related to nuclear counterterrorism. (A supplemental DOE Manual, Control of and Access to Improvised Nuclear Device Information, provides requirements and procedures for protecting Sigma 20 information. The Manual is Official Use Only, and is not available on the Directives Portal. The point of contact for the Manual is Randall Weidman, NA-121.2, 202-586-4582.) Canceled by DOE O 457.1A

  7. Environmental management requirements/defensible costs project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) used a systems engineering approach to develop the first formal requirements baseline for Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Environmental Management (EM) Programs. The recently signed Settlement Agreement with the State of Idaho (Batt Agreement), along with dramatically reduced EM funding targets from Department of Energy (DOE) headquarters, drove the immediacy of this effort. Programs have linked top-level requirements to work scope to cost estimates. All EM work, grouped by decision units, was scrubbed by INEL EM programs and by an independent {open_quotes}Murder Board.{close_quotes} Direct participation of upper level management from LITCO and the DOE-Idaho Operations Office ensured best information and decisions. The result is a scrubbed down, defensible budget tied to top-level requirements for use in the upcoming DOE-Headquarters` budget workout, the Internal Review Board, the FY98 Activity Data Sheets submittal, and preparation of the FY97 control accounts and out-year plans. In addition to the remarkable accomplishments during the past eight weeks, major issues were identified and documented and follow-on tasks are underway which will lead to further improvements in INEL EM program management.

  8. Nuclear Celebrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: The North Korean situation is frightening for many reasons but none, perhaps, more eerily disturbing than images of North Koreans celebrating in brightly colored costumes just days after the nation's underground nuclear test...

  9. Nuclear Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkins-Duffin, C E

    2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    With an explosion equivalent of about 20kT of TNT, the Trinity test was the first demonstration of a nuclear weapon. Conducted on July 16, 1945 in Alamogordo, NM this site is now a Registered National Historic Landmark. The concept and applicability of nuclear power was demonstrated on December 20, 1951 with the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One (EBR-1) lit four light bulbs. This reactor is now a Registered National Historic Landmark, located near Arco, ID. From that moment forward it had been clearly demonstrated that nuclear energy has both peaceful and military applications and that the civilian and military fuel cycles can overlap. For the more than fifty years since the Atoms for Peace program, a key objective of nuclear policy has been to enable the wider peaceful use of nuclear energy while preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. Volumes have been written on the impact of these two actions on the world by advocates and critics; pundits and practioners; politicians and technologists. The nations of the world have woven together a delicate balance of treaties, agreements, frameworks and handshakes that are representative of the timeframe in which they were constructed and how they have evolved in time. Collectively these vehicles attempt to keep political will, nuclear materials and technology in check. This paper captures only the briefest abstract of the more significant aspects on the Nonproliferation Regime. Of particular relevance to this discussion is the special nonproliferation sensitivity associated with the uranium isotope separation and spent fuel reprocessing aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  10. Characterization of the Nuclear Barge Sturgis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honerlah, H. B.; Hearty, B. P.

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of the Army is authorized to build and operate nuclear reactors for defense purposes under Paragraph 91b of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (1). As part of the Army Reactor Program, the United States Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) is responsible for nuclear reactor engineering and design, reactor construction, and decommissioning design and implementation (2). The Corps is currently focused on ensuring the safety and security of the Army's three deactivated power reactors and planning for their final decommissioning. To support decommissioning cost projections, the Corps is gathering information on the residual radiological and chemical hazards associated with each reactor, starting with the MH-1A reactor on the Sturgis Barge (3). Because the Sturgis Barge is moored in the James River Reserve Fleet, there were unique challenges that had to be overcome during the characterization survey and others that will become a concern when final decommissioning is to be per formed.

  11. Metrology and quality assurance from surveillance of gas compositions over PuO[sub 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worl, L. A. (Laura A.); French, Catherine A.; Kreyer, L. S. (Lawrence S.)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Until the late 1980s, a primary mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) has been the production of nuclear materials for nuclear weapons. Termination of the Cold War in 1989 and the subsequent nuclear weapons treaties dramatically decreased the inventory needs for nuclear weapons. These activities resulted in the consolidation of nuclear material inventories and activities, generating substantial amounts of surplus nuclear materials ranging from plutonium metal and pure oxides to impure plutonium residues. Packaging and storage of these materials in physically and environmentally safe configurations for significant time periods were required. In 1993 the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) and the DOE Office of Nuclear Safety examined the storage of metal and oxides at the Rocky Flats Plant that ultimately resulted in recommendation 94-1, calling for a standard to define the processing and storage of plutonium bearing materials. This recommendation generated a standard for storage of plutonium metals and oxides, DOE-STD-3013-2000, which is now in its fourth revision. The current DOE 3013 Standard is limited to metal and oxides, which contain greater than 30 weight percent plutonium and uranium. The 3013 Standard requires that the oxide be calcined to 950 C for two hours in an oxidizing environment. Before packaging, the oxide is required to have less than 0.5 weight percent moisture. Up to five kilograms of the stabilized oxide material is subsequently sealed in a set of two-nested welded stainless steel container, which must have a power less than 19 Watts.

  12. Nuclear Science/Nuclear Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Astrophysics One of the greatNuclear Science/Nuclear

  13. China's Second Ballistic Missile Defense Test: A Search for Strategic Stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    POLLPETER, Kevin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of_Conduct.pdf. Study of Innovation and Technology in Chinabut preliminary step in China’s missile defense program.Warning Satellites. ” 18 “China Warns of Response to U.S.

  14. Demonstration of Natural Gas Engine Driven Air Compressor Technology at Department of Defense Industrial Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, M.; Aylor, S. W.; Van Ormer, H.

    Recent downsizing and consolidation of Department of Defense (DOD) facilities provides an opportunity to upgrade remaining facilities with more efficient and less polluting equipment. Use of air compressors by the DOD is widespread and the variety...

  15. Rejuvenating the Chinese Defense Economy: Present Developments and Future Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHEUNG, Tai Ming

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Study of Innovation and Technology in China (SITC) is aon the Study of Innovation and Technology in China (SITC),defense science, technology, and innovation system pursues a

  16. The J-20 Fighter Aircraft and the State of China's Defense Science, Technology, and Innovation Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHEUNG, Tai Ming

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the Study of Innovation and Technology in China (SITC),The Study of Innovation and Technology in China (SITC) is as Defense Science, Technology, and Innovation Potential Tai

  17. The Chinese Defense Economy’s Long March from Imitation to Innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheung, Tai Ming

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the Study of Innovation and Technology in China (SITC),The Study of Innovation and Technology in China (SITC) is as defense science, technology, and innovation (DSTI) system

  18. Design for affordability in defense and aerospace systems using tradespace-based methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Marcus Shihong

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Program failures have plagued the defense and aerospace industry for decades, as unanticipated cost and schedule overruns have rendered the development of systems ineffective in terms of time and cost considerations. This ...

  19. Defense acquisition program manager as program leader : improving program outcomes through key competencies and relationship management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, B. Marc

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US defense acquisition system is a massive enterprise charged with developing and acquiring state-of-the-art military technology and systems. For the past 65 years, many broad-reaching studies and commissions have ...

  20. Methodology for technology selection for Department of Defense research and development programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Michael L. (Michael Lawrie), 1979-

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, many of the Department of Defense's major acquisition programs have experienced significant budget overruns and schedule delays. Closer examination of these programs reveals that in many cases, technologies ...

  1. Mechanistic origins of bombardier beetle (Brachinini) explosion-induced defensive spray pulsation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arndt, Eric Michael

    Bombardier beetles (Brachinini) use a rapid series of discrete explosions inside their pygidial gland reaction chambers to produce a hot, pulsed, quinone-based defensive spray. The mechanism of brachinines’ spray pulsation ...

  2. Thermal phase stability of some simulated Defense waste glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, R.P.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three simulated defense waste glass compositions developed by Savannah River Laboratories were studied to determine viscosity and compositional effects on the comparative thermal phase stabilities of these glasses. The glass compositions are similar except that the 411 glasses are high in lithium and low in sodium compared to the 211 glass, and the T glasses are high in iron and low in aluminum compared to the C glass. Specimens of these glasses were heat treated using isothermal anneals as short as 10 min and up to 15 days over the temperature range of 450/sup 0/C to 1100/sup 0/C. Additionally, a specimen of each glass was cooled at a constant cooling rate of 7/sup 0/C/hour from an 1100/sup 0/C melt down to 500/sup 0/C where it was removed from the furnace. The following were observed. The slow cooling rate of 7/sup 0/C/hour is possible as a canister centerline cooling rate for large canisters. Accordingly, it is important to note that a short range diffusion mechanism like cooperative growth phenomena can result in extensive devitrification at lower temperatures and higher yields than a long-range diffusion mechanism can; and can do it without the growth of large crystals that can fracture the glass. Refractory oxides like CeO/sub 2/ and (Ni, Mn, Fe)/sub 2/O/sub 4/ form very rapidly at higher temperatures than silicates and significant yields can be obtained at sufficiently high temperatures that settling of these dense phases becomes a major microstructural feature during slow cooling of some glasses. These annealing studies further show that below 500/sup 0/C there is but little devitrification occurring implying that glass canisters stored at 300/sup 0/C may be kinetically stable despite not being thermodynamically so.

  3. Defense Waste Processing Facility wasteform and canister description: Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, R.G.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the reference wasteform and canister for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The principal changes include revised feed and glass product compositions, an estimate of glass product characteristics as a function of time after the start of vitrification, and additional data on glass leaching performance. The feed and glass product composition data are identical to that described in the DWPF Basic Data Report, Revision 90/91. The DWPF facility is located at the Savannah River Plant in Aiken, SC, and it is scheduled for construction completion during December 1989. The wasteform is borosilicate glass containing approximately 28 wt % sludge oxides, with the balance consisting of glass-forming chemicals, primarily glass frit. Borosilicate glass was chosen because of its stability toward reaction with potential repository groundwaters, its relatively high ability to incorporate nuclides found in the sludge into the solid matrix, and its reasonably low melting temperature. The glass frit contains approximately 71% SiO/sub 2/, 12% B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and 10% Na/sub 2/O. Tests to quantify the stability of DWPF waste glass have been performed under a wide variety of conditions, including simulations of potential repository environments. Based on these tests, DWPF waste glass should easily meet repository criteria. The canister is filled with about 3700 lb of glass which occupies 85% of the free canister volume. The filled canister will generate approximately 690 watts when filled with oxides from 5-year-old sludge and precipitate from 15-year-old supernate. The radionuclide activity of the canister is about 233,000 curies, with an estimated radiation level of 5600 rad/hour at the canister surface. 14 figs., 28 tabs.

  4. The release of technetium from defense waste processing facility glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebert, W.L.; Wolf, S.F.; Bates, J.K.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory tests are being, conducted using two radionuclide-doped Defense Waste Processing, Facility (DWPF) glasses (referred to as SRL 13IA and SRL 202A) to characterize the effects of the glass surface area/solution volume (SN) ratio on the release and disposition of {Tc} and several actinide elements. Tests are being conducted at 90{degrees}C in a tuff ground water solution at SN ratios of 10, 2000, and 20,000 m{sup {minus}1} and have been completed through 1822 days. The formation of certain alteration phases in tests at 2000 and 20,000 m{sup {minus}1} results in an increase in the dissolution rates of both classes. The release of {Tc} parallels that of B and Na under most test conditions and its release increases when alteration phases form. However, in tests with SRL 202A glass at 20,000 ,{sup {minus}1}, the {Tc} concentration in solution decreases coincidentally with an increase in the nitrite/nitrate ratio that indicates a decrease in the solution Eh. This may have occurred due to radiolysis, glass dissolution, the formation of alteration phases, or vessel interactions. Technetium that was reduced from {Tc}(VII) to {Tc}(IV) may have precipitated, thou-h the amount of {Tc} was too low to detect any {Tc}-bearing phases. These results show the importance of conducting long-term tests with radioactive glasses to characterize the behavior of radionuclides, rather than relying on the observed behavior of nonradioactive surrogates.

  5. NUCLEAR PROXIMITY FORCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randrup, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One might summarize of nuclear potential energy has beendegree of freedom) for the nuclear interaction between anyUniversity of California. Nuclear Proximity Forces 'I< at

  6. Nuclear scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friar, J.L.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear scales are discussed from the nuclear physics viewpoint. The conventional nuclear potential is characterized as a black box that interpolates nucleon-nucleon (NN) data, while being constrained by the best possible theoretical input. The latter consists of the longer-range parts of the NN force (e.g., OPEP, TPEP, the {pi}-{gamma} force), which can be calculated using chiral perturbation theory and gauged using modern phase-shift analyses. The shorter-range parts of the force are effectively parameterized by moments of the interaction that are independent of the details of the force model, in analogy to chiral perturbation theory. Results of GFMC calculations in light nuclei are interpreted in terms of fundamental scales, which are in good agreement with expectations from chiral effective field theories. Problems with spin-orbit-type observables are noted.

  7. Nuclear winter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehrlich, A.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 13 speakers at the October 1983 Conference on the World After Nuclear War each contributed specialized knowledge to the climatic and biological effects of nuclear war. The author highlights the findings of the TTAPS (named for its authors) study and confirmation by Soviet scientists on the nuclear winter. Atmospheric consequences would come from debris blocking sunlight and creating conditions of cold and darkness that could preclude the continued existence of life. The biological consequences of cold and darkness would be reduced photosynthesis, devastating losses of food, damage and death from ionizing radiation, and a breakdown of ecosystems. Impacts on the human population would be intensified by a breakdown in social services. The author summarizes points of discussion during the conference. 4 references.

  8. Nuclear Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE Project TapsDOERecovery NuclearSensor NodesNuclear

  9. Nuclear space power safety and facility guidelines study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehlman, W.F.

    1995-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses safety guidelines for space nuclear reactor power missions and was prepared by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) under a Department of Energy grant, DE-FG01-94NE32180 dated 27 September 1994. This grant was based on a proposal submitted by the JHU/APL in response to an {open_quotes}Invitation for Proposals Designed to Support Federal Agencies and Commercial Interests in Meeting Special Power and Propulsion Needs for Future Space Missions{close_quotes}. The United States has not launched a nuclear reactor since SNAP 10A in April 1965 although many Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) have been launched. An RTG powered system is planned for launch as part of the Cassini mission to Saturn in 1997. Recently the Ballistic Missile Defense Office (BMDO) sponsored the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP) which was to demonstrate and evaluate the Russian-built TOPAZ II nuclear reactor as a power source in space. As of late 1993 the flight portion of this program was canceled but work to investigate the attributes of the reactor were continued but at a reduced level. While the future of space nuclear power systems is uncertain there are potential space missions which would require space nuclear power systems. The differences between space nuclear power systems and RTG devices are sufficient that safety and facility requirements warrant a review in the context of the unique features of a space nuclear reactor power system.

  10. NREL: Department of Defense Energy Programs Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency Visit | National Nuclear13Summer 2015 / Issue

  11. Col. Kabban receives NNSA Defense Programs Excellence Award | National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization2Climate,Cobalt discoveryCodeNuclear

  12. NNSA Defense Programs leadership meets with Sandia employees | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTubahq.na.govSecurityMaintainingAdministration B61Nuclear Security

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: National Security Missions: Defense Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear PressLaboratorySoftware100LifeAnnouncementsLocationsand

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: National Security Missions: Defense Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear PressLaboratorySoftware100LifeAnnouncementsLocationsandand

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: National Security Missions: Defense Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear

  16. Nuclear Golf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: Pay no attention to that nuclear warhead behind the 18th hole; just shout "Fore!" and drive your Titleist down the fairway. In a development that is bizarre even by North Korean standards, the country is making a move to sell...

  17. Nuclear Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

  18. Nuclear Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

  19. Audit Report on "Work for Others Performed by the Department of Energy for the Department of Defense"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pursuant to the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, and the Economy Act of 1932, the Department of Energy and its semi-autonomous National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) provide research and technical assistance to other Federal agencies on a reimbursable, full cost recovery basis through the Work for Others (WFO) program. For the vast majority of WFO technical projects, Department Federal officials furnish administrative project oversight while the actual detailed scientific or technical work is completed by the Department's 'management and operating' contractors. These contractors are awarded a special contract type specifically created under the Federal Acquisition Regulation to manage and operate Department sites and facilities, including sophisticated laboratories and technical centers, on a government-owned, contractor-operated basis. With annual expenditures exceeding $1 billion, the Department of Defense (DoD) is one of the Department's largest WFO customers. Work performed for DoD at the Department's national laboratories and other facilities includes highly technical research in areas such as nuclear weapons systems, counter-terrorism, and in-theater troop support. The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year (FY) 2009, required the Inspectors General of the DoD and the Department to review procurement methods to determine whether the Department complied with DoD procurement requirements and/or whether alternative procurement policies were in place. In response, we focused our review on projects performed by NNSA because it completes the vast majority (approximately $900 million in FY 2008) of the Department's work for DoD. As part of this effort, and, at the specific request of the DoD Office of Inspector General (DoD OIG), we identified the universe of WFO technical projects that received new funding in the fourth quarter of FY 2008 at NNSA sites. We independently reviewed a judgmental sample of 11 projects selected by the DoD OIG to meet the objectives of this audit. Our review revealed that NNSA managed DoD WFO technical projects in a manner consistent with requirements of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, the Federal Acquisition Regulation, and the Department's implementing guidance, the Department of Energy Acquisition Regulation. Because of the very nature of the Department's management and operating contracting model, WFO projects may not be technically compliant with DoD procurement regulations in certain instances. We found that NNSA did not let new contracts or task orders for the DoD WFO technical projects we reviewed and instead managed them under its existing internal control process as part of its management and operating contract structure. In one instance, we noted that the Department had, at DoD's request, supplemented its control structure to incorporate specific DoD procurement requirements. Senior Department of Energy procurement officials acknowledged that neither the Department nor NNSA modified their existing prime contracts to incorporate specific defense procurement requirements because such modifications would be inappropriate, costly, and inefficient. In short, they informed us that the Department had developed and implemented a series of controls designed to monitor overall contractor performance, including WFO technical projects. Department and NNSA officials noted, however, that they were willing to incorporate DoD specific requirements into work orders should DoD request and fund such efforts. Additional details regarding management of WFO technical projects are discussed in the body of this report.

  20. WORKSHOP ON NUCLEAR DYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, W.D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L. Wilets, "Theories of Nuclear Fission", Clarendon Press,of the nuclear force, result in lower calculated fission

  1. INSTRUCTIONS FOR SUBMITTING NUCLEAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    waste management proceedings. Keywords Nuclear, nuclear power plant, spent fuel, nuclear waste, data of Submitted Data 3 NUCLEAR POWER PLANT DATA REQUESTS 6 A. Environmental Impacts 6 B. Spent Fuel Generation 8 C. Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage 9 D. Spent Nuclear Fuel Transport and Disposal Issues 10 E. Interim Spent

  2. Administrator Highlights U.S.-Georgian Nuclear Security Cooperation in Tbilisi

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Thomas D'Agostino

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NNSA Administrator Thomas D'Agostino highlighted the strong U.S.-Georgian cooperation on nuclear security issues during a day-long visit to the Republic of Georgia in mid-June. He briefed the media at availability at the Tbilisi airport. In April 2009, President Obama outlined an ambitious agenda to secure vulnerable nuclear material around the world within four years, calling the danger of a terrorist acquiring nuclear weapons "the most immediate and extreme threat to global security." In this year's State of the Union, he called the threat of nuclear weapons, "the greatest danger to the American people." In order to meet that challenge, the President's FY2011 Budget Request includes close to $2.7 billion for the National Nuclear Security Administration's Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation program -- an increase of 25.7 percent over FY2010. Included in that request is NNSA's Second Line of Defense (SLD) program, which works around the world to strengthen the capability of foreign governments to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime shipping system.

  3. Administrator Highlights U.S.-Georgian Nuclear Security Cooperation in Tbilisi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas D'Agostino

    2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    NNSA Administrator Thomas D'Agostino highlighted the strong U.S.-Georgian cooperation on nuclear security issues during a day-long visit to the Republic of Georgia in mid-June. He briefed the media at availability at the Tbilisi airport. In April 2009, President Obama outlined an ambitious agenda to secure vulnerable nuclear material around the world within four years, calling the danger of a terrorist acquiring nuclear weapons "the most immediate and extreme threat to global security." In this year's State of the Union, he called the threat of nuclear weapons, "the greatest danger to the American people." In order to meet that challenge, the President's FY2011 Budget Request includes close to $2.7 billion for the National Nuclear Security Administration's Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation program -- an increase of 25.7 percent over FY2010. Included in that request is NNSA's Second Line of Defense (SLD) program, which works around the world to strengthen the capability of foreign governments to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime shipping system.

  4. Network attack detection and defense – Manifesto of the Dagstuhl Perspective Workshop, March 2nd–6th, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carle, Georg; Dressler, Falko; Kemmerer, Richard A.; Koenig, Hartmut; Kruegel, Christopher; Laskov, Pavel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    y REGULÄRE BEITRÄGE Network attack detection and defense –Perspective Workshop Network Attack Detection and Defensefor the detection of network attacks, should more strongly

  5. A systems-based approach to the design, management and integration of enterprise-level change in defense shipbuilding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bond, Andrew S., 1975-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continually declining Navy surface combatant acquisitions, the war on terror, shifting Congressional priorities and a consolidated shipbuilding industrial base are forcing fundamental changes in the defense shipbuilding ...

  6. Managing nuclear weapons in a changing world: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Center for Security and Technology Studies was established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to support long-range technical studies on issues of importance to US national security. An important goal of the Center is to bring together Laboratory staff and the broader outside community through a program of technical studies, visitors, symposia, seminars, workshops, and publications. With this in mind, the Center and LLNL`s Defense Systems Program sponsored a conference on Managing Nuclear Weapons in a Changing World held on November 17--18,1992. The first day of the meeting focused on nuclear weapons issues in the major geographical areas of the world. On the second day, the conference participants discussed what could be done to manage, control, and account for nuclear weapons in this changing world. Each of the talks and the concluding panel discussion are being indexed as separate documents.

  7. Nuclear photonics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habs, D.; Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Max Planck Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Institut Laue-Langevin, F-38042 Grenoble (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    With the planned new {gamma}-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 10{sup 13}{gamma}/s and a band width of {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -3}, a new era of {gamma} beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HI{gamma}S facility at Duke University (USA) with 10{sup 8}{gamma}/s and {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 3 Dot-Operator 10{sup -2}. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for {gamma} beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused {gamma} beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the {gamma} beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for {gamma} beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for {gamma} beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the {gamma}-beam facility, the {gamma}-beam optics and {gamma} detectors. We can trade {gamma} intensity for band width, going down to {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -6} and address individual nuclear levels. The term 'nuclear photonics' stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with {gamma}-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, {gamma} beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to {mu}m resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of applications. We find many new applications in biomedicine, green energy, radioactive waste management or homeland security. Also more brilliant secondary beams of neutrons and positrons can be produced.

  8. Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4C, Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons by LtCol Karl Basham Functional areas: Nuclear Explosives, Nuclear Weapons, Security The Order establishes...

  9. The Global Nuclear Futures Model: A Dynamic Simulation Tool for Energy Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixler, N.E. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185-0748 (United States)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Global Nuclear Futures Model (GNFM) is a dynamic simulation tool that provides an integrated framework to model key aspects of nuclear energy, nuclear materials storage and disposition, global nuclear materials management, and nuclear proliferation risk. It links nuclear energy and other energy shares dynamically to greenhouse gas emissions and twelve other measures of environmental impact. It presents historical data from 1990 to 2000 and extrapolates energy demand through the year 2050. More specifically, it contains separate modules for energy, the nuclear fuel cycle front end, the nuclear fuel cycle back end, defense nuclear materials, environmental impacts, and measures of the potential for nuclear proliferation. It is globally integrated but also breaks out five regions of the world so that environmental impacts and nuclear proliferation concerns can be evaluated on a regional basis. The five regions are the United States of America (USA), The Peoples Republic of China (China), the former Soviet Union (FSU), the OECD nations excluding the USA, and the rest of the world (ROW). (author)

  10. Nuclear Astrophysics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Astrophysics One of the great scientific challenges is

  11. Nuclear Forensics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Astrophysics One of the great scientific

  12. Nuclear Energy!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE Project TapsDOE Directives,838Nuclear Detectionmore

  13. Nuclear Nonproliferation,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE Project TapsDOERecovery NuclearSensor Nodes for

  14. NUCLEAR ENERGY

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked QuestionsDepartment of Energyof Energy NREL:Education &NTSF NUCLEAR

  15. Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowman, Charles D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

  16. Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowman, C.D.

    1992-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

  17. Nuclear reactor engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glasstone, S.; Sesonske, A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapters are presented concerning energy from nuclear fission; nuclear reactions and radiations; diffusion and slowing-down of neutrons; principles of reactor analysis; nuclear reactor kinetics and control; energy removal; non-fuel reactor materials; the reactor fuel system; radiation protection and environmental effects; nuclear reactor shielding; nuclear reactor safety; and power reactor systems.

  18. Characterization plan for Hanford spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abrefah, J.; Thornton, T.A.; Thomas, L.E.; Berting, F.M.; Marschman, S.C.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Hanford Site Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX) was terminated in 1972. Since that time a significant quantity of N Reactor and Single-Pass Reactor SNF has been stored in the 100 Area K-East (KE) and K-West (KW) reactor basins. Approximately 80% of all US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned SNF resides at Hanford, the largest portion of which is in the water-filled KE and KW reactor basins. The basins were not designed for long-term storage of the SNF and it has become a priority to move the SNF to a more suitable location. As part of the project plan, SNF inventories will be chemically and physically characterized to provide information that will be used to resolve safety and technical issues for development of an environmentally benign and efficient extended interim storage and final disposition strategy for this defense production-reactor SNF.

  19. Trident | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Defense Programs Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation Inertial Confinement Fusion ICF Facilities Trident Trident Fred Archuleta working in the main laser bay of...

  20. TESLA-Based Defense Against Pollution Attacks in P2P Systems with Network Coding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markopoulou, Athina

    TESLA-Based Defense Against Pollution Attacks in P2P Systems with Network Coding Anh Le, Athina and time asymmetry (as in TESLA [1]) to provide source authentication for the detection scheme and non; pollution; detection; identification; TESLA; homomorphic MAC. I. INTRODUCTION Peer-to-peer (P2P) systems

  1. RateGuard: A Robust Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) Defense System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, Jonathan

    , USA chao@poly.edu Abstract--One of the major threats to cyber security is the Distributed Denial-Rate TCP Attacks. I. INTRODUCTION One of the major threats to cyber security is the Distributed DenialRateGuard: A Robust Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) Defense System Huizhong Sun ECE

  2. Dissection of defense responses of skl, an ethylene insensitive mutant of Medicago truncatula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedro, Uribe Mejia

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ..............................................................................................................................176 xi LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE 1 Ethylene signal transduction pathway................................................................16 2 Proposed plant defense responses to pathogens and insects .............................. 21 3... gene expression......................................................... 119 25 In silica analysis of Actin homologue TC85697. ............................................. 122 26 In silica analysis of His H3, TC85197...

  3. Doctoral Defense "Carbon Dioxide Capture on Elastic Layered Metal-Organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Doctoral Defense "Carbon Dioxide Capture on Elastic Layered Metal-Organic Framework Adsorbents requires drastic modifications to the current energy infrastructure. Thus, carbon capture and sequestration for use as carbon capture adsorbents. Ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) estimates of CO2 selectivity

  4. Stopping the Insider Threat: the case for implementing integrated autonomic defense mechanisms in computing systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menascé, Daniel A.

    Stopping the Insider Threat: the case for implementing integrated autonomic defense mechanisms that are inseparable from the systems that are being defended. 1. Introduction Threats to the security of an information system may be initiated from either outside or from within an organization. Detecting such threats

  5. CBF: A Packet Filtering Method for DDoS Attack Defense in Cloud Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    CBF: A Packet Filtering Method for DDoS Attack Defense in Cloud Environment Qi Chen, Wenmin Lin-of-Service attack (DDoS) is a major threat for cloud environment. Traditional defending approaches cannot be easily, in this paper. Concretely speaking, the method is deployed by two periods, i.e., non-attack period and attack

  6. SMASHUP: Secure Mashup for Defense Transformation and Net-Centric Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heileman, Gregory L.

    SMASHUP: Secure Mashup for Defense Transformation and Net- Centric Systems Mark D. Heileman., 709 S. Harbor City Blvd., Suite 400, Melbourne, FL 32901; b University of New Mexico, Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Albuquerque, NM 87131; c Air Force Research Laboratory, AFRL/RIEBB, Rome

  7. Ecology Letters, (2003) 6: 13-18 Are three-dimensional spider webs defensive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LETTER Ecology Letters, (2003) 6: 13-18 Are three-dimensional spider webs defensive adaptations? Abstract Spider webs result from complex behaviours that have evolved under many selective pressures. Webs risk in the evolution of web architecture. The ecological success of spiders has been attributed to key

  8. Adaptations of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) for defense against herbivores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharer, John E.

    Adaptations of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) for defense against herbivores Richard L 2013 Keywords: Aspen decline Fire Herbivory Phytochemistry Plant­animal interactions Populus tremuloides a b s t r a c t Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) is a quintessential ``foundation species

  9. The Pollution Attack in P2P Live Video Streaming: Measurement Results and Defenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saxena, Nitesh

    The Pollution Attack in P2P Live Video Streaming: Measurement Results and Defenses Prithula Dhungel in the recent years. In this paper, we examine the stream pollution attack, for which the attacker mixes polluted chunks into the P2P distribu- tion, degrading the quality of the rendered media at the receivers

  10. Pollution Attacks and Defenses in Wireless Inter-flow Network Coding Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtmola, Reza

    1 Pollution Attacks and Defenses in Wireless Inter-flow Network Coding Systems Jing Dong, Reza Abstract--We study data pollution attacks in wireless inter-flow network coding systems. Although several the existing systems, and use it to analyze the impact of pollution attacks. Our analysis shows

  11. Defense Transuranic Waste Program. Transuranic waste transportation assessment and guidance report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transportation Assessment and Guidance Report (TAGR) is designed to provide DOE-managed defense sites with guidance and citable analyses addressing National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requirements for qualifying and transporting transuranic (TRU) wastes to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico.

  12. Inhibition of pulmonary antibacterial defense by interferon-g during recovery from influenza infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inhibition of pulmonary antibacterial defense by interferon-g during recovery from influenza infection Keer Sun & Dennis W Metzger Secondary bacterial infection often occurs after pulmonary virus burden, and leads to enhanced susceptibility to secondary pneumococcal infection, which can be prevented

  13. Negative regulation of defense responses in plants by a conserved MAPKK kinase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Innes, Roger

    for review August 22, 2000) The enhanced disease resistance 1 (edr1) mutation of Arabidopsis confers by the edr1 mutation is correlated with induction of several defense responses, including host cell death. Double mutant analysis revealed that all edr1-associated phenotypes are suppressed by mutations

  14. Implementation of Section 1072 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This Notice provides guidance for implementing the mandates of Section 1072 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008, commonly referred to as the Bond Amendment. Extended until 9-28-11 by DOE N 251.90 dated 9-28-10. Canceled by DOE O 472.2. Does not cancel other directives.

  15. A Game-Theoretic Framework for Bandwidth Attacks and Statistical Defenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sundaram, Ravi

    , a common form of distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks. In particular, our traffic injection game statistical methods for creating defense mechanisms that can detect a DDoS attack and that even when--changing the source address of IP packets-- has been used in DDoS attacks on popular websites (Ya- hoo!) and root DNS

  16. Proceedings of the 22nd Annual DoD/DOE Seismic Research Symposium: Planning for Verification of and Compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, James W., LTC [Editor

    2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 22nd Annual DoD/DOE Seismic Research Symposium: Planning for Verification of and Compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), held 13-15 September 2000 in New Orleans, Louisiana. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Department of Defense (DoD), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  17. Evaluating Russian space nuclear reactor technology for United States applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polansky, G.F. [Phillips Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schmidt, G.L. [New Mexico Engineering Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Voss, S.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Reynolds, E.L. [Applied Physics Lab., Laurel, MD (United States)

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Space nuclear power and nuclear electric propulsion are considered important technologies for planetary exploration, as well as selected earth orbit applications. The Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP) was intended to provide an early flight demonstration of these technologies at relatively low cost through extensive use of existing Russian technology. The key element of Russian technology employed in the program was the Topaz II reactor. Refocusing of the activities of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO), combined with budgetary pressures, forced the cancellation of the NEPSTP at the end of the 1993 fiscal year. The NEPSTP was faced with many unique flight qualification issues. In general, the launch of a spacecraft employing a nuclear reactor power system complicates many spacecraft qualification activities. However, the NEPSTP activities were further complicated because the reactor power system was a Russian design. Therefore, this program considered not only the unique flight qualification issues associated with space nuclear power, but also with differences between Russian and United States flight qualification procedures. This paper presents an overview of the NEPSTP. The program goals, the proposed mission, the spacecraft, and the Topaz II space nuclear power system are described. The subject of flight qualification is examined and the inherent difficulties of qualifying a space reactor are described. The differences between United States and Russian flight qualification procedures are explored. A plan is then described that was developed to determine an appropriate flight qualification program for the Topaz II reactor to support a possible NEPSTP launch.

  18. 2014 Secretary of Defense Environmental Awards For more information about the DoD Environmental Program, please visit www.denix.osd.mil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    six subject areas: natural resources conservation; environmental quality; sustainability Secretary of Defense Environmental Awards For more information about the DoD Environmental Program, please visit www.denix.osd.mil 2014 Secretary of Defense Environmental Awards Cultural Resources Management

  19. NUCLEAR DEFORMATION ENERGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blocki, J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J.R. Nix, Theory of Nuclear Fission and Superheavy Nuclei,energy maps relevant for nuclear fission and nucleus-nucleusin connection with nuclear fission. The need for a better

  20. Office of Nuclear Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Nuclear Safety establishes nuclear safety requirements and expectations for the Department to ensure protection of workers and the public from the hazards associated with nuclear operations with all Department operations.

  1. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, or successor directive, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs).

  2. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs).

  3. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, R.B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CALIFORNIA NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE R. B. Firestone and E.11089 NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE by R.B. Firestone and E.iii- NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE R.B Firestone and E. Browne

  4. RELATIVISTIC NUCLEAR COLLISIONS: THEORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gyulassy, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions", Preprint LBL-Pion Interferometry of Nuclear Collisions. 18.1 M.Gyulassy,was supported by the Office of Nuclear Physics of the U.S.

  5. Nuclear Safety (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Nuclear Safety Division conducts a comprehensive nuclear power plant oversight review program of the nine reactors at the five nuclear power sites in Pennsylvania. It also monitors the...

  6. Nuclear Fuel Cycle & Vulnerabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of safeguards is the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful nuclear activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. The safeguards system should be designed to provide credible assurances that there has been no diversion of declared nuclear material and no undeclared nuclear material and activities.

  7. Nuclear Physics: Campaigns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free-Electron Laser (FEL) Medical Imaging Physics Topics Campaigns The Structure of the Nuclear Building Blocks The Structure of Nuclei Symmetry Tests in Nuclear Physics Meetings...

  8. Nuclear Power Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station Bob Ashe-Everest Southern California Edison 10 Incoming New Fuel Inspecting New Fuel SONGS Unit 1 Fuel...

  9. Nuclear weapons modernizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristensen, Hans M. [Federation of American Scientists, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reviews the nuclear weapons modernization programs underway in the world's nine nuclear weapons states. It concludes that despite significant reductions in overall weapons inventories since the end of the Cold War, the pace of reductions is slowing - four of the nuclear weapons states are even increasing their arsenals, and all the nuclear weapons states are busy modernizing their remaining arsenals in what appears to be a dynamic and counterproductive nuclear competition. The author questions whether perpetual modernization combined with no specific plan for the elimination of nuclear weapons is consistent with the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and concludes that new limits on nuclear modernizations are needed.

  10. Advancing Global Nuclear Security

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today world leaders gathered at The Hague for the Nuclear Security Summit, a meeting to measure progress and take action to secure sensitive nuclear materials.

  11. Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering...

  12. Nuclear Security Summit | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

  13. Nuclear Safeguards | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

  14. Instructions for Dissertation Defense Report Note: This is a fillable form that eliminates the need to print-out and write-in your

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    Instructions for Dissertation Defense Report Note: This is a fillable form that eliminates the need to the results of the defense and print the form. 2. Submit to Dissertation Supervisor who will record the results of the defense and the Committee's recommendations. 3. Acquire (typically done by Dissertation

  15. CASE STUDY -- LEAN 94-02: A Case Study of Self-Directed Work Teams at Boeing Defense and Space Group - Corinth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Janice

    1994-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Boeing Defense & Space Group - Corinth (BD&SG-C) is a self-directed team based unionized facility in the defense and commercial aircraft industry. The plant was a greenfield start-up in 1987. Due to the nature of the defense ...

  16. What are Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste ?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste are materials from nuclear power plants and government defense programs. These materials contain highly radioactive elements, such as cesium, strontium, technetium, and neptunium. Some of these elements will remain radioactive for a few years, while others will be radioactive for millions of years. Exposure to such radioactive materials can cause human health problems. Scientists worldwide agree that the safest way to manage these materials is to dispose of them deep underground in what is called a geologic repository.

  17. Sustainable Forward Operating Base Nuclear Power Evaluation (Relationship Mapping System) Users’ Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Listed

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sustainable Forward Operating Base (FOB) Nuclear Power Evaluation was developed by the Idaho National Laboratory Systems Engineering Department to support the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) in assessing and demonstrating the viability of deploying small-scale reactors in support of military operations in theatre. This document provides a brief explanation of how to access and use the Sustainable FOB Nuclear Power Evaluation utility to view assessment results as input into developing and integrating the program elements needed to create a successful demonstration.

  18. Detection of localized and general corrosion of mild steel in simulated defense nuclear waste solutions using electrochemical noise analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edgemon, G.L.; Ohl, P.C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Bell, G.E.C. [M.J. Schiff and Associates, Inc., Claremont, CA (United States); Wilson, D.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Underground waste tanks fabricated from mild steel store more than 60 million gallons of radioactive waste from 50 years of weapons production. Leaks are suspected in a significant number of tanks. The probable modes of corrosion failures are reported to be localized corrosion (e.g. nitrate stress corrosion cracking and pitting). The use of electrochemical noise (EN) for the monitoring and detection of localized corrosion processes has received considerable attention and application over the last several years. Proof of principle laboratory tests were conducted to verify the capability of EN evaluation to detect localized corrosion and to compare the predictions of general corrosion obtained from EN with those derived from other sources. Simple, pre-fabricated flat and U-bend specimens of steel alloys A516-Grade 60 (UNS K02100) and A537-CL 1 (UNS K02400) were immersed in temperature controlled simulated waste solutions. The simulated waste solution was either 5M NaNO{sub 3} with 0.3M NaOH at 90 C or 11M NaNO{sub 3} with 0.15M NaOH at 95 C. The electrochemical noise activity from the specimens was monitored and recorded for periods ranging between 140 and 240 hours. At the end of each test period, the specimens were metallographically examined to correlated EN data with corrosion damage.

  19. DOE-STD-1146-2001; General Technical Base Qualification Standard DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No Significant Impact610-9464-941 February

  20. The Joys of Nuclear Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon Carmack

    2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear fuels researcher Jon Carmack talks about the satisfactions of a career in nuclear engineering.

  1. The Joys of Nuclear Engineering

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jon Carmack

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear fuels researcher Jon Carmack talks about the satisfactions of a career in nuclear engineering.

  2. ANNOUNCEMENT NUCLEAR ENGINEERING FACULTY POSITION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    ANNOUNCEMENT NUCLEAR ENGINEERING FACULTY POSITION The Department of Nuclear Engineering at the Assistant or Associate Professor level. These areas include, but are not limited to, nuclear system instrumentation & controls, monitoring and diagnostics, reactor dynamics, nuclear security, nuclear materials

  3. Soviet exploitation of the nuclear winter hypothesis. Technical report, 8 May 1984-4 June 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This study, which is based entirely on open Soviet sources, examines and analyzes Soviet views on and uses made by Soviet scientists of the so-called Nuclear Winter hypothesis. In particular, the study seeks to ascertain whether Soviet scientists have in fact independently confirmed the TTAPS prediction of a Nuclear Winter phenomenon or have contributed independent data or scenarios to it. The findings of the study are that the Soviets view the Nuclear Winter hypothesis as a political and propaganda opportunity to influence Western scientific and public opinion and to restrain U.S. defense programs. Analysis of Soviet publications shows that, in fact, Soviet scientists have made no independent or new contributions to the study of the Nuclear Winter phenomenon, but have uncritically made use of the worst-case scenarios, parameters, and values published in the Crutzen-Birks (Ambio 1982) and the TTAPS (Science, December 1983) studies, as well as models of atmospheric circulation borrowed from Western sources. Furthermore, current Soviet directives to scientists call for work on the further strengthening of the Soviet Union's military might, while it is also explained that the dire predictions of the possible consequences of a nuclear war in no way diminish the utility of the Soviet civil defense program and the need for its further improvement.

  4. Proceedings of the 2011 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetovsky, Marvin A. [Editor; Patterson, Eileen F. [Editor; Sandoval, Marisa N. [Editor

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the Monitoring Research Review 2011: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 13-15 September, 2011 in Tucson, Arizona. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), National Science Foundation (NSF), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States' capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  5. Nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomson, Wallace B. (Severna Park, MD)

    2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor comprising a cylindrical pressure vessel, an elongated annular core centrally disposed within and spaced from the pressure vessel, and a plurality of ducts disposed longitudinally of the pressure vessel about the periphery thereof, said core comprising an annular active portion, an annular reflector just inside the active portion, and an annular reflector just outside the active a portion, said annular active portion comprising rectangular slab, porous fuel elements radially disposed around the inner reflector and extending the length of the active portion, wedge-shaped, porous moderator elements disposed adjacent one face of each fuel element and extending the length of the fuel element, the fuel and moderator elements being oriented so that the fuel elements face each other and the moderator elements do likewise, adjacent moderator elements being spaced to provide air inlet channels, and adjacent fuel elements being spaced to provide air outlet channels which communicate with the interior of the peripheral ducts, and means for introducing air into the air inlet channels which passes through the porous moderator elements and porous fuel elements to the outlet channel.

  6. Advanced nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrani, Kurt

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Kurt Terrani uses his expertise in materials science to develop safer fuel for nuclear power plants.

  7. Nuclear Reaction Data Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLane, V.; Nordborg, C.; Lemmel, H.D.; Manokhin, V.N.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cooperating Nuclear Reaction Data Centers are involved in the compilation and exchange of nuclear reaction data for incident neutrons, charged particles and photons. Individual centers may also have services in other areas, e.g., evaluated data, nuclear structure and decay data, reactor physics, nuclear safety; some of this information may also be exchanged between interested centers. 20 refs., 1 tab.

  8. Catalysinganenergyrevolution Nuclear Failures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    extraction, fuel manufacture and management of spent fuel and waste. Currently, CEA is a large FrenchCatalysinganenergyrevolution France's Nuclear Failures The great illusion of nuclear energy greenpeace.org #12;Contents 2 Greenpeace International France's Nuclear Failures The French nuclear industry

  9. Advanced nuclear fuel

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Terrani, Kurt

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Kurt Terrani uses his expertise in materials science to develop safer fuel for nuclear power plants.

  10. Focus Article Nuclear winter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    the climatic effects of nuclear war. Smoke from the fires started by nuclear weapons, especially the black in recorded human history. Although the number of nuclear weapons in the world has fallen from 70,000 at its and Russia could still produce nuclear winter. This theory cannot be tested in the real world. However

  11. Broad Overview of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Opportunities for Department of Defense Installations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, E.; Antkowiak, M.; Butt, R.; Davis, J.; Dean, J.; Hillesheim, M.; Hotchkiss, E.; Hunsberger, R.; Kandt, A.; Lund, J.; Massey, K.; Robichaud, R.; Stafford, B.; Visser, C.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Strategic Environmental Research and Developmental Program (SERDP)/Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) is the Department of Defense?s (DOD) environmental science and technology program focusing on issues related to environment and energy for the military services. The SERDP/ESTCP Office requested that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provide technical assistance with strategic planning by evaluating the potential for several types of renewable energy technologies at DOD installations. NREL was tasked to provide technical expertise and strategic advice for the feasibility of geothermal resources, waste-to-energy technology, photovoltaics (PV), wind, microgrids, and building system technologies on military installations. This technical report is the deliverable for these tasks.

  12. Preliminary technical data summary No. 3 for the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landon, L.F. (comp.)

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents an update on the best information presently available for the purpose of establishing the basis for the design of a Defense Waste Processing Facility. Objective of this project is to provide a facility to fix the radionuclides present in Savannah River Plant (SRP) high-level liquid waste in a high-integrity form (glass). Flowsheets and material balances reflect the alternate CAB case including the incorporation of low-level supernate in concrete. (DLC)

  13. A Case Study of the Defense Support of Civil Authorities Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Suzanne 1963-

    2013-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    and Improvement ............. 147 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Background of the Study The Department of Defense (DOD) has struggled with its role in a national crisis since the attacks on 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina. Although most disasters... and other federal agencies ?in the planning, coordination, and execution of the response to catastrophic events including hurricanes, tornadoes, and acts of terror? (DSCA, n.d.). The DSCA program educates military and civilian personnel in the proper...

  14. SPD SEIS References for Appendix C | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Energy), 1982, Final Environmental Impact Statement, Defense Waste Processing Facility, Savannah River Plant, Aiken, S.C., DOEEIS-0082, Office of Defense Waste and Byproducts...

  15. Similarities of host defense mechanisms against pulmonary infectious disease in animals and man

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, G.M.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evidence linking exposure to air pollutants with increased susceptibility to infectious diseases in humans comes from epidemiological, clinical, and experimental laboratory studies. The data suggest that the most common, and perhaps the most sensitive, index of the pulmonary effect of air pollutant exposure is on post upper respiratory infection, prolonged cough, phlegm, and purulent sputum. Experimental models of these relationships for extrapolation to humans should be able to measure such minor changes in symptomatology and physiology rather than require major lethal events. The bacterial aerosol model for quantifying nonspecific defense mechanisms of the bronchopulmonary tree utilizing nonpathogenic organisms fulfills this criterion. The function of the six major components of pulmonary antimicrobial defense mechanisms - including aerodynamic filtration, secretory respiratory tract fluid, fluid transport at the alveolar and bronchial levels, the phagocytic function of alveolar macrophages, the augmenting mechanisms of blood-derived inflammatory cells, and the secretory and cellular-specific immune mechanisms and their mediator products - can all be quantified by this experimental animal model system. The defensive functions are remarkably similar across animal species, and available human data suggest that findings obtained using the model may be extrapolatred to humans.

  16. Final Report for Bio-Inspired Approaches to Moving-Target Defense Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fink, Glenn A.; Oehmen, Christopher S.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report records the work and contributions of the NITRD-funded Bio-Inspired Approaches to Moving-Target Defense Strategies project performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory under the technical guidance of the National Security Agency’s R6 division. The project has incorporated a number of bio-inspired cyber defensive technologies within an elastic framework provided by the Digital Ants. This project has created the first scalable, real-world prototype of the Digital Ants Framework (DAF)[11] and integrated five technologies into this flexible, decentralized framework: (1) Ant-Based Cyber Defense (ABCD), (2) Behavioral Indicators, (3) Bioinformatic Clas- sification, (4) Moving-Target Reconfiguration, and (5) Ambient Collaboration. The DAF can be used operationally to decentralize many such data intensive applications that normally rely on collection of large amounts of data in a central repository. In this work, we have shown how these component applications may be decentralized and may perform analysis at the edge. Operationally, this will enable analytics to scale far beyond current limitations while not suffering from the bandwidth or computational limitations of centralized analysis. This effort has advanced the R6 Cyber Security research program to secure digital infrastructures by developing a dynamic means to adaptively defend complex cyber systems. We hope that this work will benefit both our client’s efforts in system behavior modeling and cyber security to the overall benefit of the nation.

  17. 60169Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 189 / Monday, September 30, 2013 / Rules and Regulations DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION 48 CFR Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Interim rule. SUMMARY: DoD, GSA, and NASA are issuing

  18. EIS-0113: Disposal of Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic and Tank Waste, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this EIS to examine the potential environmental impacts of final disposal options for legacy and future radioactive defense wastes stored at the Hanford Site.

  19. A Comparison Study of Collaborative Strategies for Distributed Defense against Internet Worms based on Small-World Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yu

    based on Small-World Modeling Hao Chen, Yu Chen* Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engineering, SUNY threats to the network infrastructure. Distributed defense collaborating with single- point.0 vulnerability, mobile malware, industrial espionage, and attacks from organized crime. Malicious activities

  20. The Nuclear Revolution, Relative Gains, and International Nuclear Assistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroenig, Matthew

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    it would transfer nuclear technology. Washington Post. 26preferences: the export of sensitive nuclear technology.export of sensitive nuclear technology presents a kind of

  1. Dynamics of nuclear envelope and nuclear pore complex formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Limited expression of nuclear pore membrane glycoprotein 210suggests cell-type specific nuclear pores in metazoans. Expand Dultz, E. (2008). Nuclear pore complex assembly through

  2. Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Point Beach Nuclear Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Point Beach Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

  3. Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Watts Bar Nuclear Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Watts Bar Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

  4. Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer cpacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

  5. Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Arkansas Nuclear One

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nuclear One" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  6. Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    009-0270-y Is Nuclear Energy the Solution? Milton H. Saier &in the last 50 years, nuclear energy subsidies have totaledadministration, the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP)

  7. Nuclear Safety Research and Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Safety Research and Development Proposal Review and Prioritization Process and Criteria Nuclear Safety Research and Development Program Office of Nuclear Safety Office of...

  8. NUCLEAR SCIENCE ANNUAL REPORT 1975

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gove and A. H. Wapstra, Nuclear Data Tables 11, 127 (1972).P. Jackson, Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories Report (1975)national Conference on Nuclear Structure and Spec­ troscopy,

  9. China's Nuclear Industry After Fukushima

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    YUAN, Jingdong

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the previous year. NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY AND FUEL CYCLES China’third-generation nuclear technology and reactor design, withs own third-generation nuclear technology. Westing- house,

  10. NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY ANNUAL REPORT 1970

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Laboratories, AECL, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada.Nuclear Laboratories, AECL, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. 1.Nuclear Laboratories, AECL, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. 1.

  11. Reactor & Nuclear Systems Publications | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Publications and Reports | Reactor and Nuclear Systems Publications SHARE Reactor and Nuclear Systems Publications The...

  12. Protection of Nuclear Plants Against Vehicular Bombs Via Full Spectrum Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campagna, M. S.; Sawruk, W.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A more urgent need now exists since 9/11 to protect vital assets at nuclear plants from physical security threats. Any approach to successful defense must result in the best possible risk profile , while also performing this defense against credible threats within the context of limited personnel and materiel resources. Engineered solutions need to be well thought out, and take advantage of each plant's available organic strengths and opportunities. A robust, well trained/equipped highly motivated protective force will help reduce concerns where there are weaknesses making the plant vulnerable to threats. A thorough risk assessment takes into account the proper combination of both deterministic and probabilistic application of resources as a most advantageous approach; this is postulated to be development of integrated protection methods and plans, which blend solid engineering design with the highest caliber of protection forces. By setting a clear and ambitious objective to shield the nuclear assets with this type of dynamic full spectrum defense in depth, the risk of harm-breach or likelihood of any opponent's threat being realized should be reduced to the lowest practicable levels.

  13. Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear Waste Technology R&D Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear Waste Technology R&D "Even...

  14. Linking legacies: Connecting the Cold War nuclear weapons production processes to their environmental consequences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the US has begun addressing the environmental consequences of five decades of nuclear weapons production. In support of this effort, the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1995 directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to describe the waste streams generated during each step in the production of nuclear weapons. Accordingly, this report responds to this mandate, and it is the Department`s first comprehensive analysis of the sources of waste and contamination generated by the production of nuclear weapons. The report also contains information on the missions and functions of nuclear weapons facilities, on the inventories of waste and materials remaining at these facilities, as well as on the extent and characteristics of contamination in and around these facilities. This analysis unites specific environmental impacts of nuclear weapons production with particular production processes. The Department used historical records to connect nuclear weapons production processes with emerging data on waste and contamination. In this way, two of the Department`s legacies--nuclear weapons manufacturing and environmental management--have become systematically linked. The goal of this report is to provide Congress, DOE program managers, non-governmental analysts, and the public with an explicit picture of the environmental results of each step in the nuclear weapons production and disposition cycle.

  15. Proceedings of the 26th Seismic Research Review: Trends in Nuclear Explosion Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chavez, Francesca C. [Editor; Benson, Jody [Editor; Hanson, Stephanie [Editor; Mark, Carol [Editor; Wetovsky, Marvin A. [Editor

    2004-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 26th Seismic Research Review: Trends in Nuclear Explosion Monitoring, held 21-23 September, 2004 in Orlando, Florida. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  16. Proceedings of the 25th Seismic Research Review -- Nuclear Explosion Monitoring: Building the Knowledge Base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chavez, Francesca C. [Editor; Mendius, E. Louise [Editor

    2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 25th Seismic Research Review -- Nuclear Explosion Monitoring: Building the Knowledge Base, held 23-25 September, 2003 in Tucson, Arizona. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  17. Defense Gallery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavid Turner David3 | NationalSUBSCRIBE: PrintGallery

  18. defense programs

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich5 |0/%2A en6/%2A en2/%2A3/%2A

  19. B53 Nuclear Bomb Dismantlement | National Nuclear Security Administrat...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Dismantlement | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

  20. Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quiter, Brian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spent Fuel Assay Using Nuclear Resonance Fluo- rescence,” Annual Meeting of the Institute of Nuclear Material Management,

  1. Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quiter, Brian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Institute of Nuclear Material Management, Tucson, AZ,Assay, Institute of Nuclear Materials Management 51st Annual

  2. Nuclear disarmament verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVolpi, A.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Arms control treaties, unilateral actions, and cooperative activities -- reflecting the defusing of East-West tensions -- are causing nuclear weapons to be disarmed and dismantled worldwide. In order to provide for future reductions and to build confidence in the permanency of this disarmament, verification procedures and technologies would play an important role. This paper outlines arms-control objectives, treaty organization, and actions that could be undertaken. For the purposes of this Workshop on Verification, nuclear disarmament has been divided into five topical subareas: Converting nuclear-weapons production complexes, Eliminating and monitoring nuclear-weapons delivery systems, Disabling and destroying nuclear warheads, Demilitarizing or non-military utilization of special nuclear materials, and Inhibiting nuclear arms in non-nuclear-weapons states. This paper concludes with an overview of potential methods for verification.

  3. Nuclear radiation actuated valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Schively, Dixon P. (Richland, WA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

  4. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains brief papers that discusses the following topics: Fundamental Symmetries in the Nucleus; Internucleon Interactions; Dynamics of Very Light Nuclei; Facets of the Nuclear Many-Body Problem; and Nuclear Instruments and Methods.

  5. Promulgating Nuclear Safety Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Applies to all Nuclear Safety Requirements Adopted by the Department to Govern the Conduct of its Nuclear Activities. Cancels DOE P 410.1. Canceled by DOE N 251.85.

  6. NUCLEAR PLANT AND CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: software require- ments, safety analysis, formal, the missiles, and the digital protection systems embed- ded in nuclear power plants. Obviously, safety method SOFTWARE SAFETY ANALYSIS OF DIGITAL PROTECTION SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS USING A QUALITATIVE FORMAL

  7. Hegemony and nuclear proliferation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Nicholas L. (Nicholas LeSuer)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contrary to longstanding of predictions of nuclear tipping points, the number of states interested in nuclear weapons has sharply declined in recent decades. In contrast to existing explanations, this dissertation argues ...

  8. Nuclear Explosive Safety Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual provides supplemental details to support the requirements of DOE O 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety.

  9. 3D NUCLEAR SEGMENTAT

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003029WKSTN00 Delineation of nuclear structures in 3D multicellular systems  https://vision.lbl.gov/Software/3DMorphometry/ 

  10. Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Initiatives Nonproliferation Technology Nonproliferation Systems Safeguards and Security Technology International Safeguards Nuclear Material Detection and Characterization For...

  11. Nuclear Multifragmentation Critical Exponents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang Bauer; William Friedman

    1994-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the critical exponents of nuclear multi-fragmentation have not been determined conclusively yet.

  12. Nuclear Energy Research Brookhaven National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Nuclear Energy Research Brookhaven National Laboratory William C. Horak, Chair Nuclear Science and Technology Department #12;BNL Nuclear Energy Research Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor - 1948 National Nuclear Data Center - 1952* High Flux Beam Reactor - 1964 Technical Support for NRC - 1974

  13. Nuclear Materials: Reconsidering Wastes and Assets - 13193

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalske, T.A. [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear industry, both in the commercial and the government sectors, has generated large quantities of material that span the spectrum of usefulness, from highly valuable ('assets') to worthless ('wastes'). In many cases, the decision parameters are clear. Transuranic waste and high level waste, for example, have no value, and is either in a final disposition path today, or - in the case of high level waste - awaiting a policy decision about final disposition. Other materials, though discardable, have intrinsic scientific or market value that may be hidden by the complexity, hazard, or cost of recovery. An informed decision process should acknowledge the asset value, or lack of value, of the complete inventory of materials, and the structure necessary to implement the range of possible options. It is important that informed decisions are made about the asset value for the variety of nuclear materials available. For example, there is a significant quantity of spent fuel available for recycle (an estimated $4 billion value in the Savannah River Site's (SRS) L area alone); in fact, SRS has already blended down more than 300 metric tons of uranium for commercial reactor use. Over 34 metric tons of surplus plutonium is also on a path to be used as commercial fuel. There are other radiological materials that are routinely handled at the site in large quantities that should be viewed as strategically important and / or commercially viable. In some cases, these materials are irreplaceable domestically, and failure to consider their recovery could jeopardize our technological leadership or national defense. The inventories of nuclear materials at SRS that have been characterized as 'waste' include isotopes of plutonium, uranium, americium, and helium. Although planning has been performed to establish the technical and regulatory bases for their discard and disposal, recovery of these materials is both economically attractive and in the national interest. (authors)

  14. NUCLEAR POWER in CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NUCLEAR POWER in CALIFORNIA: 2007 STATUS REPORT CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION October 2007 CEC-100, California Contract No. 700-05-002 Prepared For: California Energy Commission Barbara Byron, Senior Nuclear public workshops on nuclear power. The Integrated Energy Policy Report Committee, led by Commissioners

  15. Nuclear fact book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, O.F.; Platt, A.M.; Robinson, J.V.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This reference provides significant highlights and summary facts in the following areas: general energy; nuclear energy; nuclear fuel cycle; uranium supply and enrichment; nuclear reactors; spent fuel and advanced repacking concepts; reprocessing; high-level waste; gaseous waste; transuranic waste; low-level waste; remedial action; transportation; disposal; radiation information; environment; legislation; socio-political aspects; conversion factors; and a glossary. (GHT)

  16. NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: moderator temper ature coefficient, reactivity co reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed absorption cross-section behavior. Consequently, if NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 140 NOV. 2002 147 #12;Demazière

  17. NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: moderator temper- ature coefficient, reactivity co reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed. Consequently, if*E-mail: demaz@nephy.chalmers.se NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 140 NOV. 2002 147 #12;high-burnup fuel

  18. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations. Cancels DOE O 452.2C. Admin Chg 1, 7-10-13

  19. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs). Cancels DOE O 452.2C. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE O 452.2D.

  20. Nike | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    or 2,000,000 miles per hour) than any other laser. For more information on NRL's Nike facility, visit Nike's webpage. Related Topics stockpile stewardship defense programs R&D...

  1. Nuclear & Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Cosmology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear & Particle Physics science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Nuclear & Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Cosmology National security depends on science and...

  2. Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the potential of nuclear power to combat global warming havecompetitive today, and for nuclear power to succeed, it must

  3. Self-Defense: What's a Jury Got to Do with It?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilles Phillips, Jean K.; Cateforis, Elizabeth

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 93, 117 (1936). Raymond finds evidence for the strict liability concept as late as 1118. Id. at 95. Quoting from a group of Anglo- Saxon laws, Raymond writes: “It is the law: one who does wrong unknowingly must suffer for it knowingly... homicide. Id. Green does caution that the statistics should be loosely relied on as it is impossible to tell the frequency of acquittal when self-defense was not alleged. Id. 123. Sir Henry Bracton was a cleric and judge whose writings heavily...

  4. Tank 42 sludge-only process development for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, D.P.

    2000-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) requested the development of a sludge-only process for Tank 42 sludge since at the current processing rate, the Tank 51 sludge has been projected to be depleted as early as August 1998. Testing was completed using a non-radioactive Tank 42 sludge simulant. The testing was completed under a range of operating conditions, including worst case conditions, to develop the processing conditions for radioactive Tank 42 sludge. The existing Tank 51 sludge-only process is adequate with the exception that 10 percent additional acid is recommended during sludge receipt and adjustment tank (SRAT) processing to ensure adequate destruction of nitrite during the SRAT cycle.

  5. LysM receptor-like kinases to improve plant defense response against fungal pathogens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, Jinrong; Stacey, Gary; Stacey, Minviluz; Zhang, Xuecheng

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Perception of chitin fragments (chitooligosaccharides) is an important first step in plant defense response against fungal pathogen. LysM receptor-like kinases (LysM RLKs) are instrumental in this perception process. LysM RLKs also play a role in activating transcription of chitin-responsive genes (CRGs) in plants. Mutations in the LysM kinase receptor genes or the downstream CRGs may affect the fungal susceptibility of a plant. Mutations in LysM RLKs or transgenes carrying the same may be beneficial in imparting resistance against fungal pathogens.

  6. LysM receptor-like kinases to improve plant defense response against fungal pathogens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, Jinrong (Columbia, MO); Stacey, Gary (Columbia, MO); Stacey, Minviluz (Columbia, MO); Zhang, Xuecheng (Columbia, MO)

    2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Perception of chitin fragments (chitooligosaccharides) is an important first step in plant defense response against fungal pathogen. LysM receptor-like kinases (LysM RLKs) are instrumental in this perception process. LysM RLKs also play a role in activating transcription of chitin-responsive genes (CRGs) in plants. Mutations in the LysM kinase receptor genes or the downstream CRGs may affect the fungal susceptibility of a plant. Mutations in LysM RLKs or transgenes carrying the same may be beneficial in imparting resistance against fungal pathogens.

  7. Defense Production Act of 1950 in U.S.C. | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0and Transparency,8-9612-985-2007SupplementalDanielDay 1:EnergyDefense

  8. Microsoft Word - Defense Related Uranium Mines Report to Congress-FINAL

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 atthe DistrictIndependent Research Assessment of1-13) AllDefense-

  9. Nuclear Safety Design Principles & the Concept of Independence: Insights from Nuclear Weapon Safety for Other High-Consequence Applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brewer, Jeffrey D.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Insights developed within the U.S. nuclear weapon system safety community may benefit system safety design, assessment, and management activities in other high consequence domains. The approach of assured nuclear weapon safety has been developed that uses the Nuclear Safety Design Principles (NSDPs) of incompatibility, isolation, and inoperability to design safety features, organized into subsystems such that each subsystem contributes to safe system responses in independent and predictable ways given a wide range of environmental contexts. The central aim of the approach is to provide a robust technical basis for asserting that a system can meet quantitative safety requirements in the widest context of possible adverse or accident environments, while using the most concise arrangement of safety design features and the fewest number of specific adverse or accident environment assumptions. Rigor in understanding and applying the concept of independence is crucial for the success of the approach. This paper provides a basic description of the assured nuclear weapon safety approach, in a manner that illustrates potential application to other domains. There is also a strong emphasis on describing the process for developing a defensible technical basis for the independence assertions between integrated safety subsystems.

  10. PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) STABILIZATION & PACKAGING PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GERBER, M.S.

    2004-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluor Hanford is pleased to submit the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Stabilization and Packaging Project (SPP) for consideration by the Project Management Institute as Project of the Year for 2004. The SPP thermally stabilized and/or packaged nearly 18 metric tons (MT) of plutonium and plutonium-bearing materials left in PFP facilities from 40 years of nuclear weapons production and experimentation. The stabilization of the plutonium-bearing materials substantially reduced the radiological risk to the environment and security concerns regarding the potential for terrorists to acquire the non-stabilized plutonium products for nefarious purposes. The work was done In older facilities which were never designed for the long-term storage of plutonium, and required working with materials that were extremely radioactive, hazardous, pyrophoric, and In some cases completely unique. I n some Instances, one-of-a-kind processes and equipment were designed, installed, and started up. The SPP was completed ahead of schedule, substantially beating all Interim progress milestone dates set by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) and in the Hanford Site's Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement or TPA), and finished $1-million under budget.

  11. Nuclear spirals in galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witold Maciejewski

    2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent high-resolution observations indicate that nuclear spirals are often present in the innermost few hundred parsecs of disc galaxies. My models show that nuclear spirals form naturally as a gas response to non-axisymmetry in the gravitational potential. Some nuclear spirals take the form of spiral shocks, resulting in streaming motions in the gas, and in inflow comparable to the accretion rates needed to power local Active Galactic Nuclei. Recently streaming motions of amplitude expected from the models have been observed in nuclear spirals, confirming the role of nuclear spirals in feeding of the central massive black holes.

  12. Commercial nuclear power 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  13. Proceedings of the 21st Seismic Research Symposium: Technologies for Monitoring The Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, N. Jill [Editor

    1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 21st Seismic Research Symposium: Technologies for Monitoring The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, held 21-24 September 1999 in Las Vegas, Nevada. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Department of Defense (DoD), the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  14. Standard Guide for Preparing Waste Management Plans for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This guide addresses the development of waste management plans for potential waste streams resulting from decommissioning activities at nuclear facilities, including identifying, categorizing, and handling the waste from generation to final disposal. 1.2 This guide is applicable to potential waste streams anticipated from decommissioning activities of nuclear facilities whose operations were governed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or Agreement State license, under Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, or Department of Defense (DoD) regulations. 1.3 This guide provides a description of the key elements of waste management plans that if followed will successfully allow for the characterization, packaging, transportation, and off-site treatment or disposal, or both, of conventional, hazardous, and radioactive waste streams. 1.4 This guide does not address the on-site treatment, long term storage, or on-site disposal of these potential waste streams. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address ...

  15. Startup control of the TOPAZ-II space nuclear reactor. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Astrin, C.D.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Russian designed and manufactured TOPAZ-II Thermionic Nuclear Space Reactor has been supplied to the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization for study as part of the TOPAZ International Program. A Preliminary Nuclear Safety Assessment investigated the readiness to use the TOPAZ-II in support of a Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Mission (NEPSTP). Among the anticipated system modifications required for launching the TOPAZ-II system within safety goals is for a U.S. designed Automatic Control System. The requirements and desired features of such a control system are developed based upon U.S. safety standards. System theory and design are presented in order to establish the basis for development of a hybrid control model from available simulations. The model is verified and then used in exploration of various control schemes and casualty analysis providing groundwork for future Automatic Control System design.

  16. DWPF (Defense Waste Processing Facility) canister impact testing and analyses for the Transportation Technology Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farnsworth, R.K.; Mishima, J.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A legal weight truck cask design has been developed for the US Department of Energy by GA Technologies, Inc. The cask will be used to transport defense high-level waste canisters produced by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Plant. The development of the cask required the collection of impact data for the DWPF canisters. The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) performed this work under the guidance of the Transportation Technology Center (TTC) at Sandia National Laboratories. Two full-scale DWPF canisters filled with nonradioactive borosilicate glass were impacted under ''normal'' and ''hypothetical'' accident conditions. Two canisters, supplied by the DWPF, were tested. Each canister was vertically dropped on the bottom end from a height of either 0.3 m or 9.1 m (for normal or hypothetical accident conditions, respectively). The structural integrity of each canister was then examined using helium leak and dye penetrant testing. The canisters' diameters and heights, which had been previously measured, were then remeasured to determine how the canister dimensions had changed. Following structural integrity testing, the canisters were flaw leak tested. For transportation flaw leak testing, four holes were fabricated into the shell of canister A-27 (0.3 m drop height). The canister was then transported a total distance of 2069 miles. During transport, the waste form material that fell from each flaw was collected to determine the amount of size distribution of each flaw release. 2 refs., 8 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. Online Monitoring of Plant Assets in the Nuclear Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nancy Lybeck; Vivek Agarwal; Binh Pham; Richard Rusaw; Randy Bickford

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today’s online monitoring technologies provide opportunities to perform predictive and proactive health management of assets within many different industries, in particular the defense and aerospace industries. The nuclear industry can leverage these technologies to enhance safety, productivity, and reliability of the aging fleet of existing nuclear power plants. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is collaborating with the Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI’s) Long-Term Operations program to implement online monitoring in existing nuclear power plants. Proactive online monitoring in the nuclear industry is being explored using EPRI’s Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management (FW-PHM) Suite software, a set of web-based diagnostic and prognostic tools and databases that serves as an integrated health monitoring architecture. This paper focuses on development of asset fault signatures used to assess the health status of generator step-up transformers and emergency diesel generators in nuclear power plants. Asset fault signatures describe the distinctive features based on technical examinations that can be used to detect a specific fault type. Fault signatures are developed based on the results of detailed technical research and on the knowledge and experience of technical experts. The Diagnostic Advisor of the FW-PHM Suite software matches developed fault signatures with operational data to provide early identification of critical faults and troubleshooting advice that could be used to distinguish between faults with similar symptoms. This research is important as it will support the automation of predictive online monitoring techniques in nuclear power plants to diagnose incipient faults, perform proactive maintenance, and estimate the remaining useful life of assets.

  18. Enhancement of NRC station blackout requirements for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, M. W. [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Mail Stop: 012-H2, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established a Near-Term Task Force (NTTF) in response to Commission direction to conduct a systematic and methodical review of NRC processes and regulations to determine whether the agency should make additional improvements to its regulatory system and to make recommendations to the Commission for its policy direction, in light of the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. The NTTF's review resulted in a set of recommendations that took a balanced approach to defense-in-depth as applied to low-likelihood, high-consequence events such as prolonged station blackout (SBO) resulting from severe natural phenomena. Part 50, Section 63, of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), 'Loss of All Alternating Current Power,' currently requires that each nuclear power plant must be able to cool the reactor core and maintain containment integrity for a specified duration of an SBO. The SBO duration and mitigation strategy for each nuclear power plant is site specific and is based on the robustness of the local transmission system and the transmission system operator's capability to restore offsite power to the nuclear power plant. With regard to SBO, the NTTF recommended that the NRC strengthen SBO mitigation capability at all operating and new reactors for design-basis and beyond-design-basis external events. The NTTF also recommended strengthening emergency preparedness for prolonged SBO and multi-unit events. These recommendations, taken together, are intended to clarify and strengthen US nuclear reactor safety regarding protection against and mitigation of the consequences of natural disasters and emergency preparedness during SBO. The focus of this paper is on the existing SBO requirements and NRC initiatives to strengthen SBO capability at all operating and new reactors to address prolonged SBO stemming from design-basis and beyond-design-basis external events. The NRC initiatives are intended to enhance core and spent fuel pool cooling, reactor coolant system integrity, and containment integrity. (authors)

  19. Technical cooperation on nuclear security between the United States and China : review of the past and opportunities for the future.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pregenzer, Arian Leigh

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States and China are committed to cooperation to address the challenges of the next century. Technical cooperation, building on a long tradition of technical exchange between the two countries, can play an important role. This paper focuses on technical cooperation between the United States and China in the areas of nonproliferation, arms control and other nuclear security topics. It reviews cooperation during the 1990s on nonproliferation and arms control under the U.S.-China Arms Control Exchange, discusses examples of ongoing activities under the Peaceful Uses of Technology Agreement to enhance security of nuclear and radiological material, and suggests opportunities for expanding technical cooperation between the defense nuclear laboratories of both countries to address a broader range of nuclear security topics.

  20. Nuclear facilities: criteria for the design and operation of ventilation systems for nuclear installations other than nuclear reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear facilities: criteria for the design and operation of ventilation systems for nuclear installations other than nuclear reactors

  1. Coherent Nuclear Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. I. Yukalov; E. P. Yukalova

    2004-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The main part of this review is devoted to the comprehensive description of coherent radiation by nuclear spins. The theory of nuclear spin superradiance is developed and the experimental observations of this phenomenon are considered. The intriguing problem of how coherence develops from initially incoherent quantum fluctuations is analysed. All main types of coherent radiation by nuclear spins are discussed, which are: free nuclear induction, collective induction, maser generation, pure superradiance, triggered superradiance, pulsing superradiance, punctuated superradiance, and induced emission. The influence of electron-nuclear hyperfine interactions and the role of magnetic anisotropy are studied. Conditions for realizing spin superradiance by magnetic molecules are investigated. The possibility of nuclear matter lasing, accompanied by pion or dibaryon radiation, is briefly touched.

  2. Instrumentation for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to develop and coordinate nuclear instrumentation standards with resulting economies for the nuclear and radiation fields. There was particular emphasis on coordination and management of the Nuclear Instrument Module (NIM) System, U.S. activity involving the CAMAC international standard dataway system, the FASTBUS modular high-speed data acquisition and control system and processing and management of national nuclear instrumentation and detector standards, as well as a modest amount of assistance and consultation services to the Pollutant Characterization and Safety Research Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research. The principal accomplishments were the development and maintenance of the NIM instrumentation system that is the predominant instrumentation system in the nuclear and radiation fields worldwide, the CAMAC digital interface system in coordination with the ESONE Committee of European Laboratories, the FASTBUS high-speed system and numerous national and international nuclear instrumentation standards.

  3. Nuclear Science References Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Pritychenko; E. B?ták; B. Singh; J. Totans

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Science References (NSR) database together with its associated Web interface, is the world's only comprehensive source of easily accessible low- and intermediate-energy nuclear physics bibliographic information for more than 210,000 articles since the beginning of nuclear science. The weekly-updated NSR database provides essential support for nuclear data evaluation, compilation and research activities. The principles of the database and Web application development and maintenance are described. Examples of nuclear structure, reaction and decay applications are specifically included. The complete NSR database is freely available at the websites of the National Nuclear Data Center http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/nsr and the International Atomic Energy Agency http://www-nds.iaea.org/nsr.

  4. INDEPENDENT PARTICLE ASPECTS OF NUCLEAR DYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robel, M.C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    situations: nuclear vibrations, fission, collisions, theformulae to nuclear vibrations, fission, collisions, thenuclear phenomena: nuclear vibrations, fission, collisions,

  5. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  6. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  7. Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levesque, Stephen

    2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) � Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : � Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. � Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. � Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. � Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. � Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. � Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. � Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. � Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium projects. Full technical reports for each of the projects have been submitted as well.

  8. Nuclear Spectra from Skyrmions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manton, N. S. [DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The structures of Skyrmions, especially for baryon numbers 4, 8 and 12, are reviewed. The quantized Skyrmion states are compared with nuclear spectra.

  9. Nuclear Physics from QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. van Kolck

    2008-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective field theories provide a bridge between QCD and nuclear physics. I discuss light nuclei from this perspective, emphasizing the role of fine-tuning.

  10. Tag: nuclear deterrence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    class"field-item even" property"content:encoded">

    The National Nuclear Security Administration has completed a major capital improvement project that has...

  11. Reference handbook: Nuclear criticality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose for this handbook is to provide Rocky Flats personnel with the information necessary to understand the basic principles underlying a nuclear criticality.

  12. Nuclear Physics: Experiment Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UserResearcher Information print version Research Highlights Public Interest Nuclear Physics Accelerator Free Electron Laser (FEL) Medical Imaging Physics Topics Campaigns...

  13. Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    overall Nuclear Safety Policy & ESH Goals Safety Basis Review and Approval In the DOE governance model, contractors responsible for the facility develop the safety basis and...

  14. Nuclear power attitude trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nealey, S.M.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The increasing vulnerability of nuclear power to political pressures fueled by public concerns, particularly about nuclear plant safety and radioactive waste disposal, has become obvious. Since Eisenhower's Atoms-for-Peace program, utility and government plans have centered on expansion of nuclear power generating capability. While supporters have outnumbered opponents of nuclear power expansion for many years, in the wake of the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident the margin of support has narrowed. The purpose of this paper is to report and put in perspective these long-term attitude trends.

  15. Management of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish requirements for the lifecycle management of DOE owned and/or managed accountable nuclear materials. Cancels DOE O 5660.1B.

  16. Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    To prevent unauthorized dissemination of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI). Cancels DOE 5635.4 and DOE 5650.3A

  17. National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Related Structures within TA-3 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico U. S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos Area...

  18. Nuclear | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Astrophysics One of the greatNuclearNuclear Nuclear An error

  19. National Nuclear Science Week 2012 - SRSCRO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Know Nuclear National Nuclear Science Week January 23 - 27, 2012 Fostering a deeper public understanding Logos for: National Nuclear Science Week, Nuclear Workforce Initiative,...

  20. Nuclear Reactions and Reactor Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Onuchic, José

    Nuclear Reactions and Reactor Safety DO NOT LICK We haven't entirely nailed down what element nuclear chain reaction, 1938 #12;Nuclear Chain Reactions Do nuclear chain reactions lead to runaway explosions? or ? -Controlled nuclear chain reactions possible: control energy release/sec -> More