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1

Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Responses of E. coli to DNA Damage and Stress  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exposure of Escherichia coli to agents that damage DNA or interfere with DNA replication results in the induction of the SOS response. A number of chromosomal genes that are repressed by the LexA protein are tran...

Toshihiro Ohta; John R. Battista…

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF THE DNA DAMAGE RESPONSE INDUCED DURING PARVOVIRUS INFECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DNA damage response (DDR) is a critical safeguarding system to protect genomic stability and integrality through a cascade of phosphorylation events of three PI-3-kinase-like kinases: ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated), ATR (ATM and Rad3 related...

Luo, Yong

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

Low Dose Radiation Induced DNA Damage Signaling and Repair Responses in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Induced DNA Damage Signaling and Repair Responses in Induced DNA Damage Signaling and Repair Responses in Human 3-Dimensional Skin Model System Yanrong Su, Jarah Meador and Adayabalam S. Balajee Center for Radiological Research, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, 630 West, 168th Street, New York, NY 10032. Exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) inflicts a wide variety of lesions in the genomic DNA. Among them, DNA double strand break (DSB) is considered to be the critical lesion for most of the deleterious radiation effects including carcinogenesis. Much of our knowledge on induction and repair kinetics of DSB has come from studies in two dimensional cell culture systems. However, the damage signaling and repair responses to DSB in tissue microenvironment are largely unknown. Knowledge of tissue responses to

5

Modular Systems Biology applied to TGFbeta and DNA Damage Response Signaling following Low Dose Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Modular Systems Biology applied to TGFbeta and DNA Damage Response Signaling following Modular Systems Biology applied to TGFbeta and DNA Damage Response Signaling following Low Dose Radiation Francis A. Cucinotta 1 , Yongfeng Li 2 , Minli Wang 2 , Claudio Carra 2 , Janice Pluth 3 , and Peter O'Neill 4 1 NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 2 U.S.R.A. Division of Life Sciences, Houston TX 3 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 4 Oxford University, Oxford UK Abstract: Modular systems biology (MSB) describes the complexity of biological systems using well defined modules that represent distinct biological response pathways or sub-systems within pathways. We review mathematical concepts from control theory that can be used to identify and construct well defined modules for describing complex biological processes. The DNA damage response and TGFbeta/Smad signaling are two important response pathways following

6

A DNA damage checkpoint response in telomere-initiated senescence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... array) or triplicate (tiling path) onto 3D-link activated slides (Motorola) using a MicroGrid II arrayer (BioRobotics). DNA labelling, hybridization and analysisDNA labelling and hybridization were essentially ...

Fabrizio d'Adda di Fagagna; Philip M. Reaper; Lorena Clay-Farrace; Heike Fiegler; Philippa Carr; Thomas von Zglinicki; Gabriele Saretzki; Nigel P. Carter; Stephen P. Jackson

2003-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

7

Conserved and Unconventional Responses to DNA Damage in Tetrahymena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the transition G1/S phase to promote the loading of DNA polymerases. Additionally CDK prevent any further activation of pre-RC. CDK also induce phosphorylation of Sld2, Sld3 and Mcm5 that promotes the initiation of DNA synthesis. Diagram modified from Sclafani... and Holzen (2007). Cdc45 Sld2-3 S-CDK Initiation G1 phase G1/S transition S phase 21 21 mechanism to restrict pre-RC formation to only once per cell cycle (Lutzmann et al., 2006). Cdc6 in budding yeast stimulates the Abf1 binding activity...

Sandoval Oporto, Pamela

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

8

STOCHASTIC MODELS OF SPACE RADIATION DNA DAMAGE RESPONSES AND CANCER RISKS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

STOCHASTIC MODELS OF SPACE RADIATION DNA DAMAGE STOCHASTIC MODELS OF SPACE RADIATION DNA DAMAGE RESPONSES AND CANCER RISKS Francis A. Cucinotta 1 , Janice M. Pluth 2 , Artem Ponomarev 3 , Shaowen Hu 3 , Jennifer Anderson 4 , Jane Harper 4 , and Peter O'Neill 4 1 NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston TX, USA; 2 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA, USA; 3 U.S.R.A., Division of Life Sciences, Houston TX, USA; 4 MRC Radiation and Genome Stability Unit, Harwell, Didcot, UK Abstract: On space missions astronauts are exposed to a steady flux of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) consisting of high-energy protons and heavy ions. In the next decades long- term missions of up to 200 days to the Earth's moon and 1100 days to Mars are planed by NASA where cumulative doses will not be low (>100 mSv) albeit dose-

9

Genome-wide single-cell-level screen for protein abundance and localization changes in response to DNA damage in S. cerevisiae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An effective response to DNA damaging agents involves modulating numerous facets of cellular homeostasis in addition to DNA repair and cell-cycle checkpoint pathways. Fluorescence microscopy-based imaging offers the ...

Mazumder, Aprotim

10

DNA Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFβ and ATM  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFβ and ATM Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFβ and ATM Signaling Peter O'Neill University of Oxford Abstract The ATM and TGFbeta signal transduction pathways are essential to cellular and tissue control responses to ionizing radiation (IR) and aberrant modifications to these pathways are extensive in cancer. We hypothesize that the ATM and TGFbeta signaling pathways are fully induced at high doses of acute low-LET radiation, whereas only partially induced at low doses. As a consequence of partial stimulation of these pathways important questions arise not only on the validity of the linear no-threshold assumption used in radiation regulations, but also on our ability to extrapolate experimental and human epidemiology data from high to low doses. The

11

The DNA Damage Response Signaling Cascade Regulates Proliferation of the Phytopathogenic Fungus Ustilago maydis in Planta  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and Sanchez, 2004) in a broad range of eukaryotes, including U. maydis...double-strand breaks in DNA; and ionizing radiation (IR), which generates double-strand...were irradiated at the indicated dose after being spotted. The spots...

Carmen de Sena-Tomás; Alfonso Fernández-Álvarez; William K. Holloman; José Pérez-Martín

2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

12

Physiological Responses of the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon “Pyrococcus abyssi” to DNA Damage Caused by Ionizing Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Damage Caused by Ionizing Radiation Edmond Jolivet 1 Corresponding...Fukuoka 812-8581, Japan The mechanisms by which...temperature and/or ionizing radiation. The hyperthermophilic...Matsunaga thanks the Japan Society for the Promotion...resistant to ionizing radiation? Trends Microbiol...

Edmond Jolivet; Fujihiko Matsunaga; Yoshizumi Ishino; Patrick Forterre; Daniel Prieur; Hannu Myllykallio

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

A DNA Damage-Induced, SOS-Independent Checkpoint Regulates Cell Division in Caulobacter crescentus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cells must coordinate DNA replication with cell division, especially during episodes of DNA damage. The paradigm for cell division control following DNA damage in bacteria involves the SOS response where cleavage of the ...

Modell, Joshua W.

14

Systems Biology Model of Interactions Between Tissue Growth Factors and DNA Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFbeta and ATM Signaling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The etiology of radiation carcinogenesis has been described in terms of aberrant changes that span several levels of biological organization. Growth factors regulate many important cellular and tissue functions including apoptosis, differentiation and proliferation. A variety of genetic and epigenetic changes of growth factors have been shown to contribute to cancer initiation and progression. It is known that cellular and tissue damage to ionizing radiation is in part initiated by the production of reactive oxygen species, which can activate cytokine signaling, and the DNA damage response pathways, most notably the ATM signaling pathway. Recently the transforming growth factor ? (TGF?) pathway has been shown to regulate or directly interact with the ATM pathway in the response to radiation. The relevance of this interaction with the ATM pathway is not known although p53 becomes phosphorylated and DNA damage responses are involved. However, growth factor interactions with DNA damage responses have not been elucidated particularly at low doses and further characterization of their relationship to cancer processes is warranted. Our goal will be to use a systems biology approach to mathematically and experimentally describe the low dose responses and cross-talk between the ATM and TGF? pathways initiated by low and high LET radiation. We will characterize ATM and TGF? signaling in epithelial and fibroblast cells using 2D models and ultimately extending to 3D organotypic cell culture models to begin to elucidate possible differences that may occur for different cell types and/or inter-cellular communication. We will investigate the roles of the Smad and Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) proteins as the potential major contributors to cross- talk between the TGF? and ATM pathways, and links to cell cycle control and/or the DNA damage response, and potential differences in their responses at low and high doses. We have developed various experimental approaches to apply to these problems using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry to detail changes at low dose/dose-rate in order to understand individual cell responses, and will establish our mathematical models based on the experimental findings resulting from changes in DNA repair, apoptosis and proliferation.

O'Neill, Peter [University of Oxford; Anderson, Jennifer [University of Oxford

2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

15

A Reversible Gene-Targeting Strategy Identifies Synthetic Lethal Interactions between MK2 and p53 in the DNA Damage Response In Vivo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary A fundamental limitation in devising new therapeutic strategies for killing cancer cells with DNA damaging agents is the need to identify synthetic lethal interactions between tumor-specific mutations and components of the DNA damage response (DDR) in vivo. The stress-activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/MAPKAP kinase-2 (MK2) pathway is a critical component of the DDR network in p53-deficient tumor cells in vitro. To explore the relevance of this pathway for cancer therapy in vivo, we developed a specific gene targeting strategy in which Cre-mediated recombination simultaneously creates isogenic MK2-proficient and MK2-deficient tumors within a single animal. This allows direct identification of MK2 synthetic lethality with mutations that promote tumor development or control response to genotoxic treatment. In an autochthonous model of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), we demonstrate that MK2 is responsible for resistance of p53-deficient tumors to cisplatin, indicating synthetic lethality between p53 and MK2 can successfully be exploited for enhanced sensitization of tumors to DNA-damaging chemotherapeutics in vivo.

Sandra Morandell; H. Christian Reinhardt; Ian G. Cannell; Jacob S. Kim; Daniela M. Ruf; Tanya Mitra; Anthony D. Couvillon; Tyler Jacks; Michael B. Yaffe

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Role of p53 in Sensing Oxidative DNA Damage in Response to Reactive Oxygen Species-Generating Agents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...by the base excision repair (BER) machinery. Using synthetic DNA containing 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2-deoxyguanosine...by the base excision repair (BER) machinery. Using synthetic DNA containing 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine...

Geetha Achanta and Peng Huang

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

DNA DAMAGE QUANTITATION BY ALKALINE GEL ELECTROPHORESIS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Physical and chemical agents in the environment, those used in clinical applications, or encountered during recreational exposures to sunlight, induce damages in DNA. Understanding the biological impact of these agents requires quantitation of the levels of such damages in laboratory test systems as well as in field or clinical samples. Alkaline gel electrophoresis provides a sensitive (down to {approx} a few lesions/5Mb), rapid method of direct quantitation of a wide variety of DNA damages in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNAs from laboratory, field, or clinical specimens, including higher plants and animals. This method stems from velocity sedimentation studies of DNA populations, and from the simple methods of agarose gel electrophoresis. Our laboratories have developed quantitative agarose gel methods, analytical descriptions of DNA migration during electrophoresis on agarose gels (1-6), and electronic imaging for accurate determinations of DNA mass (7-9). Although all these components improve sensitivity and throughput of large numbers of samples (7,8,10), a simple version using only standard molecular biology equipment allows routine analysis of DNA damages at moderate frequencies. We present here a description of the methods, as well as a brief description of the underlying principles, required for a simplified approach to quantitation of DNA damages by alkaline gel electrophoresis.

SUTHERLAND,B.M.; BENNETT,P.V.; SUTHERLAND, J.C.

2004-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

18

MDC1 Cleavage by Caspase-3: A Novel Mechanism for Inactivating the DNA Damage Response during Apoptosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...double-strand break repair and may be a novel therapeutic...commonly used or are in the pipeline, yet virtually all pancreatic...these lines, the DNA repair pathway is an attractive...timely drug development pipeline. Therefore, the model...components of the DNA repair complex (31, 33...

Stéphanie Solier and Yves Pommier

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Links between persistent DNA damage, genome instability, and aging  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Links between persistent DNA damage, genome instability, and aging Links between persistent DNA damage, genome instability, and aging William Dynan Medical College of Georgia Abstract There is considerable overlap between cellular and molecular changes that occur in response to low doses of ionizing radiation and those that occur during aging. Both processes are characterized by accumulation of persistent DNA damage ("wear and tear" on the genome), accumulation of protein and lipid oxidation products, loss of regenerative capacity at the cellular and tissue level, and increased incidence of cancer. These observations support a hypothesis that exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation accelerates normal, aging-related tissue changes. We have investigated this hypothesis using a genetically tractable model organism, the Japanese medaka fish. The medaka is a whole-animal vertebrate

20

Single cell trapping and DNA damage analysis using microwell arrays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With a direct link to cancer, aging, and heritable diseases as well as a critical role in cancer treatment, the importance of DNA damage is well-established. The intense interest in DNA damage in applications ranging from ...

Wood, David

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dna damage response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Quantifying murine bone marrow and blood radiation dose response following 18F-FDG PET with DNA damage biomarkers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The purpose of this study was to quantify the poorly understood radiation doses to murine bone marrow and blood from whole-body fluorine 18 (18F)-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET), by using specific biomarkers and comparing with whole body external low dose exposures. Groups of 3–5 mice were randomly assigned to 10 groups, each receiving either a different activity of 18F-FDG: 0–37 MBq or whole body irradiated with corresponding doses of 0–300 mGy X-rays. Blood samples were collected at 24 h and at 43 h for reticulocyte micronucleus assays and QPCR analysis of gene expression in peripheral blood leukocytes. Blood and bone marrow dose estimates were calculated from injected activities of 18F-FDG and were based on a recommended ICRP model. Doses to the bone marrow corresponding to 33.43 mGy and above for internal 18F-FDG exposure and to 25 mGy and above for external X-ray exposure, showed significant increases in radiation-induced MN-RET formation relative to controls (P dose–responses at 24 h for Bbc3 and Cdkn1 were similar for 18F-FDG and X-ray exposures, with significant modifications occurring for doses over 300 mGy for Bbc3 and at the lower dose of 150 mGy for Cdkn1a. Both leucocyte gene expression and quantification of MN-RET are highly sensitive biomarkers for reliable estimation of the low doses delivered in vivo to, respectively, blood and bone marrow, following 18F-FDG PET.

Grainne Manning; Kristina Taylor; Paul Finnon; Jennifer A. Lemon; Douglas R. Boreham; Christophe Badie

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Induction of DNA Damage by Low Dose PET scans  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Induction of DNA Damage by Low Dose PET scans Induction of DNA Damage by Low Dose PET scans Douglas Boreham McMaster University Abstract This research is focused on assessing the radiation risk associated with positron emission tomography (PET) scans. It has been suggested that low dose medical imaging, such as PET scans, carry an added biological risk because they expose the patient to ionizing radiation. PET scanning is an increasingly used nuclear medicine procedure that requires the administration of isotope 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG, E=250 keV β and 511 keV γ) and results in an effective dose to the patient ranging from 7-22 mSv. The radiation induced DNA damage associated with a PET scan was studied in 7-9 week old female wild type Trp53 +/+ mice. Mice were given a PET scan with 18F-FDG and the biological response was assessed in bone marrow using

23

Modulating radiation induced TGFβ and ATM signaling in the DNA damage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Modulating radiation induced TGFβ and ATM signaling in the DNA damage Modulating radiation induced TGFβ and ATM signaling in the DNA damage response Jennifer A. Anderson Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology Abstract Both the ATM and TGFβ signal transduction pathways are essential for cellular and tissue control responses to ionizing radiation and aberrant modifications to these pathways are extensive in cancer. We hypothesize that the ATM and TGFβ signaling pathways are fully induced at high doses of acute low-LET radiation, whereas only partially induced at low doses. Numerous studies have linked the p38 MAPK signaling pathway with the ATM DNA damage response, and others have shown that TGFβ stimulation results in the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. Our aim is to perturb potential crosstalk between ATM, TGFβ and p38 MAPK at the DNA damage level and

24

Persistent DNA damage foci, cellular senescence and low dose radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Persistent DNA damage foci, cellular senescence and low dose radiation Persistent DNA damage foci, cellular senescence and low dose radiation Denise Munoz 1 , Albert Davalos 1 , Francis Rodier 1 , Misako Kawahara 1 , Judith Campisi 1,2 and Steven Yannone 1,3 1 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Mailstop 84-171, Berkeley CA 94720; 2 Buck Institute for Age Research, 8001 Redwood Boulevard, Novato CA 94945; 3 Corresponding author Ionizing radiation (IR) induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are cytologically detectable as large nuclear foci that contain phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), the adaptor protein 53BP1, and several other proteins that participate in the sensing and processing of DNA damage (DNA damage foci). In normal human cells, moderately high IR (0.5-1 Gy) doses cause the rapid appearance of these foci (acute DNA damage foci), which gradually disappear

25

Linking Cell Cycle Reentry and DNA Damage in Neurodegeneration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aberrant cell cycle activity and DNA damage have been observed in neurons in association with various neurodegenerative conditions. While there is strong evidence for a causative role for these events in neurotoxicity, it ...

Kim, Dohoon

26

Nanofoams Response to Radiation Damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) np-Au foams were successfully synthesized by de-alloying process; (2) np-Au foams remain porous structure after Ne ion irradiation to 1 dpa; (3) SFTs were observed in irradiated np-Au foams with highest and intermediate flux, while no SFTs were observed with lowest flux; (4) SFTs were observed in irradiated np-Au foams at RT, whereas no SFTs were observed at LNT irradiation; (5) The diffusivity of vacancies in Au at RT is high enough so that the vacancies have enough time to agglomerate and thus collapse. As a result, SFTs were formed; (6) The high flux created much more damage/time, vacancies don't have enough time to diffuse or recombine. As a result, SFTs were formed.

Fu, Engang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Serrano De Caro, Magdalena [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Yongqiang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nastasi, Michael [Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, NE 68508; Zepeda-Ruiz, Luis [PLS, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551; Bringa, Eduardo M. [CONICET and Inst. Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza, 5500 Argentina; Baldwin, Jon K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Caro, Jose A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

27

DNA Damage and Repair in Translational Oncology: An Overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...is a molecular sensor of DNA breaks that facilitates DNA repair and controls genomic stability and apoptosis. PARP inhibitors...PARP-1 inhibitor NSC 737664 entered the NCI clinical development pipeline, we initiated a program to model pharmacodynamic responses...

Eddie Reed

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Chapter 11 - Exploiting Synthetic Lethal Interactions Between DNA Damage Signaling, Checkpoint Control, and p53 for Targeted Cancer Therapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

DNA damage signaling and checkpoint control pathways are among the most commonly mutated networks in human tumors. Emerging data suggest that synthetic lethal interactions between mutated oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes with molecules involved in the DNA damage response and DNA repair pathways can be therapeutically exploited to preferentially kill cancer cells. In this review, we discuss the concept of synthetic lethality with a focus on p53, a commonly lost tumor suppressor gene, in the context of DNA damage signaling. We describe several recent examples in which this concept was successfully applied to target tumor cells in culture or in mouse models, as well as in human cancer patients.

Sandra Morandell; Michael B. Yaffe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Examining the regulation of DNA end-processing at telomeres and double-strand breaks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

do not exhibit synthetic growth or DNA damage responsedo not exhibit synthetic growth or DNA damage responsedo not exhibit synthetic growth or DNA damage response

Ballew, Bari Jane

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

DNA damage and repair in human skin in situ  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding the molecular and cellular origins of sunlight-induced skin cancers in man requires knowledge of the damages inflicted on human skin during sunlight exposure, as well as the ability of cells in skin to repair or circumvent such damage. Although repair has been studied extensively in procaryotic and eucaryotic cells - including human cells in culture - there are important differences between repair by human skin cells in culture and human skin in situ: quantitative differences in rates of repair, as well as qualitative differences, including the presence or absence of repair mechanisms. Quantitation of DNA damage and repair in human skin required the development of new approaches for measuring damage at low levels in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNA. The method allows for analysis of multiple samples and the resulting data should be related to behavior of the DNA molecules by analytic expressions. Furthermore, it should be possible to assay a variety of lesions using the same methodology. The development of new analysis methods, new technology, and new biochemical probes for the study of DNA damage and repair are described. 28 refs., 4 figs.

Sutherland, B.M.; Gange, R.W.; Freeman, S.E.; Sutherland, J.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Spatially localized generation of nucleotide sequence-specific DNA damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, San Francisco, CA 94143; Dermatology Research Unit, San Francisco Veterans Administration Medical laser light, which is half the quantum energy required for conventional one-photon excitation, as used in a light dose-dependent fashion. To localize DNA damage in a model tissue-like medium, a DNA­psoTFO mixture

Boxer, Steven G.

32

Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein Protects against DNA Damage in Low  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein Protects against DNA Damage in Low Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein Protects against DNA Damage in Low Dose γ-Irradiated Cells Edouard Azzam New Jersey Medical School Cancer Center Abstract We have previously shown that exposure to low dose/low dose rate γ-rays can protect normal human and rodent cells against oxidative/clastogenic damages induced spontaneously or by a subsequent challenge dose of ionizing radiation. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying these effects, we used amine-specific isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based approach to identify induced proteolytic events. Intriguingly, the Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (TCTP) was significantly up-regulated after 10cGy (0.2cGy/h) but not after 4 Gy (1 Gy/min) in several strains of normal human fibroblasts maintained in 2- or

33

A COMPARISON OF DNA DAMAGE PROBES IN TWO HMEC LINES WITH X-IRRADIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, we investigated ?H2AXser139 and 53BP1ser25, DNA damage pathway markers, to observe responses to radiation insult. Two Human Mammary Epithelial Cell (HMEC) lines were utilized to research the role of immortalization in DNA damage marker expression, HMEC HMT-3522 (S1) with an infi nite lifespan, and a subtype of HMEC 184 (184V) with a fi nite lifespan. Cells were irradiated with 50cGy X-rays, fi xed with 4% paraformaldehyde after 1 hour repair at 37°C, and processed through immunofl uorescence. Cells were visualized with a fl uorescent microscope and images were digitally captured using Image-Pro Plus software. The 184V irradiated cells exhibited a more positive punctate response within the nucleus for both DNA damage markers compared to the S1 irradiated cells. The dose and time course will be expanded in future studies to augment the preliminary data from this research. It is important to understand whether the process of transformation to immortalization compromises the DNA damage sensor and repair process proteins of HMECs in order to understand what is “normal” and to evaluate the usefulness of cell lines as experimental models.

Wisnewski, C.L.; Bjornstad, K.A.; Rosen, C.J.; Chang, P.Y.; Blakely, E.A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

A comparison of DNA damage probes in two HMEC lines withX-irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, we investigated {gamma}H2AX{sup ser139} and 53BP1{sup ser25}, DNA damage pathway markers, to observe responses to radiation insult. Two Human Mammary Epithelial Cell (HMEC) lines were utilized to research the role of immortalization in DNA damage marker expression, HMEC HMT-3522 (S1) with an infinite lifespan, and a subtype of HMEC 184 (184V) with a finite lifespan. Cells were irradiated with 50 cGy X-rays, fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde after 1 hour repair at 37 C, and processed through immunofluorescence. Cells were visualized with a fluorescent microscope and images were digitally captured using Image-Pro Plus software. The 184V irradiated cells exhibited a more positive punctate response within the nucleus for both DNA damage markers compared to the S1 irradiated cells. We will expand the dose and time course in future studies to augment the preliminary data from this research. It is important to understand whether the process of transformation to immortalization compromises the DNA damage sensor and repair process proteins of HMECs in order to understand what is 'normal' and to evaluate the usefulness of cell lines as experimental models.

Wisnewski, Christy L.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; Rosen, ChristoperJ.; Chang, Polly Y.; Blakely, Eleanor A.

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

35

Engineering a single cell microarray platform for high throughput DNA damage and repair analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DNA damage contributes to cancer, aging, and heritable diseases. Ironically, DNA damaging agents are also commonly used in current cancer treatment. We therefore need robust, high throughput, and inexpensive tools for ...

Weingeist, David McGregor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Epigenetic Modifications in Double-Strand Break DNA Damage Signaling and Repair  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Focus 10 14 31 DNA Damage and Repair in Translational Oncology...investigators, DNA damage and repair has been a major focus of anticancer...Plummer R . Perspective on the pipeline of drugs being developed with...break DNA damage signaling and repair. Clin Cancer Res 2010;16...

Dorine Rossetto; Andrew W. Truman; Stephen J. Kron; and Jacques Côté

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Oxidative DNA damage and its repair in rat spleen following subchronic exposure to aniline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mechanisms by which aniline exposure elicits splenotoxic response, especially the tumorigenic response, are not well-understood. Splenotoxicity of aniline is associated with iron overload and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which can cause oxidative damage to DNA, proteins and lipids (oxidative stress). 8-Hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is one of the most abundant oxidative DNA lesions resulting from ROS, and 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (OGG1), a specific DNA glycosylase/lyase enzyme, plays a key role in the removal of 8-OHdG adducts. This study focused on examining DNA damage (8-OHdG) and repair (OGG1) in the spleen in an experimental condition preceding a tumorigenic response. To achieve that, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subchronically exposed to aniline (0.5 mmol/kg/day via drinking water for 30 days), while controls received drinking water only. Aniline treatment led to a significant increase in splenic oxidative DNA damage, manifested as a 2.8-fold increase in 8-OHdG levels. DNA repair activity, measured as OGG1 base excision repair (BER) activity, increased by {approx} 1.3 fold in the nuclear protein extracts (NE) and {approx} 1.2 fold in the mitochondrial protein extracts (ME) of spleens from aniline-treated rats as compared to the controls. Real-time PCR analysis for OGG1 mRNA expression in the spleen revealed a 2-fold increase in expression in aniline-treated rats than the controls. Likewise, OGG1 protein expression in the NEs of spleens from aniline-treated rats was {approx} 1.5 fold higher, whereas in the MEs it was {approx} 1.3 fold higher than the controls. Aniline treatment also led to stronger immunostaining for both 8-OHdG and OGG1 in the spleens, confined to the red pulp areas. It is thus evident from our studies that aniline-induced oxidative stress is associated with increased oxidative DNA damage. The BER pathway was also activated, but not enough to prevent the accumulation of oxidative DNA damage (8-OHdG). Accumulation of mutagenic oxidative DNA lesions in the spleen following exposure to aniline could play a critical role in the tumorigenic process.

Ma Huaxian; Wang Jianling [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z. [Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Boor, Paul J. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Khan, M. Firoze [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States)], E-mail: mfkhan@utmb.edu

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

A novel role for the transcriptional modulator NusA in DNA repair/damage tolerance pathways in Escherichia coli  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

All organisms must contend with the consequences of DNA damage, induced by a variety of both endogenous and exogenous sources. Mechanisms of DNA repair and DNA damage tolerance are crucial for cellular survival after DNA ...

Cohen, Susan E., Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

DNA damage induced clusterin expression - A sensitive measure of genomic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

damage induced clusterin expression - A sensitive measure of genomic damage induced clusterin expression - A sensitive measure of genomic instability David Boothman University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas Abstract Secretory clusterin (sCLU) is a glycoprotein secreted from cells following exposure to genotoxic stress, and sCLU expression is elevated in many different disease states. sCLU is a pro-survival protein that acts as a molecular chaperone to remove cell debris caused by trauma to cells and tissues in vivo. sCLU expression is extremely sensitive to oxidative stress and DNA damage and can be induced by low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR), as low as 2 cGy. We previously demonstrated that sCLU was induced after LDIR by activation of the Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 Receptor (IGF-1R), and downstream stimulation of Src/MAPK/Erk-1/2 to promote binding of the Egr-1

40

DNA damage: risk comparisons of low radiation vis-a-vis dietary micronutrient deficiencies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Micronutrients are the substances in minute amounts that are essential for human life. This study discusses laboratory and epidemiological evidence that dietary micronutrient deficiencies cause DNA damage. DNA damage comparisons are made between dietary micronutrient deficiencies and low dose radiation. Laboratory studies show that micronutrient deficiencies can cause greater DNA damage than radiation doses significantly above background environmental levels. Previous concerns that have been expressed about comparing endogenous DNA damages to radiation-induced DNA damages are discussed, in particular, the role of radiation clusters. It is shown that cluster damage does not preclude making comparisons of dietary micronutrient deficiencies vis-a-vis radiation, especially at background environmental levels. Such damage comparisons provide the public with a means of placing radiation risk in perspective by comparing a readily appreciated, everyday concept (dietary deficiencies) with that of radiation.

Daniel P. Hayes

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dna damage response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Regulatory pathways controlling cell division after DNA damage in Caulobacter crescentus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

All cells must coordinate DNA replication with cell division in order to faithfully propagate whole chromosomes to daughter cells. During episodes of DNA damage, cells often delay division until the lesions have been ...

Modell, Joshua Wexler

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

A novel cis-acting element required for DNA damage-inducible expression of yeast DIN7  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Din7 is a DNA damage-inducible mitochondrial nuclease that modulates the stability of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. How DIN7 gene expression is regulated, however, has remained largely unclear. Using promoter sequence alignment, we found a highly conserved 19-bp sequence in the promoter regions of DIN7 and NTG1, which encodes an oxidative stress-inducible base-excision-repair enzyme. Deletion of the 19-bp sequence markedly reduced the hydroxyurea (HU)-enhanced DIN7 promoter activity. In addition, nuclear fractions prepared from HU-treated cells were used in in vitro band shift assays to reveal the presence of currently unidentified trans-acting factor(s) that preferentially bound to the 19-bp region. These results suggest that the 19-bp sequence is a novel cis-acting element that is required for the regulation of DIN7 expression in response to HU-induced DNA damage.

Yoshitani, Ayako [Chemical Genetics Laboratory, RIKEN Discovery Research Institute, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-ohkubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Yoshida, Minoru [Chemical Genetics Laboratory, RIKEN Discovery Research Institute, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ling Feng [Chemical Genetics Laboratory, RIKEN Discovery Research Institute, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)], E-mail: ling@postman.riken.go.jp

2008-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

43

The muc genes of pKM101 are induced by DNA damage.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...beta-galactosidase activity was induced by UV radiation and other DNA-damaging agents...beta-galactosidase activity was induced by UV radiation and other DNA-damaging agents...repressor for genes found on naturally occuring plasmids: the mucA and mucB...

S J Elledge; G C Walker

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

CONSULTATION RESPONSE The Forensic Use of DNA and the National DNA Database  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSULTATION RESPONSE The Forensic Use of DNA and the National DNA Database Wellcome Trust response on the important topic of the forensic use of DNA and the National DNA Database (NDNAD). Given the Trust Assembly; "Forensic DNA Databasing: A European perspective" - a biomedical ethics grant to Professor Robin

Rambaut, Andrew

45

Live Cell Imaging and in situ analysis of cellular responses to DNA doublestrand  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Live Cell Imaging and in situ analysis of cellular responses to DNA double- Live Cell Imaging and in situ analysis of cellular responses to DNA double- strand breaks in mammalian cells. David J. Chen Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas TX 75390 The integrity of the human genome is constantly threatened by internal as well as external factors with the propensity to cause DNA damage. Of the various types of DNA damage that can occur within the mammalian cell nucleus, the DNA double strand break (DSB) is perhaps the most dangerous. Estimates put the number of endogenous DSBs anywhere between 10-100 per nucleus per day. A direct link between DSBs and cancer has been surmised by researchers based upon the fact that many cancer-predisposition

46

To be submitted to Continuum Mechanics and Thermodynamics From the onset of damage to rupture: construction of responses with damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To be submitted to Continuum Mechanics and Thermodynamics From the onset of damage to rupture: construction of responses with damage localization for a general class of gradient damage models Kim Pham solutions for the traction problem of an elastic damaging bar. This bar has a softening behavior which obeys

Boyer, Edmond

47

International congress on DNA damage and repair: Book of abstracts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the abstracts of 105 papers presented at the Congress. Topics covered include the Escherichia coli nucleotide excision repair system, DNA repair in malignant transformations, defective DNA repair, and gene regulation. (TEM)

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

The role of ClpXP-mediated proteolysis in resculpting the proteome after DNA damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When faced with environmental assaults, E. coli can take extreme measures to survive. For example, starving bacteria consume their own proteins, and bacteria with severe DNA damage introduce mutations into their genomes. ...

Neher, Saskia B. (Saskia Byerly)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Quantitative characteristics of clustered DNA damage in irradiated cells by heavy ion beams  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......March 2014 abstract Poster Session 01: DNA Damage...Center for Experimental Sciences, Saga University...Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan. These LETs...form the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology and......

Hiroaki Terato; Yuka Shimazaki-Tokuyama; Yuko Inoue; Yoshiya Furusawa

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

DNA Damage Induced by 193-nm Radiation in Mammalian Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...States Department of Energy. Irene E. Kochevar...and, therefore, the nuclear DNA in tissue will be...and, therefore, the nuclear DNA in tissue will be...States Depart ment of Energy. 2To whom requests for...nm (14). In cells, nuclear DNA will be partially...

Irene E. Kochevar; Agnes A. Walsh; Howard A. Green; Margaret Sherwood; Alice G. Shih; and Betsy M. Sutherland

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

DNA damage-site recognition by lysine conjugates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with potent photoactivated “warheads” § (33, 34) and satisfy...envisioned that the hydrophobic “warheads” may occupy a hydrophobic...DNA is involved in the “warhead” activation step. We irradiated...3. Comparison between the intact DNA duplex A and constructs B–E. The constructs...

Boris Breiner; Jörg C. Schlatterer; Igor V. Alabugin; Serguei V. Kovalenko; Nancy L. Greenbaum

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Its Repair in Human Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DNA damage in mammalian chromatin in vitro and in cultured mammalian cells including human cells was studied. In the first phase of these studies, a cell culture laboratory was established. Necessary equipment including an incubator, a sterile laminar flow hood and several centrifuges was purchased. We have successfully grown several cell lines such as murine hybridoma cells, V79 cells and human K562 leukemia cells. This was followed by the establishment of a methodology for the isolation of chromatin from cells. This was a very important step, because a routine and successful isolation of chromatin was a prerequisite for the success of the further studies in this project, the aim of which was the measurement of DNA darnage in mammalian chromatin in vitro and in cultured cells. Chromatin isolation was accomplished using a slightly modified procedure of the one described by Mee & Adelstein (1981). For identification and quantitation of DNA damage in cells, analysis of chromatin was preferred over the analysis of "naked DNA" for the following reasons: i. DNA may not be extracted efficiently from nucleoprotein in exposed cells, due to formation of DNA-protein cross-links, ii. the extractability of DNA is well known to decrease with increasing doses of radiation, iii. portions of DNA may not be extracted due to fragmentation, iv. unextracted DNA may contain a significant portion of damaged DNA bases and DNA-protein cross-links. The technique of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), which was used in the present project, permits the identification and quantitation of modified DNA bases in chromatin in the presence of proteins without the necessity of first isolating DNA from chromatin. This has been demonstrated previously by the results from our laboratory and by the results obtained during the course of the present project. The quality of isolated chromatin was tested by measurement of its content of DNA, proteins, and RNA, by analysis of its protein components using gel electrophoresis, and by absorption spectral analysis. GeneraUy, the RNA content was <5% of the amount of DNA, and the ratio of the amount of protein to that of DNA was =1. 8-2 (w/w). Having developed a suitable methodology for routine isolation of chromatin from mammalian cells, studies of DNA damage in chromatin in vitro and in cultured human cells were pursued.

Dizdaroglu, Miral

1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

53

Repair of Damaged DNA by Arabidopsis Cell Extract  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and irradiated at the doses indicated in figure legends...the repair of a model ionizing radiation-induced DNA strand...their genomes from a wide range of genotoxic stresses...Arabidopsis cytology genetics radiation effects Cell Extracts...

Anatoliy Li; David Schuermann; Francesca Gallego; Igor Kovalchuk; Bruno Tinland

54

Inhibition of Chk1 by the G[subscript 2] DNA damage checkpoint inhibitor isogranulatimide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inhibitors of the G{sub 2} DNA damage checkpoint can selectively sensitize cancer cells with mutated p53 to killing by DNA-damaging agents. Isogranulatimide is a G{sub 2} checkpoint inhibitor containing a unique indole/maleimide/imidazole skeleton identified in a phenotypic cell-based screen; however, the mechanism of action of isogranulatimide is unknown. Using natural and synthetic isogranulatimide analogues, we show that the imide nitrogen and a basic nitrogen at position 14 or 15 in the imidazole ring are important for checkpoint inhibition. Isogranulatimide shows structural resemblance to the aglycon of UCN-01, a potent bisindolemaleimide inhibitor of protein kinase C{beta} (IC{sub 50}, 0.001 micromol/L) and of the checkpoint kinase Chk1 (IC{sub 50}, 0.007 micromol/L). In vitro kinase assays show that isogranulatimide inhibits Chk1 (IC{sub 50}, 0.1 {micro}mol/L) but not protein kinase C{beta}. Of 13 additional protein kinases tested, isogranulatimide significantly inhibits only glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (IC{sub 50}, 0.5 {micro}mol/L). We determined the crystal structure of the Chk1 catalytic domain complexed with isogranulatimide. Like UCN-01, isogranulatimide binds in the ATP-binding pocket of Chk1 and hydrogen bonds with the backbone carbonyl oxygen of Glu{sup 85} and the amide nitrogen of Cys{sup 87}. Unlike UCN-01, the basic N15 of isogranulatimide interacts with Glu{sub 17}, causing a conformation change in the kinase glycine-rich loop that may contribute importantly to inhibition. The mechanism by which isogranulatimide inhibits Chk1 and its favorable kinase selectivity profile make it a promising candidate for modulating checkpoint responses in tumors for therapeutic benefit.

Jiang, Xiuxian; Zhao, Baoguang; Britton, Robert; Lim, Lynette Y.; Leong, Dan; Sanghera, Jasbinder S.; Zhou, Bin-Bing S.; Piers, Edward; Andersen, Raymond J.; Roberge, Michel (Kinetek); (GSKPA); (UBC)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Suppression of autophagy enhances the cytotoxicity of the DNA-damaging aromatic amine p-anilinoaniline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

p-Anilinoaniline (pAA) is an aromatic amine that is widely used in hair dying applications. It is also a metabolite of metanil yellow, an azo dye that is commonly used as a food coloring agent. Concentrations of pAA between 10 and 25 {mu}M were cytostatic to cultures of the normal human mammary epithelia cell line MCF10A. Concentrations {>=} 50 {mu}M were cytotoxic. Cytostatic concentrations induced transient G{sub 1} and S cell cycle phase arrests; whereas cytotoxic concentrations induced protracted arrests. Cytotoxic concentrations of pAA caused DNA damage, as monitored by the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay, and morphological changes consistent with cells undergoing apoptosis and/or autophagy. Enzymatic and western blot analyses, and binding analyses of fluorescent labeled VAD-FMK, suggested that caspase family members were activated by pAA. Western blot analyses documented the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, a post-translational modification involved in the development of the autophagosome. Suppression of autophagosome formation, via knockdown of ATG7 with shRNA, prevented pAA-induced vacuolization, enhanced the activation of pro-caspase-3, and increased susceptibility of ATG7-deficient cells to the cytostatic and cytotoxic activities of markedly lower concentrations of pAA. Cells stably transfected with a nonsense shRNA behaved like parental MCF10A cells. Collectively, these data suggest that MCF10A cultures undergo autophagy as a pro-survival response to concentrations of pAA sufficient to induce DNA damage.

Elliott, Althea [Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Reiners, John J. [Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)], E-mail: john.reiners.jr@wayne.edu

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Comparison of DNA Damage Risk from  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Comparison of DNA Damage Risk from Low-Dose Radiation and Folate Comparison of DNA Damage Risk from Low-Dose Radiation and Folate Deficiency. Authors: Chantal Courtemanche, Arnold C. Huang, Nicole Kerry, Bernice Ng, and Bruce N. Ames. Institutions: Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, California. Our overall goal is to understand and quantify the real effects of low-dose radiation by measuring direct and specific cellular changes. However, since the background dose of radiation to which most individuals are exposed is well below the levels where significant biological effects, such as mutation or tumor induction, are observed, our novel approach is to compare the consequences of radiation to those of specific nutritional deficiencies. By determining which of these two common stresses at physiologically relevant doses leads to a greater amount of DNA damage, we

57

DNA Damage Repair Pathways in Cancer Stem Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reads to the genome was performed using the AB BioScope 1.2 Pipeline and outputs imported into Partek Genomics Suite for analysis...results reveals upregulation of genes and miRNAs involved in DNA repair, angiogenesis, and inhibitors of Estrogen Receptor-alpha...

Marcello Maugeri-Saccà; Monica Bartucci; and Ruggero De Maria

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

DNA Damage by Low-Energy Electron Impact: Dependence on Guanine Content  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

DNA Damage by Low-Energy Electron Impact: Dependence on Guanine Content ... The interaction of low-energy electrons (LEE) with living matter at energies below the ionization threshold (about 7.5 eV for DNA) is of increasing importance from the fundamental scientific as well as from technological points of view. ... This low-energy feature was shown to be a "fingerprint" in all the spectra of dinucleotides and trinucleotides that contain the guanine base. ...

T. Solomun; H. Seitz; H. Sturm

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

59

The single-strand DNA binding activity of human PC4 preventsmutagenesis and killing by oxidative DNA damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human positive cofactor 4 (PC4) is a transcriptional coactivator with a highly conserved single-strand DNA (ssDNA) binding domain of unknown function. We identified PC4 as a suppressor of the oxidative mutator phenotype of the Escherichia coli fpg mutY mutant and demonstrate that this suppression requires its ssDNA binding activity. Yeast mutants lacking their PC4 ortholog Sub1 are sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and exhibit spontaneous and peroxide induced hypermutability. PC4 expression suppresses the peroxide sensitivity of the yeast sub l{Delta} mutant, suggesting that the human protein has a similar function. A role for yeast and human proteins in DNA repair is suggested by the demonstration that Sub1 acts in a peroxide-resistance pathway involving Rad2 and by the physical interaction of PC4 with the human Rad2 homolog XPG. We show XPG recruits PC4 to a bubble-containing DNA substrate with resulting displacement of XPG and formation of a PC4-DNA complex. We discuss the possible requirement for PC4 in either global or transcription-coupled repair of oxidative DNA damage to mediate the release of XPG bound to its substrate.

Wang, Jen-Yeu; Sarker, Altaf Hossain; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Volkert, Michael R.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Predictive and Prognostic Significance of Glutathione Levels and DNA Damage in Cervix Cancer Patients Undergoing Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the predictive significance of serum glutathione (GSH) and tumor tissue DNA damage in the treatment of cervical cancer patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: This study included subjects undergoing hysterectomy (for normal cervix tissue) and cervical cancer patients who underwent conventional concurrent chemoradiotherapy (cisplatin once per week for 5 weeks with concurrent external radiotherapy of 2 Gy per fraction for 5 weeks, followed by two applications of intracavitary brachytherapy once per week after 2 weeks' rest). Blood was collected after two fractions, whereas both blood and tissues were collected after five fractions of radiotherapy in separate groups of subjects. Serum for total GSH content and tissues were processed for single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay for DNA damage analysis. Clinical tumor radioresponse was assessed 2 months after the completion of treatment as complete responders (CR) (100% shrinkage), partial responders (PR) (>50%), and nonresponders (NR) (<50%). Results: Serum GSH content depleted significantly after a total dose of 4 Gy and 10 Gy of radiotherapy with a single dose of cisplatin, which was significantly lesser in NR than of CR patients. Similarly, Olive Tail Moment, the index of DNA damage, indicated significantly higher values in the fifth fraction of radiotherapy (5-RT) than in pretreatment. The DNA damage after 5-RT in the NR subgroup was significantly lower than that of CR. Conclusions: Serum GSH analysis and tumor tissue SCGE assay found to be useful parameters for predicting chemoradioresponse prior to and also at an early stage of treatment of cervical cancers.

Vidyasagar, Mamidipudi Srinivasa [Departments of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Shirdi Saibaba Cancer Hospital, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Kodali, Maheedhar [Division of Radiobiology and Toxicology, Manipal Life Sciences Center, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Departments of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Shirdi Saibaba Cancer Hospital, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Prakash Saxena, Pu [Departments of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Shirdi Saibaba Cancer Hospital, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal, Karnataka (India)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dna damage response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Arabidopsis Cockayne Syndrome A-Like Proteins 1A and 1B Form a Complex with CULLIN4 and Damage DNA Binding Protein 1A and Regulate the Response to UV Irradiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...used for gel filtration size estimation were ferritin (440 kD...irradiated with five different doses of UV-B light (0, 10...2003). Ultraviolet-B radiation-mediated responses in plants...growth inhibition caused by UVB radiation. Plant J. 50 : 70-79...

Caiguo Zhang; Huiping Guo; Jun Zhang; Guangqin Guo; Karen S. Schumaker; Yan Guo

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

62

Repair of gamma-ray-induced DNA base damage in xeroderma pigmentosum cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The repair of DNA damage produced by /sup 137/Cs gamma irradiation was measured with a preparation from Micrococcus luteus containing DNA damage-specific endonucleases in combination with alkaline elution. The frequency of these endonuclease sensitive sites (ESS) was determined after 54 or 110 Gy of oxic irradiation in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblasts from complementation groups A, C, D, and G. Repair was rapid in all cell strains with greater than 50% repair after 1.5 h of repair incubation. At later repair times, 12-17 h, more ESS remained in XP than in normal cells. The frequency of excess ESS in XP cells was approximately 0.04 per 10(9) Da of DNA per Gy which was equivalent to 10% of the initial ESS produced. The removal of ESS was comparable in XP cells with normal radiosensitivity and XP3BR cells which have been reported to be moderately radiosensitive.

Fornace, A.J. Jr.; Dobson, P.P.; Kinsella, T.J.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Genome-Wide Identification and 3D Modeling of Proteins involved in DNA Damage Recognition and Repair (Final Report)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK-B135 DNA Damage Recognition and Repair (DDR and R) proteins play a critical role in cellular responses to low-dose radiation and are associated with cancer. the authors have performed a systematic, genome-wide computational analysis of genomic data for human genes involved in the DDR and R process. The significant achievements of this project include: (1) Construction of the computational pipeline for searching DDR and R genes, building and validation of 3D models of proteins involved in DDR and R; (2) Functional and structural annotation of the 3D models and generation of comprehensive lists of suggested knock-out mutations; (3) Important improvement of macromolecular docking technology and its application to predict the DNA-Protein complex conformation; (4) Development of a new algorithm for improved analysis of high-density oligonucleotide arrays for gene expression profiling; (5) Construction and maintenance of the DNA Damage Recognition and Repair Database; and (6) Producing 14 research papers (10 published and 4 in preparation).

Ruben A. Abagyan, PhD

2004-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

A molecular dynamics simulation of DNA damage induction by ionizing radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a multi-scale simulation of early stage of DNA damages by the indirect action of hydroxyl ($^\\bullet$OH) free radicals generated by electrons and protons. The computational method comprises of interfacing the Geant4-DNA Monte Carlo with the ReaxFF molecular dynamics software. A clustering method was employed to map the coordinates of $^\\bullet$OH-radicals extracted from the ionization track-structures onto nano-meter simulation voxels filled with DNA and water molecules. The molecular dynamics simulation provides the time evolution and chemical reactions in individual simulation voxels as well as the energy-landscape accounted for the DNA-$^\\bullet$OH chemical reaction that is essential for the first principle enumeration of hydrogen abstractions, chemical bond breaks, and DNA-lesions induced by collection of ions in clusters less than the critical dimension which is approximately 2-3 \\AA. We show that the formation of broken bonds leads to DNA base and backbone damages that collectively propagate ...

Abolfath, Ramin M; Chen, Zhe J; Nath, Ravinder

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Protection of cisplatin-induced spermatotoxicity, DNA damage and chromatin abnormality by selenium nano-particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cisplatin (CIS), an anticancer alkylating agent, induces DNA adducts and effectively cross links the DNA strands and so affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. The present study investigated the cellular/biochemical mechanisms underlying possible protective effect of selenium nano-particles (Nano-Se) as an established strong antioxidant with more bioavailability and less toxicity, on reproductive toxicity of CIS by assessment of sperm characteristics, sperm DNA integrity, chromatin quality and spermatogenic disorders. To determine the role of oxidative stress (OS) in the pathogenesis of CIS gonadotoxicity, the level of lipid peroxidation (LPO), antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and peroxynitrite (ONOO) as a marker of nitrosative stress (NS) and testosterone (T) concentration as a biomarker of testicular function were measured in the blood and testes. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were equally divided into four groups. A single IP dose of CIS (7 mg/kg) and protective dose of Nano-Se (2 mg/kg/day) were administered alone or in combination. The CIS-exposed rats showed a significant increase in testicular and serum LPO and ONOO level, along with a significant decrease in enzymatic antioxidants levels, diminished serum T concentration and abnormal histologic findings with impaired sperm quality associated with increased DNA damage and decreased chromatin quality. Coadministration of Nano-Se significantly improved the serum T, sperm quality, and spermatogenesis and reduced CIS-induced free radical toxic stress and spermatic DNA damage. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that Nano-Se may be useful to prevent CIS-induced gonadotoxicity through its antioxidant potential. Highlights: ? Cisplatin (CIS) affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. ? Effect of Nano-Se on CIS-induced spermatotoxicity was investigated. ? CIS-exposure induces oxidative sperm DNA damage and impairs steroidogenesis. ? Nano-Se retained sperm quality against CIS-induced free radicals toxic stress.

Rezvanfar, Mohammad Amin; Rezvanfar, Mohammad Ali [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza [Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Biotechnology Research Centre, Faculty of Pharmacy, TUMS, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Biotechnology Research Centre, Faculty of Pharmacy, TUMS, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahmadi, Abbas [Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Urmia University, Urmia (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Urmia University, Urmia (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Baeeri, Maryam; Mohammadirad, Azadeh [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollahi, Mohammad, E-mail: mohammad.abdollahi@utoronto.ca [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The Efficacy of a Broad-spectrum Sunscreen to Protect Engineered Human Skin from Tissue and DNA Damage Induced by Solar Ultraviolet Exposure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Specifically, the capacity of sunscreens to prevent...and DNA damage after solar UV radiation. Engineered...DNA damage induced by solar ultraviolet exposure...Specifically, the capacity of sunscreens to prevent...and DNA damage after solar UV radiation. Engineered...

Vickram Bissonauth; Régen Drouin; David L. Mitchell; Marc Rhainds; Joël Claveau; and Mahmoud Rouabhia

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: DNA Damage in Acutely Irradiated F2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DNA Damage in Acutely Irradiated F2 Mice with a History of Paternal DNA Damage in Acutely Irradiated F2 Mice with a History of Paternal F0 Germline Irradiation Authors: J.E. Baulch and O.G. Raabe Institutions: Center for Health and the Environment, University of California, Davis, CA. The main goal of this grant is to evaluate heritable, transgenerational effects of low dose, low-linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation (0.1 Gy attenuated 137Cs gamma rays) on Type B spermatogonia in 129SVE mice; wild-type and heterozygous for Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT). The ATM heterozygotes are carriers for a genetic mutation (AT mutated, ATM) that is thought to predispose both humans and mice to radiation sensitivity. Experiments conducted in our laboratory have demonstrated heritable effects of paternal germline exposure to ionizing radiation in mice using 1.0 Gy of

68

Genome-Wide Identification and 3D Modeling of Proteins involved in DNA Damage Recognition and Repair (Final Report)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DNA Damage Recognition and Repair (DDR&R) proteins play a critical role in cellular responses to low-dose radiation and are associated with cancer. We have performed a systematic, genome-wide computational analysis of genomic data for human genes involved in the DDR&R process. The significant achievements of this project include: 1) Construction of the computational pipeline for searching DDR&R genes, building and validation of 3D models of proteins involved in DDR&R; 2) Functional and structural annotation of the 3D models and generation of comprehensive lists of suggested knock-out mutations; and the development of a method to predict the effects of mutations. Large scale testing of technology to identify novel small binding pockets in protein structures leading to new DDRR inhibitor strategies 3) Improvements of macromolecular docking technology (see the CAPRI 1-3 and 4-5 results) 4) Development of a new algorithm for improved analysis of high-density oligonucleotide arrays for gene expression profiling; 5) Construction and maintenance of the DNA Damage Recognition and Repair Database; 6) Producing 15 research papers (12 published and 3 in preparation).

Abagyan, Ruben; An, Jianghong

2005-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

69

RAP80 Acts Independently of BRCA1 in Repair of Topoisomerase II Poison-Induced DNA Damage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Implications for the repair of topoisomerase I-mediated DNA damage. J Biol Chem 2004;279:37343-8. 15 El-Khamisy SF , Saifi GM, Weinfeld M, et al. Defective DNA single-strand break repair in spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy-1...

Junko Iijima; Zhihong Zeng; Shunichi Takeda; Yoshihito Taniguchi

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Generation of DNA-Damaging Reactive Oxygen Species via the Autoxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide under Physiologically Relevant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generation of DNA-Damaging Reactive Oxygen Species via the Autoxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide under found that micromolar concentrations of H2S generated single-strand DNA cleavage. Mechanistic studies indicate that this process involved autoxidation of H2S to generate superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and

Gates, Kent. S.

71

Total dose radiation response of plasma-damaged NMOS devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasma-damaged NMOS devices were subjected to the X-ray total dose irradiation. Unlike the traditional hot-carrier or Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) stress where the hole trap generation is less pronounced, this study shows enhanced hole trap and interface trap generation on plasma-damaged devices after total dose irradiation.

Yue, J.; Lo, E.; Flanery, M. [Honeywell Solid-State Electronic Center, Plymouth, MN (United States)] [Honeywell Solid-State Electronic Center, Plymouth, MN (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

LYMPHOCYTES MODULATE INNATE IMMUNE RESPONSES AND NEURONAL DAMAGE IN EXPERIMENTAL MENINGITIS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Josefs Krankenhaus, Potsdam 5 In bacterial meningitis, excessive immune responses carry significant potential for damage to brain tissue even after successful antibiotic therapy. Bacterial meningitis is regarded primarily as the domain of innate immunity...

Olaf Hoffmann; Olga Rung; Josephin Held; Chotima Boettcher; Stefan Prokop; Werner Stenzel; Josef Priller

2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

73

Resistance of Bacillus subtilis Spore DNA to Lethal Ionizing Radiation Damage Relies Primarily on Spore Core Components and DNA Repair, with Minor Effects of Oxygen Radical Detoxification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Spore DNA to Lethal Ionizing Radiation Damage Relies Primarily on...Institute of Aerospace Medicine, Radiation Biology Department, Cologne...Radiological Sciences, Chiba-shi, Japan c University of Florida, Proton...different types of ionizing radiation including X rays, protons...

Ralf Moeller; Marina Raguse; Günther Reitz; Ryuichi Okayasu; Zuofeng Li; Stuart Klein; Peter Setlow; Wayne L. Nicholson

2013-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

74

DNA–DNA interactions in bacteriophage capsids are responsible for the observed DNA knotting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cholesteric liquid crystals. This interaction...polymers confined in a spherical cavity produces, on the...term that disfavors bent-chain configurations...the surface of the spherical capsid (45 nm diameter...cholesteric liquid crystals of DNA . Eur Phys...cholesteric liquid crystals. This interaction...

Davide Marenduzzo; Enzo Orlandini; Andrzej Stasiak; De Witt Sumners; Luca Tubiana; Cristian Micheletti

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

DNA damage-inducible genes as biomarkers for exposures to environmental agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A biodosimetric approach to determine alpha-particle dose to the respiratory tract epithelium from known exposures to radon has been developed in the rat. Cytotoxicity assays have been used to obtain dose-conversion factors for cumulative exposures typical of those encountered by underground uranium miners. However, this approach is not sensitive enough to derive close-conversion factors for indoor radon exposures. The expression of DNA damage-inducible genes is being investigated as a biomarker of exposure to radon progeny. Exposure of cultures of A549 cells to alpha particles resulted in an increase in the protein levels of the DNA damage-inducible genes, p53, Cip 1, and Gadd45. These protein changes were associated with a transient arrest of cells passing through the cell cycle. This arrest was typified by an increase in the number of cells in the G{sub 1} and G{sub 2} phases and a decrease in the number of cells in the S phase. The effect of inhaled alpha particles (radon progeny) in rats was examined in the epithelial cells of the lateral wall of the anterior nasal cavity. Exposures to radon progeny resulted in a significant increase in the number of cells in the G{sub 1} phase and a decrease in the number of cells in the S phase. These cell-cycle changes were concomitant with an increase in the number of cells containing DNA strand breaks. In addition to ionizing radiation, A549 cells were exposed to 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide, methyl methanesulphonate, crocidolite asbestos, and glass microfiber. These studies showed that physical and chemical agents induce different expression patterns of p53, Cip 1, and Gadd153 proteins and they could be used to discriminate between toxic and nontoxic materials such as asbestos and glass microfiber. The measurement of gene expression in A549 cells may provide a means to identify a broad spectrum of physical and chemical toxicants encountered in the environment. 9 figs., 42 refs.

Johnson, N.F.; Carpenter, T.R.; Jaramillo, R.J.; Liberati, T.A. [Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Effect of triclosan on reproduction, DNA damage and heat shock protein gene expression of the earthworm Eisenia fetida  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Triclosan (TCS) is released into the terrestrial...p < 0.05) after exposure to the concentrations ranges from 50 to 300 mg kg?1, with a half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) of 142.11 mg kg?1. DNA damage, d...

Dasong Lin; Ye Li; Qixing Zhou; Yingming Xu; Di Wang

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

DNA damage in barn swallows (Hirundo rustica) from the Chernobyl region detected by use of the comet assay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DNA damage in barn swallows (Hirundo rustica) from the Chernobyl region detected by use November 2009 Accepted 19 November 2009 Available online 24 November 2009 Keywords: Barn swallow Chernobyl swallows (Hirundo rustica) inhabiting the Chernobyl region to evaluate whether chronic exposure to low

Mousseau, Timothy A.

78

RADIATION SENSITIVITY & PROCESSING OF DNA DAMAGE FOLLOWING LOW DOSES OF GAMMA-RAY ALPHA PARTICLES & HZE IRRADIATION OF NORMAL DSB REPAIR DEFICIENT CELLS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) predominates in the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) over homologous recombination (HR). NHEJ occurs throughout the cell cycle whereas HR occurs in late S/G2 due to the requirement of a sister chromatid (Rothkamm et al, Mol Cell Biol 23 5706-15 [2003]). To date evidence obtained with DSB repair deficient cells using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis has revealed the major pathway throughout all phases of the cell cycle for processing high dose induced DSBs is NHEJ (Wang et al, Oncogene 20 2212-24 (2001); Pluth et al, Cancer Res. 61 2649-55 [2001]). These findings however were obtained at high doses when on average >> 20-30 DSBs are formed per cell. The contribution of the repair pathways (NHEJ and HR) induced in response to DNA damage during the various phases of the cell cycle may depend upon the dose (the level of initial DSBs) especially since low levels of DSBs are induced at low dose. To date, low dose studies using NHEJ and HR deficient mutants have not been carried out to address this important question with radiations of different quality. The work presented here leads us to suggest that HR plays a relatively minor role in the repair of radiation-induced prompt DSBs. SSBs lead to the induction of DSBs which are associated specifically with S-phase cells consistent with the idea that they are formed at stalled replication forks in which HR plays a major role in repair. That DNA-PKcs is in some way involved in the repair of the precursors to replication-induced DSB remains an open question. Persistent non-DSB oxidative damage also leads to an increase in RAD51 positive DSBs. Both simple and complex non-DSB DNA damage may therefore contribute to indirect DSBs induced by ionising radiation at replication forks.

O'Neil, Peter

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

Silencing of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase sensitizes lung cancer cells to radiation through the abrogation of DNA damage checkpoint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •Radiosensitization by PARG silencing was observed in multiple lung cancer cells. •PAR accumulation was enhanced by PARG silencing after DNA damage. •Radiation-induced G2/M arrest and checkpoint activation were impaired by PARG siRNA. -- Abstract: Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is a major enzyme that plays a role in the degradation of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). PARG deficiency reportedly sensitizes cells to the effects of radiation. In lung cancer, however, it has not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated whether PARG siRNA contributes to an increased radiosensitivity using 8 lung cancer cell lines. Among them, the silencing of PARG induced a radiosensitizing effect in 5 cell lines. Radiation-induced G2/M arrest was largely suppressed by PARG siRNA in PC-14 and A427 cells, which exhibited significantly enhanced radiosensitivity in response to PARG knockdown. On the other hand, a similar effect was not observed in H520 cells, which did not exhibit a radiosensitizing effect. Consistent with a cell cycle analysis, radiation-induced checkpoint signals were not well activated in the PC-14 and A427 cells when treated with PARG siRNA. These results suggest that the increased sensitivity to radiation induced by PARG knockdown occurs through the abrogation of radiation-induced G2/M arrest and checkpoint activation in lung cancer cells. Our findings indicate that PARG could be a potential target for lung cancer treatments when used in combination with radiotherapy.

Nakadate, Yusuke [Shien-Lab, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan) [Shien-Lab, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Department of Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Kodera, Yasuo; Kitamura, Yuka [Shien-Lab, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)] [Shien-Lab, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Tachibana, Taro [Department of Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan)] [Department of Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Tamura, Tomohide [Division of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)] [Division of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Koizumi, Fumiaki, E-mail: fkoizumi@ncc.go.jp [Division of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)] [Division of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

80

The interaction between air pollution and diet does not influence the DNA damage in lymphocytes of pregnant women  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The aim of the study was to evaluate the risk of DNA damage in lymphocytes of pregnant women with respect to hormonal and nutritional status and to air pollution in Lesser Poland. The study was performed on 39 healthy pregnant women. The oxidative DNA damage, alkali-labile sites and uracil in DNA of lymphocytes were measured by using the comet assay. The concentration of 17beta-estradiol, progesterone, DHEA, cholesterol, vitamin B12 and folates were determined. Dietary data were assembled from food diaries. Voivodeship Inspectorate for Environmental Protection in Krakow using automatic pollution monitoring system provided the air pollution information, such as concentrations of PM10, PM2.5, NO, NO2, SO2, CO and O3. Many statistical correlations between DNA damage and air pollutants concentration were found however their biological meaning is still to be explained. It should be taken under consideration, that the protective effect of air pollutants is a result of hormesis, as the measured amounts of air pollutants during the study did not exceed the admissible levels. There was found no diet-and air pollution interaction.

Ma?gorzata Kalemba-Dro?d?

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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81

Assay for reactive oxygen species-induced DNA damage: measurement of the formamido and thymine glycol lesions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A 32P-postlabeling assay has been developed for the simultaneous detection of the thymine glycol lesion and the formamido remnant of pyrimidine bases in DNA exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS). The formamido lesion is a principal lesion produced in X-irradiated DNA oligomers when oxygen is available to mediate the damage process. Production of the well-known thymine glycol lesion is less dependent on the concentration of oxygen. These two lesions have the common property that they make the phosphoester bond 3? to the modified nucleoside resistant to hydrolysis by nuclease P1. Our assay uses 32P-postlabeling to measure these lesions in the form of modified dimers obtained from DNA by nuclease P1 digestion. Appropriate carriers and internal standards have been chemically synthesized to improve the reliability and accuracy of the assay. The measurements were accomplished on 1-?g samples of DNA.

Alexander E. Maccubbin; Helen B. Patrzyc; Noreen Ersing; Edwin E. Budzinski; Jean B. Dawidzik; John C. Wallace; Herbert Iijima; Harold C. Box

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The low dose damage response pathways in the mouse mammary glands depends  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

low dose damage response pathways in the mouse mammary glands depends low dose damage response pathways in the mouse mammary glands depends on genotype, tissue compartment, exposure regimen, and sampling times Joe Gray & Andrew Wyrobek Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract The objectives of this research are to characterize the early and persistent low-dose and adaptive response (AR) damage surveillance networks in mammary glands of radiation sensitive and resistant strains of mice to identify the molecular signatures/mechanisms associated with nonlinear modifications of risk for mammary gland cancer. Our approach uses low-dose exposure regimens that have been reported to induce mammary gland cancer in sensitive strains to determine whether low-dose induced pathways are differentially expressed in epithelial or stromal cells and to determine

83

BapE DNA endonuclease induces an apoptotic-like response to DNA damage in Caulobacter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Silhavy, Thomas Gregor, Coleen Murphy, Rich Losick, and Alison Gammie, for helpful discussions. This work was supported...crosslinker mitomycin C (MMC) drug at 1 g/mL unless other-wise noted or UV irradiation (100 J.m2 ). Microscopy and Cell...

Julia Bos; Anastasiya A. Yakhnina; Zemer Gitai

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

A Critical Examination of the Adaptive Response for Cytogenetic Damage in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Critical Examination of the Adaptive Response for Cytogenetic Damage in Critical Examination of the Adaptive Response for Cytogenetic Damage in Human Cells, and Insights into the Adaptive Response Mechanism Björn E. Rydberg Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Goal: Task 1 of the Berkeley Lab SFA is designed to identify adaptive response (AR) mechanisms that may affect risk of developing radiation-induced cancer and to assess the linearity with dose of processes that influence mammary gland carcinogenesis. We use both in vitro and in vivo experimental systems in a parallelogram strategy. Our human cell culture model will elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the AR and investigate the relationships in target vs. non-target cells between a range of cancer-relevant endpoints potentially affected by adaptation such

85

Transcriptome Analysis of Aspergillus nidulans Exposed to Camptothecin-Induced DNA Damage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the mutS family DNA mismatch repair protein gene msh6), cshA...fluorescence automated sequencers. A pipeline was built to analyze and assemble...functional categories (DNA repair, DNA metabolism, proteasome...mshA) involved in mismatch repair, and AN6073.2, a prohibitin...

Iran Malavazi; Marcela Savoldi; Sônia Marli Zingaretti Di Mauro; Carlos Frederico Martins Menck; Steven D. Harris; Maria Helena de Souza Goldman; Gustavo Henrique Goldman

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Perspective on the Pipeline of Drugs Being Developed with Modulation of DNA Damage as a Target  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...When considering the pipeline of novel agents that...which blocking a DNA repair pathway was the primary...RD D'Andrea AD. DNA repair pathways in clinical...Perspective on the pipeline of drugs being developed...various elements of the DNA repair pathways have entered...

Ruth Plummer

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Reactive oxygen species and oxidative DNA damage mediate the cytotoxicity of tungsten-nickel-cobalt alloys in vitro  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tungsten alloys (WA) have been introduced in an attempt to find safer alternatives to depleted uranium and lead munitions. However, it is known that at least one alloy, 91% tungsten-6% nickel-3% cobalt (WNC-91-6-3), causes rhabdomyosarcomas when fragments are implanted in rat muscle. This raises concerns that shrapnel, if not surgically removable, may result in similar tumours in humans. There is therefore a clear need to develop rapid and robust in vitro methods to characterise the toxicity of different WAs in order to identify those that are most likely to be harmful to human health and to guide development of new materials in the future. In the current study we have developed a rapid visual in vitro assay to detect toxicity mediated by individual WA particles in cultured L6-C11 rat muscle cells. Using a variety of techniques (histology, comet assay, caspase-3 activity, oxidation of 2'7'-dichlorofluorescin to measure the production of reactive oxygen species and whole-genome microarrays) we show that, in agreement with the in vivo rat carcinogenicity studies, WNC-91-6-3 was the most toxic of the alloys tested. On dissolution, it produces large amounts of reactive oxygen species, causes significant amounts of DNA damage, inhibits caspase-3, triggers a severe hypoxic response and kills the cells in the immediate vicinity of the alloy particles within 24 h. By combining these in vitro data we offer a mechanistic explanation of the effect of this alloy in vivo and show that in vitro tests are a viable alternative for assessing new alloys in the future.

Harris, R.M.; Williams, T.D.; Hodges, N.J.; Waring, R.H., E-mail: R.H.Waring@bham.ac.uk

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Damage of supercoiled DNA by an ultrafast laser-driven electron x-ray source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using magnetic fields to differentiate the effects of electrons and x-rays, it was discovered that single strand breaks in supercoiled DNA were

Shan, Fang; Carter, Joshua D; Guo, Ting

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Molecular Recognition of DNA Damage Sites by Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonucleases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DNA repair/redox factor AP endonuclease 1 (APE1) is a multifunctional protein which is known to to be essential for DNA repair activity in human cells. Structural/functional analyses of the APE activity is thus been an important research field to assess cellular defense mechanisms against ionizing radiation.

Braun, W. A.

2005-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

90

A fluorescence method to detect photo-activated repair of UV-induced DNA damage in marine organisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After UV exposure, marine microorganisms may re-activate their photosynthetic systems or regain their pre-exposure metabolic rates, but they will not long survive, nor grow or reproduce, if they cannot repair DNA or ERN damage. Several repair mechanisms, including nucleotide excision repair and photo-reactivation, are known in terrestrial organisms, but there is little information on either process in marine microorganisms. Photo-reactivation may be especially important near the ocean surface where a few meters difference in vertical position or a few hours difference in time may alleviate UV-irradiation stress yet still provide sufficient light for photoactivated repair processes. We have developed a relatively simple, sensitive method to measure the activity of the photo-reactivation enzyme, photolyase, by fluorometry. UV irradiation causes adjacent thymine nucleotides in DNA to form cyclobutane dimers. Photolyase attaches to the dimerized DNA then breaks the dimers in a reaction catalyzed by visible light, thereby allowing restoration of cross-strand base pairing. Our assay for photolyase activity involves a dimerized synthetic DNA and DNA-specific fluorochromes with affinity for thymine-rich regions of DNA. When thymine dimers are present, fluorescence of these dyes is reduced. As dimers are repaired, fluorescence increases, allowing us to demonstrate the presence of photolyase and measure its activity using conventional fluorometers available in most marine laboratories. Photo-reactivation activity has been unambiguously demonstrated in samples of coastal seawater. In preliminary investigations, cells taken from surface slicks did not have enhanced photo-repair capabilities relative to cells collected 5 meters below the surface. Additional tests of the method and measurements of photo-repair activities of surface and subsurface organisms will be made during the SLIX-89 Surface Microlayer Experiment in October 1989.

Carlson, D.J.; Mordy, C.W.; Nelson, K. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (United States))

1990-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

91

Reduced Repair of the Oxidative 8-Oxoguanine DNA Damage and Risk of Head and Neck Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Oncology, Kaplan Medical Center, Rehovot, Israel...Oncology, Sourasky Medical Center; 5 Sackler Faculty...Research, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel; and 8 Department of Industrial Engineering and Management...carcinogenesis|cancer risk assessment|8-oxoguanine DNA...

Tamar Paz-Elizur; Rami Ben-Yosef; Dalia Elinger; Akiva Vexler; Meir Krupsky; Alain Berrebi; Adi Shani; Edna Schechtman; Laurence Freedman; and Zvi Livneh

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

THAP5 is a DNA-binding transcriptional repressor that is regulated in melanoma cells during DNA damage-induced cell death  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research highlights: {yields} THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. {yields} THAP5 is induced in melanoma cells upon exposure to UV or treatment with cisplatin. {yields} THAP5 induction correlates with the degree of apoptosis in melanoma cell population. {yields} THAP5 is a pro-apoptotic protein involved in melanoma cell death. -- Abstract: THAP5 was originally isolated as a specific interactor and substrate of the mitochondrial pro-apoptotic Omi/HtrA2 protease. It is a human zinc finger protein characterized by a restricted pattern of expression and the lack of orthologs in mouse and rat. The biological function of THAP5 is unknown but our previous studies suggest it could regulate G2/M transition in kidney cells and could be involved in human cardiomyocyte cell death associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). In this report, we expanded our studies on the properties and function of THAP5 in human melanoma cells. THAP5 was expressed in primary human melanocytes as well as in all melanoma cell lines that were tested. THAP5 protein level was significantly induced by UV irradiation or cisplatin treatment, conditions known to cause DNA damage. The induction of THAP5 correlated with a significant increase in apoptotic cell death. In addition, we show that THAP5 is a nuclear protein that could recognize and bind a specific DNA motif. THAP5 could also repress the transcription of a reporter gene in a heterologous system. Our work suggests that THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. Furthermore, THAP5 has a pro-apoptotic function and it was induced in melanoma cells under conditions that promoted cell death.

Balakrishnan, Meenakshi P.; Cilenti, Lucia; Ambivero, Camilla [Biomolecular Science Center, Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)] [Biomolecular Science Center, Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Goto, Yamafumi [Department of Dermatology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto (Japan)] [Department of Dermatology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto (Japan); Takata, Minoru [Department of Dermatology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medical Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama (Japan)] [Department of Dermatology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medical Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama (Japan); Turkson, James; Li, Xiaoman Shawn [Biomolecular Science Center, Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)] [Biomolecular Science Center, Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Zervos, Antonis S., E-mail: azervos@mail.ucf.edu [Biomolecular Science Center, Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

93

Comparison of two freshwater turtle species as monitors of radionuclide and chemical contamination: DNA damage and residue analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two species of turtles that occupy different ecological niches were compared for their usefulness as monitors of freshwater ecosystems where both low-level radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants are present. The pond slider (Trachemys scripta) and common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) were analyzed for the presence of [sup 90]Sr, [sup 137]Cs, [sup 60]Co, and Hg, radionuclides and chemicals known to be present at the contaminated site, and single-strand breaks in liver DNA. The integrity of the DNA was examined by the alkaline unwinding assay, a technique that detects strand breaks as a biological marker of possible exposure to genotoxic agents. This measure of DNA damage was significantly increased in both species of turtles at the contaminated site compared with turtles of the same species at a reference site, and shows that contaminant-exposed populations were under more severe genotoxic stress than those at the reference site. The level of strand breaks observed at the contaminated site was high and in the range reported for other aquatic species exposed to deleterious concentrations of genotoxic agents such as chemicals and ionizing radiation. Statistically significantly higher concentrations of radionuclides and Hg were detected in the turtles from the contaminated area. Mercury concentrations were significantly higher in the more carnivorous snapping turtle compared with the slider; however, both species were effective monitors of the contaminants.

Meyers-Schoene, L. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)); Shugart, L.R.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Walton, B.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Biochemistry 1992, 31, 4315-4324 4315 DNA-Ditercalinium Interactions: Implications for Recognition of Damaged  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biochemistry 1992, 31, 4315-4324 4315 DNA-Ditercalinium Interactions: Implications for Recognition- um-[d(CGCG)], complex in detail with an analysis of both the structure and its implications-Meyers posited in the Brookhaven Data Bank under Identifier Code 1D32. of Health and the Medical Foundation

Williams, Loren

95

Immunological Detection of DNA Damage Caused by Melphalan Using Monoclonal Antibodies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...adducts were varied together in the serial dilutions. The concentrations of DNA and RNA 5100-'xo e 80- o: 60- 40-rescence inIS}= 0 z .,E_E1 100-Xo* 801o j60:' rt ^ 40- 20-Olx 4> \\ \\\\\\ \\\\\\ \\\\\\^:Va1111 ""i i ' "IMI' ""i10 100...

Michael J. Tilby; Jennifer M. Styles; Christopher J. Dean

1987-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Importance of EGFR/ERCC1 Interaction Following Radiation-Induced DNA Damage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...single-strand annealing and gene conversion in mammalian cells.Nucleic Acids Res 2008;36:1-9. 34. Houtsmuller AB , Rademakers S, Nigg AL, Hoogstraten D, Hoeijmakers JH Vermeulen W.Action of DNA repair endonuclease ERCC1/XPF in living cells...

Gianmaria Liccardi; John A. Hartley; Daniel Hochhauser

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Cooperative Interaction of Human XPA Stabilizes and Enhances Specific Binding of XPA to DNA Damage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

12.?Rademakers, S., Volker, M., Hoogstraten, D., Nigg, A. L., Mone, M. J., van Zeeland, A. A., Hoeijmakers, J. H. J., Houtsmuller, A. B., and Vermeulen, W. (2003) Xeroderma pigmentosum group A protein loads as a separate factor onto DNA lesions, Mol. ... Rademakers, Suzanne; Volker, Marcel; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Nigg, Alex L.; Mone, Martijn J.; van Zeeland, Albert A.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; Vermeulen, Wim ...

Yu Liu; Yiyong Liu; Zhengguan Yang; Christopher Utzat; Guizhi Wang; Ashis K. Basu; Yue Zou

2005-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

98

Imaging the early material response associated with exit surface damage in fused silica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The processes involved at the onset of damage initiation on the surface of fused silica have been a topic of extensive discussion and thought for more than four decades. Limited experimental results have helped develop models covering specific aspects of the process. In this work we present the results of an experimental study aiming at imaging the material response from the onset of the observation of material modification during exposure to the laser pulse through the time point at which material ejection begins. The system involves damage initiation using a 355 nm pulse, 7.8 ns FWHM in duration and imaging of the affected material volume with spatial resolution on the order of 1 {micro}m using as strobe light a 150 ps laser pulse that is appropriately timed with respect to the pump pulse. The observations reveal that the onset of material modification is associated with regions of increased absorption, i.e., formation of an electronic excitation, leading to a reduction in the probe transmission to only a few percent within a time interval of about 1 ns. This area is subsequently rapidly expanding with a speed of about 1.2 {micro}m/ns and is accompanied by the formation and propagation of radial cracks. These cracks appear to initiate about 2 ns after the start of the expansion of the modified region. The damage sites continue to grow for about 25 ns but the mechanism of expansion after the termination of the laser pulse is via formation and propagation of lateral cracks. During this time, the affected area of the surface appears to expand forming a bulge of about 40 {micro}m in height. The first clear observation of material cluster ejection is noted at about 50 ns delay.

Demos, S G; Raman, R N; Negres, R A

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

99

Rat colonic reactive oxygen species production and DNA damage are mediated by diet and age  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is based on the theory of decreased ROS in response to respiratory chain suppression and utilizes diphenyliodonium chloride to determine if ROS production is altered in response to a mitochondrial electron transport chain inhibitor. Although... mitochondria are thought to be a major source of ROS, literature regarding this theory is inconclusive [37]. Other sites of free radical production have been identified, each generating ROS at levels that may be specific to certain tissues. For instance, Hid...

Henderson, Cara Aletha Everett

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

100

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Assessing Biological Function of DNA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Assessing Biological Function of DNA Damage Response Genes Assessing Biological Function of DNA Damage Response Genes Larry H. Thompson Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Why This Project To understand the relative importance of individual DNA repair and DNA-damage response pathways to the recovery of mammalian cells after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR). This understanding may lead to better ways of setting limits on human exposure to IR. In spite of the discovery of many mammalian DNA repair genes, our current knowledge of how many of these genes contribute to cellular recovery from IR exposure is quite limited. Project Goals Measure cellular responses at doses in the 5-100 cGy range, which generally cause changes too small to detect in normal, repair-proficient cells Focus on DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA oxidative base

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dna damage response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The Role of DNA double-strand break repair in cellular response to low  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DNA double-strand break repair in cellular response to low DNA double-strand break repair in cellular response to low dose radiation exposure. David J. Chen Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas TX 75390 It has been assumed that molecular pathways that involved in the biological response for low dose of radiation should be similar to those for high dose radiation in general. The low dose-rate effect and DNA double-strand break repair are inextricably linked in mammalian cells. It has been reported that mammalian mutant cells deficient in nonhomologous end join (NHEJ) pathway have little or no cellular recovery when expose to low-dose-rate radiation. Recently, it has also been reported that cells deficient in

102

Free Energy Profiles of Base Flipping in Intercalative Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Damaged DNA Duplexes: Energetic and Structural Relationships to Nucleotide Excision Repair Susceptibility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Free Energy Profiles of Base Flipping in Intercalative Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Damaged DNA Duplexes: Energetic and Structural Relationships to Nucleotide Excision Repair Susceptibility ... These structural differences produce different computed van der Waals stacking interaction energies between the flipping partner base with the lesion aromatic ring system and adjacent bases; we find that the better the stacking, the higher the relative flipping free energy barrier and hence lower flipping probability. ... We emphasize, however, that the brief MD only served the purpose of equilibrating the model but is far too short for analyses of the constellation of protein–DNA interactions that stabilize the structure. ...

Yuqin Cai; Han Zheng; Shuang Ding; Konstantin Kropachev; Adam G. Schwaid; Yijin Tang; Hong Mu; Shenglong Wang; Nicholas E. Geacintov; Yingkai Zhang; Suse Broyde

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

103

EHS0749 PI rDNA Responsibilities Syllabus Form 01=03=13  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EHS 749 ~ PI Recombinant DNA (rDNA) Responsibilities Course Syllabus Subject Category: Biosafety Course Prerequisite: None Course Length: 10 minutes Medical Approval: None Delivery Mode: Online Schedule: Available online Location/Time: N/A Course Purpose: Ensure that principle investigators (PIs) of non-exempt recombinant research are aware of their responsibilities and expectations under the NIH Guidelines Course Objectives: Awareness of the following: * NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant or Synthetic Nucleic Acid Molecules * LBNL and non-exempt rDNA experiments are subject to the NIH Guidelines * Biosafety Manual and Biosafety Work Authorizations contain NIH and other biosafety requirements * NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA) is the agency that oversees the NIH Guidelines

104

Regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and DNA damage responses by singleminded-2s  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

repressor Singleminded-2, is lost or repressed in approximately 70% of human breast tumors and has a profound influence on normal mammary development. In order to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms by which SIM2s restricts malignant transformation...

Laffin, Brian Edward

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

Ku80 Deletion Suppresses Spontaneous Tumors and Induces a p53-Mediated DNA Damage Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...when incapable of reaching the water source. Morbidities were scored...chow (Harlan Teklad) and water were supplied ad libitum...min using a Pantak X-ray generator (320 kV/10 mA with 0.5-mm...to the oxidative stress of atmospheric (21) O2 (25). 53BP1 rapidly...

Valerie B. Holcomb; Francis Rodier; YongJun Choi; Rita A. Busuttil; Hannes Vogel; Jan Vijg; Judith Campisi; and Paul Hasty

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Telomere Regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana by the CST Capping Complex and DNA Damage Response Proteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). In the flowering plant, Arabidopsis thaliana telomeres are bound by the CST (CTC1/STN1/TEN1) heterotrimer. Loss of any CST component results in telomere shortening, telomere fusions, increased G-overhang length and telomere recombination. To understand...

Boltz, Kara A.

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

107

Abstract 1054: The role of DNMT1 in the DNA damage response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...NC 0 " Ea) O'U " " " 0535. 5.50 a)__ .Sa),5 0.EUI ~- ~ 0 S " UI I 053 N@'C "0 -535. a).S'U S4'53...a) 10.5 0. ~1 4)N SI 0@ (C " 053 .@.5 04' Ia) EUI ~0 I 0 0) 0 5. C I N I. " 0 .5 I .5 " 0.53 05 Za) 1...

Gun Eui Lee and Keith D. Robertson

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Physiological Responses of the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon “Pyrococcus abyssi” to DNA Damage Caused by Ionizing Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...before and after radiation and was in good...performed at a sublethal dose of 2,000 Gy to...our preliminary estimation reveals that 0...been observed for radiation-resistant Chroococcidiopsis...caused by ionizing radiation. | The mechanisms...furiosus, survive high doses of ionizing gamma...

Edmond Jolivet; Fujihiko Matsunaga; Yoshizumi Ishino; Patrick Forterre; Daniel Prieur; Hannu Myllykallio

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Repair Capacity for UV Light–Induced DNA Damage Associated with Risk of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer and Tumor Progression  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reactivation|DNA repair capacity|epidemiology|skin...increasing levels of solar UV radiation (2-4...studying the DNA repair capacity (DRC) as a marker for...keratosis with cumulative solar ultraviolet exposure...influence the DNA repair capacity of normal and skin cancer-affected...

Li-E Wang; Chunying Li; Sara S. Strom; Leonard H. Goldberg; Abenaa Brewster; Zhaozheng Guo; Yawei Qiao; Gary L. Clayman; J. Jack Lee; Adel K. El-Naggar; Victor G. Prieto; Madeleine Duvic; Scott M. Lippman; Randal S. Weber; Margaret L. Kripke; and Qingyi Wei

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

[Ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair in human cells]. Progress report, [April 1, 1993--February 28, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The excision of radiation-induced lesions in DNA by a DNA repair enzyme complex, namely the UvrABC nuclease complex, has been investigated. Irradiated DNA was treated with the enzyme complex. DNA fractions were analyzed by gas chromatography/isotope-dilution mass spectrometry. The results showed that a number pyrimidine- and purine-derived lesions in DNA were excised by the UvrABC nuclease complex and that the enzyme complex does not act on radiation-induced DNA lesions as a glycosylase. This means that it does not excise individual base products, but it excises oligomers containing these lesions. A number of pyrimidine-derived lesions that were no substrates for other DNA repair enzymes investigated in our laboratory were substrates for the UvrABC nuclease complex.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Damage identification and condition assessment of civil engineering structures through response measurement.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This research study presents a new vibration-based non-destructive global structural damage identification and condition monitoring technique that can be used for detection, localization and quantification… (more)

Bayissa, Wirtu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Nonlinear response of plain concrete shear walls with elastic-damaging behavior  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the theoretical and computational efforts on the modeling of small scale shear walls. Small scale shear walls are used extensively in the study of shear wall behavior because the construction and testing of full size walls are rather expensive. A finite element code is developed which incorporates nonlinear constitutive relations of damage mechanics. The program is used to obtain nonlinear load-deformation curves and to address the initial loss of stiffness due to shrinkage cracking. The program can also be used to monitor the continuous degradation of the fundamental frequency due to progressive damage.

Yazdani, S.; Schreyer, H.L.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

DNA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

directed directed assembly of nanoparticle linear structure for nanophotonics Baoquan Ding, a͒ Stefano Cabrini, b͒ Ronald N. Zuckermann, and Jeffrey Bokor Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd., Berkeley, California 94720 ͑Received 17 June 2008; accepted 22 December 2008; published 2 February 2009͒ Assemblies of metal nanospheres have shown interesting properties for nanophotonics. Here the authors describe a method to use robust DNA multicrossover molecules to organize Au nanoparticles with different sizes to form well controlled linear chain structures with desired distance below 10 nm between the particles. Au particles with only one piece of DNA attached are purified individually. Three different sizes DNA-Au conjugates then hybridize with five other DNA strands to form the stiff triple crossover ͑TX͒ motif. The linkage position

114

Pre-Steady-State Binding of Damaged DNA by XPC?hHR23B Reveals a Kinetic Mechanism for Damage Discrimination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

9.?Sugasawa, K., Ng, J. M., Masutani, C., Maekawa, T., Uchida, A., van der Spek, P. J., Eker, A. P., Rademakers, S., Visser, C., Aboussekhra, A., Wood, R. D., Hanaoka, F., Bootsma, D., and Hoeijmakers, J. H. (1997) Two human homologs of Rad23 are functionally interchangeable in complex formation and stimulation of XPC repair activity, Mol. ... Sugasawa, Kaoru; Ng, Jessica M. Y.; Masutani, Chikahide; Maekawa, Takafumi; Uchida, Akio; van der Spek, Peter J.; Eker, Andre P. M.; Rademakers, Suzanne; Visser, Cecile; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah; Wood, Richard D.; Hanaoka, Fumio; Bootsma, Dirk; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J. ... Rademakers, S., Volker, M., Hoogstraten, D., Nigg, A. L., Mone, M. J., van Zeeland, A. A., Hoeijmakers, J. H. J., Houtsmuller, A. B., and Vermeulen, W. (2003) Xeroderma pigmentosum group A protein loads as a separate factor onto DNA lesions, Mol. ...

Kelly S. Trego; John J. Turchi

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

115

Protein Bridges DNA Base and Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathways  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Protein Bridges DNA Base and Protein Bridges DNA Base and Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathways Protein Bridges DNA Base and Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathways Print Wednesday, 28 October 2009 00:00 Alkyltransferase proteins (AGT) protect cells from the biological effects of DNA damage caused by the addition of alkyl groups (alkylation). Alkyltransferase-like proteins (ATLs) can do the same, but they lack the reactive cysteine residue that allows the alkyltransferase function, and the mechanism for cell protection has remained unknown. To address this mystery, a British-American team lead by researchers at the Scripps Research Institute recently applied a combination of x-ray structural, biochemical, and genetic studies to ATLs in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe without and with damaged DNA. By showing how a process called non-enzymatic nucleotide flipping activates ATL-initiated DNA repair, their results may improve our understanding of genomic integrity and responses to DNA damage relevant to pathogens and cancer development.

116

Effect of silver nanoparticle and glycyrrhizic acid (SN-GLY) complex on repair of whole body radiation-induced cellular DNA damage and genomic instability in mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Silver nanoparticles (SN) were redispersed in aqueous solution of Pluronic F127 and complexed with the phytoceutical, glycyrrhizic acid (GLY) to obtain SN-GLY complex. The ability of the SN-GLY complex to offer protection against ionising radiation in post-irradiation scenarios was evaluated in ex vivo and in vivo models using Swiss albino mice. Treatment of mouse blood leucocytes with SN-GLY immediately after 4 Gy gamma radiation exposure, ex vivo, enhanced the rate of repair of cellular DNA damages as revealed by comet assay. Exposure of mice to 4 Gy whole body gamma radiation induced formation of strand breaks in cellular DNA and the unrepaired double strand breaks eventually caused the formation of micronuclei. The post-irradiation administration of SN-GLY resulted in a faster decrease in the comet parameters indicating enhanced cellular DNA repair process and reduction in micronucleus formation. Thus the studies showed effective radiation protection by SN-GLY in post-irradiation conditions.

Dhanya K. Chandrasekharan; Cherupally Krishnan Krishnan Nair

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Inactivation of Human MAD2B in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells Leads to Chemosensitization to DNA-Damaging Agents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...regulation of cell cycle progression through...Based on our analysis, impaired TLS...4 Jansen JG, de Wind N. Biological functions...EJ. DNA sequence analysis of spontaneous mutagenesis...gastric cancer cells. Life Sci 2006;78:1277-86...Guo Y, et al. Analysis of genetic alterations...

Hiu Wing Cheung; Abel C.S. Chun; Qi Wang; Wen Deng; Liang Hu; Xin-Yuan Guan; John M. Nicholls; Ming-Tat Ling; Yong Chuan Wong; Sai Wah Tsao; Dong-Yan Jin; and Xianghong Wang

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Effects of Chronic Low-Dose Ultraviolet B Radiation on DNA Damage and Repair in Mouse Skin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of mammalian skin to solar UVB. We analyzed DNA...significantly less repair capacity than rapidly dividing...the loss of this repair capacity could partially contribute...in excision-repair capacity, and potentiation of...low-dose exposure to solar UVB may result in a significant...

David L. Mitchell; Rüdiger Greinert; Frank R. de Gruijl; Kees L. H. Guikers; Eckhard W. Breitbart; Michelle Byrom; Michelle M. Gallmeier; Megan G. Lowery; and Beate Volkmer

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Expanded breadth of the T-cell response to mosaic HIV-1 envelope DNA vaccination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An effective AIDS vaccine must control highly diverse circulating strains of HIV-1. Among HIV -I gene products, the envelope (Env) protein contains variable as well as conserved regions. In this report, an informatic approach to the design of T-cell vaccines directed to HIV -I Env M group global sequences was tested. Synthetic Env antigens were designed to express mosaics that maximize the inclusion of common potential Tcell epitope (PTE) 9-mers and minimize the inclusion of rare epitopes likely to elicit strain-specific responses. DNA vaccines were evaluated using intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) in inbred mice with a standardized panel of highly conserved 15-mer PTE peptides. I, 2 and 3 mosaic sets were developed that increased theoretical epitope coverage. The breadth and magnitude ofT-cell immunity stimulated by these vaccines were compared to natural strain Env's; additional comparisons were performed on mutant Env's, including gpl60 or gpl45 with or without V regions and gp41 deletions. Among them, the 2 or 3 mosaic Env sets elicited the optimal CD4 and CD8 responses. These responses were most evident in CD8 T cells; the 3 mosaic set elicited responses to an average of 8 peptide pools compared to 2 pools for a set of3 natural Env's. Synthetic mosaic HIV -I antigens can therefore induce T-cell responses with expanded breadth and may facilitate the development of effective T -cell-based HIV -1 vaccines.

Korber, Bette [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fischer, William [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wallstrom, Timothy [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Chemopreventive activity of compounds extracted from Casearia sylvestris (Salicaceae) Sw against DNA damage induced by particulate matter emitted by sugarcane burning near Araraquara, Brazil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ethanolic extract of Casearia sylvestris is thought to be antimutagenic. In this study, we attempted to determine whether this extract and casearin X (a clerodane diterpene from C. sylvestris) are protective against the harmful effects of airborne pollutants from sugarcane burning. To that end, we used the Tradescantia micronucleus test in meiotic pollen cells of Tradescantia pallida, the micronucleus test in mouse bone marrow cells, and the comet assay in mouse blood cells. The mutagenic compound was total suspended particulate (TSP) from air. For the Tradescantia micronucleus test, T. pallida cuttings were treated with the extract at 0.13, 0.25, or 0.50 mg/ml. Subsequently, TSP was added at 0.3 mg/ml, and tetrads from the inflorescences were examined for micronuclei. For the micronucleus test in mouse bone marrow cells and the comet assay in mouse blood cells, Balb/c mice were treated for 15 days with the extract—3.9, 7.5, or 15.0 mg/kg body weight (BW)—or with casearin X—0.3, 0.25, or 1.2 mg/kg BW—after which they received TSP (3.75 mg/kg BW). In T. pallida and mouse bone marrow cells, the extract was antimutagenic at all concentrations tested. In mouse blood cells, the extract was antigenotoxic at all concentrations, whereas casearin X was not antimutagenic but was antigenotoxic at all concentrations. We conclude that C. sylvestris ethanolic extract and casearin X protect DNA from damage induced by airborne pollutants from sugarcane burning. -- Highlights: ? We assessed DNA protection of C. sylvestris ethanolic extract. ? We assessed DNA protection of casearin X. ? We used Tradescantia pallida micronucleus test as screening. ? We used comet assay and micronucleus test in mice. ? The compounds protected DNA against sugar cane burning pollutants.

Prieto, A.M. [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Clinical Analysis, Rua Expedicionários do Brasil, 1621, Araraquara (Brazil)] [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Clinical Analysis, Rua Expedicionários do Brasil, 1621, Araraquara (Brazil); Santos, A.G. [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Natural Principles and Toxicology, Rodovia Araraquara-Jau, km 01, Araraquara (Brazil)] [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Natural Principles and Toxicology, Rodovia Araraquara-Jau, km 01, Araraquara (Brazil); Csipak, A.R.; Caliri, C.M.; Silva, I.C. [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Clinical Analysis, Rua Expedicionários do Brasil, 1621, Araraquara (Brazil)] [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Clinical Analysis, Rua Expedicionários do Brasil, 1621, Araraquara (Brazil); Arbex, M.A. [UNIFESP — Federal University of São Paulo, Paulista College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Rua Pedro de Toledo, 720, São Paulo (Brazil)] [UNIFESP — Federal University of São Paulo, Paulista College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Rua Pedro de Toledo, 720, São Paulo (Brazil); Silva, F.S.; Marchi, M.R.R. [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, Chemistry Institute, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Rua Francisco Degni, S/N, Araraquara (Brazil)] [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, Chemistry Institute, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Rua Francisco Degni, S/N, Araraquara (Brazil); Cavalheiro, A.J.; Silva, D.H.S.; Bolzani, V.S. [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, Chemistry Institute, Department of Organic Chemistry, Rua Francisco Degni, S/N, Araraquara (Brazil)] [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, Chemistry Institute, Department of Organic Chemistry, Rua Francisco Degni, S/N, Araraquara (Brazil); Soares, C.P., E-mail: soarescp@hotmail.com [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Clinical Analysis, Rua Expedicionários do Brasil, 1621, Araraquara (Brazil)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dna damage response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Interdependent genotoxic mechanisms of monomethylarsonous acid: Role of ROS-induced DNA damage and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 inhibition in the malignant transformation of urothelial cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exposure of human bladder urothelial cells (UROtsa) to 50 nM of the arsenic metabolite, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}), for 12 weeks results in irreversible malignant transformation. The ability of continuous, low-level MMA{sup III} exposure to cause an increase in genotoxic potential by inhibiting repair processes necessary to maintain genomic stability is unknown. Following genomic insult within cellular systems poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a zinc finger protein, is rapidly activated and recruited to sites of DNA strand breaks. When UROtsa cells are continuously exposed to 50 nM MMA{sup III}, PARP-1 activity does not increase despite the increase in MMA{sup III}-induced DNA single-strand breaks through 12 weeks of exposure. When UROtsa cells are removed from continuous MMA{sup III} exposure (2 weeks), PARP-1 activity increases coinciding with a subsequent decrease in DNA damage levels. Paradoxically, PARP-1 mRNA expression and protein levels are elevated in the presence of continuous MMA{sup III} indicating a possible mechanism to compensate for the inhibition of PARP-1 activity in the presence of MMA{sup III}. The zinc finger domains of PARP-1 contain vicinal sulfhydryl groups which may act as a potential site for MMA{sup III} to bind, displace zinc ion, and render PARP-1 inactive. Mass spectrometry analysis demonstrates the ability of MMA{sup III} to bind a synthetic peptide representing the zinc-finger domain of PARP-1, and displace zinc from the peptide in a dose-dependent manner. In the presence of continuous MMA{sup III} exposure, continuous 4-week zinc supplementation restored PARP-1 activity levels and reduced the genotoxicity associated with MMA{sup III}. Zinc supplementation did not produce an overall increase in PARP-1 protein levels, decrease the levels of MMA{sup III}-induced reactive oxygen species, or alter Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase levels. Overall, these results present two potential interdependent mechanisms in which MMA{sup III} may increase the susceptibility of UROtsa cells to genotoxic insult and/or malignant transformation: elevated levels of MMA{sup III}-induced DNA damage through the production of reactive oxygen species, and the direct MMA{sup III}-induced inhibition of PARP-1.

Wnek, Shawn M.; Kuhlman, Christopher L.; Camarillo, Jeannie M.; Medeiros, Matthew K. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)] [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Liu, Ke J. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)] [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Lau, Serrine S. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States) [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, The University of Arizona Health Sciences Center, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Gandolfi, A.J., E-mail: wnek@pharmacy.arizona.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Protein Bridges DNA Base and Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathways  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Protein Bridges DNA Base and Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathways Print Protein Bridges DNA Base and Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathways Print Alkyltransferase proteins (AGT) protect cells from the biological effects of DNA damage caused by the addition of alkyl groups (alkylation). Alkyltransferase-like proteins (ATLs) can do the same, but they lack the reactive cysteine residue that allows the alkyltransferase function, and the mechanism for cell protection has remained unknown. To address this mystery, a British-American team lead by researchers at the Scripps Research Institute recently applied a combination of x-ray structural, biochemical, and genetic studies to ATLs in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe without and with damaged DNA. By showing how a process called non-enzymatic nucleotide flipping activates ATL-initiated DNA repair, their results may improve our understanding of genomic integrity and responses to DNA damage relevant to pathogens and cancer development.

123

Protein Bridges DNA Base and Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathways  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Protein Bridges DNA Base and Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathways Print Protein Bridges DNA Base and Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathways Print Alkyltransferase proteins (AGT) protect cells from the biological effects of DNA damage caused by the addition of alkyl groups (alkylation). Alkyltransferase-like proteins (ATLs) can do the same, but they lack the reactive cysteine residue that allows the alkyltransferase function, and the mechanism for cell protection has remained unknown. To address this mystery, a British-American team lead by researchers at the Scripps Research Institute recently applied a combination of x-ray structural, biochemical, and genetic studies to ATLs in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe without and with damaged DNA. By showing how a process called non-enzymatic nucleotide flipping activates ATL-initiated DNA repair, their results may improve our understanding of genomic integrity and responses to DNA damage relevant to pathogens and cancer development.

124

Protein Bridges DNA Base and Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathways  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Protein Bridges DNA Base and Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathways Print Protein Bridges DNA Base and Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathways Print Alkyltransferase proteins (AGT) protect cells from the biological effects of DNA damage caused by the addition of alkyl groups (alkylation). Alkyltransferase-like proteins (ATLs) can do the same, but they lack the reactive cysteine residue that allows the alkyltransferase function, and the mechanism for cell protection has remained unknown. To address this mystery, a British-American team lead by researchers at the Scripps Research Institute recently applied a combination of x-ray structural, biochemical, and genetic studies to ATLs in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe without and with damaged DNA. By showing how a process called non-enzymatic nucleotide flipping activates ATL-initiated DNA repair, their results may improve our understanding of genomic integrity and responses to DNA damage relevant to pathogens and cancer development.

125

DNA hybridization for assessment of response of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine therapy.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the accuracy of PFR1-AP, a synthetic DNA hybridization probe conjugated...the accuracy of PFR1-AP, a synthetic DNA hybridization probe conjugated...the accuracy of PFR1-AP, a synthetic DNA hybridization probe conjugated...

G L McLaughlin; P Deloron; A Y Huong; C Sezibera; G H Campbell

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Energy and Technology Review: Unlocking the mysteries of DNA repair  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DNA, the genetic blueprint, has the remarkable property of encoding its own repair following diverse types of structural damage induced by external agents or normal metabolism. We are studying the interplay of DNA damaging agents, repair genes, and their protein products to decipher the complex biochemical pathways that mediate such repair. Our research focuses on repair processes that correct DNA damage produced by chemical mutagens and radiation, both ionizing and ultraviolet. The most important type of DNA repair in human cells is called excision repair. This multistep process removes damaged or inappropriate pieces of DNA -- often as a string of 29 nucleotides containing the damage -- and replaces them with intact ones. We have isolated, cloned, and mapped several human repair genes associated with the nucleotide excision repair pathway and involved in the repair of DNA damage after exposure to ultraviolet light or mutagens in cooked food. We have shown that a defect in one of these repair genes, ERCC2, is responsible for the repair deficiency in one of the groups of patients with the recessive genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP group D). We are exploring ways to purify sufficient quantities (milligrams) of the protein products of these and other repair genes so that we can understand their functions. Our long-term goals are to link defective repair proteins to human DNA repair disorders that predispose to cancer, and to produce DNA-repair-deficient mice that can serve as models for the human disorders.

Quirk, W.A.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Inhibition of Repair of Radiation-Induced DNA Damage Enhances Gene Expression from Replication-Defective Adenoviral Vectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...those related to increased expression of CAR and integrin are responsible for the enhanced...of gene expression from replication-defective adenoviral vectors: implications for...enhances gene expression from replication-defective adenoviral vectors. | Radiation has been...

Mohan Hingorani; Christine L. White; Andrew Merron; Inge Peerlinck; Martin E. Gore; Andrew Slade; Simon D. Scott; Christopher M. Nutting; Hardev S. Pandha; Alan A. Melcher; Richard G. Vile; Georges Vassaux; and Kevin J. Harrington

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Modeling marrow damage from response data: Morphallaxis from radiation biology to benzene toxicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Consensus principles from radiation biology were used to describe a generic set of nonlinear, first-order differential equations for modeling of toxicity-induced compensatory cell kinetics in terms of sublethal injury, repair, direct killing, killing of cells with unrepaired sublethal injury, and repopulation. This cellular model was linked to a probit model of hematopoietic mortality that describes death from infection and/or hemorrhage between {approximately} 5 and 30 days. Mortality data from 27 experiments with 851 doseresponse groups, in which doses were protracted by rate and/or fractionation, were used to simultaneously estimate all rate constants by maximum-likelihood methods. Data used represented 18,940 test animals distributed according to: (mice, 12,827); (rats, 2,925); (sheep, 1,676); (swine, 829); (dogs, 479); and (burros, 204). Although a long-term, repopulating hematopoietic stem cell is ancestral to all lineages needed to restore normal homeostasis, the dose-response data from the protracted irradiations indicate clearly that the particular lineage that is ``critical`` to hematopoietic recovery does not resemble stem-like cells with regard to radiosensitivity and repopulation rates. Instead, the weakest link in the chain of hematopoiesis was found to have an intrinsic radioresistance equal to or greater than stromal cells and to repopulate at the same rates. Model validation has been achieved by predicting the LD{sub 50} and/or fractional group mortality in 38 protracted-dose experiments (rats and mice) that were not used in the fitting of model coefficients.

Jones, T.D.; Morris, M.D.; Hasan, J.S.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Estimating the Effect of Human Base Excision Repair Protein Variants on the Repair of Oxidative DNA Base Damage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...oligonucleotide, completing the transcription bubble. Ternary complexes were bound to streptavidin...synthesis. Because our study confirms the stability of the rRNA pool, we decided to further...regulates cyclin D1 and c-Myc mRNA stability in response to rapamycin in an Akt-dependent...

Bahrad A. Sokhansanj and David M. Wilson III

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Meter Damage: Many customers have questions about who is responsible for repair to the electrical service at their homes. These pages may help to answer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meter Damage: Many customers have questions about who is responsible for repair. weather head stack meter base connectors house knob weather head connectors mast clamp stack meter base meter meter #12; Let's start with definitions: Meter base: This is the metal box mounted

Rose, Annkatrin

131

Impact of ?-irradiation on antioxidant capacity of mango (Mangifera indica L.) wine from eight Indian cultivars and the protection of mango wine against DNA damage caused by irradiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present study aims to evaluate the effect of gamma-irradiation on the total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), antioxidant and radioprotective properties of the mango wine. ?-Irradiation resulted in an increase in TPC and TFC in a dose dependent manner and their concentrations were in the range of 226.8–555.3 mg/L and 68.6–165.1 mg/L, respectively, in 3 kGy irradiated wine samples. There was a significant increase in the concentration of certain polyphenolic compounds with the exception of ellagic acid, which was unaltered and a significant decrease in the ferulic and synapic acids as measured by HPLC. Treatment with ?-irradiation resulted in overall reduction in microbial loads; further, no microbe was detected with a dose of 3 kGy in all wine samples, indicating improvement in the quality of mango wine. The DPPH radical scavenging activity of mango wine varied from 97.14 (Sindhura) to 83.64% (Mulgoa) and the DMPD scavenging capacity varied from 95.27 (Banginapalli) to 77.8% (Mulgoa) at 100 ?L and 3 kGy dose. However, the FRAP activity of mango wine varied from 33.96 (Sindhura) to 27.38 mM/L (Mulgoa), and the NO scavenging capacity from 88.2 (Banginapalli) to 74.44% (Mulgoa) at 500 ?L and 3 kGy dose. These scavenging activities were significantly increased with the irradiation dose and also with concentration. Mango wine was also demonstrated to protect DNA against UV + H2O2 and ?-irradiation (500 Gy) induced DNA damage, confirming its protective actions in vitro and thus could be a valuable source of antioxidants.

Naresh Kondapalli; Varakumar Sadineni; Prasad Shekhar Variyar; Arun Sharma; Vijaya Sarathi Reddy Obulam

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Earthquake Damage Detection in the Imperial County Services Building III: Analysis of Wave Travel Times via Impulse Response Functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, one such method is explored using strong motion data from the 1979 Imperial Valley Earthquake recorded1 Earthquake Damage Detection in the Imperial County Services Building III: Analysis of Wave Travel in the former Imperial County Services (ICS) Building, severely damaged by this earthquake. Shear wave travel

Southern California, University of

133

Ribosome Synthesis-Unrelated Functions of the Preribosomal Factor Rrp12 in Cell Cycle Progression and the DNA Damage Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Given the high metabolic cost required to generate...route that is crucial for nuclear sequestration of ribonucleotide...Kap121 are required for nuclear localization of the Rnr2...Rnr4 complex. (A, B) Nuclear import of Rnr4 in rrp12-td...confocal microscope (B). Graphs show the quantification...

Mercedes Dosil

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

134

Cell cycle and DNA damage response regulation by Spy1, and the intersection of FGFR and NFkappaB pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Silva LF, Duncker BP. ORC function in late G1: maintaining128-30. DePamphilis ML. The 'ORC cycle': a novel pathway forOrigin Recognition Complex (ORC), cdc6/18, cdc45, cdt1, the

McAndrew, Christopher William

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Cell cycle and DNA damage response regulation by Spy1, and the intersection of FGFR and NFkappaB pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regulates the synthesis of the CIP/KIP family of CDKCKIs), specifically p21 CIP and p27 KIP , which negativelyB, CDC25C activity, and p21 CIP levels, which are controlled

McAndrew, Christopher William

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Induction of DNA Damage Responses by Adozelesin Is S Phase-specific and Dependent on Active Replication Forks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Todorov, I. T., Melendy, T., and Gilbert, D. M. Mcm2, but not RPA, is a component...1999. 18 Dimitrova, D. S., and Gilbert, D. M. Stability and nuclear distribution...nuclei of S phase cells. | Departments of Microbiology and Biochemistry and the Witebsky Center...

Jen-Sing Liu; Shu-Ru Kuo; Terry A. Beerman; and Thomas Melendy

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Functional role of p53 N-terminal phosphorylation in regulating the p53 response to DNA damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M. T. , Joseloff, E. , Milczarek, G. , and Bowden, G. T. (M. T. , Joseloff, E. , Milczarek, G. , and Bowden, G. T. (

Chao, Connie

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Studies towards DNA-polymer-silica-iron oxide hybrid nanoparticles as stimulus-responsive MR theranostics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stimulus-Responsive MR Theranostics A Thesis is submitted inTHERANOSTICS ..as Stimulus-Responsive MR Theranostics by Claudia Meneses

Shuldberg, Claudia Meneses

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

DNA repair: Dynamic defenders against cancer and aging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

You probably weren't thinking about your body's cellular DNA repair systems the last time you sat on the beach in the bright sunshine. Fortunately, however, while you were subjecting your DNA to the harmful effects of ultraviolet light, your cells were busy repairing the damage. The idea that our genetic material could be damaged by the sun was not appreciated in the early days of molecular biology. When Watson and Crick discovered the structure of DNA in 1953 [1], it was assumed that DNA is fundamentally stable since it carries the blueprint of life. However, over 50 years of research have revealed that our DNA is under constant assault by sunlight, oxygen, radiation, various chemicals, and even our own cellular processes. Cleverly, evolution has provided our cells with a diverse set of tools to repair the damage that Mother Nature causes. DNA repair processes restore the normal nucleotide sequence and DNA structure of the genome after damage [2]. These responses are highly varied and exquisitely regulated. DNA repair mechanisms are traditionally characterized by the type of damage repaired. A large variety of chemical modifications can alter normal DNA bases and either lead to mutations or block transcription if not repaired, and three distinct pathways exist to remove base damage. Base excision repair (BER) corrects DNA base alterations that do not distort the overall structure of the DNA helix such as bases damaged by oxidation resulting from normal cellular metabolism. While BER removes single damaged bases, nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes short segments of nucleotides (called oligonucleotides) containing damaged bases. NER responds to any alteration that distorts the DNA helix and is the mechanism responsible for repairing bulky base damage caused by carcinogenic chemicals such as benzo [a]pyrene (found in cigarette smoke and automobile exhaust) as well as covalent linkages between adjacent pyrimidine bases resulting from the ultraviolet (UV) component of sunlight. NER can be divided into two classes based on where the repair occurs. NER occurring in DNA that is not undergoing transcription (i.e., most of the genome) is called global genome repair (GGR or GGNER), while NER taking place in the transcribed strand of active genes is called transcription-coupled repair (TCR or TC-NER). We will explore NER in more detail below. Mismatch repair (MMR) is another type of excision repair that specifically removes mispaired bases resulting from replication errors. DNA damage can also result in breaks in the DNA backbone, in one or both strands. Single-strand breaks (SSBs) are efficiently repaired by a mechanism that shares common features with the later steps in BER. Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are especially devastating since by definition there is no intact complementary strand to serve as a template for repair, and even one unrepaired DSB can be lethal [3]. In cells that have replicated their DNA prior to cell division, the missing information can be supplied by the duplicate copy, or sister chromatid, and DSBs in these cells are faithfully repaired by homologous recombination involving the exchange of strands of DNA between the two copies. However, most cells in the body are non-dividing, and in these cells the major mechanism for repairing DSBs is by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), which as the name implies involves joining two broken DNA ends together without a requirement for homologous sequence and which therefore has a high potential for loss of genetic information.

Fuss, Jill O.; Cooper, Priscilla K.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

UV-induced DNA Damage and Mutations in Hupki (Human p53 Knock-in) Mice Recapitulate p53 Hotspot Alterations in Sun-exposed Human Skin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...development of severely sun-damaged skin and...year (6 , 7) . Chronic sun exposure causes cumulative...spatial and statistical distribution of chromatin) and that...histologically normal, sun-damaged skin. Materials...and stored at room temperature. Vitamin A Clinical...

Jun-Li Luo; Wei-Min Tong; Jung-Hoon Yoon; Manfred Hergenhahn; Riita Koomagi; Qin Yang; Dominique Galendo; Gerd P. Pfeifer; Zhao-Qi Wang; and Monica Hollstein

2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dna damage response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Association of polymorphisms in AhR, CYP1A1, GSTM1, and GSTT1 genes with levels of DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes among coke-oven workers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accumulating evidence has shown that both DNA damage caused by the metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and genetic polymorphisms in PAH-metabolic genes contribute to individual susceptibility to PAH-induced carcinogenesis. However, the functional relevance of genetic polymorphisms in PAH-metabolic genes in exposed individuals is still unclear. In this study of 240 coke-oven workers (the exposed group) and 123 non-coke-oven workers (the control group), we genotyped for polymorphisms in the AhR, CYP1A1, GSTM1, and GSTT1 genes by PCR methods, and determined the levels of DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes using the alkaline comet assay. It was found that the ln-transformed Olive tail moment (Olive TM) values in the exposed group were significantly higher than those in the control group. Furthermore, in the exposed group, the Olive TM values in subjects with the AhR Lys{sup 554} variant genotype were higher than those with the AhR Arg{sup 554}/Arg{sup 554} genotype. Similarly, the Olive TM values in the non-coke-oven workers with the CYP1A1 MspI CC + CT genotype were lower than the values of those with the CYP1A1 MspI TT genotype. However, these differences were not evident for GSTM1 and GSTT1. These results suggested that the polymorphism of AhR might modulate the effects of PAHs in the exposed group; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms by which this polymorphism may have affected the levels of PAH-induced DNA damage warrant further investigation.

Yongwen Chen; Yun Bai; Jing Yuan; Weihong Chen; Jianya Sun; Hong Wang; Huashan Liang; Liang Guo; Xiaobo Yang; Hao Tan; Yougong Su; Qingyi Wei; Tangchun Wu [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). Institute of Occupational Medicine and Ministry of Education Key Lab of Environment and Health

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Time-resolved imaging of material response during laser-induced bulk damage in SiO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on time resolved imaging of the dynamic events taking place during laser-induced damage in the bulk of fused silica samples with nanosecond temporal resolution and one micron spatial resolution. These events include: shock/pressure wave formation and propagation, transient absorption, crack propagation and formation of residual stress fields. The work has been performed using a time-resolved microscope system that utilizes a probe pulse to acquire images at delay times covering the entire timeline of a damage event. Image information is enhanced using polarized illumination and simultaneously recording the two orthogonal polarization image components. For the case of fused silica, an electronic excitation is first observed accompanied by the onset of a pressure wave generation and propagation. Cracks are seen to form early in the process and reach their final size at about 25 ns into the damage event. In addition, changes that in part are attributed to transient absorption in the modified material are observed for delays up to about 200 microseconds.

Demos, S G; Negres, R A

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

143

Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma induces apoptosis in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma: Involvement of DNA-damage-triggering sub-G1 arrest via the ATM/p53 pathway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Recent advances in physics have made possible the use of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NTP) in cancer research. Although increasing evidence suggests that NTP induces death of various cancer cell types, thus offering a promising alternative treatment, the mechanism of its therapeutic effect is little understood. In this study, we report for the first time that NTP led to apoptotic cell death in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Interestingly, NTP induced a sub-G1 arrest in p53 wild-type OSCCs, but not in p53-mutated OSCCs. In addition, NTP increased the expression levels of ATM, p53 (Ser 15, 20 and 46), p21, and cyclin D1. A comet assay, Western blotting and immunocytochemistry of ?H2AX suggested that NTP-induced apoptosis and sub-G1 arrest were associated with DNA damage and the ATM/p53 signaling pathway in SCC25 cells. Moreover, ATM knockdown using siRNA attenuated the effect of NTP on cell death, sub-G1 arrest and related signals. Taken together, these results indicate that NTP induced apoptotic cell death in p53 wild-type \\{OSCCs\\} through a novel mechanism involving DNA damage and triggering of sub-G1 arrest via the ATM/p53 pathway. These findings show the therapeutic potential of NTP in OSCC.

Jae Won Chang; Sung Un Kang; Yoo Seob Shin; Kang Il Kim; Seong Jin Seo; Sang Sik Yang; Jong-Soo Lee; Eunpyo Moon; Seung Jae Baek; Keunho Lee; Chul-Ho Kim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Mechanisms of Tissue Response to Low  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tissue Response to Low Dose Radiation Tissue Response to Low Dose Radiation Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Why This Project? In the past, the effects of ionizing radiation on humans has been attributed in great part to its ability to damage DNA, which transmits information from cell to cell, and generation to generation. Damaged DNA can lead to cell death or perpetuate the damage to daughter cells and to future generations. In addition to the information contained with the genome (i.e., DNA sequence), information directing cell behavior and tissue function is also stored outside the DNA. The success in cloning sheep from the DNA contained in the nucleus of an adult cell shows how important signals from the outside are in defining how the genome is expressed. This

145

Survival Response and Rearrangement of Plasmid DNA of Lactococcus lactis during Long-Term Starvation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...lane 1. Growth response under different energy levels. The growth...to utilize an energy source other than...in the mutation frequency, leading to a...competition for energy exists. Possession...accumulate carbonaceous storage compounds, such...

Woojin S. Kim; Ji Hyeon Park; Jun Ren; Ping Su; Noel W. Dunn

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Atypical Response Regulator ChxR from Chlamydia trachomatis Is Structurally Poised for DNA Binding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

] and are as follows: PhoB (1QQI); YycF (2D1V); HP1043 (2HQR); OmpR (2JPB); PhoP (2PMU); KdpE (3ZQ7) for effector domains and DrrD (1KGS); DrrB (1P2F); PrrA (1YS6); MtrA (2GWR); HP1043 (2HQR); RegX3 (2OQR); PhoP (3R0J) for full-length structures. Representations of all... to interact with the DNA repeats found within ChxR promoter sites [13,15,17]. Using the constrained dataset, Minimal Ensemble Search (MES) was applied to determine the level of conformational heterogeneity in ChxR and develop refined conformers that better...

Barta, Michael L.; Hickey, John Michael; Anbanandam, Asokan; Dyer, Kevin; Hammel, Michal; Hefty, P. Scott

2014-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

147

On the Mechanisms of OH Radical Induced DNA-Base Damage:? A Comparative Quantum Chemical and Car?Parrinello Molecular Dynamics Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a detailed Car?Parrinello molecular dynamics study of DNA bases in explicit water interacting with an OH radical. ... Thus, we choose to compute the power spectrum of guanine in the gas phase and in the presence of 21 and 56 waters. ...

Yudong Wu; Christopher J. Mundy; Michael E. Colvin; Roberto Car

2004-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

148

Ablation of p21waf1cip1 Expression Enhances the Capacity of p53-deficient Human Tumor Cells to Repair UVB-induced DNA Damage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...an early initiating event in solar UVB-induced skin cell transformation...restore much of the DNA repair capacity lost in these precancerous...p21waf1cip1 expression enhances the capacity of p53-deficient human tumor...can significantly enhance the capacity of p53-deficient human tumor...

Jean-Philippe Therrien; Martin Loignon; Régen Drouin; and Elliot A. Drobetsky

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Abstract 1581: Ethanol overrides DNA synthesis inhibition in response to PAHs (tobacco smoke carcinogens): a mechanistic explanation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2014; San Diego, CA Abstract 1581: Ethanol overrides DNA synthesis inhibition in...different cell lines. Here we observed that ethanol (EtOH) treatment at physiologically...inhibitor (PD098059) significantly reduced ethanol's ability to increase DNA synthesis...

Jagat J. Mukherjee and Subodh Kumar

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Comparative investigations of sodium arsenite, arsenic trioxide and cadmium sulphate in combination with gamma-radiation on apoptosis, micronuclei induction and DNA damage in a human lymphoblastoid cell line  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the field of radiation protection the combined exposure to radiation and other toxic agents is recognised as an important research area. To elucidate the basic mechanisms of simultaneous exposure, the interaction of the carcinogens and environmental toxicants cadmium and two arsenic compounds, arsenite and arsenic trioxide, in combination with gamma-radiation in human lymphoblastoid cells (TK6) were investigated. Gamma-radiation induced significant genotoxic effects such as micronuclei formation, DNA damage and apoptosis, whereas arsenic and cadmium had no significant effect on these indicators of cellular damage at non-toxic concentrations. However, in combination with gamma-radiation arsenic trioxide induced a more than additive apoptotic rate compared to the sum of the single effects. Here, the level of apoptotic cells was increased, in a dose-dependent way, up to two-fold compared to the irradiated control cells. Arsenite did not induce a significant additive effect at any of the concentrations or radiation doses tested. On the other hand, arsenic trioxide was less effective than arsenite in the induction of DNA protein cross-links. These data indicate that the two arsenic compounds interact through different pathways in the cell. Cadmium sulphate, like arsenite, had no significant effect on apoptosis in combination with gamma-radiation at low concentrations and, at high concentrations, even reduced the radiation-induced apoptosis. An additive effect on micronuclei induction was observed with 1 ?M cadmium sulphate with an increase of up to 80% compared to the irradiated control cells. Toxic concentrations of cadmium and arsenic trioxide seemed to reduce micronuclei induction. The results presented here indicate that relatively low concentrations of arsenic and cadmium, close to those occuring in nature, may interfere with radiation effects. Differences in action of the two arsenic compounds were identified.

Sabine Hornhardt; Maria Gomolka; Linda Walsh; Thomas Jung

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Guest Editorial: Laser Damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser damage of optical materials, first reported in 1964, continues to limit the output energy and power of pulsed and continuous-wave laser systems. In spite of some 48 years of research in this area, interest from the international laser community to laser damage issues remains at a very high level and does not show any sign of decreasing. Moreover, it grows with the development of novel laser systems, for example, ultrafast and short-wavelength lasers that involve new damage effects and specific mechanisms not studied before. This interest is evident from the high level of attendance and presentations at the annual SPIE Laser Damage Symposium (aka, Boulder Damage Symposium) that has been held in Boulder, Colorado, since 1969. This special section of Optical Engineering is the first one devoted to the entire field of laser damage rather than to a specific part. It is prepared in response to growing interest from the international laser-damage community. Some papers in this special section were presented at the Laser Damage Symposium; others were submitted in response to the general call for papers for this special section. The 18 papers compiled into this special section represent many sides of the broad field of laser-damage research. They consider theoretical studies of the fundamental mechanisms of laser damage including laser-driven electron dynamics in solids (O. Brenk and B. Rethfeld; A. Nikiforov, A. Epifanov, and S. Garnov; T. Apostolova et al.), modeling of propagation effects for ultrashort high-intensity laser pulses (J. Gulley), an overview of mechanisms of inclusion-induced damage (M. Koldunov and A. Manenkov), the formation of specific periodic ripples on a metal surface by femtosecond laser pulses (M. Ahsan and M. Lee), and the laser-plasma effects on damage in glass (Y. Li et al). Material characterization is represented by the papers devoted to accurate and reliable measurements of absorption with special emphasis on thin films (C. Mühlig and S. Bublitz; B. Cho, E. Danielewicz, and J. Rudisill; W. Palm et al; and J. Lu et al.). Statistical treatment of measurements of the laser-damage threshold (J. Arenberg) and the relationship to damage mechanisms (F. Wagner et al.) represent the large subfield of laser-damage measurements. Various aspects of multilayer coating and thin-film characterization are considered in papers by B. Cho, J. Rudisill, and E. Danielewicz (spectral shift in multilayer mirrors) and R. Weber et al. (novel approach to damage studies based on third-harmonic generation microscopy). Of special interest for readers is the paper by C. Stolz that summarizes the results of four “thin-film damage competitions” organized as a part of the Laser Damage Symposium. Another paper is devoted to thermal annealing of damage precursors (N. Shen et al.). Finally, the influence of nano-size contamination on initiation of laser damage by ultrashort pulses is considered in paper of V. Komolov et al.

Vitaly Gruzdev, Michelle D. Shinn

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Human AlkB Homolog ABH8 Is a tRNA Methyltransferase Required for Wobble Uridine Modification and DNA Damage Survival  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tRNA nucleosides are extensively modified to ensure their proper function in translation. However, many of the enzymes responsible for tRNA modifications in mammals await identification. Here, we show that human AlkB homolog ...

Fu, Dragony

153

The Efficacy of a Broad-spectrum Sunscreen to Protect Engineered Human Skin from Tissue and DNA Damage Induced by Solar Ultraviolet Exposure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...responses of the skin to solar UVR, 3 whereas photoaging...are diagnosed in Canada (2) . It has been...that a child born in Canada today has a 1 in...Skin exposure to solar UVR induces significant...Sunscreen Treatment and Solar UVR Irradiation...Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., Canada, were applied at...

Vickram Bissonauth; Régen Drouin; David L. Mitchell; Marc Rhainds; Joël Claveau; and Mahmoud Rouabhia

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Modeling the Physics of Damage Cluster  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Modeling the Physics of Damage Cluster Formation in a Cellular Environment Modeling the Physics of Damage Cluster Formation in a Cellular Environment Larry Toburen East Carolina University Why This Project Modern tools of radiobiology are leading to many new discoveries regarding how cells and tissues respond to radiation exposure. We can now irradiate single cells and observe responses in adjacent cells. We can also measure clusters of radiation damage produced in DNA. The primary tools available to describe the initial spatial pattern of damage formed by the absorption of ionizing radiation are based on (MC) Monte Carlo simulations of the structure of charged particle tracks. Although many MC codes exist and considerable progress is being made in the incorporation of detailed macromolecular target structures into these codes, much of the interaction

155

Suppression of Melanoma Growth and Metastasis by DNA Vaccination Using an Ultrasound-Responsive and Mannose-Modified Gene Carrier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

DNA vaccination has attracted much attention as a promising therapy for the prevention of metastasis and relapse of malignant tumors, especially highly metastatic tumors such as melanoma. However, it is difficult to achieve a potent cancer vaccine effect ...

Keita Un; Shigeru Kawakami; Ryo Suzuki; Kazuo Maruyama; Fumiyoshi Yamashita; Mitsuru Hashida

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

156

Identification and Characterization of a Small Inhibitory Peptide That Can Target DNA-PKcs Autophosphorylation and Increase Tumor Radiosensitivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The DNA protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is one of the critical elements involved in the DNA damage repair process. Inhibition of DNA-PKcs results in hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation (IR); therefore, this approach has been explored to develop molecular targeted radiosensitizers. Here, we aimed to develop small inhibitory peptides that could specifically target DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation, a critical step for the enzymatic activation of the kinase in response to IR. Methods and Materials: We generated several small fusion peptides consisting of 2 functional domains, 1 an internalization domain and the other a DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation inhibitory domain. We characterized the internalization, toxicity, and radiosensitization activities of the fusion peptides. Furthermore, we studied the mechanisms of the inhibitory peptides on DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation and DNA repair. Results: We found that among several peptides, the biotin-labeled peptide 3 (BTW3) peptide, which targets DNA-PKcs threonine 2647 autophosphorylation, can abrogate IR-induced DNA-PKcs activation and cause prolonged {gamma}-H2AX focus formation. We demonstrated that BTW3 exposure led to hypersensitivity to IR in DNA-PKcs-proficient cells but not in DNA-PKcs-deficient cells. Conclusions: The small inhibitory peptide BTW3 can specifically target DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation and enhance radiosensitivity; therefore, it can be further developed as a novel class of radiosensitizer.

Sun Xiaonan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, Sir Run Run Shaw Institute of Clinical Medicine of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, Sir Run Run Shaw Institute of Clinical Medicine of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Yang Chunying [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Weill Cornell Medical College, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Weill Cornell Medical College, Houston, TX (United States); Liu Hai; Wang Qi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, Sir Run Run Shaw Institute of Clinical Medicine of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, Sir Run Run Shaw Institute of Clinical Medicine of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Wu Shixiu [Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China); Li Xia; Xie Tian [Research Center of Biomedicine and Health, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou (China)] [Research Center of Biomedicine and Health, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou (China); Brinkman, Kathryn L.; Teh, Bin S.; Butler, E. Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Weill Cornell Medical College, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Weill Cornell Medical College, Houston, TX (United States); Xu Bo, E-mail: bxu@tmhs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Weill Cornell Medical College, Houston, TX (United States); Zheng, Shu, E-mail: zhengshu@zju.edu.cn [Cancer Institute, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China)] [Cancer Institute, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Radiation-induced electron migration along DNA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation-induced electron migration along DNA is a mechanism by which randomly produced stochastic energy deposition events can lead to nonrandom types of damage along DNA manifested distal to the sites of the initial energy deposition. Electron migration along DNA is significantly influenced by the DNA base sequence and DNA conformation. Migration along 7 base pairs in oligonucleotides containing guanine bases was observed for oligonucleotides irradiated in solution which compares to average migration distances of 6 to 10 bases for Escherichia coli DNA irradiated in solution and 5.5 base pairs for Escherichia coli DNA irradiated in cells. Evidence also suggests that electron migration can occur preferentially in the 5{prime} to 3{prime} direction along DNA. Our continued efforts will provide information regarding the contribution of electron transfer along DNA to formation of locally multiply damaged sites created in DNA by exposure to ionizing radiation.

Fuciarelli, A.F.; Sisk, E.C.; Miller, J.H. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Zimbrick, J.D. [National Research Council, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

The Early Response to DNA Damage Can Lead to Activation of Alternative Splicing Activity Resulting in CD44 Splice Pattern Changes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, 121 Mortensen Hall, Loma...Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Loma Linda University School...Duriez C, Van Kerckhove J, Gilbert C, Wang Q, Puisieux A...Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Loma Linda University School...

Valery Filippov; Maria Filippova; and Penelope J. Duerksen-Hughes

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

Nuclear Accumulation of the Papillomavirus E1 Helicase Blocks S-Phase Progression and Triggers an ATM-Dependent DNA Damage Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1 September 2011 research-article Virus-Cell Interactions Nuclear Accumulation of...differentiation program that keratinocytes...established as a nuclear episome and is replicated...We propose that nuclear export of E1 prevents...Journal Article Research Support, N.I...

Amélie Fradet-Turcotte; Fanny Bergeron-Labrecque; Cary A. Moody; Michaël Lehoux; Laimonis A. Laimins; Jacques Archambault

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

160

A matrix damage accumulation model for laminated composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

affect the response of the compo- rsent. The efiects of damage are refiected through the property degradation of the structure as the subcritical damage accumulates. For laminated composites, this sub- critical damage takes the form of matrix cracks... identifies damage as dominant. cracks and fracture mechanics is applied to predict crack growth. The physical significance of the damage mode is retained with this approach. LJnfor- tunately, the damage states in composite materials contain a multitude...

Lo, David Chi Shing

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dna damage response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Cambium Damage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cambium Damage Cambium Damage Name: Jamie Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: If the bark from the lower part of trees (elm trees) is almost completly removed (in this case by animals)to a height of about 8ft, is it possible that the trees will still live? What can be done to help the trees? Replies: If the tree has been girdled, that is, the bark and cambium layer beneath it, has been removed completely around the tree, then it will die. If there is any portion of the bark remaining it may live, but if that remaining is small it probably will die fairly soon due to general decline. If the cambium layer has not been destroyed it may recover, but once the bark is stripped away it is most likely doomed because of the likelihood of invasion by fungi, insects, etc. A local forester or landscaper might be able to offer more help if they see it.

162

An Optimized, Synthetic DNA Vaccine Encoding the Toxin A and Toxin B Receptor Binding Domains of Clostridium difficile Induces Protective Antibody Responses In Vivo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Immunity and Vaccines An Optimized, Synthetic DNA Vaccine Encoding the Toxin A and...these advantages make newer, synthetic DNA-based immunizations a desirable...our work demonstrates that a synthetic DNA vaccine encoding the toxin RBDs...

Scott M. Baliban; Amanda Michael; Berje Shammassian; Shikata Mudakha; Amir S. Khan; Simon Cocklin; Isaac Zentner; Brian P. Latimer; Laurent Bouillaut; Meredith Hunter; Preston Marx; Niranjan Y. Sardesai; Seth L. Welles; Jeffrey M. Jacobson; David B. Weiner; Michele A. Kutzler

2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

163

Nanotechnology with DNA DNA Nanodevices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanotechnology with DNA DNA Nanodevices Friedrich C. Simmel* and Wendy U. Dittmer A DNA actuator. Introduction.............285 2. Overview: DNA Nanotechnology.......285 3. Prototypes of Nanomechanical DNA overview of DNA nanotechnology as a whole is given. The most important properties of DNA molecules

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München

164

Replication protein A and g-H2AX foci assembly is triggered by cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pathway that removes the oxidized base lesions from the genomic DNA [6]. Evidence for the stimulation

165

Recognition and processing of a new repertoire of DNA substrates by human 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The human 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) recognizes and excises a broad range of purines damaged by alkylation and oxidative damage, including 3-methyladenine, 7-methylguanine, hypoxanthine (Hx), and 1,N[superscript ...

Lee, Chun-Yue I.

166

Damage experiments in a cylindrical geometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studying spallation damage with a cylindrical configuration allows for a natural recollection of the damaged material under proper driving conditions. Additionally, the damaged material can come to a complete rest without the application of further stopping forces. Specific areas of research include the damage initiation regime in convergent geometry, behavior of material recollected after damage, and effects of convergent geometry on the material response. Such experiments produce unique strain and shear stress states, motivating improvements in existing computational material models and increasing the predictive capabilities of codes. A LANL/VNIIEF joint experimental series has produced cylindrical aluminum failure initiation data and studied the behavior of material recollected after damage initiation and after complete failure. In addition to post-shot collection of the damaged target material for subsequent metallographic analysis, dynamic in-situ experimental diagnostics include velocimetry and transverse radial radiography. This paper will discuss the current experimental status.

Kaul, Ann M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

167

Transcriptional and Epigenetic Responses of Human Cells to Low Dose  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transcriptional and Epigenetic Responses of Human Cells to Low Dose Transcriptional and Epigenetic Responses of Human Cells to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Identified through High Throughput ChIP-Seq Analysis Carl Anderson Brookhaven National Laboratory Abstract The major consequence of human exposures to ionizing radiation (IR) is considered to be an increased incidence of cancer (Brenner et al., 2003). Exposure of cells to 1 Gy of IR produces approximately 40 double-stranded breaks, 1000 single-stranded breaks, and 1000 damaged bases per genome equivalent (Pandita and Richardson, 2009); however, most direct DNA damage is rapidly repaired. Exposure to IR also induces epigenetic changes including both increases and decreases in DNA methylation, and increasing evidence suggests that epigenetic changes can both initiate cancer and

168

SUBSPACE-BASED DETECTION OF FATIGUE DAMAGE ON JACKET SUPPORT STRUCTURES OF OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUBSPACE-BASED DETECTION OF FATIGUE DAMAGE ON JACKET SUPPORT STRUCTURES OF OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES damage in real size structural components of offshore wind turbines. KEYWORDS : Damage detection, Offshore wind turbines, Numerical response simulation. INTRODUCTION Offshore wind turbines are exposed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

169

WHERE MULTIFUNCTIONAL DNA REPAIR PROTEINS MEET: MAPPING THE INTERACTION DOMAINS BETWEEN XPG AND WRN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rapid recognition and repair of DNA damage is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity and cellular survival. Multiple complex and interconnected DNA damage responses exist within cells to preserve the human genome, and these repair pathways are carried out by a specifi c interplay of protein-protein interactions. Thus a failure in the coordination of these processes, perhaps brought about by a breakdown in any one multifunctional repair protein, can lead to genomic instability, developmental and immunological abnormalities, cancer and premature aging. This study demonstrates a novel interaction between two such repair proteins, Xeroderma pigmentosum group G protein (XPG) and Werner syndrome helicase (WRN), that are both highly pleiotropic and associated with inherited genetic disorders when mutated. XPG is a structure-specifi c endonuclease required for the repair of UV-damaged DNA by nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mutations in XPG result in the diseases Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS). A loss of XPG incision activity results in XP, whereas a loss of non-enzymatic function(s) of XPG causes CS. WRN is a multifunctional protein involved in double-strand break repair (DSBR), and consists of 3’–5’ DNA-dependent helicase, 3’–5’ exonuclease, and single-strand DNA annealing activities. Nonfunctional WRN protein leads to Werner syndrome, a premature aging disorder with increased cancer incidence. Far Western analysis was used to map the interacting domains between XPG and WRN by denaturing gel electrophoresis, which separated purifi ed full length and recombinant XPG and WRN deletion constructs, based primarily upon the length of each polypeptide. Specifi c interacting domains were visualized when probed with the secondary protein of interest which was then detected by traditional Western analysis using the antibody of the secondary protein. The interaction between XPG and WRN was mapped to the C-terminal region of XPG as well as the C-terminal region of WRN. The physical interaction between XPG and WRN links NER, (made evident by the disease XP) with DSBR, which imparts additional knowledge of the overlapping nature of these two proteins and the previously distinct DNA repair pathways they are associated with. Since genomic integrity is constantly threatened by both endogenous and exogenous (internal and external) damage, understanding the roles of these proteins in coordinating DNA repair processes with replication will signifi cantly further understanding how defects instigate physiological consequences in response to various DNA damaging sources. This ultimately contributes to our understanding of cancer and premature aging.

Rangaraj, K.; Cooper, P.K.; Trego, K.S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

A DinB variant reveals diverse physiological consequences of incomplete TLS extension by a Y-family DNA polymerase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The only Y-family DNA polymerase conserved among all domains of life, DinB and its mammalian ortholog pol ?, catalyzes proficient bypass of damaged DNA in translesion synthesis (TLS). Y-family DNA polymerases, including ...

Walker, Graham C.

171

A DinB variant reveals diverse physiological consequences of incomplete extension by a Y-family DNA polymerase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The only Y-family DNA polymerase conserved among all domains of life, DinB and its mammalian ortholog pol ?, catalyzes proficient bypass of damaged DNA in translesion synthesis (TLS). Y-family DNA polymerases, including ...

Jarosz, Daniel F.

172

DNA Extraction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DNA Extraction DNA Extraction Being able to extract deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is important for a number of reasons. By studying DNA, scientists can identify genetic disorders or diseases, and they can also possibly find cures for them by manipulating or experimenting with this DNA. At the Laboratory, researchers have studied DNA to detect biothreat agents in environmental and forensic samples. Scientists also are studying how human DNA may be destroyed by certain types of electromagnetic waves at certain frequencies. Classroom Activity: This activity is about the extraction of DNA from strawberries. Strawberries are a great fruit to use for this lesson because each student can work on his or her own. Strawberries are recommended because they yield more DNA than any other fruit. Strawberries are octoploid, which means that they have eight copies of each

173

Induction of NEIL1 and NEIL2 DNA glycosylases in aniline-induced splenic toxicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mechanisms by which aniline exposure elicits splenotoxic response, especially the tumorigenic response, are not well-understood. Earlier, we have shown that aniline-induced oxidative stress is associated with increased oxidative DNA damage in rat spleen. The base excision repair (BER) pathway is the major mechanism for the repair of oxidative DNA base lesions, and we have shown an up-regulation of 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (OGG1), a specific DNA glycosylase involved in the removal of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) adducts, following aniline exposure. Nei-like DNA glycosylases (NEIL1/2) belong to a family of BER proteins that are distinct from other DNA glycosylases, including OGG1. However, contribution of NEIL1/2 in the repair of aniline-induced oxidative DNA damage in the spleen is not known. This study was, therefore, focused on evaluating if NEILs also contribute to the repair of oxidative DNA lesions in the spleen following aniline exposure. To achieve that, male SD rats were subchronically exposed to aniline (0.5 mmol/kg/day via drinking water for 30 days), while controls received drinking water only. The BER activity of NEIL1/2 was assayed using a bubble structure substrate containing 5-OHU (preferred substrates for NEIL1 and NEIL2) and by quantitating the cleavage products. Aniline treatment led to a 1.25-fold increase in the NEIL1/2-associated BER activity in the nuclear extracts of spleen compared to the controls. Real-time PCR analysis for NEIL1 and NEIL2 mRNA expression in the spleen revealed 2.7- and 3.9-fold increases, respectively, in aniline-treated rats compared to controls. Likewise, Western blot analysis showed that protein expression of NEIL1 and NEIL2 in the nuclear extract of spleens from aniline-treated rats was 2.0- and 3.8-fold higher than controls, respectively. Aniline treatment also led to stronger immunoreactivity for NEIL1 and NEIL2 in the spleens, confined to the red pulp areas. These studies, thus, show that aniline-induced oxidative stress is associated with an induction of NEIL1/2. The increased NIEL-mediated BER activity is another indication of aniline-induced oxidative damage in the spleen and could constitute another important mechanism of removal of oxidative DNA lesions, especially in transcribed DNA following aniline insult.

Ma Huaxian; Wang Jianling [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Hazra, Tapas K. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Boor, Paul J. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Khan, M. Firoze, E-mail: mfkhan@utmb.edu [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

NMR Structure and Dynamics of the C-Terminal Domain from Human Rev1 and Its Complex with Rev1 Interacting Region of DNA Polymerase ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rev1 is a translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerase essential for DNA damage tolerance in eukaryotes. In the process of TLS stalled high-fidelity replicative DNA polymerases are temporarily replaced by specialized TLS ...

Pozhidaeva, Alexandra

175

Connections Between the TCR Proteins XPG and CSB, Repair of Oxidative DNA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Connections Between the TCR Proteins XPG and CSB, Repair of Oxidative DNA Connections Between the TCR Proteins XPG and CSB, Repair of Oxidative DNA Base Damage, and the Radio-Adaptive Response Helen Budworth, Brett Haltiwanger, Altaf Sarker, Torsten Grösser, Björn Rydberg, and Priscilla K. Cooper* Life Sciences Division, MailStop 74-157, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720; *Corresponding author A key question that is central to accurately assessing human health risks from environmentally relevant low level (low dose, low dose rate) exposures to ionizing radiation is whether cellular responses measured at the higher doses for which there are strong epidemiological health data and the high doses commonly used in laboratory experiments extrapolate in a linear fashion to low doses. Recent data suggest that they may not. For example, low-dose hypersensitivity for

176

Fisetin attenuates hydrogen peroxide-induced cell damage by scavenging reactive oxygen species and activating protective functions of cellular glutathione system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2...) can induce cell damage by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in DNA damage and cell death. The aim of this study is to elucidate the protective effects of fisetin (3,7...

Kyoung Ah Kang; Mei Jing Piao; Ki Cheon Kim…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Recycling greenhouse gas fossil fuel emissions into low radiocarbon food products to reduce human genetic damage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radiocarbon from nuclear fallout is a known health risk. However, corresponding risks from natural...10 and 3.4 × 1011 lifetime chromosomal damage events from natural background radiocarbon incorporated into DNA ...

Christopher P. Williams

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Nondestructive Damage Detection in General Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is to provide NDE methodologies that simultaneously identify the location, the extent, and the severity of damage in general beams. By general beams, we mean beyond Euler-Bernoulli beams (i.e. slender beams) to deep beams and stubby beams whose response may...

Dincal, Selcuk

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

179

Application of Damage Detection Techniques Using Wind Turbine Modal Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As any structure ages, its structural characteristics will also change. The goal of this work was to determine if modal response data fkom a wind turbine could be used in the detection of damage. The input stimuli to the wind turbine were from traditional modal hammer input and natural wind excitation. The structural response data was acquired using accelerometers mounted on the rotor of a parked and undamaged horizontal-axis wind turbine. The bolts at the root of one of the three blades were then loosened to simulate a damaged blade. The structural response data of the rotor was again recorded. The undamaged and damage-simulated datasets were compared using existing darnage detection algorithms. Also, a novel algorithm for combining the results of different damage detection algorithms was utilized in the assessment of the data. This paper summarizes the code development and discusses some preliminary damage detection results.

Gross, E.; Rumsey, M.; Simmermacher, T.; Zadoks, R.I.

1998-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

180

Graded Materials for Resistance to Contact Deformation and Damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graded Materials for Resistance to Contact Deformation and Damage S. Suresh The mechanical response, materials sci- entists increasingly aim to engineer graded materials that are more damage-resistant than of materials with spatial gradients in composition and structure is of considerable interest in disciplines

Suresh, Subra

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dna damage response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Combined Haploinsufficiency for ATM and RAD9 as a Factor in Cell Transformation, Apoptosis, and DNA Lesion Repair Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a role in genomic instability and carcinogenesis after DNA damage is induced. Because the effect to haploinsufficiency for proteins involved in DNA repair pathways plays a role in genomic instability

182

Atomistic simulations of radiation damage in amorphous metal alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While numerous fundamental studies have characterized the atomic-level radiation response mechanisms in irradiated crystalline alloys, comparatively little is known regarding the mechanisms of radiation damage in amorphous ...

Baumer, Richard E. (Richard Edward)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Reducing Radiation Damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This talk describes the use of a modified treatment sequence, i.e., radiation dose, geometry, dwell time, etc., to mitigate some of the deleterious effects of cancer radiotherapy by utilizing natural cell repair processes. If bad side effects can be reduced, a more aggressive therapy can be put into place. Cells contain many mechanisms that repair damage of various types. If the damage can not be repaired, cells will undergo apoptosis (cell death). Data will be reviewed that support the fact that a small dose of radiation will activate damage repair genes within a cell. Once the mechanisms are fully active, they will efficiently repair the severe damage from a much larger radiation dose. The data ranges from experiments on specific cell cultures using microarray (gene chip) techniques to experiments on complete organisms. The suggested effect and treatment is consistent with the assumption that all radiation is harmful, no matter how small the dose. Nevertheless, the harm can be reduced. These mechanisms need to be further studied and characterized. In particular, their time dependence needs to be understood before the proposed treatment can be optimized. Under certain situations it is also possible that the deleterious effects of chemotherapy can be mitigated and the damage to radiation workers can be reduced.

Blankenbecler, Richard

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

184

8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (ogg1) maintains the function of cardiac progenitor cells during heart formation in zebrafish  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Genomic damage may devastate the potential of progenitor cells and consequently impair early organogenesis. We found that ogg1, a key enzyme initiating the base-excision repair, was enriched in the embryonic heart in zebrafish. So far, little is known about DNA repair in cardiogenesis. Here, we addressed the critical role of ogg1 in cardiogenesis for the first time. ogg1 mainly expressed in the anterior lateral plate mesoderm (ALPM), the primary heart tube, and subsequently the embryonic myocardium by in situ hybridisation. Loss of ogg1 resulted in severe cardiac morphogenesis and functional abnormalities, including the short heart length, arrhythmia, decreased cardiomyocytes and nkx2.5{sup +} cardiac progenitor cells. Moreover, the increased apoptosis and repressed proliferation of progenitor cells caused by ogg1 deficiency might contribute to the heart phenotype. The microarray analysis showed that the expression of genes involved in embryonic heart tube morphogenesis and heart structure were significantly changed due to the lack of ogg1. Among those, foxh1 is an important partner of ogg1 in the cardiac development in response to DNA damage. Our work demonstrates the requirement of ogg1 in cardiac progenitors and heart development in zebrafish. These findings may be helpful for understanding the aetiology of congenital cardiac deficits. - Highlights: • A key DNA repair enzyme ogg1 is expressed in the embryonic heart in zebrafish. • We found that ogg1 is essential for normal cardiac morphogenesis in zebrafish. • The production of embryonic cardiomyocytes requires appropriate ogg1 expression. • Ogg1 critically regulated proliferation of cardiac progenitor cells in zebrafish. • foxh1 is a partner of ogg1 in the cardiac development in response to DNA damage.

Yan, Lifeng [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Institute of Toxicology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Zhou, Yong [Key Laboratory of Stem Cell Biology, Institute of Health Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Yu, Shanhe [Shanghai Institute of Hematology, RuiJin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Ji, Guixiang [Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences/Key Laboratory of Pesticide Environmental Assessment and Pollution Control, Ministry of Environmental Protection, Nanjing 210042 (China); Wang, Lei [Key Laboratory of Stem Cell Biology, Institute of Health Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Liu, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Institute of Toxicology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Gu, Aihua, E-mail: aihuagu@njmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Institute of Toxicology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Public Comment re NOI on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

ENERGYSOLUTIONS' Comment in Response to Notice of Inquiry, Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation -75 FR 43945

186

Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, Section 934  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

LES comments in response to Notice of Inquiry on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, Section 934

187

DNA Activity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DNA Activity DNA Activity Name: Sara Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Is DNA an anion or a cation? I thought since it was negatively charged it was an anion but mt teacher in class today said it was a cation because negatively charged molecules logically migrate to the positively charged plate of the cathode, ie molecules that migrate towards a cathode are cations. Where is the error in my logic or there error in my logic? Replies: DNA is negatively charged due to the phosphate ions present in the ribose-phosphate backbone. It moves towards the positive pole during electrophoresis. The definition kation/anion is confusing because: 1. a cation moves to the cathode 2. the cathode is negative, thus 3. a cation is positive DNA is an anion. The confusion is that a cathode is negative, but a cation is positively charged. For that reason these terms are not generally used in this context.

188

PML nuclear bodies: dynamic sensors of DNA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-a (RAR-a).(8­10) Nuclear domains containing PML are disrupted or dispersed in the lymphocytes of APLPML nuclear bodies: dynamic sensors of DNA damage and cellular stress Graham Dellaire and David P. Bazett-Jones* Summary Promyelocytic leukaemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs) are generally present in all

Dellaire, Graham

189

The Escherichia coli RhaS Transcriptional Activator: Transcriptional Activation by the DNA-Binding Domain, The Interdomain Effector Response, and Negative Autoregulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) in 100 µL of RNAP storage buffer (50 mM Tris-HCl, pH 8.0; 50% glycerol; 0.1 mM NaEDTA; 0.1 mM DTT; 50 mM NaCl) and incubating at 25°C for 10 minutes, then storing at –20°C. To prepare the transcription reaction, His6-RhaS-CTD and/or CRP was incubated... using a Cyclone Storage Phosphor System (PerkinElmer). The results shown are representative of three similar experiments. 16 RESULTS In vitro DNA binding by His6-RhaS-CTD and His6-RhaR-CTD. Specific residues in the C-terminal domains of Rha...

Skredenske, Jeffrey M.

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

“Contextual” Synthetic Lethality and/or Loss of Heterozygosity: Tumor Hypoxia and Modification of DNA Repair  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Break DNA Damage Signaling and Repair Dorine Rossetto 1 Andrew W...machineries for chromosomal DNA repair. Genes Dev 2004;18:602-16...Plummer R . Perspective on the pipeline of drugs being developed with...hypoxia and modification of DNA repair. Clin Cancer Res 2010;16...

Norman Chan and Robert G. Bristow

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Tracking down the links between charged particles and biological response: A UK perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The UK has a long history of radiobiology research into charged particles with interest likely to expand in the coming years following the recent government announcement of £250 million to build two proton beam therapy facilities in the UK. A brief overview of research and facilities past and present with respect to radiation protection and oncology along with biological consequences and underlying mechanisms will be presented and discussed. Increased knowledge of the mechanisms underpinning the radiation action on biological systems is important in understanding not only the risks associated with exposure but also in optimising radiotherapy treatment of cancer. Ionizing radiation is always in the form of structure tracks which are a unique characteristic of ionizing radiation alone producing damage grossly different and far more biologically effective than endogenous damage. The track structure is the prime determinant of biological response to DNA with charged particles of increasing LET leading to an increase in the frequency and complexity of clustered DNA damage. High-LET particles will also produce non-homogeneous dose distribution through a cell nucleus resulting in correlated DNA breaks along the path of the particle and an increase in the probability of complex chromosomal rearrangements. However it is now well established that there is variety of phenomena that do not conform to the conventional paradigm of targeted radiobiology but there is insufficient evidence to assess the implications of these non-targeted effects for radiotherapy or relevance to risk for human health.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Automated Image Processing for the Analysis of DNA Repair Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The efficient repair of cellular DNA is essential for the maintenance and inheritance of genomic information. In order to cope with the high frequency of spontaneous and induced DNA damage, a multitude of repair mechanisms have evolved. These are enabled by a wide range of protein factors specifically recognizing different types of lesions and finally restoring the normal DNA sequence. This work focuses on the repair factor XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C), which identifies bulky DNA lesions and initiates their removal via the nucleotide excision repair pathway. The binding of XPC to damaged DNA can be visualized in living cells by following the accumulation of a fluorescent XPC fusion at lesions induced by laser microirradiation in a fluorescence microscope. In this work, an automated image processing pipeline is presented which allows to identify and quantify the accumulation reaction without any user interaction. The image processing pipeline comprises a preprocessing stage where the ima...

Riess, Thorsten; Tomas, Martin; Ferrando-May, Elisa; Merhof, Dorit

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Microfluidic DNA sample preparation method and device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Manipulation of DNA molecules in solution has become an essential aspect of genetic analyses used for biomedical assays, the identification of hazardous bacterial agents, and in decoding the human genome. Currently, most of the steps involved in preparing a DNA sample for analysis are performed manually and are time, labor, and equipment intensive. These steps include extraction of the DNA from spores or cells, separation of the DNA from other particles and molecules in the solution (e.g. dust, smoke, cell/spore debris, and proteins), and separation of the DNA itself into strands of specific lengths. Dielectrophoresis (DEP), a phenomenon whereby polarizable particles move in response to a gradient in electric field, can be used to manipulate and separate DNA in an automated fashion, considerably reducing the time and expense involved in DNA analyses, as well as allowing for the miniaturization of DNA analysis instruments. These applications include direct transport of DNA, trapping of DNA to allow for its separation from other particles or molecules in the solution, and the separation of DNA into strands of varying lengths.

Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Miles, Robin R. (Danville, CA); Wang, Xiao-Bo (San Diego, CA); Mariella, Raymond P. (Danville, CA); Gascoyne, Peter R. C. (Bellaire, TX); Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Radiation and viral DNA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiation and viral DNA Radiation and viral DNA Name: Loretta L Lamb Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Can viral DNA be changed through exposure to radiation? If so, what type of radiation will do this? Can these irradiated viruses cause changes in the genome of any human cells they may infect? Can these (or any) viruses actually cause cancer, or do they merely act as triggering devices for cancer? Replies: In theory, any nucleic acid (viral or otherwise) can be changed by exposure to many kinds of radiation. Depending on the type of virus, these may then change the human cells that they infect. Although there are many different things that are being implicated in causing cancers, it looks like a fairly common model involves the sequential "knockout" of several human genes. Viruses may be one cause of such gene changes, radiation and other environmental causes may also contribute. Some of these changes may be inherited through families, so it becomes more likely that the environmental factors may happen to "hit" the right places in cells to cause cancers in these families. If you ask something more specific, perhaps I can focus my response a bit more

195

Diphenylarsinic acid, a chemical warfare-related neurotoxicant, promotes liver carcinogenesis via activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling and consequent induction of oxidative DAN damage in rats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA), a chemical warfare-related neurotoxic organic arsenical, is present in the groundwater and soil in some regions of Japan due to illegal dumping after World War II. Inorganic arsenic is carcinogenic in humans and its organic arsenic metabolites are carcinogenic in animal studies, raising serious concerns about the carcinogenicity of DPAA. However, the carcinogenic potential of DPAA has not yet been evaluated. In the present study we found that DPAA significantly enhanced the development of diethylnitrosamine-induced preneoplastic lesions in the liver in a medium-term rat liver carcinogenesis assay. Evaluation of the expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in the liver revealed that DPAA induced the expression of CYP1B1, but not any other CYP1, CYP2, or CYP3 enzymes, suggesting that CYP1B1 might be the enzyme responsible for the metabolic activation of DPAA. We also found increased oxidative DNA damage, possibly due to elevated CYP1B1 expression. Induction of CYP1B1 has generally been linked with the activation of AhR, and we found that DPAA activates the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Importantly, the promotion effect of DPAA was observed only at a dose that activated the AhR, suggesting that activation of AhR and consequent induction of AhR target genes and oxidative DNA damage plays a vital role in the promotion effects of DPAA. The present study provides, for the first time, evidence regarding the carcinogenicity of DPAA and indicates the necessity of comprehensive evaluation of its carcinogenic potential using long-term carcinogenicity studies. - Highlights: • DPAA, an environmental neurotoxicant, promotes liver carcinogenesis in rats. • DPAA is an activator of AhR signaling pathway. • DPAA promoted oxidative DNA damage in rat livers. • AhR target gene CYP 1B1 might be involved in the metabolism of DPAA.

Wei, Min; Yamada, Takanori; Yamano, Shotaro; Kato, Minoru; Kakehashi, Anna; Fujioka, Masaki; Tago, Yoshiyuki; Kitano, Mistuaki; Wanibuchi, Hideki, E-mail: wani@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Northwestern University Recombinant DNA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

natural or synthetic DNA segments to DNA molecules that can replicate in a living cell · molecules that result from the replication of those described above Synthetic DNA segments which are likely to yield) are considered as equivalent to their natural DNA counterpart. If the synthetic DNA segment is not expressed

Shull, Kenneth R.

197

Synthesis of DNA  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of synthesizing a desired double-stranded DNA of a predetermined length and of a predetermined sequence. Preselected sequence segments that will complete the desired double-stranded DNA are determined. Preselected segment sequences of DNA that will be used to complete the desired double-stranded DNA are provided. The preselected segment sequences of DNA are assembled to produce the desired double-stranded DNA.

Mariella, Jr., Raymond P. (Danville, CA)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

198

Mechanisms that prevent DNA re-replication in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Every time a cell divides it must faithfully duplicate its genome before the cell divides. If replication initiates a second time (re-replication) before cytokinesis, cells can accumulate extensive DNA damage, which results ...

Tanny, Robyn E

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Use of recombinant DNA (rDNA) and Biohazardous Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

constructed outside living cells by joining natural or synthetic DNA segments to DNA molecules that can

Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

200

Asiakastyytyväisyystutkimus - DNA Kauppa Lappeenranta.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Opinnäytetyön aiheena oli DNA Kauppa Lappeenrannan asiakastyytyväisyyden tutkiminen. Tutkimuksen ensisijaisena tavoitteena oli selvittää, kuinka tyytyväisiä asiakkaat olivat olleet DNA Kauppa Lappeenrannan ja asiakkaan väliseen kontaktipintaan… (more)

Pitkänen, Jesse

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dna damage response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Collision damage of jack-ups  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

North Sea collision accident records covering a period of ten years indicate that the risk of collisions involving jack-ups is not dissimilar to that for semi-submersibles or fixed jacket structures. However, jack-ups are much more flexible than jackets and have a much lower degree of redundancy. Their response to collisions and their ability to absorb impact energy is, therefore, expected to be considerably different in comparison to jackets. This paper examines available data and information regarding the capability of jack-ups to withstand collision impacts and investigates the level of local damage that can potentially be caused to jack-up legs due to accidental collisions.

Charles P. Ellinas; Raymond Kwok; Kevin A.J. Williams

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Shock induced multi-mode damage in depleted uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent dynamic damage studies on depleted uranium samples have revealed mixed mode failure mechanisms leading to incipient cracking as well as ductile failure processes. Results show that delamination of inclusions upon compression may provide nucleation sites for damage initiation in the form of crack tip production. However, under tension the material propagates cracks in a mixed shear localization and mode-I ductile tearing and cracking. Cracks tips appear to link up through regions of severe, shear dominated plastic flow. Shock recovery experiments were conducted on a 50 mm single stage light gas gun. Serial metallographic sectioning was conducted on the recovered samples to characterize the bulk response of the sample. Experiments show delaminated inclusions due to uniaxial compression without damage propagation. Further results show the propagation of the damage through tensile loading to the incipient state, illustrating ductile processes coupled with mixed mode-I tensile ductile tearing, shear localization, and mode-I cracking in depleted uranium.

Koller, Darcie D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cerreta, Ellen K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gray, Ill, George T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase (Tdp1) participates in the repair of Top2-mediated DNA damage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2730 – 2740 . 34 Takashima H. Boerkoel C. F. John J. Saifi G. M. Salih M. A. Armstrong D. Mao Y. Quiocho F. A. Roa...2002 ) Nat. Genet. 32 : 267 – 272 . 35 El-Khamisy S. F. Saifi G. M. Weinfeld M. Johansson F. Helleday T. Lupski J. R...

Karin C. Nitiss; Mobeen Malik; Xiaoping He; Stephen W. White; John L. Nitiss

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Enhanced Toll-like receptor responses in the absence of signaling adaptor DAP12.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of LPS, CpG DNA, synthetic bacterial lipopeptide or zymosanin response to LPS, CpG DNA, and synthetic lipopeptide (Fig.of LPS, CpG DNA, or synthetic bacterial lipopeptide for 16

Hamerman, Jessica A; Tchao, Nadia K; Lowell, Clifford A; Lanier, Lewis L

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

BDS thin film damage competition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laser damage competition was held at the 2008 Boulder Damage Symposium in order to determine the current status of thin film laser resistance within the private, academic, and government sectors. This damage competition allows a direct comparison of the current state-of-the-art of high laser resistance coatings since they are all tested using the same damage test setup and the same protocol. A normal incidence high reflector multilayer coating was selected at a wavelength of 1064 nm. The substrates were provided by the submitters. A double blind test assured sample and submitter anonymity so only a summary of the results are presented here. In addition to the laser resistance results, details of deposition processes, coating materials, and layer count will also be shared.

Stolz, C J; Thomas, M D; Griffin, A J

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

206

DNA Nanotechnology- Architechtures Designed with DNA.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??As the genetic information storage vehicle, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules are essential to all known living organisms and many viruses. It is amazing that such… (more)

Han, Dongran

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

A Protein that Repairs Damage to Cancer Cells | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An X-ray Vortex on the Horizon? An X-ray Vortex on the Horizon? How Two Drops Become One Scientists Discover How Nanocluster Contaminants Increase Risk of Spreading Mobile RNA is Poised and Ready Glass Does a Double-Take Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed A Protein that Repairs Damage to Cancer Cells MAY 5, 2008 Bookmark and Share The ABH2-DNA complex. A team of University of Chicago scientists has shown how two proteins locate and repair damaged genetic material inside cells. Because one of the proteins detects and repairs DNA damage that may result from a certain type of cancer therapy, the researchers raised the possibility of designing a molecule that could interfere with the repair process, making cancer

208

Molecular dissection of the roles of the SOD genes in mammalian response to low dose irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been long recognized that a significant fraction of the radiation-induced genetic damage to cells are caused by secondary oxidative species. Internal cellular defense systems against oxidative stress play significant roles in countering genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. The role of the detoxifying enzymes may be even more prominent in the case of low-dose, low-LET irradiation, as the majority of genetic damage may be caused by secondary oxidative species. In this study we have attempted to decipher the roles of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) genes, which are responsible for detoxifying the superoxide anions. We used adenovirus vectors to deliver RNA interference (RNAi or siRNA) technology to down-regulate the expression levels of the SOD genes. We have also over-expressed the SOD genes by use of recombinant adenovirus vectors. Cells infected with the vectors were then subjected to low dose ?-irradiation. Total RNA were extracted from the exposed cells and the expression of 9000 genes were profiled by use of cDNA microarrays. The result showed that low dose radiation had clear effects on gene expression in HCT116 cells. Both over-expression and down-regulation of the SOD1 gene can change the expression profiles of sub-groups of genes. Close to 200 of the 9000 genes examined showed over two-fold difference in expression under various conditions. Genes with changed expression pattern belong to many categories that include: early growth response, DNA-repair, ion transport, apoptosis, and cytokine response.

Eric Y. Chuang

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

209

Radiation damage to scintillator in the D0 luminosity monitor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the result of evaluating radiation damage to Bicron BC408 plastic scintillator used in the D0 Luminosity Monitor during Run IIa. The Luminosity Monitor provides pseudo-rapidity coverage over the range 2.7 < |{eta}| < 4.4, with the radiation dose in Run IIa estimated to be 0.5 MRad for the region closest to the beams. We find the light yield is degraded by 10-15% due to radiation damage by comparing new and old scintillator in four observables: (1) visual inspection, (2) optical transmittance, (3) response to the radioactive source of {sup 90}Sr and (4) light yield for cosmic rays.

Casey, Brendan; DeVaughan, Kayle; /Brown U. /Nebraska U.; Enari, Yuji; Partridge, Richard; /Brown U.; Yacoob, Sahal; /Northwestern U.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Fanconi Anemia FANCG Protein in Mitigating Radiation- and Enzyme-Induced DNA Double-Strand Breaks by Homologous Recombination in Vertebrate Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Protein in Mitigating Radiation- and Enzyme-Induced...Okayama 701-0192, Japan. Phone: 81-86-462-1111...exhibit increased MMC and radiation-induced chromosome...Okayama 701-0192, Japan. | Journal Article...pharmacology DNA drug effects radiation effects DNA Damage DNA...

Kazuhiko Yamamoto; Masamichi Ishiai; Nobuko Matsushita; Hiroshi Arakawa; Jane E. Lamerdin; Jean-Marie Buerstedde; Mitsune Tanimoto; Mine Harada; Larry H. Thompson; Minoru Takata

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

The Application of Flow Cytometry to Examine Damage Clearance in Stem Cells From Whole-Body Irradiated Mice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bone marrow contains many types of cells. Approximately 1-2% of these cells are critical for life, these are the so-called ‘bone marrow stem cells’ which divide indefinitely to produce platelets, red blood cells and white blood cells. Death of the bone marrow stem cells results in a diminished ability of the organism to make new blood cell components and can be fatal without medical intervention, such as a bone marrow transplant. Bone marrow stem cells are considered to be particularly sensitive to radiation injury. Therefore, it is important to understand how these cells response to total body radiation exposure and how these cells can be protected from radiation damage. The aim of this project was to determine if these critical cells in the bone marrow are susceptible to short-term and long-term injury after a whole-body exposure to a sub-lethal low dose of ionizing radiation. The overall aims were to determine if the extent of injury produced by the sub-lethal radiation exposure would be cleared from the stem cells and therefore present no long- term genetic risk to the organism, or if the radiation injury persisted and had an adverse long-term consequences for the cell genome. This research question is of interest in order to define the risks to exposed persons after occupational, accidental or terrorism-related sub-lethal low-dose radiation exposures. The novel aspect of this project was the methodology used to obtain the bone marrow stem cell-like cells and examining the outcomes of sub-lethal low-dose radiation in a mammalian animal model. Four radiation treatments were used: single treatments of 0.01Gy, 0.1 Gy, 1 Gy and ten treatments of 0.1 Gy given over 10 days. Bone marrow stem cell-like cells were then harvested 6 hours, 24 hours and 24 days later. The levels of radiation-induced cell death, damage to DNA and permanent changes to cellular DNA were measured in the isolated stem cell-like cells after each radiation treatment and time point and then the results were compared. As expected, the largest radiation dose produced the greatest level of damage but a linear relationship did not exist between cellular effects and radiation dose. The low dose exposures appeared to be more efficient at producing damage than the highest dose when normalized for the initial extent of damage. Additionally, immune stimulation given prior to radiation exposure appeared to protect the critical bone marrow stem cell population from radiation injury. The data suggest that the response of bone marrow stem-cell like cells to radiation injury is dependent on the extent of the initial levels of damage and the effects of total-body low-dose exposures can not be predicted by extrapolating from high dose exposures. This research has provided new information about the radiation sensitivity of bone marrow stem cell-like cells following total-body exposures, and suggests that these critical cells might be more sensitive to radiation than more mature cells in the bone marrow. Further work is need with intermediate radiation doses to confirm this conclusion.

Marples, Brian; Kovalchuk, Olga; McGonagle, Michele; Martinez, Alvaro; Wilson, George, D.

2010-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

212

Prediction of Damage in Randomly Oriented Short-Fibre Composites by means of A Mechanistic Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A micro-macro mechanistic approach to damage in short-fiber composites is developed in this paper. At the micro-scale, the damage mechanisms such as matrix cracking, fiber/matrix debonding are analyzed to define the associated damage variables. The stiffness reduction law dependent on these variables is then established using micromechanical models and average orientation distributions of fibers and microcracks. The macroscopic response is obtained by means of thermodynamics of continuous media, continuum damage mechanics and a finite element formulation.

Nguyen, Ba NGHIEP; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Cellular response to low dose radiation: Role of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is increasingly realized that human exposure either to an acute low dose or multiple chronic low doses of low LET radiation has the potential to cause different types of cancer. Therefore, the central theme of research for DOE and NASA is focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms and pathways responsible for the cellular response to low dose radiation which would not only improve the accuracy of estimating health risks but also help in the development of predictive assays for low dose radiation risks associated with tissue degeneration and cancer. The working hypothesis for this proposal is that the cellular mechanisms in terms of DNA damage signaling, repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation are different for low and high doses of low LET radiation and that the mode of action of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases (PIKK: ATM, ATR and DNA-PK) determines the dose dependent cellular responses. The hypothesis will be tested at two levels: (I) Evaluation of the role of ATM, ATR and DNA-PK in cellular response to low and high doses of low LET radiation in simple in vitro human cell systems and (II) Determination of radiation responses in complex cell microenvironments such as human EpiDerm tissue constructs. Cellular responses to low and high doses of low LET radiation will be assessed from the view points of DNA damage signaling, DNA double strand break repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation by analyzing the activities (i.e. post-translational modifications and kinetics of protein-protein interactions) of the key target proteins for PI-3 kinase like kinases both at the intra-cellular and molecular levels. The proteins chosen for this proposal are placed under three categories: (I) sensors/initiators include ATM ser1981, ATR, 53BP1, gamma-H2AX, MDC1, MRE11, Rad50 and Nbs1; (II) signal transducers include Chk1, Chk2, FANCD2 and SMC1; and (III) effectors include p53, CDC25A and CDC25C. The primary goal of this proposal is to elucidate the differences in cellular defense mechanisms between low and high doses of low LET radiation and to define the radiation doses where the cellular DNA damage signaling and repair mechanisms tend to shift. This information is critically important to address and advance some of the low dose research program objectives of DOE. The results of this proposed study will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms for the cellular responses to low and high doses of low LET radiation. Further, systematic analysis of the role of PIKK signaling pathways as a function of radiation dose in tissue microenvironment will provide useful mechanistic information for improving the accuracy of radiation risk assessment for low doses. Knowledge of radiation responses in tissue microenvironment is important for the accurate prediction of ionizing radiation risks associated with cancer and tissue degeneration in humans.

Balajee, A.S.; Meador, J.A.; Su, Y.

2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

214

Analysis of heat-labile sites generated by reactions of depleted uranium and ascorbate in plasmid DNA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The goal of this study was to characterize how depleted uranium (DU) causes DNA damage. Procedures were ... Radical scavengers did not affect the formation of uranium-induced SSB, suggesting that SSB arose from.....

Janice Wilson; Ashley Young…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Automating DNA processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center are exploring the potential of sequencing by hybridization (3). They are developing electronically addressable fixtures to contain immobilized synthetic DNA probes that can bind to target DNA samples. They call these microfabricated devices... Center are exploring the potential of sequencing by hybridization (3). They are developing electronically addressable fixtures to contain immobilized synthetic DNA probes that can bind to target DNA samples. They call these microfabricated devices...

Wienen, Michael Jan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

216

Covalently Linked DNA Nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SEM analyses of the nanotubes generated according to Scheme 2 further support the suggested folding of the 2D cross-linked DNA array into the nanotube structure. ... Here, we report a modular approach to DNA nanotube synthesis that provides access to geometrically well-defined triangular and square-shaped DNA nanotubes. ... and assembly of carbon nanotubes, and in nanotube-based DNA sensing and sepns. ...

Ofer I. Wilner; Anja Henning; Bella Shlyahovsky; Itamar Willner

2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

217

DNA nanotechnology: a future perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The rise of DNA-based nanobiotechnology has led to an increase in demand for synthetic DNA. DNA can be synthesized from nucleotides into ... technology has been the significant error rate of synthetic DNA sequenc...

Muniza Zahid; Byeonghoon Kim; Rafaqat Hussain; Rashid Amin…

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

A flexible pavement damage metric for a straight truck  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pavement damage attributed to heavy truck traffic is related to many road- and vehicle-related factors in a complex manner. A better estimation of pavement damage potential of heavy trucks is vital for management of roads and for determination of costs associated with the particular types of truck. In this paper, a metric based upon the energy stored within the pavement during a vehicle pass is proposed to assess pavement damage potential of trucks as a function of pavement responses to tyre loads, including both the normal and shear forces. The proposed metric effectively accounts for rate of loading, vehicle acceleration and deceleration and the pavement temperature. The simulation results suggest that the proposed metric could be effectively applied for road pricing purposes.

J.A. Romero; A.A. Lozano-Guzmán; E. Betanzo-Quezada; S.A. Obregón-Biosca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Natural DNA sequencing by synthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

labeling of a synthetic DNA template. By combining the bestpolyadenylation of a 100-base synthetic DNA template (nSBST)

Roller, Eric E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Damage detection in initially nonlinear systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is to detect structural anomalies before they reach a critical level. Because of the potential life-safety and economic benefits, SHM has been widely studied over the past decade. In recent years there has been an effort to provide solid mathematical and physical underpinnings for these methods; however, most focus on systems that behave linearly in their undamaged state - a condition that often does not hold in complex 'real world' systems and systems for which monitoring begins mid-lifecycle. In this work, we highlight the inadequacy of linear-based methodology in handling initially nonlinear systems. We then show how the recently developed autoregressive support vector machine (AR-SVM) approach to time series modeling can be used for detecting damage in a system that exhibits initially nonlinear response. This process is applied to data acquired from a structure with induced nonlinearity tested in a laboratory environment.

Bornn, Luke [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dna damage response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

DNA Sequencing apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An automated DNA sequencing apparatus having a reactor for providing at least two series of DNA products formed from a single primer and a DNA strand, each DNA product of a series differing in molecular weight and having a chain terminating agent at one end; separating means for separating the DNA products to form a series bands, the intensity of substantially all nearby bands in a different series being different, band reading means for determining the position an This invention was made with government support including a grant from the U.S. Public Health Service, contract number AI-06045. The U.S. government has certain rights in the invention.

Tabor, Stanley (Cambridge, MA); Richardson, Charles C. (Chestnut Hill, MA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Retrieval of DNA using soft-landing after mass analysis by ESI-FTICR for enzymatic manipulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DNA modifications that lead to mutations are of direct interest for, e.g. the understanding of DNA damage recognition and repair. The characterization of the modified oligonucleotides and enzymatic responses to specific DNA modifications are of primary concern, but also present major analytical challenges. Among the available techniques, mass spectrometry has become an increasingly important tool for the study of oligonucleotides, their mutations, and interactions. Conventionally, mass spectrometry provides mass and structural information (e.g. from dissociation experiments and the use of tandem mass spectrometry). However, the small quantities of material analyzed and the destructive nature of conventional mass spectrometric detection (e.g., due to high energy impact on particle multiplier surfaces) have precluded subsequent use of mass separated biopolymers. The authors report the use of mass spectrometry in conjunction with soft-landing for the high-resolution analysis, separation, and selective collection of oligonucleotides, and their subsequent retrieval for enzymatic manipulation. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry coupled with electrospray ionization (ESI-FTICR) allows nondestructive (i.e., image current) measurement of the mass-to-charge ratios (m/z) of ions with high sensitivity, resolution, and mass accuracy.

Feng, B.; Wunschel, D.S.; Masselon, C.D.; Pasa-Tolic, L.; Smith, R.D.

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

223

Acute sun damage and photoprotective responses in whales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...La Paz, BCS C.P. 23000, Mexico 4 Centre for Cutaneous Research...Queretaro, , 76230, Queretaro, Mexico Rising levels of ultraviolet...worldwide mounting levels of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR...in the Gulf of California (Mexico) between January and June...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Keeping track of the damage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

News Archives: News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed Keeping track of the damage Scientists resolve long-standing mystery of ion-solid interactions Reprinted with kind permission from ScienceWise - Science Magazine of the Australian National University JANUARY 27, 2009 Bookmark and Share Dr. Patrick Kluth and Claudia Schnohr. Silica (silicon dioxide) is the most abundant mineral in the earth's crust and consequently is a core component in many rocks. It's quite common for such rocks to also contain natural traces of materials like uranium that undergo slow radioactive decay. This radioactivity produces energetic particles that smash through the surrounding silica creating tracks of localized damage in their wake.

225

Meta-DNA: synthetic biology via DNA nanostructures and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meta-DNA: synthetic biology via DNA nanostructures and hybridization reactions Harish Chandran1 strands and may be modified to allow for mutations. Keywords: DNA self-assembly; synthetic biology; DNA nanostructures 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1. Synthetic biology using DNA nanosystems A major goal of synthetic biology

Reif, John H.

226

Laser-Induced Damage in DKDP Crystals under Simultaneous Exposure to Laser Harmonics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While KDP and DKDP crystals remain the only viable solution for frequency conversion in large aperture laser systems in the foreseeable future, our understanding of damage behavior in the presence of multiple colors is very limited. Such conditions exist during normal operation where, for third harmonic generation, 1{omega}, 2{omega} and 3{omega} components are present with different energy ratios as they propagate inside the crystal. The objective of this work is to shed light into the damage behavior of frequency conversion crystals during operational conditions as well as probe the fundamental mechanisms of damage initiation. We have performed a series of experiments to quantify the damage performance of pristine (unconditioned) DKDP material under simultaneous exposure to 2{omega} and 3{omega} laser pulses from a 3-ns Nd:YAG laser system as a function of the laser influences at each frequency. Results show that simultaneous dual wavelength exposure leads to a much larger damage density as compared to the total damage resulting from separate exposure at each wavelength. Furthermore, under such excitation conditions, the damage performance is directly related to and can be predicted from the damage behavior of the crystal at each wavelength separately while the mechanism and type of defects responsible for damage initiation are shown to be the same at both 2{omega} and 3{omega} excitation.

Negres, R A; DeMange, P; Radousky, H B; Demos, S G

2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

227

Cytokine secretion profiles in primary cultured cells and in mice stimulated with plasmid DNA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CpG motif5?- Pur Pur CG Pyr Pyr -3? Danger signal Naked CpG DNA DNA lipoplex Macrophages or dendritic cells ???? ???? Cytokine geneNF-?B AP-1 ???? ???? Endosome Nucleus ? TLR9 Interferon ?/? gene Inflammatory cytokines TNF-?, IL-6 etc. Type I... interferon IFN-?, INF-? ? Mechanisms of immune response induced by naked CpG DNA or DNA/cationic liposome complex (lipoplex) CpG motif recognition by Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) Significance of the immune response to DNA Apoptotic ornecrotic cells...

Yoshida, Hiroyuki

2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

228

DNA-incorporating nanomaterials in biotechnological applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recently developed ability to controllably connect biological and inorganic objects on a molecular scale opens a new page in biomimetic methods with potential applications in biodetection, tissue engineering, targeted therapeutics and drug/gene delivery. Particularly in the biodetection arena, a rapid development of new platforms has largely been stimulated by a spectrum of novel nanomaterials with physical properties that offer efficient, sensitive and inexpensive molecular sensing. Recently, DNA-functionalized nano-objects have emerged as a new class of nanomaterials that can be controllably assembled in predesigned structures. Such DNA-based nanoscale structures might provide a new detection paradigm due to their regulated optical, electrical and magnetic responses, chemical heterogeneity and high local biomolecular concentration. The specific biorecognition DNA and its physical-chemical characteristics allows for an exploitation of DNA-functionalized nanomaterials for sensing of nucleic acids, while a broad tunability of DNA interactions permits extending their use for detection of proteins, small molecules and ions. We discuss the progress that was achieved in the last decade in the exploration of new detection methods based on DNA-incorporating nanomaterials as well as their applications to gene delivery. The comparison between various detection platforms, their sensitivity and selectivity, and specific applications are reviewed.

Stadler, A.; van der Lelie, D.; Chi, C.; Gang, O.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Focused ion beam damage to MOS integrated circuits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercial focused ion beam (FIB) systems are commonly used to image integrated circuits (ICS) after device processing, especially in failure analysis applications. FIB systems are also often employed to repair faults in metal lines for otherwise functioning ICS, and are being evaluated for applications in film deposition and nanofabrication. A problem that is often seen in FIB imaging and repair is that ICS can be damaged during the exposure process. This can result in degraded response or out-right circuit failure. Because FIB processes typically require the surface of an IC to be exposed to an intense beam of 30--50 keV Ga{sup +} ions, both charging and secondary radiation damage are potential concerns. In previous studies, both types of effects have been suggested as possible causes of device degradation, depending on the type of device examined and/or the bias conditions. Understanding the causes of this damage is important for ICS that are imaged or repaired by a FIB between manufacture and operation, since the performance and reliability of a given IC is otherwise at risk in subsequent system application. In this summary, the authors discuss the relative roles of radiation damage and charging effects during FIB imaging. Data from exposures of packaged parts under controlled bias indicate the possibility for secondary radiation damage during FIB exposure. On the other hand, FIB exposure of unbiased wafers (a more common application) typically results in damage caused by high-voltage stress or electrostatic discharge. Implications for FIB exposure and subsequent IC use are discussed.

FLEETWOOD,D.M.; CAMPBELL,ANN N.; HEMBREE,CHARLES E.; TANGYUNYONG,PAIBOON; JESSING,JEFFREY R.; SODEN,JERRY M.

2000-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

230

Competition between mesoplasticity and damage under HCF Elasticity/damage shakedown concept  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

during all the sample lifetime of the plasticity and damage effects. The plasticity mechanisms induce in the framework of the continuum damage mechanics, according to the identified physical mechanisms during, the damage growth arrest. Keywords High cycle fatigue; Multiaxial loading; Continuum damage mechanics

Boyer, Edmond

231

Controlling DNA Methylation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Controlling DNA Methylation Though life on earth is composed of a diverse range of organisms, some with many different types of tissues and cells, all these are encoded by a molecule we call DNA. The information required to build a protein is stored in DNA within the cells. Not all the message in the DNA is used in each cell and not all the message is used all the time. During cell differentiation, the cells become dedicated for their specific function which involves selectively activating some genes and repressing others. Gene regulation is an important event in the developmental biology and the biology of various diseases, but a more complex process. Controlling DNA Methylation Though life on earth is composed of a diverse range of organisms, some with many different types of tissues and cells, all these are encoded by a molecule we call DNA. The information required to build a protein is stored in DNA within the cells. Not all the message in the DNA is used in each cell and not all the message is used all the time. During cell differentiation, the cells become dedicated for their specific function which involves selectively activating some genes and repressing others. Gene regulation is an important event in the developmental biology and the biology of various diseases, but a more complex process. In the bacteria there are distinct enzymes while one is capable of cleaving DNA, the other protects DNA by modification. The complementary function provided by the set of enzymes offers a defense mechanism against the phage infection and DNA invasion. The incoming DNA is cleaved sequence specifically by the class of enzymes called restriction endonuclease (REase). The host DNA is protected by the sequence specific action of matching set of enzymes called the DNA methyltransferase (MTase). The control of the relative activities of the REase and MTase is critical because a reduced ratio of MTase/REase activity would lead to cell death via autorestriction. However too high a ratio would fail to provide protection against invading viral DNA. In addition a separate group of proteins capable of controlling R-M proteins have been identified in various restriction-modification (R-M) systems which are called C proteins (Roberts et al., 2003).

232

DNA's Role with Proteins  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DNA's Role with Proteins DNA's Role with Proteins Name: Hans Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Is it sure that the most important information of living cells is stored in the DNA? DNA seems to be nothing more than an inventory of useful proteins and a tool to create those proteins. Could it be that more important operational know how of how these proteins interact to build a living organism is actually located in the rest of the cell? So that the rest of the cell is the most important inheritance, whereas DNA merely takes care of the genetic variation? Replies: DNA is the entire library of protein information for an organism. All seven types of protein. It is true that in developmental stages of an organism that the presence and absences of certain proteins and other chemicals generated by proteins will influence what the DNA in a "particular" cell will express. Hence, you can start out with one cell and end up with a complex organism. You may have heard some of this information with the cloning activities that have been going on lately. All the inheritance comes from the DNA, but what parts of the DNA expression may be dictated by the cells special characteristics developed upon specializing. In that way the liver cells will only do "liver" things and the kidney cells will only do "kidney" things, BUT they use the same DNA information to operate, just a different portion of the same DNA that pertains to their particular "job". If you can convince a cell that it does not have a special job anymore, then you can develop the entire organism from this cell with the right signals; this is what cloning techniques have done!

233

An Automated Method to Quantify Radiation Damage in Human Blood Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cytogenetic analysis of blood lymphocytes is a well established method to assess the absorbed dose in persons exposed to ionizing radiation. Because mature lymphocytes circulate throughout the body, the dose to these cells is believed to represent the average whole body exposure. Cytogenetic methods measure the incidence of structural aberrations in chromosomes as a means to quantify DNA damage which occurs when ionizing radiation interacts with human tissue. Methods to quantify DNA damage at the chromosomal level vary in complexity and tend to be laborious and time consuming. In a mass casualty scenario involving radiological/nuclear materials, the ability to rapidly triage individuals according to radiation dose is critically important. For high-throughput screening for dicentric chromosomes, many of the data collection steps can be optimized with motorized microscopes coupled to automated slide scanning platforms.

Gordon K. Livingston, Mark S. Jenkins and Akio A. Awa

2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

234

Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack.

Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack. 8 figs.

Weiss, J.D.

1995-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

236

DNA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DNA DNA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Casual Use Determination of NEPA Adequacy Categorical Exclusion Environmental Assessment Environmental Impact Statements Print PDF NEPA-Related Analysis: Determination of NEPA Adequacy (DNA) General Document Collections (28) Documents Regulatory Roadmap NEPA-Related Analysis: Determination of NEPA Adequacy and Land Use Plan Conformance (DNA) placeholder. This query has been included to allow you to use the black arrows in the table header cells to sort the table data. Document # Serial Number Applicant Lead Agency District Office Field Office Development Phase(s) Techniques DOI-BLM-NM-L000-2012-0020-DNA Lightning Dock Geothermal Inc BLM BLM Las Cruces District Office BLM Geothermal/Exploration

237

Cell damage seen from Chernobyl  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 30 kilometer radius forbidden zone around the Chernobyl atomic plant serves as a sobering reminder of the world's worst nuclear accident. But for former Soviet biologists, it's also a unique natural laboratory. And one scientist, Nadejda Gulaya of Kiev's Pallaguine Institute of Biochemistry, has been doing studies that she claims offer surprising evidence of Chernobyl's after-effects. Prolonged exposure to radioactive fallout from the 1986 accident, she says, has caused damage to cell membranes in both animals and humans. For the past year, Gulaya has been comparing tissues from animals such as mink, pigs, and rodents inhabiting the Chernobyl area with those from other parts of Ukraine. Her conclusion: Exposure to radiation has, in many cases, caused alterations to membrane phospholipids. These changes, are similar to those that disrupt cellular metabolism following exposure to oxidizing free radicals. Gulaya also has preliminary data from human studies. She claims to have found similar alterations in the neurons of people who have died since being exposed to Chernobyl radiation. That leads her to speculate that the frequent psychiatric disorders may not just be from mental stress or radiophobia, but might reflect actual damage to the central nervous system.

Not Available

1992-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

238

ANALYTICAL NEUTRONIC STUDIES CORRELATING FAST NEUTRON FLUENCE TO MATERIAL DAMAGE IN CARBON, SILICON, AND SILICON CARBIDE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluates how fast neutron fluence >0.1 MeV correlates to material damage (i.e., the total fluence spectrum folded with the respective material’s displacements-per- atom [dpa] damage response function) for the specific material fluence spectra encountered in Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) service and the irradiation tests conducted in material test reactors (MTRs) for the fuel materials addressed in the white paper. It also reports how the evaluated correlations of >0.1 MeV fluence to material damage vary between the different spectral conditions encountered in material service versus testing.

Jim Sterbentz

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Determination of laser damage initiation probability and growth on fused silica scratches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current methods for the manufacture of optical components inevitably leaves a variety of sub-surface imperfections including scratches of varying lengths and widths on even the finest finishes. It has recently been determined that these finishing imperfections are responsible for the majority of laser-induced damage for fluences typically used in ICF class lasers. We have developed methods of engineering subscale parts with a distribution of scratches mimicking those found on full scale fused silica parts. This much higher density of scratches provides a platform to measure low damage initiation probabilities sufficient to describe damage on large scale optics. In this work, damage probability per unit scratch length was characterized as a function of initial scratch width and post fabrication processing including acid-based etch mitigation processes. The susceptibility of damage initiation density along scratches was found to be strongly affected by the post etching material removal and initial scratch width. We have developed an automated processing procedure to document the damage initiations per width and per length of theses scratches. We show here how these tools can be employed to provide predictions of the performance of full size optics in laser systems operating at 351 nm. In addition we use these tools to measure the growth rate of a damage site initiated along a scratch and compare this to the growth measured on an isolated damage site.

Norton, M A; Carr, C W; Cross, D A; Negres, R A; Bude, J D; Steele, W A; Monticelli, M V; Suratwala, T I

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

240

Supramolecular DNA nanotechnology : discrete nanoparticle organization, three-dimensional DNA construction, and molecule templated DNA assembly.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The field of structural DNA nanotechnology utilizes DNA's powerful base-pairing molecular recognition criteria to help solve real challenges facing researchers in material science and nanotechnology,… (more)

Aldaye, Faisal A., 1979-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dna damage response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Corrosion-induced damage raises serious implications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most difficult and often underestimated aspects of pipeline rehabilitation is the assessment of corrosion-induced damage. This question involves evaluation of damage from prior service as well as consideration of conditions which may pose additional time-dependent degradation which could affect the future serviceability of the pipeline. The present study examines the assessment of pipeline damage and rehabilitation requirements through knowledge of materials of construction, operating conditions, field inspection and service records.

Kane, R.D.; Cayard, M.S. [CLI International, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Structure of the Full-Length Human RPA14/32 Complex Gives Insights Into the Mechanism of DNA Binding And Complex Formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Replication protein A (RPA) is the ubiquitous, eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein and is essential for DNA replication, recombination, and repair. Here, crystal structures of the soluble RPA heterodimer, composed of the RPA14 and RPA32 subunits, have been determined for the full-length protein in multiple crystal forms. In all crystals, the electron density for the N-terminal (residues 1--42) and C-terminal (residues 175--270) regions of RPA32 is weak and of poor quality indicating that these regions are disordered and/or assume multiple positions in the crystals. Hence, the RPA32 N terminus, that is hyperphosphorylated in a cell-cycle-dependent manner and in response to DNA damaging agents, appears to be inherently disordered in the unphosphorylated state. The C-terminal, winged helix-loop-helix, protein-protein interaction domain adopts several conformations perhaps to facilitate its interaction with various proteins. Although the ordered regions of RPA14/32 resemble the previously solved protease-resistant core crystal structure, the quaternary structures between the heterodimers are quite different. Thus, the four-helix bundle quaternary assembly noted in the original core structure is unlikely to be related to the quaternary structure of the intact heterotrimer. An organic ligand binding site between subunits RPA14 and RPA32 was identified to bind dioxane. Comparison of the ssDNA binding surfaces of RPA70 with RPA14/32 showed that the lower affinity of RPA14/32 can be attributed to a shallower binding crevice with reduced positive electrostatic charge.

Deng, X.; Habel, J.E.; Kabaleeswaran, V.; Snell, E.H.; Wold, M.S.; Borgstahl, G.E.O.

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

243

DNA microarray analyses reveal a post-irradiation differential time-dependent gene expression profile in yeast cells exposed to X-rays and {gamma}-rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ionizing radiation (IR) is the most enigmatic of genotoxic stress inducers in our environment that has been around from the eons of time. IR is generally considered harmful, and has been the subject of numerous studies, mostly looking at the DNA damaging effects in cells and the repair mechanisms therein. Moreover, few studies have focused on large-scale identification of cellular responses to IR, and to this end, we describe here an initial study on the transcriptional responses of the unicellular genome model, yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain S288C), by cDNA microarray. The effect of two different IR, X-rays, and gamma ({gamma})-rays, was investigated by irradiating the yeast cells cultured in YPD medium with 50 Gy doses of X- and {gamma}-rays, followed by resuspension of the cells in YPD for time-course experiments. The samples were collected for microarray analysis at 20, 40, and 80 min after irradiation. Microarray analysis revealed a time-course transcriptional profile of changed gene expressions. Up-regulated genes belonged to the functional categories mainly related to cell cycle and DNA processing, cell rescue defense and virulence, protein and cell fate, and metabolism (X- and {gamma}-rays). Similarly, for X- and {gamma}-rays, the down-regulated genes belonged to mostly transcription and protein synthesis, cell cycle and DNA processing, control of cellular organization, cell fate, and C-compound and carbohydrate metabolism categories, respectively. This study provides for the first time a snapshot of the genome-wide mRNA expression profiles in X- and {gamma}-ray post-irradiated yeast cells and comparatively interprets/discusses the changed gene functional categories as effects of these two radiations vis-a-vis their energy levels.

Kimura, Shinzo [Laboratory of Environmental Biology, Department of Preventive Medicine, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan); Ishidou, Emi [Human Stress Signal Research Center (HSS), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) WEST, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Kurita, Sakiko [Human Stress Signal Research Center (HSS), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) WEST, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Suzuki, Yoshiteru [Human Stress Signal Research Center (HSS), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) WEST, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Shibato, Junko [Human Stress Signal Research Center (HSS), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) WEST, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Rakwal, Randeep [Human Stress Signal Research Center (HSS), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) WEST, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan)]. E-mail: rakwal-68@aist.go.jp; Iwahashi, Hitoshi [Human Stress Signal Research Center (HSS), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) WEST, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan)

2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

244

Visualizing the Local Optical Response of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Visualizing the Local Optical Response of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes to DNA-Wrapping Huihong ABSTRACT We studied the local optical response of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes to wrapping-field images of single nanotubes reveal large DNA-wrapping-induced red shifts of the exciton energy

Novotny, Lukas

245

Influence of 8-Oxoguanosine on the Fine Structure of DNA Studied with Biasing-Potential Replica Exchange Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical modification or radiation can cause DNA damage, which plays a crucial role for mutagenesis of DNA, carcinogenesis, and aging. DNA damage can also alter the fine structure of DNA that may serve as a recognition signal for DNA repair enzymes. A new, advanced sampling replica-exchange method has been developed to specifically enhance the sampling of conformational substates in duplex DNA during molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The approach employs specific biasing potentials acting on pairs of pseudodihedral angles of the nucleic acid backbone that are added in the replica simulations to promote transitions of the most common substates of the DNA backbone. The sampled states can exchange with a reference simulation under the control of the original force field. The application to 7,8-dihydro-8oxo-guanosine, one of the most common oxidative damage in DNA indicated better convergence of sampled states during 10 ns simulations compared to 20 times longer standard MD simulations. It is well suited to study systematically the fine structure and dynamics of large nucleic acids under realistic conditions, including explicit solvent and ions. The biasing potential-replica exchange MD simulations indicated significant differences in the population of nucleic acid backbone substates in the case of 7,8-dihydro-8oxo-guanosine compared to a regular guanosine in the same sequence context. This concerns both the ratio of the B-DNA substates BI and BII associated with the backbone dihedral angles ? and z but also coupled changes in the backbone dihedral angles a and g. Such differences may play a crucial role in the initial recognition of damaged DNA by repair enzymes.

Kara, Mahmut; Zacharias, Martin W.

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

246

Structure of an aprataxin?DNA complex with insights into AOA1 neurodegenerative disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DNA ligases finalize DNA replication and repair through DNA nick-sealing reactions that can abort to generate cytotoxic 5'-adenylation DNA damage. Aprataxin (Aptx) catalyzes direct reversal of 5'-adenylate adducts to protect genome integrity. Here the structure of a Schizosaccharomyces pombe Aptx-DNA-AMP-Zn{sup 2+} complex reveals active site and DNA interaction clefts formed by fusing a histidine triad (HIT) nucleotide hydrolase with a DNA minor groove-binding C{sub 2}HE zinc finger (Znf). An Aptx helical 'wedge' interrogates the base stack for sensing DNA ends or DNA nicks. The HIT-Znf, the wedge and an '[F/Y]PK' pivot motif cooperate to distort terminal DNA base-pairing and direct 5'-adenylate into the active site pocket. Structural and mutational data support a wedge-pivot-cut HIT-Znf catalytic mechanism for 5'-adenylate adduct recognition and removal and suggest that mutations affecting protein folding, the active site pocket and the pivot motif underlie Aptx dysfunction in the neurodegenerative disorder ataxia with oculomotor apraxia 1 (AOA1).

Tumbale, Percy; Appel, C. Denise; Kraehenbuehl, Rolf; Robertson, Patrick D.; Williams, Jessica S.; Krahn, Joe; Ahel, Ivan; Williams, R. Scott (NIEHS); (Manchester)

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

247

Autonomous Programmable Biomolecular Devices Using Self-Assembled DNA Nanostructures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Assembled DNA Nanostructures: · use synthetic DNA to self-assemble into DNA nanostructure devices. Goals

Reif, John H.

248

AIR-RAID DAMAGED AND ELECTRICITY SUPPLY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Review record instances of the air-raid damage sustained by overhead lines, cables, and substation equipment, and the steps taken to effect repairs and restore supply (see also NATUBE ... only a slight puncturing of the casing. As an indication of the amount of damage substation equipment can withstand, a switchboard which was blown right out by blast needed only ...

1942-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

249

Vibration–based structural damage identification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...N. A. J. Lieven and D. J. Ewins Vibration-based structural damage identification...identification based upon changes in vibration characteristics is one of the few methods...last thirty years is first presented. Vibration-based damage detection is a primary...

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Damage from methamphetamine abuse documented  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dennis Tartaglia, 212 481-7000, dennist@mbooth.com or Karen McNulty Walsh, 631 344-8350 go to home page Dennis Tartaglia, 212 481-7000, dennist@mbooth.com or Karen McNulty Walsh, 631 344-8350 go to home page 01-16 March 1, 2001 Researchers Document Brain Damage, Reduction in Motor and Cognitive Function from Methamphetamine Abuse "Speed" Shows More Neurotoxic Effects Than Heroin, Cocaine, or Alcohol UPTON, NY -- Two studies by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory provide evidence for the first time that abuse of methamphetamine -- the drug commonly known as "speed" -- is associated with physiological changes in two systems of the human brain. The changes are evident even for abusers who have not taken the drug for a year or more. The studies also found that methamphetamine abusers have reduced cognitive and motor functions, even at one year after quitting the drug. The findings appear in the March issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry.

251

Mechanisms of formation damage in matrix permeability geothermal wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laboratory study was conducted at simulated in-situ geothermal conditions to identify the mechanisms responsible for significant declines in permeability. Testing was conducted on core material retrieved from the East Mesa KGRA, (known geothermal resource area) Imperial Valley, California. In this paper, apparatus, procedures and results are described. Damage in this formation, which was not originally thought to be water sensitive, is attributed to cation exchange and the removal processes which alter the stability of the clay structures. Fluid shearing dislodges particles, which clog pore throats and irreversibly reduce permeability. The implications of these findings on operating procedures and production of the well can be significant and are discussed. 7 refs.

Bergosh, G.L.; Enniss, D.O.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

A new damage testing system for detailed evaluation of damage behavior of bulk KDP and DKDP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe a new damage testing approach and instrumentation that provides quantitative measurements of bulk damage performance versus fluence for several frequencies. A major advantage of this method is that it can simultaneously provide direct information on pinpoint density and size, and beam obscuration. This allows for more accurate evaluation of material performance under operational conditions. Protocols for laser conditioning to improve damage performance can also be easily and rapidly evaluated.This damage testing approach has enabled us to perform complex experiments toward probing the fundamental mechanisms of damage initiation and conditioning.

DeMange, P; Negres, R A; Carr, C W; Radousky, H B; Demos, S G

2004-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

253

Development of a portable electronic nose for detection of pests and plant damage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Agricultural pests are responsible for millions of dollars of crop losses and control costs every year. To reduce these losses and minimize control costs, new methods to detect pests and/or pest damage must be investigated in order to optimize control measures. One such method evaluated in this study was to detect the chemicals released by pests or pest-damaged products. A portable device was developed to draw volatiles from pests or pest-damaged products over carbon black–polymer composite sensors and measure the change in resistance for each sensor. The device successfully sampled pest and plant volatiles and these volatiles were detected using carbon black–polymer composite sensors. These results indicated an electronic nose is a feasible approach to detect pests and/or pest damage.

B.D. Lampson; Y.J. Han; A. Khalilian; J.K. Greene; D.C. Degenhardt; J.O. Hallstrom

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Seismic damage estimation for buried pipelines - challenges after three decades of progress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the evolution over the past three decades of seismic damage estimation for buried pipelines and identifies some challenges for future research studies on the subject. The first section of this paper presents a chronological description of the evolution since the mid-1970s of pipeline fragility relations - the most common tool for pipeline damage estimation - and follows with a careful analysis of the use of several ground motion parameters as pipeline damage indicators. In the second section of the paper, four gaps on the subject are identified and proposed as challenges for future research studies. The main conclusion of this work is that enhanced fragility relations must be developed for improving pipeline damage estimation, which must consider relevant parameters that could influence the seismic response of pipelines.

Pineda-porras, Omar Andrey [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Najafi, Mohammand [U. OF TEXAS

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Pathogenic Mechanisms in Ischemic Damage: A Computational Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pathogenic Mechanisms in Ischemic Damage: A Computational Study Eytan Ruppin and Elad Ofer Depts of ischemic tissue damage during acute stroke. Two prime pathogenic mechanisms, cor- tical spreading the patterns of damage that arise if damage is caused by either mechanism are generated. These damaged tissue

Ruppin, Eytan

256

ASSESSMENT OF INDIVIDUAL VARIATION IN DNA DOUBLE-STRAND BREAK REPAIR CAPACITY IN HUMAN DIPLOID FIBROBLASTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ASSESSMENT OF INDIVIDUAL VARIATION IN DNA DOUBLE-STRAND ASSESSMENT OF INDIVIDUAL VARIATION IN DNA DOUBLE-STRAND BREAK REPAIR CAPACITY IN HUMAN DIPLOID FIBROBLASTS Paul F. Wilson, John M. Hinz, Peter B. Nham, Salustra S. Urbin, Cynthia B. Thomas, Irene M. Jones, and Larry H. Thompson Biosciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA The induction of bi-stranded clustered DNA damage (BCD), which includes direct DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), is a hallmark of ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Incorrectly repaired DSBs can cause chromosomal rearrangements and an increased risk of genomic instability and cancer. Because there is polymorphic variation in DNA repair genes and much of this variation is predicted to have a functional impact, healthy people likely vary in their capacity to repair DSBs and other BCD. This project

257

Quantitative, non-invasive imaging of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in vivo  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Quantitative, non-invasive imaging of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in vivo Quantitative, non-invasive imaging of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in vivo Wenrong Li 1, , Fang Li 1 , Qian Huang 1 , Jingping Shen 1 , Frank Wolf 1 , Yujun He 1 , Xinjian Liu 1 , Y. Angela Hu 1 , Joel. S. Bedford 5 , and Chuan-Yuan Li 1,2,* Departments of 1 Radiation Oncology, 2 Pharmacology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, USA; 3 Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA DNA double strand breaks are a major form of DNA damage and a key mechanism through which radiotherapy and some chemotherapeutic agents kill cancer cells. Despite its importance, measuring DNA double strand breaks is still a tedious task that is normally carried out by gel electrophoresis or immunofluorescence staining. Here we report a novel approach to image and

258

Intelligent-based Structural Damage Detection Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the application of a novel Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model for the diagnosis of structural damage. The ANN model, denoted as the GRNNFA, is a hybrid model combining the General Regression Neural Network Model (GRNN) and the Fuzzy ART (FA) model. It not only retains the important features of the GRNN and FA models (i.e. fast and stable network training and incremental growth of network structure) but also facilitates the removal of the noise embedded in the training samples. Structural damage alters the stiffness distribution of the structure and so as to change the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the system. The measured modal parameter changes due to a particular damage are treated as patterns for that damage. The proposed GRNNFA model was trained to learn those patterns in order to detect the possible damage location of the structure. Simulated data is employed to verify and illustrate the procedures of the proposed ANN-based damage diagnosis methodology. The results of this study have demonstrated the feasibility of applying the GRNNFA model to structural damage diagnosis even when the training samples were noise contaminated.

Lee, Eric Wai Ming; Yu, K.F. [Department of Building and Construction, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

259

Damage spreading in the Ising model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present two interesting results regarding damage spreading in ferromagnetic Ising models. First, we show that a damage spreading transition can occur in an Ising chain that evolves in contact with a thermal reservoir. Damage heals at low temperature and spreads at high T. The dynamic rules for the system’s evolution for which such a transition is observed are as legitimate as the conventional rules (Glauber, Metropolis, heat bath). Our second result is that such transitions are not always in the directed percolation universality class.

Haye Hinrichsen and Eytan Domany

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Carbon Fiber Damage in Accelerator Beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon fibers are commonly used as moving targets in Beam Wire Scanners. Because of their thermomechanical properties they are very resistant to particle beams. Their strength deteriorates with time due to radiation damage and low-cycle thermal fatigue. In case of high intensity beams this process can accelerate and in extreme cases the fiber is damaged during a single scan. In this work a model describing the fiber temperature, thermionic emission and sublimation is discussed. Results are compared with fiber damage test performed on SPS beam in November 2008. In conclusions the limits of Wire Scanner operation on high intensity beams are drawn.

Sapinski, M; Guerrero, A; Koopman, J; Métral, E

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dna damage response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Assessing United States hurricane damage under different environmental conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hurricane activity between 1979 and 2011 was studied to determine damage statistics under different environmental conditions. Hurricanes cause billions of dollars of damage every year in the United States, but damage ...

Maheras, Anastasia Francis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

The Impact of Climate Change on Hurricane Flooding Inundation, Property Damages, and Population Affected  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of barrier island x Distance shoreward from edge of continental shelf ? Specific weight of seawater ?p Pressure differential ?SST Change in Sea-surface Temperature ? Water level ? B Barometric response ? w Water level increase... Page 37 Inundation Area for All Scenarios ............................................................. 91 38 Structural Damages for All Scenarios ........................................................ 93 39 Parcels Flooded for Mainland...

Frey, Ashley E.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

263

Structural rehabilitation of a fossil power station after major fire damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the eruption and course of a fire at a fossil power station. Focus is on the damage to the building and the reinforced concrete pedestal, and the assessments and repairs involved in the restoration. Emphasis is given to the pedestal since, both the response to fire and the repair for such a massive structure are of particular interest.

Freskakis, G.N.; Archer, J.C. (Burns and Roe, Inc., Oradell, NJ (USA)); Shipskie, W.P. (Seminole Electric Cooperative, Inc., Tampa, FL (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Formation damage in underbalanced drilling operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formation damage has long been recognized as a potential source of reduced productivity and injectivity in both horizontal and vertical wells. From the moment that the pay zone is being drilled until the well is put on production, a formation...

Reyes Serpa, Carlos Alberto

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

265

Probabilistic evaluation of flood damage in buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Because the ocean level keeps rising and because hurricanes and storms become increasingly destructive in terms of damage and economic loss, the built environment has become very vulnerable to floods. Every city is building ...

Wathier, Claire-Marine

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Thin Film Femtosecond Laser Damage Competition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to determine the current status of thin film laser resistance within the private, academic, and government sectors, a damage competition was started at the 2008 Boulder Damage Symposium. This damage competition allows a direct comparison of the current state of the art of high laser resistance coatings since they are tested using the same damage test setup and the same protocol. In 2009 a high reflector coating was selected at a wavelength of 786 nm at normal incidence at a pulse length of 180 femtoseconds. A double blind test assured sample and submitter anonymity so only a summary of the results are presented here. In addition to the laser resistance results, details of deposition processes, coating materials and layer count, and spectral results will also be shared.

Stolz, C J; Ristau, D; Turowski, M; Blaschke, H

2009-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

267

Restoration of Large Damage Volumes in Polymers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Restoration of Large...regenerative power of tissues...synthetic system that restores...hours. After restoration of impact damage...tripodal ligand system based on the...Ed., CRC Handbook of Chemistry...construction. Restoration of Large...

S. R. White; J. S. Moore; N. R. Sottos; B. P. Krull; W. A. Santa Cruz; R. C. R. Gergely

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

268

Review Paper. Ancient DNA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...poorly char- acterized (Gilbert et al. 2003a,b...research has been done in microbiology departments where the...unlikely to preserve DNA (Gilbert et al. 2005a). This...Smith, B. D., Gilbert, M. T. P., Cooper...the tenacity of life. Microbiology 140, 25132529. Kim...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Roles of the Major, Small, Acid-Soluble Spore Proteins and Spore-Specific and Universal DNA Repair Mechanisms in Resistance of Bacillus subtilis Spores to Ionizing Radiation from X Rays and High-Energy Charged-Particle Bombardment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mutagenic effects induced by ionizing radiation are thought to be the result...of DNA damage caused by given doses of ionizing radiation for different bacteria are very similar, although the range of ionizing-radiation resistance...

Ralf Moeller; Peter Setlow; Gerda Horneck; Thomas Berger; Günther Reitz; Petra Rettberg; Aidan J. Doherty; Ryuichi Okayasu; Wayne L. Nicholson

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

270

Cable Damage Detection System and Algorithms Using Time Domain Reflectometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the hardware system and the set of algorithms we have developed for detecting damage in cables for the Advanced Development and Process Technologies (ADAPT) Program. This program is part of the W80 Life Extension Program (LEP). The system could be generalized for application to other systems in the future. Critical cables can undergo various types of damage (e.g. short circuits, open circuits, punctures, compression) that manifest as changes in the dielectric/impedance properties of the cables. For our specific problem, only one end of the cable is accessible, and no exemplars of actual damage are available. This work addresses the detection of dielectric/impedance anomalies in transient time domain reflectometry (TDR) measurements on the cables. The approach is to interrogate the cable using time domain reflectometry (TDR) techniques, in which a known pulse is inserted into the cable, and reflections from the cable are measured. The key operating principle is that any important cable damage will manifest itself as an electrical impedance discontinuity that can be measured in the TDR response signal. Machine learning classification algorithms are effectively eliminated from consideration, because only a small number of cables is available for testing; so a sufficient sample size is not attainable. Nonetheless, a key requirement is to achieve very high probability of detection and very low probability of false alarm. The approach is to compare TDR signals from possibly damaged cables to signals or an empirical model derived from reference cables that are known to be undamaged. This requires that the TDR signals are reasonably repeatable from test to test on the same cable, and from cable to cable. Empirical studies show that the repeatability issue is the 'long pole in the tent' for damage detection, because it is has been difficult to achieve reasonable repeatability. This one factor dominated the project. The two-step model-based approach is summarized as follows: Step 1, Cable Modeling: Given input-output TDR signals s(n) and x{sub U}(n) for a cable known to be free of damage, system identification algorithms are used to compute a dynamic prediction-error cable model that has output {cflx x}{sub U}(n). The model is declared valid when the innovations e{sub U}(n) = x{sub U}(n) {cflx x}{sub U}(n) satisfy a statistical zero-mean whiteness test. This validated model output is then used as a known reference to which other cables can be compared. Step 2, Cable Testing: The TDR output signal x{sub D}(n) from a cable under test is compared with the model output {cflx x}{sub U}(n) by computing the innovations e{sub D}(n) = x{sub D}(n) {cflx x}{sub U}(n). The innovations are tested using a short-term whiteness test statistic, which employs a statistical confidence interval. If the cable passes the test, this implies that the model is valid and the cable is declared undamaged. If the cable fails the test, this indicates a model mismatch, which means that the cable's dielectric properties have changed; and this implies that the cable is damaged. The test threshold is adjusted to maximize probability of detection and minimize probability of false alarm according to an empirically determined receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. An associated confidence interval on the probability of correct classification is also provided. The effectiveness of the algorithm is demonstrated using measured TDR signals for undamaged and damaged cables. Experimental and algorithmic methods for coping with repeatability issues are presented. The model-based damage detection algorithms have been shown to perform well for some representative examples of real TDR signals acquired using the two-dimensional (2D) mockup fixture. If the damage causes a short circuit, then damage detection performance is generally good to excellent. Examples include the cases demonstrated in this report for cuts and pinholes. If the damage does not cause a short circuit, then damage detection performance is generally poor to fair. Examples include

Clark, G A; Robbins, C L; Wade, K A; Souza, P R

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

271

Recognition of DNA by Synthetic Antibodies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recognition of DNA by Synthetic Antibodies ... The recombinant anti-ssDNA Fab, DNA-1, and 16 heavy chain complementarity determining region 3 (HCDR3) mutant variants were selected for thermodynamic characterization of ssDNA binding. ...

Shana M. Barbas; Peter Ghazal; Carlos F. Barbas III; Dennis R. Burton

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Atomic-Scale Simulations of Cascade Overlap and Damage Evolution...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atomic-Scale Simulations of Cascade Overlap and Damage Evolution in Silicon Carbide. Atomic-Scale Simulations of Cascade Overlap and Damage Evolution in Silicon Carbide. Abstract:...

273

High-energy radiation damage in zirconia: modeling results ....  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

energy radiation damage in zirconia: modeling results . High-energy radiation damage in zirconia: modeling results . Abstract: Zirconia has been viewed as a material of exceptional...

274

Nuclear DNA Amounts in Angiosperms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

27 May 1976 research-article Nuclear DNA Amounts in Angiosperms M. D. Bennett...number of angiosperm species for which nuclear DNA amount estimates have been made has...is overdue. This paper lists absolute nuclear DNA amounts for 753 angiosperm species...

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

DNA Structural Nanotechnology Duke University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DNA Structural Nanotechnology John Reif Duke University Graduate Students: Harish Chandran&Caltech Tube Lattices #12;Ned Seeman New York University, USA Ned Seeman: Father of DNA Nanotechnology His Initial Ideas & Motivation for DNA Nanotechnology #12;Cube Chen & Seeman, Nature350:631 (1991) Truncated

Reif, John H.

276

Heuristic for Maximizing DNA Reuse in Synthetic DNA Library Assembly  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heuristic for Maximizing DNA Reuse in Synthetic DNA Library Assembly ... In concert with entirely de novo synthesis, a swathe of alternative DNA assembly methods are being introduced(4-6) that concatenate parts from hundreds of base pairs in length, through gene fusions, to synthetic biological devices built from catalogued parts, up to megabase fragments and entire chromosomes. ... De novo synthesis relies on synthetic oligos that are inherently error prone, and therefore, reusing existing error-free DNA in constructing new DNA provides an inherent advantage. ...

Jonathan Blakes; Ofir Raz; Uriel Feige; Jaume Bacardit; Pawe? Widera; Tuval Ben-Yehezkel; Ehud Shapiro; Natalio Krasnogor

2014-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

277

In Situ Analysis of 8-Oxo-7,8-dihydro-2?-deoxyguanosine Oxidation Reveals Sequence- and Agent-Specific Damage Spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guanine is a major target for oxidation in DNA, with 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2?-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) as a major product. 8-oxodG is itself significantly more susceptible to oxidation than guanine, with the resulting damage ...

Lim, Kok Seong

278

Responses of the small and large intestine to oxidative stress and modulation by dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recently shown that fish oil (FO), rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), reduces methylation-induced DNA damage in the colon compared to corn oil (CO), rich in n-6 PUFA (Hong et al. 2000), we hypothesized that FO confers protection against DNA...

Bancroft, Laura Katherine

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

279

Fleet DNA (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fleet DNA project objectives include capturing and quantifying drive cycle and technology variation for the multitude of medium- and heavy-duty vocations; providing a common data storage warehouse for medium- and heavy-duty vehicle fleet data across DOE activities and laboratories; and integrating existing DOE tools, models, and analyses to provide data-driven decision making capabilities. Fleet DNA advantages include: for Government - providing in-use data for standard drive cycle development, R&D, tech targets, and rule making; for OEMs - real-world usage datasets provide concrete examples of customer use profiles; for fleets - vocational datasets help illustrate how to maximize return on technology investments; for Funding Agencies - ways are revealed to optimize the impact of financial incentive offers; and for researchers -a data source is provided for modeling and simulation.

Walkokwicz, K.; Duran, A.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Chiral Mesophases of DNA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the hexagonal columnar phase of chiral polymers a bias towards cholesteric twist competes with braiding along an average direction. When the chirality is strong, topological defects proliferate, leading to either a tilt grain boundary phase or a new ``moire state'' with twisted bond order. This moire phase can melt leading to a new phase: the chiral hexatic. I will discuss some recent experimental results from the NIH on DNA liquid crystals in the context of these theories.

Randall D. Kamien

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dna damage response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Pooled Analysis of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number and Lung Cancer Risk in Three Prospective Studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...AACR. Introduction Mitochondria are primarily responsible for energy production in eukaryotic cells (1). Mitochondria have a singular...molecule. Mitochondria copy number (mtDNA CN) varies to meet energy needs and cope with oxidative stress (2). Oxidative stress...

Christopher Kim; Bryan A. Bassig; Wei Jie Seow; Wei Hu; Mark P. Purdue; Xiao-Ou Shu; Wen-Yi Huang; Chin-San Liu; Wen-Ling Cheng; Ta-Tsung Lin; Yong-Bing Xiang; Bu-Tian Ji; Yu-Tang Gao; Wong-Ho Chow; Satu Männistö; Stephanie J. Weinstein; Demetrius Albanes; Wei Zheng; H. Dean Hosgood; Unhee Lim; Nathaniel Rothman; Qing Lan

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Subcellular Spatial Correlation of Particle Traversal and Biological Response in Clinical Ion Beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To report on the spatial correlation of physical track information (fluorescent nuclear track detectors, FNTDs) and cellular DNA damage response by using a novel hybrid detector (Cell-Fit-HD). Methods and Materials: The FNTDs were coated with a monolayer of human non-small cell lung carcinoma (A549) cells and irradiated with carbon ions (270.55 MeV u{sup ?1}, rising flank of the Bragg peak). Phosphorylated histone variant H2AX accumulating at the irradiation-induced double-strand break site was labeled (RIF). The position and direction of ion tracks in the FNTD were registered with the location of the RIF sequence as an ion track surrogate in the cell layer. Results: All RIF sequences could be related to their corresponding ion tracks, with mean deviations of 1.09 ?m and ?1.72 ?m in position and of 2.38° in slope. The mean perpendicular between ion track and RIF sequence was 1.58 ?m. The mean spacing of neighboring RIFs exhibited a regular rather than random spacing. Conclusions: Cell-Fit-HD allows for unambiguous spatial correlation studies of cell damage with respect to the intracellular ion traversal under therapeutic beam conditions.

Niklas, Martin, E-mail: m.niklas@dkfz.de [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Abdollahi, Amir [German Cancer Consortium, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Molecular and Translational Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, University of Heidelberg Medical School and National Center for Tumor Diseases, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Akselrod, Mark S. [Stillwater Crystal Growth Division, Landauer Inc, Stillwater, Oklahoma (United States); Debus, Jürgen [German Cancer Consortium, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Molecular and Translational Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, University of Heidelberg Medical School and National Center for Tumor Diseases, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Jäkel, Oliver [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium, National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); and others

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Fretting Corrosion Damage of Total Hip Prosthesis: Friction Coefficient and Damage Rate Constant Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Fretting Corrosion Damage of Total Hip Prosthesis: Friction Coefficient and Damage Rate Constant Building, University Park 16802 PA USA 4 Chair Professor Center for Research Excellence in Corrosion hip prosthesis. Fretting corrosion tests were conducted with stainless steel and poly (methyl

Boyer, Edmond

284

Method to reduce damage to backing plate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a method for penetrating a workpiece using an ultra-short pulse laser beam without causing damage to subsequent surfaces facing the laser. Several embodiments are shown which place holes in fuel injectors without damaging the back surface of the sack in which the fuel is ejected. In one embodiment, pulses from an ultra short pulse laser remove about 10 nm to 1000 nm of material per pulse. In one embodiment, a plasma source is attached to the fuel injector and initiated by common methods such as microwave energy. In another embodiment of the invention, the sack void is filled with a solid. In one other embodiment, a high viscosity liquid is placed within the sack. In general, high-viscosity liquids preferably used in this invention should have a high damage threshold and have a diffusing property.

Perry, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); Banks, Paul S. (Livermore, CA); Stuart, Brent C. (Fremont, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Unscheduled DNA synthesis and mitochondrial DNA synthetic rate following injury of the facial nerve  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) of nuclear DNA and mitochondrial (mt) DNA synthetic rates were determined autoradiographically in different cell ... nerve transection. In addition to an increased synthetic rate ...

H. Korr; V. Philippi; C. Helg; J. Schiefer; M. B. Graeber…

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Management Responsibilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Management Responsibilities Management Responsibilities Depleted UF6 Management Responsibilities DOE has responsibility for safe and efficient management of approximately 700,000 metric tons of depleted UF6. Organizational Responsibilities In the United States, the U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for managing all the depleted uranium that has been generated by the government and has been declared surplus to national defense needs. In addition, as a result of two memoranda of agreement that have been signed between the DOE and USEC, the DOE has assumed management responsibility for approximately 145,000 metric tons of depleted UF6 that has been or will be generated by USEC. Any additional depleted UF6 that USEC generates will be USEC's responsibility to manage. DOE Management Responsibility

287

Hypersensitivity of human and rodent Fanconianemia (FA) cells to bystander effect-induced DNA damage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hypersensitivity Hypersensitivity o f h uman a nd r odent F anconi a nemia ( FA) c ells t o b ystander effect---induced D NA d amage P.F. Wilson 1,2 , H. Nagasawa 3 , A .C. K ohlgruber 2 , S .S. U rbin 2 , F .A. Bourguet 2 , J .R. Brogan 3 , J .S. Bedford 3 , M .A. Coleman 2 , J.M. Hinz 4 , and J.B. Little 5 1 B iology D epartment/NASA S pace R adiation L aboratory, B rookhaven N ational L aboratory, U pton, N Y 1 1733 2 Biosciences a nd B iotechnology D ivision, L awrence L ivermore N ational L aboratory, L ivermore, C A 9 4551 3 Department o f E nvironmental a nd R adiological H ealth S ciences, C olorado S tate U niversity, F ort C ollins, C O 8 0523 4 School o f M olecular B iosciences, W ashington S tate U niversity, P ullman, W A 9 9164 5 D epartment o f G enetics a nd C omplex D iseases, H arvard S chool o f P ublic H ealth, B oston, M A 0 2115 Fanconi

288

DNA damage checkpoint triggers autophagy to regulate the initiation of anaphase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...clogging” of the CVT pathway so that enough Pds1 remains at liberty to carry out its function or that the sequestration of cargo is in some way reversible in the...We thank Kathryn Patterson for help in early stages of this project. This work was supported by National Institutes of Health...

Farokh Dotiwala; Vinay V. Eapen; Jacob C. Harrison; Ayelet Arbel-Eden; Vikram Ranade; Satoshi Yoshida; James E. Haber

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

A comparison of DNA damage probes in two HMEC lines with X-irradiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L. WISNEWSKI, KATHLEEN A. BJORNSTAD, CHRISTOPHER J. ROSEN,Eleanor Blakely, Kathleen Bjornstad, Polly Chang and Chris

Wisnewski, Christy L.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; Rosen, Christoper J.; Chang, Polly Y.; Blakely, Eleanor A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Thermal Enhancement of DNA Damage in Mammalian Cells Treated with cis-Diamminedichloroplatinum(II)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Demetriades Department of Physics, The University of Texas...significant difference in the rate of disappearance of cross-links...significant differnence in the rate of disappearance of cross-links...Demetriades Department of Physics, The University of TexasSystem...solution was allowed to pass through the filter by...

Raymond E. Meyn; Peter M. Corry; Susan E. Fletcher; and Marie Demetriades

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Detection of DNA Damage Induced by Space Radiation in Mir and Space Shuttle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......American space shuttle for 9 days. After landing, we labeled space-radiation-induced...American space shuttle for 9 days. After landing, we labeled space-radiation-induced...studied in Go human lymphocytes using the comet assay. J. Radiat. Res. 42: 91101......

Takeo Ohnishi; Ken Ohnishi; Akihisa Takahashi; Yoshitaka Taniguchi; Masaru Sato; Tamotsu Nakano; Shunji Nagaoka

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Hydroxyl Radical Production and Human DNA Damage Induced by Ferric Nitrilotriacetate and Hydrogen Peroxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to radical production by using...NTA plus hydrogen peroxide...MATERIALS AND METHODS Materials...described method (17, 18...hydroxyl radical production from hydrogen peroxide...Hydroxyl Radical Production from Hydrogen Peroxide...trapping methods were used...

Sumiko Inoue and Shosuke Kawanishi

1987-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

Abstract 3771: Splenic macrophages induce chemotherapy resistance via DNA damage repair  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...First, PIFAs were unable to induce resistance in splenectomized tumor-bearing mice. Second, administration of conditioned medium from splenocytes (sCM) activated by the PIFAs to splenectomized mice was able to re-introduce systemic chemotherapy resistance...

Julia M. Houthuijzen; Laura G.M. Daenen; Jeanine M.L. Roodhart; Klaas M. Govaert; Michelle E. Smith; Juergen Thomale; Sahar J. Sadatmand; Hilde Rosing; Fabian Kruse; Nico van Rooijen; Jos H. Beijnen; Piet Borst; Sven Rottenberg; Bodduluri Haribabu; Emile E. Voest

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Advancing age has differential effects on DNA damage, chromatin integrity, gene mutations, and aneuploidies in sperm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...predominantly white (91%), highly educated (55% postcollege education), and in good to excellent health by self report; they provided a convenience specimen...volunteers were recruited from advertisements, listserves, posters, and newsletters. We enrolled at least 15 men from each age...

A. J. Wyrobek; B. Eskenazi; S. Young; N. Arnheim; I. Tiemann-Boege; E. W. Jabs; R. L. Glaser; F. S. Pearson; D. Evenson

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Advancing age has differential effects on DNA damage, chromatin integrity, gene mutations, and aneuploidies in sperm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...educated (55% postcollege education), and in good to excellent health by self report...B. Wilkie A. O. ( 2003 ) Science 301 : 643 – 646 . 36 Brohede...Institute on Environmental Health Sciences/Environmental...advertisements, listserves, posters, and newsletters. We enrolled...

A. J. Wyrobek; B. Eskenazi; S. Young; N. Arnheim; I. Tiemann-Boege; E. W. Jabs; R. L. Glaser; F. S. Pearson; D. Evenson

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Mutations in Tetranucleotide Repeats following DNA Damage Depend on Repeat Sequence and Carcinogenic Agent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...horizontal line was drawn to determine the midway point of the growth plate. The perpendicular...growth plate thickness was measured at the midway point. An estimate of growth plate diameter...of the preceding line to indicate the midway point of the growth plate, which is 10...

Robbert J. C. Slebos; Daniel S. Oh; David M. Umbach; Jack A. Taylor

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Structural and mechanistic studies of polymerase ? bypass of phenanthriplatin DNA damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Platinum drugs are a mainstay of anticancer chemotherapy. Nevertheless, tumors often display inherent or acquired resistance to platinum-based treatments, prompting the search for new compounds that do not exhibit ...

Gregory, Mark T.

298

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaloid damages dna Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Antisense-mediated reduction in ADC activity causes minor alterations in the alkaloid profile of cultured hairy roots Summary: Antisense-mediated reduction in ADC activity causes...

299

Perspective on the Pipeline of Drugs Being Developed with Modulation of DNA Damage as a Target  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Depth Cancer Centers Work to Optimize Pipelines In recent years, the Valley of Death...Institute/Sam Ogden.] Pushing the Pipeline At MD Anderson's new institute...Corliss Cancer centers work to optimize pipelines. | News

Ruth Plummer

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

RhoJ Regulates Melanoma Chemoresistance by Suppressing Pathways that Sense DNA Damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s t-test IPA-3 alone in the same dose. C.purchased from Sigma and IPA-3 was purchased from Tocrispopulation. $watermark-text IPA-3 Cisplatin sensitization

Ho, Hsiang; Aruri, Jayavani; Kapadia, Rubina; Mehr, Hootan; White, Michael A.; Ganesan, Anand K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dna damage response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

DOE contractors' workshop: Cellular and molecular aspects of radiation induced DNA damage and repair  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For four decades the US Department of Energy and its predecessors have been the lead federal agency in supporting radiation biology research. Over the years emphasis in this program has gradually shifted from dose-effect studies on animals to research on the effects of radiations of various qualities on cells and molecules. Mechanistic studies on the action of radiation at the subcellular level are few in number and there is a need for more research in this area if we are to gain a better understanding of how radiation affects living cells. The intent of this workshop was to bring together DOE contractors and grantees who are investigating the effects of radiation at the cellular and molecular levels. The aims were to foster the exchange of information on research projects and experimental results, promote collaborative research efforts, and obtain an overview of research currently supported by the Health Effects Research Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research. The latter is needed by the Office for program planning purposes. This report on the workshop which took place in Albuquerque, New Mexico on March 10-11, 1987, includes an overview with future research recommendations, extended abstracts of the plenary presentations, shorter abstracts of each poster presentation, a workshop agenda and the names and addresses of the attendees.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Radiation dose-rate effects, endogenous DNA damage, and signaling resonance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...These data from the Oak Ridge and Harwell laboratories...other nuclear industries) workers (22 –24), and Chernobyl's...clean-up”) workers (21). These data provide...that of nuclear industry workers, including nuclear plant personnel...

Michael M. Vilenchik; Alfred G. Knudson

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Biomonitoring on Carcinogenic Metals and Oxidative DNA Damage in a Cross-Sectional Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...result of human activities such as mining, smelting, fossil fuel combustion, and industrial application of metals. The highest...production of stainless steel, high-nickel alloys, Ni-Cd batteries, and electronic components. A major fraction of nickel absorbed...

Hiltrud Merzenich; Andrea Hartwig; Wolfgang Ahrens; Detmar Beyersmann; Regina Schlepegrell; Martin Scholze; Jürgen Timm; and Karl-Heinz Jöckel

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Ultraviolet B-induced DNA Damage in Human Skin and Its Modulation by a Sunscreen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Abstract The UVB component of solar radiation is a risk factor for...defined as the ratio of the energy required to produce a MED...sunscreen compared with the energy required to produce the same...able to reduce many effects of solar radiation, it is unclear how...

Vladimir J. Bykov; Jan A. Marcusson; and Kari Hemminki

1998-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

3'-Blocking Damage of DNA as a Mutagenic Lesion Caused by Hydrogen Peroxide in Escherichia coli  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Osaka 532-0031, Japan *** Present address: Human Biological Chemistry and Genetics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas 77555, USA **** Present address: Department of Radiation Research, Tohoku University School of......

Tadashi Takemoto; Qiu-Mei Zhang; Yukiko Matsumoto; Seiji Mito; Tadahide Izumi; Hironobu Ikehata; Shuji Yonei

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

E-Print Network 3.0 - ancient dna damage Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

253,1354-1356. ... Source: Crandall, Keith A. - Departments of Integrative Biology & Microbiology and Molecular Biology, Brigham Young University; Fetzner Jr., James W. -...

307

Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Induce DNA Damage and Genetic Instability In vivo in Mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Mice were housed in a 12-h light/dark cycle. Pregnancy was timed by checking for...0.05, respectively; Fig. 6A ). A general upregulation of these cytokines may be...rat lung following chronic inhalation of diesel emissions, carbon black and titanium...

Benedicte Trouiller; Ramune Reliene; Aya Westbrook; Parrisa Solaimani; and Robert H. Schiestl

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Transcription-coupled repair of oxidative DNA damage in human cells: Mechanisms and consequences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10518. Citterio E. , Rademakers S. , Van Der Horst G.T. ,A.J. , Citterio E. , Rademakers S. , Van Os R. , VermeulenE. , Auriol J. , Rademakers S. , Frit P. , Appeldoorn E. ,

Tsutakawa, Susan; Cooper, Priscilla K.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

RhoJ Regulates Melanoma Chemoresistance by Suppressing Pathways That Sense DNA Damage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reaction by transfer ring the oil well bubble into 100 i\\of 50 mM Hepes buffer, pH...of commercial enzyme acting after the bubble dilution as well as to minimize any effect...on the basis of its solubility, heat stability, relative size (M, > 10,000, as...

Hsiang Ho; Jayavani Aruri; Rubina Kapadia; Hootan Mehr; Michael A. White; and Anand K. Ganesan

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Menin Associates with FANCD2, a Protein Involved in Repair of DNA Damage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...S. Y., Spiegel A. M., Burns A. L., Debelenko L. V...Crabtree J. S., Wang Y., Roe B. A., Weisemann J., Boguski...Dong Q., Spiegel A. M., Burns A. L., Marx S. J. Positional...1118-1123, 2001. 7 Kim Y. S., Burns A. L., Goldsmith P. K...

Shenghao Jin; Hua Mao; Robert W. Schnepp; Stephen M. Sykes; Albert C. Silva; Alan D. D’Andrea; and Xianxin Hua

2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Evidence of reactive oxygen species-mediated damage to mitochondrial DNA in children with typical autism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1997:77–102. 3. Lin MT, Beal MF: Mitochondrial dysfunction13:262–270. 5. Albers DS, Beal MF: Mitochondrial dysfunctionAMS, Mecocci P, Cormio A, Beal MF, Cherubini A, Cantatore P,

Napoli, Eleonora; Wong, Sarah; Giulivi, Cecilia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Prediction of blast damage from vapor cloud explosions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process industries handle a wide range of different materials and use them in different types of chemical reaction. Of particular concern is the prospect of damage and injury affecting the general public outside the boundary wall of the chemical plant. It is not wise to permit the construction of homes, schools or hospitals so close to chemical plants that they, and the people within, might be damaged or injured should there be an accidental explosion in the plant. The major hazard outside the plant is over-pressure, a consequence of an accidental explosion in a cloud of flammable gas or vapor (Vapor Cloud Explosion or VCE). It is the responsibility of plant management to ensure that any such accidental explosion is not so large as to endanger the public, and of the local planning authorities to ensure that homes, schools or hospitals are not sited so close to chemical plants that they may be endangered by accidental explosion. A vital tool for such authorities is a simple method of assessing the possible consequences of an accidental VCE. In this paper those methods of assessing the consequences are examined.

Phillips, H. [Phillips (H.), Buxton (United Kingdom)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

Optical characterization of damage resistant kilolayer'' rugate filters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multilayer dielectric optical coatings produced by high temperature plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (PCVD) have been previously shown to have very high surface and bulk damage thresholds (above 40J/cm{sup 2}). Because these experimental coatings are deposited on tubular substrates, conventional wavelength scanning cannot accurately measure the coating peak reflectance and bandwidth. Measurement of the variation of transmittance with incidence angle at fixed wavelength permits analysis of the coating spectral response. The results indicate that the PCVD coatings behave as nearly ideal'' rugate filters. Their optical performance agrees well with that predicted for a rugate by Southwell's coupled-wave theory and by the characteristic-matrix model. These 1000-layer-pair filters have maximum reflectances exceeding 99.9%, peak reflectance wavelengths within 0.5% of the design wavelength, and FWHM bandwidths narrower than 10 nm. Minor perturbations to the ideal rugate sinusoidal profile do not appreciably affect the coating optical performance. Comparison with calculations suggest that the only significant deviation of the PCVD structure from that of an ideal rugate is a small (0.7%) drift in the index period. Excellent optical performance and high damage resistance makes PCVD rugate coatings potentially useful for several high power laser applications. 13 refs., 7 figs.

Elder, M.L.; Jancaitis, K.S.; Milam, D.; Campbell, J.H.

1990-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

314

Ion irradiation damage in ilmenite under cryogenic conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A natural single crystal of ilmenite was irradiated at 100 K with 200 keV Ar{sup 2+}. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and ion channeling with 2 MeV He{sup +} ions were used to monitor damage accumulation in the surface region of the implanted crystal. At an irradiation fluence of 1 {times} 10{sup 15} Ar{sup 2+} cm{sup {minus}2}, considerable near-surface He{sup +} ion dechanneling was observed, to the extent that ion yield from a portion of the aligned crystal spectrum reached the yield level of a random spectrum. This observation suggests that the near-surface region of the crystal was amorphized by the implantation. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction on this sample confirmed the presence of a 150 mm thick amorphous layer. These results are compared to similar investigations on geikielite (MgTiO{sub 3}) and spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) to explore factors that may influence radiation damage response in oxides.

Mitchell, J.N.; Yu, N.; Devanathan, R.; Sickafus, K.E.; Nastasi, M.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.; Nord, G.L. Jr. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Damage detection technique by measuring laser-based mechanical impedance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study proposes a method for measurement of mechanical impedance using noncontact laser ultrasound. The measurement of mechanical impedance has been of great interest in nondestructive testing (NDT) or structural health monitoring (SHM) since mechanical impedance is sensitive even to small-sized structural defects. Conventional impedance measurements, however, have been based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) using contact-type piezoelectric transducers, which show deteriorated performances induced by the effects of a) Curie temperature limitations, b) electromagnetic interference (EMI), c) bonding layers and etc. This study aims to tackle the limitations of conventional EMI measurement by utilizing laser-based mechanical impedance (LMI) measurement. The LMI response, which is equivalent to a steady-state ultrasound response, is generated by shooting the pulse laser beam to the target structure, and is acquired by measuring the out-of-plane velocity using a laser vibrometer. The formation of the LMI response is observed through the thermo-mechanical finite element analysis. The feasibility of applying the LMI technique for damage detection is experimentally verified using a pipe specimen under high temperature environment.

Lee, Hyeonseok; Sohn, Hoon [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (Daehak-ro 291, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701) (Korea, Republic of)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

316

Damage potential characteristics of near-field earthquake motions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent major earthquakes; i.e., 1994 Northridge earthquake in the US and 1995 Great Kansai earthquake in Japan, several close-distance strong ground motions have been obtained, which may be of significant interest to earthquake/structural engineers. The damage potential of those recently obtained ground motions is examined based on the nonlinear response analyses of various SDOF systems. For comparison purposes, the El Centro records from the 1940 Imperial Valley earthquake, as well as a set of artificial motions consistent with the R.G. 1.60 spectrum were also used. The engineering insights regarding the seismic design of structures are discussed based on a series of parametric studies.

Park, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Chokshi, N. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

DNA attachment to support structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microscopic beads or other structures are attached to nucleic acids (DNA) using a terminal transferase. The transferase adds labeled dideoxy nucleotide bases to the ends of linear strands of DNA. The labels, such as the antigens digoxigenin and biotin, bind to the antibody compounds or other appropriate complementary ligands, which are bound to the microscopic beads or other support structures. The method does not require the synthesis of a synthetic oligonucleotide probe. The method can be used to tag or label DNA even when the DNA has an unknown sequence, has blunt ends, or is a very large fragment (e.g., >500 kilobase pairs).

Balhorn, Rodney L. (Livermore, CA); Barry, Christopher H. (Fresno, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Algae create glue to repair cell damage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... The reproductive secret of an environmentally damaging alga has been rumbled. When strands of Caulerpa taxifolia break off to form separate organisms, ... organisms, the parent heals itself with a fast-acting natural glue. This helps the algae to spread rapidly, but might also prove an Achilles heel, aiding the ecologists fighting ...

Mark Peplow

2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

319

Feral burro populations: Distribution and damage assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared to document (1) regional use of the National Training Center (NTC), Fort Irwin, CA, by burros, (2)influence of available water sources for burro use, (3) burro-related damage at several NTC sensitive habitat areas, and (4) management recommendations. All work described in this report was conducted in 1996 and 1997. Roadside transects were conducted and mapped using Geographical Positioning Systems/Geographical Information Systems (GPS/GIS) to indirectly measure relative abundance of feral burros (scat per mile) and to examine the spatial relationship of burro use to permanent or semi-permanent water sources that exist on the NTC. The authors also surveyed several permanent springs for burro-related damage and mapped the impact areas using GPS/GIS to quantify the extent of damage and to provide guidance on size and extent of burro exclosures in those areas. Photographs of the spring sites were also archived and permanent photo points were established for long-term monitoring of feral burro damage areas. In addition, aquatic invertebrate data collected during another spring site study were summarized and discussed in relation to burro-related impacts on the NTC`s sensitive habitats. Several water-quality parameters were also obtained from each spring, including temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and total dissolved solids.

Tiller, B.L.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

A Route to Scale up DNA Origami Using DNA Tiles as Folding Staples  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Route to Scale up DNA Origami Using DNA Tiles as Folding Staples Authors: Zhao, Z., Yan, H., and Liu, Y. Title: A Route to Scale up DNA Origami Using DNA Tiles as Folding Staples...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dna damage response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A Model for Structure and Thermodynamics of ssDNA and dsDNA Near...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Structure and Thermodynamics of ssDNA and dsDNA Near a Surface:A Coarse Grained Approach. A Model for Structure and Thermodynamics of ssDNA and dsDNA Near a Surface:A Coarse...

322

Design of a New Fluorescent Cofactor for DNA Methyltransferases and Sequence-Specific Labeling of DNA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sequence-specific labeling of DNA is of immense interest for analytical and functional studies of DNA. We present a novel approach for sequence-specific labeling of DNA using a newly designed fluorescent cofactor for the DNA methyltransferase from ...

Goran Pljevaljcic; Marc Pignot; Elmar Weinhold

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

323

Smoking Status and Occupational Exposure Affects Oxidative DNA Injury in Boilermakers Exposed to Metal Fume and Residual Oil Fly Ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sensitization by residual oil fly ash particles...composition of residual oil fly ash determines...coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry...particulate-mediated cytokine production in lung epithelial...et al. Residual oil fly ash induces cytotoxicity...probably through cumulative oxidative DNA damage...

Sutapa Mukherjee; Lyle J. Palmer; Jee Young Kim; David B. Aeschliman; Robert S. Houk; Mark A. Woodin; and David C. Christiani

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Structural investigations of platinum anticancer drugs with DNA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The antitumor agent cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) (cis-DDP) can successfully treat testicular and ovarian cancers, presumably by binding to DNA and preventing replication. cis-DDP is less successful in treating lung and breast cancers and the trans isomer is inactive. It has been suggested that cellular recognition and repair processes may be responsible for the difference in activity between cis- and trans-DDP, the differential effectiveness against different types of cancers, as well as acquired resistance. The author reviews structural methods used to characterize several site-specific adducts. Structure-function relations that emerge may help clarify the mechanism of action. The extent of DNA bending caused by several site-specific DNA adducts formed by cis- and trans-DDP has been determined using a gel electrophoresis assay. The adducts cis-GG, cis-AG, cis-GTG, and trans-GTG were incorporated into synthetic DNA oligonucleotides of varying lengths with two bp cohesive ends. Subtle DNA distortions were amplified by polymerizing these monomers and quantitated using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The three adducts cis-GG, cis-AG, and cis-GTG were all found to bend the helix in a directed fashion by about 32-35[degrees]. The trans-GTG adduct gave a degree of flexibility to the double helix, allowing bending in more than one direction. The DNA unwinding caused by the platinum binding was measured by systematically varying the interplatinum distance in a series of synthetic DNA oligonucleotides. The cis-GG and cis-AG adducts both unwind the double helix by 13[degrees]C, while the cis-GTG adduct unwinds by 23[degrees]. To determine the complete structure of platinated duplex DNA< single crystals of a platinated 12 base pair duplex oligonucletide were obtained. Despite extreme temperature and radiation sensitivity problems, a complete set of data was collected. Several different approaches to solve the structure were attempted.

Bellon, S.F.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Two-Color DNA Nanoprobe of Intracellular Dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed a correlation microscopy technique to follow the dynamics of quantum dot labeled DNA within living cells. ... The intracellular environment imposes a variety of mechanical constraints and engenders interactions both from molecular crowding to a range of motor-driven activity responsible for transcription, replication, cargo transport, cytoskeletal rearrangement, chromosomal remodeling, and so on. ... Other future applications of this method could be to witness a variety of cellular processes, such as chromosomal rearrangement or DNA cleavage, so long as the correlated motion of the two labels is altered during the dynamics. ...

Joshua N. Milstein; Mike Chu; Krishnan Raghunathan; Jens-Christian Meiners

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

326

Imaging System to Measure Kinetics of Material Cluster Ejection During Exit-Surface Damage Initiation and Growth in Fused Silica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser-induced damage on the surface of optical components typically is manifested by the formation of microscopic craters that can ultimately degrade the optics performance characteristics. It is believed that the damage process is the result of the material exposure to high temperatures and pressures within a volume on the order of several cubic microns located just below the surface. The response of the material following initial localized energy deposition by the laser pulse, including the timeline of events and the individual processes involved during this timeline, is still largely unknown. In this work we introduce a time-resolved microscope system designed to enable a detailed investigation of the sequence of dynamic events involved during surface damage. To best capture individual aspects of the damage timeline, this system is employed in multiple imaging configurations (such as multi-view image acquisition at a single time point and multi-image acquisition at different time points of the same event) and offers sensitivity to phenomena at very early delay times. The capabilities of this system are demonstrated with preliminary results from the study of exit-surface damage in fused silica. The time-resolved images provide information on the material response immediately following laser energy deposition, the processes later involved during crater formation or growth, the material ejecta kinetics, and overall material motion and transformation. Such results offer insight into the mechanisms governing damage initiation and growth in the optical components of ICF class laser systems.

Raman, R N; Negres, R A; Demos, S G

2009-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

327

DNA unwinding produced by site-specific intrastrand cross-links of the antitumor drug cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DNA unwinding produced by specific adducts of the antitumor drug cis-diamminedi-chloroplatinum(II) has been quantitatively determined. Synthetic DNA duplex oligonucleotides of varying lengths with two base pair cohesive ends were synthesized and characterized that contained site-specific intrastrand N7-purine/N7-purine cross-links. Included are cis-(Pt(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}(d(GpG))), cis-(Pt(NH){sub 3}{sub 2}(d(ApG))), and cis-(Pt(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}(d(GpTpG))) adducts, respectively referred to as cis-GG, cis-AG, and cis-GTG. Local DNA distortions at the site of platination were amplified by polymerization of these monomers and quantitatively evaluated by using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The extent of DNA unwinding was determined by systematically varying the interplatinum distance, or phasing, in polymers containing the adducts. The multimer that migrates most slowly gives the optimal phasing for cooperative bending, from which the degree of unwinding can be obtained. The authors find that the cis-GG and cis-AG adducts both unwind DNA by 13{degrees}, while the cis-GTG adduct unwinds DNA by 23{degrees}. In addition, experiments are presented that support previous studies revealing that a hinge joint forms at the sites of platination in DNA molecules containing trans-GTG adducts. On the basis of an analysis of the present and other published studies of site-specifically modified DNA. The authors propose that local duplex unwinding is a major determinant in the recognition of DNA damage by the Escherichia coli (A)BC excinuclease. In addition, local duplex unwinding of 13{degrees} and bending by 35{degrees} are shown to correlate well with the recognition of platinated DNA by a previously identified damage recognition protein (DRP) in human cells.

Bellon, S.F.; Coleman, J.H.; Lippard, S.J. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge (United States))

1991-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

328

DNA Meta-Molecules: Synthe4c Biology via DNA Nanostructures &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reaction - DNA walkers - Activatable tiles and assemblies (4) DNA-based synthetic biology (slides 107-122) - Synthetic biology - DNA-based meta molecules and their use in synthetic biology - Meta DNA #12;SelfDNA Meta-Molecules: Synthe4c Biology via DNA Nanostructures & Hybridiza4on Reac

Reif, John H.

329

Continuum-based Multiscale Computational Damage Modeling of Cementitous Composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of ? , and its comparison with experimental results by Kupfer et al. (1969) ...... 32 5.1 Evolution of the damage due to the change of the compressive hardening modulus Q ? for: (a) Exponential damage evolution law in Eq. (2.48) and (b) power damage... evolution law in Eq. (2.52) ............... 71 5.2 Evolution of the damage due to the change of the compressive hardening rate constant b? for: (a) Exponential damage evolution law in Eq. (2.48) and (b) power damage evolution law in Eq. (2...

Kim, Sun-Myung

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

330

Radiation Damage in Nanostructured Metallic Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with favorable microstructures and to investigate their response to radiation. The goals of this thesis are to study the radiation responses of several nanostructured metallic thin film systems, including Ag/Ni multilayers, nanotwinned Ag and nanocrystalline Fe...

Yu, Kaiyuan

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

Integrated Microfluidic Electrochemical DNA Sensor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of small scale fluid flow Laminar flow Easy to predict the flow patterns Very little diffusion This can make mixing difficult Small volumes Don't need to waste expensive reagents Easy fluid control;DNA Purification The DNA will be extracted using Invitrogen Charge Switch beads. Cellular Lysis

Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

332

Single Molecule Studies of Telomere DNA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009) G-quadruplex DNA bound by a synthetic ligand is highly2009) G-quadruplex DNA bound by a synthetic ligand is highly2009) G-quadruplex DNA bound by a synthetic ligand is highly

Long, Xi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

DNA Origami: A History and Current Perspective  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DNA origami' has emerged as one of the most promising assembly techniques in DNA nanotechnology with a broad range of applications. In the past two years alone, DNA origami has...

334

Control of electrostatic damage to electronic circuits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Static is caused by the flow of materials and people within an environment. The static voltages generated by these movements can degrade or destroy many solid state devices currently being used in sophisticated electronic equipment. Discharge of static voltages through these sensitive devices during assembly operations can lead to a nonfunctional assembly fabricated from parts which previously were acceptable or to later failure of an assembly which was functional after fabrication. Sources of electrostatic charges, equipment and methods for minimizing the generation of electrostatic voltages during the production, assembly and packaging of solid state electronic equipment, and the sensitivity of solid state devices to electrostatic damage are discussed. It is concluded that static awareness is the key to an effective electrostatic damage (ESD) control program, and that production facilities must incorporate electrostatic protection facilities, materials, and processes so that workers can concentrate on producing a high-quality product without having to be overly concerned about ESD procedures. (LCL)

Kirk, W.J. Jr.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Carbon Fiber Damage in Particle Beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon fibers are commonly used as moving targets in beam wire scanners. The heating of the fiber due to energy loss of the particles travelling through is simulated with Geant4. The heating induced by the beam electromagnetic field is estimated with ANSYS. The heat transfer and sublimation processes are modelled. Due to the model nonlinearity, a numerical approach based on discretization of the wire movement is used to solve it for particular beams. Radiation damage to the fiber is estimated with SRIM. The model is tested with available SPS and LEP data and a dedicated damage test on the SPS beam is performed followed by a post-mortem analysis of the wire remnants. Predictions for the LHC beams are made.

Dehning, B; Kroyer, T; Meyer, M; Sapinski, M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Challenges and opportunities for structural DNA nanotechnology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Challenges and opportunities for structural DNA nanotechnology Authors: Pinheiro, A. V., Han, D., Shih, W. M., and Yan, H. Title: Challenges and opportunities for structural DNA...

337

Medical Progress: Bilirubin-Induced Neurologic Damage — Mechanisms and Management Approaches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...differences in the cellular mechanisms for unconjugated bilirubin removal. In vitro studies have shown important neuronal and non-neuronal cell-specific responses to unconjugated bilirubin. These findings suggest that there are additional interacting and intricate mechanisms of unconjugated bilirubin toxicity... The complex cascade of molecular and cellular events leading to bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity remains incompletely delineated. This review discusses bilirubin-induced brain damage and recent insights into its pathogenesis and prevention.

Watchko J.F.; Tiribelli C.

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

338

Damage analysis in asphalt concrete mixtures based on parameter relationships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Asphalt pavements experience damage due to traffic loading under various environmental conditions. Damage can be caused by viscopl microcracks, fracture due to fatigue cracking, or fracture due to thermal cracking. Asphalt pavements have...

Song, Injun

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Monitoring Forest Damage Methods and Development in Sweden  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monitoring Forest Damage Methods and Development in Sweden Sören Wulff Faculty of Forestry. Wulff) #12;Monitoring Forest Damage: Methods and Development in Sweden Abstract The aims of the work this thesis is based upon were to assess past and current methods of monitoring forest damage in Sweden

340

Saga of Glass Damage in Urban Environments Continues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Saga of Glass Damage in Urban Environments Continues: Consequences of Aerodynamics and Debris Laboratory University of Notre Dame The Saga of Glass Damage in Urban Environments Continues: Consequences east of the city of Houston. Initial reconnaissance suggested that the observed glass/cladding damage

Kareem, Ahsan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dna damage response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

NONLINEAR ACOUSTIC IMAGING OF STRUCTURAL DAMAGES IN LAMINATED COMPOSITES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NONLINEAR ACOUSTIC IMAGING OF STRUCTURAL DAMAGES IN LAMINATED COMPOSITES L. Pieczonka1 , A. Klepka1 for imaging of structural damage in a laminated composite plate. The techniques that have been considered are performed on a carbon fiber/epoxy laminated composite plate with barely visible impact damage

Boyer, Edmond

342

Induction and Persistence of Large ?H2AX Foci by High Linear Energy Transfer Radiation in DNA-Dependent protein kinase–Deficient Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the cell response to DNA double-strand breaks induced by low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations when the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), an essential protein of the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway, lacks kinase activity. Methods and Materials: CHO10B2, a Chinese hamster ovary cell line, and its derived radiosensitive mutant cell line, irs-20, lacking DNA-PKcs activity, were evaluated after 0 to 3 Gy of ?-rays, plateau and Bragg peak protons, and lithium beams by clonogenic assay, and as a measurement of double-strand breaks, phosphorylated H2AX (?H2AX) foci number and size were quantified by immunocytofluorescence. Results: Irs-20 exhibited greater radiosensitivity and a higher amount of ?H2AX foci than CHO10B2 at 6 hours after irradiation for all types of radiations. Remarkably, CHO10B2 and irs-20 maintained their difference in radiosensitivity after high-LET radiation. Six hours after low-LET radiations, irs-20 did not reach basal levels of ?H2AX at high doses, whereas CHO10B2 recovered basal levels for all doses. After high-LET radiation, only CHO10B2 exhibited a reduction in ?H2AX foci, but it never reached basal levels. Persistent foci in irs-20 confirmed a repair deficiency. Interestingly, after 30 minutes of high-LET radiation both cell lines exhibited large foci (size >0.9 ?m{sup 2}) related to the damage nature, whereas at 6 hours irs-20 showed a higher amount of large foci than CHO10B2, with a 7-fold increase at 3 Gy, that could also be associated to radiosensitivity. Conclusions: We demonstrated, for the first time, an association between deficient DNA-PKcs activity and not only high levels of H2AX phosphorylation but also persistence and size increase of ?H2AX foci after high-LET irradiation.

Bracalente, Candelaria; Ibañez, Irene L. [Departamento de Micro y Nanotecnología, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Molinari, Beatriz [Departamento de Radiobiología, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Palmieri, Mónica [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kreiner, Andrés [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de San Martín, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Valda, Alejandro [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de San Martín, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); and others

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

Nanotechnology Applications in Self-Assembly and DNA Computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Covalent attachment of synthetic DNA to self-assembledof synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides to phi chi 174 DNA:

Akin, Hayri Engin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Sequence independent amplification of DNA  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a rapid sequence-independent amplification procedure (SIA). Even minute amounts of DNA from various sources can be amplified independent of any sequence requirements of the DNA or any a priori knowledge of any sequence characteristics of the DNA to be amplified. This method allows, for example, the sequence independent amplification of microdissected chromosomal material and the reliable construction of high quality fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes from YACs or from other sources. These probes can be used to localize YACs on metaphase chromosomes but also--with high efficiency--in interphase nuclei. 25 figs.

Bohlander, S.K.

1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

345

Sequence independent amplification of DNA  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a rapid sequence-independent amplification procedure (SIA). Even minute amounts of DNA from various sources can be amplified independent of any sequence requirements of the DNA or any a priori knowledge of any sequence characteristics of the DNA to be amplified. This method allows, for example the sequence independent amplification of microdissected chromosomal material and the reliable construction of high quality fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes from YACs or from other sources. These probes can be used to localize YACs on metaphase chromosomes but also--with high efficiency--in interphase nuclei.

Bohlander, Stefan K. (Chicago, IL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Unnatural nucleotides for DNA sequencing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'-dT4XT5 (below). . . 65 4. 4 Attempted incorporation of dXTP by A) Sequenase~ Version 2. 0, B) Klenow, Exonuclease-free and C) DNA Polymerase, Klenow Fragment. . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . 68 4. 5 Attempted... detection of small amounts of DNA present in DNA sequencing gels. Second, tMferent fluorophores are used for each of the base specific reactions. Fluorophores (Figure 1. 4) are covalently attached to the 5' end CHs CHs 0 0 0 HsC CHs 0 ~NH 0 I NH CHs...

Jacutin, Swanee E

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

347

DNA UPTAKE BY TRANSFORMABLE BACTERIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The various processes of DNA uptake by cells can be categorized as: viral DNA entry, conjugation, or transformation. Within each category, a variety of mechanisms have been found. However, considerable similarities occur among the different mechanisms of conjugation and, especially, transformation. All of these natural mechanisms of DNA transfer are quite elaborate and involve multiple protein components, as the case may be, of the virus, the donor cell, and the recipient cell. The mechanisms of viral infection and conjugation will be discussed mainly with respect to their relevance to transformation.

LACKS,S.A.

1999-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

348

Normalized cDNA libraries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

Soares, Marcelo B. (New York, NY); Efstratiadis, Argiris (Englewood, NJ)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Normalized cDNA libraries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3{prime} noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 4 figs.

Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

350

The Arabidopsis SWR1 Chromatin-Remodeling Complex Is Important for DNA Repair, Somatic Recombination, and Meiosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...either without or with a drug (doses ranging from 0.25 to 2 mug...additive roles in response to ionizing radiation. Plant J. 48 : 947-961...1999). DNA-PK activation by ionizing radiation-induced DNA single-strand...

Marisa Rosa; Mona Von Harder; Riccardo Aiese Cigliano; Peter Schlögelhofer; Ortrun Mittelsten Scheid

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

351

PRECISE VIBRATION-BASED DAMAGE LOCALIZATION IN 3D STRUCTURES CONSISTING OF 1D ELEMENTS: SINGLE VS MULTIPLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the experimental setup: The force excitation (Point X) and the two vibration acceleration measurement positionsPRECISE VIBRATION-BASED DAMAGE LOCALIZATION IN 3D STRUCTURES CONSISTING OF 1D ELEMENTS: SINGLE VS MULTIPLE RESPONSE MEASUREMENTS Christos S. Sakaris, John S. Sakellariou and Spilios D. Fassois Stochastic

Boyer, Edmond

352

25.99.99.Q0.05 Damage to University Property Page 1 of 2 STANDARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

25.99.99.Q0.05 Damage to University Property Page 1 of 2 STANDARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE 25, 2015 Standard Administrative Procedure Statement The responsibility for the care of all University and the Building Operations Department and the Department of Student Affairs. The Directors and Program Chairs

353

MICROWAVE IMAGING FOR DAMAGE DETECTION Microwave imaging technology has been developed to detect invisible damage such as  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to detect invisible damage such as voids and cracks inside concrete and debonding between concrete and fiber

De Flaviis, Franco

354

Mechanical Damage from Cavitation in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Accelerated Thrombolysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Mechanical Damage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.3.3 Connection to Mechanical Damage . . . . . . 3.41.2.5 Assessing mechanical damage . . 1.3 Bubble

Weiss, Hope

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Slow elimination of phosphorylated histone {gamma}-H2AX from DNA of terminally differentiated mouse heart cells in situ  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phosphorylation of replacement histone H2AX occurs in megabase chromatin domains around double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) and this modification (called {gamma}-H2AX) may serve as a useful marker of genome damage and repair in terminally differentiated cells. Here using immunohistochemistry we studied kinetics of {gamma}-H2AX formation and elimination in the X-irradiated mouse heart and renal epithelial tissues in situ. Unirradiated tissues have 3-5% {gamma}-H2AX-positive cells and in tissues fixed 1 h after X-irradiation {gamma}-H2AX-positive nuclei are induced in a dose-dependent manner approaching 20-30% after 3 Gy of IR. Analysis of mouse tissues at different times after 3 Gy of IR showed that maximal induction of {gamma}-H2AX in heart is observed 20 min after IR and then is decreased slowly with about half remaining 23 h later. In renal epithelium maximum of the {gamma}-H2AX-positive cells is observed 40 min after IR and then decreases to control values in 23 h. This indicates that there are significant variations between non-proliferating mammalian tissues in the initial H2AX phosphorylation rate as well as in the rate of {gamma}-H2AX elimination after X-irradiation, which should be taken into account in the analysis of radiation responses.

Gavrilov, Boris [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Vezhenkova, Irina [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Firsanov, Denis [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Solovjeva, Liudmila [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Svetlova, Maria [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Mikhailov, Vyacheslav [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Tomilin, Nikolai [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: nvtom@hotmail.com

2006-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

356

Natural Resource Damage Assessment Cooperation and Integration  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), 42 U.S.C. 9601, et seq., Executive Order 12580, and CERCLA's implementing regulations in the National Contingency Plan (NCP), 40 CFR Part 300, give the DOE three roles at DOE facilities undergoing environmental cleanup: lead response agency, natural resource trustee, and the party responsible for releases and threatened releases of hazardous substances. Does not cancel other directives.

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

357

Delay-active damage versus non-local enhancement for anisotropic damage dynamics computations with alternated loading  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of anisotropic visco-damage, by introducing a material strain rate effect in the cases of positive hydro- static: anisotropic damage, concrete, non-local, visco-damage, micro-cracks closure Email address: desmorat such as concrete are mainly governed by the nucleation and the propagation of micro-cracks. Present within

358

CORRELATION OF DNA METHYLATION WITH MERCURY CONTAMINATION IN MARINE ORGANISMS: A CASE STUDY OF NOAA MUSSEL WATCH TISSUE SAMPLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

American oysters (Crassostrea virginica) obtained from the NOAA Mussel Watch program were screened for DNA methylation, a type of epigenetic response to stressors. Oysters were collected from sites in the Gulf of Mexico having high mercury...

Brinkmeyer, Robin; Taylor, Robert; Germ, Kaylyn E.

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

359

Modeling DNA Shuffling Fengzhu Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling DNA Shuffling Fengzhu Sun 1Department of Genetics Emory University School of Medicine property are selected. Irvine et al. (1991) and Sun et al. (1996) studied in vitro evolution not involving

Sun, Fengzhu - Sun, Fengzhu

360

Nanoscale Molecular Transport by Synthetic DNA Machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscale Molecular Transport by Synthetic DNA Machines Jong-Shik Shin1 and Niles A. Pierce1,2 1 a processive bipedal DNA walker. Powered by externally controlled DNA fuel strands, the walker locomotes with a 5 nm stride by advancing the trailing foot to the lead at each step. On a periodic DNA track

Pierce, Niles A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dna damage response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Designs of Autonomous Unidirectional Walking DNA Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a route programmably embedded in the under- lying nanostructure ­ existing synthetic DNA mechanical

Reif, John H.

362

Ancient DNA: the first three decades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Romanov family by DNA analysis. Nat. Genet. 6...Tyler-Smith, C. 1998 Reliability of DNA-based sex tests...W. 2000 Molecular analysis of Neanderthal DNA from...and mitochondrial DNA analysis of a 2000-year-old...high-density picolitre reactors. Nature 437, 376-380...

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Molecular Computing with DNA Self-Assembly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular Computing with DNA Self-Assembly Urmi Majumder #12;Self-Assembly in Nature #12;Key to DNA for Molecular Computing with DNA Self-Assembly Compact: Small library of assembly primitives Complex: Capable in Tiling Assembly: vitroation tural DNA self-assembly has powerful echanisms for error correction

Reif, John H.

364

Covalent Structure of the DNA-DNA Interstrand Cross-Link Formed by Reductively Activated FR66979 in Synthetic DNA Duplexes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Covalent Structure of the DNA-DNA Interstrand Cross-Link Formed by Reductively Activated FR66979 in Synthetic DNA Duplexes ...

Huifang Huang; Tom K. Pratum; Paul B. Hopkins

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Survey of four damage models for concrete.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four conventional damage plasticity models for concrete, the Karagozian and Case model (K&C), the Riedel-Hiermaier-Thoma model (RHT), the Brannon-Fossum model (BF1), and the Continuous Surface Cap Model (CSCM) are compared. The K&C and RHT models have been used in commercial finite element programs many years, whereas the BF1 and CSCM models are relatively new. All four models are essentially isotropic plasticity models for which 'plasticity' is regarded as any form of inelasticity. All of the models support nonlinear elasticity, but with different formulations. All four models employ three shear strength surfaces. The 'yield surface' bounds an evolving set of elastically obtainable stress states. The 'limit surface' bounds stress states that can be reached by any means (elastic or plastic). To model softening, it is recognized that some stress states might be reached once, but, because of irreversible damage, might not be achievable again. In other words, softening is the process of collapse of the limit surface, ultimately down to a final 'residual surface' for fully failed material. The four models being compared differ in their softening evolution equations, as well as in their equations used to degrade the elastic stiffness. For all four models, the strength surfaces are cast in stress space. For all four models, it is recognized that scale effects are important for softening, but the models differ significantly in their approaches. The K&C documentation, for example, mentions that a particular material parameter affecting the damage evolution rate must be set by the user according to the mesh size to preserve energy to failure. Similarly, the BF1 model presumes that all material parameters are set to values appropriate to the scale of the element, and automated assignment of scale-appropriate values is available only through an enhanced implementation of BF1 (called BFS) that regards scale effects to be coupled to statistical variability of material properties. The RHT model appears to similarly support optional uncertainty and automated settings for scale-dependent material parameters. The K&C, RHT, and CSCM models support rate dependence by allowing the strength to be a function of strain rate, whereas the BF1 model uses Duvaut-Lion viscoplasticity theory to give a smoother prediction of transient effects. During softening, all four models require a certain amount of strain to develop before allowing significant damage accumulation. For the K&C, RHT, and CSCM models, the strain-to-failure is tied to fracture energy release, whereas a similar effect is achieved indirectly in the BF1 model by a time-based criterion that is tied to crack propagation speed.

Leelavanichkul, Seubpong (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT); Brannon, Rebecca Moss (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT)

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

The spindle checkpoint : Bubs, Mads, and chromosome-microtubule attachment in budding yeast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) DNA damage response, we hypothesize that the perinuclear pool of Mad proteins may be required for spindle checkpoint-independent functions such as invoking metaphase arrest following DNA damage.

Gillett, Emily S., 1976-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Identification of new functions for BRCT domains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Our lab identified the tandem BRCT domains of PTIP function as a DNA damage responsive phospho binding domain that recognizes proteins phosphorylated by ATM and ATR after DNA damage. The PTIP tandem BRCT domains are ...

Mohammad, Duaa H

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Meta-DNA: synthetic biology via DNA nanostructures and hybridization reactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...articles 1004 181 131 18 Meta-DNA: synthetic biology via DNA nanostructures...protocols for its manipulation. Synthetic DNA is also cheaply and readily available...specific to mDNA and also occurs in synthetic DNA synthesis. One of the key technological...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

SELF-ASSEMBLED DNA NANOSTRUCTURES AND DNA-TEMPLATED SILVER NANOWIRES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

helix bundles, and the cross-tiles as well as synthetic double-stranded DNA moleculesSELF-ASSEMBLED DNA NANOSTRUCTURES AND DNA-TEMPLATED SILVER NANOWIRES by Sung Ha Park Department;ABSTRACT SELF-ASSEMBLED DNA NANOSTRUCTURES AND DNA-TEMPLATED SILVER NANOWIRES by Sung Ha Park Department

Reif, John H.

370

7th International Workshop on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The extended abstracts that follow present a summary of the Proceedings of the 7th International Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at Columbia University’s Kellogg Center in New York City on March 15–17, 2006. These International Workshops on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response have been held regularly since 1993 (1–5). Since the first workshop, there has been a rapid growth (see Fig. 1) in the number of centers developing microbeams for radiobiological research, and worldwide there are currently about 30 microbeams in operation or under development. Single-cell/single-particle microbeam systems can deliver beams of different ionizing radiations with a spatial resolution of a few micrometers down to a few tenths of a micrometer. Microbeams can be used to addressquestions relating to the effects of low doses of radiation (a single radiation track traversing a cell or group of cells), to probe subcellular targets (e.g. nucleus or cytoplasm), and to address questions regarding the propagation of information about DNA damage (for example, the radiation-induced bystander effect). Much of the recent research using microbeams has been to study low-dose effects and ‘‘non-targeted’’ responses such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. This Workshop provided a forum to assess the current state of microbeam technology and current biological applications and to discuss future directions for development, both technological and biological. Over 100 participants reviewed the current state of microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments in the fields of both physics and biology.

Brenner, David J.

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

371

Precise thermal NDE for quantifying structural damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors demonstrated a fast, wide-area, precise thermal NDE imaging system to quantify aircraft corrosion damage, such as percent metal loss, above a threshold of 5% with 3% overall uncertainties. The DBIR precise thermal imaging and detection method has been used successfully to characterize defect types, and their respective depths, in aircraft skins, and multi-layered composite materials used for wing patches, doublers and stiffeners. This precise thermal NDE inspection tool has long-term potential benefits to evaluate the structural integrity of airframes, pipelines and waste containers. They proved the feasibility of the DBIR thermal NDE imaging system to inspect concrete and asphalt-concrete bridge decks. As a logical extension to the successful feasibility study, they plan to inspect a concrete bridge deck from a moving vehicle to quantify the volumetric damage within the deck and the percent of the deck which has subsurface delaminations. Potential near-term benefits are in-service monitoring from a moving vehicle to inspect the structural integrity of the bridge deck. This would help prioritize the repair schedule for a reported 200,000 bridge decks in the US which need substantive repairs. Potential long-term benefits are affordable, and reliable, rehabilitation for bridge decks.

Del Grande, N.K.; Durbin, P.F.

1995-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

372

Identification of Intrinsic Order and Disorder in the DNA Repair Protein XPA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The damage recognition protein XPA is required to recognize a wide variety of bulky lesions during nucleotide excision repair (NER). Independent NMR solution structures of a human XPA protein (hXPA) fragment comprising approximately one-third of the full-length protein, the minimal DNA-binding domain (MBD), revealed that ~30% of the molecule was structurally disordered. To better characterize structural features of XPA, we performed time-resolved trypsin proteolysis on active, full-length recombinant Xenopus XPA protein (xXPA). The resulting proteolytic fragments were analyzed by electrospray ionization interface coupled to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ESI-FTICR) mass spectrometry, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), and selected N-terminal sequence determinations. The mass spectrum of the full-length xXPA was consistent with the predicted sequence, 30922.02 vs. 30922.45 Da; respectively. Moreover, the mass spectrometric data allowed the assignment of multiple xXPA fragments not resolvable by SDS PAGE. Full-length xXPA exhibited aberrant mobility on SDS-PAGE with an apparent MW of ~40 kDa. To test predictions that a Glu-rich region (E70-E76) or other local regions of high charge were responsible for this ~40% aberrant SDS-PAGE mobility, the MW's of partial proteolytic fragments from ~5 to 25 kDa precisely determined by ESI-FTICR MS were correlated with their gel positions. Surprisingly, all tested partial tryptic fragments within this size-range exhibited 10-42% divergence between calculated MW and that estimated by SDS-PAGE, thus indicating the origin of anomalous migration of XPA is not localized. The computer program Predictor of Natural Disordered Regions (PONDR) correctly identified several regions of xXPA either sensitive or resistant to partial proteolysis, thereby indicating that disorder in XPA shares sequence features with other well-characterized intrinsically unstructured proteins.

Iakoucheva, Lilia M.; Kimzey, Amy L.; Masselon, Christophe D.; Bruce, James E.; Garner, Ethan C.; Brown, Celeste J.; Dunker, A. K.; Smith, Richard D.; Ackerman, Eric J.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Does complex absorption behavior leading to conditioning and damage in KDP/DKDP reflect the electronic structure of initiators?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, most of our thinking about the defects responsible for initiating laser damage considers them as featureless absorbers. However, an increasing body of evidence, particularly involving multi-wavelength irradiation, suggests electronic structure of damage initiators is important in determining both initiation and conditioning behaviors in KDP. The effective absorption coefficient of energy under multi-wavelength irradiation cannot be accounted for by a structureless absorber, but is consistent with an initiator with a multi-level structure. We outline the evidence and assess the ability of such a simple multi-level model to explain these and other experimentally observed behaviors.

Feit, M D; DeMange, P P; Negres, R A; Rubenchik, A M; Demos, S G

2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

374

Anisotropy of Laser-Induced Bulk Damage of Single Crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The regularities of laser-induced damage of anisotropic materials, such as LiNbO3 and KDP dielectric single crystals, are experimentally studied. It is revealed that the shape of laser-induced damage in the dielectric crystals depends on the elastic symmetry of crystal and the propagation direction of the laser beam. When the beam propagates along the optic axis of crystals, the figures of the laser damage are six-path stars for LiNbO3 and four-path ones for KDP crystals. For the direction parallel to X and Y axes in KDP crystal, the damage has initially cross-like configuration, with further splitting of Z-oriented crack into two cracks in the process of damage evolution, leading to transformation of orthogonal-type damage to a hexagonal-type one.

Krupych, O; Smaga, I; Vlokh, R

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Diagnostics for the detection and evaluation of laser induced damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Laser Damage and Conditioning Group at LLNL is evaluating diagnostics which will help make damage testing more efficient and reduce the risk of damage during laser conditioning. The work to date has focused on photoacoustic and scattered light measurements on 1064-nm wavelength HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} multilayer mirror and polarizer coatings. Both the acoustic and scatter diagnostics have resolved 10 {mu}m diameter damage points in these coatings. Using a scanning stage, the scatter diagnostic can map both intrinsic and laser-induced scatter. Damage threshold measurements obtained using scatter diagnostics compare within experimental error with those measured using 100x Nomarski microscopy. Scatter signals measured during laser conditioning can be used to detect damage related to nodular defects.

Sheehan, L.; Kozlowski, M.; Rainer, F.

1995-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

376

Coordination of Centrosome Homeostasis and DNA Repair Is Intact in MCF-7 and Disrupted in MDA-MB 231 Breast Cancer Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sites of UV-irradiation-induced DNA damage, in vivo. Carcinogenesis 2003;24:843-50. 11 van der Spek PJ , Eker A, Rademakers S, et al. XPC and human homologs of RAD23: intracellular localization and relationship to other nucleotide excision repair...

Ilie D. Acu; Tieju Liu; Kelly Suino-Powell; Steven M. Mooney; Antonino B. D'Assoro; Nicholas Rowland; Alysson R. Muotri; Ricardo G. Correa; Yun Niu; Rajiv Kumar; Jeffrey L. Salisbury

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Thermal Decomposition of Radiation-Damaged Polystyrene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiation-damaged polystyrene (given the identification name of 'polycube') was fabricated by mixing high-density polystyrene material ("Dylene Fines # 100") with plutonium and uranium oxides. The polycubes were used in the 1960s for criticality studies during processing of spent nuclear fuel. The polycubes have since been stored for almost 40 years at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) after failure of two processes to reclaim the plutonium and uranium oxides from the polystyrene matrix. Thermal decomposition products from this highly cross-linked polystyrene matrix were characterized using Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectroscopy (GC/MS) system coupled to a horizontal furnace. The decomposition studies were performed in air and helium atmospheres at about 773 K. The volatile and semi-volatile organic products for the radiation-damaged polystyrene were different compared to virgin polystyrene. The differences were in the number of organic species generated and their concentrations. In the inert (i.e., helium) atmosphere, the major volatile organic products identified (in order of decreasing concentrations) were styrene, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, nathphalene, propane, .alpha.-methylbenzene, indene and 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene. But in air, the major volatile organic species identified changed slightly. Concentrations of the organic species in the inert atmosphere were significantly higher than those for the air atmosphere processing. Overall, 38 volatile organic species were identified in the inert atmosphere compared to 49 species in air. Twenty of the 38 species in the inert conditions were also products in the air atmosphere. Twenty-two oxidized organic products were identified during thermal processing in air.

Abrefah, John; Klinger, George S.

2000-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

378

Thermal Decomposition of Radiation-Damaged Polystyrene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiation-damaged polystyrene material (''polycube'') used in this study was synthesized by mixing a high-density polystyrene (''Dylene Fines No. 100'') with plutonium and uranium oxides. The polycubes were used on the Hanford Site in the 1960s for criticality studies to determine the hydrogen-to-fissile atom ratios for neutron moderation during processing of spent nuclear fuel. Upon completion of the studies, two methods were developed to reclaim the transuranic (TRU) oxides from the polymer matrix: (1) burning the polycubes in air at 873 K; and (2) heating the polycubes in the absence of oxygen and scrubbing the released monomer and other volatile organics using carbon tetrachloride. Neither of these methods was satisfactory in separating the TRU oxides from the polystyrene. Consequently, the remaining polycubes were sent to the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) for storage. Over time, the high dose of alpha and gamma radiation has resulted in a polystyrene matrix that is highly cross-linked and hydrogen deficient and a stabilization process is being developed in support of Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 94-1. Baseline processes involve thermal treatment to pyrolyze the polycubes in a furnace to decompose the polystyrene and separate out the TRU oxides. Thermal decomposition products from this degraded polystyrene matrix were characterized by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to provide information for determining the environmental impact of the process and for optimizing the process parameters. A gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) system coupled to a horizontal tube furnace was used for the characterization studies. The decomposition studies were performed both in air and helium atmospheres at 773 K, the planned processing temperature. The volatile and semi-volatile organic products identified for the radiation-damaged polystyrene were different from those observed for virgin polystyrene. The differences were in the n umber of organic species generated and their concentrations.

J Abrefah GS Klinger

2000-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

379

Mass Spectrometric Study of Genetic and Epigenetic DNA Modifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of cytosine in synthetic duplex DNA. Moreover, the level ofmethylation in synthetic duplex DNA. The underlined “C”of cytosine in synthetic duplex DNA. Moreover, the global

Wang, Hongxia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Structure of the 'Escherichia Coli' Leucine-Responsive Regulatory Protein Lrp Reveals a Novel Octameric Assembly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structure of Escherichia coli leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) cocrystallized with a short duplex oligodeoxynucleotide reveals a novel quaternary assembly in which the protein octamer forms an open, linear array of four dimers. In contrast, structures of the Lrp homologs LrpA, LrpC and AsnC crystallized in the absence of DNA show that these proteins instead form highly symmetrical octamers in which the four dimers form a closed ring. Although the DNA is disordered within the Lrp crystal, comparative analyses suggest that the observed differences in quaternary state may arise from DNA interactions during crystallization. Interconversion of these conformations, possibly in response to DNA or leucine binding, provides an underlying mechanism to alter the relative spatial orientation of the DNA-binding domains. Breaking of the closed octamer symmetry may be a common essential step in the formation of active DNA complexes by all members of the Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulatory proteins.

de los Rios, S.; Perona, J.J.; /UC, Santa Barbara

2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dna damage response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Thermomechanics of damage and fatigue by a phase field model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the paper we present an isothermal model for describing damage and fatigue by the use of the Ginzburg-Landau (G-L) equation. Fatigue produces progressive damage, which is related with a variation of the internal structure of the material. The G-L equation studies the evolution of the order parameter, which describes the constitutive arrangement of the system and, in this framework, the evolution of damage. The thermodynamic coherence of the model is proved. In the last part of the work, we extend the results of the paper to a non-isothermal system, where fatigue contains thermal effects, which increase the damage of materials.

Giovambattista Amendola; Mauro Fabrizio

2014-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

382

Hail Ice Damage of Stringer-Stiffened Curved Composite Panels /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stiffener Impact Damage. Composite Structures 2003;62:213–FTE Values of Carbon/Epoxy Composite Tape Laminate Plates [Sarh B, Kismarton MU. Composite Structures: The First 100

Le, Jacqueline Linh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Radiation Damage in Titanate Ceramics Used for Plutonium Immobilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results from radiation damage experiments are discussed with respect to the immobilization of Pu declared excess to the weapons programs. The ceramics are titanate-based.

Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Richard L.; Schaef, Herbert T.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Buchmiller, William C.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

A Case of Acquired Stuttering Following Brain Damage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Whilst neurogenic stuttering is by now a well-recognized nosological ... , this volume). A case of acquired stuttering following brain damage sustained in adulthood is...

H. Bijleveld; A.-M. Simon

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Femtosecond Laser Damage Resistance of Optical Coating Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On the basis of recent experiments and published results we investigate the Laser Induced Damage Threshold of optical coatings materials (oxides, fluorides, mixture materials) with...

Gallais, Laurent; Commandré, Mireille

386

Seismic damage identification for steel structures using distributed fiber optics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A distributed fiber optic monitoring methodology based on optic time domain reflectometry technology is developed for seismic damage identification of steel structures. Epoxy with a...

Hou, Shuang; Cai, C S; Ou, Jinping

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

DNA chips --Integrated Chemical Circuits for DNADiagnosis and DNA computers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Their needs are i nc reasing with the rapid progress of the genome projects. DNA chips will also provide basic about 6,000 genes. In 2002­2005, sequencing of the whole human genome w i l l be finished. There are about 100,000 genes in the human genome. These efforts are about to open a new age where everything

Hagiya, Masami

388

PHMC post-NPH emergency response training  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes post-Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) emergency response training that was provided to two teams of Project Hanford Management Contractors (PHMC) staff that will be used to assess potential structural damage that may occur as a result of a significant natural phenomena event. This training supports recent plans and procedures to use trained staff to inspect structures following an NPH event on the Hanford Site.

Conrads, T.J.

1997-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

389

The assessment of DNA-synthetic activity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method is described by which a numerical value can be assigned to the amount of DNA-synthesis shown graphically by population-histograms obtained ... index appeared to give a reasonable measure of DNA-synthetic

L. A. Coulton; B. Henderson; J. Chayen

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Fralin Life Science Institute DNA Biotechnology Kit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fralin Life Science Institute DNA Biotechnology Kit INFORMATION MANUAL Kristi DeCourcy & Erin Dolan ..................................................................................................... 3 DNA Biotechnology Kit contents), in partnership with the Virginia Biotechnology Association (VaBIO) and the Virginia Manufacturers Association

Virginia Tech

391

A DNA tweezer-actuated enzyme nanoreactor  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A DNA tweezer-actuated enzyme nanoreactor Authors: Liu, M., Fu, J., Hejesen, C., Yang, Y., Woodbury, N.W., Gothelf, K., Liu, Y., and Yan, H. Title: A DNA tweezer-actuated enzyme...

392

DNA Concentration By UV Spectrophotometry Measure Absorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DNA Concentration By UV Spectrophotometry Measure Absorption: 1. Dilute DNA to 0.5 to 50 µg 2. Measure absorption at 260 nm (A260). Start by zeroing instrument with TE buffer or dH2O alone

Aris, John P.

393

Towards Privacy Preserving of Forensic DNA Databases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protecting privacy of individuals is critical for forensic genetics. In a kinship/identity testing, related DNA profiles between user's query and the DNA database need to be extracted. However, unrelated profiles cannot be revealed to each other...

Liu, Sanmin

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

394

Response Elements  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Guide provides acceptable methods for meeting the requirement of DOE O 151.1C for response elements that respond or contribute to response as needed in an emergency. Cancels DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-5, and DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-6.

2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

395

Chromosome specific repetitive DNA sequences  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for determining specific nucleotide sequences useful in forming a probe which can identify specific chromosomes, preferably through in situ hybridization within the cell itself. In one embodiment, chromosome preferential nucleotide sequences are first determined from a library of recombinant DNA clones having families of repetitive sequences. Library clones are identified with a low homology with a sequence of repetitive DNA families to which the first clones respectively belong and variant sequences are then identified by selecting clones having a pattern of hybridization with genomic DNA dissimilar to the hybridization pattern shown by the respective families. In another embodiment, variant sequences are selected from a sequence of a known repetitive DNA family. The selected variant sequence is classified as chromosome specific, chromosome preferential, or chromosome nonspecific. Sequences which are classified as chromosome preferential are further sequenced and regions are identified having a low homology with other regions of the chromosome preferential sequence or with known sequences of other family me This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

Moyzis, Robert K. (Los Alamos, NM); Meyne, Julianne (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

International Standards in Forensic DNA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Standards in Forensic DNA John M. Butler, Ph.D. National Institute of Standards and Technology NIST Fellow & Special Assistant to the Director for Forensic Science Vice-Chair, National Commission on Forensic Science World Forensics Festival Seoul, Korea October 15, 2014 #12;Definition

397

DNA Hybridization Catalysts and Catalyst Circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

blocks for a synthetic DNA-based circuit. While ri- bozymes are the best known example of nucleic acids

Winfree, Erik

398

Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ to increase the amount of DNA associated with a chromosome or chromosome region is described. The amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ provides for the synthesis of Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) painting probes from single dissected chromosome fragments, the production of cDNA libraries from low copy mRNAs and improved in Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) procedures.

Christian, Allen T. (Tracy, CA); Coleman, Matthew A. (Livermore, CA); Tucker, James D. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Mutations & DNA Repair I. What are Mutations?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ one strand loops out and becomes displaced during replication ­ DNA pol stuttering ­ Occurs frequently

Dever, Jennifer A.

400

DNA Assembly Method Standardization for Synthetic Biomolecular Circuits and Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simply put, the DNA assembly challenge is to take a set of double-stranded DNA fragments, and physically (as well as ... to yield a single, potentially circular, assembled DNA sequence. These DNA sequence fragmen...

Nathan J. Hillson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dna damage response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Meta-DNA: A DNA-Based Approach to Synthetic Harish Chandran1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meta-DNA: A DNA-Based Approach to Synthetic Biology Harish Chandran1 harish@cs.duke.edu Nikhil Gopalkrishnan, Bernard Yurke, John Reif, Meta-DNA: Synthetic Biology via DNA Nanostructures and Hybridization@cs.duke.edu Abstract The goal of synthetic biology is to design and assemble synthetic systems that mimic bio- logical

Reif, John H.

402

Identification of sequence-dependent DNA features correlating to activity of DNA sites interacting with proteins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......transcription factor MEF-2C for synthetic DNA (Meierhans et al ., 1997; Meierhans...Savinkova et al ., 1998) Synthetic DNA start 20 affinity yTBP/DNA X1...Bendall and Molloy, 1994) Synthetic DNA start X1 X2 10; 13 10; 18 depth......

MP Ponomarenko; JV Ponomarenko; AS Frolov; NL Podkolodny; LK Savinkova; NA Kolchanov; GC Overton

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

DNA nanotubes and helical nanotapes via self-assembly of ssDNA-amphiphiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DNA nanotubes and helical nanotapes via self- assembly of ssDNA-amphiphiles Timothy R. Pearcea and Efrosini Kokkoli*b DNA nanotubes were created using molecular self-assembly of single-stranded DNA (ss. The nanotube structures were formed by bilayers of amphiphiles, with the hydrophobic components forming

Kokkoli, Efie

404

Supplementary Information for: Integrating DNA Strand Displacement Circuitry with DNA Tile Self-assembly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supplementary Information for: Integrating DNA Strand Displacement Circuitry with DNA Tile Self-assembly of Contents: · Supplementary Figures 1. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of DNA tile self-assembly 2. UV absorbance annealing and melting curves of DNA tile self-assembly 3. Characterization

Zhang, David Yu

405

GHG Targets as Insurance Against Catastrophic Climate Damages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GHG Targets as Insurance Against Catastrophic Climate Damages Martin L. Weitzman The climate system GHG concentration targets as insurance against catastrophic climate-change temperatures and damages, the primary reason for keeping GHG levels down is to insure against high-temperature catastrophic climate

406

An enhanced Lemaitre model formulation for materials processing damage computation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are presented and discussed to deal with complex multiaxial configurations ­ such as multi-stages bulk forming loading, involving crack closure effects. - Simple parameters identification: whatever the damage model used, the identification of damage parameters is an important issue. Most of the time

Boyer, Edmond

407

Evaluation of moisture damage within asphalt concrete mixes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pavements are a major part of the infrastructure in the United States. Moisture damage of these pavements is a significant problem. To predict and prevent this kind of moisture damage a great deal of research has been performed on this issue in past...

Shah, Brij D.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

408

20 May 2013 Moore, Oklahoma, Tornado: Damage Survey and Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The tornado that affected Moore, Oklahoma, and the surrounding area on 20 May 2013 was an extreme event. It traveled 23 km and damage was up to 1.7 km wide. The tornado killed 24 people, injured over 200 others, and damaged many structures. A team ...

Donald Burgess; Kiel Ortega; Greg Stumpf; Gabe Garfield; Chris Karstens; Tiffany Meyer; Brandon Smith; Doug Speheger; Jim Ladue; Rick Smith; Tim Marshall

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTE CRYSTAL SURFACES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Semi-conducting CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals can be used in a variety of detector-type applications. CZT shows great promise for use as a gamma radiation spectrometer. However, its performance is adversely affected by point defects, structural and compositional heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), secondary phases and in some cases, damage caused by external forces. One example is damage that occurs during characterization of the surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy. Even minimal laser power can cause Te enriched areas on the surface to appear. The Raman spectra resulting from measurements at moderate intensity laser power show large increases in peak intensity that is attributed to Te. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the extent of damage to the CZT crystal surface following exposure to the Raman laser. AFM data reveal localized surface damage in the areas exposed to the Raman laser beam. The degree of surface damage to the crystal is dependent on the laser power, with the most observable damage occurring at high laser power. Moreover, intensity increases in the Te peaks of the Raman spectra are observed even at low laser power with little to no visible damage observed by AFM. AFM results also suggest that exposure to the same amount of laser power yields different amounts of surface damage depending on whether the exposed surface is the Te terminating face or the Cd terminating face of CZT.

Hawkins, S; Lucile Teague, L; Martine Duff, M; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

410

LASER ULTRASONIC IMAGING FOR IMPACT DAMAGE VISUALIZATION IN COMPOSITE STRUCTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LASER ULTRASONIC IMAGING FOR IMPACT DAMAGE VISUALIZATION IN COMPOSITE STRUCTURE Chao Zhang1 , Jinhao Qiu1* , Hongli Ji1 1 State Key Laboratory of Mechanics and Control of Mechanical Structures ultrasonic scanning technique has great potential for damage evaluation in various applications. In order

Boyer, Edmond

411

Sm and DNA Binding by dual reactive B cells requires distinct V{sub H}, V{sub {kappa}}, and V{sub H} CDR3 structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have previously demonstrated an overlap of the anti-Sm and anti-DNA responses in MRL/Mp-Ipr/Ipr mice. The Ab produced by many anti-Sm hybridomas bind DNA and are encoded by Ig V genes used by anti-DNA hybridomas. In addition, some anti-Sm Ab that bind DNA have acquired mutations that improve DNA binding, indicating that DNA is a selecting Ag in the anti-Sm response. To gain insight into the basis for the dual binding ability of these Ab, we coexpressed the H chain from the anti-Sm hybridoma 2-12 with nine different L chains. Hybridoma 2-12 binds Sm but not DNA, yet expresses the same J558 V{sub H} gene as three anti-Sm hybridomas that bind ssDNA and at least one anti-DNA hybridoma that does not bind Sm. We found that most of the transfectoma Ab bind Sm, but their avidities vary over more than 3 orders of magnitude. Five of the nine transfectoma Ab bind ssDNA, and none bind dsDNA. In general, the ability to bind each Ag follows the binding ability of the hybridoma from which the L chain is derived. H Chain swapping experiments indicate that the H chain, V{sub H} CDR3 in particular contributes to the binding of both Sm and DNA. We conclude that Sm and DNA select for distinct features of V{sub H}, V{sub {kappa}}, and V{sub H} CDR3, suggesting selection by both Ag in the anti-Sm response.

Retter, M.W.; Eisenberg, R.A.; Cohen, P.L. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)] [and others

1995-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

DNA adsorption on synthetic and natural allophanes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The adsorption of DNA on natural and synthetic samples of allophane, which is a primary clay mineral of andosols, was investigated with respect to the DNA concentration, pH, ionic strength in the sample solution, and competition between DNA molecules and phosphate ions for adsorption to understand the behavior of extracellular DNA molecules in andosols. The relationships between DNA adsorption and the final concentrations were significantly fitted to a simple linear Langmuir equation. DNA adsorption decreased considerably with increasing suspension pH in the range between 3 and 9. The adsorption was less affected by the ionic strength of the suspension from 0.1 to 0.5 mol L? 1. Under the same experimental conditions, DNA adsorption on allophanes was relatively higher than that on montmorillonite and silica but relatively lower than that on gibbsite and goethite. DNA adsorption on allophanes decreased on the addition of phosphate, indicating that there was a competition between DNA molecules and phosphate ions for adsorption on the minerals. These results suggested that DNA adsorption on allophanes occurred via two mechanisms: direct bonding of the phosphate group at the end of the DNA molecule to the OH groups of the Al-oxide layer on allophane, and the association of DNA molecules with the surface of negatively charged allophane via a bridging of inorganic cations.

Kazutoshi Saeki; Masao Sakai; Shin-Ichiro Wada

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Electromechanical Unzipping of Individual DNA Molecules Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electromechanical Unzipping of Individual DNA Molecules Using Synthetic Sub-2 nm Pores Ben Mc synthetic pores can be used to electrome- chanically unzip DNA duplexes.13 However, direct measure- ment time that the unzipping kinetics of individual DNA duplexes can be probed by analyzing the dwell

414

DNA Nanotechnology and its Biological Applications1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 DNA Nanotechnology and its Biological Applications1 Chapter 13 of Book: Bio-inspired and Nano, amplified sensing, and molecular transport. 13.1 Introduction 13.1.1 DNA Nanotechnology and its use conventional top-down manufacturing techniques. Other surveys of DNA nanotechnology and devices have been given

Reif, John H.

415

Self-assembled DNA Structures for Nanoconstruction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-assembled DNA Structures for Nanoconstruction Hao Yan, Peng Yin, Sung Ha Park, Hanying Li methods based on DNA self-assembly. Here we review our recent experimental progress to utilize novel DNA nanostructures for self-assembly as well as for templates in the fabrication of functional nano

Yin, Peng

416

HELICASE DEPENDENT AMPLICATION transfer the DNA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STEP 1 STEP 2 STEP 3 HELICASE DEPENDENT AMPLICATION HELICASE DNA POLYMERASE transfer the DNA instrumentation. MOLECULAR BIOMARKERS MADE UP DNA or RNA STRANDS ARE A POWERFUL WEAPON IN DETECTING DISEASE. USING for sample preparation at the point to care using only hand generated power.... #12;

417

Self-Assembled DNA Crystals: The Impact on Resolution of 5?-Phosphates and the DNA Source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Self-assembled 3D DNA crystals; crystal resolution; phosphorylated DNA; natural and synthetic DNA; X-ray diffraction; designed crystals ... During the last two decades, we have found two instances where synthetic DNA did not produce the results expected from it, when used as an enzymatic substrate; by contrast, DNA generated by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was an effective substrate. ... One example was the low level at which a synthetic DNA molecule was transcribed by T7 RNA polymerase to produce an RNA knot;(6, 7) the other instance was the incomplete restriction of a DNA graph assembled from synthetic branched junctions. ...

Ruojie Sha; Jens J. Birktoft; Nam Nguyen; Arun Richard Chandrasekaran; Jianping Zheng; Xinshuai Zhao; Chengde Mao; Nadrian C. Seeman

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

418

Exploring the common molecular basis for the universal DNA mutation bias: Revival of Loewdin mutation model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: {yields} There exists a universal G:C {yields} A:T mutation bias in three domains of life. {yields} This universal mutation bias has not been sufficiently explained. {yields} A DNA mutation model proposed by Loewdin 40 years ago offers a common explanation. -- Abstract: Recently, numerous genome analyses revealed the existence of a universal G:C {yields} A:T mutation bias in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. To explore the molecular basis for this mutation bias, we examined the three well-known DNA mutation models, i.e., oxidative damage model, UV-radiation damage model and CpG hypermutation model. It was revealed that these models cannot provide a sufficient explanation to the universal mutation bias. Therefore, we resorted to a DNA mutation model proposed by Loewdin 40 years ago, which was based on inter-base double proton transfers (DPT). Since DPT is a fundamental and spontaneous chemical process and occurs much more frequently within GC pairs than AT pairs, Loewdin model offers a common explanation for the observed universal mutation bias and thus has broad biological implications.

Fu, Liang-Yu [National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China) [National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Center for Bioinformatics, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Wang, Guang-Zhong [State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Ma, Bin-Guang [Center for Bioinformatics, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China)] [Center for Bioinformatics, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Zhang, Hong-Yu, E-mail: zhy630@mail.hzau.edu.cn [National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China) [National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Center for Bioinformatics, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China)

2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

419

Control of Damage to Museum Objects by Optical Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Control of Damage to Museum Objects by Optical Radiation Control of Damage to Museum Objects by Optical Radiation Speaker(s): Eliyahu Ne'eman Date: June 7, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 This Presentation is based on CIE Publication 157:2004 which has been recently published. It is the report of CIE Technical Committee 3-22 with the same title. Leading experts on Museum lighting from Australia, Canada, Finland, France, Japan, Germany, Great Britain, New Zealand and the USA, took part in writing this document. The two processes by which exposure to light may cause damage are photochemical action and radiant heating effect. These processes are examined and the characteristics of damage caused to museum objects are described. Recent research, which has aimed to relate the extent of exposure of materials to measures of damage

420

Excavation Damaged Zones In Rock Salt Formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Salt formations have long been proposed as potential host rocks for nuclear waste disposal. After the operational phase of a repository the openings, e.g., boreholes, galleries, and chambers, have to be sealed in order to avoid the release of radionuclides into the biosphere. For optimising the sealing techniques knowledge about the excavation damaged zones (EDZ) around these openings is essential. In the frame of a project performed between 2004 and 2007, investigations of the EDZ evolution were performed in the Stassfurt halite of the Asse salt mine in northern Germany. Three test locations were prepared in the floor of an almost 20 year old gallery on the 800-m level of the Asse mine: (1) the drift floor as existing, (2) the new drift floor shortly after removing of a layer of about 1 m thickness of the floor with a continuous miner, (3) the new drift floor 2 years after cutting off the 1-m layer. Subject of investigation were the diffusive and advective gas transport and the advective brine transport very close to the opening. Spreading of the brine was tracked by geo-electric monitoring in order to gain information about permeability anisotropy. Results obtained showed that EDZ cut-off is a useful method to improve sealing effectiveness when constructing technical barriers. (authors)

Jockwer, N.; Wieczorek, K. [Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Braunschweig (Germany)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dna damage response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Speeding up a single-molecule DNA device with a simple catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, several groups have designed and synthesized single-molecule devices based on DNA that can switch between different configurations in response to sequential addition of fuel DNA strands. There is considerable interest in improving the speed of these “nanomotors.” One approach is the use of rationally designed DNA catalysts to promote hybridization of complementary oligonucleotides. A particularly simple and robust DNA device reported by Li and Tan is comprised of a single-strand 17-base oligomer that folds into a chairlike quadruplex structure. We have identified the key rate-limiting barrier in this device as the tendency for one of the fuel strands B to fold into the quadruplex configuration of the device strand. This seriously impedes the restoration reaction. We have designed a catalytic strand to inhibit the folding of B and shown that the catalyst speeds up the restoration reaction by roughly a factor of 2. The catalyst remains effective even after repeated cycling.

Yufang Wang; Y. Zhang; N. P. Ong

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1994, a status report. Volume 22: Appendix I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nine operational events that affected eleven commercial light-water reactors (LWRs) during 1994 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by computer-screening the 1994 licensee event reports from commercial LWRs to identify those that could be potential precursors. Candidate precursors were then selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure that the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969--1981 and 1984--1993 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for events. This document is bound in two volumes: Vol. 21 contains the main report and Appendices A--H; Vol. 22 contains Appendix 1.

Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dolan, B.W.; Minarick, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

A study of radiation damage effects on the magnetic structure of bulk Iron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Defects, defect interactions, and defect dynamics in solids created by fast neutrons are known to have significant impact on the performance and lifetime of structural materials. A fundamental understanding of the radiation damage effects in solids is therefore of great importance in assisting the development of improved materials - materials with ultrahigh strength, toughness, and radiation resistance. In this presentation, we show our recent theoretical investigation on the magnetic structure evolution of bulk iron in the region of the radiation defects. We applied a linear scaling ab-initio method based on density functional theory with local spin density approximation, namely the locally self-consistent multiple scattering method (LSMS), to the study of magnetic moment distributions in a cascade at the damage peak and for a series of time steps as the interstitials and vacancies recombined. Atomic positions correspond to those in a low energy cascade in a 10|000 atom sample, in which the primary damage state and the evolution of all defects produced were simulated using molecular dynamics with empirical, embedded-atom inter-atomic potentials. We will discuss how a region of affected moments expands and then recedes in response to a cascade evolution.

Wang Yang [Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Nicholson, D. M. C.; Stocks, G. M.; Rusanu, Aurelian; Eisenbach, Markus; Stoller, R. E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Chemical repair of base lesions, AP-sites, and strand breaks on plasmid DNA in dilute aqueous solution by ascorbic acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •We report a novel mechanism of radiation protection of DNA by chemical activity of ascorbic acid. •The “chemical repair” of DNA damage was revealed using biochemical assay and chemical kinetics analysis. •We found that ascorbic acid significantly repairs precursors of nucleobase lesions and abasic sites. •However, ascorbic acid seldom repairs precursors of DNA-strand breaks. -- Abstract: We quantified the damage yields produced in plasmid DNA by ?-irradiation in the presence of low concentrations (10–100 ?M) of ascorbic acid, which is a major antioxidant in living systems, to clarify whether it chemically repairs radiation damage in DNA. The yield of DNA single strand breaks induced by irradiation was analyzed with agarose gel electrophoresis as conformational changes in closed circular plasmids. Base lesions and abasic sites were also observed as additional conformational changes by treating irradiated samples with glycosylase proteins. By comparing the suppression efficiencies to the induction of each DNA lesion, in addition to scavenging of the OH radicals derived from water radiolysis, it was found that ascorbic acid promotes the chemical repair of precursors of AP-sites and base lesions more effectively than those of single strand breaks. We estimated the efficiency of the chemical repair of each lesion using a kinetic model. Approximately 50–60% of base lesions and AP-sites were repaired by 10 ?M ascorbic acid, although strand breaks were largely unrepaired by ascorbic acid at low concentrations. The methods in this study will provide a route to understanding the mechanistic aspects of antioxidant activity in living systems.

Hata, Kuniki [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan) [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakatashirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Urushibara, Ayumi; Yamashita, Shinichi; Shikazono, Naoya; Yokoya, Akinari [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakatashirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)] [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakatashirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Katsumura, Yosuke, E-mail: katsu@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan) [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakatashirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan)

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

425

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-3047E Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers G described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers. California Energy

426

Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA Resources with Additional Information Charles DeLisi As head of DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research, Charles DeLisi played a pivotal role in proposing and initiating the Human Genome Program in 1986. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has historically been active in supporting human genome research. On September 10, 2003, Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham presented the Secretary's Gold Award to Aristides Patrinos and Francis Collins for their leadership of the government's Human Genome Project. At DOE's Office of Science, Dr. Patrinos is the Associate Director for Biological and Environmental Research. He has been a researcher at the department's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Brookhaven National Laboratory.

427

Electromagnetic Signals from Bacterial DNA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical reactions can be induced at a distance due to the propagation of electromagnetic signals during intermediate chemical stages. Although is is well known at optical frequencies, e.g. photosynthetic reactions, electromagnetic signals hold true for muck lower frequencies. In E. coli bacteria such electromagnetic signals can be generated by electric transitions between energy levels describing electrons moving around DNA loops. The electromagnetic signals between different bacteria within a community is a "wireless" version of intercellular communication found in bacterial communities connected by "nanowires". The wireless broadcasts can in principle be of both the AM and FM variety due to the magnetic flux periodicity in electron energy spectra in bacterial DNA orbital motions.

A. Widom; J. Swain; Y. N. Srivastava; S. Sivasubramanian

2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

428

Repairs for damaged bolt holes in continuous fiber reinforced plastics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

repair method for damaged bolt holes in such composites. Bolt holes in three types of graphite-epoxy were purposely damaged and then repaired. Each was tested to characterize its static and fatigue behavior. The tests used a special fixture to simulate... composite joints . Bearing-bypass ratio can change the failure mode of bolted composite joints 7 Drilling defects in graphite-epoxy coupons 12 26 The exit side of a IM7/8551-7A 18 ply tape coupon showing the damage due to drilling 27 9 Resin filled...

Copps, Kevin Daniel

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

429

A Critical Examination of the Adaptive Response for Cytogenetic Damagein Human Cells, and Insights into the Adaptive Response Mechanism  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Critical Examination of the Adaptive Response for Cytogenetic Damage Critical Examination of the Adaptive Response for Cytogenetic Damage in Human Cells, and Insights into the Adaptive Response Mechanism Björn E. Rydberg, Torsten Groesser, Antoine Snijders, Kelly Trego, Ju Han, Do Yup Lee, Bahram Parvin, Trent Northen, Andrew J. Wyrobek, and Priscilla K. Cooper Berkeley Lab SFA P.I.: Gary Karpen Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 Goal: Task 1 of the Berkeley Lab SFA is designed to identify adaptive response (AR) mechanisms that may affect risk of developing radiation-induced cancer and to assess the linearity with dose of processes that influence mammary gland carcinogenesis. We use both in vitro and in vivo experimental systems in a parallelogram strategy. Our human cell culture

430

HIV-1 Tat depresses DNA-PK{sub CS} expression and DNA repair, and sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose There is accumulating evidence that cancer patients with human immmunodeficiency virus-1/acquired immunodeficency syndrome (HIV-1/AIDS) have more severe tissue reactions and often develop cutaneous toxic effects when subjected to radiotherapy. Here we explored the effects of the HIV-1 Tat protein on cellular responses to ionizing radiation. Methods and Materials Two Tat-expressing cell lines, TT2 and TE671-Tat, were derived from human rhabdomyosarcoma cells by transfecting with the HIV-1 tat gene. Radiosensitivity was determined using colony-forming ability. Gene expression was assessed by cDNA microarray and immunohybridization. The Comet assay and {gamma}-H2AX foci were use to detect DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and repair. Radiation-induced cell cycle changes were detected by flow cytometry. Results The radiosensitivity of TT2 and TE671-Tat cells was significantly increased as compared with parental TE671 cells or the control TE671-pCI cells. Tat also increased proliferation activity. The comet assay and {gamma}H2AX foci detection revealed a decreased capacity to repair radiation-induced DNA DSBs in Tat-expressing cells. Microarray assay demonstrated that the DNA repair gene DNA-PKcs, and cell cycle-related genes Cdc20, Cdc25C, KIF2C and CTS1 were downregulated in Tat-expressing cells. Depression of DNA-PKcs in Tat-expressing cells was further confirmed by RT-PCR and immuno-hybridization analysis. Tat-expressing cells exhibited a prolonged S phase arrest after 4 Gy {gamma}-irradiation, and a noticeable delay in the initiation and elimination of radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M arrest as compared with parental cells. In addition, the G{sub 2}/M arrest was incomplete in TT2 cells. Moreover, HIV-1 Tat resulted in a constitutive overexpression of cyclin B1 protein. Conclusion HIV-1 Tat protein sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation via depressing DNA repair and dysregulating cell cycle checkpoints. These observations provide new insight into the increased tissue reactions of AIDS cancer patients to radiotherapy.

Sun Yi [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China); Huang Yuechen [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China); Xu Qinzhi [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China); Wang Huiping [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China); Bai Bei [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China); Sui Jianli [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China); Zhou Pingkun [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China)]. E-mail: zhoupk@nic.bmi.ac.cn

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Computational Hydrocode Study of Target Damage due to Fragment-Blast Impact  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A target's terminal ballistic effects involving explosively generated fragments, along with the original blast, are of critical importance for many different security and safety related applications. Personnel safety and protective building design are but a few of the practical disciplines that can gain from improved understanding combined loading effects. Traditionally, any engineering level analysis or design effort involving explosions would divide the target damage analysis into two correspondingly critical areas: blast wave and fragment related impact effects. The hypothesis of this paper lies in the supposition that a linear combination of a blast-fragment loading, coupled with an accurate target response description, can lead to a non-linear target damage effect. This non-linear target response could then stand as the basis of defining what a synergistic or combined frag-blast loading might actually look like. The table below, taken from Walters, et. al. categorizes some of the critical parameters driving any combined target damage effect and drives the evaluation of results. Based on table 1 it becomes clear that any combined frag-blast analysis would need to account for the target response matching similar ranges for the mechanics described above. Of interest are the critical times upon which a blast event or fragment impact loading occurs relative to the target's modal response. A blast, for the purposes of this paper is defined as the sudden release of chemical energy from a given material (henceforth referred to as an energetic material) onto its surrounding medium. During the coupling mechanism a discrete or discontinuous shockwave is generated. This shockwave travels outward from the source transferring energy and momentum to any surrounding objects including personnel and engineering structures. From an engineering perspective blast effects are typically characterized by way of physical characteristics such as Peak Pressure (PP), Time of Arrival (TOA), Pressure-Impulse (PI) and Time of Duration (TD). Other peculiarities include the radial decrease in pressure from the source, any fireball size measurement, and subsequent increase in temperature from the passing of the shockwave through the surrounding medium. In light of all of these metrics, the loading any object receives from a blast event becomes intricately connected to the distance between itself and the source. Because of this, a clear distinction is made between close-in effects and those from a source far away from the object of interest. Explosively generated fragments on the other hand are characterized by means of their localized damage potential. Metrics such as whether the fragment penetrates or perforates a given object is quantified as well as other variables including fragment's residual velocity, % kinetic energy decrease, residual fragment mass and other exit criteria. A fragment launched under such violent conditions could easily be traveling at speeds in excess of 2500 ft/s. Given these speeds it is conceivable to imagine how any given fragment could deliver a concentrated load to a target and penetrates through walls, vehicles or even the protection systems of nearby personnel. This study will focus on the individual fragment-target impact event with the hopes of expanding it to eventually include statistical procedures. Since this is a modeling excursion into the combined frag-blast target damage effects the numerical methods used to frame this problem become important in-so-far as the simulations are done in a consistent manner. For this study a Finite-Element based Hydrocode solution called ALE3D (ALE=Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) was utilized. ALE3D is developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Livermore, CA), and as this paper will show, successfully implemented a converged ALE formulation including as many of the different aspects needed to query the synergistic damage on a given target. Further information on the modeling setup is included.

Hatch-Aguilar, T; Najjar, F; Szymanski, E

2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

432

SAMHD1 Restricts Herpes Simplex Virus 1 in Macrophages by Limiting DNA Replication  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Cellular Response to Infection SAMHD1 Restricts Herpes Simplex Virus 1 in Macrophages by Limiting DNA Replication Eui Tae Kim a Tommy E. White b Alberto Brandariz-Nunez b Felipe Diaz-Griffero b Matthew D. Weitzman a Address correspondence...

Eui Tae Kim; Tommy E. White; Alberto Brandariz-Núñez; Felipe Diaz-Griffero; Matthew D. Weitzman

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

433

IH Report #04-010 April 2004 Water Damage Response (Mold Prevention)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

small quantity, well contained and easily cleaned up within 24 hours, and building materials do not have) This document is designed to help facility zone and building managers take proper action when addressing, tub or sink overflows and rainwater, or Contaminated Water ­ contaminated with sewage, biological

434

CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Workforce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

account of in workforce planning. The importance of integrating academic training with clinical trainingCONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Workforce of the Healthcare Science Workforce Modernising Scientific Careers: The Next Steps Response by the Wellcome Trust

Rambaut, Andrew

435

Architectural Accommodation in the Complex of Four p53 DNA Binding Domain Peptides with the p21/waf1/cip1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1/cip1 DNA Response Element* (Received for publication, January 10, 1997, and in revised form, March acids 98­ 309) and the p21/waf1/cip1 DNA response element impli- cated in the G1/S phase cell cycle, gadd45, and p21/waf1/cip1, the last being involved in the G1/S phase checkpoint (5­8). When ex- pressed

Clore, G. Marius

436

The effects of shockwave profile shape and shock obliquity on spallation in Cu and Ta: kinetic and stress-state effects on damage evolution(u)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Widespread research over the past five decades has provided a wealth of experimental data and insight concerning shock hardening and the spallation response of materials subjected to square-topped shock-wave loading profiles. Less quantitative data have been gathered on the effect of direct, in-contact, high explosive (HE)-driven Taylor wave (or triangular-wave) loading profile shock loading on the shock hardening, damage evolution, or spallation response of materials. Explosive loading induces an impulse dubbed a 'Taylor Wave'. This is a significantly different loading history than that achieved by a square-topped impulse in terms of both the pulse duration at a fixed peak pressure, and a different unloading strain rate from the peak Hugoniot state achieved. The goal of this research is to quantify the influence of shockwave obliquity on the spallation response of copper and tantalum by subjecting plates of each material to HE-driven sweeping detonation-wave loading and quantify both the wave propagation and the post-mortem damage evolution. This talk will summarize our current understanding of damage evolution during sweeping detonation-wave spallation loading in Cu and Ta and show comparisons to modeling simulations. The spallation responses of Cu and Ta are both shown to be critically dependent on the shockwave profile and the stress-state of the shock. Based on variations in the specifics of the shock drive (pulse shape, peak stress, shock obliquity) and sample geometry in Cu and Ta, 'spall strength' varies by over a factor of two and the details of the mechanisms of the damage evolution is seen to vary. Simplistic models of spallation, such as P{sub min} based on 1-D square-top shock data lack the physics to capture the influence of kinetics on damage evolution such as that operative during sweeping detonation loading. Such considerations are important for the development of predictive models of damage evolution and spallation in metals and alloys.

Gray, George T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

437

DAMAGE DETECTION METHODS ON WIND TURBINE BLADE TESTING WITH WIRED AND WIRELESS ACCELEROMETER SENSORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DAMAGE DETECTION METHODS ON WIND TURBINE BLADE TESTING WITH WIRED AND WIRELESS ACCELEROMETER for nonstationary blade excitations. KEYWORDS : Structural Health Monitoring, Damage Detection, Wind Turbine, Wireless sensing, Wavelets. INTRODUCTION Detecting damage in wind turbine blades is a very

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

438

E-Print Network 3.0 - acquired brain damage Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

brain damage Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: acquired brain damage Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Focal brain damage protects against...

439

Effect of cumulative seismic damage and corrosion on life-cycle cost of reinforced concrete bridges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reinforced concrete (RC) bridges in earthquake prone regions. The approach is developed by combining cumulative seismic damage and damage associated to corrosion due to environmental conditions. Cumulative seismic damage is obtained from a low-cycle fatigue...

Kumar, Ramesh

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

A Comparison of Wind Speed and Forest Damage Associated with Tornadoes in Northern Arizona  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Damage surveys in the aftermath of tornadoes occurring in the forested regions of the Mogollon Rim in northern Arizona have been assessed using the enhanced Fujita scale (EF scale) damage indicator (DI) and degree of damage (DOD) tables. These ...

David O. Blanchard

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dna damage response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Strain localization and cyclic damage of polyurethane foam cylinders: experimental tests and theoretical model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strain localization and cyclic damage of polyurethane foam cylinders: experimental tests subject to progressive damage. The chain of springs models the strain localization, and the second series qualitative agreement with the experiments. Keywords: polyurethane foams; strain localization; cyclic damage

Boyer, Edmond

442

Remote inspection system for impact damage in large composite structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...development of an economically efficient method to detect barely visible or invisible impact damage...manufacture. Chirp-based excitation is used to enable single-shot measurements with high signal-to-random-noise ratio to be obtained. Signal...

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Fast neutron Damage Studies on NdFeB Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

used in the SLAC Photon and Neutron Fields”, SLAC-PUB-8517,SLAC-PUB-11219 May2005 Fast Neutron Damage Studies on NdFeBrst mea- surements of fast neutron, stepped doses at the UC

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Review of Dynamic Recovery Effects on Ion Irradiation Damage...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6H–SiC, ionization processes are less dominant. Citation: Weber WJ, Y Zhang, and LM Wang.2012."Review of Dynamic Recovery Effects on Ion Irradiation Damage in...

445

Obstacles to Determining Punitive Damages in Class Actions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Courts and commentators have often embraced the class action device as an ideal means of assessing punitive damages fairly in mass tort cases. In this Article, Professor Hines sounds a cautionary note by identifying a number of procedural...

Hines, Laura J.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Assessing blackbird damage to ripening rice in Matagorda County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of pyrotechnic and auditory scare devices, but with only limited success. However, in order to develop new control techniques, as well as to test the efficacy of current techniques, damage must be accurately assessed. Large scale estimates (over entire fields...

Wright, Robert Glen

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

The Resistance of Materials to Impact Erosion Damage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article The Resistance of Materials to Impact Erosion Damage...constitution of the materials. It has been found...of relative erosion resistance, and for a restricted range of materials it has been related...

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Fretting damage prediction of connecting rod of marine diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is frequent fretting damage at the mating surface of a connecting rod because the connecting rod in a combustion engine is heavily loaded as well as rotated. ... possibility at the planar upper split of the...

Jung Ho Son; Sung Chan Ahn; Jong Gug Bae…

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Automated structural damage detection using one class machine learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring and analysing the vibration of structures using sensors can help identify and detect damage, potentially prolonging the life of structures and preventing disasters. Wireless sensor systems promise to make this ...

Long, James, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Scientists Assess Damage Caused by Earthquake near Amchitka  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Contractor scientists for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) traveled to the Amchitka, Alaska, Site in late August to assess the damage caused by a recent earthquake....

451

How Do Bacteria Repair Damage from the Sun? | Advanced Photon...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

| Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed How Do Bacteria Repair Damage from the Sun? JANUARY 22, 2014 Bookmark and Share Modeling of UvrAUvrB SAXS data. Panel A shows the...

452

Economic Damages from Climate Change: An Assessment of Market Impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

damage induced by sea level rise in the United States. InImpacts on Water Sea Level Rise Temperature-Related Extremewater supply and sea level rise and the costs of adjustment

Hanemann, W Michael; Dale, Larry

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Damage Detection and Characterization in Smart Material Structures \\Lambda y  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in which self­testing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques may be employed. There are several ways for including geometry of the damage in any NDE testing scheme, something which is not easily done in frequency

454

Neutron and gamma irradiation damage to organic materials.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document discusses open literature reports which investigate the damage effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on polymers and/or epoxies - damage refers to reduced physical chemical, and electrical properties. Based on the literature, correlations are made for an SNL developed epoxy (Epon 828-1031/DDS) with an expected total fast-neutron fluence of {approx}10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} and a {gamma} dosage of {approx}500 Gy received over {approx}30 years at < 200 C. In short, there are no gamma and neutron irradiation concerns for Epon 828-1031/DDS. To enhance the fidelity of our hypotheses, in regards to radiation damage, we propose future work consisting of simultaneous thermal/irradiation (neutron and gamma) experiments that will help elucidate any damage concerns at these specified environmental conditions.

White, Gregory Von, II; Bernstein, Robert

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Commercial & Industrial Demand Response  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources News & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Agricultural Residential Demand Response Commercial & Industrial Demand Response...

456

The application of ultrasonics to assess damage in composite materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE APPLICATION OF ULTRASONICS TO ASSESS DAMAGE IN COMPOSITE MATERIALS A Thesis by JOHN GREGORY EDEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1985 Major Subjectr Aerospace Engineering THE APPLICATION OF ULTRASONICS TO ASSESS DAMAGE IN COMPOSITE MATERIALS A Thesis by JOHN GREGORY EDEN Approved as to style and content by: (V. . Kinra, Chairman) (D. H. Allen, Member) (R. A...

Eden, John Gregory

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

457

Damage and collapse of double hull tankers in groundings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will discuss and analyze the mechanics of ships in groundings on rock. A damage estimate model in grounding of ships is proposed. The accuracy and applicability of the model are verified by a comparison of experimental results. The progressive collapse analysis of damaged hull sections, under vertical bending moments by use of the ALPS/ISUM computer code, is described. The procedure is applied to grounding simulation of a double hull tanker with transverseless system.

Paik, J.K.; Lee, T.K. [Pusan National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

458

Predicting threshold and location of laser damage on optical surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus useful in the prediction of the damage threshold of various optical devices, the location of weak spots on such devices and the location, identification, and elimination of optical surface impurities comprising, a focused and pulsed laser, an photo electric detector/imaging means, and a timer. The weak spots emit photoelectrons when subjected to laser intensities that are less than the intensity actually required to produce the damage. The weak spots may be eliminated by sustained exposure to the laser beam.

Siekhaus, Wigbert (Berkeley, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

An investigation of damage accumulation in graphite/epoxy laminates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN INVESTIGATION OF DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by ROBERT GERALD NORVELL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1985 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering AN INVESTIGATION OF DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by ROBERT GERALD NORVELL Approved as to style and content by: David H. Allen (Co-Chair of C mmitt. ) Richard A. Schap...

Norvell, Robert Gerald

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

460

Viscoelastic{Viscoplastic Damage Model for Asphalt Concrete  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 2.2.1 Yield surface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 2.2.2 Viscoplastic potential energy function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 2.2.3 Hardening function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 2.3 Numerical... viii LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 1.1 Moisture-induced damage in pavements results in raveling and potholing 4 1.2 Adhesive and cohesive failure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1.3 Damaged and e ective undamaged con gurations...

Graham, Michael A.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dna damage response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Grey Squirrel bark stripping damage A Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Height & DBH each tree Stems per ha Basal area Thinned Nov 1998 43% removed Growth Rate 1998 & 2003 with no damage 223 81.1 51 39 7 13/04/2010 #12;Case study DBH Tree size (DBH) v year of damage for `new.4 9.4 11.4 10 9 12 11 Basal area Post thinning 25.4 18.0 20.0 18 20 18 19 Total Basal area 27.2 28

462

Plasma focus assisted damage studies on tungsten  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tungsten is being considered as a front runner choice for the plasma facing component material of next generation fusion reactor because of its superior thermophysical and mechanical properties. Therefore, it is essential to study the ion material interaction of this material for its response to severe conditions of fusion reactor. In this work, we have used an ingenious ion source a namely plasma focus to study the effect of proton irradiation on tungsten under various experimental conditions. Exposed and reference tungsten samples were analyzed using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and Vickers hardness tester. Surface analyses confirm the formation of microcracks, bubbles, blisters, holes, etc. X-ray diffraction pattern confirms the development of compressive stress on the sample due to thermal load and formation of other phases or some expanded phases. A slight reduction in hardness values is observed in case of the exposed sample than the reference sample.

M. Bhuyan; S.R. Mohanty; C.V.S. Rao; P.A. Rayjada; P.M. Raole

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Probing Radiation Damage in Plutonium Alloys with Multiple Measurement Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A material subjected to radiation damage will usually experience changes in its physical properties. Measuring these changes in the physical properties provides a basis to study radiation damage in a material which is important for a variety of real world applications from reactor materials to semiconducting devices. When investigating radiation damage, the relative sensitivity of any given property can vary considerably based on the concentration and type of damage present as well as external parameters such as the temperature and starting material composition. By measuring multiple physical properties, these differing sensitivities can be leveraged to provide greater insight into the different aspects of radiation damage accumulation, thereby providing a broader understanding of the mechanisms involved. In this report, self-damage from {alpha}-particle decay in Pu is investigated by measuring two different properties: magnetic susceptibility and resistivity. The results suggest that while the first annealing stage obeys second order chemical kinetics, the primary mechanism is not the recombination of vacancy-interstitial close pairs.

McCall, S K; Fluss, M J; Chung, B W

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

464

Laser-induced Damage in Optical Materials: 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains papers presented at the 35th Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High-Power Lasers, held at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, Colorado, 22-24 September 2003. The symposium was attended by 125 participants from China, India, Russia, France, Germany, Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom. A meeting summary and some 75 reviewed papers appear. The book is divided into sections devoted to the following topics: thin films, surfaces and mirrors, fundamental mechanisms, materials and measurements, and finally, understanding optical damage with ultrashort laser pulses. Topics of interest to the high-peak-power and high-average-power laser communities in addition to damage issues related to various research efforts and commercial laser applications are discussed. Also discussed are improved scaling relations as a function of pulse duration in the femtosecond range, beam footprint size, and irradiation of optical materials with wavelengths down to the x-ray region. New sources at shorter wavelengths continue to be developed, and a corresponding shift in emphasis to short-wavelength and repetitively pulsed damage problems can be seen in some of these papers. Fabrication and test procedures are discussed particularly in the area of thin films. New materials and the implication of defects on the damage process are emphasized in addition to new reports of conditioning effects and damage repair or damage mitigation.

Exarhos, Gregory J.; Guenther, Arthur H.; Kaiser, Norbert; Lewis, Keith L.; Soileau, M. J.; Stolz, Christopher J.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Reliability-based framework for fatigue damage prognosis of bonded structural elements in aerospace composite structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

situ damage detection of composite materials for structuralmaterials, Journal of Composite Materials , 10, 342-354,effects in damaged composite aerospace structures ,

Gobbato, Maurizio

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Assessment of Natural Hazard Damage and Reconstruction: A Case Study from Band Aceh, Indonesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thomas. 2007. Assessment and prediction of natural hazardsAssessment of Natural Hazard Damage and Reconstruction: AWorking Paper Series Assessment of Natural Hazard Damage and

Gillespie, Thomas; Frankenberg, Elizabeth; Braughton, Matt; Cooke, Abigail M.; Armenta, Tiffany; Thomas, Duncan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

acetaminophen-induced oxidative damage: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and damage detection...21 3.5 Damage identification using a 3DOFs reduced order system Yang, Jann 105 Numerical aperture...

468

E-Print Network 3.0 - alleviates oxidative damage Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

myelin damage. To further support this notion, a recent report demonstrated... , anti-acrolein therapy significantly alleviated myelin damage, delayed the Fig. 6 CAP reduction...

469

E-Print Network 3.0 - alleviating oxidative damage Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

myelin damage. To further support this notion, a recent report demonstrated... , anti-acrolein therapy significantly alleviated myelin damage, delayed the Fig. 6 CAP reduction...

470

Resistance of Bacillus subtilis Spore DNA to Lethal Ionizing Radiation Damage Relies Primarily on Spore Core Components and DNA Repair, with Minor Effects of Oxygen Radical Detoxification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...samples for radiation exposure has...different types of ionizing radiation: X rays...mum, and a range of 301 mm in...mum, and a range of 99 mm in...dosimetry, and dose calculations...the dose of ionizing radiation killing 90...

Ralf Moeller; Marina Raguse; Günther Reitz; Ryuichi Okayasu; Zuofeng Li; Stuart Klein; Peter Setlow; Wayne L. Nicholson

2013-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

471

UV-Induced DNA Damage and Repair: A Powerful Light Trapping System in DNA in Order to Convert Light Energy into Biochemical Signals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Photons participate in many atomic and molecular interactions and changes. Recent biophysical research has shown the existence of photons in biological tissue and plants, animal and human cells emit a very wea...

H. J. Niggli

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Single molecule studies of DNA mismatch repair  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract DNA mismatch repair, which involves is a widely conserved set of proteins, is essential to limit genetic drift in all organisms. The same system of proteins plays key roles in many cancer related cellular transactions in humans. Although the basic process has been reconstituted in vitro using purified components, many fundamental aspects of DNA mismatch repair remain hidden due in part to the complexity and transient nature of the interactions between the mismatch repair proteins and DNA substrates. Single molecule methods offer the capability to uncover these transient but complex interactions and allow novel insights into mechanisms that underlie DNA mismatch repair. In this review, we discuss applications of single molecule methodology including electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, particle tracking, FRET, and optical trapping to studies of DNA mismatch repair. These studies have led to formulation of mechanistic models of how proteins identify single base mismatches in the vast background of matched DNA and signal for their repair.

Dorothy A. Erie; Keith R. Weninger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Enhancing the DNA Patent Database  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final Report on Award No. DE-FG0201ER63171 Principal Investigator: LeRoy B. Walters February 18, 2008 This project successfully completed its goal of surveying and reporting on the DNA patenting and licensing policies at 30 major U.S. academic institutions. The report of survey results was published in the January 2006 issue of Nature Biotechnology under the title “The Licensing of DNA Patents by US Academic Institutions: An Empirical Survey.” Lori Pressman was the lead author on this feature article. A PDF reprint of the article will be submitted to our Program Officer under separate cover. The project team has continued to update the DNA Patent Database on a weekly basis since the conclusion of the project. The database can be accessed at dnapatents.georgetown.edu. This database provides a valuable research tool for academic researchers, policymakers, and citizens. A report entitled Reaping the Benefits of Genomic and Proteomic Research: Intellectual Property Rights, Innovation, and Public Health was published in 2006 by the Committee on Intellectual Property Rights in Genomic and Protein Research and Innovation, Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy at the National Academies. The report was edited by Stephen A. Merrill and Anne-Marie Mazza. This report employed and then adapted the methodology developed by our research project and quoted our findings at several points. (The full report can be viewed online at the following URL: http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=11487&page=R1). My colleagues and I are grateful for the research support of the ELSI program at the U.S. Department of Energy.

Walters, LeRoy B.

2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

474

Self-Assembly of Metal-DNA Triangles and DNA Nanotubes with Synthetic Junctions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While DNA represents one of nature’s most predictable ... catalytic properties that are not observed naturally for DNA. Conceptually, this brings the toolbox of ... a diverse array of structures and functions usi...

Hua Yang; Pik Kwan Lo; Christopher K. McLaughlin; Graham D. Hamblin…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

A Synthetic DNA Walker for Molecular Transport  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Synthetic DNA Walker for Molecular Transport ... The authors report the incrementally staged design, synthesis, characterization, and operation of a mol. ...

Jong-Shik Shin; Niles A. Pierce

2004-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

476

IT for synthetic biology and DNA nanotechnology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Somewhere between the studies of information technology and organic chemistry, researchers are trying to make tiny robots out of DNA molecules.

Masami Hagiya; Fumiaki Tanaka; Ibuki Kawamata

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

j5 DNA Assembly Design Automation Software  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

j5 DNA Assembly Design Automation Software ... Here, we report the development and deployment of a web-based software tool, j5, which automates the design of scar-less multipart DNA assembly protocols including SLIC, Gibson, CPEC, and Golden Gate. ... The key innovations of the j5 design process include cost optimization, leveraging DNA synthesis when cost-effective to do so, the enforcement of design specification rules, hierarchical assembly strategies to mitigate likely assembly errors, and the instruction of manual or automated construction of scar-less combinatorial DNA libraries. ...

Nathan J. Hillson; Rafael D. Rosengarten; Jay D. Keasling

2011-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

478

On Damage Propagation in a Soft Low-Permeability Formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this presentation, we develop a mathematical model of fluid flow with changing formation properties. The modification of formation permeability is caused by development of a connected system of fractures. As the fluids are injected or withdrawn from the reservoir, the balance between the pore pressure and the geostatic formation stresses is destroyed. If the strength of the rock is not sufficient to accommodate such an imbalance, the cementing bonds between the rock grains become broken. Such a process is called damage propagation. The micromechanics and the basic mathematical model of damage propagation have been studied in [7]. The theory was further developed in [3], where new nonlocal damage propagation model has been studied. In [2] this theory has been enhanced by incorporation of the coupling between damage propagation and fluid flow. As it has been described above, the forced fluid flow causes changes in the rock properties including formation permeability. At the same time, changing permeability facilitates fluid flow and, therefore, enhances damage propagation. One of the principle concepts introduced in [3] and [2] is the characterization of damage by a dimensionless ratio of the number of broken bonds to the number of bonds in pristine rock per unit volume. It turns out, that the resulting mathematical model consist of a system of two nonlinear parabolic equations. As it has been shown in [6] using modeling of micromechanical properties of sedimentary rocks, at increasing stress the broken bonds coalesce into a system of cracks surrounding practically intact matrix blocks. These blocks have some characteristic size and a regular geometry. The initial microcracks expand, interact with each other, coalesce and form bigger fractures, etc. Therefore, as the damage is accumulated, the growing system of connected fractures determines the permeability of the reservoir rock. Significant oil deposits are stored in low-permeability soft rock reservoirs such as shales, chalks and diatomites [9, 10]. The permeability of the pristine formation matrix in such reservoirs is so low that oil production was impossible until hydraulic fracturing was applied. For development of correct production policy, it is very significant to adequately understand and predict how fast and to what extend the initial damage induced by drilling and hydrofracturing will propagate into the reservoir. The importance of fractures for rock flow properties is a well-established and recognized fact [4, 9, 5]. Different conceptual models have been developed [8]. In this study, we propose a damage propagation model based on a combination of the model of double-porosity and double-permeability medium [4] and a modification of the model of damage propagation developed in [2].

Silin, D.; Patzek, T.; Barenblatt, G.I.

2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

479

Assessment of substrate-stabilizing factors for DnaK on the folding of aggregation-prone proteins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrophobic interactions between molecular chaperones and their nonnative substrates have been believed to be mainly responsible for both substrate recognition and stabilization against aggregation. However, the hydrophobic contact area between DnaK and its substrate proteins is very limited and other factors of DnaK for the substrate stabilization could not be excluded. Here, we covalently fused DnaK to the N-termini of aggregation-prone proteins in vivo. In the context of a fusion protein, DnaK has the ability to efficiently solubilize its linked proteins. The point mutation of the residue of DnaK critical for the substrate recognition and the deletion of the C-terminal substrate-binding domain did not have significant effect on the solubilizing ability of DnaK. The results imply that other factors of DnaK, distinct from the hydrophobic shielding of folding intermediates, also contributes to stabilization of its noncovalently bound substrates against aggregation. Elucidation of the nature of these factors would further enhance our understanding of the substrate stabilization of DnaK for expedited protein folding.

Ryu, Kisun; Kim, Chul Woo; Kim, Byung Hee [Department of Biotechnology, College of Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Kyoung Sim [Protheon Incorporated, Yonsei Engineering Research Center B120E, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyun-Hwan [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, and Center for Diagnostic Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Science and Technology, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seong Il [Department of Biotechnology, College of Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: seongilchoi@daum.net; Seong, Baik L. [Department of Biotechnology, College of Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Protheon Incorporated, Yonsei Engineering Research Center B120E, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: blseong@yonsei.ac.kr