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  1. German Aerospace Center (DLR) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    German Aerospace Center (DLR) Name: German Aerospace Center (DLR) Place: Cologne, Germany Number of Employees: 5001-10,000 Website: www.dlr.deendesktopdefault.a Coordinates:...

  2. German Aerospace Center DLR | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aerospace Center DLR Jump to: navigation, search Name: German Aerospace Center (DLR) Place: Stuttgart, Germany Zip: 70569 Product: Stuttgart-based, agency that manages the...

  3. China-DLR Resource Assessments | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DLR Resource Assessments Jump to: navigation, search Name China-DLR Resource Assessments AgencyCompany Organization German Aerospace Center (DLR) Sector Energy Focus Area...

  4. Kenya-GEF Projects | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    database1 GEF Climate Projects in Kenya 1780 Kenya Joint Geophysical Imaging (JGI) Methodology for Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Climate Change UNEP Medium Size Project, GEF...

  5. Turkmenistan-GEF Projects | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Topics Background analysis Website http:www.gefonline.orgproje Country Turkmenistan Central Asia References GEF Climate Projects1 For a list of GEF climate projects in...

  6. geospatial | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geospatial Home Geospatial Description: Discuss and explore geospatial data available on OpenEI. geospatial GIS spatial analysis...

  7. Kenya-DLR Cooperation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2001 to 2004 the German Aerospace Center (DLR) worked with Kenya on solar resource and GIS analysis as part of UNEP's Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Programme....

  8. GEF-Colombia-Geothermal Energy Grant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Colombia-Geothermal Energy Grant Jump to: navigation, search Name GEF-Colombia-Geothermal Energy Grant AgencyCompany Organization Global Environment Facility (GEF),...

  9. UNEP-GEF Renewable Energy Project Financial Risk Management in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEF Renewable Energy Project Financial Risk Management in Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Name UNEP-GEF Renewable Energy Project Financial Risk Management in...

  10. Algeria-DLR Resource Assessments | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Algeria. The key products included maps of existing ressource assessments, pre feasibility studies for CSP and wind projects. References "DLR Website" Retrieved from...

  11. Jordan-DLR Resource Assessments | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Tunisia. The key products included maps of existing resource assessments, pre feasibility studies for CSP and wind projects. References "DLR Website" Retrieved from...

  12. Tunisia-DLR Resource Assessments | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Tunisia. The key products included maps of existing resource assessments, pre feasibility studies for CSP and wind projects. References "DLR Website" Retrieved from...

  13. Ethiopia-DLR Resource Assessments | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to 2004 the German Aerospace Center (DLR) worked with Ethiopia on solar resource and GIS analysis as part of UNEP's Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Programme....

  14. Bangladesh-DLR Resource Assessments | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to 2004 the German Aerospace Center (DLR) worked with Bangladesh on solar resource and GIS analysis as part of UNEP's Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Programme....

  15. Nepal-DLR Resource Assessments | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Renewable Energy Topics Background analysis, Resource assessment Resource Type Softwaremodeling tools, Dataset, Maps Website http:www.dlr.dettdesktopde Program Start...

  16. Sri Lanka-DLR Cooperation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Renewable Energy Topics Background analysis, Resource assessment Resource Type Softwaremodeling tools, Dataset, Maps Website http:www.dlr.dettdesktopde Program Start...

  17. Peru-GEF Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in the Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (Redirected from UNDP-Peru GEF Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in the Energy Generation and End-Use Sectors)...

  18. Geospatial Science Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The overarching mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) is to discover solutions to power and secure America's future. DOE’s Geospatial Science Program was established to optimize geospatial...

  19. Ghana-DLR Resource Assessments | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2001 to 2004 the German Aerospace Center (DLR) worked with Ghana on solar resource and GIS analysis as part of UNEP's Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Programme....

  20. Geospatial Science Steering Committee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Geospatial Science Steering Committee (GSSC) functions in an advisory role to the DOE national laboratories, major facilities, and to headquarters and field office elements to actively promote...

  1. GEF-Knowledge Management Initiative | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AgencyCompany Organization Global Environment Facility (GEF) Resource Type Dataset, Lessons learnedbest practices Website http:www.thegef.orggefsite Program Start 2010...

  2. Geospatial | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geospatial > Posts by term Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds ask queries (1) compound queries (1) data (1) developer (1) geospatial data (1) GIS (1) GIS data (1) Global...

  3. UNDP-GEF Fuel Cell Bus Programme: Update | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEF Fuel Cell Bus Programme: Update Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: UNDP-GEF Fuel Cell Bus Programme: Update AgencyCompany Organization: United Nations...

  4. geospatial data | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geospatial data Home NickL's picture Submitted by NickL(137) Contributor 25 June, 2012 - 21:45 GIS keyword geospatial data GIS GIS data Explore the geospatial datasets in OpenEI's...

  5. Geospatial Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Laboratory (NREL). It integrates resource data and geographic information systems (GIS) - for integrated resource assessment. The Geospatial Toolkit (GsT) is a map-based...

  6. Geospatial | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Groups > Groups > Geospatial Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds There are no feeds from external sites for this group. Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this...

  7. Contacts for Geospatial Science Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LeAnn Oliver Associate Chief Information Officer for IT Policy and GovernanceUS Department of Energy202-586-0166Geospatial@hq.doe.gov

  8. NREL: International Activities - Geospatial Toolkits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geospatial Toolkit The Geospatial Toolkit is an NREL-developed map-based software application that integrates resource data and other geographic information systems (GIS) data for integrated resource assessment. The non-resource, country-specific data for each toolkit comes from a variety of agencies within each country as well as from global datasets. Funding for the toolkit was provided by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), United States Trade and Development

  9. NREL: Energy Analysis: Geospatial Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geospatial Analysis To perform and support geospatial analysis, NREL analyzes, maintains, and disseminates data sets and maps on renewable energy resources, energy infrastructure, demographics and land ownership, and the earth's physical geography (topography, land use, rivers). NREL's geographic information system models enable rapid visualization of these data, support informed decisions on renewable energy development across the globe, and provide the foundation for many of NREL's analytical

  10. China Renewable Energy Scale up Program CRESP GOC WB GEF | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    up Program CRESP GOC WB GEF Jump to: navigation, search Name: China Renewable Energy Scale-up Program (CRESP) GOCWBGEF Place: Beijing, Beijing Municipality, China Zip: 100038...

  11. Integrating semantic web technologies and geospatial catalog services for geospatial information discovery and processing in cyberinfrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yue, Peng; Gong, Jianya; Di, Liping; He, Lianlian; Wei, Yaxing

    2011-04-01

    Abstract A geospatial catalogue service provides a network-based meta-information repository and interface for advertising and discovering shared geospatial data and services. Descriptive information (i.e., metadata) for geospatial data and services is structured and organized in catalogue services. The approaches currently available for searching and using that information are often inadequate. Semantic Web technologies show promise for better discovery methods by exploiting the underlying semantics. Such development needs special attention from the Cyberinfrastructure perspective, so that the traditional focus on discovery of and access to geospatial data can be expanded to support the increased demand for processing of geospatial information and discovery of knowledge. Semantic descriptions for geospatial data, services, and geoprocessing service chains are structured, organized, and registered through extending elements in the ebXML Registry Information Model (ebRIM) of a geospatial catalogue service, which follows the interface specifications of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Catalogue Services for the Web (CSW). The process models for geoprocessing service chains, as a type of geospatial knowledge, are captured, registered, and discoverable. Semantics-enhanced discovery for geospatial data, services/service chains, and process models is described. Semantic search middleware that can support virtual data product materialization is developed for the geospatial catalogue service. The creation of such a semantics-enhanced geospatial catalogue service is important in meeting the demands for geospatial information discovery and analysis in Cyberinfrastructure.

  12. Geospatial Decision Making System - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find More Like This Return to Search Geospatial Decision Making System Idaho National Laboratory Contact INL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary The INL has developed a geospatial decision making process to assist agricultural producers in optimizing operating conditions of combine harvesters which detects the presence of grain and distinguishes between that and residual plant material. Upon detecting grain in the process, the system sends

  13. Wyoming Game and Fish Department Geospatial Data | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wyoming Game and Fish Department Geospatial Data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Map: Wyoming Game and Fish Department Geospatial DataInfo...

  14. FK-DLR properties of a quantum multi-type Bose-gas with a repulsive interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suhov, Y.; Stuhl, I.

    2014-08-01

    The paper extends earlier results from Suhov and Kelbert [FK-DLR states of a quantum Bose-gas with a hardcore interaction, http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1304.0782 ] and Suhov et al. [Shift-invariance for FK-DLR states of a 2D quantum Bose-gas, http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1304.4177 ] about infinite-volume quantum bosonic states (FK-DLR states) to the case of multi-type particles with non-negative interactions. (An example is a quantum WidomRowlinson model.) Following the strategy from Suhov and Kelbert and Suhov et al., we establish that, for the values of fugacity z?(0, 1) and inverse temperature ? > 0, finite-volume Gibbs states form a compact family in the thermodynamic limit. Next, in dimension two we show that any limit-point state (an FK-DLR state in the terminology adopted in Suhov and Kelbert and Suhov et al.) is translation-invariant.

  15. Integrated: Geospatial Toolkit GIS data for Nicaragua from NREL...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nicaragua from NREL (Abstract): Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data intended for use in the Geospatial toolkit or with any GIS software. (Purpose): The Solar and Wind Energy...

  16. Integrated: Geospatial Toolkit GIS data for Cuba from NREL -...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cuba from NREL (Abstract): Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data intended for use in the Geospatial toolkit or with any GIS software. (Purpose): The Solar and Wind Energy...

  17. Renewable Energy and Defense Geospatial Database | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Database Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Renewable Energy and Defense Geospatial Database Abstract This database provides GIS data...

  18. Recognition of the Activated States of G[alpha]13 by the rgRGS Domain of PDZRhoGEF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Zhe; Singer, William D.; Danesh, Shahab M.; Sternweis, Paul C.; Sprang, Stephen R.

    2009-12-01

    G12 class heterotrimeric G proteins stimulate RhoA activation by RGS-RhoGEFs. However, p115RhoGEF is a GTPase Activating Protein (GAP) toward G{alpha}13, whereas PDZRhoGEF is not. We have characterized the interaction between the PDZRhoGEF rgRGS domain (PRG-rgRGS) and the alpha subunit of G13 and have determined crystal structures of their complexes in both the inactive state bound to GDP and the active states bound to GDP {center_dot} AlF (transition state) and GTP{gamma}S (Michaelis complex). PRG-rgRGS interacts extensively with the helical domain and the effector-binding sites on G{alpha}13 through contacts that are largely conserved in all three nucleotide-bound states, although PRG-rgRGS has highest affinity to the Michaelis complex. An acidic motif in the N terminus of PRG-rgRGS occupies the GAP binding site of G{alpha}13 and is flexible in the GDP {center_dot} AlF complex but well ordered in the GTPS complex. Replacement of key residues in this motif with their counterparts in p115RhoGEF confers GAP activity.

  19. GeoSpatial Data Analysis for DHS Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephan, Eric G.; Burke, John S.; Carlson, Carrie A.; Gillen, David S.; Joslyn, Cliff A.; Olsen, Bryan K.; Critchlow, Terence J.

    2009-05-10

    The Department of Homeland Security law enforcement faces the continual challenge of analyzing their custom data sources in a geospatial context. From a strategic perspective law enforcement has certain requirements to first broadly characterize a given situation using their custom data sources and then once it is summarily understood, to geospatially analyze their data in detail.

  20. The Challenges to Coupling Dynamic Geospatial Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, N

    2006-06-23

    Many applications of modeling spatial dynamic systems focus on a single system and a single process, ignoring the geographic and systemic context of the processes being modeled. A solution to this problem is the coupled modeling of spatial dynamic systems. Coupled modeling is challenging for both technical reasons, as well as conceptual reasons. This paper explores the benefits and challenges to coupling or linking spatial dynamic models, from loose coupling, where information transfer between models is done by hand, to tight coupling, where two (or more) models are merged as one. To illustrate the challenges, a coupled model of Urbanization and Wildfire Risk is presented. This model, called Vesta, was applied to the Santa Barbara, California region (using real geospatial data), where Urbanization and Wildfires occur and recur, respectively. The preliminary results of the model coupling illustrate that coupled modeling can lead to insight into the consequences of processes acting on their own.

  1. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Geospatial Team

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geospatial Data Science Team The following are members of NREL's Geospatial Data Science Team: Jon Duckworth Michael Gleason Nick Grue Pamela Gray-Hann Donna Heimiller Dylan Hettinger Jim Leyshon Anthony Lopez Galen Maclaurin Meghan Mooney Billy J. Roberts If you have questions about our programs or would like to contact our staff, please email Webmaster. Printable Version NREL GIS Home About NREL GIS Renewable Energy Technical Potential Renewable Energy Economic Potential Maps Data Resources

  2. Geospatial Analysis of Renewable Energy Technical Potential on Tribal Lands

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geospatial Analysis of Renewable Energy Technical Potential on Tribal Lands E. Doris, A. Lopez, and D. Beckley National Renewable Energy Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy | Office of Indian Energy 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Washington DC 20585 | 202-586-1272 energy.gov/indianenergy | indianenergy@hq.doe.gov Geospatial Analysis of Renewable Energy Technical Potential on Tribal Lands NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

  3. 3-D HYDRODYNAMIC MODELING IN A GEOSPATIAL FRAMEWORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollinger, J; Alfred Garrett, A; Larry Koffman, L; David Hayes, D

    2006-08-24

    3-D hydrodynamic models are used by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to simulate the transport of thermal and radionuclide discharges in coastal estuary systems. Development of such models requires accurate bathymetry, coastline, and boundary condition data in conjunction with the ability to rapidly discretize model domains and interpolate the required geospatial data onto the domain. To facilitate rapid and accurate hydrodynamic model development, SRNL has developed a pre- and post-processor application in a geospatial framework to automate the creation of models using existing data. This automated capability allows development of very detailed models to maximize exploitation of available surface water radionuclide sample data and thermal imagery.

  4. Activated RhoA Binds to the Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain of PDZ-RhoGEF, a Potential Site for Autoregulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Zhe; Medina, Frank; Liu, Mu-ya; Thomas, Celestine; Sprang, Stephen R.; Sternweis, Paul C.

    2010-07-19

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) catalyze exchange of GDP for GTP by stabilizing the nucleotide-free state of the small GTPases through their Dbl homology/pleckstrin homology (DH {center_dot} PH) domains. Unconventionally, PDZ-RhoGEF (PRG), a member of the RGS-RhoGEFs, binds tightly to both nucleotide-free and activated RhoA (RhoA {center_dot} GTP). We have characterized the interaction between PRG and activated RhoA and determined the structure of the PRG-DH {center_dot} PH-RhoA {center_dot} GTP{gamma}S (guanosine 5{prime}-O-[{gamma}-thio]triphosphate) complex. The interface bears striking similarity to a GTPase-effector interface and involves the switch regions in RhoA and a hydrophobic patch in PRG-PH that is conserved among all Lbc RhoGEFs. The two surfaces that bind activated and nucleotide-free RhoA on PRG-DH {center_dot} PH do not overlap, and a ternary complex of PRG-DH {center_dot} PH bound to both forms of RhoA can be isolated by size-exclusion chromatography. This novel interaction between activated RhoA and PH could play a key role in regulation of RhoGEF activity in vivo.

  5. Insights into the Molecular Activation Mechanism of the RhoA-specific Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor, PDZRhoGEF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bielnicki, Jakub A.; Shkumatov, Alexander V.; Derewenda, Urszula; Somlyo, Avril V.; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Derewenda, Zygmunt S.

    2012-10-09

    PDZRhoGEF (PRG) belongs to a small family of RhoA-specific nucleotide exchange factors that mediates signaling through select G-protein-coupled receptors via G{alpha}{sub 12/13} and activates RhoA by catalyzing the exchange of GDP to GTP. PRG is a multidomain protein composed of PDZ, regulators of G-protein signaling-like (RGSL), Dbl-homology (DH), and pleckstrin-homology (PH) domains. It is autoinhibited in cytosol and is believed to undergo a conformational rearrangement and translocation to the membrane for full activation, although the molecular details of the regulation mechanism are not clear. It has been shown recently that the main autoregulatory elements of PDZRhoGEF, the autoinhibitory 'activation box' and the 'GEF switch,' which is required for full activation, are located directly upstream of the catalytic DH domain and its RhoA binding surface, emphasizing the functional role of the RGSL-DH linker. Here, using a combination of biophysical and biochemical methods, we show that the mechanism of PRG regulation is yet more complex and may involve an additional autoinhibitory element in the form of a molten globule region within the linker between RGSL and DH domains. We propose a novel, two-tier model of autoinhibition where the activation box and the molten globule region act synergistically to impair the ability of RhoA to bind to the catalytic DH-PH tandem. The molten globule region and the activation box become less ordered in the PRG-RhoA complex and dissociate from the RhoA-binding site, which may constitute a critical step leading to PRG activation.

  6. Geospatial Analysis of Renewable Energy Technical Potential on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doris, E.; Lopez, A.; Beckley, D.

    2013-02-01

    This technical report uses an established geospatial methodology to estimate the technical potential for renewable energy on tribal lands for the purpose of allowing Tribes to prioritize the development of renewable energy resources either for community scale on-tribal land use or for revenue generating electricity sales.

  7. Oncor DLR case study

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Delivery » On-Site and Bulk Hydrogen Storage On-Site and Bulk Hydrogen Storage On-site hydrogen storage is used at central hydrogen production facilities, transport terminals, and end-use locations. Storage options today include insulated liquid tanks and gaseous storage tanks. The four types of common high pressure gaseous storage vessels are shown in the table. Type I All-metal cylinder Type II Load-bearing metal liner hoop wrapped with resin-impregnated continuous filament Type III

  8. ON THE VERIFICATION AND VALIDATION OF GEOSPATIAL IMAGE ANALYSIS ALGORITHMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Randy S.; Trucano, Timothy G.; Pope, Paul A.; Aragon, Cecilia R.; Jiang , Ming; Wei, Thomas; Chilton, Lawrence; Bakel, A. J.

    2010-07-25

    Verification and validation (V&V) of geospatial image analysis algorithms is a difficult task and is becoming increasingly important. While there are many types of image analysis algorithms, we focus on developing V&V methodologies for algorithms designed to provide textual descriptions of geospatial imagery. In this paper, we present a novel methodological basis for V&V that employs a domain-specific ontology, which provides a naming convention for a domain-bounded set of objects and a set of named relationship between these objects. We describe a validation process that proceeds through objectively comparing benchmark imagery, produced using the ontology, with algorithm results. As an example, we describe how the proposed V&V methodology would be applied to algorithms designed to provide textual descriptions of facilities

  9. A Geospatial Integrated Problem Solving Environment for Homeland Security Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Daniel B

    2010-01-01

    Effective planning, response, and recovery (PRR) involving terrorist attacks or natural disasters come with a vast array of information needs. Much of the required information originates from disparate sources in widely differing formats. However, one common attribute the information often possesses is physical location. The organization and visualization of this information can be critical to the success of the PRR mission. Organizing information geospatially is often the most intuitive for the user. In the course of developing a field tool for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Office for Bombing Prevention, a geospatial integrated problem solving environment software framework was developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This framework has proven useful as well in a number of other DHS, Department of Defense, and Department of Energy projects. An overview of the software architecture along with application examples are presented.

  10. Unconventional Energy Resources and Geospatial Information: 2006 Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-09-15

    This article contains a brief summary of some of the 2006 annual committee reports presented to the Energy Minerals Division (EMD) of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists. The purpose of the reports is to advise EMD leadership and members of the current status of research and developments of energy resources (other than conventional oil and natural gas that typically occur in sandstone and carbonate rocks), energy economics, and geospatial information. This summary presented here by the EMD is a service to the general geologic community. Included in this summary are reviews of the current research and activities related to coal, coalbed methane, gas hydrates, gas shales, geospatial information technology related to energy resources, geothermal resources, oil sands, and uranium resources.

  11. The new geospatial tools: global transparency enhancing safeguards verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pabian, Frank Vincent

    2010-09-16

    This paper focuses on the importance and potential role of the new, freely available, geospatial tools for enhancing IAEA safeguards and how, together with commercial satellite imagery, they can be used to promote 'all-source synergy'. As additional 'open sources', these new geospatial tools have heralded a new era of 'global transparency' and they can be used to substantially augment existing information-driven safeguards gathering techniques, procedures, and analyses in the remote detection of undeclared facilities, as well as support ongoing monitoring and verification of various treaty (e.g., NPT, FMCT) relevant activities and programs. As an illustration of how these new geospatial tools may be applied, an original exemplar case study provides how it is possible to derive value-added follow-up information on some recent public media reporting of a former clandestine underground plutonium production complex (now being converted to a 'Tourist Attraction' given the site's abandonment by China in the early 1980s). That open source media reporting, when combined with subsequent commentary found in various Internet-based Blogs and Wikis, led to independent verification of the reporting with additional ground truth via 'crowdsourcing' (tourist photos as found on 'social networking' venues like Google Earth's Panoramio layer and Twitter). Confirmation of the precise geospatial location of the site (along with a more complete facility characterization incorporating 3-D Modeling and visualization) was only made possible following the acquisition of higher resolution commercial satellite imagery that could be correlated with the reporting, ground photos, and an interior diagram, through original imagery analysis of the overhead imagery.

  12. A Hybrid Classification Scheme for Mining Multisource Geospatial Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vatsavai, Raju; Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2007-01-01

    Supervised learning methods such as Maximum Likelihood (ML) are often used in land cover (thematic) classification of remote sensing imagery. ML classifier relies exclusively on spectral characteristics of thematic classes whose statistical distributions are often overlapping. The spectral response distributions of thematic classes are dependent on many factors including elevation, soil types, and atmospheric conditions present at the time of data acquisition. A second problem with statistical classifiers is the requirement of large number of accurate training samples, which are often costly and time consuming to acquire over large geographic regions. With the increasing availability of geospatial databases, it is possible to exploit the knowledge derived from these ancillary datasets to improve classification accuracies even when the class distributions are highly overlapping. Likewise newer semi-supervised techniques can be adopted to improve the parameter estimates of statistical model by utilizing a large number of easily available unlabeled training samples. Unfortunately there is no convenient multivariate statistical model that can be employed for mulitsource geospatial databases. In this paper we present a hybrid semi-supervised learning algorithm that effectively exploits freely available unlabeled training samples from multispectral remote sensing images and also incorporates ancillary geospatial databases. We have conducted several experiments on real datasets, and our new hybrid approach shows over 15% improvement in classification accuracy over conventional classification schemes.

  13. Transforming on-grid renewable energy markets. A review of UNDP-GEF support for feed-in tariffs and related price and market-access instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glemarec, Yannick; Rickerson, Wilson; Waissbein, Oliver

    2012-11-15

    As a Global Environment Facility (GEF) founding implementing agency, UNDP has worked on over 230 GEF-supported clean energy projects in close to 100 developing countries since 1992. About 100 of these projects in 80 countries have focused on renewable energy, supported by approximately US $ 293 million in GEF funds and leveraging US $1.48 billion in associated co-financing from national governments, international organizations, the private sector and non-governmental organizations. As part of UNDP efforts to codify and share lessons learnt from these initiatives, this report addresses how scarce public resources can be used to catalyze larger private financial flows for renewable energy. It provides an overview of UNDP-GEF’s extensive work supporting development of national renewable energy policies such as feed-in tariffs. In these activities UNDP-GEF assists developing countries to assess key risks and barriers to technology diffusion and then to identify a mix of policy and financial de-risking measures to remove these barriers and drive investment. This approach is illustrated through three case studies in Uruguay, Mauritius and Kazakhstan. This report is complemented by a companion publication presenting an innovative UNDP financial modeling tool to assist policymakers in appraising different public instruments to promote clean energy.

  14. Perspective on Department of Energy Geospatial Science: Past, Present, and Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2007-01-01

    For many decades, the Department of Energy (DOE) has been a leader in basic scientific and engineering research that utilizes geospatial science to advance the state of knowledge in disciplines impacting national security, energy sustainability, and environmental stewardship. DOE recently established a comprehensive Geospatial Science Program that will provide an enterprise geographic information system infrastructure connecting all elements of DOE to critical geospatial data and associated geographic information services (GIServices). The Geospatial Science Program will provide a common platform for enhanced scientific and technical collaboration across DOE's national laboratories and facilities.

  15. Geospatial Analysis and Technical Assistance for Power Plant Siting Interagency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neher, L A

    2002-03-07

    The focus of this contract (in the summer and fall of 2001) was originally to help the California Energy Commission (CEC) locate and evaluate potential sites for electric power generation facilities and to assist the CEC in addressing areas of congestion on transmission lines and natural gas supply line corridors. Subsequent events have reduced the immediate urgency, although not the ultimate need for such analyses. Software technology for deploying interactive geographic information systems (GIS) accessible over the Internet have developed to the point that it is now practical to develop and publish GIS web sites that have substantial viewing, movement, query, and even map-making capabilities. As part of a separate project not funded by the CEC, the GIS Center at LLNL, on an experimental basis, has developed a web site to explore the technical difficulties as well as the interest in such a web site by agencies and others concerned with energy research. This exploratory effort offers the potential or developing an interactive GIS web site for use by the CEC for energy research, policy analysis, site evaluation, and permit and regulatory matters. To help ground the geospatial capabilities in the realistic requirements and needs of the CEC staff, the CEC requested that the GIS Center conduct interviews of several CEC staff persons to establish their current and envisioned use of spatial data and requirements for geospatial analyses. This survey will help define a web-accessible central GIS database for the CEC, which will augment the well-received work of the CEC Cartography Unit. Individuals within each siting discipline have been contacted and their responses to three question areas have been summarized. The web-based geospatial data and analytical tools developed within this project will be available to CEC staff for initial area studies, queries, and informal, small-format maps. It is not designed for fine cartography or for large-format posters such as the Cartographic Unit is excellent at producing for public meetings. Nor is it designed for the specialized geospatial analyses that the Cartographic Unit maintains a deservedly excellent reputation for producing. The web-based system could be used by the Cartographic Unit staff in support of CEC technical and policy staff to respond during meetings to questions posed by senior management or the public.

  16. Geospatial Products and Techniques at the Center for Transportation Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chin, Shih-Miao; Hwang, Ho-Ling; Peterson, Bruce E

    2008-01-01

    This paper highlights geospatial science-related innovations and developments conducted by the Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. CTA researchers have been developing integrated inter-modal transportation solutions through innovative and cost-effective research and development for many years. Specifically, this paper profiles CTA-developed Geographic Information System (GIS) products that are publicly available. Examples of these GIS-related products include: the CTA Transportation Networks; GeoFreight system; and the web-based Multi-Modal Routing Analysis System. In addition, an application on assessment of railroad Hazmat routing alternatives is also discussed.

  17. Geospatial Visualization of Global Satellite Images with Vis-EROS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Standart, G. D.; Stulken, K. R.; Zhang, Xuesong; Zong, Ziliang

    2011-04-13

    The Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center of U.S. Geological Survey is currently managing and maintaining the world largest satellite images distribution system, which provides 24/7 free download service for researchers all over the globe in many areas such as Geology, Hydrology, Climate Modeling, and Earth Sciences. A large amount of geospatial data contained in satellite images maintained by EROS is generated every day. However, this data is not well utilized due to the lack of efficient data visualization tools. This software implements a method for visualizing various characteristics of the global satellite image download requests. More specifically, Keyhole Markup Language (KML) files are generated which can be loaded into an earth browser such as Google Earth. Colored rectangles associated with stored satellite scenes are painted onto the earth browser; and the color and opacity of each rectangle is varied as a function of the popularity of the corresponding satellite image. An analysis of the geospatial information obtained relative to specified time constraints provides an ability to relate image download requests to environmental, political, and social events.

  18. Geospatial Toolkits and Resource Maps for Selected Countries from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    NREL developed the Geospatial Toolkit (GsT), a map-based software application that integrates resource data and geographic information systems (GIS) for integrated resource assessment. A variety of agencies within countries, along with global datasets, provided country-specific data. Originally developed in 2005, the Geospatial Toolkit was completely redesigned and re-released in November 2010 to provide a more modern, easier-to-use interface with considerably faster analytical querying capabilities. Toolkits are available for 21 countries and each one can be downloaded separately. The source code for the toolkit is also available. [Taken and edited from http://www.nrel.gov/international/geospatial_toolkits.html

  19. Establishment of the Northeast Coastal Watershed Geospatial Data Network (NECWGDN)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hannigan, Robyn

    2014-02-17

    The goals of NECWGDN were to establish integrated geospatial databases that interfaced with existing open-source (water.html) environmental data server technologies (e.g., HydroDesktop) and included ecological and human data to enable evaluation, prediction, and adaptation in coastal environments to climate- and human-induced threats to the coastal marine resources within the Gulf of Maine. We have completed the development and testing of a "test bed" architecture that is compatible with HydroDesktop and have identified key metadata structures that will enable seamless integration and delivery of environmental, ecological, and human data as well as models to predict threats to end-users. Uniquely this database integrates point as well as model data and so offers capacities to end-users that are unique among databases. Future efforts will focus on the development of integrated environmental-human dimension models that can serve, in near real time, visualizations of threats to coastal resources and habitats.

  20. A brief history of geospatial science in the Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a rich history of significant contributions to geospatial science spanning the past four decades. In the early years, work focused on basic research, such as development of algorithms for processing geographic data and early use of LANDSAT imagery. The emphasis shifted in the mid-1970s to development of geographic information system (GIS) applications to support programs such as the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE), and later to issue-oriented GIS applications supporting programs such as environmental restoration and management (mid-1980s through present). Throughout this period, the DOE national laboratories represented a strong chorus of voices advocating the importance of geospatial science and technology in the decades to come. The establishment of a Geospatial Science Program by the DOE Office of the Chief Information Officer in 2005 reflects the continued potential of geospatial science to enhance DOE's science, projects, and operations, as is well demonstrated by historical analysis.

  1. LDRD final report : first application of geospatial semantic graphs to SAR image data.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brost, Randolph C.; McLendon, William Clarence,

    2013-01-01

    Modeling geospatial information with semantic graphs enables search for sites of interest based on relationships between features, without requiring strong a priori models of feature shape or other intrinsic properties. Geospatial semantic graphs can be constructed from raw sensor data with suitable preprocessing to obtain a discretized representation. This report describes initial work toward extending geospatial semantic graphs to include temporal information, and initial results applying semantic graph techniques to SAR image data. We describe an efficient graph structure that includes geospatial and temporal information, which is designed to support simultaneous spatial and temporal search queries. We also report a preliminary implementation of feature recognition, semantic graph modeling, and graph search based on input SAR data. The report concludes with lessons learned and suggestions for future improvements.

  2. Encoding and analyzing aerial imagery using geospatial semantic graphs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Jean-Paul; Strip, David R.; McLendon, William C.; Parekh, Ojas D.; Diegert, Carl F.; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Rintoul, Mark Daniel

    2014-02-01

    While collection capabilities have yielded an ever-increasing volume of aerial imagery, analytic techniques for identifying patterns in and extracting relevant information from this data have seriously lagged. The vast majority of imagery is never examined, due to a combination of the limited bandwidth of human analysts and limitations of existing analysis tools. In this report, we describe an alternative, novel approach to both encoding and analyzing aerial imagery, using the concept of a geospatial semantic graph. The advantages of our approach are twofold. First, intuitive templates can be easily specified in terms of the domain language in which an analyst converses. These templates can be used to automatically and efficiently search large graph databases, for specific patterns of interest. Second, unsupervised machine learning techniques can be applied to automatically identify patterns in the graph databases, exposing recurring motifs in imagery. We illustrate our approach using real-world data for Anne Arundel County, Maryland, and compare the performance of our approach to that of an expert human analyst.

  3. Industrial Geospatial Analysis Tool for Energy Evaluation (IGATE-E)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkadi, Nasr E; Starke, Michael R; Ma, Ookie; Nimbalkar, Sachin U; Cox, Daryl

    2013-01-01

    IGATE-E is an energy analysis tool for industrial energy evaluation. The tool applies statistical modeling to multiple publicly available datasets and provides information at the geospatial resolution of zip code using bottom up approaches. Within each zip code, the current version of the tool estimates electrical energy consumption of manufacturing industries based on each type of industries using DOE s Industrial Assessment Center database (IAC-DB) and DOE s Energy Information Administration Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey database (EIA-MECS DB), in addition to other commercially available databases such as the Manufacturing News database (MNI, Inc.). Ongoing and future work include adding modules for the predictions of fuel energy consumption streams, manufacturing process steps energy consumption, major energy intensive processes (EIPs) within each industry type among other metrics of interest. The tool provides validation against DOE s EIA-MECS state level energy estimations and permits several statistical examinations. IGATE-E is intended to be a decision support and planning tool to a wide spectrum of energy analysts, researchers, government organizations, private consultants, industry partners, and alike.

  4. Discover, Visualize, and Deliver Geospatial Data through OGC Standards-based WebGIS System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Yaxing; SanthanaVannan, Suresh K; Cook, Robert B

    2009-01-01

    Geospatial data are important to understand the Earth - ecosystem dynamics, land cover changes, resource management, and human interactions with the Earth to name a few. One of the biggest difficulties users face is to discover, access, and assemble distributed, large volume, heterogeneous geospatial data to conduct geo-analysis. Traditional methods of geospatial data discovery, visualization, and delivery lack the capabilities of resource sharing and automation across systems or organizational boundaries. They require users to download the data ldquoas-isrdquo in their original file format, projection, and extent. Also, discovering data served by traditional methods requires prior knowledge of data location, and processing requires specialized expertise. These drawbacks of traditional methods create additional burden to users, introduce too much overhead to research, and also reduce the potential usage of the data. At the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), researchers working on NASA-sponsored projects: Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) and Modeling and Synthesis Thematic Data Center (MAST-DC) have tapped into the benefits of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards to overcome the drawbacks of traditional methods of geospatial data discovery, visualization, and delivery. The OGC standards-based approach facilitates data sharing and interoperability across network, organizational, and geopolitical boundaries. Tools and services based on OGC standards deliver the data in many user defined formats and allow users to visualize the data prior to download. This paper introduces an approach taken to visualize and deliver ORNL DAAC, MAST-DC, and other relevant geospatial data through OGC standards-based Web Services, including Web Map Service (WMS), Web Coverage Service (WCS), and Web Feature Service (WFS). It also introduces a WebGIS system built on top of OGC services that helps users discover, visualize, and access geospatial data.

  5. GX-Means: A model-based divide and merge algorithm for geospatial image clustering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vatsavai, Raju; Symons, Christopher T; Chandola, Varun; Jun, Goo

    2011-01-01

    One of the practical issues in clustering is the specification of the appropriate number of clusters, which is not obvious when analyzing geospatial datasets, partly because they are huge (both in size and spatial extent) and high dimensional. In this paper we present a computationally efficient model-based split and merge clustering algorithm that incrementally finds model parameters and the number of clusters. Additionally, we attempt to provide insights into this problem and other data mining challenges that are encountered when clustering geospatial data. The basic algorithm we present is similar to the G-means and X-means algorithms; however, our proposed approach avoids certain limitations of these well-known clustering algorithms that are pertinent when dealing with geospatial data. We compare the performance of our approach with the G-means and X-means algorithms. Experimental evaluation on simulated data and on multispectral and hyperspectral remotely sensed image data demonstrates the effectiveness of our algorithm.

  6. Automated Feature Generation in Large-Scale Geospatial Libraries for Content-Based Indexing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin Jr, Kenneth William; Bhaduri, Budhendra L; Bright, Eddie A; Cheriydat, Anil; Karnowski, Thomas Paul; Palathingal, Paul J; Potok, Thomas E; Price, Jeffery R

    2006-05-01

    We describe a method for indexing and retrieving high-resolution image regions in large geospatial data libraries. An automated feature extraction method is used that generates a unique and specific structural description of each segment of a tessellated input image file. These tessellated regions are then merged into similar groups, or sub-regions, and indexed to provide flexible and varied retrieval in a query-by-example environment. The methods of tessellation, feature extraction, sub-region clustering, indexing, and retrieval are described and demonstrated using a geospatial library representing a 153 km2 region of land in East Tennessee at 0.5 m per pixel resolution.

  7. Preliminary Geospatial Analysis of Arctic Ocean Hydrocarbon Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Philip E.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Sullivan, E. C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bradley, Donald J.

    2008-10-01

    Ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean is predicted to become thinner and to cover less area with time. The combination of more ice-free waters for exploration and navigation, along with increasing demand for hydrocarbons and improvements in technologies for the discovery and exploitation of new hydrocarbon resources have focused attention on the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Basin and its margins. The purpose of this document is to 1) summarize results of a review of published hydrocarbon resources in the Arctic, including both conventional oil and gas and methane hydrates and 2) develop a set of digital maps of the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Ocean. These maps can be combined with predictions of ice-free areas to enable estimates of the likely regions and sequence of hydrocarbon production development in the Arctic. In this report, conventional oil and gas resources are explicitly linked with potential gas hydrate resources. This has not been attempted previously and is particularly powerful as the likelihood of gas production from marine gas hydrates increases. Available or planned infrastructure, such as pipelines, combined with the geospatial distribution of hydrocarbons is a very strong determinant of the temporal-spatial development of Arctic hydrocarbon resources. Significant unknowns decrease the certainty of predictions for development of hydrocarbon resources. These include: 1) Areas in the Russian Arctic that are poorly mapped, 2) Disputed ownership: primarily the Lomonosov Ridge, 3) Lack of detailed information on gas hydrate distribution, and 4) Technical risk associated with the ability to extract methane gas from gas hydrates. Logistics may control areas of exploration more than hydrocarbon potential. Accessibility, established ownership, and leasing of exploration blocks may trump quality of source rock, reservoir, and size of target. With this in mind, the main areas that are likely to be explored first are the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea, in spite of the fact that these areas do not have highest potential for future hydrocarbon reserves. Opportunities for improving the mapping and assessment of Arctic hydrocarbon resources include: 1) Refining hydrocarbon potential on a basin-by-basin basis, 2) Developing more realistic and detailed distribution of gas hydrate, and 3) Assessing the likely future scenarios for development of infrastructure and their interaction with hydrocarbon potential. It would also be useful to develop a more sophisticated approach to merging conventional and gas hydrate resource potential that considers the technical uncertainty associated with exploitation of gas hydrate resources. Taken together, additional work in these areas could significantly improve our understanding of the exploitation of Arctic hydrocarbons as ice-free areas increase in the future.

  8. Identifying high energy density stream-reaches through refined geospatial resolution in hydropower resource assessment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pasha, M. Fayzul K.; Yang, Majntxov; Yeasmin, Dilruba; Saetern, Sen; Kao, Shih -Chieh; Smith, Brennan T.

    2016-01-07

    Benefited from the rapid development of multiple geospatial data sets on topography, hydrology, and existing energy-water infrastructures, the reconnaissance level hydropower resource assessment can now be conducted using geospatial models in all regions of the US. Furthermore, the updated techniques can be used to estimate the total undeveloped hydropower potential across all regions, and may eventually help identify further hydropower opportunities that were previously overlooked. To enhance the characterization of higher energy density stream-reaches, this paper explored the sensitivity of geospatial resolution on the identification of hydropower stream-reaches using the geospatial merit matrix based hydropower resource assessment (GMM-HRA) model. GMM-HRAmore » model simulation was conducted with eight different spatial resolutions on six U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 8-digit hydrologic units (HUC8) located at three different terrains; Flat, Mild, and Steep. The results showed that more hydropower potential from higher energy density stream-reaches can be identified with increasing spatial resolution. Both Flat and Mild terrains exhibited lower impacts compared to the Steep terrain. Consequently, greater attention should be applied when selecting the discretization resolution for hydropower resource assessments in the future study.« less

  9. Geospatial Image Mining For Nuclear Proliferation Detection: Challenges and New Opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vatsavai, Raju; Bhaduri, Budhendra L; Cheriyadat, Anil M; Arrowood, Lloyd; Bright, Eddie A; Gleason, Shaun Scott; Diegert, Carl; Katsaggelos, Aggelos K; Pappas, Thrasos N; Porter, Reid; Bollinger, Jim; Chen, Barry; Hohimer, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    With increasing understanding and availability of nuclear technologies, and increasing persuasion of nuclear technologies by several new countries, it is increasingly becoming important to monitor the nuclear proliferation activities. There is a great need for developing technologies to automatically or semi-automatically detect nuclear proliferation activities using remote sensing. Images acquired from earth observation satellites is an important source of information in detecting proliferation activities. High-resolution remote sensing images are highly useful in verifying the correctness, as well as completeness of any nuclear program. DOE national laboratories are interested in detecting nuclear proliferation by developing advanced geospatial image mining algorithms. In this paper we describe the current understanding of geospatial image mining techniques and enumerate key gaps and identify future research needs in the context of nuclear proliferation.

  10. iGlobe: an interactive visualization and analysis framework for geospatial data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandola, Varun; Vatsavai, Raju; Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate an interactive visualization and analysis system for integrating climate data with other geospatial data sets, such as environmental and demographic data. The \\eviz system is a desktop-based visualization and analysis environment which allows seamless integration of multiple geospatial data sets from varied sources and provides an interface to interactively analyze the different data sets and apply sophisticated data analysis and mining algorithms in a near real time fashion. The framework is highly desirable in domains such as earth and climate sciences where great emphasis is placed on simultaneous analysis of different data sets such as remote sensing images, climate model simulation outputs, and other environmental and demographic databases, to understand weather and climate systems and the impact of climate change on nature and people.

  11. Large-Scale Geospatial Indexing for Image-Based Retrieval and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin Jr, Kenneth William; Bhaduri, Budhendra L; Bright, Eddie A; Cheriydat, Anil; Karnowski, Thomas Paul; Palathingal, Paul J; Potok, Thomas E; Price, Jeffery R

    2005-12-01

    We describe a method for indexing and retrieving high-resolution image regions in large geospatial data libraries. An automated feature extraction method is used that generates a unique and specific structural description of each segment of a tessellated input image file. These tessellated regions are then merged into similar groups and indexed to provide flexible and varied retrieval in a query-by-example environment.

  12. A Hybrid Semi-supervised Classification Scheme for Mining Multisource Geospatial Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vatsavai, Raju; Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2011-01-01

    Supervised learning methods such as Maximum Likelihood (ML) are often used in land cover (thematic) classification of remote sensing imagery. ML classifier relies exclusively on spectral characteristics of thematic classes whose statistical distributions (class conditional probability densities) are often overlapping. The spectral response distributions of thematic classes are dependent on many factors including elevation, soil types, and ecological zones. A second problem with statistical classifiers is the requirement of large number of accurate training samples (10 to 30 |dimensions|), which are often costly and time consuming to acquire over large geographic regions. With the increasing availability of geospatial databases, it is possible to exploit the knowledge derived from these ancillary datasets to improve classification accuracies even when the class distributions are highly overlapping. Likewise newer semi-supervised techniques can be adopted to improve the parameter estimates of statistical model by utilizing a large number of easily available unlabeled training samples. Unfortunately there is no convenient multivariate statistical model that can be employed for mulitsource geospatial databases. In this paper we present a hybrid semi-supervised learning algorithm that effectively exploits freely available unlabeled training samples from multispectral remote sensing images and also incorporates ancillary geospatial databases. We have conducted several experiments on real datasets, and our new hybrid approach shows over 25 to 35% improvement in overall classification accuracy over conventional classification schemes.

  13. An Interactive Visual Analytics Framework for Multi-Field Data in a Geo-Spatial Context

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zhiyuan; Tong, Xiaonan; McDonnell, Kevin T.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, D.; Mueller, Klaus

    2013-04-01

    Climate research produces a wealth of multivariate data. These data often have a geospatial reference and so it is of interest to show them within their geospatial context. One can consider this configuration as a multi field visualization problem, where the geospace provides the expanse of the field. However, there is a limit on the amount of multivariate information that can be fit within a certain spatial location, and the use of linked multivari ate information displays has previously been devised to bridge this gap. In this paper we focus on the interactions in the geographical display, present an implementation that uses Google Earth, and demonstrate it within a tightly linked parallel coordinates display. Several other visual representations, such as pie and bar charts are integrated into the Google Earth display and can be interactively manipulated. Further, we also demonstrate new brushing and visualization techniques for parallel coordinates, such as fixedwindow brushing and correlationenhanced display. We conceived our system with a team of climate researchers, who already made a few important discov eries using it. This demonstrates our system’s great potential to enable scientific discoveries, possibly also in oth er domains where data have a geospatial reference.

  14. Strengthened IAEA Safeguards-Imagery Analysis: Geospatial Tools for Nonproliferation Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pabian, Frank V

    2012-08-14

    This slide presentation focuses on the growing role and importance of imagery analysis for IAEA safeguards applications and how commercial satellite imagery, together with the newly available geospatial tools, can be used to promote 'all-source synergy.' As additional sources of openly available information, satellite imagery in conjunction with the geospatial tools can be used to significantly augment and enhance existing information gathering techniques, procedures, and analyses in the remote detection and assessment of nonproliferation relevant activities, facilities, and programs. Foremost of the geospatial tools are the 'Digital Virtual Globes' (i.e., GoogleEarth, Virtual Earth, etc.) that are far better than previously used simple 2-D plan-view line drawings for visualization of known and suspected facilities of interest which can be critical to: (1) Site familiarization and true geospatial context awareness; (2) Pre-inspection planning; (3) Onsite orientation and navigation; (4) Post-inspection reporting; (5) Site monitoring over time for changes; (6) Verification of states site declarations and for input to State Evaluation reports; and (7) A common basis for discussions among all interested parties (Member States). Additionally, as an 'open-source', such virtual globes can also provide a new, essentially free, means to conduct broad area search for undeclared nuclear sites and activities - either alleged through open source leads; identified on internet BLOGS and WIKI Layers, with input from a 'free' cadre of global browsers and/or by knowledgeable local citizens (a.k.a.: 'crowdsourcing'), that can include ground photos and maps; or by other initiatives based on existing information and in-house country knowledge. They also provide a means to acquire ground photography taken by locals, hobbyists, and tourists of the surrounding locales that can be useful in identifying and discriminating between relevant and non-relevant facilities and their associated infrastructure. The digital globes also provide highly accurate terrain mapping for better geospatial context and allow detailed 3-D perspectives of all sites or areas of interest. 3-D modeling software (i.e., Google's SketchUp6 newly available in 2007) when used in conjunction with these digital globes can significantly enhance individual building characterization and visualization (including interiors), allowing for better assessments including walk-arounds or fly-arounds and perhaps better decision making on multiple levels (e.g., the best placement for International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) video monitoring cameras).

  15. Evaluation of Open Geospatial Consortium Standards fur Use In LLNL Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, H; Chou, R; Chubb, K; Schek, J

    2005-09-28

    The objective of this project is to evaluate existing and emerging Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards for use in LLNL programs that rely heavily on geographic data. OGC standards are intended to facilitate interoperability between geospatial processing systems to avoid duplication of effort, lower development costs, and encourage competition based on improved capability and performance rather than vendor lock-in. Some of these standards appear to be gaining traction in the geospatial data community, the Federal government, DOE and DHS. A serious evaluation of this technology is appropriate at this time due to increasing interest and mandated compliance in the Federal government in some situations. A subset of OGC standards is identified and reviewed with a focus on applications to LLNL programs. Each standard or recommendation reviewed was evaluated in general terms. In addition, for specific programs such as Gen&SIS and NARAC, a specific evaluation was made of several of the standards and how they could be used most effectively. It is also important to evaluate the acceptance of these standards in the commercial arena. The implementation of OGC standards by the largest GIS vendor (ESRI) was reviewed. At present, OGC standards are primary useful in specific situations. More generally, many of the standards are immature and their impact on the government and commercial sectors is unclear. Consequently, OGC and related developments need to be observed. As specific standards or groups of standards mature and establish their relevance, these can also be incorporated in LLNL programs as requirements dictate, especially if open implementations and commercial products are available.

  16. iGlobe: An Interactive Visualization and Analysis Framework for Geospatial Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-07-22

    The iGlobe system is a desktop-based visualization and analysis environment which allows seamless integration of multiple geospatial data sets from varied sources and provides an interface to interactively analyze the different data sets and apply sophisticated data analysis and mining algorithms in a near real time fashion. The framework is highly desirable in domains such as earth and climate sciences where great emphasis is placed on simultaneous analysis of different data sets such as remote sensing images, climate model simulation outputs, and other environmental and demographic databases, to understand weather and climate systems and the impact of climate change in nature and people.

  17. GIS-and Web-based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Wei; Minnick, Matthew; Geza, Mengistu; Murray, Kyle; Mattson, Earl

    2012-09-30

    The Colorado School of Mines (CSM) was awarded a grant by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct a research project en- titled GIS- and Web-based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development in October of 2008. The ultimate goal of this research project is to develop a water resource geo-spatial infrastructure that serves as “baseline data” for creating solutions on water resource management and for supporting decisions making on oil shale resource development. The project came to the end on September 30, 2012. This final project report will report the key findings from the project activity, major accomplishments, and expected impacts of the research. At meantime, the gamma version (also known as Version 4.0) of the geodatabase as well as other various deliverables stored on digital storage media will be send to the program manager at NETL, DOE via express mail. The key findings from the project activity include the quantitative spatial and temporal distribution of the water resource throughout the Piceance Basin, water consumption with respect to oil shale production, and data gaps identified. Major accomplishments of this project include the creation of a relational geodatabase, automated data processing scripts (Matlab) for database link with surface water and geological model, ArcGIS Model for hydrogeologic data processing for groundwater model input, a 3D geological model, surface water/groundwater models, energy resource development systems model, as well as a web-based geo-spatial infrastructure for data exploration, visualization and dissemination. This research will have broad impacts of the devel- opment of the oil shale resources in the US. The geodatabase provides a “baseline” data for fur- ther study of the oil shale development and identification of further data collection needs. The 3D geological model provides better understanding through data interpolation and visualization techniques of the Piceance Basin structure spatial distribution of the oil shale resources. The sur- face water/groundwater models quantify the water shortage and better understanding the spatial distribution of the available water resources. The energy resource development systems model reveals the phase shift of water usage and the oil shale production, which will facilitate better planning for oil shale development. Detailed descriptions about the key findings from the project activity, major accomplishments, and expected impacts of the research will be given in the sec- tion of “ACCOMPLISHMENTS, RESULTS, AND DISCUSSION” of this report.

  18. Computing quality scores and uncertainty for approximate pattern matching in geospatial semantic graphs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stracuzzi, David John; Brost, Randolph C.; Phillips, Cynthia A.; Robinson, David G.; Wilson, Alyson G.; Woodbridge, Diane M. -K.

    2015-09-26

    Geospatial semantic graphs provide a robust foundation for representing and analyzing remote sensor data. In particular, they support a variety of pattern search operations that capture the spatial and temporal relationships among the objects and events in the data. However, in the presence of large data corpora, even a carefully constructed search query may return a large number of unintended matches. This work considers the problem of calculating a quality score for each match to the query, given that the underlying data are uncertain. As a result, we present a preliminary evaluation of three methods for determining both match qualitymore » scores and associated uncertainty bounds, illustrated in the context of an example based on overhead imagery data.« less

  19. iGlobe: An Interactive Visualization and Analysis Framework for Geospatial Data

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-07-22

    The iGlobe system is a desktop-based visualization and analysis environment which allows seamless integration of multiple geospatial data sets from varied sources and provides an interface to interactively analyze the different data sets and apply sophisticated data analysis and mining algorithms in a near real time fashion. The framework is highly desirable in domains such as earth and climate sciences where great emphasis is placed on simultaneous analysis of different data sets such as remotemore » sensing images, climate model simulation outputs, and other environmental and demographic databases, to understand weather and climate systems and the impact of climate change in nature and people.« less

  20. Computing quality scores and uncertainty for approximate pattern matching in geospatial semantic graphs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stracuzzi, David John; Brost, Randolph C.; Phillips, Cynthia A.; Robinson, David G.; Wilson, Alyson G.; Woodbridge, Diane M. -K.

    2015-09-26

    Geospatial semantic graphs provide a robust foundation for representing and analyzing remote sensor data. In particular, they support a variety of pattern search operations that capture the spatial and temporal relationships among the objects and events in the data. However, in the presence of large data corpora, even a carefully constructed search query may return a large number of unintended matches. This work considers the problem of calculating a quality score for each match to the query, given that the underlying data are uncertain. As a result, we present a preliminary evaluation of three methods for determining both match quality scores and associated uncertainty bounds, illustrated in the context of an example based on overhead imagery data.

  1. ARM - Campaign Instrument - linet-dlr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers for the list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. Lightning stroke...

  2. Data management for geospatial vulnerability assessment of interdependencies in US power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shih, C.Y.; Scown, C.D.; Soibelman, L.; Matthews, H.S.; Garrett, J.H.; Dodrill, K.; McSurdy, S.

    2009-09-15

    Critical infrastructures maintain our society's stability, security, and quality of life. These systems are also interdependent, which means that the disruption of one infrastructure system can significantly impact the operation of other systems. Because of the heavy reliance on electricity production, it is important to assess possible vulnerabilities. Determining the source of these vulnerabilities can provide insight for risk management and emergency response efforts. This research uses data warehousing and visualization techniques to explore the interdependencies between coal mines, rail transportation, and electric power plants. By merging geospatial and nonspatial data, we are able to model the potential impacts of a disruption to one or more mines, rail lines, or power plants, and visually display the results using a geographical information system. A scenario involving a severe earthquake in the New Madrid Seismic Zone is used to demonstrate the capabilities of the model when given input in the form of a potentially impacted area. This type of interactive analysis can help decision makers to understand the vulnerabilities of the coal distribution network and the potential impact it can have on electricity production.

  3. VERIFICATION & VALIDATION OF A SEMANTIC IMAGE TAGGING FRAMEWORK VIA GENERATION OF GEOSPATIAL IMAGERY GROUND TRUTH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleason, Shaun Scott; Ferrell, Regina Kay; Cheriyadat, Anil M; Vatsavai, Raju; Sari-Sarraf, Hamed; Dema, Mesfin A

    2011-01-01

    As a result of increasing geospatial image libraries, many algorithms are being developed to automatically extract and classify regions of interest from these images. However, limited work has been done to compare, validate and verify these algorithms due to the lack of datasets with high accuracy ground truth annotations. In this paper, we present an approach to generate a large number of synthetic images accompanied by perfect ground truth annotation via learning scene statistics from few training images through Maximum Entropy (ME) modeling. The ME model [1,2] embeds a Stochastic Context Free Grammar (SCFG) to model object attribute variations with Markov Random Fields (MRF) with the final goal of modeling contextual relations between objects. Using this model, 3D scenes are generated by configuring a 3D object model to obey the learned scene statistics. Finally, these plausible 3D scenes are captured by ray tracing software to produce synthetic images with the corresponding ground truth annotations that are useful for evaluating the performance of a variety of image analysis algorithms.

  4. Regional scale cropland carbon budgets: evaluating a geospatial agricultural modeling system using inventory data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; Sahajpal, Ritvik; West, Tristram O.; Thomson, Allison M.; Xu, Min; Zhao, Kaiguang; LeDuc, Stephen D.; Williams, Jimmy R.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate quantification and clear understanding of regional scale cropland carbon (C) cycling is critical for designing effective policies and management practices that can contribute toward stabilizing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. However, extrapolating site-scale observations to regional scales represents a major challenge confronting the agricultural modeling community. This study introduces a novel geospatial agricultural modeling system (GAMS) exploring the integration of the mechanistic Environmental Policy Integrated Climate model, spatially-resolved data, surveyed management data, and supercomputing functions for cropland C budgets estimates. This modeling system creates spatially-explicit modeling units at a spatial resolution consistent with remotely-sensed crop identification and assigns cropping systems to each of them by geo-referencing surveyed crop management information at the county or state level. A parallel computing algorithm was also developed to facilitate the computationally intensive model runs and output post-processing and visualization. We evaluated GAMS against National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) reported crop yields and inventory estimated county-scale cropland C budgets averaged over 2000–2008. We observed good overall agreement, with spatial correlation of 0.89, 0.90, 0.41, and 0.87, for crop yields, Net Primary Production (NPP), Soil Organic C (SOC) change, and Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE), respectively. However, we also detected notable differences in the magnitude of NPP and NEE, as well as in the spatial pattern of SOC change. By performing crop-specific annual comparisons, we discuss possible explanations for the discrepancies between GAMS and the inventory method, such as data requirements, representation of agroecosystem processes, completeness and accuracy of crop management data, and accuracy of crop area representation. Based on these analyses, we further discuss strategies to improve GAMS by updating input data and by designing more efficient parallel computing capability to quantitatively assess errors associated with the simulation of C budget components. The modularized design of the GAMS makes it flexible to be updated and adapted for different agricultural models so long as they require similar input data, and to be linked with socio-economic models to understand the effectiveness and implications of diverse C management practices and policies.

  5. Stream-reach Identification for New Run-of-River Hydropower Development through a Merit Matrix Based Geospatial Algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasha, M. Fayzul K.; Yeasmin, Dilruba; Kao, Shih-Chieh; Hadjerioua, Boualem; Wei, Yaxing; Smith, Brennan T

    2014-01-01

    Even after a century of development, the total hydropower potential from undeveloped rivers is still considered to be abundant in the United States. However, unlike evaluating hydropower potential at existing hydropower plants or non-powered dams, locating a feasible new hydropower plant involves many unknowns, and hence the total undeveloped potential is harder to quantify. In light of the rapid development of multiple national geospatial datasets for topography, hydrology, and environmental characteristics, a merit matrix based geospatial algorithm is proposed to help identify possible hydropower stream-reaches for future development. These hydropower stream-reaches sections of natural streams with suitable head, flow, and slope for possible future development are identified and compared using three different scenarios. A case study was conducted in the Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa (ACT) and Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) hydrologic subregions. It was found that a merit matrix based algorithm, which is based on the product of hydraulic head, annual mean flow, and average channel slope, can help effectively identify stream-reaches with high power density and small surface inundation. The identified stream-reaches can then be efficiently evaluated for their potential environmental impact, land development cost, and other competing water usage in detailed feasibility studies . Given that the selected datasets are available nationally (at least within the conterminous US), the proposed methodology will have wide applicability across the country.

  6. GIS-based Geospatial Infrastructure of Water Resource Assessment for Supporting Oil Shale Development in Piceance Basin of Northwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Wei; Minnick, Matthew D; Mattson, Earl D; Geza, Mengistu; Murray, Kyle E.

    2015-04-01

    Oil shale deposits of the Green River Formation (GRF) in Northwestern Colorado, Southwestern Wyoming, and Northeastern Utah may become one of the first oil shale deposits to be developed in the U.S. because of their richness, accessibility, and extensive prior characterization. Oil shale is an organic-rich fine-grained sedimentary rock that contains significant amounts of kerogen from which liquid hydrocarbons can be produced. Water is needed to retort or extract oil shale at an approximate rate of three volumes of water for every volume of oil produced. Concerns have been raised over the demand and availability of water to produce oil shale, particularly in semiarid regions where water consumption must be limited and optimized to meet demands from other sectors. The economic benefit of oil shale development in this region may have tradeoffs within the local and regional environment. Due to these potential environmental impacts of oil shale development, water usage issues need to be further studied. A basin-wide baseline for oil shale and water resource data is the foundation of the study. This paper focuses on the design and construction of a centralized geospatial infrastructure for managing a large amount of oil shale and water resource related baseline data, and for setting up the frameworks for analytical and numerical models including but not limited to three-dimensional (3D) geologic, energy resource development systems, and surface water models. Such a centralized geospatial infrastructure made it possible to directly generate model inputs from the same database and to indirectly couple the different models through inputs/outputs. Thus ensures consistency of analyses conducted by researchers from different institutions, and help decision makers to balance water budget based on the spatial distribution of the oil shale and water resources, and the spatial variations of geologic, topographic, and hydrogeological Characterization of the basin. This endeavor encountered many technical challenging and hasn't been done in the past for any oil shale basin. The database built during this study remains valuable for any other future studies involving oil shale and water resource management in the Piceance Basin. The methodology applied in the development of the GIS based Geospatial Infrastructure can be readily adapted for other professionals to develop database structure for other similar basins.

  7. Global Environment Fund GEF | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Invests in companies that make positive contributions to environmental quality, human health and sustainable management of resources. References: Global Environment Fund...

  8. Multi-scale geospatial agroecosystem modeling: a case study on the influence of soil data resolution on carbon budget estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, D.; Zhao, Kaiguang; LeDuc, Stephen D.; Xu, Min; Xiong, Wei; Zhang, Aiping; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Thomson, Allison M.; West, Tristram O.; Post, W. M.

    2014-05-01

    The development of effective measures to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentration and mitigate negative impacts of climate change requires accurate quantification of the spatial variation and magnitude of the terrestrial carbon (C) flux. However, the spatial pattern and strength of terrestrial C sinks and sources remain uncertain. In this study, we designed a spatially-explicit agroecosystem modeling system by integrating the Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) model with multiple sources of geospatial and surveyed datasets (including crop type map, elevation, climate forcing, fertilizer application, tillage type and distribution, and crop planting and harvesting date), and applied it to examine the sensitivity of cropland C flux simulations to two widely used soil databases (i.e. State Soil Geographic-STATSGO of a scale of 1:250,000 and Soil Survey Geographic-SSURGO of a scale of 1:24,000) in Iowa, USA. To efficiently execute numerous EPIC runs resulting from the use of high resolution spatial data (56m), we developed a parallelized version of EPIC. Both STATSGO and SSURGO led to similar simulations of crop yields and Net Ecosystem Production (NEP) estimates at the State level. However, substantial differences were observed at the county and sub-county (grid) levels. In general, the fine resolution SSURGO data outperformed the coarse resolution STATSGO data for county-scale crop-yield simulation, and within STATSGO, the area-weighted approach provided more accurate results. Further analysis showed that spatial distribution and magnitude of simulated NEP were more sensitive to the resolution difference between SSURGO and STATSGO at the county or grid scale. For over 60% of the cropland areas in Iowa, the deviations between STATSGO- and SSURGO-derived NEP were larger than 1MgCha(-1)yr(-1), or about half of the average cropland NEP, highlighting the significant uncertainty in spatial distribution and magnitude of simulated C fluxes resulting from differences in soil data resolution.

  9. PlanetSense: A Real-time Streaming and Spatio-temporal Analytics Platform for Gathering Geo-spatial Intelligence from Open Source Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thakur, Gautam S; Bhaduri, Budhendra L; Piburn, Jesse O; Sims, Kelly M; Stewart, Robert N; Urban, Marie L

    2015-01-01

    Geospatial intelligence has traditionally relied on the use of archived and unvarying data for planning and exploration purposes. In consequence, the tools and methods that are architected to provide insight and generate projections only rely on such datasets. Albeit, if this approach has proven effective in several cases, such as land use identification and route mapping, it has severely restricted the ability of researchers to inculcate current information in their work. This approach is inadequate in scenarios requiring real-time information to act and to adjust in ever changing dynamic environments, such as evacuation and rescue missions. In this work, we propose PlanetSense, a platform for geospatial intelligence that is built to harness the existing power of archived data and add to that, the dynamics of real-time streams, seamlessly integrated with sophisticated data mining algorithms and analytics tools for generating operational intelligence on the fly. The platform has four main components i) GeoData Cloud a data architecture for storing and managing disparate datasets; ii) Mechanism to harvest real-time streaming data; iii) Data analytics framework; iv) Presentation and visualization through web interface and RESTful services. Using two case studies, we underpin the necessity of our platform in modeling ambient population and building occupancy at scale.

  10. German Aerospace Center (DLR)Feed | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition...

  11. UNDP/GEF-Cambodia-Sustainable Forest Management | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    be carried out through community forestry activities to engage rural communities in nature conservation and create markets for sustainable bio-energy technologies to help curb...

  12. Investing in Sustainable Transport and Urban Systems: The GEF...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    expand clean public transportation choices that also have the added benefits of lowering air pollution and reducing traffic congestion. LEDSGP green logo.png This tool is included...

  13. Geospatial Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ghana, Guatemala, Honduras, India, Nepal, Nicaragua, Oaxaca, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Turkey Cost: Free Southern Asia, Southern Asia, Southern Asia, South America, Eastern Asia,...

  14. Drainage Algorithm for Geospatial Knowledge

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-08-15

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed a prototype stream extraction algorithm that semi-automatically extracts and characterizes streams using a variety of multisensor imagery and digital terrain elevation data (DTED) data. The system is currently optimized for three types of single-band imagery: radar, visible, and thermal. Method of Solution: DRAGON: (1) classifies pixels into clumps of water objects based on the classification of water pixels by spectral signatures and neighborhood relationships, (2) uses themore » morphology operations (erosion and dilation) to separate out large lakes (or embayment), isolated lakes, ponds, wide rivers and narrow rivers, and (3) translates the river objects into vector objects. In detail, the process can be broken down into the following steps. A. Water pixels are initially identified using on the extend range and slope values (if an optional DEM file is available). B. Erode to the distance that defines a large water body and then dilate back. The resulting mask can be used to identify large lake and embayment objects that are then removed from the image. Since this operation be time consuming it is only performed if a simple test (i.e. a large box can be found somewhere in the image that contains only water pixels) that indicates a large water body is present. C. All water pixels are ‘clumped’ (in Imagine terminology clumping is when pixels of a common classification that touch are connected) and clumps which do not contain pure water pixels (e.g. dark cloud shadows) are removed D. The resulting true water pixels are clumped and water objects which are too small (e.g. ponds) or isolated lakes (i.e. isolated objects with a small compactness ratio) are removed. Note that at this point lakes have been identified has a byproduct of the filtering process and can be output has vector layers if needed. E. At this point only river pixels are left in the image. To separate out wide rivers all objects in the image are eroded by the half width of narrow rivers. This causes all narrow rivers to be removed and leaves only the core of wide rivers. This core is dilated out by the same distance to create a mask that is used with the original river image to separate out rivers into two separate images of narrow rivers and wide rivers F. If in the image that contains wide rivers there are small isolated short (less than 300 meters if NGA criteria is used) segments these segments are transferred to the narrow river file in order to be treated has parts of single line rivers G. The narrow river file is optionally dilated and eroded. This ‘closing’ has the effect of removing small islands, filling small gaps, and smoothing the outline H. The user also has the option of ‘closing’ objects in the wide river file. However, this depends on the degree to which the user wants to remove small islands in the large rivers. I. To make the translation from raster to single vector easier the objects in the narrow river image are reduced to a single center line (i.e. thinned) with binary morphology operations.« less

  15. Geospatial | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Groups Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Share your own status updates, and follow the updates & activities of others by creating your own account. Or, remember to log in...

  16. Geospatial | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blog entry Discussion Document Event Poll Question Keywords Author Apply NickL Hi-Yes, you are correct wi... Posted by: NickL 10 Sep 2013 - 10:02 Hi- Yes, you are correct...

  17. NREL: Energy Analysis: Geospatial Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy infrastructure, demographics and land ownership, and the earth's physical geography (topography, land use, rivers). NREL's geographic information system models enable...

  18. Geospatial Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Company Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Solar, Wind Phase: Determine Baseline Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Guide...

  19. Geospatial - Q & A | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - 13:59 1 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Hi-Yes, you are correct wi... How do I display the Map of Wind Farms csv coordinates in...

  20. Geospatial Technology Summit | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Location, Location0.pdf More Documents & Publications Hydrothermal Exploration Data Gap Analysis Update Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the ...

  1. UC Davis Models: Geospatial Station Network Design Tool and Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    perspective of the network, individual station owners, and consumers. Platform, Requirements & Availability Microsoft Excel-based hydrogen infrastructure rollout spreadsheet model

  2. Integrated: Geospatial Toolkit for Honduras from NREL - Datasets...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and easy to use geographic toolkit that allows non-GIS users to relate the renewable energy resource (solar and wind) data to other geographic data, such as land use, protected...

  3. Geospatial Toolkit (GsT) Webinar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    wikiGsT Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentgeospatial-toolkit-gst Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance...

  4. Integrated: Geospatial Toolkit GIS data for Oaxaca from NREL...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    show good potential for renewable energy projects. The toolkit displays renewable energy data along with information about the geography, location of population centers,...

  5. Integrated: Geospatial Toolkit GIS data for India from NREL ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    show good potential for renewable energy projects. The toolkit displays renewable energy data along with information about the geography, location of population centers,...

  6. Recent content in Geospatial | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - 21:45 Discussion Question about Map of Wind Farms Wzeng 13 Jul 2012 - 13:59 Question Hi, there is a button labeled ... NickL 13 Jul 2012 - 14:21 Answer How can I open .ASC...

  7. Next Generation (NextGen) Geospatial Information System (GIS)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) manages environmental records from Cold War legacy sites spanning nearly 40 years. These records are a key LM asset and must be...

  8. Geospatial Optimization of Siting Large-Scale Solar Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, J.; Quinby, T.; Caulfield, E.; Gerritsen, M.; Diffendorfer, J.; Haines, S.

    2014-03-01

    Recent policy and economic conditions have encouraged a renewed interest in developing large-scale solar projects in the U.S. Southwest. However, siting large-scale solar projects is complex. In addition to the quality of the solar resource, solar developers must take into consideration many environmental, social, and economic factors when evaluating a potential site. This report describes a proof-of-concept, Web-based Geographical Information Systems (GIS) tool that evaluates multiple user-defined criteria in an optimization algorithm to inform discussions and decisions regarding the locations of utility-scale solar projects. Existing siting recommendations for large-scale solar projects from governmental and non-governmental organizations are not consistent with each other, are often not transparent in methods, and do not take into consideration the differing priorities of stakeholders. The siting assistance GIS tool we have developed improves upon the existing siting guidelines by being user-driven, transparent, interactive, capable of incorporating multiple criteria, and flexible. This work provides the foundation for a dynamic siting assistance tool that can greatly facilitate siting decisions among multiple stakeholders.

  9. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Hydrogen Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biomass Geospatial Toolkits Geothermal Hydrogen International Marine & Hydrokinetic Solar Wind Data Visualization & Geospatial Tools Geospatial Team Publications Contact Us...

  10. The Earth System Grid Federation: An Open Infrastructure for Access to Distributed Geo-Spatial Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cinquini, Luca; Crichton, Daniel; Miller, Neill; Mattmann, Chris; Harney, John F; Shipman, Galen M; Wang, Feiyi; Bell, Gavin; Drach, Bob; Ananthakrishnan, Rachana; Pascoe, Stephen; Fiore, Sandro; Schweitzer, Roland; Danvil, Sebastian; Morgan, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) is a multi-agency, international collaboration that aims at developing the software infrastructure needed to facilitate and empower the study of climate change on a global scale. The ESGF s architecture employs a system of geographically distributed peer nodes, which are independently administered yet united by the adoption of common federation protocols and application programming interfaces (APIs). The cornerstones of its interoperability are the peer-to-peer messaging that is continuously exchanged among all nodes in the federation; a shared architecture and API for search and discovery; and a security infrastructure based on industry standards (OpenID, SSL, GSI and SAML). The ESGF software is developed collaboratively across institutional boundaries and made available to the community as open source. It has now been adopted by multiple Earth science projects and allows access to petabytes of geophysical data, including the entire model output used for the next international assessment report on climate change (IPCC-AR5) and a suite of satellite observations (obs4MIPs) and reanalysis data sets (ANA4MIPs).

  11. Detailed methodology of geospatial fire behavior analyses for the Savannah River Site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollingsworth, LaWen; Kurth, Laurie

    2010-11-19

    Three data sources were utilized to compare and contrast fire behavior modeling outputs (Table 1) from FlamMap for the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina.

  12. Application of Hybrid Geo-Spatially Granular Fragility Curves to Improve Power Outage Predictions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, Steven J; Allen, Melissa R; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Walker, Kimberly A

    2014-01-01

    Fragility curves depict the relationship between a weather variable (wind speed, gust speed, ice accumulation, precipitation rate) and the observed outages for a targeted infrastructure network. This paper describes an empirical study of the county by county distribution of power outages and one minute weather variables during Hurricane Irene with the objective of comparing 1) as built fragility curves (statistical approach) to engineering as designed (bottom up) fragility curves for skill in forecasting outages during future hurricanes; 2) county specific fragility curves to find examples of significant deviation from average behavior; and 3) the engineering practices of outlier counties to suggest future engineering studies of robustness. Outages in more than 90% of the impacted counties could be anticipated through an average or generic fragility curve. The remaining counties could be identified and handled as exceptions through geographic data sets. The counties with increased or decreased robustness were characterized by terrain more or less susceptible to persistent flooding in areas where above ground poles located their foundations. Land use characteristics of the area served by the power distribution system can suggest trends in the as built power grid vulnerabilities to extreme weather events that would be subjects for site specific studies.

  13. Geospatial Analysis and Optimization of Fleet Logistics to Exploit Alternative Fuels and Advanced Transportation Technologies: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparks, W.; Singer, M.

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes how the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is developing geographical information system (GIS) tools to evaluate alternative fuel availability in relation to garage locations and to perform automated fleet-wide optimization to determine where to deploy alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles and fueling infrastructure.

  14. Efficient Data Management for Knowledge Discovery in Large-Scale Geospatial Imagery Collections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, C; Abdulla, G

    2006-01-24

    We describe the results of our investigation on supporting ad-hoc and continuous queries over data streams. The major problem we address here is how to identify and utilize metadata for smart caching and to support queries over streaming and archived or historical data.

  15. GeoSpatial Infrastructure at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Andre M.; Webber, William D.

    2007-12-01

    Geographic Information Systems technology provides a keystone for achieving the mission and vision of the U. S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site. The Hanford Site located in Richland, Washington, is at a critical crossroads involving environmental, political, cultural, and economic concerns. The site has been collecting spatial data for a period of 60 years and now, more than ever, the organization and structure of spatial databases at Hanford provide a critical path to providing an effective, efficient, and safe cleanup mission demonstrating the effectiveness of environmental protection and restoration activities. This paper provides a current state of spatial data collections, use, management, and challenges at the Hanford Site through the development of a spatial data infrastructure. Recommendations designed to ensure long-term data quality, usability, and sustainability now and into the future are presented.

  16. SEMANTIC INFORMATION EXTRACTION FROM MULTISPECTRAL GEOSPATIAL IMAGERY VIA A FLEXIBLE FRAMEWORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleason, Shaun Scott; Ferrell, Regina Kay; Cheriyadat, Anil M; Vatsavai, Raju; De, Soumya

    2010-01-01

    Identification and automatic labeling of facilities in high-resolution satellite images is a challenging task as the current thematic classification schemes and the low-level image features are not good enough to capture complex objects and their spatial relationships. In this paper we present a novel algorithm framework for automated semantic labeling of large image collections. The framework consists of various segmentation, feature extraction, vector quantization, and Latent Dirichlet Allocation modules. Initial experimental results show promise as well as the challenges in semantic classification technology development for nuclear proliferation monitoring.

  17. The Earth System Grid Federation: An Open Infrastructure for Access to Distributed Geospatial Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ananthakrishnan, Rachana; Bell, Gavin; Cinquini, Luca; Crichton, Daniel; Danvil, Sebastian; Drach, Bob; Fiore, Sandro; Gonzalez, Estanislao; Harney, John F; Mattmann, Chris; Kershaw, Philip; Morgan, Mark; Pascoe, Stephen; Shipman, Galen M; Wang, Feiyi

    2013-01-01

    The Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) is a multi-agency, international collaboration that aims at developing the software infrastructure needed to facilitate and empower the study of climate change on a global scale. The ESGF s architecture employs a system of geographically distributed peer nodes, which are independently administered yet united by the adoption of common federation protocols and application programming interfaces (APIs). The cornerstones of its interoperability are the peer-to-peer messaging that is continuously exchanged among all nodes in the federation; a shared architecture and API for search and discovery; and a security infrastructure based on industry standards (OpenID, SSL, GSI and SAML). The ESGF software is developed collaboratively across institutional boundaries and made available to the community as open source. It has now been adopted by multiple Earth science projects and allows access to petabytes of geophysical data, including the entire model output used for the next international assessment report on climate change (IPCC-AR5) and a suite of satellite observations (obs4MIPs) and reanalysis data sets (ANA4MIPs).

  18. spatial analysis | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    spatial analysis Home Geospatial Description: Discuss and explore geospatial data available on OpenEI. geospatial GIS spatial analysis Syndicate content...

  19. HNF-50340

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... information systems management, including geospatial management, and records management. ... to current technology Ensure geospatial data are legible, traceable to their ...

  20. Engineered Natural Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    petroleum systems, basin analysis, and geospatial and geostatistical approaches utilizing ... tracer investigations; measuring stream flow; and conducting geospatial investigations

  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - LANL Student Symposium Poster.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fire severity qualification was determined using geospatial applications and ground ... Fire severity qualification was determined using geospatial applications and ground ...

  2. Geoscience Australia Continuous Global Positioning System (GPS...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    including maintenance of the Geospatial Reference Frame, both national and ... the maintenance of the National Geospatial Reference Systems, tectonic plate ...

  3. A comparison of geospatially modeled fire behavior and potential application to fire and fuels management for the Savannah River Site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurth, Laurie; Hollingsworth, LaWen; Shea, Dan

    2011-12-20

    This study evaluates modeled fire behavior for the Savannah River Site in the Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern U.S. using three data sources: FCCS, LANDFIRE, and SWRA. The Fuel Characteristic Classification System (FCCS) was used to build fuelbeds from intensive field sampling of 629 plots. Custom fire behavior fuel models were derived from these fuelbeds. LANDFIRE developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy attributes for the U.S. using satellite imagery informed by field data. The Southern Wildfire Risk Assessment (SWRA) developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy cover for the southeastern U.S. using satellite imagery.

  4. Inside Idaho: Interactive Numeric and Spatial Information Data...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GraphicMapChart Abstract Idaho GIS Clearinghouse Organization Idaho Geospatial Office Published Idaho Geospatial Office, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  5. 06554_GreenRiverGIS | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GIS and Web-Based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development Last ... GIS- (Geographic Information Systems) and web-based water resource geospatial ...

  6. Who ESnet Serves

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... (Denver, CO) DOE-IN NVIC National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) Nevada ... (Berkeley, CA) NGA-SW National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency - Southwest (White ...

  7. 02-2016 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... roles at NETL. A geology-geospatial researcher with NETL's Research and Innovation Center (RIC), Rose's research is focused on using geologic and geospatial science to ...

  8. Color Palette

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORNL - Three proven tools: ORNL Geospatial Viewer (OGV); Microgrid Integrated Energy and ... ORNL * Microgrid Assisted Design for Remote Areas (MADRA) - ORNL Geospatial Viewer (OGV) - ...

  9. ARM - Field Campaign - Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ; National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Calibration Target Placements Related Campaigns ... Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE); National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Calibration Target ...

  10. Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-4-2012_Integration of Spatial Data...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Since 2011, the project team has focused on integrating and analyzing geospatial datasets, ... The goal of this work is to develop geospatial relationships to support assessment of ...

  11. NREL: Energy Analysis - Models and Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for hydrogen, with this geospatial and temporal infrastructure analysis model. Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Model Use NREL's geospatial toolkit to visualize ...

  12. Microsoft Word - Climate-Infrastructure-Workshop_agenda_R4.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... These climate-related impacts could range from changes in geospatial distributions of ... requires predicting the evolution of geospatial energy demands and infrastructure ...

  13. Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Geospatial Information Management - The "Building List Map Set" has been updated and is ... INFORMATION SUPPORT SERVICES Geospatial Information Management - The "Building List Map ...

  14. Microsoft Word - SECTION J - Current to Mod 002 with Track Changes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Users Requirements Cost Allocations IS Geospatial Information Management Deliver input to ... Medical Services at Hanford J-3-34 Geospatial Information (relates the visualization, ...

  15. Monthly Performance Report October 2009

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... community." - Ted Feigenbaum Geospatial Information System Kaizen. The Property & Land Management Team completed a three-day Geospatial Information System Kaizen in October. ...

  16. Learning from Semantic Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Learning from Semantic Interactions Most machine learning tools used in geospatial mapping ... Phase 2 - Geospatial Applications: * Identify collaborators, data and problems in the ...

  17. Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-2-2015_CSIL_BroadImpacts.final.20150219...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... existing datasets to develop a geospatial database for the GOM and an online ... Geospatial data of state park boundaries was available from the appropriate state agency, ...

  18. Maryland's 8th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    8th congressional district Arborview Capital Clean Currents Global Environment Fund GEF National Interest Security Company NISC Formerly Technology Management Services TMS Inc...

  19. Annual Monitoring Report Interactive Map | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    inception, that are not currently under implementation, data is extracted from the GEF's Project Management Information System (PMIS). The main concept behind the map is to create...

  20. Burkina Faso-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Environment Facility (GEF), United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Global Water Partnership (GWP), German Society for International Cooperation...

  1. Djibouti-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Environment Facility (GEF), United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Global Water Partnership (GWP), German Society for International Cooperation...

  2. Central African Republic-National Adaptation Plan Global Support...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Environment Facility (GEF), United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Global Water Partnership (GWP), German Society for International Cooperation...

  3. Niger-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Environment Facility (GEF), United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Global Water Partnership (GWP), German Society for International Cooperation...

  4. Rwanda-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Environment Facility (GEF), United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Global Water Partnership (GWP), German Society for International Cooperation...

  5. Lesotho-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Environment Facility (GEF), United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Global Water Partnership (GWP), German Society for International Cooperation...

  6. Liberia-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Environment Facility (GEF), United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Global Water Partnership (GWP), German Society for International Cooperation...

  7. Malawi-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Environment Facility (GEF), United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Global Water Partnership (GWP), German Society for International Cooperation...

  8. Comoros-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Environment Facility (GEF), United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Global Water Partnership (GWP), German Society for International Cooperation...

  9. Tanzania-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Environment Facility (GEF), United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Global Water Partnership (GWP), German Society for International Cooperation...

  10. Bangladesh-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Environment Facility (GEF), United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Global Water Partnership (GWP), German Society for International Cooperation...

  11. The Gambia-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Environment Facility (GEF), United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Global Water Partnership (GWP), German Society for International Cooperation...

  12. Democratic Republic of Congo-National Adaptation Plan Global...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Environment Facility (GEF), United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Global Water Partnership (GWP), German Society for International Cooperation...

  13. Uganda-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Environment Facility (GEF), United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Global Water Partnership (GWP), German Society for International Cooperation...

  14. Mali-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP-GSP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Environment Facility (GEF), United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Global Water Partnership (GWP), German Society for International Cooperation...

  15. Mozambique-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Environment Facility (GEF), United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Global Water Partnership (GWP), German Society for International Cooperation...

  16. Mauritania-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Environment Facility (GEF), United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Global Water Partnership (GWP), German Society for International Cooperation...

  17. Sudan-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Environment Facility (GEF), United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Global Water Partnership (GWP), German Society for International Cooperation...

  18. Cambodia-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Environment Facility (GEF), United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Global Water Partnership (GWP), German Society for International Cooperation...

  19. Benin-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Environment Facility (GEF), United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Global Water Partnership (GWP), German Society for International Cooperation...

  20. Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Download Carribean Islands Central America DNI GIS Mexico NREL GEF SWERA UNEP atmospheric water v... solar Additional Info Field Value Source www.nrel.gov Author National Renewable...

  1. Ghana-NREL Rural Electrification | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    electrification project in Ghana in cooperation with UNDP and GEF. NREL also piloted a business model for providing energy services in rural areas of Ghana.1 References ...

  2. Promotion of Wind Energy: Lessons Learned from International...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Energy: Lessons Learned from International Experience and United Nations Development Programme Global Environment Facility (UNDP-GEF) Projects Jump to: navigation, search Tool...

  3. Gateway:Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Center ClimateTechWiki ESMAP Low Carbon Development Knowledge Products and E-Learning IEA Policies and Measures Database GEF-Knowledge Management Initiative REN21...

  4. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Initial studies: DLR-A Sandia flame D Improved numerical methods allow a fuller treatment of chemistry Future: Comparison with DNS (Chen, Sandia) Premixed...

  5. Global Renewable Energy Database | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Renewable Energy Database AgencyCompany Organization: German Aerospace Center (DLR) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar, Wind...

  6. Ecosystem Spectroscopy - Investigating associations between hyperspect...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yuki's research interests include ecosystem functions and processes, big eco-geospatial data analytics, and geospatial cloud analytics. Yuki holds a B.A. and M.S. degrees in...

  7. GIS data | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GIS data Home NickL's picture Submitted by NickL(137) Contributor 25 June, 2012 - 21:45 GIS keyword geospatial data GIS GIS data Explore the geospatial datasets in OpenEI's...

  8. Carbon Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Geospatial data resources - Developing resources to improve access to geospatial data for public use (NATCARB), as well as for researchers. A micro-CT image of a sample reservoir ...

  9. Brazil-World Bank Climate Projects | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1.1 Sao Paulo Metro Line 5 Project 1.2 BR-GEF Sustainable Transport and Air Quality Project (STAQ) 1.3 First Programmatic Development Policy Loan for Sustainable...

  10. insert 52005.indd

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) is a US 9.3 million Project, co-financed with US6.8 million from the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and more than 25...

  11. GE科技为F1卡特汉姆车队添动力 | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GEF1 Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to ...

  12. Secondary PDZ domain-binding site on class B plexins enhances...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Secondary PDZ domain-binding site on class B plexins enhances the affinity for PDZ-RhoGEF Authors: Pascoe, Heath G. ; Gutowski, Stephen ; Chen, Hua ; Brautigam, Chad A. ; ...

  13. 06554_GreenRiverGIS | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GIS and Web-Based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development Last Reviewed 6/26/2013 DE-NT0006554 Goal The goal of this project is to develop a GIS- (Geographic Information Systems) and web-based water resource geospatial infrastructure, which contains the basin baseline datasets for surface and groundwater, customized analytical toolsets, and user interfaces (UIs). The water resource geospatial infrastructure will provide water management solutions that will facilitate

  14. Horizontal Plate Plate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Unknown Title: Horizontal Plate Plate GeospatialDataPresentationForm: vector digital data OnlineLinkage:

  15. U.S. OpenLabs - Educational Materials | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Practices and Application in the U.S. Geospatial Toolkit (GsT) Webinar Introduction to Hydrogen for Code Officials LEDSGPanalysisimpactsDIAWebinar on Development Impact...

  16. USAJobs Search | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    integration for applications which: 1) support agencys geospatial information systems (GIS); 2) support Computer Aided Design systems (CAD) and knowledge workers; and 3) support...

  17. United Nations Environment Programme: Global Environment Outlook...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    more than 500 different variables, as national, subregional, regional and global statistics or as geospatial data sets (maps), covering themes like Freshwater, Population,...

  18. The Pittsburgh Federal Executive Board Honors NETL with Eight...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    his Integrated Geospatial Tools for Search and Rescue (IGT4SAR). The mobility model of IGT4SAR considers the influence of slope, land cover, hydrology, and the...

  19. Washington, D.C. and Tennessee: Bioenergy Technologies Office...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a variety of data sets, publications, and collaboration and ... geospatial data; and browse the site's collection of ... Recognized at National Conference National Bioenergy Day ...

  20. A Holistic Framework for Environmental Flows Determination in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... hydrologic classification and fish traits applied to 8-digit hydrologic unit codes (top). ... of ecological geospatial data sets. (A) Fish sampling point locations provided by two ...

  1. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Environmenta...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Biology of the Chloroplast US DOE, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Green Power Network Utah, University of - Energy and Geoscience Institute, GeoSpatial ...

  2. NREL: Energy Analysis - Daniel Getman

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Daniel Getman Photo of Daniel Getman. Daniel Getman is a member of the Data Analysis and Visualization Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Geospatial Data Science Team...

  3. IGLOBE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002848MLTPL00 iGlobe: An Interactive Visualization and Analysis Framework for Geospatial Data http://www.ornl.gov/~6qz/iglobe/

  4. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... These networks support a number of different science applications including maintenance of the Geospatial Reference Frame, both national and international, continental and tectonic ...

  5. Analysis Models and Tools: Systems Analysis of Hydrogen and Fuel...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Resolved Energy and Environment Tool (STREET) Model PDF icon UC Davis Models: Geospatial Station Network Design Tool and Hydrogen Infrastructure Rollout Economic Analysis ...

  6. Climate Perspectives Bios

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory, he provides geospatial support for the Next Generation Ecosystem Experimen (NGEE-Arctic) and assists with field campaigns in Alaska. In his spare ...

  7. ARM - Field Campaign - Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE); National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Calibration Target Placements 2016.04.24, Kalukin, SGP ...

  8. ARM - DOI Guidance for ARM Facility Datastreams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The format may depend on the journal or publication requirements, but at a minimum, ARM encourages users to include ARM datastream DOIs with temporal and geospatial information and ...

  9. Los Alamos names four to Laboratory Fellows list

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Frank Pabian, of the International Research and Analysis group, is internationally recognized for his support of global security. A geospatial and remote-sensing specialist, Pabian ...

  10. rlg-uchicago-06-v6.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Time Entity (special event, etc.) Geospatial region Change Detection using Cubes of Models (CDCM)- separate baselines for each cell Greedy MeaningfulManageable Balancing (GMMB) ...

  11. Huge Potential for Hydropower: Assessment Highlights New Possible...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Researchers used new advancements in geospatial analysis to provide a first-of-its-kind look at the nation's developable hydropower potential. Several environmental, technical and ...

  12. SREL Reprint #3308

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Abstract: Stable isotope analysis is widely promoted as a practical method for tracing the geographic origins of migratory birds. However, the extent to which geospatial patterns ...

  13. Microsoft Word - Climate-Infrastructure-Workshop_read-ahead_R2...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... to infrasture assessment and planning rely on empirical weather data derived from historical trends, including geospatial distributions of both mean values and extreme values. ...

  14. SULI Alumni | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Matthew currently works as a Mechanical Engineer for Merrick and Company, which provides energy, national security, nuclear, infrastructure, and geospatial services and consulting. ...

  15. ARM - Field Campaign - Cirrus Clouds and Aerosol Properties Campaign

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lead Scientist : Shadrian Strong For data sets, see below. Abstract Through the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Characterization of Cirrus and Aerosol Properties (CCAP) ...

  16. ORISE: Environmental Assessments and Health Physics fact sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... of Indoor Contamination ORAU developed a method for using a robotic total station to capture the geospatial data necessary for 3-D mapping of radiological contamination indoors. ...

  17. emerging-lidar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Xin is currently also an adjunct professor and Ph.D. advisor at the Computer Science Department of Illinois Institute of Technology teaching a "Geospatial Vision and Visualization" ...

  18. The Role of GIS in Decision Support Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    PDF icon The Role of GIS in Decision Support Systems More Documents & Publications CX-002853: Categorical Exclusion Determination Geospatial Technology Summit The Bioenergy ...

  19. Introduction to the Office and Programs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the total national technical potential 3 Why is Geospatial Analysis Different? * A statistical approach to analyzing information that incorporates data that has a geographic ...

  20. Dynamic Line Rating: Research and Policy Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jake P. Gentle; Kurt S. Myers; Michael R. West

    2014-07-01

    Dynamic Line Rating (DLR) is a smart grid technology that allows the rating of electrical conductors to be increased based on local weather conditions. Overhead lines are conventionally given a conservative rating based on worst case scenarios. We demonstrate that observing the conditions in real time leads to additional capacity and safer operation. This paper provides a report of a pioneering scheme in the United States of America in which DLR has been applied. Thereby, we demonstrate that observing the local weather conditions in real time leads to additional capacity and safer operation. Secondly, we discuss limitations involved. In doing so, we arrive at novel insights which will inform and improve future DLR projects. Third, we provide a policy background and discussion to clarify the technology’s potential and identifies barriers to the imminent adoption of dynamic line rating systems. We provide suggestions for regulatory bodies about possible improvements in policy to encourage adoption of this beneficial technology.

  1. Dynamic Line Rating Oncor Electric Delivery Smart Grid Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Justin; Smith, Cale; Young, Mike; Donohoo, Ken; Owen, Ross; Clark, Eddit; Espejo, Raul; Aivaliotis, Sandy; Stelmak, Ron; Mohr, Ron; Barba, Cristian; Gonzalez, Guillermo; Malkin, Stuart; Dimitrova, Vessela; Ragsdale, Gary; Mitchem, Sean; Jeirath, Nakul; Loomis, Joe; Trevino, Gerardo; Syracuse, Steve; Hurst, Neil; Mereness, Matt; Johnson, Chad; Bivens, Carrie

    2013-05-04

    Electric transmission lines are the lifeline of the electric utility industry, delivering its product from source to consumer. This critical infrastructure is often constrained such that there is inadequate capacity on existing transmission lines to efficiently deliver the power to meet demand in certain areas or to transport energy from high-generation areas to high-consumption regions. When this happens, the cost of the energy rises; more costly sources of power are used to meet the demand or the system operates less reliably. These economic impacts are known as congestion, and they can amount to substantial dollars for any time frame of reference: hour, day or year. There are several solutions to the transmission constraint problem, including: construction of new generation, construction of new transmission facilities, rebuilding and reconductoring of existing transmission assets, and Dynamic Line Rating (DLR). All of these options except DLR are capital intensive, have long lead times and often experience strong public and regulatory opposition. The Smart Grid Demonstration Program (SGDP) project co-funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) and Oncor Electric Delivery Company developed and deployed the most extensive and advanced DLR installation to demonstrate that DLR technology is capable of resolving many transmission capacity constraint problems with a system that is reliable, safe and very cost competitive. The SGDP DLR deployment is the first application of DLR technology to feed transmission line real-time dynamic ratings directly into the system operation’s State Estimator and load dispatch program, which optimizes the matching of generation with load demand on a security, reliability and economic basis. The integrated Dynamic Line Rating (iDLR)1 collects transmission line parameters at remote locations on the lines, calculates the real-time line rating based on the equivalent conductor temperature, ambient temperature and influence of wind and solar radiation on the stringing section, transmits the data to the Transmission Energy Management System, validates its integrity and passes it on to Oncor and ERCOT (Electric Reliability Council of Texas) respective system operations. The iDLR system is automatic and transparent to ERCOT System Operations, i.e., it operates in parallel with all other system status telemetry collected through Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) employed across the company.

  2. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Data Visualization &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geospatial Tools MapSearch Searching for maps has never been easier. A screen capture of the MapSearch Map view option Bookmark and Share Data Visualization & Geospatial Tools NREL's Geospatial Data Science Team has developed tools that allow users to apply these data. These tools help determine things such as how much electricity can be produced from solar systems on a house or what renewable resources are available in a specific areas. Please visit http://maps.nrel.gov/ for the most

  3. Evaluation of OGC Standards for Use in LLNL GIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, H; Chou, R M; Chubb, K K; Schek, J L

    2006-06-23

    Over the summer of 2005, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Computer Applications and Research Department conducted a small project that examined whether Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards might be useful in meeting program mission requirements more effectively. OGC standards are intended to facilitate interoperability between geospatial processing systems to lower development costs and to avoid duplication of effort and vendor lock-in. Some OGC standards appear to be gaining traction in the geospatial data community, the Federal government, Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and so an evaluation was deemed appropriate.

  4. Map Data: Alternative Fuel Stations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The geospatial vector data has been compressed into one file.  You will need to uncompress it before using a geographic information systems (GIS) program to view the data.

  5. New Stream-Reach Hydropower Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The New Stream-reach Development (NSD) project implemented an ad- vanced geo-spatial approach to analyze the potential for new hydropower development in U.S. stream-reaches that do ...

  6. New Stream-Reach Hydropower Development Fact Sheet | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Funded by the Department of Energy and executed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the New Stream-reach Development (NSD) project implemented an advanced geo-spatial approach to ...

  7. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    as a tribute to the nation's armed forces (see bottom of page for a history of the Blue Star Memorials). July 12, 2013 Next Generation (NextGen) Geospatial Information System...

  8. Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-8-2015 Appalachian Basin Isotopes_7...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The Molofsky et al. (2013) data is averaged to a single point as the study does not provide more specific geospatial information for their data. For instances in which a single ...

  9. enhanced_oil_current_proj | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... New Mexico Institute of Mining & Technology DE-NT0006554 GIS and Web-Based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development Colorado School of Mines DE-FE0006015 ...

  10. Spatio-temporal Visualization for Environmental Decision Support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhaduri, Budhendra L.; Shankar, Mallikarjun; Sorokine, Alexandre; Ganguly, Auroop R.

    2009-01-01

    Traditional visualization of earth surface features has been addressed through visual exploration, analysis, synthesis, and presentation of observable geospatial data. However, characterizing the changes in their observable and unobservable properties of geospatial features is critical for planning and policy formulation. Recent approaches are addressing modeling and visualization of the temporal dynamics that describe observed and/or predicted physical and socioeconomic processes using vast volumes of earth observation (imagery and other geophysical) data from remote sensor networks. This paper provides an overview of selected geospatial modeling and simulation, exploratory analysis of earth observation data, and high performance visualization research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for developing novel data driven approaches for geospatial knowledge discovery and visualization relevant to environmental decision support.

  11. 08_2-2014 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    our eyes to the need for a common portal that would facilitate and enhance our ability to share ideas," says NETL researcher Kelly Rose, Geology & Geospatial Research Team Lead. ...

  12. Chad Rowan | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    His specialized background in GIS and geospatial analysis-fields that gave him a thorough grounding in data management, storing, and analysis-has been a strong asset for EDX. As ...

  13. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Also, the consortium will develop advanced sensing and geospatial data collection systems to quantify system performance. Industrial-scale field tests over a 2.5-yr period will ...

  14. ARM - GVAX News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Climate Research Facility U.S. Department of Energy Kicks Off Scientific Collaboration with India June 10, 2011 Also picked up by: Geospatial Today U.S. Department of Energy ...

  15. Program Update: 2nd Quarter 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Inside this Update: Blue Star Memorial By-Way Dedication: Weldon Spring Interpretive Center; LM Progressing with Uranium Mines Report to Congress; Next Generation (NextGen) Geospatial Information...

  16. Forecasting hotspots using predictive visual analytics approach

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maciejewski, Ross; Hafen, Ryan; Rudolph, Stephen; Cleveland, William; Ebert, David

    2014-12-30

    A method for forecasting hotspots is provided. The method may include the steps of receiving input data at an input of the computational device, generating a temporal prediction based on the input data, generating a geospatial prediction based on the input data, and generating output data based on the time series and geospatial predictions. The output data may be configured to display at least one user interface at an output of the computational device.

  17. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Data Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bookmark and Share Data Resources NREL's Geospatial Data Science Team develops technology-specific GIS data maps for a variety of areas, as well as targeted analysis tools that can help determine availability of renewable energy resources. Geographic Information System Data NREL's Geospatial Data Science Team develops technology-specific GIS data maps for a variety of areas, including biomass, geothermal, solar, wind, and renewable hydrogen. The team has made some of our datasets available for

  18. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Webmaster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Webmaster To contact the Webmaster, please provide your name, e-mail address, and message below. When you are finished, click "Send Message." NOTE: If you enter your e-mail address incorrectly, we will be unable to reply. Your name: Your email address: Your message: Send Message Printable Version NREL GIS Home About NREL GIS Renewable Energy Technical Potential Renewable Energy Economic Potential Maps Data Resources Data Visualization & Geospatial Tools Geospatial Data Science Team

  19. Learning from Semantic Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Learning from Semantic Interactions Most machine learning tools used in geospatial mapping can only learn from labels. Learning from Semantic Interactions LANL's new machine learning tools can learn from semantic user interactions to produce more accurate mappings Point of Contact: Reid Porter, ISR Division, 665-7508, rporter@lanl.gov Current Phase - LDRD: * Develop theory and algorithms for tools and demonstrate impact in image analysis applications in materials microscopy. Phase 2 - Geospatial

  20. SRNL EMERGENCY RESPONSE CAPABILITY FOR ATMOSPHERIC CONTAMINANT RELEASES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koffman, L; Chuck Hunter, C; Robert Buckley, R; Robert Addis, R

    2006-07-12

    Emergency response to an atmospheric release of chemical or radiological contamination is enhanced when plume predictions, field measurements, and real-time weather information are integrated into a geospatial framework. The Weather Information and Display (WIND) System at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) utilizes such an integrated framework. The rapid availability of predictions from a suite of atmospheric transport models within this geospatial framework has proven to be of great value to decision makers during an emergency involving an atmospheric contaminant release.

  1. Project Profile: High-Temperature Falling-Particle Receiver | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Concentrating Solar Power » Project Profile: High-Temperature Falling-Particle Receiver Project Profile: High-Temperature Falling-Particle Receiver SNL logo Sandia National Laboratories with partners Georgia Tech, Bucknell University, King Saud University, and DLR, are developing a falling-particle receiver and heat-exchanger system to increase efficiency and lower costs under the 2012 Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) SunShot R&D funding opportunity announcement (FOA). Approach

  2. General Observation Period 2007: Concept and first results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Orographically- induced Precipitation Study (COPS) AMF AMF Volker Wulfmeyer, Andreas Behrendt, and Hans-Stefan Bauer, University of Hohenheim Christoph Kottmeier and Ulrich Corsmeier, FZK Karlsruhe Gerhard Adrian, German Meteorological Service (DWD Alan Blyth, School of Environment, University of Leeds, UK George Craig, Ulrich Schumann, and Martin Hagen, DLR Susanne Crewell, University of Cologne Paolo Di Girolamo, Universita degli Studi della Basilicata, Potenza, Italy Cyrille Flamant,

  3. Methods and systems for seed planting management and control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Svoboda, John M.; Hess, J. Richard; Hoskinson, Reed L.; Harker, David J.

    2002-01-01

    A seed planting system providing optimal seed spacing in an agricultural field. The seed planting system includes a mobile seed planter having one or more planting shoes, or members being adapted for towing by a farm vehicle or being self-propelled. Sensors, disposed proximate to respective planting shoes, detect seed planting events and send corresponding signals to a computer. Contemporaneously, a geospatial locator acquires, and transmits to the computer, the geospatial location of each planted seed. The computer correlates the geospatial location data with the seed deposition data and generates a seed distribution profile indicating the location of each seed planted in a zone of interest to enable the control of speed spacing.

  4. Comparing English, Mandarin, and Russian Hydrographic and Terrain Categories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Chen-Chieh; Sorokine, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    The paper compares hydrographic and terrain categories in the geospatial data standards of the US, Taiwan, and Russian Federation where the dominant languages used are from di erent language families. It aims to identify structural and semantic di erences between similar categories across three geospatial data standards. By formalizing the data standard structures and identifying the properties that di erentiate sibling categories in each geospatial data standard using well-known formal relations and quality universals, we develop a common basis on which hydrographic and terrain categories in the three data standards can be compared. The result suggests that all three data standards structure categories with a mixture of relations with di erent meaning even though most of them are well-known relations in top-level ontologies. Similar categories can be found across all three standards but exact match between similar categories are rare.

  5. Long-Term Spatial Data Preservation and Archiving: What Are the Issues?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BLEAKLY, DENISE R.

    2002-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is moving towards Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) of many environmental restoration sites that cannot be released for unrestricted use. One aspect of information management for LTS is geospatial data archiving. This report discusses the challenges facing the DOE LTS program concerning the data management and archiving of geospatial data. It discusses challenges in using electronic media for archiving, overcoming technological obsolescence, data refreshing, data migration, and emulation. It gives an overview of existing guidance and policy and discusses what the United States Geological Service (USGS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) are doing to archive the geospatial data that their agencies are responsible for. In the conclusion, this report provides issues for further discussion around long-term spatial data archiving.

  6. Solar and Wind Resource Assessments for Afghanistan and Pakistan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renne, D. S.; Kelly, M.; Elliott, D.; George, R.; Scott, G.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; Milbrandt, A.; Cowlin, S.; Gilman, P.; Perez, R.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has recently completed the production of high-resolution wind and solar energy resource maps and related data products for Afghanistan and Pakistan. The resource data have been incorporated into a geospatial toolkit (GsT), which allows the user to manipulate the resource information along with country-specific geospatial information such as highway networks, power facilities, transmission corridors, protected land areas, etc. The toolkit allows users to then transfer resource data for specific locations into NREL's micropower optimization model known as HOMER.

  7. Scenario Evaluation and Regionalization Analysis (SERA) Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scenario Evaluation and Regionalization Analysis (SERA) Model (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) Objectives Determine optimal regional infrastructure development patterns for hydrogen and other transportation fuels, given resource availability and technology cost estimates. Geospatially and temporally resolve the expansion of production, transmission, and distribution infrastructure components. Identify and characterize niche markets and synergies related to refueling station placement and

  8. Query and Visualization of extremely large network datasets over the web using Quadtree based KML Regional Network Links

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dadi, Upendra; Liu, Cheng; Vatsavai, Raju

    2009-01-01

    Geographic data sets are often very large in size. Interactive visualization of such data at all scales is not easy because of the limited resolution of the monitors and inability of visualization applications to handle the volume of data. This is especially true for large vector datasets. The end user s experience is frequently unsatisfactory when exploring such data over the web using a naive application. Network bandwidth is another contributing factor to the low performance. In this paper, a Quadtree based technique to visualize extremely large spatial network datasets over the web is described. It involves using custom developed algorithms leveraging a PostGIS database as the data source and Google Earth as the visualization client. This methodology supports both point and range queries along with non-spatial queries. This methodology is demonstrated using a network dataset consisting of several million links. The methodology is based on using some of the powerful features of KML (Keyhole Markup Language). Keyhole Markup Language (KML) is an Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standard for displaying geospatial data on Earth browsers. One of the features of KML is the notion of Network Links. Using network links, a wide range of geospatial data sources such as geodatabases, static files and geospatial data services can be simultaneously accessed and visualized seamlessly. Using the network links combined with Level of Detail principle, view based rendering and intelligent server and client-side caching, scalability in visualizing extremely large spatial datasets can be achieved.

  9. Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF) Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-29

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF) is an online collaboration and geospatial analysis tool that allows researchers, policymakers, and investors to explore and engage the latest bioenergy research. This publication describes how the KDF harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that facilitates collaborative production, integration, and analysis of bioenergy-related information.

  10. The Adversarial Route Analysis Tool: A Web Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casson, William H. Jr.

    2012-08-02

    The Adversarial Route Analysis Tool is a type of Google maps for adversaries. It's a web-based Geospatial application similar to Google Maps. It helps the U.S. government plan operations that predict where an adversary might be. It's easily accessible and maintainble and it's simple to use without much training.

  11. UNITED STEELWORKERS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FOIARequestNovember 13, 2015 UNITED STEELWORKERS " ' " ' " USW Local 12-369 797 Stevens Drive Richland, Washington 99352 --P-hone-509-7-1-3-~J.180-or-FA-X:-509-71-3-1-783- - - * - - - UNRY AND $JIU!N$'!'H FQ.11; wc:HU<Elt5 November 13, 2015 USW-DLR-015-075 Dorothy Riehle, FOIA Officer Depa.rtment of Energy Richland Operations (RL) and (ORP) P.O. Box 550, Mail Stop A7-75 . Richland, WA 99352 SUBJECT: FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT AND/OR PRIVACY ACT REQUEST Dear Ms. Riehle: I am

  12. PANTHER. Pattern ANalytics To support High-performance Exploitation and Reasoning.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czuchlewski, Kristina Rodriguez; Hart, William E.

    2015-09-01

    Sandia has approached the analysis of big datasets with an integrated methodology that uses computer science, image processing, and human factors to exploit critical patterns and relationships in large datasets despite the variety and rapidity of information. The work is part of a three-year LDRD Grand Challenge called PANTHER (Pattern ANalytics To support High-performance Exploitation and Reasoning). To maximize data analysis capability, Sandia pursued scientific advances across three key technical domains: (1) geospatial-temporal feature extraction via image segmentation and classification; (2) geospatial-temporal analysis capabilities tailored to identify and process new signatures more efficiently; and (3) domain- relevant models of human perception and cognition informing the design of analytic systems. Our integrated results include advances in geographical information systems (GIS) in which we discover activity patterns in noisy, spatial-temporal datasets using geospatial-temporal semantic graphs. We employed computational geometry and machine learning to allow us to extract and predict spatial-temporal patterns and outliers from large aircraft and maritime trajectory datasets. We automatically extracted static and ephemeral features from real, noisy synthetic aperture radar imagery for ingestion into a geospatial-temporal semantic graph. We worked with analysts and investigated analytic workflows to (1) determine how experiential knowledge evolves and is deployed in high-demand, high-throughput visual search workflows, and (2) better understand visual search performance and attention. Through PANTHER, Sandia's fundamental rethinking of key aspects of geospatial data analysis permits the extraction of much richer information from large amounts of data. The project results enable analysts to examine mountains of historical and current data that would otherwise go untouched, while also gaining meaningful, measurable, and defensible insights into overlooked relationships and patterns. The capability is directly relevant to the nation's nonproliferation remote-sensing activities and has broad national security applications for military and intelligence- gathering organizations.

  13. DOE GIS core team - a best practice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollinger, J.; Bhaduri, Budhendra; Bleakly, D. R.; Brady-Sabeff, Liz; Guber, Al; Guziel, K. A.; Hargrove, Susan; Lee, J.; Lee, R.; Mickus, Kurt; Morehouse, David; Moore, K.; Ramsdell, Amy; Rich, P. M.

    2004-01-01

    Large government organizations such as the Department of Energy (DOE) are challenged with identifying and implementing best geospatial information management practices to ensure that operational needs are met and government objectives are achieved. Geographic Information System (GIS) professionals, complex wide within the Department, conduct spatial information management practices on a daily basis to complete a wide variety of science and engineering tasks. The DOE Office of the CIO recognized the wealth of geospatial information management knowledge within the DOE complex and formed the DOE GIS Core Team in 2001 as a result. The team is comprised of GIS experts-representing all major DOE labs, site facilities, and programs-who volunteer their time to address issues impacting the entire complex. These include the President's management agenda (with emphasis on the Geospatial One-Stop), homeland security, emergency response, site management, software and geospatial data licensing, and federal, national, and international standards governing the creation and dissemination of geospatial data. The strength of the DOE GIS Core Team is the wide diversity of GIS and scientific expertise represented on the team, which allows it to provide the DOE CIO's office with sound guidance on complex wide issues from a GIS practitioner's perspective. The Core Team's mission is 'to foster technical excellence and communication, to identify and advocate best business practices, and to provide sound recommendations on policy and standards.' As a first step toward identifying best practices the feam conducted a survey of all known GIS assets across the DOE complex. The survey identified each site's GIS expertise, operating systems architecture and software applications, major project areas supported, and a number of other metrics important to the operation of a GIS organization. Results of the survey will be discussed, along with the mission of the Core Team. A broad overview of best practices utilized by many of the leading GIS organizations across the complex will also be provided.

  14. Crystal Structure of the C-terminal Domain of the Subunit of Human Translation Initiation Factor eIF2B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, J.; Jia, M; Zheng, C; Wang, M; Gao, F; Xu, H; Gong, W

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF2B, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for eIF2, catalyzes conversion of eIF2 {center_dot} GDP to eIF2 {center_dot} GTP. The eIF2B is composed of five subunits, {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, {delta} and {var_epsilon}, within which the {var_epsilon} subunit is responsible for catalyzing the guanine exchange reaction. Here we present the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of human eIF2B{var_epsilon} (eIF2B{var_epsilon}-CTD) at 2.0-{angstrom} resolution. The structure resembles a HEAT motif and three charge-rich areas on its surface can be identified. When compared to yeast eIF2B{var_epsilon}-CTD, one area involves highly conserved AA boxes while the other two are only partially conserved. In addition, the previously reported mutations in human eIF2B{var_epsilon}-CTD, which are related to the loss of the GEF activity and human VWM disease, have been discussed. Based on the structure, most of such mutations tend to destabilize the HEAT motif.

  15. Distributed Object Oriented Geographic Information System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-02-01

    This interactive, object-oriented, distributed Geographic Information System (GIS) uses the World Wibe Web (WWW) as application medium and distribution mechanism. The software provides distributed access to multiple geo-spatial databases and presents them as if they came from a single coherent database. DOOGIS distributed access comes not only in the form of multiple geo-spatial servers but can break down a single logical server into the constituent physical servers actually storing the data. The program provides formore » dynamic protocol resolution and content handling allowing unknown objects from a particular server to download their handling code. Security and access privileges are negotiated dynamically with each server contacted and each access attempt.« less

  16. The PANTHER User Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coram, Jamie L.; Morrow, James D.; Perkins, David Nikolaus

    2015-09-01

    This document describes the PANTHER R&D Application, a proof-of-concept user interface application developed under the PANTHER Grand Challenge LDRD. The purpose of the application is to explore interaction models for graph analytics, drive algorithmic improvements from an end-user point of view, and support demonstration of PANTHER technologies to potential customers. The R&D Application implements a graph-centric interaction model that exposes analysts to the algorithms contained within the GeoGraphy graph analytics library. Users define geospatial-temporal semantic graph queries by constructing search templates based on nodes, edges, and the constraints among them. Users then analyze the results of the queries using both geo-spatial and temporal visualizations. Development of this application has made user experience an explicit driver for project and algorithmic level decisions that will affect how analysts one day make use of PANTHER technologies.

  17. Method for spatially distributing a population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bright, Edward A; Bhaduri, Budhendra L; Coleman, Phillip R; Dobson, Jerome E

    2007-07-24

    A process for spatially distributing a population count within a geographically defined area can include the steps of logically correlating land usages apparent from a geographically defined area to geospatial features in the geographically defined area and allocating portions of the population count to regions of the geographically defined area having the land usages, according to the logical correlation. The process can also include weighing the logical correlation for determining the allocation of portions of the population count and storing the allocated portions within a searchable data store. The logically correlating step can include the step of logically correlating time-based land usages to geospatial features of the geographically defined area. The process can also include obtaining a population count for the geographically defined area, organizing the geographically defined area into a plurality of sectors, and verifying the allocated portions according to direct observation.

  18. NREL: Energy Analysis - Capabilities and Expertise

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A chart that outlines the text on this page. It shows how our data feeds the models and tools that are used to conduct impact, sustainability, techno-economic, and geospatial anaylsis. This research is used by U.S. stakeholders to make policy and investment decisions. NREL analysis helps government policymakers, project developers and investors, utilities, and others, both at home and abroad, address the challenges of and understand the trade-offs posed by expanding renewables within today's

  19. NREL: Energy Analysis - dGen: Distributed Generation Market Demand Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Distributed Generation Market Demand (dGen) model is a geospatially rich, bottom-up, market-penetration model that simulates the potential adoption of distributed energy resources (DERs) for residential, commercial, and industrial entities in the continental United States through 2050. The dGen model builds on and provides significant advances over NREL's deprecated Solar Deployment System (SolarDS) model. The dGen model can help develop deployment forecasts for distributed resources,

  20. Renewable Energy Economic Potential

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The report describes a geospatial analysis method to estimate the economic potential of several renewable resources available for electricity generation in the United States. Economic potential, one measure of renewable generation potential, is defined in this report as the subset of the available resource technical potential where the cost required to generate the electricity (which determines the minimum revenue requirements for development of the resource) is below the revenue available in terms of displaced energy and displaced capacity.

  1. Webinar: Using the New Bioenergy KDF for Data Discovery and Research

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Bioenergy Technologies Office Webinar: Using the New Bioenergy KDF for Data Discovery and Research October 24, 2013 2:00 - 3:00 p.m. 2 | Bioenergy Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Office Overview and KDF Introduction: Alison Goss Eng, Ph.D. Operations Supervisor Acting Program Manager for Feedstocks Bioenergy Technologies Office * KDF Demonstration: Aaron Myers Geospatial Systems Architect Oak Ridge National Lab Presenters 3 | Bioenergy

  2. Annual Report: Carbon Storage (30 September 2012) (Technical Report) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Carbon Storage (30 September 2012) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Annual Report: Carbon Storage (30 September 2012) Activities include laboratory experimentation, field work, and numerical modeling. The work is divided into five theme areas (or first level tasks) that each address a key research need: Flow Properties of Reservoirs and Seals, Fundamental Processes and Properties, Estimates of Storage Potential, Verifying Storage Performance, and Geospatial Data

  3. New Stream-Reach Hydropower Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Identifying and Evaluating New Hydropower Resources More than 65 GW of sustainable hydropower potential still exists in U.S. stream-reaches, according to a hydro- power resource assessment funded by the Department of Energy and executed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The New Stream-reach Development (NSD) project implemented an ad- vanced geo-spatial approach to analyze the potential for new hydropower development in U.S. stream-reaches that do not currently have hydroelectric facilities or

  4. NREL: International Activities - Philippines Wind Resource Maps and Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A map depicting wind resources at 100 meters of the republic of the Philippines. Additional Resources Wind Prospector A web-based GIS applications designed to support resource assessment and data exploration associated with wind development. Philippines Wind Viewer Tutorial Learn how to navigate, display, query and download Philippines data in the Wind Prospector. Philippines Geospatial Toolkit EXE 926.5 MB Philippines Wind Resource Maps and Data In 2014, under the Enhancing Capacity for Low

  5. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - About GIS at NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About GIS at NREL NREL's Geospatial Data Science Team analyzes renewable energy resources and many other data sources to determine which energy technologies are viable solutions across the globe and inputs the data into a geographic information system. GIS is a computer-based system used to manipulate, manage, and analyze multidisciplinary geographic and related attribute data. The GIS system is composed of hardware, software, data, and expertise. Using a GIS system allows the user to perform

  6. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Federal Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management Program (FEMP) Maps Federal Energy Management Program The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) teamed with Geospatial Analysis staff at NREL to update the analysis for this project and created an interactive FEMP Screening Map application. The previous maps have been archived. If you have a need for one of the archived maps, please contact the Webmaster. This new application examines the viability of three solar technologies in the United States with a high-level annualized

  7. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bookmark and Share Maps NREL's Geospatial Data Science Team develops maps for various renewable resources and for specific projects. As a benefit to the public, a majority of static maps are offered and Google Map (KML/KMZ) files on a tool called MapSearch. Biomass Maps Maps showing the biomass resources available in the United States by county. Feedstock categories include crop residues; forest residues; primary and secondary mill residues; urban wood waste; and methane emissions from manure

  8. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Renewable Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Economic Potential Economic Potential Types of Renewable Generation Potential An image of a overlapping circles labelled Resource, Technical, Economic, and Market Potential that include the key assumptions for each segment on a bullet list inside it. Enlarge image The report Estimating Renewable Energy Economic Potential in the United States: Methodology and Initial Results describes a geospatial analysis method to estimate the economic potential of several renewable resources available for

  9. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Wind Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additional Resources Wind Prospector A web-based GIS applications designed to support resource assessment and data exploration associated with wind development. Wind Maps NREL's Geospatial Data Science Team offers both a national wind resource assessment of the United States and high-resolution wind data. The national wind resource assessment was created for the U.S. Department of Energy in 1986 by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and is documented in the Wind Energy Resource Atlas of the United

  10. NREL: Energy Analysis - Anelia Milbrandt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anelia Milbrandt Photo of Anelia Milbrandt. Anelia Milbrandt is a member of the Technology Systems and Sustainability Analysis Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. She is also a member of the NREL International Studies Team. Senior Energy Resources Analyst On staff since 2003 Phone number: 303-275-4633 Email: anelia.milbrandt@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Biomass resource assessment Geospatial modeling and analysis Integrated resource, infrastructure, and market analysis Primary research

  11. NREL: Energy Analysis - Anthony Lopez

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anthony Lopez Photo of Anthony Lopez Anthony Lopez is the section supervisor of the Data Analysis and Visualization Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. GIS Scientist IV - Section Supervisor On staff since April 2009 Phone number: 303-275-3654 E-mail: anthony.lopez@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Spatial database design and utilization High performance computing Parallel processing and analysis of large geospatial datasets Visualization of complex spatial-temporal datasets Renewable

  12. NREL: Energy Analysis - Donna Heimiller

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Donna Heimiller Photo of Donna Heimiller. Donna Heimiller is a member of the Data Analysis and Visualization Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Sr. GIS Analyst On staff since June 1998 Phone number: 303-275-4667 E-mail: donna.heimiller@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Geospatial analysis and modeling supporting multiple resource assessment technologies, regional-scale site evaluation, and energy system modeling Electricity infrastructure analysis Data visualization Primary research

  13. NREL: Energy Analysis - Jessica Katz

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jessica Katz Photo of Jessica Katz Jessica Katz is a member of the Market and Policy Impact Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Analyst On staff since 2009 Phone number: 303-275-4330 E-mail: Jessica.Katz@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Low emission development strategies Greenhouse gas accounting and mitigation analysis Primary research interests Grid integration of variable renewable energy Application of renewable energy resource assessment and geospatial mapping to inform clean energy

  14. NREL: Energy Analysis - Michael Gleason

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gleason Michael Gleason is a member of the Data Analysis and Visualization Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Scientist III - GIS On staff since April 2014 Phone number: 303-275-4109 E-mail: Michael.Gleason@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Geospatial analysis and modeling Scientific programming Multivariate data visualization Technical writing and editing Primary research interests Modeling technical resource potential for renewable technologies Modeling market diffusion of distributed

  15. NREL: Energy Analysis: Resource Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resource Assessment NREL has developed maps and tools to conduct renewable energy resource assessments at the state, national and international level. Around the world, interest is growing in renewable energy as a strategy to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and increase energy security. The starting point for new renewable energy projects is a characterization of the renewable resources available across a region, a resource assessment. NREL uses geospatial data sets to identify regions that

  16. Geographic Information System Tools for Management of US DOE Sites - 13489

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, Cliff; Pilz, Elaine; Pawel, Steve

    2013-07-01

    The DOE Office of Legacy Management (LM) uses a variety of GIS tools to support long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS and M) activities at DOE closure sites. These geo-spatial applications provide access to data both for external public viewing and for internal analysis and decision making. LM uses a custom geo-spatial application called geo-spatial Environmental Mapping System (GEMS) that draws validated information from a database of 4.6 million analytical results and 232,000 water level measurements for 58 LTS and M sites. These data were collected from transferred sites over a period of 40 years. The database is used to capture and store historical environmental information such as analytical chemistry data, groundwater depths and elevations, well logs, well construction data, geo-referenced boundaries, site physical features, and sampling locations from LTS and M sites. Stakeholders, regulators, and project personnel can use this Web-based application and data to display information in several forms, such as a tabular report, a graph, and a geo-spatial display, or the data can be labeled or highlighted in a map view. Institutional controls, with their LTS and M requirements and documentation, have recently been incorporated into a prototype GEMS Web page for the Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site. LM uses multiple internal GIS viewers to help ensure the future protection of human health and the environment. For example, at the Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site, LM uses a GIS application to display real property interests on authoritative maps. Another project is used to facilitate discussions at stakeholder meetings for the Rocky Flats site's Original Landfill. The Uranium Leasing Program uses multiple interactive maps that assist in ongoing monitoring and the oversight of lease-holders' activities. (authors)

  17. The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF) The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF) The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF) is an online collaboration and geospatial analysis tool that allows researchers, policymakers, and investors to explore and engage the latest bioenergy research. The KDF harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that facilitates collaborative production, integration, and analysis of

  18. Sharon Smolinski | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sharon Smolinski Sharon Smolinski Scientist II Sharon.Smolinski@nrel.gov | 303-384-6275 Education Ph.D. Candidate, Public Affairs, University of Colorado at Denver, 2012-present M.S., Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado at Denver, 2007-2011 Graduate Certificate in Geospatial Analysis, University of Colorado at Denver, 2011 B.S., Biology, University of Colorado at Denver, 1993-1998 Professional Experience Scientist II, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), 2010-present Scientist

  19. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network Map

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Network Map About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network, 2009 U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network Map The EIA has determined that the informational map displays here do not raise security concerns, based on the application of the Federal Geographic Data Committee's Guidelines for Providing Appropriate Access to Geospatial Data in Response to Security Concerns

  20. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Underground Natural Gas Storage

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Facilities Map LNG Peak Shaving and Import Facilities Map About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates U.S. LNG Peaking Shaving and Import Facilities, 2008 U.S. LNG Peak Shaving and Import Facilities, 2008 The EIA has determined that the informational map displays here do not raise security concerns, based on the application of the Federal Geographic Data Committee's Guidelines for Providing Appropriate Access to Geospatial

  1. Newcomers' Orientation

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Reach Hydropower Development Fact Sheet New Stream-Reach Hydropower Development Fact Sheet New Stream-Reach Hydropower Development Fact Sheet Funded by the Department of Energy and executed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the New Stream-reach Development (NSD) project implemented an advanced geo-spatial approach to analyze the potential for new hydropower development in U.S. stream-reaches that do not currently have hydroelectric facilities or other forms of infrastructure. PDF icon New

  2. Assessment of fission product yields data needs in nuclear reactor applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kern, K.; Becker, M.; Broeders, C.

    2012-07-01

    Studies on the build-up of fission products in fast reactors have been performed, with particular emphasis on the effects related to the physics of the nuclear fission process. Fission product yields, which are required for burn-up calculations, depend on the proton and neutron number of the target nucleus as well as on the incident neutron energy. Evaluated nuclear data on fission product yields are available for all relevant target nuclides in reactor applications. However, the description of their energy dependence in evaluated data is still rather rudimentary, which is due to the lack of experimental fast fission data and reliable physical models. Additionally, physics studies of evaluated JEFF-3.1.1 fission yields data have shown potential improvements, especially for various fast fission data sets of this evaluation. In recent years, important progress in the understanding of the fission process has been made, and advanced model codes are currently being developed. This paper deals with the semi-empirical approach to the description of the fission process, which is used in the GEF code being developed by K.-H. Schmidt and B. Jurado on behalf of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, and with results from the corresponding author's diploma thesis. An extended version of the GEF code, supporting the calculation of spectrum weighted fission product yields, has been developed. It has been applied to the calculation of fission product yields in the fission rate spectra of a MOX fuelled sodium-cooled fast reactor. Important results are compared to JEFF-3.1.1 data and discussed in this paper. (authors)

  3. A cascaded model of spectral distortions due to spectral response effects and pulse pileup effects in a photon-counting x-ray detector for CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cammin, Jochen E-mail: ktaguchi@jhmi.edu; Taguchi, Katsuyuki E-mail: ktaguchi@jhmi.edu; Xu, Jennifer; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Hartsough, Neal E.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Energy discriminating, photon-counting detectors (PCDs) are an emerging technology for computed tomography (CT) with various potential benefits for clinical CT. The photon energies measured by PCDs can be distorted due to the interactions of a photon with the detector and the interaction of multiple coincident photons. These effects result in distorted recorded x-ray spectra which may lead to artifacts in reconstructed CT images and inaccuracies in tissue identification. Model-based compensation techniques have the potential to account for the distortion effects. This approach requires only a small number of parameters and is applicable to a wide range of spectra and count rates, but it needs an accurate model of the spectral distortions occurring in PCDs. The purpose of this study was to develop a model of those spectral distortions and to evaluate the model using a PCD (model DXMCT-1; DxRay, Inc., Northridge, CA) and various x-ray spectra in a wide range of count rates. Methods: The authors hypothesize that the complex phenomena of spectral distortions can be modeled by: (1) separating them into count-rate independent factors that we call the spectral response effects (SRE), and count-rate dependent factors that we call the pulse pileup effects (PPE), (2) developing separate models for SRE and PPE, and (3) cascading the SRE and PPE models into a combined SRE+PPE model that describes PCD distortions at both low and high count rates. The SRE model describes the probability distribution of the recorded spectrum, with a photo peak and a continuum tail, given the incident photon energy. Model parameters were obtained from calibration measurements with three radioisotopes and then interpolated linearly for other energies. The PPE model used was developed in the authors previous work [K. Taguchi et al., Modeling the performance of a photon counting x-ray detector for CT: Energy response and pulse pileup effects, Med. Phys. 38(2), 10891102 (2011)]. The agreement between the x-ray spectra calculated by the cascaded SRE+PPE model and the measured spectra was evaluated for various levels of deadtime loss ratios (DLR) and incident spectral shapes, realized using different attenuators, in terms of the weighted coefficient of variation (COV{sub W}), i.e., the root mean square difference weighted by the statistical errors of the data and divided by the mean. Results: At low count rates, when DLR < 10%, the distorted spectra measured by the DXMCT-1 were in agreement with those calculated by SRE only, with COV{sub W}'s less than 4%. At higher count rates, the measured spectra were also in agreement with the ones calculated by the cascaded SRE+PPE model; with PMMA as attenuator, COV{sub W} was 5.6% at a DLR of 22% and as small as 6.7% for a DLR as high as 55%. Conclusions: The x-ray spectra calculated by the proposed model agreed with the measured spectra over a wide range of count rates and spectral shapes. The SRE model predicted the distorted, recorded spectra with low count rates over various types and thicknesses of attenuators. The study also validated the hypothesis that the complex spectral distortions in a PCD can be adequately modeled by cascading the count-rate independent SRE and the count-rate dependent PPE.

  4. Second generation sodium heat pipe receiver for a USAB V-160 Stirling engine: Evaluation of on-sun test results using the proposed IEA guidelines and analysis of heat pipe damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laing, D.; Traebing, C.

    1997-11-01

    Dish/Stirling technology has demonstrated the highest conversion efficiencies of all solar thermal conversion systems. At the DLR a second generation sodium heat pipe receiver for the Schlaich Bergermann und Partner (SBP) 9-kW{sub e} dish/Stirling system has been developed and constructed. Long-term operation occurred from Oct. 1992 until Aug. 1993 at the Plataforma Solar de Almeria (PSA) in Spain, accumulating 950 operating hours. The performance of the SBP 9-kW{sub e} system with a sodium heat pipe receiver is evaluated according to the guidelines for dish/Stirling performance evaluation by Stine and Powel, as proposed to the International Energy Agency (IEA). Tests were stopped due to a leak in the receiver absorber surface. The analysis of this damage is reported.

  5. Satellite-based snow identification and its impact on monitoring photovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wirth, Georg; Zehner, Mike; Becker, Gerd [University of Applied Sciences - Munich, Department of Electrical Engineering, Solar Technology Laboratory, Lothstrasse. 64, 80323 Munich (Germany); Schroedter-Homscheidt, Marion [German Aerospace Center (DLR), German Remote Sensing Data Center (DFD), Oberpfaffenhofen, P.O. Box 1116, 82234 Wessling (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Earth observation allows the separation of snow cover and cloudiness using multispectral measurements. Several satellite-based snow monitoring services are available, ranging from regional to world-wide scales. Using these data enables photovoltaic (PV) plant management to differentiate between failures due to snow coverage on a PV system and other error sources. Additionally, yield estimates for solar siting are improved. This paper presents a validation study from January to April 2006 comparing satellite-based datasets with ground measurements from German and Swiss meteorological stations. A false alarm rate, an error due to irradiance underestimation, the availability of daily data, and the classification accuracy are introduced as quality metrics. Compared to Switzerland, generally a higher accuracy is found in all datasets for Southern Germany. The most significant difference among the datasets is found in the error pattern shifting from too much snow (which results in an error due to underestimation of irradiance) to too little snow detection, causing a false alarm in PV monitoring. Overall, the data records of the Land Surface Analysis Satellite Application Facility (LSA SAF), the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the Interactive Multisensor Snow and Ice Mapping System (IMS) are found to be most suitable for solar energy purposes. The IMS dataset has a low false alarm rate (4%) and a good data availability (100%) making it a good choice for power plant monitoring, but the error due to underestimation relevant in site auditing is large with 59%. If a cumulative snow cover algorithm is applied to achieve information every day as needed both for power plant monitoring and site auditing, both the DLR and the LSA SAF datasets are comparable with classification accuracies of 70%, false alarm rates of 37% and 34%, respectively, and errors due to irradiance underestimation in 26% and 27% of all coincidences. (author)

  6. Digital Mapping and Environmental Characterization of National Wild and Scenic River Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A; Bosnall, Peter; Hetrick, Shelaine L; Smith, Brennan T

    2013-09-01

    Spatially accurate geospatial information is required to support decision-making regarding sustainable future hydropower development. Under a memorandum of understanding among several federal agencies, a pilot study was conducted to map a subset of National Wild and Scenic Rivers (WSRs) at a higher resolution and provide a consistent methodology for mapping WSRs across the United States and across agency jurisdictions. A subset of rivers (segments falling under the jurisdiction of the National Park Service) were mapped at a high resolution using the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD). The spatial extent and representation of river segments mapped at NHD scale were compared with the prevailing geospatial coverage mapped at a coarser scale. Accurately digitized river segments were linked to environmental attribution datasets housed within the Oak Ridge National Laboratory s National Hydropower Asset Assessment Program database to characterize the environmental context of WSR segments. The results suggest that both the spatial scale of hydrography datasets and the adherence to written policy descriptions are critical to accurately mapping WSRs. The environmental characterization provided information to deduce generalized trends in either the uniqueness or the commonness of environmental variables associated with WSRs. Although WSRs occur in a wide range of human-modified landscapes, environmental data layers suggest that they provide habitats important to terrestrial and aquatic organisms and recreation important to humans. Ultimately, the research findings herein suggest that there is a need for accurate, consistent, mapping of the National WSRs across the agencies responsible for administering each river. Geospatial applications examining potential landscape and energy development require accurate sources of information, such as data layers that portray realistic spatial representations.

  7. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 1998 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada Ecological Services

    1998-10-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U. S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 1998. Twenty-one sites for seven projects were surveyed for the presence of state or federally protected species. Three projects were in or near habitat of the threatened desert tortoise and required special clearance and transect surveys. All geospatial data collected were entered into Bechtel Nevada's Ecological Geographic Information system for use in ongoing ecosystem management of the NTS.

  8. Analyst-Driven Knowledge Enhancement & Analysis version 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-06-27

    AKEA provides tools for the creation, maintenance, visualization, and analysis of information expressed in semantic graph form. It is capable of taking information expressed in unstructured text documents or structured data documents (e.g., spreadsheets, databases), ingesting it and extracting entities and relationships of interest, then presenting said information in graphical form. In addition, it contains tools for applying traditional social network analysis algorithms to the generated graphs in order to identify key players or entitiesmorewith particular characteristics, geospatial and temporal visualization of said data, and user-controlled storage of information to support future analysis needs.less

  9. The BNL Smarter Grid Research Strategy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BNL Smarter Grid Research Strategy: Plans and Status Brookhaven National Laboratory Dr. Gerald Stokes, Global & Regional Solutions STEAB October 10,2012 Building the Smarter Grid R&D Vision  The heart of BNL's approach to grid R&D for a Smarter Grid is begins with a geospatially referenced model with access to historical and real time data and measurements.  Next, as a federal enclave, BNL has the ability to perform certain experiments and test new equipment on its grid prior

  10. Electronic Atlas Maps U.S. Renewable Energy Resources - News Releases |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL Electronic Atlas Maps U.S. Renewable Energy Resources January 6, 2012 A new geospatial application developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) allows users to easily and accurately map potential renewable energy resources in the United States. The interactive tool, RE Atlas, is free to use and available online at http://maps.nrel.gov/re_atlas. "Ease of use and breadth of data make RE Atlas an excellent tool for policymakers, planners,

  11. MAp GENeralization COntroller

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-02-24

    MAGENCO is a geographic information systems (GIS) tool for managing geospatial data. It assists in choosing an appropriate level of cartographic simplification (removal of vertices while preserving line character). While an effective algorithm for this task exists (Douglas-Peucker, published in 1973), the tolerance parameter depends on the fractal dimension or the natural or manmade feature, the scale of mapping, and the uses to which the data will be put. It is thus necessary to iterativelymore » test different parameters until an acceptable one is found.« less

  12. Framework for an Information Visualization System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-08-11

    The Program is a suite of Windows-based software applications and services for ingesting, storing, and analyzing large quantities of disparate inforamtion. The software supports the ingestion and storage of any information that can be represented in eXtensible Markup Language (XML) format. Stored information can be subsequently retrieved via search operations, then "visualized" in multiple ways using a client application that supports a variety of analytical functions. Visualization capabilities include tools for depicting a variety ofmore » relationships that may be present in the information, including geospatial, temporal, topical, categorical, and network relationships.« less

  13. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - International Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    International Maps Below are some examples of how geographic information system (GIS) modeling is used in international resource analyses. The JPG images are samples of the maps available. Refer to the Geospatial Toolkits for further information. Map of the Republic of the Philippines Wind Speed at 100m Map of Republic of the Philippines Wind Power Density at 80m Map of Flat Plate Tilted at Latitude Resource of China Map of Republic of the Philippines Wind Speed at 100m JPG 6,336 KB Map of

  14. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - MapSearch

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bookmark and Share MapSearch MapSearch Logo is a computer monitor with a magnifying glass suspended in the air before it. Use our MapSearch to easily search our collection of maps created by the Geospatial Data Science Team. Please use the search box and the filters on the left of the screen to limit results. June 2013 - The NREL GIS team released a new version of the Mapsearch tool. This new version should eliminate some of the browser issues experienced with the previous tool. This latest

  15. NREL: Energy Analysis - Nick Grue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nick Grue Nick Grue is a member of the Data Analysis and Visualization Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Scientist II - GIS On staff since June 2014 Phone number: 303-384-7278 E-mail: nick.grue@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Geospatial analysis Web GIS Primary research interests Open source energy data Web visualization of energy data Renewable energy policy Education and background training B.A. in Geography and Environmental Science, University of Colorado at Denver, Denver, CO, 2012

  16. NREL: Energy Analysis - Nick Langle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Langle Photo of Nick Langle. Nick Langle is a member of the Data Analysis and Visualization Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Front-End Web Engineer On staff since July 2010 Phone number: 303-275-3775 E-mail: nicholas.langle@nrel.gov Areas of expertise HTML/CSS/Javascript/jQuery UI/UX Responsive web design Semantic MediaWiki SEO Primary research interests Web design and usability Data visualization and analytics Geospatial analysis Transportation and alternative fuels Industrial

  17. Demand-Side Response from Industrial Loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starke, Michael R; Alkadi, Nasr E; Letto, Daryl; Johnson, Brandon; Dowling, Kevin; George, Raoule; Khan, Saqib

    2013-01-01

    Through a research study funded by the Department of Energy, Smart Grid solutions company ENBALA Power Networks along with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have geospatially quantified the potential flexibility within industrial loads to leverage their inherent process storage to help support the management of the electricity grid. The study found that there is an excess of 12 GW of demand-side load flexibility available in a select list of top industrial facilities in the United States. Future studies will expand on this quantity of flexibility as more in-depth analysis of different industries is conducted and demonstrations are completed.

  18. Analyst-Driven Knowledge Enhancement & Analysis version 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-06-27

    AKEA provides tools for the creation, maintenance, visualization, and analysis of information expressed in semantic graph form. It is capable of taking information expressed in unstructured text documents or structured data documents (e.g., spreadsheets, databases), ingesting it and extracting entities and relationships of interest, then presenting said information in graphical form. In addition, it contains tools for applying traditional social network analysis algorithms to the generated graphs in order to identify key players or entitiesmore » with particular characteristics, geospatial and temporal visualization of said data, and user-controlled storage of information to support future analysis needs.« less

  19. QER- Comment of John R. Schmidt

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Quadrennial Energy Review: Comment on the Public Meeting "Enhancing Infrastructure Resiliency," held April 11, 2014, Washington, DC". Why would this meeting not be conducted live onLine? or, at least, recorded for later access. Thank you, sincerely, john r schmidt, master (lover) of Science understanding GOD president, NCAD Corporation www.NCAD.net owner, schmidtPro www.schmidtPro.com dedicated River-straddler Erlanger, KY 41018 Cincinnati, OH 45202-0931 computer engineering Network Communications Geospatial Integrative Service Business engineering schmidtPro professional green improv improving earth and health for better world earth Model Do http://emoDo.net

  20. Energy Emergency Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Preparedness Quarterly

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2 A P R I L 1 5 , 2 0 1 2 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY In January, OE's energy infrastructure monitoring capability was offically given the name Environment for Analysis of Geo-Located Energy Information (EAGLE-I). Through EAGLE-I, OE's Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration (ISER) division has developed the capability to monitor the Nation's energy infrastructure in near real-time and to geospatially map energy assets and systems, tying together a variety of data sources into one

  1. Broad area search for regions and objects of interest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skurikhin, Alexei N; Pope, Paul A

    2011-01-12

    A quad chart provides an overview on the on-going project 'Broad Area Search for Regions and Objects of Interest' funded by the DOE Office of Nonproliferation and Verification Research and Development. Specifically, the quad chart shows: (1) Project title 'Broad Area Search for Regions and Objects of Interest'; (2) PI and Co-investigators; (3) Concept Panel outlining the project's approach built upon front-end scale-space image analysis; (4) Technical Challenges posed by the project, such as robustness, non-conformities, disparate spatial configuration and weak correlation between presence of objects of interest and low-level description of the surrounding geospatial background; and (5) Planned Accomplishment.

  2. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ascari, Matthew

    2012-10-28

    The Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy (MPEE) from the world’s ocean thermal resources. MPEE is defined as being sustainable and technically feasible, given today’s state-of-the-art ocean energy technology. Under this project the OTEEV team developed a comprehensive Geospatial Information System (GIS) dataset and software tool, and used the tool to provide a meaningful assessment of MPEE from the global and domestic U.S. ocean thermal resources.

  3. Analyst-Driven Knowledge Enhancement & Analysis version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-06-27

    AKEA provides tools for the creation, maintenance, visualization, and analysis of information expressed in semantic graph form. It is capable of taking information expressed in unstructured text documents or structured data documents (e.g., spreadsheets, databases), ingesting it and extracting entities and relationships of interest, then presenting said information in graphical form. In addition, it contains tools for applying traditional social network analysis algorithms to the generated graphs in order to identify key players or entities with particular characteristics, geospatial and temporal visualization of said data, and user-controlled storage of information to support future analysis needs.

  4. Spatial and Spatiotemporal Data Mining: Recent Advances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shekhar, Shashi; Vatsavai, Raju; Celik, Mete

    2008-01-01

    Explosive growth in geospatial data and the emergence of new spatial technologies emphasize the need for automated discovery of spatial knowledge. Spatial data mining is the process of discovering interesting and previously unknown, but potentially useful patterns from large spatial databases. The complexity of spatial data and intrinsic spatial relationships limits the usefulness of conventional data mining techniques for extracting spatial patterns. In this chapter we explore the emerging field of spatial data mining, focusing on four major topics: prediction and classification, outlier detection, co-location mining, and clustering. Spatiotemporal data mining is also briefly discussed.

  5. The Oncor Geodatabase for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program: Annual Report, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Andre M.; Johnson, Gary E.; Borde, Amy B.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Sather, Nichole K.; Seiple, Timothy E.; Serkowski, John A.

    2013-11-10

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted this project for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (Corps). The purpose of the project is to develop a geospatial, web-accessible database (called “Oncor”) for action effectiveness and related data from monitoring and research efforts for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). The intent is for the Oncor database to enable synthesis and evaluation, the results of which can then be applied in subsequent CEERP decision-making. This is the first annual report in what is expected to be a 3- to 4-year project, which commenced on February 14, 2012.

  6. Incremental Clustering Algorithm For Earth Science Data Mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vatsavai, Raju

    2009-01-01

    Remote sensing data plays a key role in understanding the complex geographic phenomena. Clustering is a useful tool in discovering interesting patterns and structures within the multivariate geospatial data. One of the key issues in clustering is the specication of appropriate number of clusters, which is not obvious in many practical situations. In this paper we provide an extension of G-means algorithm which automatically learns the number of clusters present in the data and avoids over estimation of the number of clusters. Experimental evaluation on simulated and remotely sensed image data shows the effectiveness of our algorithm.

  7. The Oncor Geodatabase for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program: Handbook of Data Reduction Procedures, Workbooks, and Exchange Templates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sather, Nichole K.; Borde, Amy B.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Serkowski, John A.; Coleman, Andre M.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2013-12-31

    This Handbook of Data Reduction Procedures, Workbooks, and Exchange Templates is designed to support the Oncor geodatabase for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). The following data categories are covered: water-surface elevation and temperature, sediment accretion rate, photo points, herbaceous wetland vegetation cover, tree plots and site summaries, fish catch and density, fish size, fish diet, fish prey, and Chinook salmon genetic stock identification. The handbook is intended for use by scientists collecting monitoring and research data for the CEERP. The ultimate goal of Oncor is to provide quality, easily accessible, geospatial data for synthesis and evaluation of the collective performance of CEERP ecosystem restoration actions at a program scale.

  8. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kelly Rose Principal Investigator Research Scientist 541-967-5883 kelly.rose@netl.doe.gov Jennifer Bauer Geospatial Researcher 541-918-4507 jennifer.bauer@netl.doe.gov Jamie Brown Associate Director 304-285-5428 jamie.brown@netl.doe.gov Grant Bromhal Acting Senior Fellow 304-285-4688 grant.bromhal@netl.doe.gov Cynthia Powell Executive Director 541-967-5803 cynthia.powell@netl.doe.gov GAIA LOCATIONS Albany, Oregon Building 1, Room 315 541-918-4507 Building 28, Room 155 541-967-5964 Morgantown,

  9. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kelly Rose Principal Investigator Research Scientist 541-967-5883 kelly.rose@netl.doe.gov Jennifer Bauer Geospatial Researcher 541-918-4507 jennifer.bauer@contr.netl.doe.gov Jamie Brown Associate Director 304-285-5428 jamie.brown@netl.doe.gov Grant Bromhal Acting Senior Fellow 304-285-4688 grant.bromhal@netl.doe.go Cynthia Powell Executive Director 541-967-5803 cynthia.powell@netl.doe.gov RESEARCH PARTNERS AECOM Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) Oregon State University

  10. Albany, OR * Archorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Archorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX Website: www.netl.doe.gov Customer Service: 1-800-553-7681 R& D FAC T S Geological & Environmental Sciences CONTACTS OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Kelly Rose Principal Investigator Research Physical Scientist 541-967-5883 kelly.rose@netl.doe.gov Jennifer Bauer Geospatial Researcher 541-918-4507 jennifer.bauer@contr.netl.doe.gov Cynthia Powell Acting Focus Area Lead 541-967-5803 cynthia.powell@netl.doe.gov RESEARCH

  11. Estimating Renewable Energy Economic Potential in the United States. Methodology and Initial Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Austin; Beiter, Philipp; Heimiller, Donna; Davidson, Carolyn; Denholm, Paul; Melius, Jennifer; Lopez, Anthony; Hettinger, Dylan; Mulcahy, David; Porro, Gian

    2015-07-30

    This report describes a geospatial analysis method to estimate the economic potential of several renewable resources available for electricity generation in the United States. Economic potential, one measure of renewable generation potential, may be defined in several ways. For example, one definition might be expected revenues (based on local market prices) minus generation costs, considered over the expected lifetime of the generation asset. Another definition might be generation costs relative to a benchmark (e.g., a natural gas combined cycle plant) using assumptions of fuel prices, capital cost, and plant efficiency. Economic potential in this report is defined as the subset of the available resource technical potential where the cost required to generate the electricity (which determines the minimum revenue requirements for development of the resource) is below the revenue available in terms of displaced energy and displaced capacity. The assessment is conducted at a high geospatial resolution (more than 150,000 technology-specific sites in the continental United States) to capture the significant variation in local resource, costs, and revenue potential. This metric can be a useful screening factor for understanding the economic viability of renewable generation technologies at a specific location. In contrast to many common estimates of renewable energy potential, economic potential does not consider market dynamics, customer demand, or most policy drivers that may incent renewable energy generation.

  12. CyberGIS software: a synthetic review and integration roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Shaowen; Anselin, Luc; Bhaduri, Budhendra L; Cosby, Christopher; Goodchild, Michael; Liu, Yan; Nygers, Timothy L.

    2013-01-01

    CyberGIS defined as cyberinfrastructure-based geographic information systems (GIS) has emerged as a new generation of GIS representing an important research direction for both cyberinfrastructure and geographic information science. This study introduces a 5-year effort funded by the US National Science Foundation to advance the science and applications of CyberGIS, particularly for enabling the analysis of big spatial data, computationally intensive spatial analysis and modeling (SAM), and collaborative geospatial problem-solving and decision-making, simultaneously conducted by a large number of users. Several fundamental research questions are raised and addressed while a set of CyberGIS challenges and opportunities are identified from scientific perspectives. The study reviews several key CyberGIS software tools that are used to elucidate a vision and roadmap for CyberGIS software research. The roadmap focuses on software integration and synthesis of cyberinfrastructure, GIS, and SAM by defining several key integration dimensions and strategies. CyberGIS, based on this holistic integration roadmap, exhibits the following key characteristics: high-performance and scalable, open and distributed, collaborative, service-oriented, user-centric, and community-driven. As a major result of the roadmap, two key CyberGIS modalities gateway and toolkit combined with a community-driven and participatory approach have laid a solid foundation to achieve scientific breakthroughs across many geospatial communities that would be otherwise impossible.

  13. Unsupervised Feature Learning for High-Resolution Satellite Image Classification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheriyadat, Anil M

    2013-01-01

    The rich data provided by high-resolution satellite imagery allow us to directly model geospatial neighborhoods by understanding their spatial and structural patterns. In this paper we explore an unsupervised feature learning approach to model geospatial neighborhoods for classification purposes. While pixel and object based classification approaches are widely used for satellite image analysis, often these approaches exploit the high-fidelity image data in a limited way. In this paper we extract low-level features to characterize the local neighborhood patterns. We exploit the unlabeled feature measurements in a novel way to learn a set of basis functions to derive new features. The derived sparse feature representation obtained by encoding the measured features in terms of the learned basis function set yields superior classification performance. We applied our technique on two challenging image datasets: ORNL dataset representing one-meter spatial resolution satellite imagery representing five land-use categories and, UCMERCED dataset consisting of 21 different categories representing sub-meter resolution overhead imagery. Our results are highly promising and, in the case of UCMERCED dataset we outperform the best results obtained for this dataset. We show that our feature extraction and learning methods are highly effective in developing a detection system that can be used to automatically scan large-scale high-resolution satellite imagery for detecting large-facility.

  14. Strategy for the Identification of an INL Comprehensive Utility Corridor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Reisenauer

    2011-05-01

    This report documents the strategy developed to identify a comprehensive utility corridor (CUC) on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site. The strategy established the process for which the Campus Development Office will evaluate land management issues. It is a process that uses geographical information system geospatial technology to layer critical INL mission information in a way that thorough evaluations can be conducted and strategies developed. The objective of the CUC Project was to develop a process that could be implemented to identify potential utility corridor options for consideration. The process had to take into account all the missions occurring on the INL and other land-related issues. The process for developing a CUC strategy consists of the following four basic elements using geographical information system capabilities: 1. Development of an INL base layer map; this base layer map geospatially references all stationary geographical features on INL and sitewide information. 2. Development of current and future mission land-use need maps; this involved working with each directorate to identify current mission land use needs and future land use needs that project 30 years into the future. 3. Development of restricted and potential constraint maps; this included geospatially mapping areas such as wells, contaminated areas, firing ranges, cultural areas, ecological areas, hunting areas, easement, and grazing areas. 4. Development of state highway and power line rights of way map; this included geospatially mapping rights-of-way along existing state highways and power lines running through the INL that support INL operations. It was determined after completing and evaluating the geospatial information that the area with the least impact to INL missions was around the perimeter of the INL Site. Option 1, in this document, identifies this perimeter; however, it does not mean the entire perimeter is viable. Many places along the perimeter corridor cannot be used or are not economically viable. Specific detailed studies will need to be conducted on a case-by-case basis to clearly identify which sections along the perimeter can and cannot be used. Option 2, in this document, identifies areas along existing highways that could be a viable option. However, discussions would have to take place with the State of Idaho to use their easement as part of the corridor and mission impact would need to be evaluated if a specific request was made to the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. Option 3, in this document, is a combination of Options 1 and 2. This option provides the most flexibility to minimize impacts to INL missions. As with the other two options, discussions and agreements with the State of Idaho would be needed and any specific route would need to be thoroughly evaluated for impact, implementation, and operability beyond just a strategy.

  15. Structural Evidence for a Sequential Release Mechanism for Activation of Heterotrimeric G Proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kapoor, Neeraj; Menon, Santosh T.; Chauhan, Radha; Sachdev, Pallavi; Sakmar, Thomas P.

    2010-01-12

    Heptahelical G-protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein)-coupled receptors couple to heterotrimeric G proteins to relay extracellular signals to intracellular signaling networks, but the molecular mechanism underlying guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP) release by the G protein {alpha}-subunit is not well understood. Amino acid substitutions in the conserved {alpha}5 helix of Gi, which extends from the C-terminal region to the nucleotide-binding pocket, cause dramatic increases in basal (receptor-independent) GDP release rates. For example, mutant G{alpha}{sub i1}-T329A shows an 18-fold increase in basal GDP release rate and, when expressed in culture, it causes a significant decrease in forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation. The crystal structure of G{alpha}{sub i1}-T329A {center_dot} GDP shows substantial conformational rearrangement of the switch I region and additional striking alterations of side chains lining the catalytic pocket that disrupt the Mg{sup +2} coordination sphere and dislodge bound Mg{sup +2}. We propose a 'sequential release' mechanism whereby a transient conformational change in the {alpha}5 helix alters switch I to induce GDP release. Interestingly, this mechanistic model for heterotrimeric G protein activation is similar to that suggested for the activation of the plant small G protein Rop4 by RopGEF8.

  16. Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Data from the National Renewable Energy Library and the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The SWERA Programme provides easy access to credible renewable energy data to stimulate investment in, and development of, renewable energy technologies. The Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) started in 2001 to advance the large-scale use of renewable energy technologies by increasing the availability and accessibility of high-quality solar and wind resource information. SWERA began as a pilot project with funding from the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and managed by the United Nations Environment Programme's (UNEP) Division of Technology, Industry and Economics (DTIE) in collaboration with more than 25 partners around the world. With the success of the project in 13 pilot countries SWERA expanded in 2006 into a full programme. Its expanded mission is to provide high quality information on renewable energy resources for countries and regions around the world, along with the tools needed to apply these data in ways that facilitate renewable energy policies and investments.[from the SWERA Guide at http://swera.unep.net/index.php?id=sweraguide_chp1] DOE and, in particular, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has been a functioning partner from the beginning. NREL was part of the original technical team involved in mapping, database, and GIS activities. Solar, wind, and meteorological data for selected countries can be accessed through a variety of different tools and interfaces.

  17. One-point fitting of the flux density produced by a heliostat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collado, Francisco J.

    2010-04-15

    Accurate and simple models for the flux density reflected by an isolated heliostat should be one of the basic tools for the design and optimization of solar power tower systems. In this work, the ability and the accuracy of the Universidad de Zaragoza (UNIZAR) and the DLR (HFCAL) flux density models to fit actual energetic spots are checked against heliostat energetic images measured at Plataforma Solar de Almeria (PSA). Both the fully analytic models are able to acceptably fit the spot with only one-point fitting, i.e., the measured maximum flux. As a practical validation of this one-point fitting, the intercept percentage of the measured images, i.e., the percentage of the energetic spot sent by the heliostat that gets the receiver surface, is compared with the intercept calculated through the UNIZAR and HFCAL models. As main conclusions, the UNIZAR and the HFCAL models could be quite appropriate tools for the design and optimization, provided the energetic images from the heliostats to be used in the collector field were previously analyzed. Also note that the HFCAL model is much simpler and slightly more accurate than the UNIZAR model. (author)

  18. INVESTIGATION OF A DYNAMIC POWER LINE RATING CONCEPT FOR IMPROVED WIND ENERGY INTEGRATION OVER COMPLEX TERRAIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jake P. Gentle; Kurt S Myers; Tyler B Phillips; Inanc Senocak; Phil Anderson

    2014-08-01

    Dynamic Line Rating (DLR) is a smart grid technology that allows the rating of power line to be based on real-time conductor temperature dependent on local weather conditions. In current practice overhead power lines are generally given a conservative rating based on worst case weather conditions. Using historical weather data collected over a test bed area, we demonstrate there is often additional transmission capacity not being utilized with the current static rating practice. We investigate a new dynamic line rating methodology using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to determine wind conditions along transmission lines at dense intervals. Simulated results are used to determine conductor temperature by calculating the transient thermal response of the conductor under variable environmental conditions. In calculating the conductor temperature, we use both a calculation with steady-state assumption and a transient calculation. Under low wind conditions, steady-state assumption predicts higher conductor temperatures that could lead to curtailments, whereas transient calculations produce conductor temperatures that are significantly lower, implying the availability of additional transmission capacity.

  19. PRE-DISCOVERY OBSERVATIONS OF CoRoT-1b AND CoRoT-2b WITH THE BEST SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rauer, H.; Erikson, A.; Kabath, P.; Hedelt, P.; Csizmadia, Sz.; Paris, P. v.; Renner, S.; Titz, R.; Voss, H.; Boer, M.; Tournois, G.; Carone, L.; Eigmueller, P.

    2010-01-15

    The Berlin Exoplanet Search Telescope (BEST) wide-angle telescope installed at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence and operated in remote control from Berlin by the Institut fuer Planetenforschung, DLR, has observed the CoRoT target fields prior to the mission. The resulting archive of stellar photometric light curves is used to search for deep transit events announced during CoRoT's alarm mode to aid in fast photometric confirmation of these events. The 'initial run' field of CoRoT (IRa01) was observed with BEST in 2006 November and December for 12 nights. The first 'long run' field (LRc01) was observed from 2005 June to September for 35 nights. After standard CCD data reduction, aperture photometry has been performed using the ISIS image subtraction method. About 30,000 light curves were obtained in each field. Transits of the first detected planets by the CoRoT mission, CoRoT-1b and CoRoT-2b, were found in archived data of the BEST survey and their light curves are presented here. Such detections provide useful information at the early stage of the organization of follow-up observations of satellite alarm-mode planet candidates. In addition, no period change was found over {approx}4 years between the first BEST observation and last available transit observations.

  20. Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    As with many professions, safety planners and first responders tend to be specialists in certain areas. To be truly useful, tools should be tailored to meet their specific needs. Thus, general software suites aimed at the professional geographic information system (GIS) community might not be the best solution for a first responder with little training in GIS terminology and techniques. On the other hand, commonly used web-based map viewers may not have the capability tomore » be customized for the planning, response, and recovery (PR&R) mission. Data formats should be open and foster easy information flow among local, state, and federal partners. Tools should be free or low-cost to address real-world budget constraints at the local level. They also need to work both with and without a network connection to be robust. The Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit (IMPACT) can satisfy many of these needs while working in harmony with established systems at the local, state, and federal levels. The IMPACT software framework, termed the Geospatial Integrated Problem Solving Environment (GIPSE), organizes tasks, tools, and resources for the end user. It uses the concept of software wizards to both customize and extend its functionality. On the Tasks panel are a number of buttons used to initiate various operations. Similar to macros, these task buttons launch scripts that utilize the full functionality of the underlying foundational components such as the SQL spatial database and ORNL-developed map editor. The user is presented with a series of instruction pages which are implemented with HTML for interactivity. On each page are links which initiate specific actions such as creating a map showing various features. Additional tasks may be quickly programmed and added to the panel. The end user can customize the graphical interface to faciltate its use during an emergency. One of the major components of IMPACT is the ORNL Geospatial Viewer (OGV). It is used to provide various map displays for the Tasks and Maps panels. Unlike typical maps however, the OGV display is highly interactive and can be customized, automated, and animated to meet the needs of the user. It is also a means to both import and export geospatial data from or to existing GIS systems. The built-in simulation capability can be used as the basis of table-top exercises.« less

  1. Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Daniel B.

    2013-04-01

    As with many professions, safety planners and first responders tend to be specialists in certain areas. To be truly useful, tools should be tailored to meet their specific needs. Thus, general software suites aimed at the professional geographic information system (GIS) community might not be the best solution for a first responder with little training in GIS terminology and techniques. On the other hand, commonly used web-based map viewers may not have the capability to be customized for the planning, response, and recovery (PR&R) mission. Data formats should be open and foster easy information flow among local, state, and federal partners. Tools should be free or low-cost to address real-world budget constraints at the local level. They also need to work both with and without a network connection to be robust. The Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit (IMPACT) can satisfy many of these needs while working in harmony with established systems at the local, state, and federal levels. The IMPACT software framework, termed the Geospatial Integrated Problem Solving Environment (GIPSE), organizes tasks, tools, and resources for the end user. It uses the concept of software wizards to both customize and extend its functionality. On the Tasks panel are a number of buttons used to initiate various operations. Similar to macros, these task buttons launch scripts that utilize the full functionality of the underlying foundational components such as the SQL spatial database and ORNL-developed map editor. The user is presented with a series of instruction pages which are implemented with HTML for interactivity. On each page are links which initiate specific actions such as creating a map showing various features. Additional tasks may be quickly programmed and added to the panel. The end user can customize the graphical interface to faciltate its use during an emergency. One of the major components of IMPACT is the ORNL Geospatial Viewer (OGV). It is used to provide various map displays for the Tasks and Maps panels. Unlike typical maps however, the OGV display is highly interactive and can be customized, automated, and animated to meet the needs of the user. It is also a means to both import and export geospatial data from or to existing GIS systems. The built-in simulation capability can be used as the basis of table-top exercises.

  2. Modeling the U.S. Rooftop Photovoltaics Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drury, E.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

    2010-09-01

    Global rooftop PV markets are growing rapidly, fueled by a combination of declining PV prices and several policy-based incentives. The future growth, and size, of the rooftop market is highly dependent on continued PV cost reductions, financing options, net metering policy, carbon prices and future incentives. Several PV market penetration models, sharing a similar structure and methodology, have been developed over the last decade to quantify the impacts of these factors on market growth. This study uses a geospatially rich, bottom-up, PV market penetration model--the Solar Deployment Systems (SolarDS) model developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory--to explore key market and policy-based drivers for residential and commercial rooftop PV markets. The identified drivers include a range of options from traditional incentives, to attractive customer financing options, to net metering and carbon policy.

  3. Development of a GIS Based Dust Dispersion Modeling System.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutz, Frederick C.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Crandall, Duard W.; Allwine, K Jerry

    2004-08-12

    With residential areas moving closer to military training sites, the effects upon the environment and neighboring civilians due to dust generated by training exercises has become a growing concern. Under a project supported by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) of the Department of Defense, a custom application named DUSTRAN is currently under development that integrates a system of EPA atmospheric dispersion models with the ArcGIS application environment in order to simulate the dust dispersion generated by a planned training maneuver. This integration between modeling system and GIS application allows for the use of real world geospatial data such as terrain, land-use, and domain size as input by the modeling system. Output generated by the modeling system, such as concentration and deposition plumes, can then be displayed upon accurate maps representing the training site. This paper discusses the development of this integration between modeling system and Arc GIS application.

  4. MATCH: Metadata Access Tool for Climate and Health Datasets

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    MATCH is a searchable clearinghouse of publicly available Federal metadata (i.e. data about data) and links to datasets. Most metadata on MATCH pertain to geospatial data sets ranging from local to global scales. The goals of MATCH are to: 1) Provide an easily accessible clearinghouse of relevant Federal metadata on climate and health that will increase efficiency in solving research problems; 2) Promote application of research and information to understand, mitigate, and adapt to the health effects of climate change; 3) Facilitate multidirectional communication among interested stakeholders to inform and shape Federal research directions; 4) Encourage collaboration among traditional and non-traditional partners in development of new initiatives to address emerging climate and health issues. [copied from http://match.globalchange.gov/geoportal/catalog/content/about.page

  5. Renewable Energy Atlas of the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuiper, J.; Hlava, K.; Greenwood, H.; Carr, A.

    2013-12-13

    The Renewable Energy Atlas (Atlas) of the United States is a compilation of geospatial data focused on renewable energy resources, federal land ownership, and base map reference information. This report explains how to add the Atlas to your computer and install the associated software. The report also includes: A description of each of the components of the Atlas; Lists of the Geographic Information System (GIS) database content and sources; and A brief introduction to the major renewable energy technologies. The Atlas includes the following: A GIS database organized as a set of Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) ArcGIS Personal GeoDatabases, and ESRI ArcReader and ArcGIS project files providing an interactive map visualization and analysis interface.

  6. Predicting the Response of Electricity Load to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Patrick; Colman, Jesse; Kalendra, Eric

    2015-07-28

    Our purpose is to develop a methodology to quantify the impact of climate change on electric loads in the United States. We perform simple linear regression, assisted by geospatial smoothing, on paired temperature and load time-series to estimate the heating- and coolinginduced sensitivity to temperature across 300 transmission zones and 16 seasonal and diurnal time periods. The estimated load sensitivities can be coupled with climate scenarios to quantify the potential impact of climate change on load, with a primary application being long-term electricity scenarios. The method allows regional and seasonal differences in climate and load response to be reflected in the electricity scenarios. While the immediate product of this analysis was designed to mesh with the spatial and temporal resolution of a specific electricity model to enable climate change scenarios and analysis with that model, we also propose that the process could be applied for other models and purposes.

  7. Precision Information Environment (PIE) for International Safeguards: Pre-Demonstration Development Use Cases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gastelum, Zoe N.; Henry, Michael J.

    2013-11-13

    In FY2013, the PIE International Safeguards team demonstrated our development progress to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) staff from the Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NA-24, our client) and the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (NA-22). Following the demonstration, the team was asked by our client to complete additional development prior to a planned demonstration at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), scheduled tentatively for January or spring of 2014. The team discussed four potential areas for development (in priority order), and will develop them as time and funding permit prior to an IAEA demonstration. The four capability areas are: 1. Addition of equipment manuals to PIE-accessible files 2. Optical character recognition (OCR) of photographed text 3. Barcode reader with information look-up from a database 4. Add Facilities to Data Model 5. Geospatial capabilities with information integration Each area will be described below in a use case.

  8. 2007-2008 Annual Progress Report for BPA Grant Exp Restore Walla Walla River Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bower, Bob

    2009-07-10

    WWBWC and its partners have been working on a wide variety of conservation and aquifer recharge related activities including: monitoring groundwater and surface water conditions, creating a geospatial database for the Walla Walla River valley (project focal area), expanding aquifer recharge testing at the HBDIC site and conducting an extensive outreach/education program by which to share the information, ideas and potential solutions to our current water management issues in this basin. This report is an outline of those activities and is accompanied by individual program-component (attached as appendices) reports for the areas that BPA is assisting to fund these on-the-ground projects along with the innovative research and monitoring being done to further aquifer recharge as a water management tool for the Pacific Northwest.

  9. Military Base Off-Taker Opportunities for Tribal Renewable Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nangle, J.

    2013-05-01

    This white paper surveys DOD installations that could have an increased potential interest in the purchase of energy from renewable energy projects on tribal lands. Identification of likely purchasers of renewable energy is a first step in the energy project development process, and this paper aims to identify likely electricity customers that tribal commercial-scale projects could serve. This white paper builds on a geospatial analysis completed in November 2012 identifying 53 reservations within 10 miles of military bases (DOE 2012). This analysis builds on those findings by further refining the list of potential opportunity sites to 15 reservations (Table ES-1), based on five additional factors: 1) The potential renewable resources required to meet the installation energy loads; 2) Proximity to transmission lines; 3) Military installation energy demand; 4) State electricity prices; 5) Local policy and regulatory environment.

  10. Text Stream Trend Analysis using Multiscale Visual Analytics with Applications to Social Media Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steed, Chad A; Beaver, Justin M; BogenII, Paul L.; Drouhard, Margaret MEG G; Pyle, Joshua M

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new visual analytics system, called Matisse, that allows exploration of global trends in textual information streams with specific application to social media platforms. Despite the potential for real-time situational awareness using these services, interactive analysis of such semi-structured textual information is a challenge due to the high-throughput and high-velocity properties. Matisse addresses these challenges through the following contributions: (1) robust stream data management, (2) automated sen- timent/emotion analytics, (3) inferential temporal, geospatial, and term-frequency visualizations, and (4) a flexible drill-down interaction scheme that progresses from macroscale to microscale views. In addition to describing these contributions, our work-in-progress paper concludes with a practical case study focused on the analysis of Twitter 1% sample stream information captured during the week of the Boston Marathon bombings.

  11. Estimating Rooftop Suitability for PV: A Review of Methods, Patents, and Validation Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melius, J.; Margolis, R.; Ong, S.

    2013-12-01

    A number of methods have been developed using remote sensing data to estimate rooftop area suitable for the installation of photovoltaics (PV) at various geospatial resolutions. This report reviews the literature and patents on methods for estimating rooftop-area appropriate for PV, including constant-value methods, manual selection methods, and GIS-based methods. This report also presents NREL's proposed method for estimating suitable rooftop area for PV using Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data in conjunction with a GIS model to predict areas with appropriate slope, orientation, and sunlight. NREL's method is validated against solar installation data from New Jersey, Colorado, and California to compare modeled results to actual on-the-ground measurements.

  12. Utah Heavy Oil Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

    2009-10-20

    The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

  13. Emerging Technologies in the Built Environment: Geographic Information Science (GIS), 3D Printing, and Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract 1: Geographic information systems emerged as a computer application in the late 1960s, led in part by projects at ORNL. The concept of a GIS has shifted through time in response to new applications and new technologies, and is now part of a much larger world of geospatial technology. This presentation discusses the relationship of GIS and estimating hourly and seasonal energy consumption profiles in the building sector at spatial scales down to the individual parcel. The method combines annual building energy simulations for city-specific prototypical buildings and commonly available geospatial data in a GIS framework. Abstract 2: This presentation focuses on 3D printing technologies and how they have rapidly evolved over the past couple of years. At a basic level, 3D printing produces physical models quickly and easily from 3D CAD, BIM (Building Information Models), and other digital data. Many AEC firms have adopted 3D printing as part of commercial building design development and project delivery. This presentation includes an overview of 3D printing, discusses its current use in building design, and talks about its future in relation to the HVAC industry. Abstract 3: This presentation discusses additive manufacturing and how it is revolutionizing the design of commercial and residential facilities. Additive manufacturing utilizes a broad range of direct manufacturing technologies, including electron beam melting, ultrasonic, extrusion, and laser metal deposition for rapid prototyping. While there is some overlap with the 3D printing talk, this presentation focuses on the materials aspect of additive manufacturing and also some of the more advanced technologies involved with rapid prototyping. These technologies include design of carbon fiber composites, lightweight metals processing, transient field processing, and more.

  14. Shift in the Equilibrium between On and Off States of the Allosteric Switch in Ras-GppNHp Affected by Small Molecules and Bulk Solvent Composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holzapfel, Genevieve; Buhrman, Greg; Mattos, Carla

    2012-08-31

    Ras GTPase cycles between its active GTP-bound form promoted by GEFs and its inactive GDP-bound form promoted by GAPs to affect the control of various cellular functions. It is becoming increasingly apparent that subtle regulation of the GTP-bound active state may occur through promotion of substates mediated by an allosteric switch mechanism that induces a disorder to order transition in switch II upon ligand binding at an allosteric site. We show with high-resolution structures that calcium acetate and either dithioerythritol (DTE) or dithiothreitol (DTT) soaked into H-Ras-GppNHp crystals in the presence of a moderate amount of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) can selectively shift the equilibrium to the 'on' state, where the active site appears to be poised for catalysis (calcium acetate), or to what we call the 'ordered off' state, which is associated with an anticatalytic conformation (DTE or DTT). We also show that the equilibrium is reversible in our crystals and dependent on the nature of the small molecule present. Calcium acetate binding in the allosteric site stabilizes the conformation observed in the H-Ras-GppNHp/NOR1A complex, and PEG, DTE, and DTT stabilize the anticatalytic conformation observed in the complex between the Ras homologue Ran and Importin-{beta}. The small molecules are therefore selecting biologically relevant conformations in the crystal that are sampled by the disordered switch II in the uncomplexed GTP-bound form of H-Ras. In the presence of a large amount of PEG, the ordered off conformation predominates, whereas in solution, in the absence of PEG, switch regions appear to remain disordered in what we call the off state, unable to bind DTE.

  15. Development of an IAEA Training Course for Future U.S. Inspectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savannah Avgerinos Fitzwater; Amanda R. Rynes; David S. Bracken; Richard R. M. Metcalf; James D. West

    2011-07-01

    U.S. citizens currently make up only 12% of the positions held in the IAEAs Department of Safeguards. While the United States has maintained a high level of support for the Agency over the duration of its history, the number of American inspectors currently in the field does not reflect this level of involvement. As a result, the National Nuclear Security Administrations Office of International Relations, as part of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) mission, has tasked Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to develop a rigorous two week hands-on training program to encourage and operationally acclimatize U.S. Citizens who are interested in applying for IAEA inspector positions using IAEA authorized equipment at INL. Idaho National Laboratory is one-of-a-kind in its ability to train IAEA inspectors by including training at nuclear facilities on site and includes, for example, direct measurement of an active spent fuel storage cooling pond. This accredited course will introduce and train attendees on the major IAEA systems used in collecting nuclear safeguards data and performing safeguards inspections. Unique in the United States, these classes will give attendees direct hands-on training and will address equipment purpose, function, operating principles, application, and troubleshooting, based upon what would be expected of an IAEA Safeguards Inspector in the field and in the office. Upon completion, U.S. applicants will be better qualified to pursue a position in the IAEA Department of Safeguards Operational Divisions. In support, INL has recently established a new laboratory space to house state of the art nuclear safeguards instrumentation. Currently, equipment installed in the laboratory space includes attended systems: 3DLR (3-D Imaging Laser) for design information verification, a Digital Cerenkov Viewing Device for measurement of spent fuel, HM-5 handheld radiation detectors, quantitative neutron and gamma systems; unattended monitoring systems including: NGAM and MiniGRAND radiation systems and a DMOS camera system, and VACOSS/EOSS Optical Sealing Systems..

  16. An Adaptive Landscape Classification Procedure using Geoinformatics and Artificial Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Andre M.

    2008-08-01

    The Adaptive Landscape Classification Procedure (ALCP), which links the advanced geospatial analysis capabilities of Geographic Information Systems (GISs) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) and particularly Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs), is proposed as a method for establishing and reducing complex data relationships. Its adaptive and evolutionary capability is evaluated for situations where varying types of data can be combined to address different prediction and/or management needs such as hydrologic response, water quality, aquatic habitat, groundwater recharge, land use, instrumentation placement, and forecast scenarios. The research presented here documents and presents favorable results of a procedure that aims to be a powerful and flexible spatial data classifier that fuses the strengths of geoinformatics and the intelligence of SOMs to provide data patterns and spatial information for environmental managers and researchers. This research shows how evaluation and analysis of spatial and/or temporal patterns in the landscape can provide insight into complex ecological, hydrological, climatic, and other natural and anthropogenic-influenced processes. Certainly, environmental management and research within heterogeneous watersheds provide challenges for consistent evaluation and understanding of system functions. For instance, watersheds over a range of scales are likely to exhibit varying levels of diversity in their characteristics of climate, hydrology, physiography, ecology, and anthropogenic influence. Furthermore, it has become evident that understanding and analyzing these diverse systems can be difficult not only because of varying natural characteristics, but also because of the availability, quality, and variability of spatial and temporal data. Developments in geospatial technologies, however, are providing a wide range of relevant data, and in many cases, at a high temporal and spatial resolution. Such data resources can take the form of high-dimensional data arrays, which can difficult to fully use. Establishing relationships among high-dimensional datasets through neurocomputing based patterning methods can help 1) resolve large volumes of data into a meaningful form; 2) provide an approach for inferring landscape processes in areas that have limited data available but that exhibit similar landscape characteristics; and 3) discover the value of individual variables or groups of variables that contribute to specific processes in the landscape.

  17. Infant sex-specific placental cadmium and DNA methylation associations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohanty, April F.; Farin, Fred M.; Bammler, Theo K.; MacDonald, James W.; Afsharinejad, Zahra; Burbacher, Thomas M.; Siscovick, David S.; and others

    2015-04-15

    Background: Recent evidence suggests that maternal cadmium (Cd) burden and fetal growth associations may vary by fetal sex. However, mechanisms contributing to these differences are unknown. Objectives: Among 24 maternal-infant pairs, we investigated infant sex-specific associations between placental Cd and placental genome-wide DNA methylation. Methods: We used ANOVA models to examine sex-stratified associations of placental Cd (dichotomized into high/low Cd using sex-specific Cd median cutoffs) with DNA methylation at each cytosine-phosphate-guanine site or region. Statistical significance was defined using a false discovery rate cutoff (<0.10). Results: Medians of placental Cd among females and males were 5 and 2 ng/g, respectively. Among females, three sites (near ADP-ribosylation factor-like 9 (ARL9), siah E3 ubiquitin protein ligase family member 3 (SIAH3), and heparin sulfate (glucosamine) 3-O-sulfotransferase 4 (HS3ST4) and one region on chromosome 7 (including carnitine O-octanoyltransferase (CROT) and TP5S target 1 (TP53TG1)) were hypomethylated in high Cd placentas. Among males, high placental Cd was associated with methylation of three sites, two (hypomethylated) near MDS1 and EVI1 complex locus (MECOM) and one (hypermethylated) near spalt-like transcription factor 1 (SALL1), and two regions (both hypomethylated, one on chromosome 3 including MECOM and another on chromosome 8 including rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) 10 (ARHGEF10). Differentially methylated sites were at or close to transcription start sites of genes involved in cell damage response (SIAH3, HS3ST4, TP53TG1) in females and cell differentiation, angiogenesis and organ development (MECOM, SALL1) in males. Conclusions: Our preliminary study supports infant sex-specific placental Cd-DNA methylation associations, possibly accounting for previously reported differences in Cd-fetal growth associations across fetal sex. Larger studies are needed to replicate and extend these findings. Such investigations may further our understanding of epigenetic mechanisms underlying maternal Cd burden with suboptimal fetal growth associations. - Highlights: • We examine sex-specific placental-Cd and -genome-wide DNA methylation associations. • In females, associated sites were at/near genes involved in cell damage response. • In males, associated sites were at/near angiogenesis and organ development genes. • Our study supports infant sex-specific placental Cd-DNA methylation associations.

  18. Distribution of the Chuckwalla, Western Burrowing Owl, and Six Bat Species on the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy A. Willis

    1997-05-01

    Field Surveys were conducted in 1996 to determine the current distribution of several animal species of concern on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). They included the chuckwall (Sauromalus obesus), western burrowing owl (Speotyto cunicularia), and six species of bats. Nineteen chuckwallas and 118 scat locations were found during the chuckwalla field study. Eighteen western burrowing owls were found at 12 sighting locations during the 1996 field study. Of the eleven bat species of concern which might occur on the NTS, five, and possibly six, were captured during this survey. The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, takes certain management actions to protect and conserve the chuckwalla, western burrowing owl, and bats on the NTS. These actions are described and include: (1) conducting surveys at sites of proposed land-disturbing activities (2) altering projects whenever possible to avoid or minimize impacts to these species (3) maintaining a geospatial database of known habitat for species of concern (4) sharing sighting and trap location data gathered on the NTS with other local land and resource managers, and (5) conducting periodic field surveys to monitor these species distribution and relative abundance on the NTS.

  19. Integrating multi-criteria decision analysis for a GIS-based hazardous waste landfill sitting in Kurdistan Province, western Iran

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharifi, Mozafar Hadidi, Mosslem Vessali, Elahe Mosstafakhani, Parasto Taheri, Kamal Shahoie, Saber Khodamoradpour, Mehran

    2009-10-15

    The evaluation of a hazardous waste disposal site is a complicated process because it requires data from diverse social and environmental fields. These data often involve processing of a significant amount of spatial information which can be used by GIS as an important tool for land use suitability analysis. This paper presents a multi-criteria decision analysis alongside with a geospatial analysis for the selection of hazardous waste landfill sites in Kurdistan Province, western Iran. The study employs a two-stage analysis to provide a spatial decision support system for hazardous waste management in a typically under developed region. The purpose of GIS was to perform an initial screening process to eliminate unsuitable land followed by utilization of a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) to identify the most suitable sites using the information provided by the regional experts with reference to new chosen criteria. Using 21 exclusionary criteria, as input layers, masked maps were prepared. Creating various intermediate or analysis map layers a final overlay map was obtained representing areas for hazardous waste landfill sites. In order to evaluate different landfill sites produced by the overlaying a landfill suitability index system was developed representing cumulative effects of relative importance (weights) and suitability values of 14 non-exclusionary criteria including several criteria resulting from field observation. Using this suitability index 15 different sites were visited and based on the numerical evaluation provided by MCDA most suitable sites were determined.

  20. Risks to global biodiversity from fossil-fuel production exceed those from biofuel production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H; Parish, Esther S; Kline, Keith L

    2015-01-01

    Potential global biodiversity impacts from near-term gasoline production are compared to biofuel, a renewable liquid transportation fuel expected to substitute for gasoline in the near term (i.e., from now until c. 2030). Petroleum exploration activities are projected to extend across more than 5.8 billion ha of land and ocean worldwide (of which 3.1 billion is on land), much of which is in remote, fragile terrestrial ecosystems or off-shore oil fields that would remain relatively undisturbed if not for interest in fossil fuel production. Future biomass production for biofuels is projected to fall within 2.0 billion ha of land, most of which is located in areas already impacted by human activities. A comparison of likely fuel-source areas to the geospatial distribution of species reveals that both energy sources overlap with areas with high species richness and large numbers of threatened species. At the global scale, future petroleum production areas intersect more than double the area and higher total number of threatened species than future biofuel production. Energy options should be developed to optimize provisioning of ecosystem services while minimizing negative effects, which requires information about potential impacts on critical resources. Energy conservation and identifying and effectively protecting habitats with high-conservation value are critical first steps toward protecting biodiversity under any fuel production scenario.

  1. Risks to global biodiversity from fossil-fuel production exceed those from biofuel production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dale, Virginia H; Parish, Esther S; Kline, Keith L

    2015-01-01

    Potential global biodiversity impacts from near-term gasoline production are compared to biofuel, a renewable liquid transportation fuel expected to substitute for gasoline in the near term (i.e., from now until c. 2030). Petroleum exploration activities are projected to extend across more than 5.8 billion ha of land and ocean worldwide (of which 3.1 billion is on land), much of which is in remote, fragile terrestrial ecosystems or off-shore oil fields that would remain relatively undisturbed if not for interest in fossil fuel production. Future biomass production for biofuels is projected to fall within 2.0 billion ha of land, most ofmore » which is located in areas already impacted by human activities. A comparison of likely fuel-source areas to the geospatial distribution of species reveals that both energy sources overlap with areas with high species richness and large numbers of threatened species. At the global scale, future petroleum production areas intersect more than double the area and higher total number of threatened species than future biofuel production. Energy options should be developed to optimize provisioning of ecosystem services while minimizing negative effects, which requires information about potential impacts on critical resources. Energy conservation and identifying and effectively protecting habitats with high-conservation value are critical first steps toward protecting biodiversity under any fuel production scenario.« less

  2. Geothermal Data from the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) is a distributed data system providing access to information resources related to geothermal energy from a network of data providers. Data are contributed by academic researchers, private industry, and state and federal agencies. Built on a scalable and open platform through the U.S. Geoscience Information Network (USGIN), NGDS respects data provenance while promoting shared resources.Since NGDS is built using a set of open protocols and standards, relying on the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) and International Organization for Standardization (ISO), members of the community may access the data in a variety of proprietary and open-source applications and software. In addition, developers can add functionality to the system by creating new applications based on the open protocols and standards of the NGDS. The NGDS, supported by the U.S. Department of Energys Geothermal Technology Program, is intended to provide access to all types of geothermal data to enable geothermal analysis and widespread public use in an effort to reduce the risk of geothermal energy development [copied from http://www.geothermaldata.org/page/about]. See the long list of data contributors at http://geothermaldata.org/page/data-types-and-contributors#data-contributors.

  3. Object-oriented Geographic Information System Framework

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-03-01

    JeoViewer is an intelligent object-oriented geographic information system (GIS) framework written in Java that provides transparent linkage to any object’s data, behaviors, and optimized spatial geometry representation. Tools are provided for typical GIS functionality, data ingestion, data export, and integration with other frameworks. The primary difference between Jeo Viewer and traditional GIS systems is that traditional GIS systems offer static views of geo-spatial data while JeoViewer can be dynamically coupled to models and live datamore » streams which dynamically change the state of the object which can be immediately represented in JeoViewer. Additionally, JeoViewer’s object-oriented paradigm provides a more natural representation of spatial data. A rich layer hierarchy allows arbitrary grouping of objects based on any relationship as well as the traditional GIS vertical ordering of objects. JeoViewer can run as a standalone product, extended with additional analysis functionality, or embedded in another framework.« less

  4. Geothermal Data from the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) is a distributed data system providing access to information resources related to geothermal energy from a network of data providers. Data are contributed by academic researchers, private industry, and state and federal agencies. Built on a scalable and open platform through the U.S. Geoscience Information Network (USGIN), NGDS respects data provenance while promoting shared resources.Since NGDS is built using a set of open protocols and standards, relying on the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) and International Organization for Standardization (ISO), members of the community may access the data in a variety of proprietary and open-source applications and software. In addition, developers can add functionality to the system by creating new applications based on the open protocols and standards of the NGDS. The NGDS, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Geothermal Technology Program, is intended to provide access to all types of geothermal data to enable geothermal analysis and widespread public use in an effort to reduce the risk of geothermal energy development [copied from http://www.geothermaldata.org/page/about]. See the long list of data contributors at http://geothermaldata.org/page/data-types-and-contributors#data-contributors.

  5. Renewable energy atlas of the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuiper, J.A.; Hlava, K.Greenwood, H.; Carr, A.

    2012-05-01

    The Renewable Energy Atlas (Atlas) of the United States is a compilation of geospatial data focused on renewable energy resources, federal land ownership, and base map reference information. It is designed for the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service (USFS) and other federal land management agencies to evaluate existing and proposed renewable energy projects. Much of the content of the Atlas was compiled at Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to support recent and current energy-related Environmental Impact Statements and studies, including the following projects: (1) West-wide Energy Corridor Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) (BLM 2008); (2) Draft PEIS for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (DOE/BLM 2010); (3) Supplement to the Draft PEIS for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (DOE/BLM 2011); (4) Upper Great Plains Wind Energy PEIS (WAPA/USFWS 2012, in progress); and (5) Energy Transport Corridors: The Potential Role of Federal Lands in States Identified by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Section 368(b) (in progress). This report explains how to add the Atlas to your computer and install the associated software; describes each of the components of the Atlas; lists the Geographic Information System (GIS) database content and sources; and provides a brief introduction to the major renewable energy technologies.

  6. Intelligent Object-Oriented GIS Engine W/dynamic Coupling to Modeled Objects

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-02-12

    The GEOVIEWER is an intelligent object-oriented Geographic Information System (GIS) engine that provides not only a spatially-optimized object representation, but also direct linkage to the underlying object, its data and behaviors. Tools are incorporated to perform tasks involving typical GIS functionality, data ingestion, linkage to external models, and integration with other application frameworks. The GOEVIEWER module was designed to provide GIS functionality to create, query, view, and manipulate software objects within a selected area undermore » investigation in a simulation system. Many of these objects are not stored in a format conductive to efficient GIS usage. Their dynamic nature, complexity, and the sheer number of possible entity classes preclude effective integration with traditional GIS technologies due to the loosely coupled nature of their data representations. The primary difference between GEOVIEWER and standard GIS packages is that standard GIS packages offer static views of geospatial data while GEOVIEWER can be dynamically coupled to models and/or applications producing data and, therefore, display changes in geometry, attributes or behavior as they occur in the simulation.« less

  7. The Future Potential of Waver Power in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirko Previsic; Jeff Epler; Maureen Hand; Donna Heimiller; Walter Short; Kelly Eurek

    2012-09-20

    The theoretical ocean wave energy resource potential exceeds 50% of the annual domestic energy demand of the United States, is located close to coastal population centers, and, although variable in nature, may be more consistent and predictable than some other renewable generation technologies. As a renewable electricity generation technology, ocean wave energy offers a low air pollutant option for diversifying the U.S. electricity generation portfolio. Furthermore, the output characteristics of these technologies may complement other renewable technologies. This study addresses the following: (1) The theoretical, technical and practical potential for electricity generation from wave energy (2) The present lifecycle cost profile (Capex, Opex, and Cost of Electricity) of wave energy conversion technology at a reference site in Northern California at different plant scales (3) Cost of electricity variations as a function of deployment site, considering technical, geo-spatial and and electric grid constraints (4) Technology cost reduction pathways (5) Cost reduction targets at which the technology will see significant deployment within US markets, explored through a series of deployment scenarios RE Vision Consulting, LLC (RE Vision), engaged in various analyses to establish current and future cost profiles for marine hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies, quantified the theoretical, technical and practical resource potential, performed electricity market assessments and developed deployment scenarios. RE Vision was supported in this effort by NREL analysts, who compiled resource information, performed analysis using the ReEDSa model to develop deployment scenarios, and developed a simplified assessment of the Alaska and Hawaii electricity markets.

  8. Design and application of a mobile ground-based observatory for continuous measurements of atmospheric trace-gas and criteria pollutant species

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bush, S. E.; Hopkins, F. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Lai, C.-T.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2015-01-06

    Ground-based measurements of atmospheric trace gas species and criteria pollutants are essential for understanding emissions dynamics across space and time. Gas composition in the surface 50 m has the greatest direct impacts on human health as well as ecosystem processes, hence data at this level is necessary for addressing carbon cycle and public health related questions. However, such surface data are generally associated with stationary measurement towers, where spatial representation is limited due to the high cost of establishing and maintaining an extensive network of measurement stations. We describe here a compact mobile laboratory equipped to provide high-precision, high-frequency, continuous,more » on-road synchronous measurements of CO2, CO, CH4, H2O, NOx, O3, aerosol, meteorological, and geospatial position data. The mobile laboratory has been deployed across the western USA. In addition to describing the vehicle and its capacity, we present data that illustrate the use of the laboratory as a powerful tool for investigating the spatial structure of urban trace gas emissions and criteria pollutants at spatial scales ranging from single streets to whole ecosystem and regional scales. We identify fugitive urban CH4 emissions and assess the magnitude of CH4 emissions from known point sources. We illustrate how such a mobile laboratory can be used to better understand emissions dynamics and quantify emissions ratios associated with trace gas emissions from wildfire incidents. Lastly, we discuss additional mobile laboratory applications in health and urban metabolism.« less

  9. Deformation analysis of Aceh April 11{sup th} 2012 earthquake using GPS observation data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maulida, Putra; Meilano, Irwan; Sarsito, Dina A.; Susilo

    2015-04-24

    This research tries to estimate the co-seismic deformation of intraplate earthquake occurred off northern Sumatra coast which is about 100-200 km southwest of Sumatrasubduction zone. The earthquake mechanism was strike-slip with magnitude 8.6 and triggering aftershock with magnitude 8.2 two hours later. We estimated the co-seismic deformation by using the GPS (Global Positioning System) continuous data along western Sumatra coast. The GPS observation derived from Sumatran GPS Array (SuGAr) and Geospatial Information Agency (BIG). For data processing we used GPS Analyze at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (GAMIT) software and Global Kalman Filter (GLOBK) to estimate the co-seismic deformation. From the GPS daily solution, the result shows that the earthquake caused displacement for the GPS stations in Sumatra. GPS stations in northern Sumatra showed the displacement to the northeast with the average displacement was 15 cm. The biggest displacement was found at station BSIM which is located at Simeuleu Island off north west Sumatra coast. GPS station in middle part of Sumatra, the displacement was northwest. The earthquake also caused subsidence for stations in northern Sumatra, but from the time series there was not sign of subsidence was found at middle part of Sumatra. In addition, the effect of the earthquake was worldwide and affected the other GPS Stations around Hindia oceanic.

  10. A Simple Evacuation Modeling and Simulation Tool for First Responders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Daniel B; Payne, Patricia W

    2015-01-01

    Although modeling and simulation of mass evacuations during a natural or man-made disaster is an on-going and vigorous area of study, tool adoption by front-line first responders is uneven. Some of the factors that account for this situation include cost and complexity of the software. For several years, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been actively developing the free Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit (IMPACT) to address these issues. One of the components of IMPACT is a multi-agent simulation module for area-based and path-based evacuations. The user interface is designed so that anyone familiar with typical computer drawing tools can quickly author a geospatially-correct evacuation visualization suitable for table-top exercises. Since IMPACT is designed for use in the field where network communications may not be available, quick on-site evacuation alternatives can be evaluated to keep pace with a fluid threat situation. Realism is enhanced by incorporating collision avoidance into the simulation. Statistics are gathered as the simulation unfolds, including most importantly time-to-evacuate, to help first responders choose the best course of action.

  11. Survey and Analysis of Weather Data for Building Energy Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhandari, Mahabir S; Shrestha, Som S; New, Joshua Ryan

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, calibrated energy modeling of residential and commercial buildings has gained importance in a retrofit-dominated market. Accurate weather data plays an important role in this calibration process and projected energy savings. It would be ideal to measure weather data at the building location to capture relevant microclimate variation but this is generally considered cost-prohibitive. There are data sources publicly available with high temporal sampling rates but at relatively poor geospatial sampling locations. To overcome this limitation, there are a growing number of service providers that claim to provide real time and historical weather data for 20-35 km2 grid across the globe. Unfortunately, there is limited documentation from 3rd-party sources attesting to the accuracy of this data. This paper compares provided weather characteristics with data collected from a weather station inaccessible to the service providers. Monthly average dry bulb temperature; relative humidity; direct, diffuse and horizontal solar radiation; and wind speed are statistically compared. Moreover, we ascertain the relative contributions of each weather variable and its impact on building loads. Annual simulations are calculated for three different building types, including a closely monitored and automated energy efficient research building. The comparison shows that the difference for an individual variable can be as high as 90%. In addition, annual building energy consumption can vary by 7% while monthly building loads can vary by 40% as a function of the provided location s weather data.

  12. Bus.py: A GridLAB-D Communication Interface for Smart Distribution Grid Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Timothy M.; Palmintier, Bryan; Suryanarayanan, Siddharth; Maciejewski, Anthony A.; Siegel, Howard Jay

    2015-07-03

    As more Smart Grid technologies (e.g., distributed photovoltaic, spatially distributed electric vehicle charging) are integrated into distribution grids, static distribution simulations are no longer sufficient for performing modeling and analysis. GridLAB-D is an agent-based distribution system simulation environment that allows fine-grained end-user models, including geospatial and network topology detail. A problem exists in that, without outside intervention, once the GridLAB-D simulation begins execution, it will run to completion without allowing the real-time interaction of Smart Grid controls, such as home energy management systems and aggregator control. We address this lack of runtime interaction by designing a flexible communication interface, Bus.py (pronounced bus-dot-pie), that uses Python to pass messages between one or more GridLAB-D instances and a Smart Grid simulator. This work describes the design and implementation of Bus.py, discusses its usefulness in terms of some Smart Grid scenarios, and provides an example of an aggregator-based residential demand response system interacting with GridLAB-D through Bus.py. The small scale example demonstrates the validity of the interface and shows that an aggregator using said interface is able to control residential loads in GridLAB-D during runtime to cause a reduction in the peak load on the distribution system in (a) peak reduction and (b) time-of-use pricing cases.

  13. Measuring Spatial Variability of Vapor Flux to Characterize Vadose-zone VOC Sources: Flow-cell Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mainhagu, Jon; Morrison, C.; Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Brusseau, Mark

    2014-10-20

    A method termed vapor-phase tomography has recently been proposed to characterize the distribution of volatile organic contaminant mass in vadose-zone source areas, and to measure associated three-dimensional distributions of local contaminant mass discharge. The method is based on measuring the spatial variability of vapor flux, and thus inherent to its effectiveness is the premise that the magnitudes and temporal variability of vapor concentrations measured at different monitoring points within the interrogated area will be a function of the geospatial positions of the points relative to the source location. A series of flow-cell experiments was conducted to evaluate this premise. A well-defined source zone was created by injection and extraction of a non-reactive gas (SF6). Spatial and temporal concentration distributions obtained from the tests were compared to simulations produced with a mathematical model describing advective and diffusive transport. Tests were conducted to characterize both areal and vertical components of the application. Decreases in concentration over time were observed for monitoring points located on the opposite side of the source zone from the local–extraction point, whereas increases were observed for monitoring points located between the local–extraction point and the source zone. The results illustrate that comparison of temporal concentration profiles obtained at various monitoring points gives a general indication of the source location with respect to the extraction and monitoring points.

  14. Improved Offshore Wind Resource Assessment in Global Climate Stabilization Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arent, D.; Sullivan, P.; Heimiller, D.; Lopez, A.; Eurek, K.; Badger, J.; Jorgensen, H. E.; Kelly, M.; Clarke, L.; Luckow, P.

    2012-10-01

    This paper introduces a technique for digesting geospatial wind-speed data into areally defined -- country-level, in this case -- wind resource supply curves. We combined gridded wind-vector data for ocean areas with bathymetry maps, country exclusive economic zones, wind turbine power curves, and other datasets and relevant parameters to build supply curves that estimate a country's offshore wind resource defined by resource quality, depth, and distance-from-shore. We include a single set of supply curves -- for a particular assumption set -- and study some implications of including it in a global energy model. We also discuss the importance of downscaling gridded wind vector data to capturing the full resource potential, especially over land areas with complex terrain. This paper includes motivation and background for a statistical downscaling methodology to account for terrain effects with a low computational burden. Finally, we use this forum to sketch a framework for building synthetic electric networks to estimate transmission accessibility of renewable resource sites in remote areas.

  15. Regional Economic Accounting (REAcct). A software tool for rapidly approximating economic impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Vargas, Vanessa N.; Loose, Verne William; Starks, Shirley J.; Ellebracht, Lory A.

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes the Regional Economic Accounting (REAcct) analysis tool that has been in use for the last 5 years to rapidly estimate approximate economic impacts for disruptions due to natural or manmade events. It is based on and derived from the well-known and extensively documented input-output modeling technique initially presented by Leontief and more recently further developed by numerous contributors. REAcct provides county-level economic impact estimates in terms of gross domestic product (GDP) and employment for any area in the United States. The process for using REAcct incorporates geospatial computational tools and site-specific economic data, permitting the identification of geographic impact zones that allow differential magnitude and duration estimates to be specified for regions affected by a simulated or actual event. Using these data as input to REAcct, the number of employees for 39 directly affected economic sectors (including 37 industry production sectors and 2 government sectors) are calculated and aggregated to provide direct impact estimates. Indirect estimates are then calculated using Regional Input-Output Modeling System (RIMS II) multipliers. The interdependent relationships between critical infrastructures, industries, and markets are captured by the relationships embedded in the inputoutput modeling structure.

  16. Outside the Continental United States International Travel and Contagion Impact Quick Look Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corley, Courtney D.; Lancaster, Mary J.; Brigantic, Robert T.; Kunkel, Brenda M.; Muller, George; McKenzie, Taylor K.

    2012-11-09

    ABSTRACT This paper describes a tool that will allow public health analysts to estimate infectious disease risk at the country level as a function of different international transportation modes. The prototype focuses on a cholera epidemic originating within Latin America or the Caribbean, but it can be expanded to consider other pathogens as well. This effort leverages previous work in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to develop the International Travel to Community Impact (IT-CI) model, which analyzes and assesses potential international disease outbreaks then estimates the associated impacts to U.S. communities and the nation as a whole and orient it for use Outside the Continental United States (OCONUS). For brevity, we refer to this refined model as OIT-CI. First, we developed an operationalized meta-population spatial cholera model for Latin America and the Caribbean at the secondary administrative-level boundary. Secondly, we developed a robust function of human airline critical to approximating mixing patterns in the meta- population model. In the prototype version currently presented here, OIT-CI models a cholera epidemic originating in a Latin American or Caribbean country and spreading via airline transportation routes. Disease spread is modeled at the country level using a patch model with a connectivity function based on demographic, geospatial, and human transportation data. We have also identified data to estimate the water and health-related infrastructure capabilities of each country to include this potential impact on disease transmission.

  17. Data Management Architectures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Critchlow, Terence J.; Abdulla, Ghaleb; Becla, Jacek; Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Lang, Sam; McGuinness, Deborah L.

    2012-10-31

    Data management is the organization of information to support efficient access and analysis. For data intensive computing applications, the speed at which relevant data can be accessed is a limiting factor in terms of the size and complexity of computation that can be performed. Data access speed is impacted by the size of the relevant subset of the data, the complexity of the query used to define it, and the layout of the data relative to the query. As the underlying data sets become increasingly complex, the questions asked of it become more involved as well. For example, geospatial data associated with a city is no longer limited to the map data representing its streets, but now also includes layers identifying utility lines, key points, locations and types of businesses within the city limits, tax information for each land parcel, satellite imagery, and possibly even street-level views. As a result, queries have gone from simple questions, such as "how long is Main Street?", to much more complex questions such as "taking all other factors into consideration, are the property values of houses near parks higher than those under power lines, and if so, by what percentage". Answering these questions requires a coherent infrastructure, integrating the relevant data into a format optimized for the questions being asked.

  18. Modeling Spatial Dependencies in High-Resolution Overhead Imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheriyadat, Anil M; Bright, Eddie A; Vatsavai, Raju

    2011-01-01

    Human settlement regions with different physical and socio-economic attributes exhibit unique spatial characteristics that are often illustrated in high-resolution overhead imageries. For example- size, shape and spatial arrangements of man-made structures are key attributes that vary with respect to the socioeconomic profile of the neighborhood. Successfully modeling these attributes is crucial in developing advanced image understanding systems for interpreting complex aerial scenes. In this paper we present three different approaches to model the spatial context in the overhead imagery. First, we show that the frequency domain of the image can be used to model the spatial context [1]. The shape of the spectral energy contours characterize the scene context and can be exploited as global features. Secondly, we explore a discriminative framework based on the Conditional Random Fields (CRF) [2] to model the spatial context in the overhead imagery. The features derived from the edge orientation distribution calculated for a neighborhood and the associated class labels are used as input features to model the spatial context. Our third approach is based on grouping spatially connected pixels based on the low-level edge primitives to form support-regions [3]. The statistical parameters generated from the support-region feature distributions characterize different geospatial neighborhoods. We apply our approaches on high-resolution overhead imageries. We show that proposed approaches characterize the spatial context in overhead imageries.

  19. Adaptive Classification of Landscape Process and Function: An Integration of Geoinformatics and Self-Organizing Maps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Andre M.

    2009-07-17

    The advanced geospatial information extraction and analysis capabilities of a Geographic Information System (GISs) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), particularly Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs), provide a topology-preserving means for reducing and understanding complex data relationships in the landscape. The Adaptive Landscape Classification Procedure (ALCP) is presented as an adaptive and evolutionary capability where varying types of data can be assimilated to address different management needs such as hydrologic response, erosion potential, habitat structure, instrumentation placement, and various forecast or what-if scenarios. This paper defines how the evaluation and analysis of spatial and/or temporal patterns in the landscape can provide insight into complex ecological, hydrological, climatic, and other natural and anthropogenic-influenced processes. Establishing relationships among high-dimensional datasets through neurocomputing based pattern recognition methods can help 1) resolve large volumes of data into a structured and meaningful form; 2) provide an approach for inferring landscape processes in areas that have limited data available but exhibit similar landscape characteristics; and 3) discover the value of individual variables or groups of variables that contribute to specific processes in the landscape. Classification of hydrologic patterns in the landscape is demonstrated.

  20. Establishing a Secure Data Center with Remote Access: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonder, J.; Burton, E.; Murakami, E.

    2012-04-01

    Access to existing travel data is critical for many analysis efforts that lack the time or resources to support detailed data collection. High-resolution data sets provide particular value, but also present a challenge for preserving the anonymity of the original survey participants. To address this dilemma of providing data access while preserving privacy, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the U.S. Department of Transportation have launched the Transportation Secure Data Center (TSDC). TSDC data sets include those from regional travel surveys and studies that increasingly use global positioning system devices. Data provided by different collecting agencies varies with respect to formatting, elements included and level of processing conducted in support of the original purpose. The TSDC relies on a number of geospatial and other analysis tools to ensure data quality and to generate useful information outputs. TSDC users can access the processed data in two different ways. The first is by downloading summary results and second-by-second vehicle speed profiles (with latitude/longitude information removed) from a publicly-accessible website. The second method involves applying for a remote connection account to a controlled-access environment where spatial analysis can be conducted, but raw data cannot be removed.

  1. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization- Final Technical Report on Award DE-EE0002664. October 28, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ascari, Matthew B.; Hanson, Howard P.; Rauchenstein, Lynn; Van Zwieten, James; Bharathan, Desikan; Heimiller, Donna; Langle, Nicholas; Scott, George N.; Potemra, James; Nagurny, N. John; Jansen, Eugene

    2012-10-28

    The Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy (MPEE) from the world's ocean thermal resources. MPEE is defined as being sustainable and technically feasible, given today's state-of-the-art ocean energy technology. Under this project the OTEEV team developed a comprehensive Geospatial Information System (GIS) dataset and software tool, and used the tool to provide a meaningful assessment of MPEE from the global and domestic U.S. ocean thermal resources. The OTEEV project leverages existing NREL renewable energy GIS technologies and integrates extractable energy estimated from quality-controlled data and projected optimal achievable energy conversion rates. Input data are synthesized from a broad range of existing in-situ measurements and ground-truthed numerical models with temporal and spatial resolutions sufficient to reflect the local resource. Energy production rates are calculated for regions based on conversion rates estimated for current technology, local energy density of the resource, and sustainable resource extraction. Plant spacing and maximum production rates are then estimated based on a default plant size and transmission mechanisms. The resulting data are organized, displayed, and accessed using a multi-layered GIS mapping tool, http://maps.nrel.gov/mhk_atlas with a user-friendly graphical user interface.

  2. Modeling Spatial Dependencies and Semantic Concepts in Data Mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vatsavai, Raju

    2012-01-01

    Data mining is the process of discovering new patterns and relationships in large datasets. However, several studies have shown that general data mining techniques often fail to extract meaningful patterns and relationships from the spatial data owing to the violation of fundamental geospatial principles. In this tutorial, we introduce basic principles behind explicit modeling of spatial and semantic concepts in data mining. In particular, we focus on modeling these concepts in the widely used classification, clustering, and prediction algorithms. Classification is the process of learning a structure or model (from user given inputs) and applying the known model to the new data. Clustering is the process of discovering groups and structures in the data that are ``similar,'' without applying any known structures in the data. Prediction is the process of finding a function that models (explains) the data with least error. One common assumption among all these methods is that the data is independent and identically distributed. Such assumptions do not hold well in spatial data, where spatial dependency and spatial heterogeneity are a norm. In addition, spatial semantics are often ignored by the data mining algorithms. In this tutorial we cover recent advances in explicitly modeling of spatial dependencies and semantic concepts in data mining.

  3. Open-Source GIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vatsavai, Raju; Burk, Thomas E; Lime, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The components making up an Open Source GIS are explained in this chapter. A map server (Sect. 30.1) can broadly be defined as a software platform for dynamically generating spatially referenced digital map products. The University of Minnesota MapServer (UMN Map Server) is one such system. Its basic features are visualization, overlay, and query. Section 30.2 names and explains many of the geospatial open source libraries, such as GDAL and OGR. The other libraries are FDO, JTS, GEOS, JCS, MetaCRS, and GPSBabel. The application examples include derived GIS-software and data format conversions. Quantum GIS, its origin and its applications explained in detail in Sect. 30.3. The features include a rich GUI, attribute tables, vector symbols, labeling, editing functions, projections, georeferencing, GPS support, analysis, and Web Map Server functionality. Future developments will address mobile applications, 3-D, and multithreading. The origins of PostgreSQL are outlined and PostGIS discussed in detail in Sect. 30.4. It extends PostgreSQL by implementing the Simple Feature standard. Section 30.5 details the most important open source licenses such as the GPL, the LGPL, the MIT License, and the BSD License, as well as the role of the Creative Commons.

  4. Building a Large Scale Climate Data System in Support of HPC Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Feiyi; Harney, John F; Shipman, Galen M

    2011-01-01

    The Earth System Grid Federation (ESG) is a large scale, multi-institutional, interdisciplinary project that aims to provide climate scientists and impact policy makers worldwide a web-based and client-based platform to publish, disseminate, compare and analyze ever increasing climate related data. This paper describes our practical experiences on the design, development and operation of such a system. In particular, we focus on the support of the data lifecycle from a high performance computing (HPC) perspective that is critical to the end-to-end scientific discovery process. We discuss three subjects that interconnect the consumer and producer of scientific datasets: (1) the motivations, complexities and solutions of deep storage access and sharing in a tightly controlled environment; (2) the importance of scalable and flexible data publication/population; and (3) high performance indexing and search of data with geospatial properties. These perceived corner issues collectively contributed to the overall user experience and proved to be as important as any other architectural design considerations. Although the requirements and challenges are rooted and discussed from a climate science domain context, we believe the architectural problems, ideas and solutions discussed in this paper are generally useful and applicable in a larger scope.

  5. Matisse: A Visual Analytics System for Exploring Emotion Trends in Social Media Text Streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steed, Chad A; Drouhard, Margaret MEG G; Beaver, Justin M; Pyle, Joshua M; BogenII, Paul L.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamically mining textual information streams to gain real-time situational awareness is especially challenging with social media systems where throughput and velocity properties push the limits of a static analytical approach. In this paper, we describe an interactive visual analytics system, called Matisse, that aids with the discovery and investigation of trends in streaming text. Matisse addresses the challenges inherent to text stream mining through the following technical contributions: (1) robust stream data management, (2) automated sentiment/emotion analytics, (3) interactive coordinated visualizations, and (4) a flexible drill-down interaction scheme that accesses multiple levels of detail. In addition to positive/negative sentiment prediction, Matisse provides fine-grained emotion classification based on Valence, Arousal, and Dominance dimensions and a novel machine learning process. Information from the sentiment/emotion analytics are fused with raw data and summary information to feed temporal, geospatial, term frequency, and scatterplot visualizations using a multi-scale, coordinated interaction model. After describing these techniques, we conclude with a practical case study focused on analyzing the Twitter sample stream during the week of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings. The case study demonstrates the effectiveness of Matisse at providing guided situational awareness of significant trends in social media streams by orchestrating computational power and human cognition.

  6. Automating Natural Disaster Impact Analysis: An Open Resource to Visually Estimate a Hurricane s Impact on the Electric Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, Alan M; Freer, Eva B; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Fernandez, Steven J; Chinthavali, Supriya; Kodysh, Jeffrey B

    2013-01-01

    An ORNL team working on the Energy Awareness and Resiliency Standardized Services (EARSS) project developed a fully automated procedure to take wind speed and location estimates provided by hurricane forecasters and provide a geospatial estimate on the impact to the electric grid in terms of outage areas and projected duration of outages. Hurricane Sandy was one of the worst US storms ever, with reported injuries and deaths, millions of people without power for several days, and billions of dollars in economic impact. Hurricane advisories were released for Sandy from October 22 through 31, 2012. The fact that the geoprocessing was automated was significant there were 64 advisories for Sandy. Manual analysis typically takes about one hour for each advisory. During a storm event, advisories are released every two to three hours around the clock, and an analyst capable of performing the manual analysis has other tasks they would like to focus on. Initial predictions of a big impact and landfall usually occur three days in advance, so time is of the essence to prepare for utility repair. Automated processing developed at ORNL allowed this analysis to be completed and made publicly available within minutes of each new advisory being released.

  7. FACE-IT. A Science Gateway for Food Security Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montella, Raffaele; Kelly, David; Xiong, Wei; Brizius, Alison; Elliott, Joshua; Madduri, Ravi; Maheshwari, Ketan; Porter, Cheryl; Vilter, Peter; Wilde, Michael; Zhang, Meng; Foster, Ian

    2015-07-14

    Progress in sustainability science is hindered by challenges in creating and managing complex data acquisition, processing, simulation, post-processing, and intercomparison pipelines. To address these challenges, we developed the Framework to Advance Climate, Economic, and Impact Investigations with Information Technology (FACE-IT) for crop and climate impact assessments. This integrated data processing and simulation framework enables data ingest from geospatial archives; data regridding, aggregation, and other processing prior to simulation; large-scale climate impact simulations with agricultural and other models, leveraging high-performance and cloud computing; and post-processing to produce aggregated yields and ensemble variables needed for statistics, for model intercomparison, and to connect biophysical models to global and regional economic models. FACE-IT leverages the capabilities of the Globus Galaxies platform to enable the capture of workflows and outputs in well-defined, reusable, and comparable forms. We describe FACE-IT and applications within the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project and the Center for Robust Decision-making on Climate and Energy Policy.

  8. Assessment of Industrial Load for Demand Response across Western Interconnect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkadi, Nasr E; Starke, Michael R; Ma, Ookie

    2013-11-01

    Demand response (DR) has the ability to both increase power grid reliability and potentially reduce operating system costs. Understanding the role of demand response in grid modeling has been difficult due to complex nature of the load characteristics compared to the modeled generation and the variation in load types. This is particularly true of industrial loads, where hundreds of different industries exist with varying availability for demand response. We present a framework considering industrial loads for the development of availability profiles that can provide more regional understanding and can be inserted into analysis software for further study. The developed framework utilizes a number of different informational resources, algorithms, and real-world measurements to perform a bottom-up approach in the development of a new database with representation of the potential demand response resource in the industrial sector across the U.S. This tool houses statistical values of energy and demand response (DR) potential by industrial plant and geospatially locates the information for aggregation for different territories without proprietary information. This report will discuss this framework and the analyzed quantities of demand response for Western Interconnect (WI) in support of evaluation of the cost production modeling with power grid modeling efforts of demand response.

  9. A Bayesian Machine Learning Model for Estimating Building Occupancy from Open Source Data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stewart, Robert N.; Urban, Marie L.; Duchscherer, Samantha E.; Kaufman, Jason; Morton, April M.; Thakur, Gautam; Piburn, Jesse; Moehl, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Understanding building occupancy is critical to a wide array of applications including natural hazards loss analysis, green building technologies, and population distribution modeling. Due to the expense of directly monitoring buildings, scientists rely in addition on a wide and disparate array of ancillary and open source information including subject matter expertise, survey data, and remote sensing information. These data are fused using data harmonization methods which refer to a loose collection of formal and informal techniques for fusing data together to create viable content for building occupancy estimation. In this paper, we add to the current state of the artmore » by introducing the Population Data Tables (PDT), a Bayesian based informatics system for systematically arranging data and harmonization techniques into a consistent, transparent, knowledge learning framework that retains in the final estimation uncertainty emerging from data, expert judgment, and model parameterization. PDT probabilistically estimates ambient occupancy in units of people/1000ft2 for over 50 building types at the national and sub-national level with the goal of providing global coverage. The challenge of global coverage led to the development of an interdisciplinary geospatial informatics system tool that provides the framework for capturing, storing, and managing open source data, handling subject matter expertise, carrying out Bayesian analytics as well as visualizing and exporting occupancy estimation results. We present the PDT project, situate the work within the larger community, and report on the progress of this multi-year project.Understanding building occupancy is critical to a wide array of applications including natural hazards loss analysis, green building technologies, and population distribution modeling. Due to the expense of directly monitoring buildings, scientists rely in addition on a wide and disparate array of ancillary and open source information including subject matter expertise, survey data, and remote sensing information. These data are fused using data harmonization methods which refer to a loose collection of formal and informal techniques for fusing data together to create viable content for building occupancy estimation. In this paper, we add to the current state of the art by introducing the Population Data Tables (PDT), a Bayesian model and informatics system for systematically arranging data and harmonization techniques into a consistent, transparent, knowledge learning framework that retains in the final estimation uncertainty emerging from data, expert judgment, and model parameterization. PDT probabilistically estimates ambient occupancy in units of people/1000 ft2 for over 50 building types at the national and sub-national level with the goal of providing global coverage. The challenge of global coverage led to the development of an interdisciplinary geospatial informatics system tool that provides the framework for capturing, storing, and managing open source data, handling subject matter expertise, carrying out Bayesian analytics as well as visualizing and exporting occupancy estimation results. We present the PDT project, situate the work within the larger community, and report on the progress of this multi-year project.« less

  10. Expansion and Enhacement of the Wyoming Coalbed Methane Clearinghouse Website to the Wyoming Energy Resources Information Clearinghouse.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulme, Diana; Hamerlinck, Jeffrey; Bergman, Harold; Oakleaf, Jim

    2010-03-26

    Energy development is expanding across the United States, particularly in western states like Wyoming. Federal and state land management agencies, local governments, industry and non-governmental organizations have realized the need to access spatially-referenced data and other non-spatial information to determine the geographical extent and cumulative impacts of expanding energy development. The Wyoming Energy Resources Information Clearinghouse (WERIC) is a web-based portal which centralizes access to news, data, maps, reports and other information related to the development, management and conservation of Wyoming??s diverse energy resources. WERIC was established in 2006 by the University of Wyoming??s Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources (ENR) and the Wyoming Geographic Information Science Center (WyGISC) with funding from the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The WERIC web portal originated in concept from a more specifically focused website, the Coalbed Methane (CBM) Clearinghouse. The CBM Clearinghouse effort focused only on coalbed methane production within the Powder River Basin of northeast Wyoming. The CBM Clearinghouse demonstrated a need to expand the effort statewide with a comprehensive energy focus, including fossil fuels and renewable and alternative energy resources produced and/or developed in Wyoming. WERIC serves spatial data to the greater Wyoming geospatial community through the Wyoming GeoLibrary, the WyGISC Data Server and the Wyoming Energy Map. These applications are critical components that support the Wyoming Energy Resources Information Clearinghouse (WERIC). The Wyoming GeoLibrary is a tool for searching and browsing a central repository for metadata. It provides the ability to publish and maintain metadata and geospatial data in a distributed environment. The WyGISC Data Server is an internet mapping application that provides traditional GIS mapping and analysis functionality via the web. It is linked into various state and federal agency spatial data servers allowing users to visualize multiple themes, such as well locations and core sage grouse areas, in one domain. Additionally, this application gives users the ability to download any of the data being displayed within the web map. The Wyoming Energy Map is the newest mapping application developed directly from this effort. With over a 100 different layers accessible via this mapping application, it is the most comprehensive Wyoming energy mapping application available. This application also provides the public with the ability to create cultural and wildlife reports based on any location throughout Wyoming and at multiple scales. The WERIC website also allows users to access links to federal, state, and local natural resource agency websites and map servers; research documents about energy; and educational information, including information on upcoming energy-relate conferences. The WERIC website has seen significant use by energy industry consultants, land management agencies, state and local decision-makers, non-governmental organizations and the public. Continued service to these sectors is desirable but some challenges remain in keeping the WERIC site viable. The most pressing issue is finding the human and financial resources to keep the site continually updated. Initially, the concept included offering users the ability to maintain the site themselves; however, this has proven not to be a viable option since very few people contributed. Without user contributions, the web page relied on already committed university staff to publish and link to the appropriate documents and web-pages. An option that is currently being explored to address this issue is development of a partnership with the University of Wyoming, School of Energy Resources (SER). As part of their outreach program, SER may be able to contribute funding for a full-time position dedicated to maintenance of WERIC.

  11. Developing custom fire behavior fuel models from ecologically complex fuel structures for upper Atlantic Coastal Plain forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parresol, Bernard, R.; Scott, Joe, H.; Andreu, Anne; Prichard, Susan; Kurth, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    Currently geospatial fire behavior analyses are performed with an array of fire behavior modeling systems such as FARSITE, FlamMap, and the Large Fire Simulation System. These systems currently require standard or customized surface fire behavior fuel models as inputs that are often assigned through remote sensing information. The ability to handle hundreds or thousands of measured surface fuelbeds representing the fine scale variation in fire behavior on the landscape is constrained in terms of creating compatible custom fire behavior fuel models. In this study, we demonstrate an objective method for taking ecologically complex fuelbeds from inventory observations and converting those into a set of custom fuel models that can be mapped to the original landscape. We use an original set of 629 fuel inventory plots measured on an 80,000 ha contiguous landscape in the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern United States. From models linking stand conditions to component fuel loads, we impute fuelbeds for over 6000 stands. These imputed fuelbeds were then converted to fire behavior parameters under extreme fuel moisture and wind conditions (97th percentile) using the fuel characteristic classification system (FCCS) to estimate surface fire rate of spread, surface fire flame length, shrub layer reaction intensity (heat load), non-woody layer reaction intensity, woody layer reaction intensity, and litter-lichen-moss layer reaction intensity. We performed hierarchical cluster analysis of the stands based on the values of the fire behavior parameters. The resulting 7 clusters were the basis for the development of 7 custom fire behavior fuel models from the cluster centroids that were calibrated against the FCCS point data for wind and fuel moisture. The latter process resulted in calibration against flame length as it was difficult to obtain a simultaneous calibration against both rate of spread and flame length. The clusters based on FCCS fire behavior parameters represent reasonably identifiable stand conditions, being: (1) pine dominated stands with more litter and down woody debriscomponents than other stands, (2) hardwood and pine stands with no shrubs, (3) hardwood dominated stands with low shrub and high non-woody biomass and high down woody debris, (4) stands with high grass and forb (i.e., non-woody) biomass as well as substantial shrub biomass, (5) stands with both high shrub and litter biomass, (6) pine-mixed hardwood stands with moderate litter biomass and low shrub biomass, and (7) baldcypress-tupelo stands. Models representing these stand clusters generated flame lengths from 0.6 to 2.3 musing a 30 km h{sub 1} wind speed and fireline intensities of 100-1500 kW m{sub 1} that are typical within the range of experience on this landscape. The fuel models ranked 1 < 2 < 7 < 5 < 4 < 3 < 6 in terms of both flame length and fireline intensity. The method allows for ecologically complex data to be utilized in order to create a landscape representative of measured fuel conditions and to create models that interface with geospatial fire models.

  12. A Bayesian Machine Learning Model for Estimating Building Occupancy from Open Source Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Robert N.; Urban, Marie L.; Duchscherer, Samantha E.; Kaufman, Jason; Morton, April M.; Thakur, Gautam; Piburn, Jesse; Moehl, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Understanding building occupancy is critical to a wide array of applications including natural hazards loss analysis, green building technologies, and population distribution modeling. Due to the expense of directly monitoring buildings, scientists rely in addition on a wide and disparate array of ancillary and open source information including subject matter expertise, survey data, and remote sensing information. These data are fused using data harmonization methods which refer to a loose collection of formal and informal techniques for fusing data together to create viable content for building occupancy estimation. In this paper, we add to the current state of the art by introducing the Population Data Tables (PDT), a Bayesian based informatics system for systematically arranging data and harmonization techniques into a consistent, transparent, knowledge learning framework that retains in the final estimation uncertainty emerging from data, expert judgment, and model parameterization. PDT probabilistically estimates ambient occupancy in units of people/1000ft2 for over 50 building types at the national and sub-national level with the goal of providing global coverage. The challenge of global coverage led to the development of an interdisciplinary geospatial informatics system tool that provides the framework for capturing, storing, and managing open source data, handling subject matter expertise, carrying out Bayesian analytics as well as visualizing and exporting occupancy estimation results. We present the PDT project, situate the work within the larger community, and report on the progress of this multi-year project.Understanding building occupancy is critical to a wide array of applications including natural hazards loss analysis, green building technologies, and population distribution modeling. Due to the expense of directly monitoring buildings, scientists rely in addition on a wide and disparate array of ancillary and open source information including subject matter expertise, survey data, and remote sensing information. These data are fused using data harmonization methods which refer to a loose collection of formal and informal techniques for fusing data together to create viable content for building occupancy estimation. In this paper, we add to the current state of the art by introducing the Population Data Tables (PDT), a Bayesian model and informatics system for systematically arranging data and harmonization techniques into a consistent, transparent, knowledge learning framework that retains in the final estimation uncertainty emerging from data, expert judgment, and model parameterization. PDT probabilistically estimates ambient occupancy in units of people/1000 ft2 for over 50 building types at the national and sub-national level with the goal of providing global coverage. The challenge of global coverage led to the development of an interdisciplinary geospatial informatics system tool that provides the framework for capturing, storing, and managing open source data, handling subject matter expertise, carrying out Bayesian analytics as well as visualizing and exporting occupancy estimation results. We present the PDT project, situate the work within the larger community, and report on the progress of this multi-year project.

  13. Final report : PATTON Alliance gazetteer evaluation project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bleakly, Denise Rae

    2007-08-01

    In 2005 the National Ground Intelligence Center (NGIC) proposed that the PATTON Alliance provide assistance in evaluating and obtaining the Integrated Gazetteer Database (IGDB), developed for the Naval Space Warfare Command Research group (SPAWAR) under Advance Research and Development Activity (ARDA) funds by MITRE Inc., fielded to the text-based search tool GeoLocator, currently in use by NGIC. We met with the developers of GeoLocator and identified their requirements for a better gazetteer. We then validated those requirements by reviewing the technical literature, meeting with other members of the intelligence community (IC), and talking with both the United States Geologic Survey (USGS) and the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency (NGA), the authoritative sources for official geographic name information. We thus identified 12 high-level requirements from users and the broader intelligence community. The IGDB satisfies many of these requirements. We identified gaps and proposed ways of closing these gaps. Three important needs have not been addressed but are critical future needs for the broader intelligence community. These needs include standardization of gazetteer data, a web feature service for gazetteer information that is maintained by NGA and USGS but accessible to users, and a common forum that brings together IC stakeholders and federal agency representatives to provide input to these activities over the next several years. Establishing a robust gazetteer web feature service that is available to all IC users may go a long way toward resolving the gazetteer needs within the IC. Without a common forum to provide input and feedback, community adoption may take significantly longer than anticipated with resulting risks to the war fighter.

  14. The ORNL Basemapping and Imagery Project: Data collection, processing and dissemination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuttle, M.; Pace, P.

    1996-04-01

    Over the past three years, the GIS and Computer Modeling (GCM) Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), has been engaged in creating a very comprehensive geospatial data base for Department of Energy (DOE) installations managed by the DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO). This effort encompasses topographic, planimetric, land use/land cover, flood plain, digital elevation, and digital imagery data for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and surrounding areas. The ORR covers approximately 34,800 acres and includes ORNL, the K-25 Site and the Y-12 Plant. The geographic extent of the Base Mapping and Imagery Project covers the ORR and surrounding area and two other DOE plants (Portsmouth, Ohio and Paducah, Kentucky) for a total of 166,000 acres. The resulting data represent a major improvement in the spatial accuracy and currency of data which are used as a foundation for environmental restoration, facility studies, and other GIS data applications. A GIS data server was also created in order to store and disseminate the new basemapping data. This paper describes the history of the Base Mapping and Imagery Project with emphasis on the logistical aspects of data quality assessment. data tracking, and data product work flow for a large comprehensive spatial data base. The paper then describes the evolution of the GIS data server including its design from an FTP server to a NetScape-based World Wide Web interface. This combination of data and data access provides the ORR environmental community with a carefully configured and managed GIS dataset.

  15. Estimating contact rates at a mass gathering by using video analysis: a proof-of-concept project

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rainey, Jeanette J.; Cheriyadat, Anil; Radke, Richard J.; Crumly, Julie; Koch, Daniel B.

    2014-10-24

    Current approaches for estimating social mixing patterns and infectious disease transmission at mass gatherings have been limited by various constraints, including low participation rates for volunteer-based research projects and challenges in quantifying spatially and temporally accurate person-to-person interactions. We developed a proof-of-concept project to assess the use of automated video analysis for estimating contact rates of attendees of the GameFest 2013 event at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in Troy, New York. Video tracking and analysis algorithms were used to estimate the number and duration of contacts for 5 attendees during a 3-minute clip from the RPI video. Attendees were consideredmore » to have a contact event if the distance between them and another person was ≤1 meter. Contact duration was estimated in seconds. We also simulated 50 attendees assuming random mixing using a geospatially accurate representation of the same GameFest location. The 5 attendees had an overall median of 2 contact events during the 3-minute video clip (range: 0 6). Contact events varied from less than 5 seconds to the full duration of the 3- minute clip. The random mixing simulation was visualized and presented as a contrasting example. We were able to estimate the number and duration of contacts for five GameFest attendees from a 3-minute video clip that can be compared to a random mixing simulation model at the same location. In conclusion, the next phase will involve scaling the system for simultaneous analysis of mixing patterns from hours-long videos and comparing our results with other approaches for collecting contact data from mass gathering attendees.« less

  16. Active Management of Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Buscheck, Thomas A.

    The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. Based on a range of well schemes, techno-economic analyses of the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) are conducted to determine the economic benefits of integrating GCS with geothermal energy production. In addition to considering CO2 injection, reservoir analyses are conducted for nitrogen (N2) injection to investigate the potential benefits of incorporating N2 injection with integrated geothermal-GCS, as well as the use of N2 injection as a potential pressure-support and working-fluid option. Phase 1 includes preliminary environmental risk assessments of integrated geothermal-GCS, with the focus on managing reservoir overpressure. Phase 1 also includes an economic survey of pipeline costs, which will be applied in Phase 2 to the analysis of CO2 conveyance costs for techno-economics analyses of integrated geothermal-GCS reservoir sites. Phase 1 also includes a geospatial GIS survey of potential integrated geothermal-GCS reservoir sites, which will be used in Phase 2 to conduct sweet-spot analyses that determine where promising geothermal resources are co-located in sedimentary settings conducive to safe CO2 storage, as well as being in adequate proximity to large stationary CO2 sources.

  17. Active Management of Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Buscheck, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. Based on a range of well schemes, techno-economic analyses of the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) are conducted to determine the economic benefits of integrating GCS with geothermal energy production. In addition to considering CO2 injection, reservoir analyses are conducted for nitrogen (N2) injection to investigate the potential benefits of incorporating N2 injection with integrated geothermal-GCS, as well as the use of N2 injection as a potential pressure-support and working-fluid option. Phase 1 includes preliminary environmental risk assessments of integrated geothermal-GCS, with the focus on managing reservoir overpressure. Phase 1 also includes an economic survey of pipeline costs, which will be applied in Phase 2 to the analysis of CO2 conveyance costs for techno-economics analyses of integrated geothermal-GCS reservoir sites. Phase 1 also includes a geospatial GIS survey of potential integrated geothermal-GCS reservoir sites, which will be used in Phase 2 to conduct sweet-spot analyses that determine where promising geothermal resources are co-located in sedimentary settings conducive to safe CO2 storage, as well as being in adequate proximity to large stationary CO2 sources.

  18. Feasibility Study for Photovoltaics, Wind, solar Hot Water and Hybrid Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooks, Ronald; Montoya, Valerie

    2008-03-26

    Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI) located in Albuquerque New Mexico is a community college that serves American Indians and Alaska Natives. SIPIs student body represents over 100 Native American Tribes. SIPI completed a renewable energy feasibility study program and established renewable energy hardware on the SIPI campus, which supplements and creates an educational resource to teach renewable energy courses. The SIPI campus is located, and has as student origins, areas, in which power is an issue in remote reservations. The following hardware was installed and integrated into the campus facilities: small wind turbine, large photovoltaic array that is grid-connected, two photovoltaic arrays, one thin film type, and one polycrystalline type, one dual-axis active tracker and one passive tracker, a hot air system for heating a small building, a portable hybrid photovoltaic system for remote power, and a hot water system to preheat water used in the SIPI Child Care facility. Educational curriculum has been developed for two renewable energy courses one being the study of energy production and use, and especially the roles renewable energy forms like solar, wind, geothermal, hydro, and biomass plays, and the second course being a more advanced in-depth study of renewable energy system design, maintenance, installation, and applications. Both courses rely heavily on experiential learning techniques so that installed renewable energy hardware is continuously utilized in hand-on laboratory activities and are part of the Electronics program of studies. Renewable energy technologies and science has also been included in other SIPI programs of study such as Environmental Science, Natural Resources, Agriculture, Engineering, Network Management, and Geospatial Technology.

  19. An Ontology Design Pattern for Surface Water Features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinha, Gaurav; Mark, David; Kolas, Dave; Varanka, Dalia; Romero, Boleslo E; Feng, Chen-Chieh; Usery, Lynn; Liebermann, Joshua; Sorokine, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities can be found due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology. It can then be used to systematically incor-porate concepts that are specific to a culture, language, or scientific domain. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this on-tology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is imple-mented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. A discussion about why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, es-pecially the previously developed Surface Network pattern is also provided. Fi-nally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through a few queries and annotated geospatial datasets.

  20. Toward an ontology framework supporting the integration of geographic information with modeling and simulation for critical infrastructure protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ambrosiano, John J; Bent, Russell W; Linger, Steve P

    2009-01-01

    Protecting the nation's infrastructure from natural disasters, inadvertent failures, or intentional attacks is a major national security concern. Gauging the fragility of infrastructure assets, and understanding how interdependencies across critical infrastructures affect their behavior, is essential to predicting and mitigating cascading failures, as well as to planning for response and recovery. Modeling and simulation (M&S) is an indispensable part of characterizing this complex system of systems and anticipating its response to disruptions. Bringing together the necessary components to perform such analyses produces a wide-ranging and coarse-grained computational workflow that must be integrated with other analysis workflow elements. There are many points in both types of work flows in which geographic information (GI) services are required. The GIS community recognizes the essential contribution of GI in this problem domain as evidenced by past OGC initiatives. Typically such initiatives focus on the broader aspects of GI analysis workflows, leaving concepts crucial to integrating simulations within analysis workflows to that community. Our experience with large-scale modeling of interdependent critical infrastructures, and our recent participation in a DRS initiative concerning interoperability for this M&S domain, has led to high-level ontological concepts that we have begun to assemble into an architecture that spans both computational and 'world' views of the problem, and further recognizes the special requirements of simulations that go beyond common workflow ontologies. In this paper we present these ideas, and offer a high-level ontological framework that includes key geospatial concepts as special cases of a broader view.

  1. Design and application of a mobile ground-based observatory for continuous measurements of atmospheric trace gas and criteria pollutant species

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bush, S. E.; Hopkins, F. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Lai, C.-T.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2015-08-26

    Ground-based measurements of atmospheric trace gas species and criteria pollutants are essential for understanding emissions dynamics across space and time. Gas composition in the lower 50 m of the atmosphere has the greatest direct impacts on human health as well as ecosystem processes; hence data at this level are necessary for addressing carbon-cycle- and public-health-related questions. However, such surface data are generally associated with stationary measurement towers, where spatial representation is limited due to the high cost of establishing and maintaining an extensive network of measurement stations. We describe here a compact mobile laboratory equipped to provide high-precision, high-frequency, continuous,more » on-road synchronous measurements of CO2, CO, CH4, H2O, NOx, O3, aerosol, meteorological, and geospatial position data. The mobile laboratory has been deployed across the western USA. In addition to describing the vehicle and its capacity, we present data that illustrate the use of the laboratory as a powerful tool for investigating the spatial structure of urban trace gas emissions and criteria pollutants at spatial scales ranging from single streets to whole ecosystem and regional scales. We assess the magnitude of known point sources of CH4 and also identify fugitive urban CH4 emissions. We illustrate how such a mobile laboratory can be used to better understand emissions dynamics and quantify emissions ratios associated with trace gas emissions from wildfire incidents. Lastly, we discuss additional mobile laboratory applications in health and urban metabolism.« less

  2. TH-C-BRD-06: A Novel MRI Based CT Artifact Correction Method for Improving Proton Range Calculation in the Presence of Severe CT Artifacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, P; Schreibmann, E; Fox, T; Roper, J; Elder, E; Tejani, M; Crocker, I; Curran, W; Dhabaan, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Severe CT artifacts can impair our ability to accurately calculate proton range thereby resulting in a clinically unacceptable treatment plan. In this work, we investigated a novel CT artifact correction method based on a coregistered MRI and investigated its ability to estimate CT HU and proton range in the presence of severe CT artifacts. Methods: The proposed method corrects corrupted CT data using a coregistered MRI to guide the mapping of CT values from a nearby artifact-free region. First patient MRI and CT images were registered using 3D deformable image registration software based on B-spline and mutual information. The CT slice with severe artifacts was selected as well as a nearby slice free of artifacts (e.g. 1cm away from the artifact). The two sets of paired MRI and CT images at different slice locations were further registered by applying 2D deformable image registration. Based on the artifact free paired MRI and CT images, a comprehensive geospatial analysis was performed to predict the correct CT HU of the CT image with severe artifact. For a proof of concept, a known artifact was introduced that changed the ground truth CT HU value up to 30% and up to 5cm error in proton range. The ability of the proposed method to recover the ground truth was quantified using a selected head and neck case. Results: A significant improvement in image quality was observed visually. Our proof of concept study showed that 90% of area that had 30% errors in CT HU was corrected to 3% of its ground truth value. Furthermore, the maximum proton range error up to 5cm was reduced to 4mm error. Conclusion: MRI based CT artifact correction method can improve CT image quality and proton range calculation for patients with severe CT artifacts.

  3. Comparing large scale CCS deployment potential in the USA and China: a detailed analysis based on country-specific CO2 transport & storage cost curves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahowski, Robert T.; Davidson, Casie L.; Dooley, James J.

    2011-04-18

    The United States and China are the two largest emitters of greenhouse gases in the world and their projected continued growth and reliance on fossil fuels, especially coal, make them strong candidates for CCS. Previous work has revealed that both nations have over 1600 large electric utility and other industrial point CO2 sources as well as very large CO2 storage resources on the order of 2,000 billion metric tons (Gt) of onshore storage capacity. In each case, the vast majority of this capacity is found in deep saline formations. In both the USA and China, candidate storage reservoirs are likely to be accessible by most sources with over 80% of these large industrial CO2 sources having a CO2 storage option within just 80 km. This suggests a strong potential for CCS deployment as a meaningful option to efforts to reduce CO2 emissions from these large, vibrant economies. However, while the USA and China possess many similarities with regards to the potential value that CCS might provide, including the range of costs at which CCS may be available to most large CO2 sources in each nation, there are a number of more subtle differences that may help us to understand the ways in which CCS deployment may differ between these two countries in order for the USA and China to work together - and in step with the rest of the world - to most efficiently reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This paper details the first ever analysis of CCS deployment costs in these two countries based on methodologically comparable CO2 source and sink inventories, economic analysis, geospatial source-sink matching and cost curve modeling. This type of analysis provides a valuable insight into the degree to which early and sustained opportunities for climate change mitigation via commercial-scale CCS are available to the two countries, and could facilitate greater collaboration in areas where those opportunities overlap.

  4. An Integrated Modeling and Data Management Strategy for Cellulosic Biomass Production Decisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David J. Muth Jr.; K. Mark Bryden; Joshua B. Koch

    2012-07-01

    Emerging cellulosic bioenergy markets can provide land managers with additional options for crop production decisions. Integrating dedicated bioenergy crops such as perennial grasses and short rotation woody species within the agricultural landscape can have positive impacts on several environmental processes including increased soil organic matter in degraded soils, reduced sediment loading in watersheds, lower green house gas (GHG) fluxes, and reduced nutrient loading in watersheds. Implementing this type of diverse bioenergy production system in a way that maximizes potential environmental benefits requires a dynamic integrated modeling and data management strategy. This paper presents a strategy for designing diverse bioenergy cropping systems within the existing row crop production landscape in the midwestern United States. The integrated model developed quantifies a wide range environmental processes including soil erosion from wind and water, soil organic matter changes, and soil GHG fluxes within a geospatial data management framework. This framework assembles and formats information from multiple spatial and temporal scales. The data assembled includes yield and productivity data from harvesting equipment at the 1m scale, surface topography data from LiDAR mapping at the less than 1m scale, soil data from US soil survey databases at the 10m to 100m scale, and climate data at the county scale. These models and data tools are assembled into an integrated computational environment that is used to determine sustainable removal rates for agricultural residues for bioenergy production at the sub-field scale under a wide range of land management practices. Using this integrated model, innovative management practices including cover cropping are then introduced and evaluated for their impact on bioenergy production and important environmental processes. The impacts of introducing dedicated energy crops onto high-risk landscape positions currently being manage in row crop production are also investigated.

  5. Emission assessment at the Burj Hammoud inactive municipal landfill: Viability of landfill gas recovery under the clean development mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Fadel, Mutasem; Abi-Esber, Layale; Salhab, Samer

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LFG emissions are measured at an abandoned landfill with highly organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mean headspace and vent emissions are 0.240 and 0.074 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At sites with high food waste content, LFG generation drops rapidly after site closure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The viability of LFG recovery for CDMs in developing countries is doubtful. - Abstract: This paper examines landfill gas (LFG) emissions at a large inactive waste disposal site to evaluate the viability of investment in LFG recovery through the clean development mechanism (CDM) initiative. For this purpose, field measurements of LFG emissions were conducted and the data were processed by geospatial interpolation to estimate an equivalent site emission rate which was used to calibrate and apply two LFG prediction models to forecast LFG emissions at the site. The mean CH{sub 4} flux values calculated through tessellation, inverse distance weighing and kriging were 0.188 {+-} 0.014, 0.224 {+-} 0.012 and 0.237 {+-} 0.008 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively, compared to an arithmetic mean of 0.24 l/m{sup 2} hr. The flux values are within the reported range for closed landfills (0.06-0.89 l/m{sup 2} hr), and lower than the reported range for active landfills (0.42-2.46 l/m{sup 2} hr). Simulation results matched field measurements for low methane generation potential (L{sub 0}) values in the range of 19.8-102.6 m{sup 3}/ton of waste. LFG generation dropped rapidly to half its peak level only 4 yrs after landfill closure limiting the sustainability of LFG recovery systems in similar contexts and raising into doubt promoted CDM initiatives for similar waste.

  6. Coastal Ohio Wind Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorsevski, Peter; Afjeh, Abdollah; Jamali, Mohsin; Bingman, Verner

    2014-04-04

    The Coastal Ohio Wind Project intends to address problems that impede deployment of wind turbines in the coastal and offshore regions of Northern Ohio. The project evaluates different wind turbine designs and the potential impact of offshore turbines on migratory and resident birds by developing multidisciplinary research, which involves wildlife biology, electrical and mechanical engineering, and geospatial science. Firstly, the project conducts cost and performance studies of two- and three-blade wind turbines using a turbine design suited for the Great Lakes. The numerical studies comprised an analysis and evaluation of the annual energy production of two- and three-blade wind turbines to determine the levelized cost of energy. This task also involved wind tunnel studies of model wind turbines to quantify the wake flow field of upwind and downwind wind turbine-tower arrangements. The experimental work included a study of a scaled model of an offshore wind turbine platform in a water tunnel. The levelized cost of energy work consisted of the development and application of a cost model to predict the cost of energy produced by a wind turbine system placed offshore. The analysis found that a floating two-blade wind turbine presents the most cost effective alternative for the Great Lakes. The load effects studies showed that the two-blade wind turbine model experiences less torque under all IEC Standard design load cases considered. Other load effects did not show this trend and depending on the design load cases, the two-bladed wind turbine showed higher or lower load effects. The experimental studies of the wake were conducted using smoke flow visualization and hot wire anemometry. Flow visualization studies showed that in the downwind turbine configuration the wake flow was insensitive to the presence of the blade and was very similar to that of the tower alone. On the other hand, in the upwind turbine configuration, increasing the rotor blade angle of attack reduced the wake size and enhanced the vortices in the flow downstream of the turbine-tower compared with the tower alone case. Mean and rms velocity distributions from hot wire anemometer data confirmed that in a downwind configuration, the wake of the tower dominates the flow, thus the flow fields of a tower alone and tower-turbine combinations are nearly the same. For the upwind configuration, the mean velocity shows a narrowing of the wake compared with the tower alone case. The downwind configuration wake persisted longer than that of an upwind configuration; however, it was not possible to quantify this difference because of the size limitation of the wind tunnel downstream of the test section. The water tunnel studies demonstrated that the scale model studies could be used to adequately produce accurate motions to model the motions of a wind turbine platform subject to large waves. It was found that the important factors that affect the platform is whether the platform is submerged or surface piercing. In the former, the loads on the platform will be relatively reduced whereas in the latter case, the structure pierces the wave free surface and gains stiffness and stability. The other important element that affects the movement of the platform is depth of the sea in which the wind turbine will be installed. Furthermore, the wildlife biology component evaluated migratory patterns by different monitoring systems consisting of marine radar, thermal IR camera and acoustic recorders. The types of radar used in the project are weather surveillance radar and marine radar. The weather surveillance radar (1988 Doppler), also known as Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD), provides a network of weather stations in the US. Data generated from this network were used to understand general migratory patterns, migratory stopover habitats, and other patterns caused by the effects of weather conditions. At a local scale our marine radar was used to complement the datasets from NEXRAD and to collect additional monitoring parameters such as passage rates, flight paths, flight directions, and flight altitudes of nocturnal migrating species. Our work focused on the design and development of custom built marine radar that used t-bar and parabolic dish antennas. The marine radar used in the project was Furuno (XANK250) which was coupled with a XIR3000B digitizing card from Russell Technologies for collection of the radar data. The radar data was processed by open source radR processing software using different computational techniques and methods. Additional data from thermal IR imaging cameras were collected to detect heat emitted from objects and provide information on movements of birds and bats, data which we used for different animal flight behavior analysis. Lastly, the data from the acoustic recorders were used to provide the number of bird calls for assessing patterns and peak passage rates during migration. The development of the geospatial database included collection of different data sources that are used to support offshore wind turbine development. Many different data sets were collected and organized using initial version of web-based repository software tools that can accommodate distribution of rectified pertinent data sets such as the lake depth, lake bottom engineering parameters, extent of ice, navigation pathways, wind speed, important bird habitats, fish efforts and other layers that are relevant for supporting robust offshore wind turbine developments. Additional geospatial products developed during the project included few different prototypes for offshore wind farm suitability which can involve different stakeholders and participants for solving complex planning problems and building consensus. Some of the prototypes include spatial decision support system (SDSS) for collaborative decision making, a web-based Participatory Geographic Information System (PGIS) framework for evaluating importance of different decision alternatives using different evaluation criteria, and an Android application for collection of field data using mobile and tablet devices . In summary, the simulations of two- and three-blade wind turbines suggested that two-bladed machines could produce comparable annual energy as the three-blade wind turbines but have a lighter tower top weight, which leads to lower cost of energy. In addition, the two-blade rotor configuration potentially costs 20% less than a three blade configuration that produces the same power at the same site. The cost model analysis predicted a potential cost savings of approximately 15% for offshore two-blade wind turbines. The foundation design for a wind turbine in Lake Erie is likely to be driven by ice loads based on the currently available ice data and ice mechanics models. Hence, for Lake Eire, the cost savings will be somewhat smaller than the other lakes in the Great Lakes. Considering the size of cranes and vessels currently available in the Great Lakes, the cost optimal wind turbine size should be 3 MW, not larger. The surveillance data from different monitoring systems suggested that bird and bat passage rates per hour were comparable during heavy migrations in both spring and fall seasons while passage rates were significantly correlated to wind directions and wind speeds. The altitude of migration was higher during heavy migrations and higher over water relative to over land. Notable portions of migration on some spring nights occurred parallel the shoreline, often moving perpendicular to southern winds. The birds approaching the Western basin have a higher propensity to cross than birds approaching the Central basin of Lake Erie and as such offshore turbine development might be a better option further east towards Cleveland than in the Western basin. The high stopover density was more strongly associated with migration volume the following night rather than the preceding night. The processed mean scalar wind speeds with temporal resolutions as fine as 10-minute intervals near turbine height showed that August is the month with the weakest winds while December is the month, which typically has the strongest winds. The ice data suggests that shallow western basin of Lake Erie has higher ice cover duration many times exceeding 90 days during some winters.

  7. Crowdsourcing, citizen sensing and Sensor Web technologies for public and environmental health surveillance and crisis management: trends, OGC standards and application examples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamel Boulos, Maged; Resch, Bernd; Crowley, David N.; Breslin, John G.; Sohn, Gunho; Burtner, Edwin R.; Pike, William A.; Jeziersk, Eduardo; Slayer Chuang, Kuo Yu

    2011-12-21

    The PIE Activity Awareness Environment is designed to be an adaptive data triage and decision support tool that allows role and activity based situation awareness through a dynamic, trainable filtering system. This paper discusses the process and methodology involved in the application as well as some of its capabilities. 'Wikification of GIS by the masses' is a phrase-term first coined by Kamel Boulos in 2005, two years earlier than Goodchild's term 'Volunteered Geographic Information'. Six years later (2005-2011), OpenStreetMap and Google Earth (GE) are now full-fledged, crowdsourced 'Wikipedias of the Earth' par excellence, with millions of users contributing their own layers to GE, attaching photos, videos, notes and even 3-D (three dimensional) models to locations in GE. From using Twitter in participatory sensing and bicycle-mounted sensors in pervasive environmental sensing, to creating a 100,000-sensor geo-mashup using Semantic Web technology, to the 3-D visualisation of indoor and outdoor surveillance data in real-time and the development of next-generation, collaborative natural user interfaces that will power the spatially-enabled public health and emergency situation rooms of the future, where sensor data and citizen reports can be triaged and acted upon in real-time by distributed teams of professionals, this paper offers a comprehensive state-of-the-art review of the overlapping domains of the Sensor Web, citizen sensing and 'human-in-the-loop sensing' in the era of the Mobile and Social Web, and the roles these domains can play in environmental and public health surveillance and crisis/disaster informatics. We provide an in-depth review of the key issues and trends in these areas, the challenges faced when reasoning and making decisions with real-time crowdsourced data (such as issues of information overload, 'noise', misinformation, bias and trust), the core technologies and Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards involved (Sensor Web Enablement and Open GeoSMS), as well as a few outstanding project implementation examples from around the world.

  8. Identifying and Mitigating Potential Nutrient and Sediment Hot Spots under a Future Scenario in the Missouri River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, May; Zhang, Zhonglong

    2015-09-01

    Using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) for large-scale watershed modeling could be useful for evaluating the quality of the water in regions that are dominated by nonpoint sources in order to identify potential “hot spots” for which mitigating strategies could be further developed. An analysis of water quality under future scenarios in which changes in land use would be made to accommodate increased biofuel production was developed for the Missouri River Basin (MoRB) based on a SWAT model application. The analysis covered major agricultural crops and biofuel feedstock in the MoRB, including pasture land, hay, corn, soybeans, wheat, and switchgrass. The analysis examined, at multiple temporal and spatial scales, how nitrate, organic nitrogen, and total nitrogen; phosphorus, organic phosphorus, inorganic phosphorus, and total phosphorus; suspended sediments; and water flow (water yield) would respond to the shifts in land use that would occur under proposed future scenarios. The analysis was conducted at three geospatial scales: (1) large tributary basin scale (two: Upper MoRB and Lower MoRB); (2) regional watershed scale (seven: Upper Missouri River, Middle Missouri River, Middle Lower Missouri River, Lower Missouri River, Yellowstone River, Platte River, and Kansas River); and (3) eight-digit hydrologic unit (HUC-8) subbasin scale (307 subbasins). Results showed that subbasin-level variations were substantial. Nitrogen loadings decreased across the entire Upper MoRB, and they increased in several subbasins in the Lower MoRB. Most nitrate reductions occurred in lateral flow. Also at the subbasin level, phosphorus in organic, sediment, and soluble forms was reduced by 35%, 45%, and 65%, respectively. Suspended sediments increased in 68% of the subbasins. The water yield decreased in 62% of the subbasins. In the Kansas River watershed, the water quality improved significantly with regard to every nitrogen and phosphorus compound. The improvement was clearly attributable to the conversion of a large amount of land to switchgrass. The Middle Lower Missouri River and Lower Missouri River were identified as hot regions. Further analysis identified four subbasins (10240002, 10230007, 10290402, and 10300200) as being the most vulnerable in terms of sediment, nitrogen, and phosphorus loadings. Overall, results suggest that increasing the amount of switchgrass acreage in the hot spots should be considered to mitigate the nutrient loads. The study provides an analytical method to support stakeholders in making informed decisions that balance biofuel production and water sustainability.

  9. Towards Sustainable Watershed Dvelopment: A Geographic Information Systems based Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2006-01-01

    With an unprecedented projection of population and urban growth in the coming decades, assessment of the long-term hydrologic impacts of land use change is crucial for optimizing management practices to control runoff and non-point source (NPS) pollution associated with sustainable watershed development. Land use change, dominated by an increase in urban/impervious areas, can have a significant impact on water resources. Non-point source (NPS) pollution is the leading cause of degraded water quality in the US and urban areas are an important source of NPS pollution. Most planners, government agencies, and consultants lack access to simple impact-assessment tools despite widespread concern over the environmental impacts of watershed development. Before investing in complex analyses and customized data collection, it is often useful to utilize simple screening analyses using data that are already available. In this paper, we discuss such a technique for long-term hydrologic impact assessment (L-THIA) that makes use of basic land use, soils and long-term rainfall data to compare the hydrologic impacts of past, present and any future land use change. Long-term daily rainfall records are used in combination with soils and land use information to calculate average annual runoff and NPS pollution at a watershed scale. Because of the geospatial nature of land use and soils data, and the increasingly widespread use of GIS by planners, government agencies and consultants, the model is integrated with a Geographic Information System (GIS) that allows convenient generation and management of model input and output data, and provides advanced visualization of the model results. An application of the L-THIA/NPS model on the Little Eagle Creek (LEC) watershed near Indianapolis, Indiana is illustrated in this paper. Three historical land use scenarios for 1973, 1984, and 1991 were analyzed to track land use change in the watershed and to assess the impacts of land use change on annual average runoff and NPS pollution from the watershed and its five sub-basins. Results highlight the effectiveness of the L-THIA approach in assessing the long-term hydrologic impact of urban sprawl. The L-THIA/NPS GIS model is a powerful tool for identifying environmentally sensitive areas in terms of NPS pollution potential and for evaluating alternative land use scenarios to enhance NPS pollution management. Access to the model via the INTERNET enhances the usability and effectiveness of the technique significantly. Recommendations can be made to community decision makers, based on this analysis, concerning how development can be controlled within the watershed to minimize the long-term impacts of increased stormwater runoff and NPS pollution for better management of water resources.

  10. Final Report Phase I Study to Characterize the Market Potential for Non-Motorized Travel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, Ho-Ling; Reuscher, Tim; Wilson, Daniel W; Schmoyer, Richard L

    2012-06-01

    The idea of livable communities suggests that people should have the option to utilize non-motorized travel (NMT), specifically walking and bicycling, to conduct their daily tasks. Forecasting personal travel by walk and bike is necessary as part of regional transportation planning, and requires fine detail not only about individual travel, but also on transportation and neighborhood infrastructure. In an attempt to characterize the 'market' potential for NMT, the Office of Planning, Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) funded the Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to conduct a study. The objectives of this effort were to identify factors that influence communities to walk and bike and to examine why, or why not, travelers walk and bike in their communities. This study relied on information collected under the 2009 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) as the major source of data, and was supplemented with data from the American Community Survey (ACS), educational survey, health, employment, and others. Initial statistical screening methods were applied to sort through over 400 potential predictor variables, and examined with various measures (e.g., walk trip per person, walk mileage per person, bike trip per person, bike mileage per person) as the dependent variables. The best geographic level of detail used in the modeling for this study was determined to be the Census block group level for walking and Census tract level for biking. The need for additional supplemental private data (i.e., Walk Scores and Nielsen employment data), and geospatial information that reflects land use and physical environments, became evident after an examination of findings from the initial screening models. To be feasible, in terms of costs and time, the geographic scale of the study region was scaled down to nine selected NHTS add-on regions. These regions were chosen based on various criteria including transit availability, population size, and a mix of geographic locations across the nation. Given the similarities in modeling results from walk trips and walk mileages, additional modeling efforts conducted under the later part of this study were focused on walk trips per person. Bike models were limited only with the stepwise logistic models using Census tracts in the selected regions. Due to NHTS sampling limitations, only about 12% of these tracts have bike trips recorded from NHTS sampled households. The modeling with NHTS bike data proved to be more challenging and time consuming than what was anticipated. Along with the late arrival of Nielsen employment data, the project team had to limit the modeling effort to focus on walking. Therefore, the final modeling and discriminant analysis was conducted only for walking trips.

  11. Climate Mitigation Policy Implications for Global Irrigation Water Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.

    2013-08-22

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which values terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to lead to increased demand for water for agricultural systems (+200%), even in the absence of climate change. In general policies to mitigate climate change will increase agricultural demands for water, regardless of whether or not terrestrial carbon is valued or not. Burgeoning demands for water are driven by the demand for bioenergy in response to emissions mitigation policies. We also find that the policy matters. Increases in the demand for water when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-prices are vastly larger than when terrestrial system carbon emissions are prices at the same rate as fossil fuel and industrial emissions. Our estimates for increased water demands when terrestrial carbon systems go un-priced are larger than earlier studies. We find that the deployment of improved irrigation delivery systems could mitigate some of the increase in water demands, but cannot reverse the increases in water demands when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-priced. Finally we estimates that the geospatial pattern of water demands could stress some parts of the world, e.g. China, India and other countries in south and east Asia, earlier and more intensely than in other parts of the world, e.g. North America.

  12. Climate policy implications for agricultural water demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2013-03-28

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of two alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which taxes terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which only taxes fossil fuel and industrial emissions but places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to almost triple demand for water for agricultural systems across the century even in the absence of climate policy. In general policies to mitigate climate change increase agricultural demands for water still further, though the largest changes occur in the second half of the century, under both policy regimes. The two policies examined profoundly affected both the sources and magnitudes of the increase in irrigation water demands. The largest increases in agricultural irrigation water demand occurred in scenarios where only fossil fuel emissions were priced (but not land-use change emission) and were primarily driven by rapid expansion in bioenergy production. In these scenarios water demands were large relative to present-day total available water, calling into question whether it would be physically possible to produce the associated biomass energy. We explored the potential of improved water delivery and irrigation system efficiencies. These could potentially reduce demands substantially. However, overall demands remained high under our fossil-fuel-only tax policy. In contrast, when all carbon was priced, increases in agricultural water demands were smaller than under the fossil-fuel-only policy and were driven primarily by increased demands for water by non-biomass crops such as rice. Finally we estimate the geospatial pattern of water demands and find that regions such as China, India and other countries in south and east Asia might be expected to experience greatest increases in water demands. 

  13. New Stream-reach Development: A Comprehensive Assessment of Hydropower Energy Potential in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kao, Shih-Chieh; McManamay, Ryan A; Stewart, Kevin M; Samu, Nicole M; Hadjerioua, Boualem; DeNeale, Scott T; Yeasmin, Dilruba; Pasha, M. Fayzul K.; Oubeidillah, Abdoul A; Smith, Brennan T

    2014-04-01

    The rapid development of multiple national geospatial datasets related to topography, hydrology, and environmental characteristics in the past decade have provided new opportunities for the refinement of hydropower resource potential from undeveloped stream-reaches. Through 2011 to 2013, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the Department of Energy (DOE) Water Power Program to evaluate the new stream-reach development (NSD) resource potential for more than 3 million US streams. A methodology was designed that contains three main components: (1) identification of stream-reaches with high energy density, (2) topographical analysis of stream-reaches to estimate inundated surface area and reservoir storage, and (3) environmental attribution to spatially join information related to the natural ecological systems, social and cultural settings, policies, management, and legal constraints to stream-reaches of energy potential. An initial report on methodology (Hadjerioua et al., 2013) was later reviewed and revised based on the comments gathered from two peer review workshops. After implementing the assessment across the entire United States, major findings were summarized in this final report. The estimated NSD capacity and generation, including both higher-energy-density (>1 MW per reach) and lower-energy-density (<1 MW per reach) stream-reaches is 84.7 GW, around the same size as the existing US conventional hydropower nameplate capacity (79.5 GW; NHAAP, 2013). In terms of energy, the total undeveloped NSD generation is estimated to be 460 TWh/year, around 169% of average 2002 2011 net annual generation from existing conventional hydropower plants (272 TWh/year; EIA, 2013). Given the run-of-river assumption, NSD stream-reaches have higher capacity factors (53 71%), especially compared with conventional larger-storage peaking-operation projects that usually have capacity factors of around 30%. The highest potential is identified in the Pacific Northwest Region (32%), followed by Missouri Region (15%) and California Region (9%). In terms of states, the highest potential is found in Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, the three states in the Pacific Northwest, followed by California, Alaska, Montana, and Colorado. In addition to the resource potential, abundant environmental attributes were also organized and attributed to the identified stream-reaches to support further hydropower market analysis. The prevalence of environmental variables and proportion of capacity from stream-reaches intersecting environmental variables varied according to hydrologic region. Detailed NSD findings are organized by hydrologic regions and presented in each chapter of this report.

  14. THE NEW ONLINE METADATA EDITOR FOR GENERATING STRUCTURED METADATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Shrestha, Biva; Palanisamy, Giri; Hook, Leslie A; Killeffer, Terri S; Boden, Thomas A; Cook, Robert B; Zolly, Lisa; Hutchison, Viv; Frame, Mike; Cialella, Alice; Lazer, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Nobody is better suited to describe data than the scientist who created it. This description about a data is called Metadata. In general terms, Metadata represents the who, what, when, where, why and how of the dataset [1]. eXtensible Markup Language (XML) is the preferred output format for metadata, as it makes it portable and, more importantly, suitable for system discoverability. The newly developed ORNL Metadata Editor (OME) is a Web-based tool that allows users to create and maintain XML files containing key information, or metadata, about the research. Metadata include information about the specific projects, parameters, time periods, and locations associated with the data. Such information helps put the research findings in context. In addition, the metadata produced using OME will allow other researchers to find these data via Metadata clearinghouses like Mercury [2][4]. OME is part of ORNL s Mercury software fleet [2][3]. It was jointly developed to support projects funded by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). OME s architecture provides a customizable interface to support project-specific requirements. Using this new architecture, the ORNL team developed OME instances for USGS s Core Science Analytics, Synthesis, and Libraries (CSAS&L), DOE s Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, and the international Surface Ocean Carbon Dioxide ATlas (SOCAT). Researchers simply use the ORNL Metadata Editor to enter relevant metadata into a Web-based form. From the information on the form, the Metadata Editor can create an XML file on the server that the editor is installed or to the user s personal computer. Researchers can also use the ORNL Metadata Editor to modify existing XML metadata files. As an example, an NGEE Arctic scientist use OME to register their datasets to the NGEE data archive and allows the NGEE archive to publish these datasets via a data search portal (http://ngee.ornl.gov/data). These highly descriptive metadata created using OME allows the Archive to enable advanced data search options using keyword, geo-spatial, temporal and ontology filters. Similarly, ARM OME allows scientists or principal investigators (PIs) to submit their data products to the ARM data archive. How would OME help Big Data Centers like the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC)? The ORNL DAAC is one of NASA s Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) data centers managed by the Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project. The ORNL DAAC archives data produced by NASA's Terrestrial Ecology Program. The DAAC provides data and information relevant to biogeochemical dynamics, ecological data, and environmental processes, critical for understanding the dynamics relating to the biological, geological, and chemical components of the Earth's environment. Typically data produced, archived and analyzed is at a scale of multiple petabytes, which makes the discoverability of the data very challenging. Without proper metadata associated with the data, it is difficult to find the data you are looking for and equally difficult to use and understand the data. OME will allow data centers like the NGEE and ORNL DAAC to produce meaningful, high quality, standards-based, descriptive information about their data products in-turn helping with the data discoverability and interoperability. Useful Links: USGS OME: http://mercury.ornl.gov/OME/ NGEE OME: http://ngee-arctic.ornl.gov/ngeemetadata/ ARM OME: http://archive2.ornl.gov/armome/ Contact: Ranjeet Devarakonda (devarakondar@ornl.gov) References: [1] Federal Geographic Data Committee. Content standard for digital geospatial metadata. Federal Geographic Data Committee, 1998. [2] Devarakonda, Ranjeet, et al. "Mercury: reusable metadata management, data discovery and access system." Earth Science Informatics 3.1-2 (2010): 87-94. [3] Wilson, B. E., Palanisamy, G., Devarakonda, R., Rhyne, B. T., Lindsley, C., & Green, J. (2010). Mercury Toolset for Spatiotemporal Metadata. [4] Pouchard, L. C., Branstetter, M. L., Cook, R. B., Devarakonda, R., Green, J., Palanisamy, G., ... & Noy, N. F. (2013). A Linked Science investigation: enhancing climate change data discovery with semantic technologies. Earth science informatics, 6(3), 175-185.

  15. Integrated Synthesis of the Permian Basin: Data and Models for Recovering Existing and Undiscovered Oil Resources from the Largest Oil-Bearing Basin in the U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Jackson; Katherine Jackson

    2008-09-30

    Large volumes of oil and gas remain in the mature basins of North America. This is nowhere more true than in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico. A critical barrier to recovery of this vast remaining resource, however, is information. Access to accurate geological data and analyses of the controls of hydrocarbon distribution is the key to the knowledge base as well as the incentives needed by oil and gas companies. The goals of this project were to collect, analyze, synthesize, and deliver to industry and the public fundamental information and data on the geology of oil and gas systems in the Permian Basin. This was accomplished in two ways. First we gathered all available data, organized it, and placed it on the web for ready access. Data include core analysis data, lists of pertinent published reports, lists of available cores, type logs, and selected PowerPoint presentations. We also created interpretive data such as type logs, geological cross sections, and geological maps and placed them in a geospatially-registered framework in ARC/GIS. Second, we created new written syntheses of selected reservoir plays in the Permian basin. Although only 8 plays were targeted for detailed analysis in the project proposal to DOE, 14 were completed. These include Ellenburger, Simpson, Montoya, Fusselman, Wristen, Thirtyone, Mississippian, Morrow, Atoka, Strawn, Canyon/Cisco, Wolfcamp, Artesia Group, and Delaware Mountain Group. These fully illustrated reports include critical summaries of published literature integrated with new unpublished research conducted during the project. As such these reports provide the most up-to-date analysis of the geological controls on reservoir development available. All reports are available for download on the project website and are also included in this final report. As stated in our proposal, technology transfer is perhaps the most important component of the project. In addition to providing direct access to data and reports through the web, we published 29 papers dealing with aspects of Permian Basin and Fort Worth Basin Paleozoic geology, and gave 35 oral and poster presentations at professional society meetings, and 116 oral and poster presentations at 10 project workshops, field trips, and short courses. These events were attended by hundreds of scientists and engineers representing dozens of oil and gas companies. This project and the data and interpretations that have resulted from it will serve industry, academic, and public needs for decades to come. It will be especially valuable to oil and gas companies in helping to better identify opportunities for development and exploration and reducing risk. The website will be continually added to and updated as additional data and information become available making it a long term source of key information for all interested in better understanding the Permian Basin.

  16. A Holistic Framework for Environmental Flows Determination in Hydropower Contexts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A; Bevelhimer, Mark S

    2013-05-01

    Among the ecological science community, the consensus view is that the natural flow regime sustains the ecological integrity of river systems. This prevailing viewpoint by many environmental stakeholders has progressively led to increased pressure on hydropower dam owners to change plant operations to affect downstream river flows with the intention of providing better conditions for aquatic biological communities. Identifying the neccessary magnitude, frequency, duration, timing, or rate of change of stream flows to meet ecological needs in a hydropower context is challenging because the ecological responses to changes in flows may not be fully known, there are usually a multitude of competing users of flow, and implementing environmental flows usually comes at a price to energy production. Realistically, hydropower managers must develop a reduced set of goals that provide the most benefit to the identified ecological needs. As a part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Water Power Program, the Instream Flow Project (IFP) was carried out by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and Argon National Laboratory (ANL) as an attempt to develop tools aimed at defining environmental flow needs for hydropower operations. The application of these tools ranges from national to site-specific scales; thus, the utility of each tool will depend on various phases of the environmental flow process. Given the complexity and sheer volume of applications used to determine environmentally acceptable flows for hydropower, a framework is needed to organize efforts into a staged process dependent upon spatial, temporal, and functional attributes. By far, the predominant domain for determining environmental flows related to hydropower is within the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) relicensing process. This process can take multiple years and can be very expensive depending on the scale of each hydropower project. The utility of such a framework is that it can expedite the environmental flow process by 1) organizing data and applications to identify predictable relationships between flows and ecology, and 2) suggesting when and where tools should be used in the environmental flow process. In addition to regulatory procedures, a framework should also provide the coordination for a comprehensive research agenda to guide the science of environmental flows. This research program has further reaching benefits than just environmental flow determination by providing modeling applications, data, and geospatial layers to inform potential hydropower development. We address several objectives within this document that highlight the limitations of existing environmental flow paradigms and their applications to hydropower while presenting a new framework catered towards hydropower needs. Herein, we address the following objectives: 1) Provide a brief overview of the Natural Flow Regime paradigm and existing environmental flow frameworks that have been used to determine ecologically sensitive stream flows for hydropower operations. 2) Describe a new conceptual framework to aid in determining flows needed to meet ecological objectives with regard to hydropower operations. The framework is centralized around determining predictable relationships between flow and ecological responses. 3) Provide evidence of how efforts from ORNL, PNNL, and ANL have filled some of the gaps in this broader framework, and suggest how the framework can be used to set the stage for a research agenda for environmental flow.

  17. Switchgrass Biofuel Research: Carbon Sequestration and Life Cycle Analysis; Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liska, Adam J; Suyker, Andrew E; Arkebauer, Timothy J; Pelton, Matthew; Fang, Xiao Xue

    2013-12-20

    Soil emissions have been inadequately characterized in life cycle assessment of biofuels (see section 3.2.3). This project measures the net differences in field‐level greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, N2O, and CH4) due to corn residue removal for cellulosic ethanol production. Gas measurements are then incorporated into life cycle assessment of the final biofuel product to determine whether it is in compliance with federal greenhouse gas emissions standards for biofuels (Renewable Fuel Standard 2, RFS2). The field measurements have been conducted over three years on two, quarter‐section, production‐scale, irrigated corn fields (both roughly 50 hectares, as this size of field is necessary for reproducible eddy covariance flux measurements of CO2; chamber measurements are used to determine N2O and CH4 emissions). Due to a large hail storm in 2010, estimates of the emission from residue could not be separated from the total CO2 flux in 2011. This led us to develop soil organic carbon (SOC) modeling techniques to estimate changes in CO2 emissions from residue removal. Modeling has predicted emissions of CO2 from oxidation of SOC that are consistent (<12%) with 9 years of CO2 flux measurements at the two production field sites, and modeling is also consistent with other field measurements (Liska et al., submitted). The model was then used to estimate the average change in SOC and CO2 emissions from nine years of simulated residue removal (6 Mg biomass per hectare per year) at the sites; a loss of 0.43 Mg C ha‐1 yr‐1 resulted. The model was then used to estimate SOC changes over 10 years across Nebraska using supercomputing, based on 61 million, 30 x 30 meter, grid cells to account for regional variability in initial SOC, crop yield, and temperature; an average loss of 0.47 Mg C ha‐1 yr‐1 resulted. When these CO2 emissions are included in simple life cycle assessment calculations, emissions from cellulosic ethanol from crop residue are above mandated levels of 60% reduction compared to gasoline (Liska, in press). These approaches are both technically effective and economically feasible. This work has been extensively peer reviewed. The useful focused data provided for biofuel producers is the relative change in SOC and CO2 emission rates that can be incorporated into LCA models, with the unit of gCO2‐equivalent per megajoule of biofuel; this information can be used directly by the EPA in RFS2 standards. All Final Report, DOE DE‐EE0003149, December 20, 2013 5 ecosystem models are based on limited selected data. The model that we use is supported by the research at our field sites; these large production‐scale field sites, covering nearly a square mile, have also resulted in over 50 research publications over the last 10 years. To extend the model across the larger region, direct field measurements of soil, crop yields (annually), and temperature (monthly averages) are used via geospatial databases. Such dedicated field sites are the basis of advanced scientific understanding of greenhouse gas fluxes in modern agriculture, which is why they have been extensively supported by the USDA, NASA, and many other government agencies (nearly $10 million in research support over the last 12 years for these field sites); we plan to further validate the SOC model with data from other regional field sites, contingent on funding. Continuation of this research would increase confidence in the understanding of residue removal and net CO2 emissions by quantifying these changes for building accurate models (more information can reduce the uncertainty in these processes); we believe these are unique experiments. This work quantifies primarily one factor in the lifecycle (CO2 emissions from soil carbon), but the results in section 3 below address other factors.

  18. Daymet: Daily Surface Weather Data on a 1-km Grid for North America, Version 2.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Peter E; Thornton, Michele M; Mayer, Benjamin W; Wilhelmi, Nate; Wei, Yaxing; Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Cook, Robert B

    2014-01-01

    More information: http://daymet.ornl.gov Presenter: Ranjeet Devarakonda Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Daymet: Daily Surface Weather Data and Climatological Summaries provides gridded estimates of daily weather parameters for North America, including daily continuous surfaces of minimum and maximum temperature, precipitation occurrence and amount, humidity, shortwave radiation, snow water equivalent, and day length. The current data product (Version 2) covers the period January 1, 1980 to December 31, 2013 [1]. The prior product (Version 1) only covered from 1980-2008. Data are available on a daily time step at a 1-km x 1-km spatial resolution in Lambert Conformal Conic projection with a spatial extent that covers the conterminous United States, Mexico, and Southern Canada as meteorological station density allows. Daymet data can be downloaded from 1) the ORNL Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) search and order tools (http://daac.ornl.gov/cgi-bin/cart/add2cart.pl?add=1219) or directly from the DAAC FTP site (http://daac.ornl.gov/cgi-bin/dsviewer.pl?ds_id=1219) and 2) the Single Pixel Tool [2] and THREDDS (Thematic Real-time Environmental Data Services) Data Server [3]. The Single Pixel Data Extraction Tool allows users to enter a single geographic point by latitude and longitude in decimal degrees. A routine is executed that translates the (lon, lat) coordinates into projected Daymet (x,y) coordinates. These coordinates are used to access the Daymet database of daily-interpolated surface weather variables. Daily data from the nearest 1 km x 1 km Daymet grid cell are extracted from the database and formatted as a table with one column for each Daymet variable and one row for each day. All daily data for selected years are returned as a single (long) table, formatted for display in the browser window. At the top of this table is a link to the same data in a simple comma-separated text format, suitable for import into a spreadsheet or other data analysis software. The Single Pixel Data Extraction Tool also provides the option to download multiple coordinates programmatically. A multiple extractor script is freely available to download at http://daymet.ornl.gov/files/daymet.zip. The ORNL DAAC s THREDDS data server (TDS) provides customized visualization and access to Daymet time series of North American mosaics. Users can subset and download Daymet data via a variety of community standards, including OPeNDAP, NetCDF Subset service, and Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map/Coverage Service. The ORNL DAAC TDS also exposes Daymet metadata through its ncISO service to facilitate harvesting Daymet metadata records into 3rd party catalogs. References: [1] Thornton, P.E., M.M. Thornton, B.W. Mayer, N. Wilhelmi, Y. Wei, R. Devarakonda, and R.B. Cook. 2014. Daymet: Daily Surface Weather Data on a 1-km Grid for North America, Version 2. Data set. Available on-line [http://daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. [2] Devarakonda R., et al. 2012. Daymet: Single Pixel Data Extraction Tool. Available on-line [http://daymet.ornl.go/singlepixel.html]. [3] Wei Y., et al. 2014. Daymet: Thematic Real-time Environmental Data Services. Available on-line [http://daymet.ornl.gov/thredds_tiles.html].

  19. Final Report: Phase II Nevada Water Resources Data, Modeling, and Visualization (DMV) Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackman, Thomas; Minor, Timothy; Pohll, Gregory

    2013-07-22

    Water is unquestionably a critical resource throughout the United States. In the semi-arid west -- an area stressed by increase in human population and sprawl of the built environment -- water is the most important limiting resource. Crucially, science must understand factors that affect availability and distribution of water. To sustain growing consumptive demand, science needs to translate understanding into reliable and robust predictions of availability under weather conditions that could be average but might be extreme. These predictions are needed to support current and long-term planning. Similar to the role of weather forecast and climate prediction, water prediction over short and long temporal scales can contribute to resource strategy, governmental policy and municipal infrastructure decisions, which are arguably tied to the natural variability and unnatural change to climate. Change in seasonal and annual temperature, precipitation, snowmelt, and runoff affect the distribution of water over large temporal and spatial scales, which impact the risk of flooding and the groundwater recharge. Anthropogenic influences and impacts increase the complexity and urgency of the challenge. The goal of this project has been to develop a decision support framework of data acquisition, digital modeling, and 3D visualization. This integrated framework consists of tools for compiling, discovering and projecting our understanding of processes that control the availability and distribution of water. The framework is intended to support the analysis of the complex interactions between processes that affect water supply, from controlled availability to either scarcity or deluge. The developed framework enables DRI to promote excellence in water resource management, particularly within the Lake Tahoe basin. In principle, this framework could be replicated for other watersheds throughout the United States. Phase II of this project builds upon the research conducted during Phase I, in which the hydrologic framework was investigated and the development initiated. Phase II concentrates on practical implementation of the earlier work but emphasizes applications to the hydrology of the Lake Tahoe basin. Phase 1 efforts have been refined and extended by creating a toolset for geographic information systems (GIS) that is usable for disparate types of geospatial and geo-referenced data. The toolset is intended to serve multiple users for a variety of applications. The web portal for internet access to hydrologic and remotely sensed product data, prototyped in Phase I, has been significantly enhanced. The portal provides high performance access to LANDSAT-derived data using techniques developed during the course of the project. The portal is interactive, and supports the geo-referenced display of hydrologic information derived from remotely sensed data, such as various vegetative indices used to calculate water consumption. The platform can serve both internal and external constituencies using inter-operating infrastructure that spans both sides of the DRI firewall. The platform is intended grow its supported data assets and to serve as a template for replication to other geographic areas. An unanticipated development during the project was the use of ArcGIS software on a new computer system, called the IBM PureSytems, and the parallel use of the systems for faster, more efficient image processing. Additional data, independent of the portal, was collected within the Sagehen basin and provides detailed information regarding the processes that control hydrologic responses within mountain watersheds. The newly collected data include elevation, evapotranspiration, energy balance and remotely sensed snow-pack data. A Lake Tahoe basin hydrologic model has been developed, in part to help predict the hydrologic impacts of climate change. The model couples both the surface and subsurface hydrology, with the two components having been independently calibrated. Results from the coupled simulations involving both surface water and groundwater processes show that it is possible to fairly accurately simulate lake effects and water budget variables over a wide range of dry and wet cycles in the historical record. The Lake Tahoe basin is representative of the hydrology, topography and climate throughout the Sierra Nevada Range, and the entire model development is prototypical of the efforts required to replicate the decision support framework to other locales. The Lake Tahoe model in particular, could allow water managers to evaluate more accurately components of the water budget (ET, runoff, groundwater, etc) and to answer important questions regarding water resources in northern Nevada. This report discusses the geographic scale and the hydrologic complexity of the calibrated model developed as part of this project, as well as simulation results for historical and future climate projects To enable human-driven data exploration and discovery, de novo software for a globalized rendering module that extends the capability of our evolving custom visualization engine from Phase I (called SMEngine) has been developed. The new rendering component, called Horizon, supports terrain rendering capable of displaying and interrogating both remotely sensed and modeled data. The development of Horizon necessitated adaptation of the visualization engine to allow extensible integration of components such as the global rendering module and support for associated features. The resulting software is general in its GIS capability, but a specific Lake Tahoe visualization application suitable for immersive decision support in the DRIVE6 virtual reality facility has been developed. During the development, various features to enhance the value of the visualization experience were explored, including the use of hyperspectral image overlays. An over-arching goal of the visualization aspect of the project has been to develop and demonstrate the CAVE (CAVE Automatic Virtual Environment) as a practical tool for hydrologic research.