Sample records for dl dolomitic limestone

  1. Effective porosity and density of carbonate rocks (Maynardville Limestone and Copper Ridge Dolomite) within Bear Creek Valley on the Oak Ridge Reservation based on modern petrophysical techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorsch, J.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to provide quantitative data on effective porosity of carbonate rock from the Maynardville Limestone and Copper Ridge Dolomite within Bear Creek Valley based on modern petrophysical techniques. The data will be useful for groundwater-flow and contaminant-flow modeling in the vicinity of the Y-12 Plant on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Furthermore, the data provides needed information on the amount of interconnected pore space potentially available for operation of matrix diffusion as a transport process within the fractured carbonate rock. A second aspect of this study is to compare effective porosity data based on modern petrophysical techniques to effective porosity data determined earlier by Goldstrand et al. (1995) with a different technique. An added bonus of the study is quantitative data on the bulk density and grain density of dolostone and limestone of the Maynardville Limestone and Copper Ridge Dolomite which might find use for geophysical modeling on the ORR.

  2. The effects of calcitic and dolomitic limestone rates and particle sizes on soil chemical changes, plant nutrient concentration, and yields of corn and Coastal bermudagrass on two acid Texas soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haby, Vincent A

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    significantly increased Ca to 18 inches, while only the 6-ton/acre rate of fine dolomitic lime- stone increased Ca into the same depth. All dolomitic treatments increased Mg to 18-inch depths. Sampling deeper than 18 inches in the 6 ton/acre dolomitic fine... formed soluble salts with the NO and were leached down as Ca(ND ) Limestone treatments did not produce significant increases in yield of corn or Coastal bermudagrass. The no-lime plots produced 70 bushels of corn and 9. 2 tons of oven-dry Coastal...

  3. FORMATION OF REPLACEMENT DOLOMITE IN THE LATEMAR CARBONATE BUILDUP, DOLOMITES, NORTHERN ITALY: PART 1.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmichael, Sarah

    FORMATION OF REPLACEMENT DOLOMITE IN THE LATEMAR CARBONATE BUILDUP, DOLOMITES, NORTHERN ITALY: PART F. McDONOUGH*** ABSTRACT. Replacement dolomite in the Latemar carbonate buildup, northern Italy of vertical columns (replacement of limestone breccia pipes) and sheets (replacement along fractures

  4. The effects of calcitic and dolomitic limestone rates and particle sizes on soil chemical changes, plant nutrient concentration, and yields of corn and Coastal bermudagrass on two acid Texas soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haby, Vincent A

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory study. Particle size. Field study. Source. . 26 . 26 Rate. . 28 Particle size. . . $0 Soil pH change with depth. Influence oi' Limestone on Ca and Ng at Different Soil Depths. . Influence of Limestone on Yields oi' Corn and Coastal... to increase the downward movement of Ca and Mg snd to reduce soil acidity as determined by pH measurements (2, 3, 4, 26, 45, 46, 54, 56). Adams et al. (3) using dolomitic lime- stone, have shown that on a Cecil sandy loam soil, N rates of 0, 400, snd 800...

  5. Testing of Oregon dolomite from central Kentucky in an atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the first in a series of six limestone reports, and describes the results of testing of an Oregon dolomite from central Kentucky (1/8 in. x 0, 63% CaCO/sub 3/, 31% MgCO/sub 3/) in a 2 ft/ 8 in. x 2 ft. 5 in., 0.75-MW AFBC. All six limestones (or dolomites) were tested using the same coal, a washed Western Kentucky No. 9 coal (1/4 in. x 0, 3.1% sulfur, 9% ash, 13230 Btu/lb.). Operating problems encountered are described. On the basis of numbers, it was concluded that an economic re-evaluation of low-superficial-velocity fluidized beds is warranted, and that it is feasible to burn high-sulfur coals efficiently in an AFBC when Oregon dolomite from central Kentucky is used as the sulfur sorbent.

  6. Stratigraphy and diagenesis of the Mississippian Lodgepole Limestone, Williston Basin, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grover, P.W. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Stratigraphic correlation of the Lodgepole Limestone (Bottineau Interval) indicates a sequence of three clinoform-shaped wedges that filled in the early Williston Basin. To date four productive 100m thick mounds have been discovered in the Lodgepole Limestone at Dickinson Field. The mounds seem to have nucleated at the toe of slope of the first highstand system tract and were subsequently buried by the second highstand systems tract. By isopaching each of the systems tracts one can predict were other mounds might have nucleated. Burial depth of the Bakken Shale-Lodgepole Limestone contact grade from 0.6 km at the edge of the Williston Basin to 3.4 km in the center. With increased depth the basal Lodgepole Limestone shows three phases of dolomitization, which are: small clear early dolomite; later iron rich fracture filling saddle dolomite and a later iron rich dolomite that seems to follow stylolites. Pre-oil migration mineralization of the overlying limestone include minor amounts of: anhydrite, pyrite, iron poor sphalerite, late iron rich sphalerite, chalcopyrite and celestite.

  7. Stratigraphy and diagenesis of the Mississippian Lodgepole Limestone, Williston Basin, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grover, P.W. (Texas A M Univ., College Station, TX (United States))

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stratigraphic correlation of the Lodgepole Limestone (Bottineau Interval) indicates a sequence of three clinoform-shaped wedges that filled in the early Williston Basin. To date four productive 100m thick mounds have been discovered in the Lodgepole Limestone at Dickinson Field. The mounds seem to have nucleated at the toe of slope of the first highstand system tract and were subsequently buried by the second highstand systems tract. By isopaching each of the systems tracts one can predict were other mounds might have nucleated. Burial depth of the Bakken Shale-Lodgepole Limestone contact grade from 0.6 km at the edge of the Williston Basin to 3.4 km in the center. With increased depth the basal Lodgepole Limestone shows three phases of dolomitization, which are: small clear early dolomite; later iron rich fracture filling saddle dolomite and a later iron rich dolomite that seems to follow stylolites. Pre-oil migration mineralization of the overlying limestone include minor amounts of: anhydrite, pyrite, iron poor sphalerite, late iron rich sphalerite, chalcopyrite and celestite.

  8. Shallow-burial dolomite cement: a major component of many ancient sucrosic dolomites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiatt, Eric E.

    Shallow-burial dolomite cement: a major component of many ancient sucrosic dolomites PHILIP W 54901, USA (E-mail: hiatt@uwosh.edu) ABSTRACT Dolomite cement is a significant and widespread component of Phanerozoic sucrosic dolomites. Cements in dolomites that were never deeply buried are limpid, have planar

  9. Enrico Fermi and the Dolomites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Battimelli; Alessandro De Angelis

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer vacations in the Dolomites were a tradition among the professors of the Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences at the University of Roma since the end of the XIX century. Beyond the academic walls, people like Tullio Levi-Civita, Federigo Enriques and Ugo Amaldi sr., together with their families, were meeting friends and colleagues in Cortina, San Vito, Dobbiaco, Vigo di Fassa and Selva, enjoying trekking together with scientific discussions. The tradition was transmitted to the next generations, in particular in the first half of the XX century, and the group of via Panisperna was directly connected: Edoardo Amaldi, the son of the mathematician Ugo sr., rented at least during two summers, in 1925 and in 1949, and in the winter of 1960, a house in San Vito di Cadore, and almost every year in the Dolomites; Enrico Fermi was a frequent guest. Many important steps in modern physics, in particular the development of the Fermi-Dirac statistics and the Fermi theory of beta decay, are related to scientific discussions held in the region of the Dolomites.

  10. Doppler Lidar (DL) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newsom, RK

    2012-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Doppler lidar (DL) is an active remote sensing instrument that provides range- and time-resolved measurements of radial velocity and attenuated backscatter. The principle of operation is similar to radar in that pulses of energy are transmitted into the atmosphere; the energy scattered back to the transceiver is collected and measured as a time-resolved signal. From the time delay between each outgoing transmitted pulse and the backscattered signal, the distance to the scatterer is inferred. The radial or line-of-sight velocity of the scatterers is determined from the Doppler frequency shift of the backscattered radiation. The DL uses a heterodyne detection technique in which the return signal is mixed with a reference laser beam (i.e., local oscillator) of known frequency. An onboard signal processing computer then determines the Doppler frequency shift from the spectra of the heterodyne signal. The energy content of the Doppler spectra can also be used to determine attenuated backscatter.

  11. ARM - Instrument - dl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9,govInstrumentsdl Documentation DL : Handbook ARM Data Discovery

  12. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treating a karsted formation containing heavy hydrocarbons and dolomite includes providing heat to at least part of one or more karsted layers in the formation from one or more heaters located in the karsted layers. A temperature in at least one of the karsted layers is allowed to reach a decomposition temperature of dolomite in the formation. The dolomite is allowed to decompose and at least some hydrocarbons are produced from at least one of the karsted layers of the formation.

  13. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may include dolomite and hydrocarbons. Methods may include providing heat at less than the decomposition temperature of dolomite from one or more heaters to at least a portion of the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids are mobilized in the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  14. The Mississippian Leadville Limestone Exploration Play, Utah and Colorado-Exploration Techniques and Studies for Independents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Chidsey

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mississippian (late Kinderhookian to early Meramecian) Leadville Limestone is a shallow, open-marine, carbonate-shelf deposit. The Leadville has produced over 53 million barrels (8.4 million m{sup 3}) of oil/condensate from seven fields in the Paradox fold and fault belt of the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. The environmentally sensitive, 7500-square-mile (19,400 km{sup 2}) area that makes up the fold and fault belt is relatively unexplored. Only independent producers operate and continue to hunt for Leadville oil targets in the region. The overall goal of this study is to assist these independents by (1) developing and demonstrating techniques and exploration methods never tried on the Leadville Limestone, (2) targeting areas for exploration, (3) increasing deliverability from new and old Leadville fields through detailed reservoir characterization, (4) reducing exploration costs and risk especially in environmentally sensitive areas, and (5) adding new oil discoveries and reserves. The final results will hopefully reduce exploration costs and risks, especially in environmentally sensitive areas, and add new oil discoveries and reserves. The study consists of three sections: (1) description of lithofacies and diagenetic history of the Leadville at Lisbon field, San Juan County, Utah, (2) methodology and results of a surface geochemical survey conducted over the Lisbon and Lightning Draw Southeast fields (and areas in between) and identification of oil-prone areas using epifluorescence in well cuttings from regional wells, and (3) determination of regional lithofacies, description of modern and outcrop depositional analogs, and estimation of potential oil migration directions (evaluating the middle Paleozoic hydrodynamic pressure regime and water chemistry). Leadville lithofacies at Libon field include open marine (crinoidal banks or shoals and Waulsortian-type buildups), oolitic and peloid shoals, and middle shelf. Rock units with open-marine and restricted-marine facies constitute a significant reservoir potential, having both effective porosity and permeability when dissolution of skeletal grains, followed by dolomitization, has occurred. Two major types of diagenetic dolomite are observed in the Leadville Limestone at Lisbon field: (1) tight 'early' dolomite consisting of very fine grained (<5 {micro}m), interlocking crystals that faithfully preserve depositional fabrics; and (2) porous, coarser (>100-250 {micro}m), rhombic and saddle crystals that discordantly replace limestone and earlier very fine grained dolomite. Predating or concomitant with late dolomite formation are pervasive leaching episodes that produced vugs and extensive microporosity. Most reservoir rocks within Lisbon field appear to be associated with the second, late type of dolomitization and associated leaching events. Other diagenetic products include pyrobitumen, syntaxial cement, sulfide minerals, anhydrite cement and replacement, and late macrocalcite. Fracturing (solution enlarged) and brecciation (autobrecciation) caused by hydrofracturing are widespread within Lisbon field. Sediment-filled cavities, related to karstification of the exposed Leadville, are present in the upper third of the formation. Pyrobitumen and sulfide minerals appear to coat most crystal faces of the rhombic and saddle dolomites. The fluid inclusion and mineral relationships suggest the following sequence of events: (1) dolomite precipitation, (2) anhydrite deposition, (3) anhydrite dissolution and quartz precipitation, (4) dolomite dissolution and late calcite precipitation, (5) trapping of a mobile oil phase, and (6) formation of bitumen. Fluid inclusions in calcite and dolomite display variable liquid to vapor ratios suggesting reequilibration at elevated temperatures (50 C). Fluid salinities exceed 10 weight percent NaCl equivalent. Low ice melting temperatures of quartz- and calcite-hosted inclusions suggest chemically complex Ca-Mg-bearing brines associated with evaporite deposits were responsible for mineral deposition. The overall conclusion from th

  15. Frictional properties between fine grained limestone, dolomite and sandstone along precut surfaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iwasaki, Takeshi

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    characteristic parallel lines upon its surface in the direction of slid- ing. If the two materials are the same, both surfaces flow equally, and mutual adhesion and welding occur at the points of contact. In the latter case, frictional work is required... FRICTIONAL PROPERTIES BETNEEN FINE GRAINED I, IMESTONE, DOLOMI"'E AND SANDSTONE ALONG PRECUT SURFACFS A Thesis TAKESHI INASAKI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas MN University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  16. Frictional properties between fine grained limestone, dolomite and sandstone along precut surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iwasaki, Takeshi

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    shear surface; w, wet surface; c, clean surface. Table 1. Coefficients of friction of rocks and Minerals (cited from Jaeger and Cook, 1969). EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE Triaxial compression experiments were conducted on dry, copper-jacketed samples in a...) and Handin (1969) suggested that it reflected the brittle-ductile transition of the tested rocks. The cohesive shear strength is zero across a precut surface, so in the brittle state Coulomb's cri- terion predicts that coefficient of sliding friction...

  17. Experimental deformation of natural and synthetic dolomite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Nathan Ernest

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural and hot isostatically pressed dolomite aggregates were experimentally deformed at effective pressures of Pe = 50 ?? 400 MPa, temperatures of 400 ?? 850??C, and strain rates of ?& = 1.2x10-4 s-1 to 1.2x10-7 s-1. Coarse- and fine-grained...

  18. DL-36361 UC-414 I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUM SULFATE: A REVIEWThis rcportJ it c 5DL-36361

  19. Replacement geometry and fabrics of Smackover (Jurassic) dolomite, southern Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, M.L.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intensity of dolomitization and associated reservoir development in the Smackover Formation, Conecuh Ridge-Wiggens arch areas, is not predictable by comparison with time-temperature index methods or porosity-depth curves. Major alteration patterns and associated dolomite fabrics reflect the early paleotopographic settings, where high fluid flux and massive replacement are associated with Late Jurassic basement highs. This large-scale replacement is most important in the lowermost Smackover section overlying the Norphlet sandstone from Chunchula field into the Manila Embayment. The heterogeneous nature of dolomite reservoir development is evident in Chunchula field, where local pods of permeable dolomite cut across sedimentary facies boundaries. Predicting the orientation of a dolomite permeability barrier where there is little well control can be facilitated by mapping the regional thickness variations; the extension of impermeable dolomite trends is generally parallel to isopach trends.

  20. Summary of Research through Phase II/Year 2 of Initially Approved 3 Phase/3 Year Project - Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Grammer

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This final scientific/technical report covers the first 2 years (Phases I and II of an originally planned 3 Year/3 Phase program). The project was focused on evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin. The characterization of select dolomite reservoirs was the major focus of our efforts in Phases I and II of the project. Structural mapping and log analysis in the Dundee (Devonian) and Trenton/Black River (Ordovician) suggest a close spatial relationship among gross dolomite distribution and regional-scale, wrench fault-related NW-SE and NE-SW structural trends. A high temperature origin for much of the dolomite in these 2 studied intervals (based upon fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and stable isotopic analyses,) coupled with persistent association of this dolomite in reservoirs coincident with wrench fault-related features, is strong evidence for these reservoirs being influenced by hydrothermal dolomitization. In the Niagaran (Silurian), there is a general trend of increasing dolomitization shelfward, with limestone predominant in more basinward positions. A major finding is that facies types, when analyzed at a detailed level, are directly related to reservoir porosity and permeability in these dolomites which increases the predictability of reservoir quality in these units. This pattern is consistent with our original hypothesis of primary facies control on dolomitization and resulting reservoir quality at some level. The identification of distinct and predictable vertical stacking patterns within a hierarchical sequence and cycle framework provides a high degree of confidence at this point that the results should be exportable throughout the basin. Much of the data synthesis and modeling for the project was scheduled to be part of Year 3/Phase III, but the discontinuation of funding after Year 2 precluded those efforts. Therefore, the results presented in this document are not final, and in many cases represent a report of 'progress to date' as numerous tasks were scheduled to extend into Year 3.

  1. Dolomitization by ground-water flow systems in carbonate platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simms, M.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dolomite occurs throughout the subsurface of modern carbonate platforms such as the Bahamas. Groundwater flow systems must be responsible for delivery of reactants needed for dolomitization. Reflux, freshwater lens flows, and thermal convection are large-scale flow systems that may be widespread in active platforms. The author has evaluated some aspects of the dynamics and characteristics of these processes with ground-water flow theory and by scaled sandbox experiments. Reflux is not restricted to hypersaline brines, but can occur with bankwaters of only slightly elevated salinity such as those found on the Bahama Banks today (42%). The lack of evaporites in a stratigraphic section, therefore, does not rule out the possibility that reflux may have operated. Flows associated with freshwater lenses include flow in the lens, in the mixing zone, and in the seawater beneath and offshore of the lens. Upward transfer of seawater through the platform margins occurs when surrounding cold ocean water migrates into the platform and is heated. This type of thermal convection (Kohout convection) has been studied by Francis Kohout in south Florida. The ranges of mass flux of magnesium in these processes are all comparable and are all sufficient to account for young dolomites beneath modern platforms. Each process yields dolomitized zones of characteristic shape and location and perhaps may be distinguishable in ancient rocks. The concepts presented here may have application to exploration for dolomite reservoirs in the Gulf Coast and elsewhere.

  2. Shallow meteoric alteration and burial diagenesis of massive dolomite in the Castle Reef Formation, northwest Montana 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitsitt, Philip Mark

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    replacement. Partial dissolution of the replacive dolomite and subsequent precipitation of brightly luminescent dolomite overgrowths ( g 0= -5. 3 to -2. 5 40) occurred in shallow burial meteoric 18 environments. Distribution of the bright overgrowths... indicates flow pathways similar to those recognized by g 0 trends in the replacive dolomite. A final stage of red luminescent dolomite formed after further compaction and local dissolution of the bright overgrowths and prior to hydrocarbon migration...

  3. Fluid-rock interactions between xanthan-chromium(III) gel systems and dolomite core material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCool, C.S.; Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gelation of chromium(III)-xanthan systems in dolomite core material was investigated. Compositional changes in the gelant caused by interactions with the dolomite core material resulted in low permeability reductions for gelants prepared with chromium chloride, chromium acetate and a chromium diamine salt. The primary cause of incomplete gelation in the dolomite material was the increase in gelant pH that resulted in precipitation of chromium.

  4. Hydrothermal dolomites in SW Sardinia (Italy): evidence for a widespread late-Variscan fluid flow event

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boni, Maria

    directly from the low-grade metamorphic lithotypes undergoing dolomitization, nor from the low-temperature across large areas of the Iglesiente­Sulcis mining district (SW Sardinia, Italy). The dolomite crops out within circulation cells, which were driven by high heat flow. Fluids originated in the underlying rocks

  5. ACM Digital Library )http://www.acm.org/dl(

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Or, Michael

    ­ 111 © , ACM Digital Library ) ( )http://www.acm.org/dl( ISI Web of Knowledge- . . ACM Digital Library -Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), . . " -ACM © , : -ACM o -ACM o -ACM " " ( -ACM) #12; ­ 411 © , -Digital Library

  6. A Comparative Study of Dolomite Dissolution in Simple Organic Acids and Chelating Agents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adenuga, Olusegun O

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    of dolomite dissolution in these acid solutions were investigated over different reaction conditions in a rotating disk apparatus. Samples of the reacted acids from the reactor were collected and then analyzed with inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Analyses...

  7. Microstructures and Rheology of a Limestone-Shale Thrust Fault

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Rachel Kristen

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    -grain junctions, and interpenetrating boundaries. Porosity rises to 6% from calcite veins. In coarse-grained calcite, trails of iv voids follow twin boundaries, and voids occur at twin-twin and twin-grain boundary intersections... contains calcite and shale. The different strengths of calcite (Rutter, 1995; Brodie and Rutter, 2000a) and dolomite (Davis et al., 2008; Delle Piane et al., 2008) and quartz (Griggs, 1967; Brodie and Rutter, 2000b) under similar conditions could...

  8. Atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion testing of western Kentucky limestones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, G.P.; Holcomb, R.S.; Guymon, R.H.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is studying and testing the burning of coal in an atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC) as a means of generating electricity and/or process heat in an environmentally acceptable manner. The abundant, high-sulfur coal resources in this country can be utilized effectively in such a system. The ORNL test program supporting the 20-MW(e) AFBC pilot plant planned for operation by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in 1982 is described. During the test program 625 hours of coal combustion were accumulated in a 25-cm-diam bench scale AFBC. The fuel was Kentucky No. 9 coal with about 4% sulfur. Five different limestones from the Western Kentucky area were tested for their ability to reduce sulfur dioxide emissions. The bench scale combustor was operated under a variety of conditions including changes in bed temperature, bed height and superficial velocity. At a superficial velocity of 1.2 m/s, four of the five limestones achieved 90% sulfur retention with weight ratios of limestone feed to coal feed near 0.40:1 under no recycle (once through) operation. Carbon utilization (based on carbon loss data) averaged 84% for these tests. Two of the more promising stones were tested by recycling the material elutriated from the combustor. The amount of fresh limestone required for 90% sulfur retention was reduced by up to 50%. Carbon utilization approaching 98% was obtained under these conditions.

  9. Frank Masci (1) IRAC D/L Review (S5), January 26, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masci, Frank

    Frank Masci (1) IRAC D/L Review (S5), January 26, 2001 Latent-Image Reporting: LATIMREPORT Frank Masci January 26, 2001 #12;Frank Masci (2)IRAC D/L Review (S5), January 26, 2001 Introduction l AIM above in target DCE. #12;Frank Masci (3)IRAC D/L Review (S5), January 26, 2001 Latency Models l IRAC

  10. An insoluble residue study of the Comanche Peak and Edwards limestones of Kimble County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jurik, Paul Peter

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Previous investigations Comanche Peak and Edwards limestones. . Insoluble res idues 1 1 3 5 6 S tratigraphy Wa)nut clay. Conanche Peak limestone Edwards limestone. Georgetown limestone. 8 9 9 12 Paleontology Macropaleontology... on the basis of tha silt?clay insoluble residua y. Tectonic map of Early Cretaceous. Plate I. Vertical variation in insoluble residua content. . . . pocket vertical variation in sand-siss insoluble residue content Vertical vari. stion in sand...

  11. Cement substitution by a combination of metakaolin and limestone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antoni, M., E-mail: mathieu.antoni@epfl.ch [EPFL-STI-IMX-Laboratoires des Materiaux de Construction, Station12, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Rossen, J. [EPFL-STI-IMX-Laboratoires des Materiaux de Construction, Station12, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)] [EPFL-STI-IMX-Laboratoires des Materiaux de Construction, Station12, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Martirena, F. [CIDEM-UCLV, Universidad Las Villas, Santa Clara (Cuba)] [CIDEM-UCLV, Universidad Las Villas, Santa Clara (Cuba); Scrivener, K. [EPFL-STI-IMX-Laboratoires des Materiaux de Construction, Station12, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)] [EPFL-STI-IMX-Laboratoires des Materiaux de Construction, Station12, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates the coupled substitution of metakaolin and limestone in Portland cement (PC). The mechanical properties were studied in mortars and the microstructural development in pastes by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry analysis, mercury intrusion porosimetry and isothermal calorimetry. We show that 45% of substitution by 30% of metakaolin and 15% of limestone gives better mechanical properties at 7 and 28 days than the 100% PC reference. Our results show that calcium carbonate reacts with alumina from the metakaolin, forming supplementary AFm phases and stabilizing ettringite. Using simple mass balance calculations derived from thermogravimetry results, we also present the thermodynamic simulation for the system, which agrees fairly well with the experimental observations. It is shown that gypsum addition should be carefully balanced when using calcined clays because it considerably influences the early age strength by controlling the very rapid reaction of aluminates.

  12. Fracture testing of Edwards limestone: a statistical treatment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redding, David Earl

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parameters. . 21 8. Goodness-of-Fit Statistic (Alpha) for Rubber Fracture Testing of Edwards Limestone. . 9. Sum of Square Residuals for Predicted Geometry vs. Base Geometry. . 38 10. Residuals in Sigma Theta Maximum at the Median Probability Value... for Predicted Geometry vs. Base Geometry. . 38 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Rubber Fracture Test Geometry. Page 2. Hollow Brass Cylinder Calibration. 13 3. Sigma Theta Max vs. Volume. . 18 4A. Cumulative Probability vs. Sigma Theta Max. Rubber Fracture...

  13. R tuart Haszeldine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom Oil Charge Preserves Deep-Burial Porosity in Sandstones and Limestones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    is a limiting value. Limestones often show complex shallow diagenesis, which obscures deeper effects. However

  14. Mixed water phreatic dolomitization of Jurassic oolites in the Upper Smackover Member, East Texas Basin: petrologic and isotopic evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, Keith Douglas

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the dolomitized zones, while not readily apparent in thin section, can often be seen in core samples by wetting the slabbed core and liberally applying dilute hydrochloric acid. As shown by the plot of standard deviation and mean size in Figure 6, sorting... in all of the proposed methods for dolomite f'ormation appear only to be the presence of fluids saturated with respect to dolomite, and a mechanism to move sufficient amounts of these magnesium-rich fluids through the rocks. 65 Two mechanisms...

  15. Core analyses for selected samples from the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, V.A.; Saulnier, G.J. Jr. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (USA))

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two groups of core samples from the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at and near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant were analyzed to provide estimates of hydrologic parameters for use in flow-and-transport modeling. Whole-core and core-plug samples were analyzed by helium porosimetry, resaturation and porosimetry, mercury-intrusion porosimetry, electrical-resistivity techniques, and gas-permeability methods. 33 refs., 25 figs., 10 tabs.

  16. Intermediate-scale tests of sodium interactions with calcite and dolomite aggregate concretes. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randich, E.; Acton, R.U.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two intermediate-scale tests were performed to compare the behavior of calcite and dolomite aggregate concretes when attacked by molten sodium. The tests were performed as part of an interlaboratory comparison between Sandia National Laboratories and Hanford Engineering Development Laboratories. Results of the tests at Sandia National Laboratories are reported here. The results show that both concretes exhibit similar exothermic reactions with molten sodium. The large difference in reaction vigor suggested by thermodynamic considerations of CO/sub 2/ release from calcite and dolomite was not realized. Penetration rates of 1.4 to 1.7 mm/min were observed for short periods of time with reaction zone temperatures in excess of 800/sup 0/C during the energetic attack. The penetration was not uniform over the entire sodium-concrete contact area. Rapid attack may be localized due to inhomogeneities in the concrete. The chemical reaction zone is less then one cm thick for the calcite concrete but is about seven cm thick for the dolomite concrete.

  17. Modeling ofHybrid (Heat Radiation and Microwave) High Temperature Processing ofLimestone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yakovlev, Vadim

    Modeling ofHybrid (Heat Radiation and Microwave) High Temperature Processing ofLimestone Shawn M (electromagnetic and thermal) modeling to cover practically valuable scenarios of hybrid (heat radiation is applied to the process of hybrid heating of cylindrical samples of limestone in Ceralink's MAT TM kiln

  18. Petrology and Petrography of Ely Limestone in Part of Eastern Great Basin*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    Petrology and Petrography of Ely Limestone in Part of Eastern Great Basin* YAZDAN MOLLAZAL Tehran petrology and petrography in three areas in the eastern Great Basin. Results are as follows: (1) At Moorman ..............................Ely Limestone 7 Carbonate petrology and ......................................petrography 8

  19. SLAM: a sodium-limestone concrete ablation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suo-Anttila, A.J.

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SLAM is a three-region model, containing a pool (sodium and reaction debris) region, a dry (boundary layer and dehydrated concrete) region, and a wet (hydrated concrete) region. The model includes a solution to the mass, momentum, and energy equations in each region. A chemical kinetics model is included to provide heat sources due to chemical reactions between the sodium and the concrete. Both isolated model as well as integrated whole code evaluations have been made with good results. The chemical kinetics and water migration models were evaluated separately, with good results. Several small and large-scale sodium limestone concrete experiments were simulated with reasonable agreement between SLAM and the experimental results. The SLAM code was applied to investigate the effects of mixing, pool temperature, pool depth and fluidization. All these phenomena were found to be of significance in the predicted response of the sodium concrete interaction. Pool fluidization is predicted to be the most important variable in large scale interactions.

  20. Frank Masci (1)MIPS D/L Review (S5), February 28, 2001 24m SUR-mode Linearization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masci, Frank

    Frank Masci (1)MIPS D/L Review (S5), February 28, 2001 24µm SUR-mode Linearization: SLOPECORR Frank Masci February 28, 2001 #12;Frank Masci (2)MIPS D/L Review (S5), February 28, 2001 Aim SLOPECORR Masci (3)MIPS D/L Review (S5), February 28, 2001 Pictorial Representation t DNobs Quadratic model fit

  1. Fluid distribution effect on sonic attenuation in partially saturated limestones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadoret, T. [Elf Exploration Production, Pau (France). Dept. Sismique] [Elf Exploration Production, Pau (France). Dept. Sismique; Mavko, G. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Zinszner, B. [Inst. Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France). Lab. de Physique des Roches] [Inst. Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France). Lab. de Physique des Roches

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensional and torsional wave-attenuation measurements are obtained at a sonic frequency around 1 kHz on partially saturated limestones using large resonant bars, 1 m long. To study the influence of the fluid distribution, the authors use two different saturation methods: drying and depressurization. When water saturation (S{sub w}) is higher than 70%, the extensional wave attenuation is found to depend on whether the resonant bar is jacketed. This can be interpreted as the Biot-Gardner-White effect. The experimental results obtained on jacketed samples show that, during a drying experiment, extensional wave attenuation is influenced strongly by the fluid content when S{sub w} is between approximately 70% and 100%. This sensitivity to fluid saturation vanishes when saturation is obtained through depressurization. Using a computer-assisted tomographic (CT) scan, the authors found that, during depressurization, the fluid distribution is homogeneous at the millimetric scale at all saturations. In contrast, during drying, heterogeneous saturation was observed at high water-saturation levels. Thus, the authors interpret the dependence of the extensional wave attenuation upon the saturation method as principally caused by a fluid distribution effect. Torsional attenuation shows no sensitivity to fluid saturation for S{sub w} between 5% and 100%.

  2. Reaction of Calcite and Dolomite with In-Situ Gelled Acids, Organic Acids, and Environmentally Friendly Chelating Agent (GLDA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabie, Ahmed 1978-

    2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    before. Therefore, the objective of this work is to study the reaction of different acid systems with calcite and dolomite and report the mass transport and kinetic data experimentally. Lactic acid, a chelating agent (GLDA), and in-situ gelled HCl...

  3. Trace fossils of Fort Hays Limestone Member of Niobrara Chalk (Upper Cretaceous), west-central Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, R. W.

    1970-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS ARTICLE 53 (CRETACEOUS 2) TRACE FOSSILS OF FORT HAYS LIMESTONE MEMBER OF NIOBRARA CHALK (UPPER CRETACEOUS), WEST-CENTRAL KANSAS ROBERT W. FREY University of Georgia Marine Institute, Sapelo... Figures, 10 Plates, 4 Tables TRACE FOSSILS OF FORT HAYS LIMESTONE MEMBER OF NIOBRARA CHALK (UPPER CRETACEOUS), WEST-CENTRAL KANSAS' ROBERT W. FREY University of Georgia Marine Institute, Sapelo Island, Georgia CONTENTS PAGE PAGE ABSTRACT 5 Thalassinoides...

  4. Microseismic monitoring as a tool for mapping fractures in the San Andres dolomite. [Microearthquakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutledge, J.T.; Fairbanks, T.D.; House, L.S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Murphy, M.B. (Murphy Operating Corp., Roswell, NM (United States))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microseismic monitoring shows promise of being a practical tool for mapping fractures in the San Andres dolomite in terms of rate of microearthquake occurrence and the areal coverage possible from a single downhole seismometer. Microearthquakes were detected during normal waterflood production but monitoring was not complete enough to correlate injection/production activity with microseismic event recurrence. Constant monitoring time capability with at least 3 downhole seismometers is needed to more accurately locate events, and to reliably characterize seismic recurrence in the field. In addition, modeling pressure variations in the reservoir may help explain the mechanisms that produces the microearthquakes. Data useful in modeling the pressure variations could be from tracer experiments, pressure interference tests and individual well production-injection volume. Understanding the mechanism of producing the microearthquakes should, in turn, allow the correlation of the microseismicity with fluid flow within the reservoir. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Microseismic monitoring as a tool for mapping fractures in the San Andres dolomite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutledge, J.T.; Fairbanks, T.D.; House, L.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Murphy, M.B. [Murphy Operating Corp., Roswell, NM (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Microseismic monitoring shows promise of being a practical tool for mapping fractures in the San Andres dolomite in terms of rate of microearthquake occurrence and the areal coverage possible from a single downhole seismometer. Microearthquakes were detected during normal waterflood production but monitoring was not complete enough to correlate injection/production activity with microseismic event recurrence. Constant monitoring time capability with at least 3 downhole seismometers is needed to more accurately locate events, and to reliably characterize seismic recurrence in the field. In addition, modeling pressure variations in the reservoir may help explain the mechanisms that produces the microearthquakes. Data useful in modeling the pressure variations could be from tracer experiments, pressure interference tests and individual well production-injection volume. Understanding the mechanism of producing the microearthquakes should, in turn, allow the correlation of the microseismicity with fluid flow within the reservoir. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Interpretations of Tracer Tests Performed in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MEIGS,LUCY C.; BEAUHEIM,RICHARD L.; JONES,TOYA L.

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides (1) an overview of all tracer testing conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WPP) site, (2) a detailed description of the important information about the 1995-96 tracer tests and the current interpretations of the data, and (3) a summary of the knowledge gained to date through tracer testing in the Culebra. Tracer tests have been used to identify transport processes occurring within the Culebra and quantify relevant parameters for use in performance assessment of the WIPP. The data, especially those from the tests performed in 1995-96, provide valuable insight into transport processes within the Culebra. Interpretations of the tracer tests in combination with geologic information, hydraulic-test information, and laboratory studies have resulted in a greatly improved conceptual model of transport processes within the Culebra. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is low (< 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a single-porosity medium in which advection occurs largely through the primary porosity of the dolomite matrix. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is high (> 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a heterogeneous, layered, fractured medium in which advection occurs largely through fractures and solutes diffuse between fractures and matrix at multiple rates. The variations in diffusion rate can be attributed to both variations in fracture spacing (or the spacing of advective pathways) and matrix heterogeneity. Flow and transport appear to be concentrated in the lower Culebra. At all locations, diffusion is the dominant transport process in the portions of the matrix that tracer does not access by flow.

  7. Frank Masci (1)MIPS D/L Review (S5), February 28, 2001 24m SUR-mode Saturation Flagging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masci, Frank

    Frank Masci (1)MIPS D/L Review (S5), February 28, 2001 24µm SUR-mode Saturation Flagging: SATMASK Frank Masci February 28, 2001 #12;Frank Masci (2)MIPS D/L Review (S5), February 28, 2001 What SATMASK are flagged in a bit-mask image (D-mask). #12;Frank Masci (3)MIPS D/L Review (S5), February 28, 2001

  8. Optimization of Trona/Limestone Injection for SO2 Control in Coal-Fired Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mobotec USA develops and markets air pollution control systems for utility boilers and other combustion systems. They have a particular interest in technologies that can reduce NOx, SOx, and mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers, and have been investigating the injection of sorbents such as limestone and trona into a boiler to reduce SOx and Hg emissions. WRI proposed to use the Combustion Test Facility (CTF) to enable Mobotec to conduct a thorough evaluation of limestone and trona injection for SO{sub 2} control. The overall goal of the project was to characterize the SO{sub 2} reductions resulting from the injection of limestone and trona into the CTF when fired with a high-sulfur eastern bituminous coal used in one of Mobotec's Midwest installations. Results revealed that when limestone was injected at Ca:S molar ratios of 1.5 to 3.0, the resulting SO{sub 2} reductions were 35-55%. It is believed that further reductions can be attained with improved mixing of the sorbent with the combustion gases. When limestone was added to the coal, at Ca:S molar ratios of 0.5 to 1.5, the SO{sub 2} reductions were 13-21%. The lower reductions were attributed to dead-burning of the sorbent in the high temperature flame zone. In cases where limestone was both injected into the furnace and added to the coal, the total SO{sub 2} reductions for a given Ca:S molar ratio were similar to the reductions for furnace injection only. The injection of trona into the mid-furnace zone, for Na:S molar ratios of 1.4 to 2.4, resulted in SO{sub 2} reductions of 29-43%. Limestone injection did not produce any slag deposits on an ash deposition probe while trona injection resulted in noticeable slag deposition.

  9. Influence of salts on the sulfur retention of limestone in atmospheric fluidized-bed combustors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.W.; Lenc, J.F.; Shearer, J.A.; Chopra, O.K.; Myles, K.M.; Johnson, I.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Increased utilization of the available CaO can reduce the amount of limestone required for SO/sub 2/ retention in atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion systems. In laboratory experiments, a pretreatment with inorganic salts, such as NaCl, CaCl/sub 2/, or Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, has been found to be an effective method of improving the CaO utilization. This report provides quantitative information on the effectiveness of the same sulfation-enhancement salts in reducing the limestone requirements in an atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC). Some laboratory experiments indicated that only 0.1 mol % of salt was required to produce the structural changes in the limestone necessary to increase the CaO utilization. In contrast, the AFBC runs indicated that as much as 2.0 mol % salt was required to obtain a significant increase in the CaO utilization. The increased utilization of the salt-treated limestone in the AFBC reduced the total amount of limestone needed to meet the EPA emission standard for sulfur dioxide to one-half of that required when no treatment is used.

  10. Conceptual model for transport processes in the Culebra Dolomite Member, Rustler Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holt, R.M. [Holt Hydrogeology, Placitas, NM (United States)] [Holt Hydrogeology, Placitas, NM (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation represents a possible pathway for contaminants from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant underground repository to the accessible environment. The geologic character of the Culebra is consistent with a double-porosity, multiple-rate model for transport in which the medium is conceptualized as consisting of advective porosity, where solutes are carried by the groundwater flow, and fracture-bounded zones of diffusive porosity, where solutes move through slow advection or diffusion. As the advective travel length or travel time increases, the nature of transport within a double-porosity medium changes. This behavior is important for chemical sorption, because the specific surface area per unit mass of the diffusive porosity is much greater than in the advective porosity. Culebra transport experiments conducted at two different length scales show behavior consistent with a multiple-rate, double-porosity conceptual model for Culebra transport. Tracer tests conducted on intact core samples from the Culebra show no evidence of significant diffusion, suggesting that at the core scale the Culebra can be modeled as a single-porosity medium where only the advective porosity participates in transport. Field tracer tests conducted in the Culebra show strong double-porosity behavior that is best explained using a multiple-rate model.

  11. Laboratory column experiments for radionuclide adsorption studies of the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucero, D.A.; Heath, C.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brown, G.O. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States). Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering Dept.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radionuclide transport experiments were carried out using intact cores obtained from the Culebra member of the Rustler Formation inside the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Air Intake Shaft. Twenty-seven separate tests are reported here and include experiments with {sup 3}H, {sup 22}Na, {sup 241}Am, {sup 239}Np, {sup 228}Th, {sup 232}U and {sup 241}Pu, and two brine types, AIS and ERDA 6. The {sup 3}H was bound as water and provides a measure of advection, dispersion, and water self-diffusion. The other tracers were injected as dissolved ions at concentrations below solubility limits, except for americium. The objective of the intact rock column flow experiments is to demonstrate and quantify transport retardation coefficients, (R) for the actinides Pu, Am, U, Th and Np, in intact core samples of the Culebra Dolomite. The measured R values are used to estimate partition coefficients, (kd) for the solute species. Those kd values may be compared to values obtained from empirical and mechanistic adsorption batch experiments, to provide predictions of actinide retardation in the Culebra. Three parameters that may influence actinide R values were varied in the experiments; core, brine and flow rate. Testing five separate core samples from four different core borings provided an indication of sample variability. While most testing was performed with Culebra brine, limited tests were carried out with a Salado brine to evaluate the effect of intrusion of those lower waters. Varying flow rate provided an indication of rate dependent solute interactions such as sorption kinetics.

  12. Revision of DL-Lite Knowledge Bases Zhe Wang, Kewen Wang, and Rodney Topor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Kewen

    for propositional logic to DLs but no specific revision operators were provided, e.g. [4, 5]. Recently, there haveRevision of DL-Lite Knowledge Bases Zhe Wang, Kewen Wang, and Rodney Topor Griffith University, Australia Abstract. We address the revision problem for knowledge bases (KBs) in De- scription Logics (DLs

  13. Measurement of the B -> Dl nu branching fractions and form factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhou, L.

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a sample of 3.3 x 10(6) B-meson decays collected with the CLEO detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have studied B- --> D(0)l(-) and (B) over bar(0) --> D(+)l(-) decays, where l(-) can be either e...

  14. Beamforming for the Underlay Cognitive MISO Interference Channel via UL-DL Duality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesbert, David

    Beamforming for the Underlay Cognitive MISO Interference Channel via UL-DL Duality Francesco Negro.negro@eurecom.fr, dirk.slock@eurecom.fr Abstract--SINR duality is shown in a multi-input single- output (MISO) downlink for the IFC. We show that SINR duality under the sum power constraint nevertheless holds in the MISO IFC

  15. Geomorphic Stream Classification "A Classification of Natural Rivers", Rosgen, D.L.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and animals are constrained by natural channel physics #12;Stream Corridor Restoration: Principles, ProcessesGeomorphic Stream Classification "A Classification of Natural Rivers", Rosgen, D.L. #12;Why is Stream Classification Essential? Napeequa River · Physical stream channel evolution ·Similar stream types

  16. paper submission to EuroDL'99, Paris Metadata for Photographs: from Digital Library to Multimedia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    paper submission to EuroDL'99, Paris Metadata for Photographs: from Digital Library to Multimedia Libraries provide access to an increasing variety of digital multimedia information, including images, photos, sound and video. For many years Libraries and Digital Libraries have been relying

  17. A. E. K.Ris Ris-M-Dl^ Title and author(s)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. E. K.Risø Risø-M-Dl^ Title and author(s) Application of Statistical Linear El -it:tic Fracture illustrations Date October 1 -}? $ Department or group R e a c t o r Group's own registration number(s) 25 crack, same time and ated as statisti- ty functions, tial cracks, f failure prob- program utilizing ce

  18. The revolution in SiGe: impact on device electronics D.L. Haramea,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieh, Jae-Sung

    The revolution in SiGe: impact on device electronics D.L. Haramea,* , S.J. Koesterb , G. Freemanc, Hopewell Junction, NY, USA d Georgia Technical University, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract SiGe is having a major impact in device electronics. The most mature application is the SiGe BiCMOS technology which

  19. MR-Trackable Intramyocardial Injection Catheter P.V. Karmarkar,1* D.L. Kraitchman,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atalar, Ergin

    MR-Trackable Intramyocardial Injection Catheter P.V. Karmarkar,1* D.L. Kraitchman,1 I. Izbudak,1 L.V. Hofmann,1 L.C. Amado,2 D. Fritzges,1 R. Young,3 M. Pittenger,3 J.W.M. Bulte,1 and E. Atalar1 ventricular remodeling. MRI can be effectively used to differentiate in- farcted from healthy myocardium. MR

  20. Kinetics of on Goethite: A Pressure Relaxation Study. P. G. GROSSL*, MJ. EICK, D.L.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    I Kinetics of on Goethite: A Pressure Relaxation Study. P. G. GROSSL*, MJ. EICK, D.L. SPARKS, and C the adsorption/desorption of the oxyanions, chromate and arsenate, on goethite (a-FeOOH). Experimental conditions included equilibration of a 10 g L-l goethite (surface area 52 m2 g-l) suspension with initial total

  1. ISSN:1575-6807 D.L.: GC-1317-1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granada, Universidad de

    ISSN:1575-6807 D.L.: GC-1317-1999 INSTITUTO UNIVERSITARIO DE CIENCIAS Y TECNOLOGIAS CIBERNETICAS · González Esther · Mazorra Luis · Salgado Agustín · Sánchez Javier · Santana Francisco · Trujillo Agustín/12/2003 19:00:Luis Alvarez, Julio Esclarín and Agustín Trujillo ...(Page 29) Universidad de Las Palmas de

  2. Accumulation of surface-applied agricultural limestone in acid soils of east Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Earl Raymond

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    limestone sample, the lime dealer who supplied the sample, and its source is found in Appendix A. Analyses of Agricultural t, imestone Analyses performed on each sample of agricultural limestone includea: total dissolution analysis, x-ray diffraction... in the surface of limed soils than in the surface of unlimed soils, and a greater proportion of exchange sites were occupied by Ca2+ in the surface of limed soils than in the subsurface. Aluminum saturation was high enough in the subsoil of some sites...

  3. Diagenetic history and evolution of porosity of the Cotton Valley Limestone, Southeastern Smith County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Covington, Thomas Edward

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    more open diagenetic system. Increasing Mg and Fe correlated with saddle dolomite in non-porous intervals. Higher Fe also reflected subsurface calcspar and pyrite. Whole rock and component isotope analysis revealed greater deple- tion of 6160 (-7... and expense in the stable isotope laboratory, along with much helpful advice, made that portion of' the study possible. A very special thanks to Dr. Tom Tieh, without whose moral and financial support during Dr. Ahr's long absence this project could...

  4. Demonstration of a hydration process for reactivating partially sulfated limestone sorbents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.W.; Hajicek, D.R.; Myles, K.M.; Goblirsch, G.M.; Mowry, R.W.; Teats, F.G.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The utilization of limestione sorbent for the removal of SO/sub 2/ in coal combustion in an atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC) can be markedly increased by reactivating the partially sulfated limestone for reuse in the combustor. Such reuse would reduce costs and the environmental impact of quarrying and disposing of large quantities of limestone. The reactivation process consists of hydrating the partially sulfated limestone by treatment with water. A demonstration of the hydration process and the reuse of the reactivated limestone were carried out at Grand Forks Energy Technology Center (GFETC) in cooperation with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The data obtained in the GFETC 0.2-m/sup 2/ AFBC are compared with those obtained earlier in the ANL 0.02-m/sup 2/ AFBC. Marked enhancement of calcium utilization was achieved in both studies, but differences were noted in the degree of enhancement and in the Ca/S mole ratios required to maintain SO/sub 2/ in the off-gas at an acceptable level.

  5. Hydrochemical Impacts of Limestone Rock Mining Ghinwa M. Naja & Rosanna Rivero &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demers, Nora Egan

    . 2002). Even though the environmental impacts of ore and coal mining have been adequately investigatedHydrochemical Impacts of Limestone Rock Mining Ghinwa M. Naja & Rosanna Rivero & Stephen E. Davis B.V. 2010 Abstract Hydrochemical impacts of shallow rock industrial-scale mining activities close

  6. Concrete international /january 2010 35 Portland limestone cement (PLC) is produced by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Concrete international /january 2010 35 Portland limestone cement (PLC) is produced by blending demonstration of PLC concrete in the late-fall construction of a parking lot at a ready mixed concrete plant near Gatineau, QC, Canada. The performance of the plastic and hardened concretes produced with PLC

  7. Depositional facies, textural characteristics, and reservoir properties of dolomites in Frobisher-Alida interval in southwest North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petty, D.M.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mississippian Frobisher-Alida interval is an upward-shoaling cycle that began with open-marine sedimentation and culminated with the deposition of a widespread sabkha-salina evaporite. This cycle is the most prolific oil-producing interval in the North Dakota portion of the Williston basin. Most Frobisher-Alida production in the southern Williston basin is from dolomite reservoirs. The six major facies defined in this paper are lithologic suites that represent sediments and precipitates deposited in similar environments. 20 figures, 5 tables.

  8. Transient sulfation behavior of limestone particles in an AFBC test rig: Data for validation studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Organ, L.; Selcuk, N.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intraparticle conversion profiles and evolution or pore structure with time were investigated by exposing essentially non-porous limestone particles with an average size of 0.655 mm to reaction conditions in a 0.3 MWt atmospheric fluidized bed combustor (AFBC) operating under steady state conditions with and without limestone addition. Structural analyses of the partially sulfated particles show that both the surface area and pore volume increase at the early stages of the reaction but later pore volume remains nearly constant while BET surface area progressively decreases due to the blockage of smaller pores by the bulky reaction product, calcium sulfate. Correspondingly, the pore size distributions indicate a progressive shift toward large pore diameters. The particles were also examined by means of SEM-EDX analysis technique in order to determine their intraparticle sulfaction profiles. The analyses demonstrate that the conversion profile starts from a maximum at the particle surface and decreases progressively toward the product layer-core interface.

  9. Characterisation of hydraulic fractures in limestones using X-ray microtomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renard, Francois; Desrues, Jacques; Plougonven, Erwan; Ougier-Simonin, Audrey

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic tension fractures were produced in porous limestones using a specially designed hydraulic cell. The 3D geometry of the samples was imaged using X-ray computed microtomography before and after fracturation. Using these data, it was possible to estimate the permeability tensor of the core samples, extract the path of the rupture and compare it to the heterogeneities initially present in the rock.

  10. Nutrients and Nutrient Nutrient cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Randall J.

    : 38,000 Fossil Fuels:Fossil Fuels: 25,000,00025,000,000 Limestone,Limestone, Dolomite:Dolomite: 18 to atmosphere currently exceed outputs because of - Fossil fuel burning - Vegetation burning - Reduced primary

  11. Distribution and diversity of ostracode assemblages from the Hamlin Shale and the Americus Limestone (Permian, Wolfcampian) in northeastern Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, R. M.; Kaesler, R. L.

    1980-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Shale have been recognized: lagoonal, carbonate mudflat, intertidal shoal and beach, and non- marine. Four lithofacies are recognized in the Americus Limestone: tidal mudflat, lagoonal, carbonate shoal, and basinal. The uppermost Hamlin Shale... bassleri, and Carbonita in- flata; 3) lagoons and tidal mudflats of the Hamlin Shale, characterized by Parapar- chites humerosus; 4) lagoons of the Americus Limestone, also characterized by Paraparchites humerosus and by Bairdia beedei; 5) mixed quiet...

  12. Effect of limestone reactivity on the digestibility of nutrients in sorghum based diets fed to lactating Holstein cows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malasri, Kriangchitt Banphabutr

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF LIMESTONE REACTIVITY ON THE DIGESTIBILITY OF NUTRIENTS IN SORGHUM BASED DIETS FED TO LACTATING HOLSTEIN COWS A Thesis by KRIANGCHITT BANPHABUTR MALASRI Submitted to the Graduate College of' Texas A&M University in partial f...'ulfillment of the requirement f' or the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1981 Major Subject: Animal Science EFFECT OF LIMESTONE REACTIVITY ON THE DIGESTIBILITY OF NUTRIENTS IN SORGHUM BASED DIETS FED TO LACTATING HOLSTEIN CONJS A thesis by KRIANGCHITT BANPHABUTR...

  13. Teaching Organic Farming and Gardening: Resources for Instructors, 3rd Edition. Part 1 - Skills and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    include: i. CaCO 3 – calcium carbonate – calcitic limestone:CO 3 ) 2 – calcium/magnesium carbonate – dolomitic lime:

  14. Hydrocarbon Seeps of the Mesozoic Great Valley Group Forearc Strata and Franciscan Complex, Northern and Central California, U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keenan, Kristin Euphrat

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sediments and Their Diagenesis. Elsevier ScientificDolomitization and Limestone Diagenesis. Society of Economictextures, porosity, diagenesis. The American Association of

  15. Reaction of Calcite and Dolomite with In-Situ Gelled Acids, Organic Acids, and Environmentally Friendly Chelating Agent (GLDA) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabie, Ahmed 1978-

    2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    -15 samples. Larger sampling time was avoided to eliminate the effect of changing the surface area on determining the rate of dissolution. The initial surface area of the sample was used to determine the dissolution rate. 2.2 . 5 Test Termin ation... rpm and 150?F, (Rabie et al. 2011a).?????.??????????????..... 17 Fig. 2.5 Effect of Disk Rotational Speed on the Calcite Dissolution of Pink Desert Limestone in 0.6M GLDA at 200oF and pH of 1.7, 3.8, and 13, (Rabie et al. 2011b...

  16. Mixing and combustion in a coal-limestone fluidized bed combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkpatrick, M.O.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Task 1 was to investigate experimentally the characteristics of solids mixing between coal and limestone in a cold fluidized bed; Task 2 was to derive a model to describe the behavior of solids mixing observed in Task 1; and Task 3 was to develop a combustor model, which couples the mixing model derived in Task 2 with a combustion model, to simulate the mixing and combustion behavior in a hot coal-limestone fluidized bed combustor. In Task 1, the experiments were carried out in a 0.203 m diameter cold fluidized bed with coal and limestone of different sizes the the fluidized particles. Experimental parameters examined included operation time, air flow rate, bed height, initial bed setup, relative particle size and relative amount of the two particles. In the second task, the mixing model considered the downward or upward movement of a particle in the bed as being governed by certain probability laws; these laws were, in turn, affected by the bubbles. The distance of the upward movement was governed by the residence time of a particle staying in a bubble wake; the distance of downward movement, however, was determined from a material balance consideration. In all, the model took into account the effects of time, flow rate, initial bed setup and relative particle size on solids mixing. Dynamic coal concentration profiles under different operating conditions were generated by the simulation and were found to represent the experimental data reasonably well. In addition to the operation parameters included in Tasks 1 and 2, the model developed in Task 3 also considered the inlet size distribution of coal, size reduction of coal due to combustion and coal elutriation. This model was a capable of predicting the dynamic mixing and combustion behavior in a combustor under specific operation conditions.

  17. Paleoenvironment of an upper Cotton Valley (Knowles limestone) patch reef, Milam County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cregg, Allen Kent

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Head of' Department) ( Mem'her ) (Member) May 198Z ABSTRACT Paleoenvironment of an Upper Cotton Valley (Knowles Limestone) Patch Reef, Milam County, Texas (May 1982) Allen Kent Cregg, B. S. , University of New Orleans Chairman of Advisory.... Depth in kilo- meters (km) and thousands of feet (kft). Two-way time in seconds {sec). (Seismic section courtesy of Mohil Producing Texas and New Mexico Incorporated-United Geo- physical). - NW 1? 5 2? SR I A 1 SA 2 1 'I S ? 10 4? 15'-' 5? Z...

  18. Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Michael Grammer

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This topical report covers the year 2 of the subject 3-year grant, evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin (Ordovician Trenton-Black River Formations; Silurian Niagara Group; and the Devonian Dundee Formation). The characterization of select dolomite reservoirs has been the major focus of our efforts in Phase II/Year 2. Fields have been prioritized based upon the availability of rock data for interpretation of depositional environments, fracture density and distribution as well as thin section, geochemical, and petrophysical analyses. Structural mapping and log analysis in the Dundee (Devonian) and Trenton/Black River (Ordovician) suggest a close spatial relationship among gross dolomite distribution and regional-scale, wrench fault related NW-SE and NE-SW structural trends. A high temperature origin for much of the dolomite in the 3 studied intervals (based upon initial fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and stable isotopic analyses,) coupled with persistent association of this dolomite in reservoirs coincident with wrench fault-related features, is strong evidence for these reservoirs being influenced by hydrothermal dolomitization. For the Niagaran (Silurian), a comprehensive high resolution sequence stratigraphic framework has been developed for a pinnacle reef in the northern reef trend where we had 100% core coverage throughout the reef section. Major findings to date are that facies types, when analyzed at a detailed level, have direct links to reservoir porosity and permeability in these dolomites. This pattern is consistent with our original hypothesis of primary facies control on dolomitization and resulting reservoir quality at some level. The identification of distinct and predictable vertical stacking patterns within a hierarchical sequence and cycle framework provides a high degree of confidence at this point that results will be exportable throughout the basin. Ten petrophysically significant facies have been described in the northern reef trend, providing significantly more resolution than the standard 4-6 that are used most often in the basin (e.g. Gill, 1977). Initial petrophysical characterization (sonic velocity analysis under confining pressures) shows a clear pattern that is dependent upon facies and resulting pore architecture. Primary facies is a key factor in the ultimate diagenetic modification of the rock and the resulting pore architecture. Facies with good porosity and permeability clearly show relatively slow velocity values as would be expected, and low porosity and permeability samples exhibit fast sonic velocity values, again as expected. What is significant is that some facies that have high porosity values, either measured directly or from wireline logs, also have very fast sonic velocity values. This is due to these facies having a pore architecture characterized by more localized pores (vugs, molds or fractures) that are not in communication.

  19. Paracontinuous boundaries within the Devonian Columbus Limestone and Delaware Formation of central Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conkin, J.E. (Univ. of Louisville, KY (United States). Dept. of Geography and Geosciences); Conkin, B.M. (Jefferson Community Coll., Louisville, KY (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Internal units within the Columbus Limestone (Early Devonian Emsian [Schoharie] to Middle Devonian Eifelian [late Onesquethawan]) and the Delaware Formation (Middle Devonian early Givetian [Cazenovian]) of central Ohio are separated by disconformities of the magnitude of paracontinuities. Stauffer (1909) divided the Columbus Limestone into zones A--H and the Delaware Formation into zones I--M. Within the Columbus, the A Zone (conglomerate at the base of Bellepoint Member) disconformably overlies Late Silurian beds. The D zone at top of the Bellepoint Member (bearing the Kawkawlin Metabentonite horizon) is overlain paracontinuously by the Marblehead Member (Lower Paraspirifer acuminatus-Spirifer macrothyris to Brevispirifer gregarius-Moellerina greenei zones [= E--G zones]), with the Onondagan Indian Nation Metabentonite in the top of the G Zone. The Marblehead Member is overlain paracontinuously by a bone bed at base of the Venice Member (H zone = Upper Paraspirifer acuminatus- Spirifer duodenarius'' Zone). I Zone (Dublin Shale=Marcellus) of the Delaware Formation overlies the Columbus and has two bone beds at its base; Tioga Metabentonite (restricted) overlies the I Zone bone beds and is a few tenths to 1.85 feet above the base of the I Zone. Paracontinuities and bone beds occur at the bases of J, K, and L zones. Conkin and Conkin (1975) have shown Stauffer's (1909) M Zone is an extension of his L Zone. The Olentangy paracontinuously overlies the L Zone.

  20. Hypothetical Distance Learning Program Costs Model A framework for thinking about the comprehensive costs of hosting a DL program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snider, Barry B.

    Hypothetical Distance Learning Program Costs Model A framework for thinking about the comprehensive costs of hosting a DL program Start-Up Ongoing Explanation 100,000$ 100,000$ FTE needed to develop any or repurpose old courses for the online context. Infrastructure Costs tbd tbd Cost of adding or improving

  1. Laboratory Investigations in Support of Dioxide-Limestone Sequestration in the Ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Golomb; Eugene Barry; David Ryan; Stephen Pennell; Carl Lawton; Peter Swett; Devinder Arora; John Hannon; Michael Woods; Huishan Duan; Tom Lawlor

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Research under this Project has proven that liquid carbon dioxide can be emulsified in water by using very fine particles as emulsion stabilizers. Hydrophilic particles stabilize a CO{sub 2}-in-H{sub 2}O (C/W) emulsion; hydrophobic particles stabilize a H{sub 2}O-in-CO{sub 2} (W/C) emulsion. The C/W emulsion consists of tiny CO{sub 2} droplets coated with hydrophilic particles dispersed in water. The W/C emulsion consists of tiny H{sub 2}O droplets coated with hydrophobic particles dispersed in liquid carbon dioxide. The coated droplets are called globules. The emulsions could be used for deep ocean sequestration of CO{sub 2}. Liquid CO{sub 2} is sparsely soluble in water, and is less dense than seawater. If neat, liquid CO{sub 2} were injected in the deep ocean, it is likely that the dispersed CO{sub 2} droplets would buoy upward and flash into vapor before the droplets dissolve in seawater. The resulting vapor bubbles would re-emerge into the atmosphere. On the other hand, the emulsion is denser than seawater, hence the emulsion plume would sink toward greater depth from the injection point. For ocean sequestration a C/W emulsion appears to be most practical using limestone (CaCO{sub 3}) particles of a few to ten ?m diameter as stabilizing agents. A mix of one volume of liquid CO{sub 2} with two volumes of H{sub 2}O, plus 0.5 weight of pulverized limestone per weight of liquid CO{sub 2} forms a stable emulsion with density 1087 kg m{sup -3}. Ambient seawater at 500 m depth has a density of approximately 1026 kg m{sup -3}, so the emulsion plume would sink by gravity while entraining ambient seawater till density equilibrium is reached. Limestone is abundant world-wide, and is relatively cheap. Furthermore, upon disintegration of the emulsion the CaCO{sub 3} particles would partially buffer the carbonic acid that forms when CO{sub 2} dissolves in seawater, alleviating some of the concerns of discharging CO{sub 2} in the deep ocean. Laboratory experiments showed that the CaCO{sub 3} emulsion is slightly alkaline, not acidic. We tested the release of the CO{sub 2}-in-H{sub 2}O emulsion stabilized by pulverized limestone in the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory High Pressure Water Tunnel Facility (HPWTF). Digital photographs showed the sinking globules in the HPWTF, confirming the concept of releasing the emulsion in the deep ocean. We modeled the release of an emulsion from the CO{sub 2} output of a 1000 MW coal-fired power plant at 500 m depth. The emulsion would typically sink several hundred meters before density equilibration with ambient seawater. The CO{sub 2} globules would rain out from the equilibrated plume toward the ocean bottom where they would disintegrate due to wave action and bottom friction. Conceptual release systems are described both for an open ocean release and a sloping seabed release of the emulsion.

  2. Limestone sand (Figure 1) has come into wide use in the treatment of waters acidified by acid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    rain or acid mine drainage. Its low cost makes it especially attractive, particularly at remote sites is available from the College of Agricultural Sciences Publications Distribution Center, 112 Ag. Administration://pubs.cas.psu.edu/freepubs/pdfs/UH157.pdf/. Summary of Limestone Sand Pros and Cons Pros Cons -No maintenance -Inconsistent results

  3. International Symposium on the Conservation of Monuments in the Mediterranean Basin MULTI-SCALE CHARACTERISATION OF MONUMENT LIMESTONES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and to model deterioration process. In this paper, two sedimentary limestones are chosen. The first one, called, it is necessary to note the great diversity of the tuffeau family (important variability of minerals proportion and porosity [1]). So, studied tuffeau is tuffeau of Saumur, extracted from an underground quarry

  4. A Leader-Follower Algorithm for Multiple AUV Formations D. B. Edwards, T.A. Bean, *D.L. Odell, M.J. Anderson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Idaho, University of

    A Leader-Follower Algorithm for Multiple AUV Formations D. B. Edwards, T.A. Bean, *D.L. Odell, M.5 million square meters of shallow water for mines in Operation Enduring Freedom in Iraq 2003 [1

  5. Diagenetic history and the evolution of porosity in the Cotton Valley Limestone, Teague Townsite Field, Freestone County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steffensen, Carl Kristian

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Porosity in the Cotton Valley Limestone, Teague Townsite Field, Freestone County, Texas (December, 1982) Carl Kristian Steffensen, B. S. , University of Illinois Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Wayne M. Ahr The Cotton Valey Lime was deposited... during a regressive phase of the Late Jurassic, in a shallow sea with an exten- sive platform. Mild salt tectonism has modified depositional and diagenetic environments through time. The Cotton Valley Lime is composed of thick, massive, oolitic...

  6. WHOLE-ROCK 87Sr/86Sr COMPOSITION AND APPARENT STRONTIUM ISOTOPIC AGE OF LIMESTONES FROM SITE 1118, WOODLARK RIFT BASIN, SOUTHWEST PACIFIC (OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 180) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Tony; Robertson, Alastair H F; Sharp, Timothy R; Trotter, Julie

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Limestone from Unit VI (857.1–859.15 meters below seafloor) collected at Site 1118 contains a planktonic foraminiferal fauna indicating a latest Miocene to early Pliocene age. Globorotalia tumida is recorded in Sample ...

  7. Microfacies analysis, paleoecology, and environment of deposition of Morrowan shelf carbonates, Magdalena Limestone (lower division), Hueco Mountains, El Paso County, West Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connolly, William Marc

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MICROFACIES ANALYSIS, PALEOECOLOGY, AND ENVIRONMENT OF DEPOSITION OF MORROWAN SHELF CARBONATES, MAGDALENA LIMESTONE (LOWER DIVISION), HUECO MOUNTAINS, EL PASO COUNTY, WEST TEXAS Volume I A Thesis by WILLIAM NARC CONNOLLY Submitted..., MAGDALENA LIMESTONE (LOWER DIVISION), HUECO MOUNTAINS, EL PASO COUNTY, WEST TEXAS Volume I A Thesis by WILLIAM MARC CONNOLLY Approved as to style and content by: Robert S to , Jr. (Chai an of Committee) Thomas E. Yancey (Member) Richard Rezak...

  8. Regional analysis of rhythmic bedding in the Fort Hays limestone member, Niobrara Formation (Upper Cretaceous), US western interior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laferriere, A.P.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of a regional stratigraphic investigation of the rhythmically bedded Fort Hays limestone member of Kansas, Colorado, and New Mexico indicate at least two levels of cyclicity. Regional development of these cycles strongly supports the hypothesis that they are climatic in origin. Departures from simple cyclical patterns resulted from sedimentary effects of Late Cretaceous orogenic activity, erosional events associated with eustatic sea level changes, diagenetic modification, and possibly from interference between orbital parameters having different periodicities. The vulnerability of Milankovitch-type cyclicity to overprinting by tectono-sedimentologic effects makes units such as the Fort Hays useful as indicators of subtle tectonic activity. Regional thickness changes in groups of shale-limestone couplets were identified, correlated, and mapped in the subsurface using geophysical well log information in order to locate subtle structural elements that influenced Fort Hays sedimentation. In the Denver-Julesburg Basin of Colorado and western Kansas, thinning of the section between Fort Hays marker horizons occurs dominantly along northeastwardly trending belts that resulted apparently from Late Cretaceous reactivation of the Transcontinental Arch. Isotopic and petrographic analyses were conducted on pelagic (carbonate matrix) and benthic (inoceramid bivalve) constituents of selected shale/limestone couplets. These data suggest that there was little difference in temperature or salinity between times of terrigenous detrital input and times of nearly pure carbonate deposition. Isotopic information from matrix samples suggests a westward decrease in salinity of surface water in the Western Interior Sea. Isotopic data from largely unaltered inoceramid bivalves indicate bottom-water conditions of near-normal marine salinity.

  9. The stratigraphy and environment of deposition of productive Wilcox clays in west central Freestone and southeast Limestone Counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelvey, Stephanie Anne

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lies between the Brazos River system to the west and the T ri n1ty River system to the east, and is 1 ncluded within the l i o r Freestone County u ~ xiogo Cs 0 QF ~ lrfi ~ Id ~ m ~ boro ~ oso ~ Limestone Count STUDY AREA Figure 2. Out1ine rf.... The dominance of these minerals indicates a highly active weathering environment in which only stable minerals could survive complete transport. The abundance of kaolinite also indicates that the area was well drained. Fisher (1961) reports that the Simsboro...

  10. ITER BLANKET AND SHIELD STUDIES FOR HIGH ASPECT RATIO DESIGN OPTION* Y .Gohar, H. Attaya, M. Billone,C. Johnson,J. Kopasz, S.Majumdar, R. Mattas, and D.L. Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    . Billone,C. Johnson,J. Kopasz, S.Majumdar, R. Mattas, and D.L. Smith Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S

  11. Pilot-scale Limestone Emission Control (LEC) process: A development project. Volume 1, Main report and appendices A, B, C, and D: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prudich, M.E. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States); Appell, K.W.; McKenna, J.D. [ETS, Inc., Roanoke, VA (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ETS, Inc., a pollution consulting firm with headquarters in Roanoke, Virginia, has developed a dry, limestone-based flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. This SO{sub 2} removal system, called Limestone Emission Control (LEC), can be designed for installation on either new or existing coal-fired boilers. In the LEC process, the SO{sub 2} in the flue gas reacts with wetted granular limestone that is contained in a moving bed. A surface layer of principally calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}) is formed on the limestone. Periodic removal of this surface layer by mechanical agitation allows high utilization of the limestone granules. A nominal 5,000 acfm LEC pilot plant has been designed, fabricated and installed on the slipstream of a 70,000 pph stoker boiler providing steam to Ohio University`s Athens, Ohio campus. A total of over 90 experimental trials have been performed using the pilot-scale moving-bed LEC dry scrubber as a part of this research project with run times ranging up to a high of 125 hours. SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies as high as 99.9% were achievable for all experimental conditions studied during which sufficient humidification was added to the LEC bed. The LEC process and conventional limestone scrubbing have been compared on an equatable basis using flue gas conditions that would be expected at the outlet of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) of a 500 MW coal-fired power plant. The LEC was found to have a definite economic advantage in both direct capital costs and operating costs. Based on the success and findings of the present project, the next step in LEC process development will be a full-scale commercial demonstration unit.

  12. Chemical alteration of limestone and marble samples exposed to acid rain and weathering in the eastern United States, 1984--1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimann, K.J.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a long-term program that began in 1984, limestone and marble briquettes have been exposed to both anthropogenic acid deposition and natural weathering of four field sites in the eastern United States. Similar tests began at an Ohio site in 1986. Effects of exposure on the briquettes and other materials at the sites are evaluated periodically by several federal agencies cooperating in the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). A primary contribution of Argonne National Laboratory to the NAPAP has been chemical analysis to determine changes in the samples caused by exposure to the environment. Wet chemical analysis was used to detect sulfates, nitrates, fluorides, chlorides, and a series of metal cations in sequential layers of stone removed from the briquettes after field exposure. Results from the first four years of the program indicate that rinsing by rain keeps skyward-facing stone relatively clean of reaction products, especially sulfate, the most abundant product. On groundward-facing samples, sulfate concentrations increased linearly with exposure time, and values were proportional to atmospheric SO{sub 2} concentrations at the site. Sulfate concentrations in groundward samples were much higher in limestone than in marble, because of the greater porosity of the limestone. A steep sulfate gradient was seen in both sample types from the surface to the interior. On skyward surfaces, material losses per rain event due to complete dissolution of accumulated sulfates were approximately equal to concentrations measured in runoff. Preexposed limestone samples had sulfate accumulations deep in their interiors, while fresh, unexposed limestone did not. No substantial changes in cation accumulations wee detected in either limestone or marble.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH EFFICIENCY FLEXIBLE CdTe SOLAR CELLS A.Romeo, M. Arnold, D.L. Btzner, H. Zogg and A.N. Tiwari*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romeo, Alessandro

    applications that require a very high specific power (ratio of output electrical power to the solar module specific power is an important issue for space solar cells: if satellites are lighter they are easierDEVELOPMENT OF HIGH EFFICIENCY FLEXIBLE CdTe SOLAR CELLS A.Romeo, M. Arnold, D.L. Bätzner, H. Zogg

  14. Cryogenic friction behavior of PTFE based solid lubricant composites N.L. McCook, D.L. Burris, P.L. Dickrell and W.G. Sawyer*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sawyer, Wallace

    of fluid lubricants is precluded. Such conditions are typically considered extreme, often existing lubrication 1. Introduction Solid lubricants are frequently used under opera- tional conditions where the useCryogenic friction behavior of PTFE based solid lubricant composites N.L. McCook, D.L. Burris, P

  15. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 105, NO. Dl, PAGES 1387-1415, JANUARY 20,2000 Sulfur chelllistry in the National Center for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    Understanding the tropospheric sulfur cycle is impor- tant because of its contribution to acid rain and its effect on the Earth's radiation balance. The role of sulfuric acid in acid rain has been recognizedJOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 105, NO. Dl, PAGES 1387-1415, JANUARY 20,2000 Sulfur

  16. ELEC 576 Semiconductor Theory for Device Applications Instructor: Dr. D.L. Pulfrey, Room K4040, pulfrey@ece.ubc.ca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    ELEC 576 Semiconductor Theory for Device Applications Fall 2005 Instructor: Dr. D.L. Pulfrey, Room the understanding of modern electronic semiconductor devices and the invention or development of new devices. Topics. Semiconductor statistics; low temperatures, degenerate. 4. Tunneling; heterostructures, S-D limitation to MOS

  17. Phase I (Year 1) Summary of Research--Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Michael Grammer

    2005-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This topical report covers the first 12 months of the subject 3-year grant, evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin (Ordovician Trenton-Black River Formations; Silurian Niagara Group; and the Devonian Dundee Formation). Phase I tasks, including Developing a Reservoir Catalog for selected dolomite reservoirs in the Michigan Basin, Characterization of Dolomite Reservoirs in Representative Fields and Technology Transfer have all been initiated and progress is consistent with our original scheduling. The development of a reservoir catalog for the 3 subject formations in the Michigan Basin has been a primary focus of our efforts during Phase I. As part of this effort, we currently have scanned some 13,000 wireline logs, and compiled in excess of 940 key references and 275 reprints that cover reservoir aspects of the 3 intervals in the Michigan Basin. A summary evaluation of the data in these publications is currently ongoing, with the Silurian Niagara Group being handled as a first priority. In addition, full production and reservoir parameter data bases obtained from available data sources have been developed for the 3 intervals in Excel and Microsoft Access data bases. We currently have an excess of 25 million cells of data for wells in the Basin. All Task 2 objectives are on time and on target for Phase I per our original proposal. Our mapping efforts to date, which have focused in large part on the Devonian Dundee Formation, have important implications for both new exploration plays and improved enhanced recovery methods in the Dundee ''play'' in Michigan--i.e. the interpreted fracture-related dolomitization control on the distribution of hydrocarbon reservoirs. In an exploration context, high-resolution structure mapping using quality-controlled well data should provide leads to convergence zones of fault/fracture trends that are not necessarily related to structural elevation. Further work in Phase II will be focused on delineating the relative contribution to fracture-only dolomitization to that which occurs in conjunction with primary facies and/or sequence stratigraphic framework.

  18. Numerical modeling of carbon dioxide sequestration on the rate of pressure solution creep in limestone: Preliminary results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renard, Francois; Hellmann, Roland; Collombet, Marielle; Guen, Yvi Le

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When carbon dioxide (CO2) is injected into an aquifer or a depleted geological reservoir, its dissolution into solution results in acidification of the pore waters. As a consequence, the pore waters become more reactive, which leads to enhanced dissolution-precipitation processes and a modification of the mechanical and hydrological properties of the rock. This effect is especially important for limestones given that the solubility and reactivity of carbonates is strongly dependent on pH and the partial pressure of CO2. The main mechanism that couples dissolution, precipitation and rock matrix deformation is commonly referred to as intergranular pressure solution creep (IPS) or pervasive pressure solution creep (PSC). This process involves dissolution at intergranular grain contacts subject to elevated stress, diffusion of dissolved material in an intergranular fluid, and precipitation in pore spaces subject to lower stress. This leads to an overall and pervasive reduction in porosity due to both grain indent...

  19. EPA's (Environmental Protection Agency's) program for evaluation and demonstration of low-cost retrofit LIMB (Limestone Injection Multistage Burner) technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, R.D.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses program objectives, approaches, current status and results, future activities, and schedules for EPA's program for research and development, field evaluation, and demonstration of Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) technology. Primary emphasis is on: (1) the full-scale demonstration being conducted on Ohio Edison's 104-MW wall-fired Edgewater Station Unit 4; (2) evaluation on a 50 million Btu/hr tangentially fired prototype nearing completion; (3) on-going field evaluation on Richmond Power and Light's 61-MW tangentially fired Whitewater Valley Generating Station Unit 2. The new program for demonstration on Virginia Electric Power's 180-MW tangentially fired Yorktown II Plant is also described. The LIMB process is based on injecting dry sorbents into the boiler for direct capture of SO/sub 2/ from the combustion gases. LIMB combines sorbent injection for SO/sub 2/ control with the use of low-NOx burners, in which staged combustion is utilized for NOx control.

  20. Pilot-scale limestone emission control (LEC) process: A development project. Volume 1: Main report and appendices A, B, C, and D. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ETS, Inc., a pollution consulting firm with headquarters in Roanoke, Virginia, has developed a dry, limestone-based flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. This SO{sub 2} removal system, called Limestone Emission Control (LEC), can be designed for installation on either new or existing coal-fired boilers. In the LEC process, the SO{sub 2} in the flue gas reacts with wetted granular limestone that is contained in a moving bed. A surface layer of principally calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}) is formed on the limestone. Periodic removal of this surface layer by mechanical agitation allows high utilization of the limestone granules. The primary goal of the current study is the demonstration of the techno/economic capability of the LEC system as a post-combustion FGD process capable of use in both existing and future coal-fired boiler facilities burning high-sulfur coal. A nominal 5,000 acfm LEC pilot plant has been designed, fabricated and installed on the slipstream of a 70,000 pph stoker boiler providing steam to Ohio University`s Athens, Ohio campus. The pilot plant was normally operated on the slipstream of the Ohio Univ. boiler plant flue gas, but also had the capability of operating at higher inlet SO{sub 2} concentrations (typically equivalent to 3-1/2% sulfur coal) than those normally available from the flue gas slipstream. This was accomplished by injecting SO{sub 2} gas into the slipstream inlet. The pilot plant was instrumented to provide around-the-clock operation and was fully outfitted with temperature, SO{sub 2}, gas flow and pressure drop monitors.

  1. The use of wet limestone systems for combined removal of SO sub 2 and NO sub x from flue gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, G.C. (Bechtel Corp., San Francisco, CA (USA)); Shen, D.X.; Littlejohn, D.; Chang, S.G. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach by utilizing yellow phosphorus in conventional wet limestone systems for high efficiency control of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions from power plants has been developed. The addition of yellow phosphorus in the system induces the production of O{sub 3} which subsequently oxidizes NO to NO{sub 2}. The resulting NO{sub 2} dissolves readily and can be reduced to form ammonium ions by dissolved SO{sub 2} under appropriate conditions. Yellow phosphorus is oxidized to yield P{sub 2}O{sub 5} which picks up water to form H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} mists and can be collected as a valuable product. Proof of concept experiments have been performed using a 20 acfm bench-scale system. The results show that better than 90% of SO{sub 2} and NO in simulated flue gas can be removed. Stoichiometric ratios (P/NO) ranging between 0.6 and 1.5 were obtained. This ratio depends on operating conditions as well as the process configuration. A conceptual process flow diagram has been proposed. A preliminary cost evaluation of this approach appears to indicate great economic potential. 22 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  2. 173. NICKEL SORPTION KINETICS ON THE CLAY FRACTION OF A SOIL. D.R. Roberts and D.L. Sparks, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    173. NICKEL SORPTION KINETICS ON THE CLAY FRACTION OF A SOIL. D.R. Roberts and D.L. Sparks on the release of Ni(II) from the clay fraction. Ascertaining the kinetics of nickel sorption on clay minerals

  3. A study of the effects of limestone rock asphalt screenings on the structural properties of hot-mix asphaltic concrete made with siliceous materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albritton, Oscar Willard

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LiSRagy pptt8pp py IEXAa A STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF LIMESTONE ROCK ASPHALT SCREENINGS ON THE STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF HOT-MIX ASPHALTIC CONCRETE MADE WITH SILICEOUS MATERIALS A Thesis By OSCAR WILLARD. AQBRITTON Submitted to the Graduate... ON THE STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF HOT-MIX ASPHALTIC CONCRETE MADE WITH SILICEOUS MATERIALS A Thesis By OSCAR WILLARD ALBRITTON Approved as to Style and Content by: Chairman of Committee ead of Departme t August 1958 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Acknowledgment is due...

  4. Stabilization of kerogen thermal maturation: Evidence from geothermometry and burial history reconstruction, Niobrara Limestone, Berthoud oil field, western Denver Basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, C.E.; Crysdale, B.L. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The burial history of this fractured Niobrara Limestone reservoir and source rock offers a setting for studying the stabilization of thermal maturity because soon after peak temperature of approximately 100{degree}C was reached, exhumation lowered temperature to about 60-70{degree}C. Vitrinite reflectance (Rm = 0.6-0.7%) and published clay mineralogy data from the Niobrara Limestone indicate that peak paleotemperature was approximately 100{degree}C. Fluid inclusion data also indicate oil migration occurred at 100{degree}C. Burial history reconstruction indicates 100{degree}C was reached in the Niobrara Limestone only during minimum burial, which occurred at 70 Ma and 8000 ft depth. However, erosion beginning at 70 Ma and continuing until 50 Ma removed over 3,000 ft of rock. This depth of erosion agrees with an Rm of 0.4% measured in surface samples of the Pierre Shale. The exhumation of the reservoir decreased temperature by about 30{degree}C to near the corrected bottom-hole temperature of 50-70{degree}C. Lopatin time-temperature index (TTI) analysis suggests the Niobrara Limestone as a source rock matured to the oil generation stage (TTI = 10) about 25 Ma, significantly later than maximum burial, and after exhumation caused cooling. The Lopatin TTI method in this case seems to overestimate the influence of heating time. If time is an important factor, thermal maturity should continue to increase after peak burial and temperature so that vitrinite reflectance will not be comparable to peak paleotemperatures estimated from geothermometers set at near-peak temperature and those estimated from burial history reconstruction. The agreement between geothermometry and the burial history reconstruction in Berthoud State 4 suggests that the influence of heating time must be small. The elapsed time available at near peak temperatures was sufficient to allow stabilization of thermal maturation in this case.

  5. Color measurements on marble and limestone briquettes exposed to outdoor environment in the Eastern United States. Volume I: Results of exposure 1984-1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimann, K.J.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a long-term program that began in 1984, limestone and marble briquettes have been exposed to both anthropogenic acid deposition and natural weathering at four field sites in the eastern United States. Similar tests began at an Ohio site in 1986. Effects of exposure on the briquettes and other materials at the sites are evaluated periodically by several federal agencies cooperating in the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). One of the primary contributions of Argonne National Laboratory to the NAPAP has been the measurement of tristimulus color change on samples exposed to the environment. Results from the first six years indicate a yellowing of the marble and a darkening of limestone on both the skyward and groundward surfaces of fresh and preexposed briquettes. The relationship between discoloration and exposure period appears to be linear. Discoloration rates as a function of a cumulative exposure time are almost constant for marble and slightly decreasing for limestone Dark spots on groundward surfaces were measured with tristimulus color equipment prior to chemical analysis to determine if a correlation exists between darkening (change in reflectance) and SO{sub 4} concentration. Taking exposure time into consideration, and assuming that the airborne concentration of dark particles, which cause darkening, is proportional to airborne SO{sub 2} concentration, one can establish a linear relationship between exposure time, darkening, and SO{sub 2} concentration. The program is continuing so that additional data can be obtained.

  6. Diagenesis of sandstones from the Douglas Creek member of the Green River Formation (Eocene) at Red Wash field, Uintay County, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Earl Scott

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , sandstone and some limestone and dolomite beds. The Garden Creek Member at Red Wash Field is about 550 ft (168 m) thick. The Parachute Creek Member, overlying the Garden Creek, is largely oil shale, gray shale, and limestone and dolomite beds...

  7. Reservoir development in bryozoan bafflestone facies of the Ullin (Warsaw) Limestone (Middle Mississippian) in the Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasemi, Z.; Treworgy, J.D.; Norby, R.D.; Grube, J.P. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent drilling in Enfield South and Johnsonville fields in southern Illinois has encountered prolific petroleum-producing zones within the Ullin (Warsaw) Limestone. This and large cumulative production from a number of older wells in the Illinois basin indicate that the Ullin has greater reservoir potential than previously recognized. The Ullin reservoir facies is mainly a fenestrate bryozoan-dominated bafflestone developed on the flanks of Waulsortian-type mud mounds or on transported skeletal sand buildups. Subsurface geology and petrography reveal such porous bryozoan bafflestone facies (some with shows of oil) at various horizons within the Ullin. However, in part because of water problems in some areas, only the upper part of the Ullin has been tested thus far and, as a result, significant reservoirs in the deeper part of the unit may have been missed. Preliminary data indicate several facies in the Ullin that vary in their aerial distribution in the basin. These facies include (1) skeletal sand-wave facies and/or bryozoan bafflestone in the upper Ullin, (2) bryozoan bafflestone with a dense Waulsortian mud mound core, (3) thick bryozoan bafflestone over a skeletal grainstone facies, and (4) thick mud mound-dominated facies with thin porous flanking bafflestone/grainstone facies. Areas with facies type 1 and 2 have the highest potential for commercial reservoir development. Facies type 3, although quite porous, is commonly wet, and the porous facies type 4 may be localized and not extensive enough to be commercial. Petrographic examination shows excellent preservation of primary intra- and interparticle porosities within the bryozoan bafflestone facies. The generally stable original mineralogy prevented extensive dissolution-reprecipitation and occlusion of porosity. Further, the stable mineralogy and minor early marine cementation prevented later compaction and burial diagenesis.

  8. Regional stratigraphy, depositional environments, and tectonic framework of Mississippian clastic rocks between Tuscumbia and Bangor Limestones in Black Warrior basin of Alabama and Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higginbotham, D.R.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed correlations in the subsurface and outcrop of northern Alabama document that Mississippian clastic rocks between the Tuscumbia and Bangor Limestones are thickest along a band across the northern and eastern parts of the Black Warrior basin. The interval thins markedly southeastward across a northeast-trending line in Monroe County, Mississippi, and Lamar County, Alabama, from more than 350 ft to less than 150 ft. The thickness distribution suggests synsedimentary differential subsidence of crustal blocks. The northeast-trending block boundary in the Black Warrior basin nearly parallels an interpreted northeast-trending late Precambrian rift segment farther southeast. The northwest-striking boundary closely parallels an interpreted northwest-trending transform fault farther southwest. The block boundaries are interpreted as basement faults that originated during late Precambrian rifting. Subsequently, the older faults were reactivated by convergenced during the Mississippian, simultaneously with the initial dispersal of clastic sediment into the Black Warrior foreland basin.

  9. Limestone concrete aerosol experiments in steam-air atmospheres: NSPP (Nuclear Safety Pilot Plant) Tests 521, 522, and 531: Data record report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobias, M.L.; Adams, R.E.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This data record report summarizes the results from two tests involving limestone concrete test aerosol in a steam-air environment and one test in a dry air environment. This research sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission was conducted in the Nuclear Safety Pilot Plant at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The purpose of this project is to provide a data base on the behavior of aerosols in containment under conditions assumed to occur in postulated LWR accident sequences; this data base will provide experimental validation of aerosol behavioral codes under development. In the report a brief description is given of each test together with the results in the form of tables and graphs. Included are data on aerosol mass concentration, aerosol fallout and plateout rates, total mass fallout and plateout, aerosol particle size, vessel atmosphere pressure, vessel atmosphere temperatures, temperature gradients near the vessel wall, and steam condensation rates on the vessel wall.

  10. Geology. Most of the Guadalupe River flows through either Glen Rose Limestone, or Fluviatile Terrace Deposits. Combined geologic categories are designated where two geologic units exist in cross section and the channel flows along a boundary between the t

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curran, Joanna C.

    Results Geology. Most of the Guadalupe River flows through either Glen Rose Limestone, or Fluviatile Terrace Deposits. Combined geologic categories are designated where two geologic units exist length. The highest percentage of bedrock coverage per geologic type appears in combined categories (Fig

  11. The Kepco Models BOP 36-12ML and BOP 36-12DL have been modified from standard Kepco Models BOP 36-12M and BOP 36-12D, respectively, to be stable handling inductive loads up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    . All other specifications are identical to the standard BOP. (2) 10%-90%, short-circuit. (3) Short-circuit to operate in a stable manner in Current or Current Limit Mode for loads up to 1 Henry. They are also stable the standard model. Spec- ifications listed in Table 1 are for BOP 36-12ML and BOP 36-12DL in Current Mode. All

  12. Construction and Building Materials, 75 (2015) 1-10, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.conbuildmat.2014.10.042. Multi-Scale Investigation of the Performance of Limestone in Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -mail: taijiro.sato@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca Abstract Limestone (calcium carbonate, CaCO3) has long been a critical with the aluminate phases present in the cement (and fly #12;2 ash). Conversely, the aragonite polymorph of CaCO3 silicate hydration at a similar particle size/surface area. However, because these two forms of CaCO3 have

  13. QUANTIFICATION OF WEATHERING Robert Hack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Robert

    sandstone, limestone and dolomites, slates, shales, and in- Weathering and especially future weathering 40 60 80 H slate medium H slate v.thin H slate tick lam. Tg21 thick Tg21 medium Tg21 thin Tg21 v

  14. Stratigraphic and diagenetic controls on the occurrence of porosity in the Mississippian Mission Canyon Formation in the Billings Nose Area, North Dakota 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaber, Daniel Edward

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , intercrystalline and dissolution, were identified. Intercrystalline porosity formed as the result of partial dolomitization of the dominantly lime mud matrix. Dissolution preferentially removed the limestone grains. Depositional facies controlled... the distribution of grains and, therefore, the distribution of dissolution to some extent. Stratigraphic location controlled the degree of dolomitization. The stratigraphically higher A and B zones were in closer proximity to the dolomitizing fluids from...

  15. Microsoft Word - mitchell-dl.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625Data ShowC - Patent RightsARMCharacterizing

  16. TEAM0.5DL.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposed Action(InsertAbout theSystems3, RevisionTEI Core Core

  17. CM200DL-Final.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r k CCLEAN ENERGY JOBS ANDCLOuDS: 2012

  18. Displacements required during multiple drapefolding along the northwest Bighorn Mountain front, Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tirey, Martha Margaret

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    folds of the eastern Uinta Mountains (Cook and Stearns, 1975). Shale sections also flow and thin easily and Vaughn (1976) reports consid. erable I;hinning in the Mesozoic fine-grained clastic rocks (Permian thru Jurassic) as they drape over... deposited on the continental shelf bor- dering the Paleozoic geosyncline. The Ordovicain Bighorn Dolomite is a massive, thick bedded dolomite, while the Devonian Jefferson-Three Fork Formation is a thin-bedded limestone interbedded wi. th thin shale...

  19. Chitinozoans in the subsurface Lower Paleozoic of West Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kauffman, A. E.

    1971-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS October 22, 1971 Paper 54 CHITINOZOANS IN THE SUBSURFACE LOWER PALEOZOIC OF WEST TEXAS A. E. KAUFFMAN Humble Oil & Refining Company, Midland, Texas ABSTRACT Studies based on both comprehensive... are found throughout the West Texas area. As generally accepted by operational petroleum geologists, the Simpson Group comprises the Joins Formation (limestone and dolomite); Oil Creek Formation (sandstone, shale, and limestone); McLish Formation (sand...

  20. Pennsylvanian-Permian deformation at 1,000-5,000 feet of overburden, Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Mark Ryan

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to argillaceous-shales and limestones within the Pennsylvanian Gobbler and Beeman Formations. Abundant field observations indicate bedding-plane slip was an active deformation mechanism in the study area and was probably the p. imary mechanism... identical rock types, but the Ordovician-Silurian section is almost all dolomite whereas the post-Silurian strata are principally limestone, shale, and sandstone. Accordingly, to minimize this possible difficulty, fracture data from fine...

  1. Is Gypsum Application Beneficial to Soil? Francisco J. Arriaga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    (A2809-Laboski & Peters, 2012) #12;Liming Value Material Neutralizing agent CaCO3 equivalent (pure material) ---- % ---- Dolomitic limestone CaCO3·MgCO3 110-118 Calcitic limestone CaCO3 100 Wood ash K2CO3, CaCO3, MgCO3 20-90 Gypsum none 0 (A3588-Management of Wisconsin Soils) #12;Sulfur in Wisconsin Soils

  2. Electrical resistivity investigations over limestone caverns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, Charles Osgood

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be calculated from ecuation (15) which, with twc current electrodes present, becomes The potentis. l difference between electrodes P& and P2 is (60) 25 where the denominators of the terms in the brackets are distances between electrodes...

  3. Preservation of limestone material culture with siloxanes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Ann Elizabeth

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    damaged areas were cut away and rebuilt in lime mortar with its constituents similar to the surrounding stonework (Marsh 1977). There is definite improvement to the overall appearance and stability of the Wells Cathedral after 20 years of conservation...

  4. Limestone, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and WindLighting Control Design JumpTexas: Energy

  5. !Tishomingo MARSHALL COUNTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /L as calcium carbonate, which is considered to be very hard (Hem, 1985). Although not a health hazard, hard rock types of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer are limestone (calcium carbonate) and dolomite (calcium magnesium carbonate). The water chemistry is produced by dissolving small amounts of minerals in these rocks

  6. STATISTICAL APPLICATIONS TO QUANTITATIVE SEISMIC RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND MONITORING AT WEST PEARL QUEEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the reservoir characterization and monitoring of CO2 sequestration at West Pearl Queen Field, ear Hobbs, New is composed of: 42% siliciclastics (quartz sandstone and siltstone), 38% carbonates (dolomite and limestone bivariate statistical classifications, is detected from changes in carbon dioxide saturation on both the Vp

  7. Creating a Geologic Play Book for Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Patchen; Taury Smith; Ron Riley; Mark Baranoski; David Harris; John Hickman; John Bocan; Michael Hohn

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary isopach and facies maps, combined with a literature review, were used to develop a sequence of basin geometry, architecture and facies development during Cambrian and Ordovician time. The main architectural features--basins, sub basins and platforms--were identified and mapped as their positions shifted with time. This is significant because a better understanding of the control of basin geometry and architecture on the distribution of key facies and on subsequent reservoir development in Ordovician carbonates within the Trenton and Black River is essential for future exploration planning. Good exploration potential is thought to exist along the entire platform margin, where clean grainstones were deposited in skeletal shoals from Indiana thorough Ohio and Ontario into Pennsylvania. The best reservoir facies for the development of hydrothermal dolomites appears to be these clean carbonates. This conclusion is supported by observations taken in existing fields in Indiana, Ontario, Ohio and New York. In contrast, Trenton-Black River production in Kentucky and West Virginia has been from fractured, but non-dolomitized, limestone reservoirs. Facies maps indicate that these limestones were deposited under conditions that led to a higher argillaceous content than the cleaner limestones deposited in higher-energy environments along platform margins. However, even in the broad area of argillaceous limestones, clean limestone buildups have been observed in eastern outcrops and, if present and dolomitized in the subsurface, may provide additional exploration targets. Structure and isopach maps developed as part of the structural and seismic study supported the basin architecture and geometry conclusions, and from them some structural control on the location of architectural features may be inferred. This portion of the study eventually will lead to a determination of the timing relative to fracturing, dolomitization and hydrocarbon charging of reservoirs in the Trenton and Black River carbonates. The focus of this effort will shift in the next few months from regional to more detailed structural analyses. This new effort will include topics such as the determination of the source of the hot, dolomitizing fluids that created hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in the Black River, and the probable migration paths of these fluids. Faults of suitable age, orientation and location to be relevant for hydrothermal dolomite creation in the Trenton-Black River play will be isolated and mapped, and potential fairways delineated. A detailed study of hydrothermal alteration of carbonate reservoirs was completed and is discussed at length in this report. New ideas that were developed from this research were combined with a literature review and existing concepts to develop a model for the development of hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in the study area. Fault-related hydrothermal alteration is a key component of this model. Hydrothermal alteration produces a spectrum of features in reservoirs, ranging from leached limestone and microporosity to matrix dolomite, saddle dolomite-lined breccias, zebra fabrics and fractures. Mineralization probably occurred during the pressure drop associated with the rise of fluids up the fault system, and is due to the mixing of hydrothermal fluids with cooler, in situ fluids. Once they began to cool themselves, the hydrothermal fluids, which had a lower pH and higher salinity than formation fluids, were capable of leaching the host limestones. Microporosity is common in leached limestones, and it is likely that it was formed, in some cases, during hydrothermal alteration. Dolomite leaching occurs near the end of the paragenetic sequence, and may significantly enhance porosity. However, leaching of dolomite typically is followed by the precipitation of calcite or anhydrite, which reduces porosity. A final conclusion is that hydrothermal alteration may be more common than previously thought, and some features previously attributed to other processes may be in fact be hydrothermal in origin. Production d

  8. Empirical Calibration for Dolomite Stoichiometry Calculation: Application on Triassic Muschelkalk-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    # Present address: Ruhr-University Bochum, Institute for Geology, Mineralogy and Geophysics, Sedimentary and Isotope Geology, Universitätstrasse 150, 44780 Bochum - Germany e-mail: melanie.turpin@rub.de - fadi and was combined with petrographical and isotopic analyses. Oil & Gas Science and Technology ­ Rev. IFP Energies

  9. Kinetics of Silicothermic Reduction of Calcined Dolomite in Flowing Argon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    of Experimental Rig De oxi dat ion Fu rn ac e TC TC Copper Turning Reduction Furnace Argon Gas Condenser Gas wash. Disadvantages: high impurity, high condenser area #12;© Swinburne University of Technology Aim of the project the fundamental physical chemistry Thermodynamic modelling Kinetic analysis High temperature experiments

  10. Prevention of Salt Damage inPrevention of Salt Damage in LimestoneLimestone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    #12;Introduction: Sources of Na2SO4 Acid rain deposits SO4 2- which combines with Na+ Na2SO4 enters with a solution of polyacrylic acid (PAA) will reduce the crystallization pressure. #12;Warping Experiment Experiment Sample Size ~ 10 x 2.5 x 1.0 cm 1. Polyacrylic acid (PAA) treatment 2. Dried at 105°C 3

  11. Synthesis and development of processes for the recovery of sulfur from acid gases. Part 1, Development of a high-temperature process for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gas using limestone -- thermodynamic and kinetic considerations; Part 2, Development of a zero-emissions process for recovery of sulfur from acid gas streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Towler, G.P.; Lynn, S.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Limestone can be used more effectively as a sorbent for H{sub 2}S in high-temperature gas-cleaning applications if it is prevented from undergoing calcination. Sorption of H{sub 2}S by limestone is impeded by sintering of the product CaS layer. Sintering of CaS is catalyzed by CO{sub 2}, but is not affected by N{sub 2} or H{sub 2}. The kinetics of CaS sintering was determined for the temperature range 750--900{degrees}C. When hydrogen sulfide is heated above 600{degrees}C in the presence of carbon dioxide elemental sulfur is formed. The rate-limiting step of elemental sulfur formation is thermal decomposition of H{sub 2}S. Part of the hydrogen thereby produced reacts with CO{sub 2}, forming CO via the water-gas-shift reaction. The equilibrium of H{sub 2}S decomposition is therefore shifted to favor the formation of elemental sulfur. The main byproduct is COS, formed by a reaction between CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S that is analogous to the water-gas-shift reaction. Smaller amounts of SO{sub 2} and CS{sub 2} also form. Molybdenum disulfide is a strong catalyst for H{sub 2}S decomposition in the presence of CO{sub 2}. A process for recovery of sulfur from H{sub 2}S using this chemistry is as follows: Hydrogen sulfide is heated in a high-temperature reactor in the presence of CO{sub 2} and a suitable catalyst. The primary products of the overall reaction are S{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Rapid quenching of the reaction mixture to roughly 600{degrees}C prevents loss Of S{sub 2} during cooling. Carbonyl sulfide is removed from the product gas by hydrolysis back to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S. Unreacted CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S are removed from the product gas and recycled to the reactor, leaving a gas consisting chiefly of H{sub 2} and CO, which recovers the hydrogen value from the H{sub 2}S. This process is economically favorable compared to the existing sulfur-recovery technology and allows emissions of sulfur-containing gases to be controlled to very low levels.

  12. Preliminary hydrogeologic framework of the Silurian and Devonian carbonate aquifer system in the Midwestern Basins and Arches Region of Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, and Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, G.D. (Geological Survey, Columbus, OH (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aquifer and confining units have been identified; data on the thickness, extent, and structural configuration of these units have been collected; and thickness and structure-contour maps have been generated. Hydrologic information for the confining units and the aquifer also has been compiled. Where present, the confining unit that caps the carbonate aquifer consists of shales of Middle and Upper Devonian age and Lower Mississippian age, however, these units have been eroded from a large part of the study area. The regional carbonate aquifer consists of Silurian and Devonian limestones and dolomites. The rocks that comprise the aquifer in Indiana and northwestern Illinois are grouped into four major stratigraphic units: Brassfield and Sexton Creek Limestones or the Cataract Formation, the Salamonie Dolomite, the Salina Group, and the Detroit River and Traverse Formations or the Muscatatuck Group. In Ohio and southern Michigan the aquifer is grouped into ten stratigraphic units: Brassfield Limestone and Cataract Formation, the Dayton Limestone, the Rochester Shale equivalent, the Lockport Dolomite, the Salina Formation, the Hillsboro Sandstone, the Detroit River Group, the Columbus Limestone, the Delaware Limestone, and the Traverse Formation. The thickness of the carbonate aquifer increases from the contact with the outcropping Ordovician shales in the south-central part of the study area from the contact into the Appalachian Foreland Structural Basin from 0 ft at the contact to more than 700 ft at the eastern boundary of the study area, to more than 1,000 ft beneath Lake Erie and greater than 1,200 ft in southeastern Michigan. At the edge of the Michigan Intercontinental Structural Basin in western Ohio and eastern Indiana, the thickness ranges from 700 to 900 ft. and from 200 ft to 300 ft in south-central Indiana along the northeastern edge of the Illinois Intercontinental Structural Basin.

  13. Facilitating DL-based Hybrid Reasoning with Inference Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Compatangelo, Ernesto

    Gordon University, Aberdeen, UK In´es Arana School of Computing, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, UK

  14. DL)TTCS^^r^i^ Ris Re Probabilistic Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the evaluation of irradiation experiments, design comparisons, and analyse of minor accidents. INIS Descriptors

  15. Distinguished Lecture Series Professor Deborah D.L. Chung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    102D, Engineering Bldg. 1, UH Abstract Polymer-matrix composites containing a high proportion. The energy conversion allows the structure to be self-powered. The heat dissipation is important due to the increasing thermal load of aircraft. The monitoring is needed for structural health monitoring, load

  16. DL-945 1/09 Animal Health Diagnostic Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    Recommendations for Horse Handlers Related to Contagious Equine Metritis or Other Reproductive System Infections infectious diseases, including Contagious Equine Metritis (CEM). CEM is spread primarily by breeding information regarding Contagious Equine Metritis, see the following fact sheets: (USDA APHIS) http://www

  17. (continued) DL-943 8/12 Animal Health Diagnostic Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    herds. The cost is $18 for out-of-state herds. Samples must be submitted through a licensed veterinarian. How will results be reported? Results will be reported through the normal channel to the veterinarian://diagcenter.vet.cornell.edu/dlaccess/login.asp What is the lag time? Results will normally be available 7-10 business days after the AHDC receives

  18. Kentucky, Tennessee: corniferous potential may be worth exploring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currie, M.T.

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The driller's term, corniferous, refers to all carbonate and clastic strata, regardless of geologic age, underlying the regional unconformity below the late Devonian-early Mississippian New Albany shale and overlying the middle Silurian Clinton shale in the study area. From oldest to youngest, the formations that constitute the corniferous are the middle Silurian Keefer formation, the middle Silurian Lockport dolomite, the upper Silurian Salina formation, the lower Devonian Helderberg limestone, the lower Devonian Oriskanysandstone, the lower Devonian Onondaga limestone, and in the extreme western portion of the study area, the middle Devonian Boyle dolomite. The overlying New Albany shale also is termed Ohio shale or Chattanooga shale in the Appalachian Basin. To drillers, it is known simply as the black shale. The study area is located in E. Kentucky on the western flank of the Appalachian Basin and covers all or parts of 32 counties.

  19. Facies analyses and environment of deposition for the Jurassic "A" zone of the "Mulussa" (Dolaa) Group, in the Homs block, Syria 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quintana, Miguel Alfredo

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mainly sequences of alternating limestone, dolomite, anhydrite, rare siltstones, and shales. These rocks are interpreted to represent tidal-flat and sabkha deposits along the southeast margin of the Palmyrid trough along the Rutbah high... of the Horns block, with wells and Jurassic outcrops (shaded pattern). Position of Palmyrid Trough within the Arabian Plate (Adapted from Lovelock, 1984) Major structural framework surrounding the Horns block (After Rowell and Swan- son, 1984...

  20. Facies analyses and environment of deposition for the Jurassic "A" zone of the "Mulussa" (Dolaa) Group, in the Homs block, Syria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quintana, Miguel Alfredo

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mainly sequences of alternating limestone, dolomite, anhydrite, rare siltstones, and shales. These rocks are interpreted to represent tidal-flat and sabkha deposits along the southeast margin of the Palmyrid trough along the Rutbah high... of the Horns block, with wells and Jurassic outcrops (shaded pattern). Position of Palmyrid Trough within the Arabian Plate (Adapted from Lovelock, 1984) Major structural framework surrounding the Horns block (After Rowell and Swan- son, 1984...

  1. Analysis of macroscopic fractures on Teton anticline, Northwestern Montana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinclair, Steven W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1817 &UNCONFORMITY 174 &UNCONFORMITY 366 &UNCONFORMITY 286 &UNCONFORMITY 1536 &UNCONFORMITY 2100 Figure 4. Stratigraphy of the Sawtooth thrust province. these rocks from the thinner, shallow-marine Devonian carbonate ~ocks above. Another... minor unconformity separates the Devonian from the Lower Mississippian (Kinderhookian and Osagean series). Mississippian rocks represent a stable shelf environment with the oresence of 366 meters of shallow marine dolomites and limestones in the area...

  2. Depositional environment of lower Green River Formation sandstones (Eocene), Red Wash field (Uinta Basin), Uintah County, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClain, Anthony Scott

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) occurred. The resulting increase in water supply to Lake Uinta while sediment remained trapped in the northern basin caused a period of exceptionally high biologic activity. This allowed the deposition of the rich oil shales for which the Green River... brown, brittle shales make up the majority of this unit. Minor amounts of limestone, dolomite, and siltstone are also present. Some of the shales are "oil shales". This 440 ft ( 134 m) thick Member is responsible for most of the production from...

  3. Microstructures and Rheology of a Limestone-Shale Thrust Fault 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Rachel Kristen

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    thick calcite and shale shear zone suggest that calcite, not shale, controlled the rheology of the shear zone rocks. While shale deformed brittley, plasticity-induced fracturing in calcite resulted in ultrafine-grained (<1.0 ?m) fault rocks that deformed...

  4. Consolidant particle transport in limestone, concrete and bone 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Alanna Stacey

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of chemically compatible nano and fine particle colloidal consolidants is a new development within the field of cultural heritage conservation and applied most widely so far to the historic built environment. The ...

  5. Isotopic tracers of gold deposition in Paleozoic limestones, Southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterman, Z.E.; Widmann, B.L.; Marshall, B.D.; Aleinikoff, J.N.; Futa, K.; Mahan, S.A.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Strontium isotopic analyses of barren and mineralized Paleozoic carbonate rocks show that hydrothermal fluids added radiogenic strontium ({sup 87}Sr) to the mineralized zones. At Bare Mountain, samples collected from mineralized areas have {delta}{sup 87}Sr{sub t} values ranging from +3.0 to +23.0, whereas unmineralized carbonate rocks have {delta}{sup 87}Sr, values of {minus}0.6 to +2.9. In other ranges, {delta}{sup 87}Sr, values of the unmineralized carbonate rocks are even lower and virtually indistinguishable from primary marine values. This correlation of elevated {delta}{sup 87}Sr{sub t} values with mineralized zones provides a useful technique for assessing the mineral potential of the Paleozoic basement beneath Yucca Mountain, and may find broader use in mineral exploration in the Basin and Range province as a whole.

  6. Experimental High Velocity Acid Jetting in Limestone Carbonates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Christopher

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    spacers have an OD of 4” and an ID of 3.5”. One spacer ring has a 2” length and the other has a 0.25” length for a total Lsp of 2.25”. Therefore, from Eq. 2.13: (2.14) The outlet holder, Fig. 2.4D secures the outlet side...…………………………………………………………… 2.2 Pulse Pump……………………………………………………………… 2.3 Core Holder…………………………………………………………….. 2.4 Hydraulic Pump………………………………………………………… 2.5 Backpressure Regulator…………………………………………………. 2.6 Data Acquisition………………………………………………………… 2.7 Permeability Measuring...

  7. Compaction characteristics of crushed limestone using the Gyratory Testing Machine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parsons, Walter Herbert, III

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    adjustments; screw T for fine adjustments. Tighten lock nuts for S and T after the adjustment is made. Load a sample into the machine at the desired vertical pressure. 4. Press start button U, which will cause roller carriage AA to revolve. 5. After a... OP PREVIOUS RESEARCH III. THE GYRATORY TESTING MACHINE Development Description Operation Operating Instructions IV. THE RESEARCH PROGRAM Material and Sample Preparation PAGE 1. 5 19 Development of the Texas Highway Department Moisture...

  8. arnager limestone denmark: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the Copernican world system. Danish astronomy at the time was however based on Tycho Brahe's view of the universe and therefore hostile to Copernican and, by implication,...

  9. Reductive Biotransformation of Fe in Shale-Limestone Saprolite...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AQDS, whereas 24% and 35% of the Fe(III)TOT was bioreduced by CN32 after 40 and 95 d in media with AQDS. Little or no Fe2+, Mn, Si, Al, and Mg were evident in aqueous filtrates...

  10. Limestone County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and WindLighting Control Design Jump

  11. Limestone County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and WindLighting Control Design JumpTexas: Energy Resources Jump

  12. Limestone Creek, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and WindLighting Control Design JumpTexas: Energy Resources

  13. Investigation of Sulfur Removal by Direct Limestone Injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colaluca, M. A.; Maloney, D. J.

    Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting, DOE/METC 88/6094, Contract DE-AC21-86MC23262, 295-304. Chase, et al, 1985, JANAF Thermochemical Tables, J. Phys. Chern. Ref. Data, 14, Suppl. 1. Cole, J. A., Kramlich, J. C., Seeker, W. R...-IE-90-06-05 Proceedings from the 12th National Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, June 19-20, 1990 Newton, G. H., Chen, S. L., and Kramlich, J. D., 1989, Role of Porosity Less in Limiting Sulfur Dioxide Capture by Calcium...

  14. CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Patchen; Katharine Lee Avary; John M. Bocan; Michael Hohn; John B. Hickman; Paul D. Lake; James A. Drahovzal; Christopher D. Laughrey; Jaime Kostelnik; Taury Smith; Ron Riley; Mark Baranoski

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Research Consortium has made significant progress toward their goal of producing a geologic play book for the Trenton-Black River gas play. The final product will include a resource assessment model of Trenton-Black River reservoirs; possible fairways within which to concentrate further studies and seismic programs; and a model for the origin of Trenton-Black River hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs. All seismic data available to the consortium have been examined. Synthetic seismograms constructed for specific wells have enabled researchers to correlate the tops of 15 stratigraphic units determined from well logs to seismic profiles in New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky. In addition, three surfaces for the area have been depth converted, gridded and mapped. A 16-layer velocity model has been developed to help constrain time-to-depth conversions. Considerable progress was made in fault trend delineation and seismic-stratigraphic correlation within the project area. Isopach maps and a network of gamma-ray cross sections supplemented with core descriptions allowed researchers to more clearly define the architecture of the basin during Middle and Late Ordovician time, the control of basin architecture on carbonate and shale deposition and eventually, the location of reservoirs in Trenton Limestone and Black River Group carbonates. The basin architecture itself may be structurally controlled, and this fault-related structural control along platform margins influenced the formation of hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in original limestone facies deposited in high energy environments. This resulted in productive trends along the northwest margin of the Trenton platform in Ohio. The continuation of this platform margin into New York should provide further areas with good exploration potential. The focus of the petrographic study shifted from cataloging a broad spectrum of carbonate rocks that occur in the Trenton-Black River interval to delineation of regional limestone diagenesis in the basin. A consistent basin-wide pattern of marine and burial diagenesis that resulted in relatively low porosity and permeability in the subtidal facies of these rocks has been documented across the study area. Six diagenetic stages have been recognized: four marine diagenesis stages and two burial diagenesis stages. This dominance of extensive marine and burial diagenesis yielded rocks with low reservoir potential, with the exception of fractured limestone and dolostone reservoirs. Commercial amounts of porosity, permeability and petroleum accumulation appear to be restricted to areas where secondary porosity developed in association with hydrothermal fluid flow along faults and fractures related to basement tectonics. A broad range of geochemical and fluid inclusion analyses have aided in a better understanding of the origin of the dolomites in the Trenton and Black River Groups over the study area. The results of these analyses support a hydrothermal origin for all of the various dolomite types found to date. The fluid inclusion data suggest that all of the dolomite types analyzed formed from hot saline brines. The dolomite is enriched in iron and manganese, which supports a subsurface origin for the dolomitizing brine. Strontium isotope data suggest that the fluids passed through basement rocks or immature siliciclastic rocks prior to forming the dolomites. All of these data suggest a hot, subsurface origin for the dolomites. The project database continued to be redesigned, developed and deployed. Production data are being reformatted for standard relational database management system requirements. Use of the project intranet by industry partners essentially doubled during the reporting period.

  15. A Comparative Study of Dolomite Dissolution in Simple Organic Acids and Chelating Agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adenuga, Olusegun O

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Acid treatments have predominantly been conducted using HCl for its availability, high rock dissolving power and soluble reaction products. At high temperatures, rapid spending of the acid with carbonates prevents deeper penetration distance...

  16. Activation of ground granulated blast furnace slag by using calcined dolomite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, Kai; Jin, Fei; Al-Tabbaa, Abir; Shi, Bin

    2014-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Siemens D5000 X-ray diffractometer with a scanning range between 5° and 55° 2?. The scanning speed of 1 s/step and resolution of 0.05°/step were applied. The TG measurements were carried out using a Perkin Elmer STA 6000 machine by heating the samples...

  17. Shallow meteoric alteration and burial diagenesis of massive dolomite in the Castle Reef Formation, northwest Montana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitsitt, Philip Mark

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ), Sawmill Creek (SC), Half Dome Crag (HDC), Morningstar Mountain (MM), Mount Field (MF), Gateway Pass (GP), North Fork of Dupuyer Creek (NFD), South Fork of Dupuyer Creek (SFD), Volcano Reef (VR), North Fork of Teton River (NFT), Teton River (TR), Cave...SHALLOW METEORIC ALTERATION AND BURIAL DIAGENESIS OF MASSIVE DOLOM I TE I N THE CASTLE REEF FORMAT I ON ~ NORTHWEST MONTANA A Thesis by PHILIP MARK WHITSITT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

  18. Biogeochemical and redox record of midlate Triassic reef evolution in the Italian Dolomites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riding, Robert

    a a Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of Tennessee, 1412 Circle Dr., Knoxville, TN 37996 (Archaeolithoporella, Shamovella), together with a variety of micritic fabrics, formed compact reefs in high energy (REE) values indicative of oxic conditions. These signatures are consistent with their original high-energy

  19. Aragonite crusts and pisolites beneath dolomitic tepees, Lake MacLeod evaporate basin, Western Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handford, C.R.; Kendall, A.C.; Dunham, J.B.; Logan, B.W.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research currently being conducted by the Sedimentology and Marine Geology Group, under Brian W. Logan at the University of Western Australia, has recently concentrated on Lake MacLeod, a 2000 km/sup 2/ (770 mi/sup 2/) coastal salina on the western coast of Australia. This work has shown that this evaporite basin, which is 3 to 4 m (10 to 13 ft) below sea level, is separated from the Indian Ocean by a topographic barrier, but seawater under hydrostatic head, seeps freely through the barrier and discharges from several vents and springs in a carbonate mud flat at the north end of the basin. From there, seawater flows slowly across the basin, evaporating and depositing carbonate, gypsum, and ephemeral halite. About 10 to 12 m (33 to 39 ft) of evaporites have been deposited in the past 5300 years. In July 1982, the authors visited the carbonate mud flats and discovered abundant aragonite pisolites and botryoidal-mammillary crusts of fibrous aragonite cement beneath lily-pad tepee slabs of cemented protodolomite. Thick aragonite crusts cover both the undersides of lily-pad slabs and the lithified floors of tepees. Crusts covering the floors are more botryoidal and consist of both aragonite nubs and mounds (0.2 to 2.5 cm, 0.08 to 1 in., in diameter), and a few scattered, loose pisolites, several millimeters in diameter. The manner in which crusts, pisolites, and tepees occur at Lake MacLeod raises the possibility that they and their ancient counterparts from the Permian basin share a common origin. Perhaps Permian pisolites and aragonite crusts formed beneath cemented slabs of peritidal sediments in tepees bathed by marine water which seeped across exposed portions of the shelf crest.

  20. Acidizing Dolomite Reservoirs Using HCL Acid Prepared with Seawater: Problems and Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arensman, Dennis G

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    with seawater and no scale inhibitors. Scale inhibitors were also tested for effectiveness in reducing calcium sulfate scale during acidizing. Static jar tests of three phosphonate-based, two sulphonated polymer-based, and one polyacrylic-based scale...

  1. Chemical exchange between seawater and nonstoichiometric dolomite: an experimental investigation in a flow-through system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards, Jennifer Ann

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    diagenesis. Natural seawater was passed through the sample, in the open-system experiments, at an average volumetric flow rate of 0. 8 to 2. 7 ml/day. Fluid analyses revealed rapid and dramatic changes in the concentration of the dissolved species through... my gratitude to Amoco Research in Tulsa, Oklahoma for the use of their experimental water/rock reaction system (EWRRS). This work was also supported by Project ?14801 from the Texas Advanced Research Program. TABLE OF CONTENTS ABSTRACT...

  2. Mesozoic and Cenozoic rocks from Malta Escarpment (central Mediterranean)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scandone, P. (Istituto di Geologia e Paleontologia, Pisa, Italy); Patacca, E.; Radoicic, R.; Ryan, W.B.F.; Cita, M.B.; Rawson, M.; Chezar, H.; Miller, E.; McKenzie, J.; Rossi, S.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sedimentary rocks of Triassic-Neogene age are present on the Malta Escarpment of the eastern Mediterranean. Upper Triassic dolomitic limestones of shallow-water origin, at depths between 2.5 and 3.5 km, are similar in lithofacies to coeval platform carbonates of the Siracusa (Syracuse) belt of southern Sicily. Jurassic rocks include lower-middle Liassic shallow-water limestones followed by condensed hemipelagic lime deposits indicative of sinking and starving of the former platform. Cretaceous materials are represented by both red marls rich in planktonic faunas and reworkd volcaniclastic breccias including shallow-water skeletal material. Paleogene rocks are both shallow-water limestones with corals, algae, and bivalves, and redeposited calcarenites of lithofacies similar to those from surface and subsurface of the Ragusa zone. Oligocene-lower Miocene rocks from the escarpment are also similar in lithology to the coeval Ragusa deposits. Tortonian is represented by hemipelagic marls indicating open-marine environment. Pervasive dolomitization on lime crusts and on initial-stage fissure fillings with strongly positive isotopic oxygen ratio is thought to be a product of Messinian evaporitic drawdown. Pliocene sediments belong to the Trubi facies and consist of pelagic foraminiferal chalk. An impressive vertical relief existed by Miocene times, as attested by Messinian crusts and veins on or in rocks as old as Late Triassic. Our data do not provide evidence that this morphologic feature necessarily coincides with a continent-ocean transition. The present escarpment was produced by faulting, erosion, and defacement. 14 figures, 1 table.

  3. Removal of H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2} by CaCO{sub 3}-based sorbents at high pressures. Semiannual report, August 1995--January 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sotirchos, S.V.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a fluidized-bed combustor, a bed of combustible (coal) and noncombustible material is fluidized using air blown upward. Using dolomite or limestone as the noncombustible material, it is possible to have fuel combustion and flue gas desulfurization taking place simultaneously in the combustion vessel. If operation occurs under atmospheric pressure, the average partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the combustor (typically, 10-15% of the total pressure) is considerably lower than the equilibrium CO, pressure for decomposition of limestone (CaCO{sub 3})or dolomite (CaCO{sub 3}{circ}MgCO{sub 3}) at the temperatures usually encountered in FBC units (800-950 {degrees}C). In the high temperature environment of the AFBC unit, the limestone or dolomite particles undergo calcination, yielding a highly porous product (CaO or MgO), which reacts with the sulfur dioxide produced during coal combustion forming, mainly, calcium or magnesium sulfate. The sulfates occupy more space than the oxides they replace, and as a result, the pores of the calcine are completely plugged with solid product before complete conversion takes place. (The conversion for complete with pore plugging is about 50% for the calcine of a stone consisting of CaCO{sub 3} only.) Pores of different size are plugged at different conversion levels, and it is thus possible to have formation of inaccessible pore space in the interior of the particles when the small feeder pores of clusters of large pore are filled with solid product. Moreover, under conditions of strong internal diffusional limitations, complete pore closure may first take place at the external surface of the particles while there is still open pore space left in the interior. For these reasons, ultimate conversions much lower than those predicted by the stoichiometry of the reaction for complete plugging of the internal pore space (less than 30-40%) are seen in AFBC units.

  4. Sulfur removal in advanced two stage pressurized fluidized bed combustion. Technical report, 1 March--31 May 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbasian, J.; Chowdiah, P.; Hill, A.H.; Rue, D.M. [Inst. of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to obtain data on the rates of reaction between hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) and uncalcined calcium-based sorbents under operating conditions relevant to first stage (carbonizer) of Advanced Two-Stage Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustors (PFBC). In these systems the CO{sub 2} partial pressure in the first stage generally exceeds the equilibrium value for calcium carbonate decomposition. Therefore, removal of sulfur compounds takes place through the reaction between H{sub 2}S and calcium carbonate. To achieve this objective, the rates of reaction between hydrogen sulfide and uncalcined calcium-based sorbents will be determined by conducting tests in pressurized thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and high-pressure/high-temperature fluidized-bed reactor (HPTR) units. The effects of sorbent type, sorbent particle size, reactor temperature and pressure, and CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S partial pressures on the sulfidation reaction rate will be determined. During this quarter a series of sulfidation tests were conducted in the high-pressure/high-temperature fluidized-bed reactor (HPTR) units. The effects of sorbent type, sorbent particle size, reactor temperature and pressure, and CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S partial pressures on the sulfidation reaction rate will be determined. During this quarter a series of sulfidation tests were conducted in the high-pressure high-temperature thermogravimetric analyzer (HPTGA unit) using limestone and dolomite. The results suggest that half-calcined dolomite is much more reactive than uncalcined limestone. Also, temperature in the range of 800 to 950 C did not significantly affect the sulfidation reaction rates for both limestone and dolomite.

  5. Layer definition and pressure buildup case histories in a carbonate reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vadgama, U.N.; Arifi, N.A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents case histories of pressure buildup analysis in a layered carbonate reservoir (Zella/Aswad Fields in the Socialist People's Libyan Arab Jamahiria). The productive formation consists of several dolomite and limestone layers separated by thin tight streaks. Lack of pressure communication between layers has been determined by pressure measurements in the individual layers using the Repeat Formation Tester (RFT). Results of the two-dimensional radial model simulated pressure buildup performance are compared to the actual measured pressure buildup data. 14 refs.

  6. Geology and oil production of the Ervay (Phosphoria) reservoirs, eastern Big Horn Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coalson, E.B. (Bass Enterprises Production, Co., Denver, CO (USA)); Inden, R.F. (LSSI, Denver, CO (USA))

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ervay consists of carbonate ramp sediments deposited under conditions of varying sea level. On the east flank of the Bighorn Basin, the Ervay displays two major, regionally correlative, shallowing-upward cycles that vary in lithofacies across the basin. West of this area, the Ervay contains four regional cycles. Within each cycle, lithofacies tracts lie subparallel to northwest-trending Permian uplifts. From southwest to northeast, the lithofacies are open-marine limestones, restricted-subtidal dolomites, peritidal (island) dolomites, and lagoon/salina deposits. Each Ervay lithofacies displays characteristic ranges in matrix permeability. The most permeable reservoirs are lower-intertidal dolomite boundstones containing well-connected laminoid-fenestral pores. As a result, lower matrix permeabilities are seen in upper-intertidal to supratidal dolomites containing poorly-connected irregular fenestral pores and vugs. Restricted-subtidal dolomites contain mainly small intercrystalline pores and poorly-connected vugs and molds, and therefore also display poor reservoir quality. Vertical tectonic macrofractures probably make a significant contribution to primary production in relatively few wells, while negatively affecting secondary recovery. Microfractures, on the other hand, may be important to primary production throughout the study area. Thus, the major factors determining Ervay Member producibility are stratigraphic and diagenetic, even though may traps are structural. In the Cottonwood Creek area, many wells with thick sequences of lower-intertidal rocks produce more than 250,000 BO, irrespective of whether or not they are structurally high. By contrast, upper-intertidal, restricted-subtidal, and fractured reservoirs generally produce fewer than 100,000 BO per well.

  7. An insoluble residue study of the upper Walnut Formation, Comanche Peak Limestone, and Edwards Limestone, Bosque and western McLennan counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpson, Jimmie Darrell

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R' ERECERICKSBURG CROUP I &AHKH&HHwAT VVVVVV VvVV LINE AA' NORTHERN LIMIT OF CHERT LINE BBI SOUTHERN LIMIT OF KIAMICHI LINE CC' SOUTHERN LIMIT OF BIOHERMS SCALE WI IAIISOR' 25 50 . . : ~ :. ;: 0 GEORGETONN C ~ , ', 'T CI MILES Fig. 2... x Main Street Pawpaw Weno Denton Fort Worth Duck Creek Kiamichi 0-15& Edwards 15'-125' Comanche Peak 70'-125' Upper Marl Member Walnut 125'-175' Paluxy 0-25' g 5 Glen Rose Fig. 3. Columnar section of Early Cretaceous formation...

  8. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE LIMB Demonstration Project Extension is a continuation of the EPA Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration. EPA ultimately expects to show that LIMB is a low cost control technology capable of producing moderate SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} control (50--60 percent) with applicability for retrofit to the major portion of the existing coal-fired boiler population. The current EPA Wall-Fired LIMB Demonstration is a four-year project that includes design and installation of a LIMB system at the 105-MW Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison's Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. LIMB Extension testing continued during the quarter with lignosulfonated hydrated lime, pulverized limestone, and hydrated dolomitic lime while firing 1.8% and 3% sulfur coals. Sulfur dioxide removal efficiencies were equivalent to the results found during EPA, base LIMB testing. Sulfur dioxide removal efficiencies were lower than expected while testing with pulverized limestone without humidification. A slight increase in sulfur capture was noted while injecting pulverized limestone at the 187' elevation and with the humidifier outlet temperature at 145{degree}F.

  9. RECIPIENT:QDOE U.S. Dl1PARTlIIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    : SEP ARRA - Deployment of Innovative Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy - Agriculture - Dufur & HanncrCantrell Funding Opportunity Announcement Number...

  10. u.s. Dl!PARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER Nl...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visils, and audits), data analysis (including , but not limited 10, computer...

  11. PMC·Fr.. U.S. Dl?PARThIENT OFFNFRGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visits, and audits), data analysis (including. but not limited to, computer...

  12. The foundational inequalities of D.L. Burkholder and some of their ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 3, 2011 ... 27. 3.4 The operators TA and Riesz transforms . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 .... a sequence of random variables {vk,k ? 0} uniformly bounded by 1 for all k ..... where Bt is n–

  13. Aggregation of n-octanoyl-dl-cysteine in aqueous solvent systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelley, Ralph Ray

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . (13) J. P. Greenstein and M. Winitz in "Chemistry of Amino Acids, " John Wiley and Sons, New York, N. Y. 1961, Vol. III, p 1920. (14) B. Liberek, Z. Grzonka and A. Michalik, Ann. Soc. Chim. Polonorum, 40, 683 (1966). (ld) G. J g, E. B 't ' d W. Vo... Micelle Concentration Dye Absorption Spectrophotometry Theory PK Values NOC Interaction with Thymine Conclusions REFERENCES 10 10 12 26 30 31 34 54 VITA LIST OF TABLES TABLE IV V VI VI I VIII IX X 'H nmr parameters for NOC in D20...

  14. u.s. Dl!PAR1'M:ENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PAR1'M:ENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlIIINATION RECIPIENT :University of California San Diego PROJECT TITL.E: San Diego Center for Algae Biotechnology Page...

  15. Dl!PARThlENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT \\1A~AGEMENT CENTER

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    requirements (such as local land use and zoning requirements) In the proposed project area and would incorporate appropriate control technologies and best management practices....

  16. TRIAC: A code for track measurements using image analysis tools D.L. Patiris a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blekas, Konstantinos

    for dosimetry proposes and classifies the tracks according to their radii for the spectrometry of alpha exposed to a radon rich environment. The system was also tested to differentiate tracks recorded by alpha-particles of different energies. Ó 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. PACS: 29.40.Wk; 29.30.Ep; 29.85.+c Keywords

  17. ,Tr{fi'q qib61-q TQTr{ 'm: erfuRror, T{ R-dl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    with synthetic enamel paint of approved brand and manafacture of required colour to give an even shade One,tower bolts,handles etc.(synthetic enamel oaint) L/S 105 15 Providing and fixing nickel plated M.S. pipe or dyed to required colour and shade, with necessary screws etc. complele. Twin rubber stopper EACH 38 t7

  18. Formation of dl-limonene in used tire vacuum pyrolysis oils. [dipentene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pakdel, H.; Roy, C.; Aubin, H.; Jean, G. (Univ. Lavel, Sainte-Foy, Quebec (Canada)); Coulombe, S. (CANMET, Varennes, Quebec (Canada))

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tire recycling has become an important environmental issue recently due to the huge piles of tires that threaten the environment. Thermal decomposition of tire, a synthetic rubber material, enables the recovery of carbon black and liquid hydrocarbon oils. Both have potential economic values. Pyrolysis oils obtained under vacuum conditions contain a significant portion of a volatile, naptha-like fraction with an octane number similar to petroleum naphtha fraction, in addition, contains approximately 15% limonene. Potential applications of vacuum pyrolysis oil and carbon black have been investigated. However, the process economics is greatly influenced by the quality of the oil and carbon black products. This paper discusses limonene formation during used tire vacuum pyrolysis and its postulated reaction mechanism. The limonene separation method from pyrolysis oil, as well as its purification in laboratory scale, and structural characterization are discussed. Large-scale limonene separation and purification is under investigation.

  19. Extrapolated fmax for Carbon Nanotube FETs L.C. Castro and D.L. Pulfrey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    for the radian frequency T at which the short-circuit, common-source, current gain reaches unity, when, small-signal equivalent circuit, in which there are no elements representing the substrate [2, p.441 the small-signal parameters of the equivalent circuit, we systematically make a series of approximations

  20. TFI: RTEfuST, T{ ftd rDl-.I: 91.1.1.41493997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    in the electrical substation area in lSl Campus, Delhi Centre, New Delhi. of work Surface dressing of the gronndour the archltectural drawinqs and the dlrections of engineer-in-charge . (Cost of aluminium snap beading sha be paid on the body / piate with double spring mechanism and door weight upto 125 kg, for doors, including cost

  1. 3.1.1.2 Feed Processing and Handling DL2 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Wend, Christopher F.

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This milestone report is the deliverable for our Feed Processing and Handling project. It includes results of wet biomass feedstock analysis, slurry pumping information, fungal processing to produce a lignin-rich biorefinery residue and two subcontracted efforts to quantify the amount of wet biomass feedstocks currently available within the corn processing and paper processing industries.

  2. DOE/SC-ARM-13-003 ARM Lead Mentor Selection Process DL Sisterson

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePARTOffice ofHale Plan24,7,INL is6 ARM203 ARM

  3. ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH AhD SAFETY DlVlSlDN

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertown Arsenal'.I Y.it ! ( ,E;;;: 61c

  4. ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH Al\rD SAFETY DlVlSlON

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertown Arsenal'.I Y.it ! ( ,E;;;:

  5. ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET hlul ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH ANI SAFETY DlVlSlON

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertown Arsenal'.I Y.it ! ( ,E;;;:hlul

  6. DEPXRTMEKT OF ENV]RO~:MENTAL F'ROTECTION DlVklOh OF

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertowni5W 95.5x-L* d!Qwner*. (OOE. *

  7. dlCC Opt: Optimization Software for Renewable Energy Projects - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , ., ..., ,+ .-detonation detection |New

  8. Preliminary analyses of matrix properties of Silurian and Devonian carbonate rocks in the Indiana and Ohio parts of the Midwestern Basins and Arches Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, G.D. (Geological Survey, Columbus, OH (United States). Water Resources Div.)

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Geological Survey's Regional Aquifer-Systems Analysis (RASA) in the Midwestern Basins and Arches Region is investigating the Silurian and Devonian carbonate-rock aquifer in parts of Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, and Illinois. Core samples from the carbonate-rock aquifer in Indiana and Ohio were analyzed for horizontal permeability and porosity. These matrix properties were used to describe the hydrogeologic aspects of the carbonate-rock aquifer throughout the regional study area. Core descriptions by the Indiana and Ohio State Geological surveys, were used for sub-dividing the core into the various lithostratigraphic groups. The lithostratigraphic groups are: the Brassfield/Sexton Creek Limestone, the Sublockport (including the Dayton Limestone and the Rochester Shale Equivalent), the Lockport Dolomite or the Salamonie Dolomite, the Salina Group, the lower section of the Muscatatuck Group and the upper section of the Muscatatuck Group. The porosities and horizontal permeabilities determined from the 38 samples were analyzed by nonparametric statistical methods. The data were grouped by lithologic unit, well location, and position within a depositional basin (the Appalachian, Michigan and Illinois Basins). In each case, all groups of data had identical distributions. These results show that the horizontal permeability and porosity of the matrix in the Silurian and Devonian carbonate rocks that were sampled are statistically similar and that variation between the groups is not statistically important.

  9. Cyrenaican platform: structure, stratigraphy, and exploration play concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, C.M.; Zegaar, M.N.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structural and stratigraphic history of the Cyrenaican platform of eastern Libya is closely related to that of both the Sirte basin and the Western Desert of Egypt. At the end of the Paleozoic Hercynian orogeny, this area comprised the eastern end of the Sirte arch, the precursor of the Sirte basin. When the arch collapsed in the mid-Cretaceous, initiating the Sirte basin, the Cyrenaican area remained relatively high. A northwest-southeast trending high, the Gabboub arch, formed on the platform in the early Mesozoic, dividing the region into three areas: the high itself, a deep on the southwestern flank related to the Sirte basin, and a deep on the northeastern flank, which plunges into the offshore and appears to relate to the downwarped offshore area of the Western Desert of Egypt. Sediments of every age, except Triassic, are found in Cyrenaica. Paleozoic sediments are composed primarily of quartzitic sandstones and shales with lesser amounts of limestone, dolomites, and anhydrites. Mesozoic sediments are a mixture of clastics and carbonates. Cenozoic sediments are predominantly limestones, dolomites, and anhydrites with some sandstones and shales. Environments of deposition range from continental to deep marine. The Cyrenaican area has not been heavily explored and, until recently, no commercial hydrocarbons were found. Drilling on surface structures of some of the first wells in Libya resulted in one Devonian gas well. A reported 5600 BOPD Cretaceous discovery offshore Benghazi in mid-1984 demonstrates that hydrocarbon potential exists where thick sediments have been preserved.

  10. Reviving Abandoned Reservoirs with High-Pressure Air Injection: Application in a Fractured and Karsted Dolomite Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Loucks; Stephen C. Ruppel; Dembla Dhiraj; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jeff Kane; Jon Olson; John A. Jackson; Katherine G. Jackson

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the United States contain vast volumes of remaining oil that is not being effectively recovered. This oil resource constitutes a huge target for the development and application of modern, cost-effective technologies for producing oil. Chief among the barriers to the recovery of this oil are the high costs of designing and implementing conventional advanced recovery technologies in these mature, in many cases pressure-depleted, reservoirs. An additional, increasingly significant barrier is the lack of vital technical expertise necessary for the application of these technologies. This lack of expertise is especially notable among the small operators and independents that operate many of these mature, yet oil-rich, reservoirs. We addressed these barriers to more effective oil recovery by developing, testing, applying, and documenting an innovative technology that can be used by even the smallest operator to significantly increase the flow of oil from mature U.S. reservoirs. The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The Permian Basin, the largest oil-bearing basin in North America, contains more than 70 billion barrels of remaining oil in place and is an ideal venue to validate this technology. We have demonstrated the potential of HPAI for oil-recovery improvement in preliminary laboratory tests and a reservoir pilot project. To more completely test the technology, this project emphasized detailed characterization of reservoir properties, which were integrated to access the effectiveness and economics of HPAI. The characterization phase of the project utilized geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. The successful development of HPAI technology has tremendous potential for increasing the flow of oil from deep carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin, a target resource that can be conservatively estimated at more than 1.5 billion barrels. Successful implementation in the field chosen for demonstration, for example, could result in the recovery of more than 34 million barrels of oil that will not otherwise be produced. Geological and petrophysical analysis of available data at Barnhart field reveals the following important observations: (1) the Barnhart Ellenburger reservoir is similar to most other Ellenburger reservoirs in terms of depositional facies, diagenesis, and petrophysical attributes; (2) the reservoir is characterized by low to moderate matrix porosity much like most other Ellenburger reservoirs in the Permian Basin; (3) karst processes (cave formation, infill, and collapse) have substantially altered stratigraphic architecture and reservoir properties; (4) porosity and permeability increase with depth and may be associated with the degree of karst-related diagenesis; (5) tectonic fractures overprint the reservoir, improving overall connectivity; (6) oil-saturation profiles show that the oil-water contact (OWC) is as much as 125 ft lower than previous estimations; (7) production history and trends suggest that this reservoir is very similar to other solution-gas-drive reservoirs in the Permian Basin; and (8) reservoir simulation study showed that the Barnhart reservoir is a good candidate for HPAI and that application of horizontal-well technology can improve ultimate resource recovery from the reservoir.

  11. Facies and Reservoir Characterization of the Permian White Rim Sandstone, Black Box Dolomite, and Black Dragon Member of the Triassic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    of Geological Sciences, BYU Master of Science Geologic sequestration of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2, and Black Dragon Member of the Triassic Moenkopi Formation for CO2 Storage and Sequestration at Woodside Formation, for CO2 Sequestration at Woodside Field, East-central Utah Walter Harston Department

  12. Disseminated `jigsaw piece' dolomite in Upper Jurassic shelf sandstones, Central North Sea: an example of cement growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    : an example of cement growth during bioturbation? JAMES P. HENDRY*1 , MARK WILKINSON , ANTHONY E. FALLICKà crystals and consequent cementation of the grain framework. Continued exchange of Mg2+ and Ca2 on calcite cementation in marine sandstones in recent years has greatly improved our understanding

  13. An insoluble residue study of the Cretaceous Cow Creek Limestone of Central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morton, William Rogers

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    '. " Fishez ard. Rodda (1966) proposed a nomer'clature revision of the basal Cretaceous rocks zn the area between the Colorado and Bed Rivers. This revision proposed. a return to the terminology of Hill (1901) in which the basal Cretaceous secuence below...

  14. Submarine diagenesis in Lower Cretaceous coral-rudist reefs, Mural Limestone, southeastern Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cross, Scott Lewis

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    carbon isotope values (d 3C? = 2. 5 '/ ) and a 0. 3X Mg enrichment over original low-Mg calcite rudi st shells support the interpretation of these peloidal features as former Mg-calcite submar1ne cements. Primary porosity in the reef core was neglig1... for selected reef-rock components. . 68 73 82 28 Mg vs. Ca f' or selected reef-rock components. . . 84 29 Graph of the oxygen isotopic equilibrium relationship between temperature, calcite, and water. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 30 Chart of cement...

  15. Paleoenvironmental significance of stromatolites in the Americus Limestone Member (Lower Permian, Midcontinent, USA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, L. E.; Kaesler, R. L.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MARSHALL CO NEMAHA CO. POTTAWATOME COTJACKSON CO. _ -141-P 11 ' W1.-6-• --• P8 ja. JE• • J4 (Hoffman, 1976, p. 265, fig. 4), which are useful aids for environmental interpretation because they relate the mor- phology of stromatolites to the degree... investigated the Nemaha anticline's effect on depositional environments and concluded that late tectonic uplift of the anticline affected deposition of the Americus but not the uppermost Hamlin. His determination of paleoenvi- ronments (Fig. 3) was based...

  16. Crinoids from the Anchor Limestone (Lower Mississippian) of the Monte Cristo Group, southern Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, G. D.; Lane, N. G.

    1987-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Visean. ACTINOCRINITES ANCHORENSIS, n. sp. Fig. 5,8-11 Diagnosis. -Calyx broadly turbinate, teg- men convex, theca bowl-shaped, basal flange scalloped, ornament sharp, stellate, 6 arms per ray. Description. -Calyx small, broadly turbi- nate, tegmen convex... Visean. ACTINOCRINITES ANCHORENSIS, n. sp. Fig. 5,8-11 Diagnosis. -Calyx broadly turbinate, teg- men convex, theca bowl-shaped, basal flange scalloped, ornament sharp, stellate, 6 arms per ray. Description. -Calyx small, broadly turbi- nate, tegmen convex...

  17. 3D simulations of an injection test done into an unsaturated porous and fractured limestone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ]; · sr the water residual saturation [-]; ineris-00973682,version1-4Apr2014 Manuscrit auteur, publié dans dissipation of the water pressures and stress variations induced by the water injection. Back analysis lead us are the water and air density [kg/m3 ]; · µw and µnw are the water and air dynamic viscosity [Pa.s]; · k

  18. Geology of the Northwest Wortham area, Navarro, Limestone, and Freestone counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Clifford Littleton

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Information as to fluidised beds of partioles used as oataIysts in petroleum cracking units and othez' chemical processes is very extensive. Pneumatic oonvsying is less known, and the basic knowledge is only available from the manufacturers... the condition of sag flow exists. Due to the decrease in the fan load the air velocity inoreases beyond the ~ conveying velocltgr. In time, the settled material in the tube will be conveyed ??, , . . . . . . CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION @hen a bed of solid...

  19. A study of strain characteristics in a limestone gravel subjected to repetitive loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hargis, Louis Lane

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    one-inch diameter, 60 case hardened steel piston applies the load to the specimen. lt moves practically free of friction along a set of lineal 'ball 'bushings whi. ch remain constantly lubricated in an oil bath. ~ The cells are easily assembled. and...

  20. Paleoenvironmental analysis of the Cotton Valley Limestone, southeastern Smith County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glynn, William George

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Porosity-Permeability CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES CITED APPENDIX VITA DO 60 60 63 69 84 87 87 107 112 144 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page Index map of the east Texas area, showing the locations of the Teague Townsite Field area, Gilmer Field area... [ I ! IE? a L. ]Southeast a Ba, abine ) T qg?g ', '~dta Townsite Fig. 1. index map of the east Texas area, showing the locations of the Teague Townsite Field area, Gilmer Field area, and the southeastern Smith County area. and determines...

  1. Geology of the Northwest Wortham area, Navarro, Limestone, and Freestone counties, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Clifford Littleton

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conveying ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 33 7, Geometric mean diameter effects on the driving requirements of a pneumatic conveyor . 33 8. Dimensional analysis appliei to pneumatic conveying... OF FIGURES Page The closed-oirouit pneumatic conveyor flow diagzam . . . , , . 10 The piping section after material feeding, showing some piescmeter rings, solenoid valves and ssu. ifold system which leads to the manometer, Also shown is the location...

  2. RECORDING OF THE THERMAL EVOLUTION OF LIMESTONES UNDERGOING EXPERIMENTAL ACCELERATED AGEING TESTS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . Abstract Sodium sulfates are widely regarded as the most destructive salts for porous stone, concrete destructive salts for porous stones, and other building materials such as concrete or brick (Goudie et al, 1997). It is important to fully understand their crystallization process in porous networks and

  3. Failure mode analysis for lime/limestone FGD systems. Volume 3. Plant profiles. Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenney, S.M.; Rosenberg, H.S.; Nilsson, L.I.O.; Oxley, J.H.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant profiles are given for the following plants: Tombigbee 2, 3; Apache 2, 3; Cholla 1, 2; Four Corners 1, 2, 3; Laramie River 1; Green 1, 2; Duck Creek 1; Craig 1, 2; Conesville 5, 6; Coal Creek 1, 2; Elrama 1, 2, 3, 4; and Phillips 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. (DLC)

  4. Paleoautecology of Caninia torquia (Owen) from the Beil Limestone Member (Pennsylvanian, Virgilian), Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maerz, R. H., Jr.

    1978-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    in Heliophyllum halli from the Devonian of New York, con- cluded that variation was the result of mode of reproduction, stability on the substratum, age, rejuvenescence, and differential growth rate. Oliver ( 1958 ) concluded that individ- ual variation... in Heliophyllum halli from the Devonian of New York, con- cluded that variation was the result of mode of reproduction, stability on the substratum, age, rejuvenescence, and differential growth rate. Oliver ( 1958 ) concluded that individ- ual variation...

  5. Accumulation of surface-applied agricultural limestone in acid soils of east Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Earl Raymond

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    County Trinity County Jasper County Gregg County 45 45 53 61 68 79 Wood County General Discussion Page 96 120 CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES APPENDIX A APPENDIX B APPENDIX C 127 129 134 135 148 VITA 155 LIST OF TABLES Table Page U. S... of the transects sampled at the Wood county and Gregg county sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 14 Calcium carbonate content as a function of soil depth for the Leon county pasture. The soil series was a Demons taxadjunct. The erroz bars indicate...

  6. Reservoir rock properties of the Arun limestone (Miocene), Arun field, North Sumatra, Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saman, Suryadi

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RA 113 RA LF UC 29 LF BS PACK WACK WACK PACK WACK WACK PACK BOUN PACK PACK A024 Core 101 ID. 2 101 13. 2 10119$ 10123. 5 10128. 2 10132. 1 10137. 3 A02-5 Cne 10165. 6 10172. 6 10176. 0 101874 101 L3. 2 101198 101 23. 5...

  7. Pathogen and chemical transport in the karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to augment geologic and geophysical studies and to develop a hydrogeologic conceptual model of groundwater.1029/2007WR006058. 1. Introduction [2] In 2000, more than 226 m3 /s of groundwater were withdrawn from conceptualization of groundwater flow Robert A. Renken,1 Kevin J. Cunningham,1 Allen M. Shapiro,2 Ronald W. Harvey,3

  8. The use of FBC wastes in the reclamation of coal slurry solids. Technical report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steele, J.D. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) is a relatively new technology that is used commercially for the combustion of coal. In Illinois, this technology is valuable because it allows the combustion of Illinois high sulfur coal without pollution of the atmosphere with vast quantities of sulfur oxides. In FBC, coal is mixed with limestone or dolomite either before injection into the combustion chamber or in the combustion chamber. As the coal burns, sulfur in the coal is oxidized to S0{sub 2} and this is trapped by reaction with the limestone or dolomite to form gypsum (CaSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O). Solid by-products from FBC are generally a mixture of calcium oxide, gypsum, coal ash, and unburned coal. The present research project is designed to provide initial data on one possible use of FBC waste. FBC wastes from five different locations in Illinois are mixed with coal slurry solids (CSS) from two different coal preparation plants at Illinois coal mines. In mixtures of FBC waste and coal slurry solids, the alkaline components of the FBC waste are expected to react with acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in the coal slurry solid. An objective of this research is to determine the chemical composition of aqueous leachates from mixtures of FBC wastes, generated under various operating conditions, and the coal slurry solids. These data will be used in future research into the ability of such mixtures to support seed germination and plant growth. The final goal of this and future research is to determine whether mixed FBC waste and coal slurry solids can be used as a satisfactory growing medium in slurry pond reclamation. The chemical analyses of the 8 starting solids (5 FBC wastes, 2 Css samples, and 1 agricultural limestone sample) were completed.

  9. Vega field and potential of Ragusa basin, Offshore Sicily

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schramm, M. Jr.; Livraga, G.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vega, the largest single oil field in the Mediterranean Sea, is located between the southeastern coast of Sicily and the Island of Malta. The field lies entirely in Italian waters. Its discovery in October 1980 was based on interpretation of a very poor-quality seismic survey which, nevertheless, roughly outlined a relatively small structure. A limestone and dolomite fractured reservoir of the Inici, or Siracusa Formation, of Late Jurasic age, may contain in excess of 1 billion bbl of heavy crude (15.5 API) within a productive area of approximately 10,000 acres (4000 ha.). Reservoir properties are excellent, with permeabilities in darcys. The field extends northwest-southeast for 8.5 mi (14 km) and averages 1.7 mi (3 km) in width, according to the 3D seismic survey (2000 km) shot soon after the discovery well was drilled. The gross oil column reaches approximately 820 ft (250 m). The southeasternmost part of the Vega structure is not yet completely defined, and an additional 3D seismic survey is in progress. Should the new seismic results confirm expectations, the Vega structure could extend over 10 mi (17 km). The overlying Inici reservoir consists of dolomite and underlain by limestone in the southwestern part of the basin, and entirely of limestone in the northwestern portion of the basin. The Inici Formation represents the platform facies of the open-sea Villagonia and Giardini sediments. The Cammarata-Pozzillo (discovered in 1959), Perla (1979), Vega (1980), and Prezioso (1983) heavy crude oil fields are related to this formation. The potential for discovery of other fields similar to Vega in the Ragusa basin is excellent.

  10. Eocene and Upper Cretaceous carbonate reservoirs in east-central Tunisia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, W.F.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regionally, well-defined belts of lowest Eocene (Ypresian) Metlaoui carbonates trend northwest-southeast. On the northeast is an open-marine, basinal facies of planktonic foraminiferal micrite and marl. Thick bars of shallow marine nummulitic wackestone, packstone, and grainstone trend northeastward at an angle to the paleoshelf. Lagoonal or supratidaly carbonates are widespread between the shelf deposits and thick evaporites that crop out in intermontane basins. The reservoir is confined largely to nummulitic packstone, and visible effective porosity is best developed between forams in zones filled with sand-size debris where secondary solution-enlargement has occurred. Porosity within nummulite chambers, while abundant, is ineffective, although a few open fractures were observed in cores. This lithology tested oil in 2 recent wildcats and is a commercial reservoir at Sidi El Itayem and Ashtart fields. Distribution of Zebbag carbonates of Late Cretaceous (Turonian) age is more complex. A northwest-southeast-trending platform is bounded on 3 sides by basinal shale and micrite with planktonic forams which grade into a transitional facies of micrite and wackestone that shows some evidence of shallow-water deposition, such as dolomitization, bioclasts, rare ooliths, etc. Predominately back-reef and lagoonal bioclastic wackestones and packstones occur in narrow belts, apparently controlled at least locally by block faulting. The rest of the platform lithology comprises mostly dolomite and dolomitic limestone. The most significant porosity is interparticle (generally solution-enlarged) in foram packstones, but intraparticle porosity in forams and rudists commonly enhances the reservoir. Intercrystalline porosity in dolomitized zones is common, and fenestral porosity occurs in a few places. All are modified by nonfabric-selective channel and vuggy porosity and in some instances by fractures.

  11. Geologic constraints to fluid flow in the Jurassic Arab D reservoir, eastern Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laing, J.E. (Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A giant oil field located in eastern Saudi Arabia has produced several billion barrels of 37{degree} API oil from fewer than 100 wells. The Upper Jurassic Arab Formation is the main producing unit, and is made up of a series of upward-shoaling carbonate and anhydrite members. Porous carbonates of the Arab D member make up the principle oil reservoir, and overlying Arab D anhydrite provides the seal. Principal reservoir facies are stromatoporoid-coral and skeletal grainstones. Reservoir drive is currently provided by flank water injection. Despite more than 30 years of flank water injection (1.5 billion bbl) into the northern area of the field, a thick oil column remains in the Arab D reservoir. Geological factors which affect fluid flow in this area are (1) a downdip facies change from permeable skeletal-stromatoporoid limestone to less permeable micritic limestone, (2) vertical permeability barriers resulting from shoaling-upward cycles, (3) a downdip tar mat, (4) dolomite along the flanks in the upper portion of the reservoir, (5) highly permeable intervals within the skeletal-stromatoporoid limestone, and (6) an updip, north to south facies change from predominantly stromatoporoid-coral grainstone to skeletal grainstone. These factors are considered in reservoir modeling, simulation studies, and planning locations for both water injection and producer wells.

  12. ID 22_Tappero Author Tappero, R.; Roberts, D.R.; Grfe, M.; Marcus, M.A.; Sparks, D.L.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Parameter (In situ) Elemental distributions, associations, and molecular speciation in solid phases Soil (fine map). The multi-element SXRF images are useful for observing (in situ) elemental distributions-edge region (XANES) of the XAFS spectra can be used to investigate the oxidation state of redox-sensitive

  13. Recrystallization in CdTe/CdS A. Romeo, D.L. Batzner, H. Zogg, A.N. Tiwari*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romeo, Alessandro

    ¯uence on the microstructure of CdTe and photovoltaic properties. Solar cells with ef®ciency of 11.2 and 2.5% are obtainedTe/CdS photovoltaic devices have been obtained with different growth methods [1±3]. Recrys- tallization treatments. Therefore PVD grown CdS layers are used for better reliability despite of the opti- cal losses due to large

  14. Newbie here. Is there any software/site which can poll my utility to D/L my

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpen EnergyNelsoniX LtdNew EnergyCity Data JamNewberryWatergreen

  15. Studies of in-situ calcium based sorbents in advanced pressurized coal conversion systems. Final report, June 1991--October 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katta, S.; Shires, P.J.; Campbell, W.M.; Henningsen, G.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project was to obtain experimental data on the reactions of calcium-based sorbents in both air-blown coal gasification systems and second generation fluid bed coal combustion systems (partial gasification) as well as stabilization of the spent sorbent produced. The project consisted of six tasks: Tasks 1 and 2 dealt mostly with project-related activities and preparation of test equipment, Task 3 -- study on sulfidation of calcium-based sorbents, Task 4 -- kinetic studies on calcium-catalyzed carbon gasification reactions, and Task 5 -- oxidation of CaS present in LASHs and DASHs (mixtures of coal ash and limestone or dolomite respectively) to CaSO{sub 4} and absorption of SO{sub 2} on various solids, and Task 6 -- economic evaluation of the most promising CaS oxidation method developed under this program. Experimental studies were conducted primarily to address Task 5 issues, and are discussed in this report.

  16. Relative abundance of desert tortoises on the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautenstrauch, K.R.; O`Farrell, T.P.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Seven hundred fifty-nine transects having a total length of 1,191 km were walked during 1981--1986 to determine the distribution and relative abundance of desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The abundance of tortoises on NTS was low to very low relative to other populations in the Mojave Desert. Sign of tortoises was found from 880 to 1,570 m elevation and was more abundant above 1,200 m than has been reported previously for Nevada. Tortoises were more abundant on NTS on the upper alluvial fans and slopes of mountains than in valley bottoms. They also were more common on or near limestone and dolomite mountains than on mountains of volcanic origin.

  17. Decontamination of combustion gases in fluidized bed incinerators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leon, Albert M. (Mamaroneck, NY)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfur-containing atmospheric pollutants are effectively removed from exit gas streams produced in a fluidized bed combustion system by providing a fluidized bed of particulate material, i.e. limestone and/or dolomite wherein a concentration gradient is maintained in the vertical direction. Countercurrent contacting between upwardly directed sulfur containing combustion gases and descending sorbent particulate material creates a concentration gradient across the vertical extent of the bed characterized in progressively decreasing concentration of sulfur, sulfur dioxide and like contaminants upwardly and decreasing concentration of e.g. calcium oxide, downwardly. In this manner, gases having progressively decreasing sulfur contents contact correspondingly atmospheres having progressively increasing concentrations of calcium oxide thus assuring optimum sulfur removal.

  18. Mineral Resource Information System for Field Lab in the Osage Mineral Reservation Estate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, H.B.; Johnson, William I.

    1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Osage Mineral Reservation Estate is located in Osage County, Oklahoma. Minerals on the Estate are owned by members of the Osage Tribe who are shareholders in the Estate. The Estate is administered by the Osage Agency, Branch of Minerals, operated by the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). Oil, natural gas, casinghead gas, and other minerals (sand, gravel, limestone, and dolomite) are exploited by lessors. Operators may obtain from the Branch of Minerals and the Osage Mineral Estate Tribal Council leases to explore and exploit oil, gas, oil and gas, and other minerals on the Estate. Operators pay a royalty on all minerals exploited and sold from the Estate. A mineral Resource Information system was developed for this project to evaluate the remaining hydrocarbon resources located on the Estate. Databases on Microsoft Excel spreadsheets of operators, leases, and production were designed for use in conjunction with an evaluation spreadsheet for estimating the remaining hydrocarbons on the Estate.

  19. Review of Distribution Coefficients for Radionuclides in Carbonate Minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, M

    2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An understanding of the transport of radionuclides in carbonate minerals is necessary to be able to predict the fate of (and potentially remediate) radionuclides in the environment. In some environments, carbonate minerals such as calciate, aragonite, dolomite and limestone are present and an understanding of the sorption of radionuclides in these carbonate minerals is therefore advantageous. A list of the radionuclides of interest is given in Table 1. The distribution coefficient, K{sub d} is defined as the ratio of the contaminant concentration bound on the solid phase to the contaminant concentration remaining in the liquid phase at equilibrium. Some authors report distribution coefficients and other report partition coefficients, the data presented in this work assumes equality between these two terms, and data are presented and summarized in this work as logarithmic distribution coefficient (log K{sub D}). Published literature was searched using two methods. Firstly, the JNC Sorption Database, namely Shubutani et al (1999), and Suyama and Sasamoto (2004) was used to select elements of interest and a number of carbonate minerals. Secondly, on-line literature search tools were used to locate relevant published articles from 1900 to 2009. Over 300 data points covering 16 elements (hydrogen, carbon, calcium, nickel, strontium, technetium, palladium, iodine, cesium, samarium, europium, holmium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium) were used to calculate an average and range of log K{sub d} values for each element. Unfortunately, no data could be found for chlorine, argon, krypton, zirconium, niobium, tin, thorium and curium. A description of the data is given below, together with the average, standard deviation, minimum, maximum and number of inputs for radionuclide K{sub d} values for calcite, aragonate, limestone, dolomite and unidentified carbonate rocks in Table 2. Finally, the data are condensed into one group (carbonate minerals) of data for each element of interest in Table 3.

  20. The use of FBC wastes in the reclamation of coal slurry solids. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreher, G.B.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) is a relatively new technology that is used commercially for the combustion of coal. In Illinois, this technology is valuable because it allows the combustion of Illinois high sulfur coal without pollution of the atmosphere with vast quantities of sulfur oxides. In FBC, coal is mixed with limestone or dolomite either before injection into the combustion chamber or in the combustion chamber. As the coal burns, sulfur in the coal is oxidized to SO{sub 2} and this is trapped by reaction with the limestone or dolomite to form gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O). Solid by-products from FBC are generally a mixture of calcium oxide, gypsum, coal ash, and unburned coal. The present research project is designed to provide initial data on one possible use of FBC waste. FBC wastes from five different locations in the Illinois are mixed with coal slurry solids from two different coal preparation plants at Illinois coal mines. In mixtures of FBC waste and coal slurry solids, the alkaline components of the FBC waste are expected to react with acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in the coal slurry solid. An objective of this research is to determine the chemical composition of aqueous leachates from mixtures of FBC wastes, generated under various operating conditions, and the coal slurry solids. These data will be used in future research into the ability of such mixtures to support seed germination and plant growth. The ultimate of this and future research is to determine whether mixed FBC waste and coal slurry solids can be slurry pond reclamation.

  1. The use of FBC wastes in the reclamation of coal slurry solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreher, G.B.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) is a relatively new technology that is used commercially for the combustion of coal. In Illinois, this technology is valuable because it allows the combustion of Illinois high sulfur coal without pollution of the atmosphere with vast quantities of sulfur oxides. In FBC, coal is mixed with limestone or dolomite either before injection into the combustion chamber or in the combustion chamber. As the coal burns, sulfur in the coal is oxidized to SO{sub 2} and this is trapped by reaction with the limestone or dolomite to form gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{center dot}2H{sub 2}O). Solid by-products from FBC are generally a mixture of calcium oxide, gypsum, coal ash, and unburned coal. The present research project is designed to provide initial data on one possible use of FBC waste. FBC wastes from five different locations in the Illinois are mixed with coal slurry solids from two different coal preparation plants at Illinois coal mines. In mixtures of FBC waste and coal slurry solids, the alkaline components of the FBC waste are expected to react with acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in the coal slurry solid. An objective of this research is to determine the chemical composition of aqueous leachates from mixtures of FBC wastes, generated under various operating conditions, and the coal slurry solids. These data will be used in future research into the ability of such mixtures to support seed germination and plant growth. The ultimate of this and future research is to determine whether mixed FBC waste and coal slurry solids can be slurry pond reclamation.

  2. Critical porosity: The key to relating physical properties to porosity in rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nur, A.M.; Mavko, G.; Dvorkin, J.; Gal, D.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Many classes of rock such as sandstones, dolomites, chalks, and cracked igneous rocks have each a distinct characteristic porosity above which the material behaves as s suspension. The porosity at which this system changes, or transforms from isostress to solid load-bearing is defined here as the critical porosity {phi}{sub c}. It is easy to envision that at {phi}{sub c} not only the mechanical moduli, but also other properties such as strength and electrical conductivity, may also undergo transformations. Consequently, the critical porosity must be a fundamental property of a given porous system, not just of one of its physical properties. The observed values of {phi}{sub c} range from .005 for cracked granites to .30 or .40 for limestones, dolomites and sandstones, .60 for chalks and .90 for volcanic glasses. The data suggest that (1) A critical porosity value {phi}{sub c} exists which is typical of a given class of porous materials. Each class is defined on the basis of its common mineralogy or diagenetic porosity reduction processes. (2) Given {phi}{sub c} it may be possible to closely approximate the relation between porosity and velocity, over the entire range of porosity, with a modified mixture relation, in which the mixed components are the pure solid on one end, and a critical suspension on the other. (3) Without {phi}{sub c}, theory cannot yield reliable or useful velocity-porosity relations.

  3. A review of WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) repository clays and their relationship to clays of adjacent strata

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krumhansl, J.L.; Kimball, K.M.; Stein, C.L.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Salado Formation is a thick evaporite sequence located in the Permian Delaware Basin of southeastern New Mexico. This study focuses on the intense diagenetic alteration that has affected the small amounts of clay, feldspar, and quartz washed into the basin during salt deposition. These changes are of more than academic interest since this formation also houses the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant). Site characterization concerns warrant compiling a detailed data base describing the clays in and around the facility horizon. An extensive sampling effort was undertaken to address these programmatic issues as well as to provide additional insight regarding diagenetic mechanisms in the Salado. Seventy-five samples were collected from argillaceous partings in halite at the stratigraphic level of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These were compared with twenty-eight samples from cores of the Vaca Triste member of the Salado, a thin clastic unit at the top of the McNutt potash zone, and with a clay-rich sample from the lower contact of the Culebra Dolomite (in the overlying Rustler Formation). These settings were compared to assess the influence of differences in brine chemistry (i.e., halite and potash facies, normal to hypersaline marine conditions) and sediment composition (clays, sandy silt, dolomitized limestone) on diagenetic processes. 44 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Sequence stratigraphic framework of the Upper Jurassic Smackover and related units, western Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, C.H.; Druckman, Y. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Post-Norphlet Upper Jurassic subsurface rocks of the western Gulf may be divided into four sequences encompassing some 12 million years (Lower Zuni A-4). The transgressive systems tract of the lower sequence (Smackover) consists of laminated muddy carbonate rocks and is the source for upper Jurassic hydrocarbons. The highstand systems tract of the Smackover consists of blanket ooid grainstones deposited on a platform. The Buckner 'B' begins with a siliciclastic lowstand fan ('C' sand). Highstand deposits of the 'B' consist of subaqueous lagoonal evaporites and an ooid grainstone prograding barrier system. Reflux of Buckner brines into Smackover grainstones resulted in regional dolomitization. The Buckner 'A' is similar to the 'B' except that the lagoon is dominated by siliciclastics. The Gray Sands of northern Louisiana may represent a lowstand fan initiating the 'A' sequence. The last sequence (Gilmer) is dominated by siliciclastics in Arkansas and Louisiana and limestones in east Texas. Its highstand systems tract in Texas is ooid dominated and is similar to the Buckner 'B' and 'A.' The regionally extensive Bossier Shale represents the transgressive systems tract of the next major sequence (Cotton Valley). Jurassic hydrocarbon production is controlled by sequence architecture: porosity of Smackover highstand deposits are dominantly secondary, developed by exposure during sea level fall and by dolomitization during the subsequent Buckner 'B' highstand, while Buckner and Gilmer highstand porosity is primary; Smackover traps are structural because of the blanket nature of the highstand system, while Buckner traps are stratigraphic developed in progradational highstand wedges.

  5. Diagenetic history and the evolution of porosity in the Cotton Valley Limestone, Teague Townsite Field, Freestone County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steffensen, Carl Kristian

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isotopes Environments of Diagenesis. CONCLUSIONS. REFERENCES CITED APPENDIX I APPENDIX II APPENDIX III APPENDIX IV. 19 19 25 26 26 28 28 29 37 37 72 88 96 107 116 118 132 VITA 134 LIST OF TABLES Table Page Composition of modern... fine, intragranular porosity that is not detectable with the petrographic microscope. The "chalky" or pithy appearance of both the grains and cement can be seen under the SEM (Figs. 17 and 18). Inversion The transformation of aragonite to calcite...

  6. Effect of limestone reactivity on the digestibility of nutrients in sorghum based diets fed to lactating Holstein cows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malasri, Kriangchitt Banphabutr

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    17 energy rations had little effect on pH in the reticulo- rumen but substantially increased (P(. 01) post-abomasal pH (61, 63) because of a low absorption rate of calcium from the lower gastro-intestinal tract (62 ). The increase of dietary...

  7. Enhanced deformation of limestone and sandstone in the presence of high PCO2 fluids Yvi Le Guen,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to the injection of large amounts of anthropogenic carbon dioxide will undergo chemical and mechanical The subsurface sequestration of CO2 in geological repositories is frequently cited as a promising solution- sues involved in the long-term sequestration of CO2 in such sites are discussed in an overview by [62

  8. Timing and local perturbations to the carbon pool in the lower Mississippian Madison Limestone, Montana and Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Abstract Coupling of carbon isotope stratigraphy with strontium isotope analysis by laser ablation MC

  9. Sequence Stratigraphy of the Lower Pennsylvanian (Bashkirian, Morrowan) Round Valley Limestone at Split Mountain (Dinosaur National Monument) and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    of Geological Sciences Brigham Young University April 2011 Copyright © 2011 Nathan Robert Davis All Rights Robert Davis Department of Geological Sciences Master of Science The Early Pennsylvanian (Bashkirian are characterized by mudstone and heterozoan wackestone-packstone microfacies (MF1-4) and comprise the lower

  10. An investigation of the creep phenomena exhibited by Solenhofen limestone, halite, and cement under medium confining pressures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kendall, Halcombe Augustus

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SHORT-T II" 1' - T IN F I GURE 5. CONF INED SHORT-T IME T'- ' T IN vROGR. 8 26 F IGURE 6 F IGURE 7 CREEP TESTS IN PROG+' b~, SH' ~tNG AUXILIARY LOADING DEViCi FA I LURE OF SOLENHOF t N L I I'tc STONc SPECIMENS 2'7 JO FIGURE 8. FAILURE OF CEMENT... IN 19/7 ON ROCK SALT& AND BY 12 LAYS LIBRARY A BIB COLLEGE OF TEXAS IN 19/6~ GR I GGS DEFORMED L I MESTONE UNDER CONF I N ING 1 PRESSURES UP TO 13 F000 ATMOSPHERES ~ HE SHOWED THAT WHEN THE SPECIMENS WERE JACKETED' SO THAT THE KEROSENE (USED...

  11. An investigation of the creep phenomena exhibited by Solenhofen limestone, halite, and cement under medium confining pressures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kendall, Halcombe Augustus

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SHORT-T II" 1' - T IN F I GURE 5. CONF INED SHORT-T IME T'- ' T IN vROGR. 8 26 F IGURE 6 F IGURE 7 CREEP TESTS IN PROG+' b~, SH' ~tNG AUXILIARY LOADING DEViCi FA I LURE OF SOLENHOF t N L I I'tc STONc SPECIMENS 2'7 JO FIGURE 8. FAILURE OF CEMENT... IN 19/7 ON ROCK SALT& AND BY 12 LAYS LIBRARY A BIB COLLEGE OF TEXAS IN 19/6~ GR I GGS DEFORMED L I MESTONE UNDER CONF I N ING 1 PRESSURES UP TO 13 F000 ATMOSPHERES ~ HE SHOWED THAT WHEN THE SPECIMENS WERE JACKETED' SO THAT THE KEROSENE (USED...

  12. A comparative molecular analysis of water-filled limestone sinkholes in north-eastern Mexicoemi_2324 226..240

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science and Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401, USA. 2 Department of geological. Summary Sistema Zacatón in north-eastern Mexico is host to several deep, water-filled, anoxic, karstic (Huber et al., 2007) and soil (Roesch et al., 2007) samples. Comparative methods that exploit the large

  13. Petrological and petrophysical causes for porosity reduction by bitumen plugging, Uwainat limestone (Middle Jurassic), Dukhan field, Qatar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdulla, Hezam Yahya H.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and fabric whereas the pores formed by diagenetic alteration are related to processes of leaching and pressure dissolution. Intergranular pores are the most abundant pore type present in Uwainat rocks; therefore, they are considered to be the primary...

  14. An insoluble residue study of the Comanche Peak and Edwards limestones in central Kimble and eastern Sutton counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graczyk, Edward John

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -weighed, qualitative-type, filter gaper, The sand- sixe fraction was washed onto a pre-weighed, hard, quanti- tative-type, filter paper. Both fractions were then oven- dried, cooled in a desiccator, end weighed on an analytical balanoe, All of the sand fraction...

  15. Paleoecology and depositional environment of Fort Hays Limestone Member, Niobrara Chalk (Upper Cretaceous), west-central Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, R. W.

    1972-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Sigma Xi, and Indiana University. STRATIGRAPHY AND PETROGRAPHY PHYSICAL STRATIGRAPHIC SETTING The Niobrara Chalk, as presently defined, is the uppermost formation of the Colorado Group (Zeller, 1968, pl. 1). Units of this group comprise about 900 ) feet... each unit of the Colorado Group. It may therefore be present at any stratigraphie level of the Niobrara. In west-central Kansas the Ogallala has been stripped away by erosion along the major stream valleys, except for scattered lag deposits...

  16. Failure mode analysis for lime/limestone FGD system. Volume III. Plant profiles. Part 1 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenney, S.M.; Rosenberg, H.S.; Nilsson, L.I.O.; Oxley, J.H.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains plant profiles for: Petersburg 3; Hawthorn 3, 4; La Cygne 1; Jeffry 1, 2; Lawrence 4, 5; Green River 1-3; Cane Run 4, 5; Mill Creek 1, 3; Paddy's Run 6; Clay Boswell 4; Milton R. Young 2; Pleasants 1, 2; and Colstrip 1, 2. (DLC)

  17. Petrological and petrophysical causes for porosity reduction by bitumen plugging, Uwainat limestone (Middle Jurassic), Dukhan field, Qatar 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdulla, Hezam Yahya H.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and fabric whereas the pores formed by diagenetic alteration are related to processes of leaching and pressure dissolution. Intergranular pores are the most abundant pore type present in Uwainat rocks; therefore, they are considered to be the primary...

  18. Control of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions from Pulverized Coal-Fired Boilers by Dry Removal with Lime and Limestone Sorbants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, M. H.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pulverized coal-fired boiler equipment. These are: (1) coal cleaning to remove pyritic sulfur, (2) conventional wet, nonregenerable scrubbing with alkaline slurry and solution processes, and (3) dry processes which involve direct introduction of lime...

  19. Control of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions from Pulverized Coal-Fired Boilers by Dry Removal with Lime and Limestone Sorbants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, M. H.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past decade increasing concern over the potential environmental impact associated with the emissions of both gaseous and particulate pollutants has resulted in the promulgation of strict regulatory standards governing such emissions...

  20. Image processing for the non-destructive characterization of porous media. Application to limestones and trabecular bones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ) and manmade materials (e.g. industrial foams, ceramics, electronic nanodevices) are examples of porous media their complex geometry, in order to improve and enhance their performance (glass or carbon fiber), to avoid (or

  1. Application of reservoir geology of enhanced oil recovery from upper Devonian Nisku Reefs, Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watts, N.R. (AEC Oil and Gas Company, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Coppold, M.P. (Imperial Oil Resources Limited (Esso), Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Douglas, J.L. (Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Devonian West Pembina reef trend of west-central Alberta contains recoverable reserves of over 79 x 10[sup 6] m[sup 3] (500 million bbl) of oil and 1.4 x 10[sup 10] m[sup 3] (500 billion ft[sup 3]) of gas within approximately 50 pinnacle reefs in the Nisku Formation. Although the oil is saturated with gas at original reservoir pressure, primary depletion would soon lower the reservoir pressure below the bubble point, decreasing recovery. Thus, pressure maintenance is applied early in the producing life of the pools through waterflood or miscible flood schemes. Selection of the appropriate enhanced recovery scheme depends upon the internal flow-unit geometry of the reefs. The Bigoray Nisku C pool and the Pembina Nisku L pool form end members of the reservoir spectrum. They can be used as flow-unit models in the geological input for reservoir simulation studies. The Bigoray Nisku C pool is dominantly limestone. The primary textures, well perserved in this reef, provide the key to interpreting the relict textures in fully dolomitized reefs. Due to the presence of horizontal permeability barriers associated with the limestone lithology, the pool is developed with a waterflood displacement scheme. Ultimate recovery is estimated to be on the order of 0.55 x 10[sup 6] m[sup 3] (3.5 million bbl) or 46% or original oil in place (OOIP). The Pembina Nisku L pool is a completely dolomitized reef. In contrast to the Bigoray Nisku C pool, the complete dolomitization reduces the number of generic reservoir flow units observed in the L pool reef from six to three. Due to the excellent reservoir quality and absence of horizontal permeability barriers, it is being exploited by a vertical miscible flood. The Nisku L pool is one of the largest pinnacle reefs discovered in the Nisku reef fairway and contains an estimated 5 x 10[sup 6] m[sup 3] (31 million bbl) OOIP. Ultimate recovery is estimated to be approximately 4.1 x 10[sup 6] m[sup 3] (25.8 million bbl) or 82% of OOIP.

  2. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANTS IOS 1518, C25A, AND T15 ON DOLOMITE POWDER IN DI WATER Leela Christian-Tabak1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    natural pressure. · inject CO2/H2O/surfactant foam to force oil from porous rock. · Surfactant must Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Adsorption Measurement Results Conclusion What is adsorption? · Adherence · Monolayer or multi-layer What is surfactant EOR? · increase oil recovery from a reservoir that has lost its

  3. Geochemical and optical characterization of diagenetic and hydrothermal dolomite from the Bonneterre formation within the Southeastern Missouri Lead-Zinc District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borkowski, Richard Michael

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (continued) ~Fi ure ~Pa e 31 MN-1-927. 0 Color cathodoluminescence, 200X, a. slightly raottled core, b. single 'rim 1, c. single rira 2, d. composite rira 4. 68 32 MN-1-946. 0 Plane light, crossed nicols, 220X. . 69 33 MN-1-946. 0 Cathodoluminescence... r E ~NE v I E v 0 0 PIEOA OMT WINONA 0 C 4 R T E R L VIBURHUM SA 1' R 0 !GOO OSIALEM IXBY IT Pl III I OZ(Lgx DONg I S VI8URNU V. ISO f', TRENI3 ~LL ~. P ( s 0 ~ OBUHKER ' LESTERVI'L ?A~BI S O M ANHAsOUSa V 1 AN AFLLIS MINg; ?9...

  4. Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales -- Sulfur control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, M.J.; Abbasian, J.; Akin, C.; Lau, F.S.; Maka, A.; Mensinger, M.C.; Punwani, D.V.; Rue, D.M. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)); Gidaspow, D.; Gupta, R.; Wasan, D.T. (Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States)); Pfister, R.M.: Krieger, E.J. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States))

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This topical report on Sulfur Control'' presents the results of work conducted by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), and the Ohio State University (OSU) to develop three novel approaches for desulfurization that have shown good potential with coal and could be cost-effective for oil shales. These are (1) In-Bed Sulfur Capture using different sorbents (IGT), (2) Electrostatic Desulfurization (IIT), and (3) Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification (OSU and IGT). The objective of the task on In-Bed Sulfur Capture was to determine the effectiveness of different sorbents (that is, limestone, calcined limestone, dolomite, and siderite) for capturing sulfur (as H{sub 2}S) in the reactor during hydroretorting. The objective of the task on Electrostatic Desulfurization was to determine the operating conditions necessary to achieve a high degree of sulfur removal and kerogen recovery in IIT's electrostatic separator. The objectives of the task on Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification were to (1) isolate microbial cultures and evaluate their ability to desulfurize and denitrify shale, (2) conduct laboratory-scale batch and continuous tests to improve and enhance microbial removal of these components, and (3) determine the effects of processing parameters, such as shale slurry concentration, solids settling characteristics, agitation rate, and pH on the process.

  5. Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales -- Sulfur control. Topical report for Subtask 3.1, In-bed sulfur capture tests; Subtask 3.2, Electrostatic desulfurization; Subtask 3.3, Microbial desulfurization and denitrification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, M.J.; Abbasian, J.; Akin, C.; Lau, F.S.; Maka, A.; Mensinger, M.C.; Punwani, D.V.; Rue, D.M. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Gidaspow, D.; Gupta, R.; Wasan, D.T. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States); Pfister, R.M.: Krieger, E.J. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This topical report on ``Sulfur Control`` presents the results of work conducted by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), and the Ohio State University (OSU) to develop three novel approaches for desulfurization that have shown good potential with coal and could be cost-effective for oil shales. These are (1) In-Bed Sulfur Capture using different sorbents (IGT), (2) Electrostatic Desulfurization (IIT), and (3) Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification (OSU and IGT). The objective of the task on In-Bed Sulfur Capture was to determine the effectiveness of different sorbents (that is, limestone, calcined limestone, dolomite, and siderite) for capturing sulfur (as H{sub 2}S) in the reactor during hydroretorting. The objective of the task on Electrostatic Desulfurization was to determine the operating conditions necessary to achieve a high degree of sulfur removal and kerogen recovery in IIT`s electrostatic separator. The objectives of the task on Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification were to (1) isolate microbial cultures and evaluate their ability to desulfurize and denitrify shale, (2) conduct laboratory-scale batch and continuous tests to improve and enhance microbial removal of these components, and (3) determine the effects of processing parameters, such as shale slurry concentration, solids settling characteristics, agitation rate, and pH on the process.

  6. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

    1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and nitrogen oxides (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison's Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0[sub 2] removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0[sub 2] emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

  7. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration. [Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

    1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison`s Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0{sub 2} removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0{sub 2} emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

  8. Pore Characterization and Classification in Carbonate Reservoirs and the Influence of Diagenesis on the Pore System. Case Study: Thrombolite and Grainstone Units of the Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation, Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tonietto, Sandra

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    and capillary pressure analysis was completed on thrombolite samples with no dolomitization and samples with distinct degrees of dolomitization. The dolomitization, associated with dissolution of calcite, created an intercrystalline pore network...

  9. Competing Models for the Timing of Cryogenian Glaciation: Evidence From the Kingston Peak Formation, Southeastern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mrofka, David Douglas

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    versus vadose meteoric diagenesis of limestones: evidence6 Figs. —, 1986, Limestone diagenesis - some geochemicalwith applications to carbonate diagenesis: Geochimica et

  10. GEOLOGY, June 2011 571 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    two requirements for formation of dolomite: a high Mg/Ca aque- ous fluid and a mechanism that can pump of isotopo- logues. In practice, measured data for minerals are normalized to CO2 gases heated to 1000 °C of the formation of dolomite, specifically in the Latemar carbon- ate buildup, Dolomites, northern Italy. Dolomite

  11. Ontology-Based Data Access with Dynamic TBoxes in DL-Lite Floriana Di Pinto, Giuseppe De Giacomo, Maurizio Lenzerini, Riccardo Rosati

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Giacomo, Giuseppe

    the relationships between the sources and the elements of the ontology. Several OBDA projects have been carried out Sedan M3 1973 FALCON XB GT COUPE Ford Coupe M4 1967 MUSTANG SHELBY Ford Coupe M5 1973 MUSTANG MACH 1

  12. Kinetics of Adsorption of Selenate and Selonite at the Goethite/Water InterfAce. p.e. ZHANG* and D.L. SPARKS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Kinetics of Adsorption of Selenate and Selonite at the Goethite/Water InterfAce. p.e. ZHANG* and D. A modified triple layer 1llOde1 (ILK) was used to describe the adsorption and calculate parameters of SeO, adsorption was electrostatic attraction and Se~ adsorption was ligand exchange. A single

  13. Poste Italiane Spa -spedizione in A.P. -DL 353/2003 (conv. in L 27/02/04 n. 46)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEL 4.8.98 www.unitn.it/unitn PERIODICO DI INFORMAZIONE, POLITICA E CULTURA DELL'UNIVERSIT� DEGLI l'Università di Mainz). #12;2 UNITN. PERIODICO DI INFORMAZIONE, POLITICA E CULTURA DELL

  14. Cartilage Tribology and its role in Osteoarthritis Prof. D.L. Burris, E.D. Bonnevie, V.J. Baro, J. Ye, M. Durst,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    impedes lubrication, lubrication disruptions cause damage #12;3 Tissue composition and structure dominate) Lateral stage: 0-1.5 mm, 0-5 mm/s Methods: 1) MCA: physiological maintenance 2) Localized 3) In-situ measurements of contact mechanics & fluid load support #12;6 Example measurements: motion induced

  15. Effects of diesel fuel combustion-modifier additives on In-cylinder soot formation in a heavy-duty Dl diesel engine.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musculus, Mark P. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Dietz, Jeff (The Lubrizol Corp.)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on a phenomenological model of diesel combustion and pollutant-formation processes, a number of fuel additives that could potentially reduce in-cylinder soot formation by altering combustion chemistry have been identified. These fuel additives, or ''combustion modifiers'', included ethanol and ethylene glycol dimethyl ether, polyethylene glycol dinitrate (a cetane improver), succinimide (a dispersant), as well as nitromethane and another nitro-compound mixture. To better understand the chemical and physical mechanisms by which these combustion modifiers may affect soot formation in diesel engines, in-cylinder soot and diffusion flame lift-off were measured, using an optically-accessible, heavy-duty, direct-injection diesel engine. A line-of-sight laser extinction diagnostic was employed to measure the relative soot concentration within the diesel jets (''jetsoot'') as well as the rates of deposition of soot on the piston bowl-rim (''wall-soot''). An OH chemiluminescence imaging technique was utilized to measure the lift-off lengths of the diesel diffusion flames so that fresh oxygen entrainment rates could be compared among the fuels. Measurements were obtained at two operating conditions, using blends of a base commercial diesel fuel with various combinations of the fuel additives. The ethanol additive, at 10% by mass, reduced jet-soot by up to 15%, and reduced wall-soot by 30-40%. The other fuel additives also affected in-cylinder soot, but unlike the ethanol blends, changes in in-cylinder soot could be attributed solely to differences in the ignition delay. No statistically-significant differences in the diesel flame lift-off lengths were observed among any of the fuel additive formulations at the operating conditions examined in this study. Accordingly, the observed differences in in-cylinder soot among the fuel formulations cannot be attributed to differences in fresh oxygen entrainment upstream of the soot-formation zones after ignition.

  16. BULLETIN OF TITE UNI+ED STATES FISH COMMISSION. 427 When winter came I took :dl of them (soiiio 18)arid put8them in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the treaty to which I have referred was iiiade, and also before 1110 Hdifkix Coinmis- ,$oil, were based cliieflg 011 the assumption that fislietirieii of the United St;btes derived great profits froin being able

  17. Chemical characteristics of waters in Karst Formations at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shevenell, L.A. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several waste disposal sites are located adjacent to or on a karst aquifer composed of the Cambrian Maynardville Limestone (Cmn) and the Cambrian Copper Ridge Dolomite (Ccr) at the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, TN. Highly variable chemical characteristics (i.e., hardness) can indicate that the portion of the aquifer tapped by a particular well is subject to a significant quick-flow component where recharge to the system is rapid and water levels and water quality change rapidly in response to precipitation events. Water zones in wells at the Y-12 Plant that exhibit quick-flow behavior (i.e., high hydraulic conductivity) are identified based on their geochemical characteristics and variability in geochemical parameters, and observations made during drilling of the wells. The chemical data used in this study consist of between one and 20 chemical analyses for each of 102 wells and multipart monitoring zones. Of these 102 water zones, 10 were consistently undersaturated with respect to calcite suggesting active dissolution. Repeat sampling of water zones shows that both supersaturation and undersaturation with respect to dolomite occurs in 46 water zones. Twelve of the zones had partial pressure of CO{sub 2} near atmospheric values suggesting limited interaction between recharge waters and the gases and solids in the vadose zone and aquifer, and hence, relatively short residence times. The preliminary data suggest that the Cmn is composed of a complicated network of interconnected, perhaps anastomosing, cavities. The degree of interconnection between the identified cavities is yet to be determined, although it is expected that there is a significant vertical and lateral interconnection between the cavities located at shallow depths in the Cnm throughout Bear Creek Valley and the Y-12 Plant area.

  18. Wettability and Oil Recovery by Imbibition and Viscous Displacement from Fractured and Heterogeneous Carbonates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman R. Morrow; Jill Buckley

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    About one-half of U.S. oil reserves are held in carbonate formations. The remaining oil in carbonate reservoirs is regarded as the major domestic target for improved oil recovery. Carbonate reservoirs are often fractured and have great complexity even at the core scale. Formation evaluation and prediction is often subject to great uncertainty. This study addresses quantification of crude oil/brine/rock interactions and the impact of reservoir heterogeneity on oil recovery by spontaneous imbibition and viscous displacement from pore to field scale. Wettability-alteration characteristics of crude oils were measured at calcite and dolomite surfaces and related to the properties of the crude oils through asphaltene content, acid and base numbers, and refractive index. Oil recovery was investigated for a selection of limestones and dolomites that cover over three orders of magnitude in permeability and a factor of four variation in porosity. Wettability control was achieved by adsorption from crude oils obtained from producing carbonate reservoirs. The induced wettability states were compared with those measured for reservoir cores. The prepared cores were used to investigate oil recovery by spontaneous imbibition and viscous displacement. The results of imbibition tests were used in wettability characterization and to develop mass transfer functions for application in reservoir simulation of fractured carbonates. Studies of viscous displacement in carbonates focused on the unexpected but repeatedly observed sensitivity of oil recovery to injection rate. The main variables were pore structure, mobility ratio, and wettability. The potential for improved oil recovery from rate-sensitive carbonate reservoirs by increased injection pressure, increased injectivity, decreased well spacing or reduction of interfacial tension was evaluated.

  19. Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas C. Chidsey; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan

    2003-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing vertical wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the first half of the fourth project year (April 6 through October 5, 2003). The work included (1) analysis of well-test data and oil production from Cherokee and Bug fields, San Juan County, Utah, and (2) diagenetic evaluation of stable isotopes from the upper Ismay and lower Desert Creek zones of the Paradox Formation in the Blanding sub-basin, Utah. Production ''sweet spots'' and potential horizontal drilling candidates were identified for Cherokee and Bug fields. In Cherokee field, the most productive wells are located in the thickest part of the mound facies of the upper Ismay zone, where microporosity is well developed. In Bug field, the most productive wells are located structurally downdip from the updip porosity pinch out in the dolomitized lower Desert Creek zone, where micro-box-work porosity is well developed. Microporosity and micro-box-work porosity have the greatest hydrocarbon storage and flow capacity, and potential horizontal drilling target in these fields. Diagenesis is the main control on the quality of Ismay and Desert Creek reservoirs. Most of the carbonates present within the lower Desert Creek and Ismay have retained a marine-influenced carbon isotope geochemistry throughout marine cementation as well as through post-burial recycling of marine carbonate components during dolomitization, stylolitization, dissolution, and late cementation. Meteoric waters do not appear to have had any effect on the composition of the dolomites in these zones. Light oxygen values obtained from reservoir samples for wells located along the margins or flanks of Bug field may be indicative of exposure to higher temperatures, to fluids depleted in {sup 18}O relative to sea water, or to hypersaline waters during burial diagenesis. The samples from Bug field with the lightest oxygen isotope compositions are from wells that have produced significantly greater amounts of hydrocarbons. There is no significant difference between the oxygen isotope compositions from lower Desert Creek dolomite samples in Bug field and the upper Ismay limestones and dolomites from Cherokee field. Carbon isotopic compositions for samples from Patterson Canyon field can be divided into two populations: isotopically heavier mound cement and isotopically lighter oolite and banded cement. Technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting a booth display of project materials at the annual national convention of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, a technical presentation, a core workshop, and publications. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

  20. Stratigraphy and sedimentation of the Unayzah reservoir, central Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senalp, M.; Abdulaziz, A. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant reserves of Arabian super light oil, condensate, and associated gas occur in the various genetically different sandstone bodies of the upper Permian Unayzah and Khuff Formations in Central Saudi Arabia. The Unayzah Formation which rests unconformably on the older formations is composed of red colored, poorly sorted conglomerate, sandstone, siltstone, mudstone, caliche and nodular anhydrite. Facies changes occur due to the presence of various subenvironments and possible faulting and structural growth in the basin during deposition. However, the entire Unayzah Formation shows an overall fining and thinning-upward sequence. It was deposited as coalescing alluvial fans dominated by braided streams which graded into meandering stream and playa lakes under and to semi-arid conditions. Eolian processes were also inferred. A marked unconformity which is indicated by the occurrence of thick caliche and soil horizons separate the Unayzah and the overlying Khuff Formation. The Khuff Formation consists primarily of marine shale, marl, and fine- to very coarse-grained sandstones in the lower parts; shale, limestone, dolomite, and amhydrite in the upper parts. The sandstones were deposited as incised channel fills and their associated low stand deltaic sediments as a result of fluctuating sea level during the deposition of the Khuff Formation. The base of the incised channels represent a sequence boundary. Red colored and rooted paleosols were formed on the underlying marine sediments. During relative sea level rise, good quality reservoir sands were deposited by aggradation within the incised channels. Sand deposition within the channels terminated at the same time, and the area was covered by shallow marine limestones, shales and marls during maximum sea level highstand. Although the Unayzah reservoir occurs in both the Unayzah and the Khuff Formations because of their different geometry, continuity, and reservoir quality, they have been studied separately.

  1. Comparative study of the reactions of metal oxides and carbonates with H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. Final technical report, September 1990--February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sotirchos, S.V.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project had been the investigation of the effects of pore structure on the capacity of porous metal oxides for removal of gaseous pollutants from flue gases of power plants (SO{sub 2}) and hot coal gas (primarily H{sub 2}S). Porous calcines obtained from natural precursors (limestones and dolomites) and sorbents based on zinc oxide were used as model systems in our experimental studies, which included reactivity evolution experiments and pore structure characterization using a variety of methods. The key idea behind this project was to appropriately exploit the differences of the sulfidation and sulfation reactions (for instance, different molar volumes of solid products) to elucidate the dependence of the sorptive capacity of a porous sorbent on its physical microstructure. In order to be able to proceed faster and more productively on the analysis of the above defined problem, it was decided to employ in our studies solids whose reaction with SO{sub 2} (limestone calcines) or H{sub 2}S (sorbents based on zinc oxide) had been investigated in detail in past studies by our research group. Reactivity vs time or conversion vs time studies were conducted using thermogravimetry and fixed-bed and fluidized-bed reactors. The pore structure of partially reacted samples collected at selected time instants or conversion levels was analyzed by gas adsorption and mercury porosimetry. For better characterization of the pore structure of the solid samples, we also carried out intraparticle diffusivity measurements by the peak-broadening (chromatographic) method, using a system developed for this purpose in our laboratory. In the context of this part of the project, we also conducted a detailed theoretical investigation of the measurement of effective diffusivities in porous solids using the diffusion-cell method.

  2. Reductive Biotransformation of Fe in Shale-Limestone Saprolite Containing Fe(III) Oxides and Fe(II)/Fe(III) Phyllosilicates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; McKinley, James P.; Kennedy, David W.; Smith, Steven C.; Dong, Hailiang

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A <2.0-mm fraction of a mineralogically complex subsurface sediment containing goethite and Fe(II)/Fe(III) phyllosilicates was incubated with Shewanella putrefaciens (strain CN32) and lactate at circumneutral pH under anoxic conditions to investigate electron acceptor preference and the nature of the resulting biogenic Fe(II) fraction. Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), an electron shuttle, was included in select treatments to enhance bioreduction and subsequent biomineralization. The sediment was highly aggregated and contained two distinct clast populations: i) a highly weathered one with “sponge-like” internal porosity, large mineral crystallites, and Fe-containing micas, and ii) a dense, compact one with fine-textured Fe-containing illite and nano-sized goethite, as revealed by various forms of electron microscopic analyses. Approximately 10 to 15% of the Fe(III)TOT was bioreduced by CN32 over 60 d in media without AQDS, whereas 24% and 35% of the Fe(III)TOT was bioreduced by CN32 after 40 and 95 d in media with AQDS. Little or no Fe2+, Mn, Si, Al, and Mg were evident in aqueous filtrates after reductive incubation. Mössbauer measurements on the bioreduced sediments indicated that both goethite and phyllosilicate Fe(III) were partly reduced without bacterial preference. Goethite was more extensively reduced in the presence of AQDS whereas phyllosilicate Fe(III) reduction was not influenced by AQDS. Biogenic Fe(II) resulting from phyllosilicate Fe(III) reduction remained in a layer-silicate environment that displayed enhanced solubility in weak acid. The mineralogic nature of the goethite biotransformation product was not determined. Chemical and cryogenic Mössbauer measurements, however, indicated that the transformation product was not siderite, green rust, magnetite, Fe(OH)2, or Fe(II) adsorbed on phyllosilicate or bacterial surfaces. Several lines of evidence suggested that biogenic Fe(II) existed as surface associated phase on the residual goethite, and/or as a Fe(II)-Al coprecipitate. Sediment aggregation and mineral physical and/or chemical factors were demonstrated to play a major role on the nature and location of the biotransformation reaction and its products.

  3. The effect of metals and soil pH on the growth of Rhododendron and other alpine plants in limestone soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaisheva, Maria V

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rhododendrons are economically important plants in horticulture, and many species are threatened in the wild by habitat degradation. It is therefore doubly important that their nutritional needs should be understood....

  4. A study of some of the factors influencing the laboratory determination of the relative permeability-saturation relationship for large diameter limestone cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Roy M

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are several relative permeability curves for porous media. Although much experimental work has been done on the flow of heterogeneous fluids through porous med. ia there is insuffici. ent, data to allow the prediction of the relative permeabi11ty-saturation... med. ia. His experiments were made w1th water flowing through horizontal sand filter bed, s and resulted. in his formulation that the rate of flow of a fluid. through a porous medium is proportional to the pressure or hydraulic gradient...

  5. Moduli dispersion and attenuation in limestones in the laboratory L. Adam and M. Batzle, Center for Rock Abuse, Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is common practice in reservoir rock physics. With knowl- edge of these properties, enhanced oil recovery application for enhanced oil recovery mon- itoring: a change in Q might contain valuable information about carbonate reser- voir that is undergoing enhanced oil recovery. Light hydrocarbon pro- duction is stimulated

  6. Inorganic hazardous air pollutants before and after a limestone flue gas desulfurization system as a function of <10 micrometer particle sizes and unit load

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, D.P.; Williams, W.A.; Flora, H.B. II [Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Radian Corporation collected size-fractionated particulate samples from stack gas at a unit burning high sulfur coal with a venturi scrubber FGD system. Independent sample fractions were collected under high-load and low-load operating conditions and subjected to various techniques designed to measure the total composition and surface-extractable concentrations of selected trace elements. The relationships between unit load, particle-size distribution, total composition, and surface-extractable inorganic species are reported and compared to show the availability of trace elements relevant to potential health risks from flue gas particulate emissions.

  7. Carnets de Gologie / Notebooks on Geology -Article 2007/01 (CG2007_A01) Environmental changes during marl-limestone formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    lithotypes of sedimentological parameters (clay mineralogy, sediment composition, ...) seems to indicate

  8. A study of the effects of limestone rock asphalt screenings on the structural properties of hot-mix asphaltic concrete made with siliceous materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albritton, Oscar Willard

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Society for Testing Materials, Phila. , Pa. 15 PROCEDURE To limit the wide variations of aggregate grading, specifica- tions of the Texas Highway Department for a Type "D" Hot-Mix, Hot- Laid, Asphaltic Concrete were used as a guide in the design... Standards on Mineral Aggregates, Concrete, and Nonbituminous Highway Materials, American Society for Testing Materials, Phila, , Pa. Benson, Fred J, and Bh. Subbaraju, "Specific Gravity of Aggregates in Asphaltic Paving Mixtures, " Texas Engineering...

  9. Study of well logs from Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn, W.E.; Ross, H.P.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Union Oil Company drilled four geothermal test wells in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA between 1975 and 1979. A fairly complete suite of well logs were recorded for the three deeper holes, and these data are presented as composite well log plots in this report. The composite well log plots have facilitated the interpretation of limestone, dolomite, sandstone, quartz-monzonite, serpentine, and volcanic lithologies and the identification of numerous fractures. This has been especially helpful because of the extensive lost circulaton zones and poor cuttings recovery. Intraformational flow was identified by a fluid migration-temperature tracer log at depth in CFSU 31-33. Well log crossplots were computed to assist in lithologic identification and the determination of physical properties for specific depth intervals in a given hole. The presence of hydrous minerals sometimes results in neutron porosity somewhat higher than the true nonfracture porosity, which is generally less than 4%. Permeability is clearly controlled by fractures. A maximum well temperature of 178.9/sup 0/C, low flow rates and low probable percent flash indicate these wells are subeconomic for electric generation at present. The well log study has substantially improved our understanding of the reservoir as presently drilled.

  10. Indirect fracture delineation in a carbonate reservoir: The Upper Jurassic Hanifa of Abqaiq field, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, D.L. (Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abqaiq field is a northeast-trending anticline approximately 60 km long and 12 km wide and contains several reservoirs. The Hanifa Reservoir is approximately 100 m thick and consists of fine-grained, muddy limestone with subordinate dolomite and anhydrite. Since discovery of the Hanifa oil pool in 1947, pressure fluctuations have indicated communication with the overlying Arab-D Reservoir. Welltest permeability measurements are approximately 40 times higher than core permeability measurements of the Hanifa. This divergence of Hanifa permeability measurements combined with the indicated Arab-D communication suggests the presence of a natural fracture network. Direct observations of Hanifa cores reveal common, sub-vertical fractures with average apertures <200 microns. With limited core coverage and no oriented cores, a new technique was needed to delineate the areas affected by fractures. A technique combining indirect fracture indicators was devised for Abqaiq field and can be applied to other, similar fields. The actual flow system of the Abqaiq Hanifa is a complex interaction between matrix porosity/permeability and fracture permeability or enhanced permeability. Future development plans allow for low matrix permeability access to much of the Hanifa storage space and high fracture permeability both within the Hanifa and connecting to the Arab-D Reservoir.

  11. In Situ Production of Chlorine-36 in the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer, Idaho: Implications for Describing Ground-Water Contamination Near a Nuclear Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. D. Cecil; L. L. Knobel; J. R. Green (USGS); S. K. Frape (University of Waterloo)

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to describe the calculated contribution to ground water of natural, in situ produced 36Cl in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer and to compare these concentrations in ground water with measured concentrations near a nuclear facility in southeastern Idaho. The scope focused on isotopic and chemical analyses and associated 36Cl in situ production calculations on 25 whole-rock samples from 6 major water-bearing rock types present in the eastern Snake River Plain. The rock types investigated were basalt, rhyolite, limestone, dolomite, shale, and quartzite. Determining the contribution of in situ production to 36Cl inventories in ground water facilitated the identification of the source for this radionuclide in environmental samples. On the basis of calculations reported here, in situ production of 36Cl was determined to be insignificant compared to concentrations measured in ground water near buried and injected nuclear waste at the INEEL. Maximum estimated 36Cl concentrations in ground water from in situ production are on the same order of magnitude as natural concentrations in meteoric water.

  12. Review of fluidized bed combustion technology in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnan, R.P.; Daw, C.S.; Jones, J.E. Jr.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States (US) initiated work in fluidized bed combustion (FBC) in the mid-1960s, with primary emphasis on industrial applications. With passage of the Clean Air Act in 1970, the environmental benefits of the technology soon attracted interest. This provided the impetus for expanded effort focused on the reduced NO/sub x/ emissions resulting from lower combustion temperature and SO/sub 2/ capture by means of chemical reaction with limestone or dolomite in the fluidized bed. The oil embargo in 1973 further stimulated interest in FBC technology. Several manufacturers presently offer atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) and circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) units for industrial application in the United States. However, FBC for electric power generation remains in the development and demonstration phase. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) are operating a 20-MW AFBC utility pilot plant and are proceeding with plans for a 160-MW(e) demonstration plant with other participants. Research has been under way on pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) at Grimethorpe in South Yorkshire, England, and within the United States at the Curtiss-Wright Pilot Plant, and at other smaller test facilities. An emerging turbocharged PFBC concept will likely stimulate more near-term interest in PFBC technology for both industrial and utility applications. The major US programs and test facilities are described; remaining technical uncertainties are discussed, and the future outlook for the technology is assessed.

  13. Market Assessment and Technical Feasibility Study of Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion Ash Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bland, A.E.; Brown, T.H. [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Western Research Institute in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute, Foster Wheeler Energy International, Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy Technology Center (METC), has undertaken a research and demonstration program designed to examine the market potential and the technical feasibility of ash use options for pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) ashes. The assessment is designed to address six applications, including: (1) structural fill, (2) road base construction, (3) supplementary cementing materials in portland cement, (4) synthetic aggregate, and (5) agricultural/soil amendment applications. Ash from low-sulfur subbituminous coal-fired Foster Wheeler Energia Oy pilot circulating PFBC tests in Karhula, Finland, and ash from the high-sulfur bituminous coal-fired American Electric Power (AEP) bubbling PFBC in Brilliant, Ohio, were evaluated in laboratory and pilot-scale ash use testing. This paper addresses the technical feasibility of ash use options for PFBC unit using low- sulfur coal and limestone sorbent (karhula ash) and high-sulfur coal and dolomite sorbents (AEP Tidd ash).

  14. Cyclic transgressive and regressive sequences and their association with hydrocarbons, Sirte Basin, Libya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abushagar, S.A.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sirte basin was developed in north Africa between the Tethys Sea and the Saharan shield during Late Cretaceous time and was the site of mixed siliciclastic and carbonate deposition throughout the Tertiary. A series of bioclastic limestones and shales was deposited around the basin rim. Shales were confined to the low-energy zones in the basin, whereas carbonates were deposited on the shelf areas. The Farrud Formation (equivalent to the Beda Formation in the central part) is the main reservoir for oil found in the western portion of the basin. The faunal assemblages and lithologies recognized in this formation apparently reflect a very shallow marine depositional environment. Source rocks are developed in organic-rich, transgressive shales (Dahra and Hagfa). Moldic, fenestral, and intraparticle porosities are the most common types recognized in the carbonate reservoirs of the Farrud Formation. Permeability is developed in part by processes such as dolomitization, leaching, and fracturing in the two progradational, regressive carbonate cycles, resulting in the exceptional Ghani field reservoirs. Hydrocarbons were trapped in these reservoirs due to the presence of a supratidal anhydrite cap rock.

  15. Sulfur removal in advanced two stage pressurized fluidized bed combustion. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.; Wangerow, J.R. [Inst. of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to obtain data on the rates and the extent of sulfation reactions involving partially sulfided calcium-based sorbents, and oxygen as well as sulfur dioxide, at operating conditions closely simulating those prevailing in the second stage (combustor) of Advanced Two-Stage Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustors (PFBC). In these systems the CO{sub 2} partial pressure generally exceeds the equilibrium value for calcium carbonate decomposition. Therefore, calcium sulfate is produced through the reactions between SO{sub 2} and calcium carbonate as well as the reaction between calcium sulfide and oxygen. To achieve this objective, the rates of reaction involving SO{sub 2} and oxygen (gaseous reactant); and calcium sulfide and calcium carbonate (solid reactants), will be determined by conducting tests in a pressurized thermogravimetric analyzer (HPTGA) unit. The effects of sorbent type, sorbent particle size, reactor temperature and pressure; and O{sub 2} as well as SO{sub 2} partial pressures on the sulfation reactions rate will be determined. During this quarter, samples of the selected limestone and dolomite were sulfided in the fluidized-bed reactor. These tests were conducted in both calcining and non-calcining operating conditions to produce partially-sulfided sorbents containing calcium oxide and calcium carbonate, respectively. These samples which represent the carbonizer discharge material, will be used as the feed material in the sulfation tests to be conducted in the HPTGA unit during the next quarter.

  16. ENGINEERING A NEW MATERIAL FOR HOT GAS CLEANUP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.D. Wheelock; L.K. Doraiswamy; K.P. Constant

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project was to develop a superior, regenerable, calcium-based sorbent for desulfurizing hot coal gas with the sorbent being in the form of small pellets made with a layered structure such that each pellet consists of a highly reactive lime core enclosed within a porous protective shell of strong but relatively inert material. The sorbent can be very useful for hot gas cleanup in advanced power generation systems where problems have been encountered with presently available materials. An economical method of preparing the desired material was demonstrated with a laboratory-scale revolving drum pelletizer. Core-in-shell pellets were produced by first pelletizing powdered limestone or other calcium-bearing material to make the pellet cores, and then the cores were coated with a mixture of powdered alumina and limestone to make the shells. The core-in-shell pellets were subsequently calcined at 1373 K (1100 C) to sinter the shell material and convert CaCO{sub 3} to CaO. The resulting product was shown to be highly reactive and a very good sorbent for H{sub 2}S at temperatures in the range of 1113 to 1193 K (840 to 920 C) which corresponds well with the outlet temperatures of some coal gasifiers. The product was also shown to be both strong and attrition resistant, and that it can be regenerated by a cyclic oxidation and reduction process. A preliminary evaluation of the material showed that while it was capable of withstanding repeated sulfidation and regeneration, the reactivity of the sorbent tended to decline with usage due to CaO sintering. Also it was found that the compressive strength of the shell material depends on the relative proportions of alumina and limestone as well as their particle size distributions. Therefore, an extensive study of formulation and preparation conditions was conducted to improve the performance of both the core and shell materials. It was subsequently determined that MgO tends to stabilize the high-temperature reactivity of CaO. Therefore, a sorbent prepared from dolomite withstands the effects of repeated sulfidation and regeneration better than one prepared from limestone. It was also determined that both the compressive strength and attrition resistance of core-in-shell pellets depend on shell thickness and that the compressive strength can be improved by reducing both the particle size and amount of limestone in the shell preparation mixture. A semiempirical model was also found which seems to adequately represent the absorption process. This model can be used for analyzing and predicting sorbent performance, and, therefore, it can provide guidance for any additional development which may be required. In conclusion, the overall objective of developing an economical, reusable, and practical material was largely achieved. The material appears suitable for removing CO{sub 2} from fuel combustion products as well as for desulfurizing hot coal gas.

  17. Stimulation of Carbonate Reservoirs Using a New Emulsified Acid System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sayed, Mohammed Ali Ibrahim

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    calcite and dolomite formations, measuring the reaction rate and diffusion coefficient when the new emulsified acid systems react with both calcite and dolomite, and testing the new emulsified acid using core samples obtained from carbonate reservoirs...

  18. National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and Sulfur Dioxide in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wet lime/ limestone scrubber The European Commission (2006)the following information about wet limestone scrubbers: Wetlimestone scrubbers are the most widely used of all the FGD

  19. Natural analogue synthesis report, TDR-NBS-GS-000027 rev00 icn 02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthesis Report Table 10.3-6c. Mineral Saturation Indices Mineral Dolomite Hematite Quartz Chalcedony Goethite

  20. ICFA Sardinia July 1-6, 2002 Z. Huang (zrh@aps.anl.gov) CSR Microbunching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bunch Compressors (BC)LCLS Bunch Compressors (BC) Linac Linac Linac SC wiggler DL1 Injector DL2 BC1 BC2

  1. Dilute Acid Hydrolysis of Oligomers in Hydrothermal Pretreatment Hydrolyzate into Monomers with High Yields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Yueh-Du

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Klass DL. 1998. Biomass for renewable energy, fuels, andNational Renewable Energy Laboratory.2003, Biomass feedstockKlass DL. 1998. Biomass for Renewable Energy, Fuels and

  2. Structure elucidation of biomedically relevant marine cyanobacterial natural products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malloy, Karla Lynn

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chao DL, Malloy K, Sun D, Alessandri B, Bullock MR. Tempol,Chao DL, Malloy KL, Alessandri B, Watson JC, and Bullock MR.

  3. -./012&3)45&%$6'&78 -.//$9$).:);$573/)<$(&=&5$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grishok, Alla

    )JD.K High Cholesterol Colesterol Alto FIC)JC&K DL)JD.K Hypertension Presión Alta FIC)JC&K DL)JD.K Chest Pain

  4. Proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing March 1993 Cambridge, UK Edited by P.F. Linden, D.L. Youngs & S.B. Dalziel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalziel, Stuart

    Physics, 454070, Chelyabinsk-70, PO BOX 245 RUSSIA. Daryl Landeg, Atomic Weapons Establishment, Foulness

  5. DtpAr{l rMtiNt.o Dl 5luDt EuRopl,t AlaL(rcant I iN1 [RCUrruRALr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidoni, Leonardo

    'Archivio di Enrico Falqui; inserimento dei dati nel portale AD900; preparazione dell'inventario dell'Archivio di Enrico Falqui per la stampa; collaborazione per la preparazione ai fini della stampa dell'inventario

  6. College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, in partnership with the NYS Dept of Ag & Markets Phone: 607-253-3900 Fax: 607-253-3943 Web: ahdc.vet.cornell.edu DL-650 6/12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    or antemortem test results. The submitting veterinarian must sign the submis- sion form. This kit will also parame- ters support both diagnostic and educational uses. #12;Field Necropsy Kit College of Veterinary and 18 G x 1 ½" needles for fluid aspiration You may want a supply of extra scalpel blades

  7. Abundance of fin whales in West Greenland in 2007 M.P. HEIDE-JRGENSEN*, K.L. LAIDRE*+, M. SIMON*, M.L. BURT$, D.L. BORCHERS$ AND M. RASMUSSEN#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laidre, Kristin L.

    Abundance of fin whales in West Greenland in 2007 M.P. HEIDE-JØRGENSEN*, K.L. LAIDRE*+, M. SIMON transect survey of fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus) conducted off West Greenland in 2007 was used of the survey plane. The abundance estimate furthermore only represents the coastal areas of West Greenland

  8. D.W. Johnson, B.P. LeBlanc, D.L. Long, and G. Renda* An electronics system has been installed and tested for the readout of APD detectors for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    * ################################################################# ############################################################### ######## An electronics system has been installed and tested for the readout of APD detectors for the NSTX Thomson , with initial operation scheduled July, 2000. This paper describes design performance this electronics falling 30-40 1050 APDs operated 100 setting voltage to ~400 volts. At a given voltage varies device

  9. Corona driven air propulsion for cooling of electronics F. Yang, N.E. Jewell-Larsen, D.L. Brown, K. Pendergrass, D.A. Parker, I.A. Krichtafovitch*, A.V. Mamishev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mamishev, Alexander

    Abstract: The possibility of building a high voltage electrostatic air pump for cooling of microelectronics closely to increase the heat exchange surface area, resulting in narrower channels between the fins. Air viscosity in narrow channels reduces the cooling efficiency of the heat sinks. Electrostatic air propulsion

  10. H2/O2 reaction mechanism used in Donovan, M.T., Hall, D.L., Torek, P.V., Schrock, C.R., and Wooldridge, M.S., Proc. Combust. Inst. 29 (2002), in press.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wooldridge, Margaret S.

    Base," Sandia National Laboratories Report No. SAND87-8215B UC-4. 2. Wooldridge, M.S., Hanson, R:411 (1992). 5. Miller, J.A., and Bowman, C.T., Prog. Energy Comb. Sci. 15:287 (1989). 6. Warnatz, J, M., Wang, H., Rabinowitz, M.J., Prog. Energy Combust. Sci. 18:47 (1992). 8. Gardiner, Jr., W

  11. 174. THE EFFECTS OF RESIDENCE TIME ON THE RETENTION OF ARSENATE BY GOETHITE. S.E. O'Reilly and D.L. Sparks, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    174. THE EFFECTS OF RESIDENCE TIME ON THE RETENTION OF ARSENATE BY GOETHITE. S.E. O'Reilly and D on goethite. Batch sorption and desorption studies were conducted at pH 6 for periods up to 2 months. Arsenate sorption increased slowly with time. As residence time between arsenate and goethite increased

  12. IMPROVING CO2 EFFICIENCY FOR RECOVERING OIL IN HETEROGENEOUS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid B. Grigg

    2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The second annual report of ''Improving CO{sub 2} Efficiency for Recovery Oil in Heterogeneous Reservoirs'' presents results of laboratory studies with related analytical models for improved oil recovery. All studies have been undertaken with the intention to optimize utilization and extend the practice of CO{sub 2} flooding to a wider range of reservoirs. Many items presented in this report are applicable to other interest areas: e.g. gas injection and production, greenhouse gas sequestration, chemical flooding, reservoir damage, etc. Major areas of studies include reduction of CO{sub 2} mobility to improve conformance, determining and understanding injectivity changes in particular injectivity loses, and modeling process mechanisms determined in the first two areas. Interfacial tension (IFT) between a high-pressure, high-temperature CO{sub 2} and brine/surfactant and foam stability are used to assess and screen surfactant systems. In this work the effects of salinity, pressure, temperature, surfactant concentration, and the presence of oil on IFT and CO{sub 2} foam stability were determined on the surfactant (CD1045{trademark}). Temperature, pressure, and surfactant concentration effected both IFT and foam stability while oil destabilized the foam, but did not destroy it. Calcium lignosulfonate (CLS) can be used as a sacrificial and an enhancing agent. This work indicates that on Berea sandstone CLS concentration, brine salinity, and temperature are dominant affects on both adsorption and desorption and that adsorption is not totally reversible. Additionally, CLS adsorption was tested on five minerals common to oil reservoirs; it was found that CLS concentration, salinity, temperature, and mineral type had significant effects on adsorption. The adsorption density from most to least was: bentonite > kaolinite > dolomite > calcite > silica. This work demonstrates the extent of dissolution and precipitation from co-injection of CO{sub 2} and brine in limestone core. Metal tracers in the brine were used as markers to identify precipitation location and extent. This indicated possible causes of permanent permeability changes in the core and thus in a reservoir. Core segment porosity, permeability, chemical and back-scattered electron imaging, and chemical titrations were all used for qualitative and quantitative determination of compositional and injectivity changes. Also, injectivity effects of high flow rate near a wellbore and stress changes were shown on five different cores (two Berea sandstones, two Indiana limestones, and one Dakota sandstone).

  13. THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY CO2 STORAGE PROJECT - PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF DEEP SALINE RESERVOIRS AND COAL SEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael J. Mudd; Howard Johnson; Charles Christopher; T.S. Ramakrishnan, Ph.D.

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the geologic setting for the Deep Saline Reservoirs and Coal Seams in the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} Storage Project area. The object of the current project is to site and design a CO{sub 2} injection facility. A location near New Haven, WV, has been selected for the project. To assess geologic storage reservoirs at the site, regional and site-specific geology were reviewed. Geologic reports, deep well logs, hydraulic tests, and geologic maps were reviewed for the area. Only one well within 25 miles of the site penetrates the deeper sedimentary rocks, so there is a large amount of uncertainty regarding the deep geology at the site. New Haven is located along the Ohio River on the border of West Virginia and Ohio. Topography in the area is flat in the river valley but rugged away from the Ohio River floodplain. The Ohio River Valley incises 50-100 ft into bedrock in the area. The area of interest lies within the Appalachian Plateau, on the western edge of the Appalachian Mountain chain. Within the Appalachian Basin, sedimentary rocks are 3,000 to 20,000 ft deep and slope toward the southeast. The rock formations consist of alternating layers of shale, limestone, dolomite, and sandstone overlying dense metamorphic continental shield rocks. The Rome Trough is the major structural feature in the area, and there may be some faults associated with the trough in the Ohio-West Virginia Hinge Zone. The area has a low earthquake hazard with few historical earthquakes. Target injection reservoirs include the basal sandstone/Lower Maryville and the Rose Run Sandstone. The basal sandstone is an informal name for sandstones that overlie metamorphic shield rock. Regional geology indicates that the unit is at a depth of approximately 9,100 ft below the surface at the project site and associated with the Maryville Formation. Overall thickness appears to be 50-100 ft. The Rose Run Sandstone is another potential reservoir. The unit is located approximately 1,100 ft above the basal sandstone and is 100-200 ft thick. The storage capacity estimates for a 20-mile radius from the injection well ranged from 39-78 million tons (Mt) for each formation. Several other oil and gas plays have hydraulic properties conducive for injection, but the formations are generally only 5-50 ft thick in the study area. Overlying the injection reservoirs are thick sequences of dense, impermeable dolomite, limestone, and shale. These layers provide containment above the potential injection reservoirs. In general, it appears that the containment layers are much thicker and extensive than the injection intervals. Other physical parameters for the study area appear to be typical for the region. Anticipated pressures at maximum depths are approximately 4,100 psi based on a 0.45 psi/ft pressure gradient. Temperatures are likely to be 150 F. Groundwater flow is slow and complex in deep formations. Regional flow directions appear to be toward the west-northwest at less than 1 ft per year within the basal sandstone. Vertical gradients are downward in the study area. A review of brine geochemistry indicates that formation fluids have high salinity and dissolved solids. Total dissolved solids ranges from 200,000-325,000 mg/L in the deep reservoirs. Brine chemistry is similar throughout the different formations, suggesting extensive mixing in a mature basin. Unconsolidated sediments in the Ohio River Valley are the primary source of drinking water in the study area.

  14. Analysis of well test data influenced by multiple reservoir boundaries using pressure derivative type curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buzarde, Charles Brett

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . kzhi-p I) 141. 2 qBop 0. 0002637kt fpcir~~ 44 0. 0002637kt PlictL~ Single linear no-flow boundary first derivative12: 2. 18 dtDL 2tDL 4tD tDL Two perpendicular no-flow boundaries first derivative12: dtDL 2tDL 4tD tDL tDL 2. 19 Two boundaries... intersecting at a 30' angle first derivative: dtDL 2tDL 4tD + X tDL tDL 2. 20 where the ai are (see Appendix II). ap= 1 ai = 3. 732050808 a2 = 7. 464101615 a3 1 1. 19615242 a4 ?? 13. 92820323 a5 ? 14. 92820323 Two boundaries intersecting at a 45...

  15. Tracer-level radioactive pilot-scale test of in situ vitrification for the stabilization of contaminated soil sites at ORNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spalding, B.P.; Jacobs, G.K.; Naney, M.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dunbar, N.W. [New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro, NM (United States); Tixier, J.S.; Powell, T.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field demonstration of in situ vitrification (ISV) was completed in May 1991, and produced approximately 12 Mg of melted earthen materials containing 12.7 mCi of radioactivity within 500 g of sludge in amodel of an old seepage trench waste disposal unit. Past waste disposal operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have left several contaminated seepage sites. In planning for remediation of such sites, ISV technology has been identified as a leading candidate because of the high risks associated with any retrieval option and because of the usual high quality of vitreous waste form. Major isotopes placed in the test trench were {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr, with lesser amounts of {sup 6O}Co, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 239,240}Pu. A total of 29 MWh of electrical power was delivered to the ground over a 5-day period producing a melt depth of 8.5 ft. During melting, 2.4% of the {sup 137}Cs volatilized from the melt into an off-gas containment hood and was captured quantitatively on a high efficiency particulate air filter. No volatilization of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 241}Am, or {sup 239,240}Pu was detected and > 99.993% retention of these isotopes in the melt was estimated. The use of added rare earth tracers (Ce, La, and Nd), as surrogates for transuranic isotopes, led to estimated melt retentions of >99.9995% during the test. The molten material, composed of the native soil and dolomitic limestone used for filling the test trench, reached a processing temperature of 1500{degrees}C. Standardized leaching procedures using Product Consistency Testing indicated that the ISV product has excellent characteristics relative to other vitreous nuclear waste forms.

  16. Tracer-level radioactive pilot-scale test of in situ vitrification for the stabilization of contaminated soil sites at ORNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spalding, B.P.; Jacobs, G.K.; Naney, M.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Dunbar, N.W. (New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro, NM (United States)); Tixier, J.S.; Powell, T.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field demonstration of in situ vitrification (ISV) was completed in May 1991, and produced approximately 12 Mg of melted earthen materials containing 12.7 mCi of radioactivity within 500 g of sludge in amodel of an old seepage trench waste disposal unit. Past waste disposal operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have left several contaminated seepage sites. In planning for remediation of such sites, ISV technology has been identified as a leading candidate because of the high risks associated with any retrieval option and because of the usual high quality of vitreous waste form. Major isotopes placed in the test trench were [sup 137]Cs and [sup 90]Sr, with lesser amounts of [sup 6O]Co, [sup 241]Am, and [sup 239,240]Pu. A total of 29 MWh of electrical power was delivered to the ground over a 5-day period producing a melt depth of 8.5 ft. During melting, 2.4% of the [sup 137]Cs volatilized from the melt into an off-gas containment hood and was captured quantitatively on a high efficiency particulate air filter. No volatilization of [sup 90]Sr, [sup 241]Am, or [sup 239,240]Pu was detected and > 99.993% retention of these isotopes in the melt was estimated. The use of added rare earth tracers (Ce, La, and Nd), as surrogates for transuranic isotopes, led to estimated melt retentions of >99.9995% during the test. The molten material, composed of the native soil and dolomitic limestone used for filling the test trench, reached a processing temperature of 1500[degrees]C. Standardized leaching procedures using Product Consistency Testing indicated that the ISV product has excellent characteristics relative to other vitreous nuclear waste forms.

  17. Composition and chemistry of particulates from the Tidd Clean Coal Demonstration Plant pressurized fluidized bed combustor, cyclone, and filter vessel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.H.; Grimm, U.; Haddad, G.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In a Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC)/cyclone/filter system ground coal and sorbent are injected as pastes into the PFBC bed; the hot gases and entrained fine particles of ash and calcined or reacted sorbent are passed through a cyclone (which removes the larger entrained particles); and the very-fine particles that remain are then filtered out, so that the cleaned hot gas can be sent through a non-ruggedized hot-gas turbine. The 70 MWe Tidd PFBC Demonstration Plant in Brilliant, Ohio was completed in late 1990. The initial design utilized seven strings of primary and secondary cyclones to remove 98% of the particulate matter. However, the Plant also included a pressurized filter vessel, placed between the primary and secondary cyclones of one of the seven strings. Coal and dolomitic limestone (i.e, SO{sub 2} sorbent) of various nominal sizes ranging from 12 to 18 mesh were injected into the combustor operating at about 10 atm pressure and 925{degree}C. The cyclone removed elutriated particles larger than about 0.025 mm, and particles larger than ca. 0.0005 mm were filtered at about 750{degree}C by ceramic candle filters. Thus, the chemical reaction times and temperatures, masses of material, particle-size distributions, and chemical compositions were substantially different for particulates removed from the bed drain, the cyclone drain, and the filter unit. Accordingly, we have measured the particle-size distributions and concentrations of calcium, magnesium, sulfur, silicon, and aluminum for material taken from the three units, and also determined the chemical formulas and predominant crystalline forms of the calcium and magnesium sulfate compounds formed. The latter information is particularly novel for the filter-cake material, from which we isolated the ``new`` compound Mg{sub 2}Ca(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}.

  18. Petroleum geology of northern central America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, W.F.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Major reserves of oil exist in the Reforma area of Tabasco and Chiapas states and the Campeche Shelf of SE Mexico in high-energy, bank-edge, reef-derived or reef-associated carbonate rocks, ranging in age from Late Jurassic to earliest Late Cretaceous. It is the conclusion of this study that the Reforma reservoir facies does not extend into West Guatemala. However, there the potential for major reserves in bank and lagoonal carbonates of similar age is considered excellent. A variety of structures, mostly resulting from salt tectonics, is present. Known reservoir rocks include fractured carbonates with secondary porosity resulting from solution and dolomitization, and limestones with primary intergranular porosity. An indigenous source is likely for the large quantities of oil which have been tested at Rubelsanto. Seals in the form of thick intervals of Cretaceous anhydrite and, in places, of Tertiary fine-grained clastics, are abundant. The area E of Rubelsanto may have considered merit, particularly if detailed structural analysis indicates that similar salt-tectonic features are present. The less deeply-buried areas of Cretaceous carbonates are not highly regarded because: (1) salt is absent; (2) temperatures sufficient for maturation of hydrocarbons may be lacking; and (3) a considerable number of dry holes with no significant shows have been drilled. North Guatemala is somewhat attractive, because the proper combination of unmetamorphosed Paleozoic organic shale on basement highs, well-developed Todos Santos sandstone reservoirs, and the overlying thick evaporite seal could trap sizable hydrocarbon accumulations. However, as degree of metamorphism decreases, presumably basinward, distance from source terrain for detritus increases and reservoirs may be inadequate. 13 figures, 1 table.

  19. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A test program is being sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), EPRI, FirstEnergy, and TVA to investigate furnace injection of alkaline sorbents as a means of reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in the flue gas from coal-fired boilers. This test program is being conducted at the FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP), although later testing will be conducted at a TVA plant. A sorbent injection test was conducted the week of April 18, 2000. The test was the first of several short-term (one- to two-week duration) tests to investigate the effectiveness of various alkaline sorbents for sulfuric acid control and the effects of these sorbents on boiler equipment performance. This first short-term test investigated the effect of injecting dry dolomite powder (CaCO{sub 3} {center_dot} MgCO{sub 3}), a mineral similar to limestone, into the furnace of Unit 2. During the test program, various analytical techniques were used to assess the effects of sorbent injection. These primarily included sampling with the controlled condensation system (CCS) for determining flue gas SO{sub 3} content and an acid dew-point (ADP) meter for determining the sulfuric acid dew point (and, indirectly, the concentration of sulfuric acid) of the flue gas. EPA Reference Method 26a was used for determining hydrochloric acid (HCl) and hydrofluoric acid (HF), as well and chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) and fluorine (F{sub 2}) concentrations in the flue gas. Fly ash resistivity was measured using a Southern Research Institute (SRI) point-to-plane resistivity probe, and unburned carbon in fly ash was determined by loss on ignition (LOI). Coal samples were also collected and analyzed for a variety of parameters. Finally, visual observations were made of boiler furnace and convective pass surfaces prior to and during sorbent injection.

  20. General Semi-Supervised Learning Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Kuo Chin Irwin

    )}l i=1, known y ±1 DU = {(xj , zj )}l+u j=l+1, unknown z ±1 Output: f : X ±1 SL: using DL SSL: using DL and DU Illustration Remarks Performance: SSL is very useful especially in the case of limited Output: f : X ±1 SL: using DL SSL: using DL and DU Illustration Remarks Performance: SSL is very useful

  1. Depositional environments, diagenetic history, and porosity development, of the Permian San Andres Formation, Vacuum Field, Lea County, New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Jeffrey Woolf

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , bryozoans, and gastropods. Mud occurs as dolomitized lime mud, or dolomicrite. Intergranular and intragranular dolomite cement is present along with a more coarsely crystalline (0. 05 mm) void- filling dolomite of a later origin. Anhydrite is common... as nodules, fracture, and void-fillings. A black residue is lines many pores and is interpreted to be hydrocarbon residue. 18 Composition Pelletoids are the most common grain type; they are found in all facies. Pelletoids range in size from 0. 3 mm...

  2. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Lime: Resources and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Industry Associations National Lime Association The National Lime Association is the trade association for U.S. and Canadian manufacturers of high calcium quicklime, dolomitic...

  3. Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical Process Relevant to Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Huifang; Zhou, Mo; Zhang, Fangfu; Konishi, Hiromi; Shen, Zhizhang; Teng, H.

    2013-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Mica, biotite, muscovite, diopside, tremolite, ultramafic rock, hematite, Ca-Mg-carbonate, calcite, aragonite, dolomite, crystal nucleation, crystallization, interface, catalysis, EBSD, XRD, TEM

  4. document

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    focusing on the marginal portions of the reservoir would require additional costs for fracking, but with a dolomite reservoir and the evidence above, it is highly likely that...

  5. CONDENSATION IN A MODEL CHICXULUB FIREBALL. D.S. Ebel1 and and L. Grossman1,2, 1Department of the Geophysical Sciences, 5734 South Ellis Ave., 2Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Lawrence

    sections [15, 16] of Pemex well Y4 were used, yielding volume fractions 0.568 calcite, 0.270 dolomite, 0

  6. Miocene shallow-water carbonates on the Eratosthenes Seamount, easternmost Mediterranean Sea 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Alastair H F

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Miocene shallow-water limestones of the Eratosthenes Seamount add considerably to the picture of widespread and heterogeneous Mediterranean Miocene reef development. Shallow-water limestones were cored at two sites on the ...

  7. 1000 2000 3000 4000 .5 0 1 KILOMETER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kidd, William S. F.

    Rocks, Including Interbedded Limestone, Ordovician Black Shale/Slate Green Shale/Slate Bedded Limestone Quartz Arenite or Quartz Rich Wacke Brown/Tan/Olive DrabShale/Slate, Mudstone, and Sandstone Red Shale/Slate

  8. DESULFURIZATION OF COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS AND COAL LIQUIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wrathall, James Anthony

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    technology is assumed. Wet scrubber or combination flue-gasFlue Gas Scrubbing Costs Scrubber Lime- Limestone Reduction-Same as lime-limestone scrubber cost. Cap. Cost*4 Since 6236

  9. REACTIONS OF SULFITE AND NITRITE IONS IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, S.G.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NO X in lime/limestone FGD scrubbers without requiring majorIntroduction Lime/limestone scrubbers represent the currentbe identified so that a scrubber with better performance and

  10. Age-dating implications from the morphologic, petrologic, and isotopic investigations of a calcic soil, Terrell County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jolley, Darren Manning

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fine grained calcic soil has developed upon Pliocene-Miocene alluvial gravels derived from Cretaceous limestone of the Stockton Plateau and Paleozoic limestone, chert, and novaculite from the Marathon uplift. This soil is located in an area...

  11. ..~ v.-~Iernoir to illustrate a Geological Map of 9!!.ch. By C. \\JV.GRANT, ESQ.,Capt. Bombay Engineers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilham, Roger

    of slate clay, limestone slate, and slaty sandstone. The third, or southern range, and composed entirel y

  12. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 8, NO. 2, MARCH 2000 247 A Model of a Bubbling Fluidized Bed Combustor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campi, Marco

    of NO and an improvement in the desulphurization process (the limestone present in the fluidized bed reacts with SO2

  13. Geology of the Homer Martin Ranch Area, Mason County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pool, Alexander Stuart

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandstone Nember. ~. . . ~ Cap Mountain Limestone Member ~. . . . ~ ~ ~ ~ Lion Mountain Sandstone Member. . . ~ ~ ~ . , ~ e ~ 36 WQberns Formation ~ 0 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 45 Welge Sandstone Member. Morgan Creek L1mestone Member... membered' the Hickory sandstone member, the Cap Mountain limestone member, and the Lion Nountain sandstone member. The Wilberns formation consists of four members: the Welge sandstone member, the Morgan Creek limestone member, the Point Peak shale...

  14. Publications July 8, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    ., 1995, Fluid-flow characterization of dolomitized carbonate-ramp reservoirs: San Andres Formation, Charles, ed., 1998, Modeling dolomitized carbonate-ramp reservoirs: a case history of the Seminole San­1875. Wang, F. P., Moscardelli, L., and Kerans, Charles, ed., 1998, Integrated reservoir characterization

  15. Catalytic iron oxide for lime regeneration in carbonaceous fuel combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, M.; Yang, R.T.

    1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Lime utilization for sulfurous oxides absorption in fluidized combustion of carbonaceous fuels is improved by impregnation of porous lime particulates with iron oxide. The impregnation is achieved by spraying an aqueous solution of mixed iron sulfate and sulfite on the limestone before transfer to the fluidized bed combustor, whereby the iron compounds react with the limestone substrate to form iron oxide at the limestone surface. It is found that iron oxide present in the spent limestone acts as a catalyst to regenerate the spent limestone in a reducing environment. With only small quantities of iron oxide the calcium can be recycled at a significantly increased rate.

  16. Longitudinal Variability of Time-Location/Activity Patterns of Population at Different Ages: A Longitudinal Study in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Xiangmei; Bennett, Deborah H; Lee, Kiyoung; Cassady, Diana L; Ritz, Beate; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I, Cassady DL, Lee K, Bennett DH, Ritz B, Vogt R: Study ofHealth 2010, 17. Wu XM, Bennett DH, Lee K, Cassady DL, RitzXiangmei Wu 1 , Deborah H Bennett 1* , Kiyoung Lee 2 , Diana

  17. Combustion Engineering Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Repowering Project -- Clean Coal II Project. Annual report, November 20, 1990--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The IGCC system will consist of CE`s air-blown, entrained-flow, two-stage, pressurized coal gasifier; an advanced hot gas cleanup process; a combustion turbine adapted to use low-Btu coal gas; and all necessary coal handling equipment. The IGCC will include CE`s slogging, entrained-flow, gasifier operating in a pressurized mode and using air as the oxidant. The hot gas will be cleaned of particulate matter (char) which is recycled back to the gasifier. After particulate removal, the product gas will be cleaned of sulfur prior to burning in a gas turbine. The proposed project includes design and demonstration of two advanced hot gas cleanup processes for removal of sulfur from the product gas of the gasifier. The primary sulfur removal method features a newly developed moving-bed zinc ferrite system downstream of the gasifier. The process data from these pilot tests is expected to be sufficient for the design of a full-scale system to be used in the proposed demonstration. A second complementary process is in situ desulfurization achieved by adding limestone or dolomite directly to the coal feed. The benefit, should such an approach prove viable, is that the downstream cleanup system could be reduced in size. In this plant, the gasifier will be producing a low-Btu gas (LBG). The LBG will be used as fuel in a standard GE gas turbine to produce power. This gas turbine will have the capability to fire LBG and natural gas (for start-up). Since firing LBG uses less air than natural gas, the gas turbine air compressor will have extra capacity. This extra compressed air will be used to pressurize the gasifier and supply the air needed in the gasification process. The plant is made of three major blocks of equipment as shown in Figure 2. They are the fuel gas island which includes the gasifier and gas cleanup, gas turbine power block, and the steam turbine block which includes the steam turbine and the HRSG.

  18. Geomechanical Analysis and Design Considerations for Thin-Bedded Salt Caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael S. Bruno

    2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The bedded salt formations located throughout the United States are layered and interspersed with non-salt materials such as anhydrite, shale, dolomite and limestone. The salt layers often contain significant impurities. GRI and DOE have initialized this research proposal in order to increase the gas storage capabilities by providing operators with improved geotechnical design and operating guidelines for thin bedded salt caverns. Terralog has summarized the geologic conditions, pressure conditions, and critical design factors that may lead to: (1) Fracture in heterogeneous materials; (2) Differential deformation and bedding plane slip; (3) Propagation of damage around single and multiple cavern; and (4) Improved design recommendations for single and multiple cavern configurations in various bedded salt environments. The existing caverns within both the Permian Basin Complex and the Michigan and Appalachian Basins are normally found between 300 m to 1,000 m (1,000 ft to 3,300 ft) depth depending on local geology and salt dissolution depth. Currently, active cavern operations are found in the Midland and Anadarko Basins within the Permian Basin Complex and in the Appalachian and Michigan Basins. The Palo Duro and Delaware Basins within the Permian Basin Complex also offer salt cavern development potential. Terralog developed a number of numerical models for caverns located in thin bedded salt. A modified creep viscoplastic model has been developed and implemented in Flac3D to simulate the response of salt at the Permian, Michigan and Appalachian Basins. The formulation of the viscoplastic salt model, which is based on an empirical creep law developed for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Program, is combined with the Drucker-Prager model to include the formation of damage and failure. The Permian salt lab test data provided by Pfeifle et al. 1983, are used to validate the assumptions made in the material model development. For the actual cavern simulations two baseline models are developed for single and multiple caverns, respectively. Different parameters that affect damage propagation and deformation of salt cavern, such as cavern pressure, operating conditions, cavern height/diameter ratio, overburden stiffness and roof thickness are analyzed and the respective results summarized. For multiple horizontal caverns numerical models are developed to determine the cavern interaction and the minimum safe center to center distance. A step by step methodology for operators to assess critical cavern design parameters for thin bedded salt formations is also presented.

  19. Improving Gas Flooding Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid Grigg; Robert Svec; Zheng Zeng; Alexander Mikhalin; Yi Lin; Guoqiang Yin; Solomon Ampir; Rashid Kassim

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study focuses on laboratory studies with related analytical and numerical models, as well as work with operators for field tests to enhance our understanding of and capabilities for more efficient enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Much of the work has been performed at reservoir conditions. This includes a bubble chamber and several core flood apparatus developed or modified to measure interfacial tension (IFT), critical micelle concentration (CMC), foam durability, surfactant sorption at reservoir conditions, and pressure and temperature effects on foam systems.Carbon dioxide and N{sub 2} systems have been considered, under both miscible and immiscible conditions. The injection of CO2 into brine-saturated sandstone and carbonate core results in brine saturation reduction in the range of 62 to 82% brine in the tests presented in this paper. In each test, over 90% of the reduction occurred with less than 0.5 PV of CO{sub 2} injected, with very little additional brine production after 0.5 PV of CO{sub 2} injected. Adsorption of all considered surfactant is a significant problem. Most of the effect is reversible, but the amount required for foaming is large in terms of volume and cost for all considered surfactants. Some foams increase resistance to the value beyond what is practical in the reservoir. Sandstone, limestone, and dolomite core samples were tested. Dissolution of reservoir rock and/or cement, especially carbonates, under acid conditions of CO2 injection is a potential problem in CO2 injection into geological formations. Another potential change in reservoir injectivity and productivity will be the precipitation of dissolved carbonates as the brine flows and pressure decreases. The results of this report provide methods for determining surfactant sorption and can be used to aid in the determination of surfactant requirements for reservoir use in a CO{sub 2}-foam flood for mobility control. It also provides data to be used to determine rock permeability changes during CO{sub 2} flooding due to saturation changes, dissolution, and precipitation.

  20. Proceedings of the 2001 Workshop on Applications of Description Logics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moeller, Ralf

    , Ernesto Compatangelo, Ines Arana A hybrid approach to extend DL-based reasoning with con- crete domains 10

  1. Hydrogen isotopic fractionation in lipid biosynthesis by H2-consuming Desulfobacterium autotrophicum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessions, Alex L.

    @geol.ucsb.edu (D.L. Valentine). 1 Present address: Stantec Consulting Corporation, 446 Eisen- hower Lane North

  2. Effects of Ocean Acidification on Learning in Coral Reef Maud C. O. Ferrari1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisenden, Brian D.

    : Ferrari MCO, Manassa RP, Dixson DL, Munday PL, McCormick MI, et al. (2012) Effects of Ocean Acidification

  3. George W. Hamlin Hamlin Transportation Consulting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ottino, Julio M.

    authority at their hubs prior to Deregulation; Delta at Atlanta was probably the closest to a true hub ·Fed Agenda #12;Principal Hubs: Pre-Deregulation Hub Carriers ATL DL, EA DEN CO, FL, UA DFW AA, BN, DL ORD AA AA, UA PHL US AA PHX HP AA PIT US SFO UA SLC DL STL TW #12;Before and After ·Prior to Deregulation

  4. LISTE DES ACQUISITIONS 2014 Dictionnaire de biologie / Jacques Berthet ; en collaboration avec Alain Amar-Costesec ; [prface de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutkin, Boris

    ; préface de Antoine Manga Bihina. Paris : L'Harmattan, DL 2010 (�tudes africaines). Après Canguilhem ; préface de Laurent Bove. Paris : L'Harmattan, DL 2010 (�pistémologie et philosophie des sciences). SUR ; Budapest ; Kinshasa [etc.] : L'Harmattan, DL 2006 (Hippocrate et Platon : études de philosophie de la

  5. The Digital Library Shell Yael Dubinsky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yehudai, Amiram

    The Digital Library Shell Yael Dubinsky University of Rome "La Sapienza" Department of Computer Libraries The Digital Library (DL) Shell The project of development the DL shell Demonstration Summary and future work #12;3 Agenda Digital Libraries The Digital Library (DL) Shell The project of development

  6. 323. 1JYNJ;MI(S AND 00!ANTIM3 CF OOGINIC rouJJI'ANl' lNll'RICITrns (}l GAY MINERAlS. Z.Z. 2'bang. Penchu 2'bang and D.L. Sjmks. l:epart:lrent of Plant and Soil Sciences.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    323. 1JYNJ;MI(S AND 00!ANTIM3 CF OOGINIC rouJJI'ANl' lNll'RICITrns (}l GAY MINERAlS. Z.Z. 2'bangI.ark. IE 19717-lm The interactions of clay minerals with organic pollutants .ere investigated using

  7. Yager, P.L., R.M. Sherrell, S.E. Stammerjohn, A.-C. Alderkamp, O. Schofield, E.P. Abrahamsen, K.R. Arrigo, S. Bertilsson, D.L. Garay, R. Guerrero, K.E. Lowry, P.-O. Moksnes, K. Ndungu,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for dramatic heat and air-sea gas exchange, greater light penetra- tion, and air-sea access for birds;Oceanography | September 2012 41 Sarmiento et al., 2004). The efficiency of the biological pump in high

  8. Blood lead levels and remediation of an abandoned smelter site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eidson, M. [New Mexico Dept. of Health, Santa Fe, NM (United States). Div. of Epidemiology, Evaluation, and Planning; Tollestrup, K. [Univ. of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Family and Community Medicine Dept.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elevated soil lead levels were documented in a New Mexico community, with levels up to 24,800 ppm in a smelter slag pile, 20 or more feet from residences. The New Mexico Department of Health offered blood lead screening to residents of three geographic areas before and after an emergency cleanup by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Blood lead levels prior to the cleanup ranged from undetectable (< 5 {mu}g/dl) to 29 {mu}g/dl; after the cleanup, they ranged from undetectable to 10 {mu}g/dl. Significant reductions in mean blood lead levels after the cleanup were found for all three geographic areas: from 6.67 {mu}g/dl to 4 {mu}dl (smelter area), from 4.12 {mu}g/dl to 2.5 {mu}g/dl (town area), and from 5.5 {mu}g/dl to 2.5 {mu}g/dl (northeast area). In both years, the mean blood lead levels of individuals who lived near the smelter area were significantly higher than the levels for those living in town for those participating in both years of the study. Mean blood lead levels were significantly higher for smelter area participants who had a household member working at a lead battery plant (19.4 {mu}g/dl) compared to those residents who did not (5.83 {mu}g/dl).

  9. Structural discordance between neogene detachments and frontal sevier thrusts, central Mormon Mountains, southern Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wernicke, Brian; Walker, J. Douglas; Beaufait, Mark S.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonanza King Formation. Between the Keystone-Muddy Mountain and Gass Peak-Wheeler Pass thrusts is a broad, regional synclinorium consisting of miogeoclinal rocks which have been folded and faulted on small thrusts. N W E s Fig. 6. Axes...-groned, thin-to rneclum- bedded chert), toward top fossaliferous, locally cross-laminated SULTAN LIMESTONE (216 m) CRYSTAL PASS LIMESTONE (69m) Lrnestone, hght c, lroy, ophonit, laminated sandstone marker bedneer top VALENTINE LIMESTONE (79m) Lm...

  10. Dissepimental rugose corals of Upper Pennsylvanian (Missourian) rocks of Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cocke, J. M.

    1970-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    limestone and shale for- mations. Each limestone formation is divided into 1) a normal facies belt of thin limestones generally containing abundant invertebrates and few phylloid algae, and 2) at least one phylloid algal mound complex belt which... corals belonging to Dibunophyllum, Neokoninckophyllum, Caninia, and Geyerophyllum are described from both carbonate facies belts but not from thick shale formations. Family Aulophyllidae is represented by 17 species of Dibunophyllum and Neokoninckophyllum...

  11. Late Pennsylvanian cyclic sedimentary units of the Brownwood area, north-central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hojnacki, Robert Stephen

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of these sediments. However, sh1fting sediment sources do play a m1nor role in creating variations within each cycle. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to thank Dr. Thomas E. Yancey, my committee chai r- man, for his geologic advice and guidance, both general.... The dual limestone cycle has a generalized lithologic sequence, in ascending order, of 1) nonmarine and/or shoreline clastics; 2) transgressive limestone; 3) marine shales, which may include phosphatic shales; 4) regressive limestone; 5) nonmarine...

  12. CALCIUM SULFATE-INDUCED ACCELERATED CORROSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akuezue, Hilary Chikezie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    temperature Corrosion In Fluidised Bed Com-· Rogers, E. A. ,Tempel"ature Corrosion In Fluidised Bed' 1 , Ash De sits AndChikezie Akuczue In fluidised-bed coal combustion, dolomite

  13. Assessing the influence of diagenesis on reservoir quality: Happy Spraberry Field, Garza County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazingue-Desailly, Vincent Philippe Guillaume

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    and selective dissolution, (5) precipitation of four different stages of calcite cement, (6) mechanical compaction, (7) late formation of anhydrite and (8) saddle dolomite and (9) replacement by chalcedony. Oomoldic porosity is the dominant pore type in oolitic...

  14. Depositional and diagenetic characteristics of Waulsortian-type buildups in the Lodgepole formation: Big Snowy Mountains, Montana, and Dickinson Field, North Dakota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Andrea Suzanne

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - most notably the pore-filling blocky calcite cements are saddle dolomite cements- are seen in the Montana and North Dakota mounds. Early rim cements and replacement chalcedony are also present. Cathodoluminescence and isotope analysis also show...

  15. 2005 EPA WIPP RECERTIFICATION FACT SHEET No. 6 Karst in the Area of WIPP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on wells drilled into the Culebra Dolomite within the Land Withdrawal Boundary show evidence of flow, such as halite (salt) and gypsum. tory through the subsurface. may form when rainwater, reacting with carbon

  16. Reservoir characters of the Ypresian carbonates, Western Libyan Offshore, Central Mediterranean Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mriheel, I.Y. [Petroleum Research Centre, Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant hydrocarbon accumulations have been discovered in Western Libyan offshore in the Ypresian carbonate reservoirs of Jdeir Formation and Jirani Dolomite. The discoveries of hydrocarbons are mainly in structural traps where the Jdeir nummulitic facies and Jirani dolomitic facies B have been structured by salt domes or underlying positive fault blocks. This study investigates the relationship between environments of deposition, diagenesis and reservoir characters of the two main hydrocarbon producing units of the Jdeir and Jirani formations. Petrographic and petrophysical studies indicate that porosity in the Jirani Dolomite is related to diagenesis in meteoric environments, while in the Jdeir reservoir is the result of the environment of deposition and diagenesis. Excellent reservoir porosity of Jdeir nummulitic facies and Jirani dolomitic facies B is related to diagenesis in meteoric water during exposure to subaerial conditions which is considered to be due to lowering of sea level and possibly local uplifting.

  17. Mobility of Tritium in Engineered and Earth Materials at the NuMI Facility, Fermilab: Progress report for work performed between June 13 and September 30, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. , and S. Childress, Tritium production in the Dolomitic4. Figure 5.3-5. Mobility of Tritium in Engineered and EarthInverse Henry’s constant + Tritium half-life 1 . 0 × 10 ? 5

  18. HYDRAULIC CALCULATIONS FOR A MODIFIED IN-SITU RETORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, W.G.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D. C. , 1974), 2. Oil Shale Tract C-b: Materials (AshlandRiver, containing the oil shale; and the Wasatch foundationof dolomitic marlstone (oil shale) and soluble materials.

  19. asce specialty conference: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: across downstream Kaibab Limestone and Coconino Sandstone cliffs flank the creek as it flows southward. The red sandstone, which holds the series of pools at Slide...

  20. aptes cross-linked polymers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A&M University - TxSpace Summary: ... 104 4.4.2 Waterflood in Fractured Limestone ... 109 4.5 Experiments in...

  1. Experience curves for power plant emission control technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Hounshell, David A; Taylor, Margaret R

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of cumulative installed capacity of each technology. We1 C umulative installed capacity of wet lime/limestone FGDFigure 2 C umulative installed capacity of SCR systems on

  2. Scripta Fac. Sci. Nat. Univ. Masaryk. Brun., Volume 36, Geology. Brno, 2007. 57 The Early Miocene micromammalian assemblage from Mokr 1/2001 Turtle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horacek, Ivan

    and in deposits of the main brown coal seam (Merkur-North) or in the limestone quarry and erosive relicts of hot

  3. asphalt concrete overlays: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    experimental results for concrete containing virgin limestone Paulino, Glaucio H. 71 Life Cycle Assessment of Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization...

  4. GEOFLUIDS _

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iournal of Hydrology,. 112, 335—73. Evamy BD (1967) Dedolomitization and the development of rhombohedral pores in limestones. [ournal of Sedimentary.

  5. How to ,,calibrate" speleothem proxy data: a critical review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sengun, Mehmet Haluk

    Ometeoric ppt Soil Limestone Atmosphere Cave CO2(atm) CaCO3 CaCO3 Biosphere DICseepage water CO2(soil gas

  6. ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT FY 1980

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfur Dioxide Oxidation in Scrubber Systems, EnvironmentalN0 in lime/limestone FGD scrubbers without requiring majorbe passed through a scrubber to separate carbon dioxide,

  7. Evaluation of the stiffness tensor of a fractured medium with ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The properties of limestone and shale, taken from [jose92] as follows: .... The thick black lines indicate zero normal displacements in (a) and (b) and zero ...

  8. Fracture-Induced Anisotropic Attenuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    shale–limestone with different degrees of anisotropy indi- cate that the quality factors (Q) of the shear modes are more anisotropic than the corresponding phase ...

  9. Geophysical Constraints on Sediment Dispersal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    modest because the source rock lithology is limestone-consis- tent with its source rock composition and longsources of silica in sediments are the weathering of rocks

  10. Geophysical constraints on sediment dispersal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers; Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    modest because the source rock lithology is limestone-consis- tent with its source rock composition and longsources of silica in sediments are the weathering of rocks

  11. Paleogene landscape evolution of the central North American Cordillera: Developing topography and hydrology in the Laramide foreland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, SJ; Mulch, A; Carroll, AR; Horton, TW; Chamberlain, CP

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microfossils of the Oil Shale of the Green River Formationded limestone, marl, oil shale (kerogen-rich and ? ssiledelineated by the rich oil shales of the Mahogany Zone (

  12. National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and Sulfur Dioxide in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with high internal desulphurization due to the limestone (org/t sinter and 90% desulphurization efficiency (EC 2009). Incompounds for internal desulphurization (EC 2006) ? Use of

  13. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT 'dfu'lAGEMENT CENTER

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    limestone chips and would be disposed of off site, adhering to Iowa Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) regulations. U .S. Environmental Protection Agency ( EPA) determined the...

  14. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    primarily used to provide detailed porosity, structural, and mineralogic compositional data on small cores and core cuttings of sandstone, limestone, volcanic rock, shale, coal,...

  15. Genetic pore typing as a means of characterizing reservoir flow units: san andres, sunflower field, terry country, texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbolt, Aubrey Nicole

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    . Poroperm values, measured petrophysical data, stratigraphic architecture, lithofacies, and genetic pore types from Sunflower field will be used to test pre-existing and modified techniques of reservoir characterization. From the resulting analysis, a... a depth of 5,300 feet. Sunflower pay is composed of several stacked, laterally continuous, high frequency cycles defined herein as parasequences. Dolomite, anhydritic dolomite, and thin bedded anhydrite serve as dominant facies although minor lime...

  16. Rektoren und Dekane seit 1976/77 1976 -1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /01 Erich Hödl Karin Wilhelm Klaus Rie�berger Ulrich Bauer Manfred Rentmeister Hans Vogler 2001/02 Erich Hödl Pierre-Alain Croset Klaus Rie�berger Ulrich Bauer Manfred Rentmeister Hans Vogler 2002/03 Erich Hödl Pierre-Alain Croset Klaus Rie�berger Ulrich Bauer Manfred Rentmeister Hans Vogler 2003/04 * Lutz

  17. The Use of Egyptian and Egyptianizing Material Culture in Nubian Burials of the Classic Kerma Period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minor, Elizabeth Joanna

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of text Limestone MFA 20.1664 Htp nTrw iA[bt] / Hr Hrof text Limestone MFA 20.1664 Htp nTrw iA[bt] / Hr HrC6009 KIII-30 Male di nswt Htp ptH-skr-wsr n kA n wr rsy(? )

  18. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    limestone quarry in Wisconsin generates over 125,000 tons of quarry fines and quarry bag-house dust each limestone quarry fines and quarry bag-house dust, to reduce costs, as well as to reduce the use of expensive be used in SCC. Use of quarry by-products in SCC will lead to economical and ecological benefits

  19. Performance of Concrete Made With Slag Cement and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Performance of Concrete Made With Slag Cement and Portland-Limestone Blended Cement Philadelphia;Today's Discussion ! The materials ! Slag cement ! Portland-limestone cement ! Use in concrete is slag cement? #12;! Non-metallic product of an iron blast furnace ! Granulated ! Ground ! Cementitious

  20. what to use when installing trees and shrubs in Miami-Dade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    underground storage cistern ­ shade? Time to explore the Acanthaceae don't forget our local butterflies. Plus shaped). If planting on limestone, especially for a large container or a field grown #12;tree, dig 3 by incorporating sufficient of a 1:2 mix of compost and coarse builders sand. On limestone, especially for a field

  1. Journal of Sedimentary Research, 2010, v. 80, 943954 Research Article

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    González, Luis A.

    boreholes advanced to depths of 400­450 cm (top of limestone bedrock) from the Chattanooga Coke Plant (CCP of anthropogenically remolded clay soil fill containing coal clinker, cinder grains, and limestone gravel; most layers of coarse fill were impregnated with creosote and coal tar. Most undisturbed soil (below 1 m depth

  2. S T U D I E S Volume 8 November 1961

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    GEOLOGY S T U D I E S Volume 8 November 1961 CONTENTS page Petrology and petrography of Ely University, Geology Studies Volume 8 November 1961 Contents Petrology and petrography of Ely Limestone research in the De- partment. Price $3.50 #12;Petrology and Petrography of Ely Limestone in Part of Eastern

  3. ARTICLE IN PRESS 1 Effects of testing methods and conditions on the elastic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Shayea, Naser Abdul-Rahman

    on the elastic 2 properties of limestone rock 3 Naser A. Al-Shayea* 4 Department of Civil Engineering, King Fahd. The objective is to compare elastic properties (elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio) for 12 limestone rockfundamental mechanical properties of rock materials 34required for the analysis and design of engineering 35

  4. Pure Maple Syrup Issue 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that in as well. 'S...sure, Benny,' he stuttered, 'sure... Whatever you say...' Dl D >- (/) UJ -J 0. - w ui -j a. < ui q: D a. Julien...

  5. Nonprice incentives and energy conservation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asensio, OI; Delmas, MA

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4. Costa DL, Kahn ME (2013) Energy conservation “nudges” andstrategies and energy conservation behavior: a meta-analysisIn the electricity sector, energy conservation through

  6. PRESSURIZATION TEST RESULTS: BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION ENERGY CONSERVATION STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krinkel, D.L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ADMINISTRATION ENERGY CONSERVATION STUDY D. L. Krinkel, D.Administration Energy Conservation Study D.L. Krinke! , D.J.Administration's Energy Conservation Study. The purpose of

  7. COMPARISON OF PROPORTIONAL AND ON/OFF COLLECTOR LOOP CONTROL STRATEGIES USING A DYNAMIC COLLECTOR MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiller, Steven R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Evacu- ated Tube Collectors. 11 Proceedings of 1977 ISEStemperature = ambient temp. collector capakitance d) lowday values qiven in (e) end (dl collector loss coefficient=

  8. antonios gonis patrice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    matrix product representations: From Statistical Physics to Hidden Markov Models IEEE, Fractal and wavelets. ISTE Ltd, London, Wiley, Hoboken, 2009. DL1 Sous la direction de...

  9. abri peptide 1-23: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    matrix product representations: From Statistical Physics to Hidden Markov Models IEEE, Fractal and wavelets. ISTE Ltd, London, Wiley, Hoboken, 2009. DL1 Sous la direction de...

  10. Characterization of two Dscam orthologues in Hirudo medicinalis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kym, Eunice Seunga

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Watson FL, Püettmann-Holgado R, Lamar DR, Schmucker D. ThePüttmann-Holgado R, Thomas F, Lamar DL, Hughes M, Kondo M,

  11. Reducing Greenhouse Emissions and Fuel Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CNGV: compressed natural gas vehicle Dl CI DV: direct-Compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles offer similar emissionvehicle ICE : internal combustion engine NG : natural gas

  12. MATERIALS AND MOLECULAR RESEARCH DIVISION, ANNUAL REPORT 1976

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction. Aside from UF6, uranium(IV) boro- hydride andPaP62- complexes, but not in the UF6 2- complex. AgaDl, the

  13. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Klass, D.L. 1998. Biomass for renewable energy, fuels, andLakes Regional Biomass Energy Program & Renewable Fuelsto accrue to renewable diesel fuels from biomass, whether as

  14. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Klass, D.L. 1998. Biomass for renewable energy, fuels, andLakes Regional Biomass Energy Program & Renewable Fuelsto accrue to renewable diesel fuels from biomass, whether as

  15. Functionalization of nanocarriers for efficient combination drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Che-Ming Jack

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    core made of poly D,L -lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA), a monolayer of phospholipids, and an outer corona

  16. Blood Chemistry of Free-Ranging and Captive White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Melanie Love

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    /dl) 28.6-252.0 52.6-196.2 32-152 51-130 47-138 Globulins (mg/dl) 2.3-5.9 2.8-5.4 1.7-5.5 2.1-4.4 2.5-6.1 A/G Ratio (mg/dl) 0.5-1.3 0.6-1.2 0.8-1.7 0.8-1.7 0.6-1.5 GGT (mg/dl) 110.8 19 34-62 11.0-39 Magnesium (mg/dl) 1.5-2.5 1.9-5.9 1.29-2.77...-12.5 Glucose (mg/dl) 116.5 ? 48.93 224.5 ? 80.28 0.000 26.0-290.0 56.0-423.0 BUN (mg/dl) 29.6 ? 7.47 32.1 ? 8.00 0.002 11.9-56.6 13.0-69.2 Creatinine (mg/dl) 1.3 ? 0.38 1.3 ? 0.29 0.053 0.7-2.6 0.6-2.4 T. Bilirubin (mg/dl) 0.3 ? 0.20 0.3 ? 0.19 0.039 0.1-1...

  17. P

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    P - . . - - 4 v - r REQUEST FOR RECORDS Dl To: NATIONAL ARCHIVES and RECORDS ADMINISTRATION (NIR) WASHINGTON, DC 20408 1. FROM (Agency or establishment) NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND...

  18. High-Resolution Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    between different mechanisms of chemical aging. Citation: Laskin J, A Laskin, PJ Roach, GW Slysz, GA Anderson, S Nizkorodov, DL Bones, and L Nguyen.2010."High-Resolution...

  19. Report on the scientific results of the voyage of H.M.S. Challenger during the years 1873-76. Zoology - Vol. 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomson, C Wyville; Murray, John

    1911-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T V . ..r.L, • '. dlYÍ*¿litio l\\ve tfttttfltfft v- ' í.Thcmuscularfibres separate .litio -&CricsofscpmiHC'miis-

  20. activated carbon application: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    black and flexible graphite. C 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers 1. Introduction Carbon materials (including composite Chung, Deborah D.L. 36 Active Carbon and Oxygen Shell Burning...

  1. Reducing Greenhouse Emissions and Fuel Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ethanol, methanol, compressed natural gas, liquefied propaneelectric vehicle CNGV: compressed natural gas vehicle Dl CIgasoline vehicles. Compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles

  2. A multi-level system quality improvement intervention to reduce racial disparities in hypertension care and control: study protocol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SH, Carson KA, Noronha G, Huizinga MM, Roter DL, Yeh HC,Simmons 7 and Mary Margaret Huizinga 8 Abstract Background:

  3. DOE and USDA Select Projects for more than $24 Million in Biomass...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    for more than 24 million in grants to research and develop technologiesto produce biofuels, bioenergy and high-value biobased products. jointsolicitation2009dl.pdf More...

  4. Improving the Energy Efficiency of Residential Clothes Dryers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hekmat, D.; Fisk, W.J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    industrial drying was a experimentally in 1976 in England by D.L. Hodgett,7 air and by using heat pump

  5. Nonprice incentives and energy conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asensio, OI; Delmas, MA; Delmas, MA

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    individual choices about energy efficiency. Proc. Natl.4. Costa DL, Kahn ME (2013) Energy conservation “nudges” andInformation strategies and energy conservation behavior: a

  6. Síndrome de Down: ¿otra causa de inmunosupresión asociada con dermatofibromas eruptivos múltiples?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monteagudo, Benigno; Suárez-Amor, Óscar; Cabanillas, Miguel; León-Mateos, Álvaro; Pérez-Valcárcel, Javier; Heras, Cristina de las

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    con depósitos de colesterol en paciente infectado por elen la 1ª paciente un colesterol total de 230 mg/dl, una IgG

  7. Jean Louis BRIAUD1 TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briaud, Jean Louis

    &M UNIVERSITY i Li= 1.25DL + EQLL+1.0EQ Para Sismos 2 #12;3 VALORES IMPORTANTES DE FACTORES RESISTENCIA PARA

  8. EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohan Kelkar

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the work done so far on Hunton Formation in West Carney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma. West Carney Field produces oil and gas from the Hunton Formation. The field was developed starting in 1995. Some of the unique characteristics of the field include decreasing water oil ratio over time, decreasing gas-oil ratio at the beginning of production, inability to calculate oil reserves in the field based on log data, and sustained oil rates over long periods of time. To understand the unique characteristics of the field, an integrated evaluation was undertaken. Production data from the field were meticulously collected, and over forty wells were cored and logged to better understand the petrophysical and engineering characteristics. Based on the work done in this budget period so far, some of the preliminary conclusions can be listed as follows: (1) Based on PVT analysis, the field most likely contains volatile oil with bubble point close to initial reservoir pressure of 1,900 psia. (2) The initial oil in place, which is contact with existing wells, can be determined by newly developed material balance technique. The oil in place, which is in communication, is significantly less than determined by volumetric analysis, indicating heterogeneous nature of the reservoir. The oil in place, determined by material balance, is greater than determined by decline curve analysis. This difference may lead to additional locations for in fill wells. (3) The core and log evaluation indicates that the intermediate pores (porosity between 2 and 6 %) are very important in determining production potential of the reservoir. These intermediate size pores contain high oil saturation. (4) The limestone part of the reservoir, although low in porosity (mostly less than 6 %) is much more prolific in terms of oil production than the dolomite portion of the reservoir. The reason for this difference is the higher oil saturation in low porosity region. As the average porosity increases, the remaining oil saturation decreases. This is evident from log and core analysis. (5) Using a compositional simulator, we are able to reproduce the important reservoir characteristics by assuming a two layer model. One layer is high permeability region containing water and the other layer is low permeability region containing mostly oil. The results are further verified by using a dual porosity model. Assuming that most of the volatile oil is contained in the matrix and the water is contained in the fractures, we are able to reproduce important reservoir performance characteristics. (6) Evaluation of secondary mechanisms indicates that CO{sub 2} flooding is potentially a viable option if CO{sub 2} is available at reasonable price. We have conducted detailed simulation studies to verify the effectiveness of CO{sub 2} huff-n-puff process. We are in the process of conducting additional lab tests to verify the efficacy of the same displacement. (7) Another possibility of improving the oil recovery is to inject surfactants to change the near well bore wettability of the rock from oil wet to water wet. By changing the wettability, we may be able to retard the water flow and hence improve the oil recovery as a percentage of total fluid produced. If surfactant is reasonably priced, other possibility is also to use huff-n-puff process using surfactants. Laboratory experiments are promising, and additional investigation continues. (8) Preliminary economic evaluation indicates that vertical wells outperform horizontal wells. Future work in the project would include: (1) Build multi-well numerical model to reproduce overall reservoir performance rather than individual well performance. Special emphasis will be placed on hydrodynamic connectivity between wells. (2) Collect data from adjacent Hunton reservoirs to validate our understanding of what makes it a productive reservoir. (3) Develop statistical methods to rank various reservoirs in Hunton formation. This will allow us to evaluate other Hunton formations based on old well logs, and determine, apriori, if

  9. Evaluating the Influence of Pore Architecture and Initial Saturation on Wettability and Relative Permeability in Heterogeneous, Shallow-Shelf Carbonates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan P. Byrnes; Saibal Bhattacharya; John Victorine; Ken Stalder

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin (3-40 ft thick), heterogeneous, limestone and dolomite reservoirs, deposited in shallow-shelf environments, represent a significant fraction of the reservoirs in the U.S. midcontinent and worldwide. In Kansas, reservoirs of the Arbuckle, Mississippian, and Lansing-Kansas City formations account for over 73% of the 6.3 BBO cumulative oil produced over the last century. For these reservoirs basic petrophysical properties (e.g., porosity, absolute permeability, capillary pressure, residual oil saturation to waterflood, resistivity, and relative permeability) vary significantly horizontally, vertically, and with scale of measurement. Many of these reservoirs produce from structures of less than 30-60 ft, and being located in the capillary pressure transition zone, exhibit vertically variable initial saturations and relative permeability properties. Rather than being simpler to model because of their small size, these reservoirs challenge characterization and simulation methodology and illustrate issues that are less apparent in larger reservoirs where transition zone effects are minor and most of the reservoir is at saturations near S{sub wirr}. These issues are further augmented by the presence of variable moldic porosity and possible intermediate to mixed wettability and the influence of these on capillary pressure and relative permeability. Understanding how capillary-pressure properties change with rock lithology and, in turn, within transition zones, and how relative permeability and residual oil saturation to waterflood change through the transition zone is critical to successful reservoir management and as advanced waterflood and improved and enhanced recovery methods are planned and implemented. Major aspects of the proposed study involve a series of tasks to measure data to reveal the nature of how wettability and drainage and imbibition oil-water relative permeability change with pore architecture and initial water saturation. Focus is placed on carbonate reservoirs of widely varying moldic pore systems that represent the major of reservoirs in Kansas and are important nationally and worldwide. A goal of the project is to measure wettability, using representative oils from Kansas fields, on a wide range of moldic-porosity lithofacies that are representative of Kansas and midcontinent shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs. This investigation will discern the relative influence of wetting and pore architecture. In the midcontinent, reservoir water saturations are frequently greater than 'irreducible' because many reservoirs are largely in the capillary transition zone. This can change the imbibition oil-water relative permeability relations. Ignoring wettability and transition-zone relative permeabilities in reservoir modeling can lead to over- and under-prediction of oil recovery and recovery rates, and less effective improved recovery management. A goal of this project is to measure drainage and imbibition oil-water relative permeabilities for a large representative range of lithofacies at differ ent initial water saturations to obtain relations that can be applied everywhere in the reservoir. The practical importance of these relative permeability and wettability models will be demonstrated by using reservoir simulation studies on theoretical/generic and actual reservoir architectures. The project further seeks to evaluate how input of these new models affects reservoir simulation results at varying scales. A principal goal is to obtain data that will allow us to create models that will show how to accurately simulate flow in the shallow-structure, complex carbonate reservoirs that lie in the transition zone. Tasks involved to meet the project objectives include collection and consolidation of available data into a publicly accessible relational digital database and collection of oil and rock samples from carbonate fields around the state (Task 1). Basic properties of these rocks and oils will be measured and used in wettability tests. Comparison will be performed between crude and synthetic oil wettability and

  10. IMPROVING CO2 EFFICIENCY FOR RECOVERING OIL IN HETEROGENEOUS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid B. Grigg; Robert K. Svec

    2002-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the First Annual Report for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No., a three-year contract entitled: ''Improving CO{sub 2} Efficiency for Recovering Oil in Heterogeneous Reservoirs.'' The research improved our knowledge and understanding of CO{sub 2} flooding and includes work in the areas of injectivity and mobility control. The bulk of this work has been performed by the New Mexico Petroleum Recovery Research Center, a research division of New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. This report covers the reporting period of September 28, 2001 and September 27, 2002. Injectivity continues to be a concern to the industry. During this period we have contacted most of the CO{sub 2} operators in the Permian Basin and talked again about their problems in this area. This report has a summary of what we found. It is a given that carbonate mineral dissolution and deposition occur in a formation in geologic time and are expected to some degree in carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) floods. Water-alternating-gas (WAG) core flood experiments conducted on limestone and dolomite core plugs confirm that these processes can occur over relatively short time periods (hours to days) and in close proximity to each other. Results from laboratory CO{sub 2}-brine flow experiments performed in rock core were used to calibrate a reactive transport simulator. The calibrated model is being used to estimate in situ effects of a range of possible sequestration options in depleted oil/gas reservoirs. The code applied in this study is a combination of the well known TOUGH2 simulator, for coupled groundwater/brine and heat flow, with the chemistry code TRANS for chemically reactive transport. Variability in response among rock types suggests that CO{sub 2} injection will induce ranges of transient and spatially dependent changes in intrinsic rock permeability and porosity. Determining the effect of matrix changes on CO{sub 2} mobility is crucial in evaluating the efficacy and potential environmental implications of storing CO{sub 2} in the subsurface. Chemical cost reductions are identified that are derived from the synergistic effects of cosurfactant systems using a good foaming agent and a less expensive poor foaming agent. The required good foaming agent is reduced by at least 75%. Also the effect on injectivity is reduced by as much as 50% using the cosurfactant system, compared to a previously used surfactant system. Mobility control of injected CO{sub 2} for improved oil recovery can be achieved with significant reduction in the chemical cost of SAG, improved injectivity of SAG, and improved economics of CO{sub 2} injection project when compared to reported systems. Our past work has identified a number of mobility control agents to use for CO{sub 2}-foam flooding. In particular the combination of the good foaming agent CD 1045 and a sacrificial agent and cosurfactant lignosulfonate. This work scrutinizes the methods that we are using to determine the efficiency of the sacrificial agents and cosurfactant systems. These have required concentration determinations and reusing core samples. Here, we report some of the problems that have been found and some interesting effects that must be considered.

  11. Facies analysis and petroleum potential of Smackover Formation, western and northern areas, East Texas basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hancharik, J.M.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Smackover Formation (Upper Jurassic) in northeast Texas is a transgressive-regressive carbonate sequence which has been extensively dolomitized. The Smackover Formation is subdivided informally into a lower and upper member based on distinctive lithologic characteristics. The lower member, which rests conformably on the fluvial-deltaic sandstones of the Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation, contains a laminated, organic carbonate mudstone facies that grades into an overlying locally fossiliferous, pelletalmicritic facies. The upper member of the Smackover Formation consists mainly of broken skeletal debris and pelletal allochems in a micritic matrix. The sediments are better winnowed and better sorted upward in the sequence. Interbedded with and overlying the skeletal-pelletal facies is a clean well-sorted dolomitized oolitic-grainstone facies. This upper-most informal member marks the beginning of a progradational sequence which lasts throughout the remainder of Smackover deposition and continues through deposition of the evaporities and red beds of the overlying Buckner Formation. Most of the Smackover production in northeast Texas occurs along the Mexia-Talco fault zone in the deeper gentle salt-related anticlines and salt-graben systems. Reservoir rocks are primarily leached and dolomitized oolitic grainstones and dolomite. Laminated organic carbonate mudstones which characterize the lower, transgressive phase of the Smackover Formation provide an excellent source rock for petroleum. Exploration targets for the Smackover Formation are the areas were dolomitized oolitic and skeletal grainstones occur on top of structurally high areas such as over salt ridges or swells in the deeper portions of the basin.

  12. IS C O N SIN FUSION TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .A. El-Guebaly, D.L. Henderson, P.P.H. Wilson, A.E. Abdou, ARIES Team April 2002 UWFDM-1178 Presented Wall Chamber L.A. El-Guebaly, D.L. Henderson, P.P.H. Wilson, A.E. Abdou, ARIES Team Fusion Technology

  13. David L. Field Curriculum vitae (April 2011) 1 Full name: David Luke Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, C.H.

    radiations, and the importance of polyploidy in adaptation. My research integrates different approaches Curriculum vitae (April 2011) 2 Manuscripts in Preparation Field DL, Pickup M, Barrett SCH (in prep) Sex ratio variation in flowering plants. Field DL, Pickup M, Barrett SCH (in prep) The influence

  14. 2014.6-[] E-JOURNAL PORTAL

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    Miyashita, Yasushi

    SSL-VPN Gateway or GW () http://www.dl.itc.u-tokyo.ac.jp/gacos/faq/gakugai.html OK PDF Education 2006;51(2):215-241. #12;2014.6- [] 4 GACoS TREE GACoS SSL-VPN Gateway or GW TREE E NPO GACoS SSL-VPN Gateway or GW () http://www.dl

  15. Received 10 May 2013 | Accepted 10 Oct 2013 | Published 8 Nov 2013 Probing single-to multi-cell level charge transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -cell level charge transport in Geobacter sulfurreducens DL-1 Xiaocheng Jiang1,*, Jinsong Hu2,*, Emily R energy into electricity, represent a potentially sustainable energy technology for the future. Here we report the single-bacterium level current measurements of Geobacter sulfurreducens DL-1 to elucidate

  16. Fishery Notes New Fishery Role for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    } \\Clen- It t as v.dl ~ educator, '>tated that the gn)v.lng eel L'port Ou~ine\\, . he \\-enttlated \\ltde\\\\oclatlon of Lndemdter In tru tllr\\ Program potllght dl\\lng Irontler the ~tate 01 the art, underv.ater gear Though Ala ka

  17. Metadata Extraction from Bibliographic Documents for Digital Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Metadata Extraction from Bibliographic Documents for Digital Library A. Belaïd1 and D. Besagni2 1 for a digital library (DL), their automatic recognition presents an obvious interest. However as their origin. 1. Introduction The digital library (DL) [1] has become more and more a common tool for everyone

  18. Dynamics and Potential Impact of the Immune Response to Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Doron

    : This work was supported by a Research Scholar Award from the American Cancer Society to PPL. The work of DL Graduate Research Fellowship Program. The work of DL and PPL was supported in part by grant number R01CA Institute. Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist. * E-mail: ppl

  19. Huffman, Lori A From: Trenchard, Glyn D

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    alto:Jef A Vem-A n-n Av Sent: Monday, October 22, 2012 04:06 PM To* DL - WRPS-NOT-ECY ; DL - WVRPS-NOT-WDOH L WRPS-NOT-ORP <2LW-RPSNOTOP@rl.gov>;...

  20. Publications List Refereed: (78 Total)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    . 9(1): 37 40. Rockwood, DL. 1984. Genetic improvement potential for biomass quality and quantity 29(l): l8 22. Rockwood, DL, LF Conde, and RH Brendemuehl. l980. Biomass production of densely planted. Current status of woody biomass production research in Florida. Proc. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. of Fla. 42

  1. Evaluation of a reduced mechanism for turbulent premixed combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolaou, Zacharias M.; Swaminathan, Nedunchezhian; Chen, Jyh-Yuan

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    of a BFG mixture [1], or a low hydrogen content syngas mixture [2– 4]. At these conditions the laminar flame speed is sl ¼ 2:5 m=s and the flame thickness is dl ¼ 0:75 mm, where dl ¼ ðTp #2; TrÞ= maxðjdT=dxjÞ, and Tp is the product temperature. 2...

  2. Social issues can impede the provision of even innocuous medical information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blandford, Ann

    Blandford Middlesex University Bounds Green Road London, N11 2NQ, U.K +44 20 8362 2683 {A.Adam, A.Blandford}@mdx.ac.uk ABSTRACT Digital libraries (DL) are major advances in information technology that frequently fall short libraries INTRODUCTION Digital libraries (DL) present the potential to greatly advance learning capabilities

  3. Carbon Dioxide-Water Emulsions for Enhanced Oil Recovery and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, David; Golomb, Dan; Shi, Guang; Shih, Cherry; Lewczuk, Rob; Miksch, Joshua; Manmode, Rahul; Mulagapati, Srihariraju; Malepati, Chetankurmar

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project involves the use of an innovative new invention ? Particle Stabilized Emulsions (PSEs) of Carbon Dioxide-in-Water and Water-in-Carbon Dioxide for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide. The EOR emulsion would be injected into a semi-depleted oil reservoir such as Dover 33 in Otsego County, Michigan. It is expected that the emulsion would dislocate the stranded heavy crude oil from the rock granule surfaces, reduce its viscosity, and increase its mobility. The advancing emulsion front should provide viscosity control which drives the reduced-viscosity oil toward the production wells. The make-up of the emulsion would be subsequently changed so it interacts with the surrounding rock minerals in order to enhance mineralization, thereby providing permanent sequestration of the injected CO{sub 2}. In Phase 1 of the project, the following tasks were accomplished: 1. Perform laboratory scale (mL/min) refinements on existing procedures for producing liquid carbon dioxide-in-water (C/W) and water-in-liquid carbon dioxide (W/C) emulsion stabilized by hydrophilic and hydrophobic fine particles, respectively, using a Kenics-type static mixer. 2. Design and cost evaluate scaled up (gal/min) C/W and W/C emulsification systems to be deployed in Phase 2 at the Otsego County semi-depleted oil field. 3. Design the modifications necessary to the present CO{sub 2} flooding system at Otsego County for emulsion injection. 4. Design monitoring and verification systems to be deployed in Phase 2 for measuring potential leakage of CO{sub 2} after emulsion injection. 5. Design production protocol to assess enhanced oil recovery with emulsion injection compared to present recovery with neat CO{sub 2} flooding. 6. Obtain Federal and State permits for emulsion injection. Initial research focused on creating particle stabilized emulsions with the smallest possible globule size so that the emulsion can penetrate even low-permeability crude oilcontaining formations or saline aquifers. The term ?globule? refers to the water or liquid carbon dioxide droplets sheathed with ultrafine particles dispersed in the continuous external medium, liquid CO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O, respectively. The key to obtaining very small globules is the shear force acting on the two intermixing fluids, and the use of ultrafine stabilizing particles or nanoparticles. We found that using Kenics-type static mixers with a shear rate in the range of 2700 to 9800 s{sup -1} and nanoparticles between 100-300 nm produced globule sizes in the 10 to 20 ?m range. Particle stabilized emulsions with that kind of globule size should easily penetrate oil-bearing formations or saline aquifers where the pore and throat size can be on the order of 50 ?m or larger. Subsequent research focused on creating particle stabilized emulsions that are deemed particularly suitable for Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide. Based on a survey of the literature an emulsion consisting of 70% by volume of water, 30% by volume of liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide, and 2% by weight of finely pulverized limestone (CaCO{sub 3}) was selected as the most promising agent for permanent sequestration of CO{sub 2}. In order to assure penetration of the emulsion into tight formations of sandstone or other silicate rocks and carbonate or dolomite rock, it is necessary to use an emulsion consisting of the smallest possible globule size. In previous reports we described a high shear static mixer that can create such small globules. In addition to the high shear mixer, it is also necessary that the emulsion stabilizing particles be in the submicron size, preferably in the range of 0.1 to 0.2 ?m (100 to 200 nm) size. We found a commercial source of such pulverized limestone particles, in addition we purchased under this DOE Project a particle grinding apparatus that can provide particles in the desired size range. Additional work focused on attempts to generate particle stabilized emulsions with a flow through, static mixer based apparatus under a variety

  4. The culture of some marine fishes in ponds receiving heated discharge water from a power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luebke, Richard William

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D 0 c( L t III X Q 0 ttt 0 IU 8 g IV IU D Q 0 C4 W 0 g 0 td D 0 0 a I LIJ EJ P C O 0 0 IA Gl O R O IK ct ILI Y O ct CS IIS C9 IZ ct X CJ CII O I ?S Cc AI AI Co I- ICI X EJ n. (L CL IL O tr...VS 0 Id III I 0 CII 2: co o o A C og & o 6 0 g I OI td o III 0 8 ~ CIC Q I g 'u ~ g IO 4-I 0 Cl OI I OI 0 2 6 g I I 8 Cd CII V ld E I Il) 0 O' IO IA O dl O IA O Ilc 0 dl 0 dl 0 dl O dl 0 III 0 Cd Id A y& Id lcl cd Id...

  5. Basic Data Report for Drillhole SNL-3 (C-2949)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis W. Powers; Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    SNL-3 (permitted by the New Mexico State Engineer as C-2949) was drilled to provide geological data and hydrological testing of the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation within a dissolution reentrant north of the WIPP site and well east of Livingston Ridge. SNL-3 is located in the southeast quarter of section 34, T21S, R31E, in eastern Eddy County, New Mexico. SNL-3 was drilled to a total depth of 970 ft below ground level (bgl). Below surface dune sand, SNL-3 encountered, in order, the Mescalero caliche, Gatuna, Dewey Lake, Rustler, and upper Salado Formations. Two intervals were cored: (1) from the lower Forty-niner Member through the Magenta Dolomite and into the upper Tamarisk Member; and (2) from the lower Tamarisk Member through the Culebra Dolomite and Los Meda?os Members and into the uppermost Salado.

  6. Geology of the Upper Schep Creek area, Mason County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Hollis Dale

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'adatio&u&1 between the un(erlyin~. " thin"bedded shales and siitstones and the overlying thick-bedded limestonss, and the contac+ is places at the base of the first thick-bedded limestone. At those places where (he uppex bioherm zone is present... that are littered with characteristic thin slabs of weathered limestone. These outcrops have less brushy and more grassy vegetation that shows as Lighter colored areas on the aerial photo- Btt~t~h ~A&~il: fhs lower contac+ with the . 'sn labs limestone is placed...

  7. Structure and evolution of the East Sierran thrust system, east central California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunne, George C.; Walker, J. Douglas

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Geologic sketch map of the southern Inyo Mountains. IMVC is Inyo Mountains Volcanic Complex of Dunne et al. [1998]. Informal pluton names are as follows: F, French Spring; B, Black Warrior; L, Long John. TC4012 DUNNE AND WALKER: EAST SIERRAN THRUST SYSTEM 2... by the Dolomite Canyon fault and by contractional shear zones in the upper plate of the Dolomite fault; truncations reveal a component of right drag; (2) prominent shear zone in Black Warrior pluton (163 Ma; SI-D91-3) shows a gently plunging mineral lineation...

  8. AlabamaWISE Home Energy Program (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The WISE Home Energy Program provides up to $750 in energy efficiency rebates for homeowners in Cullman, Madison, Jefferson, Shelby, Morgan, Limestone and Lawrence counties. A $350 rebate is...

  9. A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apps, J.A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of limestone to the coal slurry feed. Although not disclosedi.e. , pulverized or as a coal-water slurry The nature andform (PC), or as a coal-water slurry fuel (CWSF). The trace

  10. Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emissions from the Global Cement Industry, Annual Review ofThe Use of Limestone in Portland Cement: a State- of-the-Review, Skokie, IL: Portland Cement Association. Dolores, R.

  11. Mining Regulations (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation applies to all mines in this state engaged in the mining or extraction of minerals for commercial purposes, except barite, marble, limestone, and sand and gravel, or the...

  12. Microsoft Local Language Program Customer Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    , and Niger. Natural resources include natural gas, petroleum, tin, iron ore, coal, limestone, niobium, lead its petroleum-based economy and build a sound foundation for economic growth and political stability

  13. Leaching of Metals from Fly ash-Amended Permeable Reactive Barriers Doina L. Morar 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    (Petzrick 2001). Unfortunately, this HCC fly ash cannot be beneficially reused in the construction industry organic and inorganic pollutants. Specific reactive materials such as wood chips, limestone, manure (USEPA

  14. Sedimentology and stratigraphy of the Miocene to Pliocene Mona Reef Complex and its relation with relative sea-level fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez Delgado, Alejandra Maria

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    core facies that appear to be limestone. The Pliocene framework is characterized by reef core facies with less diagenetic alterations. The evolution of the Isla de Mona complex is subdivided in six stages characterized by episodes of deposition...

  15. Ornamental Stones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrell, James A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    limestone (var. 1), granite (var. 1), and granodiorite (var.porphyry (vars. 1-3), granite (var. 1), granodiorite (vars.Basins: Roman Period—granite (var. 1), andesite-dacite

  16. Landform Design Vancouver, BC Oct 2012 BGC Engineering Inc 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Jeff

    of coal/limestone/salt ­ Melting of permafrost ­ Crustal deformation ­ Mining of metallic ores large areas, it may be immediate or delayed for many years (SME, 1992). Drilling rid being retrieved

  17. New Clean Coal Cycle Optimized Using Pinch Technology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossiter, A. P.; O'Donnell, J. J.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transport reaction technology, developed originally for Fluid Catalytic Cracking plants, is used in the coal conversion steps; and pulverized limestone is circulated with the coal to capture the sulfur that is released during this process. Both gas turbines...

  18. Guide to Using Wood Ash as an Agricultural Soil Amendment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    from larger commercial sources such as wood-burning biomass plants which produce heat or electricity in the soil. Wood ash is more soluble and reactive than ground limestone, and brings about a Benefits Recycles

  19. GPR Method for the Detection and Characterization of Fractures and Karst Features: Polarimetry, Attribute Extraction, Inverse Modeling and Data Mining Techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sassen, Douglas Spencer

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    experimentation plot situated on the limestone of the Edwards Aquifer, central Texas. First, a coherency algorithm is developed for polarimetric GPR that uses the largest eigenvalue of a scattering matrix in the calculation of coherence. This coherency...

  20. Planktonic Foraminifera Record of the Mid Albian Sea Level Rise, Upper Magdalena Valley, Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukop, Mike

    Planktonic Foraminifera Record of the Mid Albian Sea Level Rise, Upper Magdalena Valley, Colombia Cretaceous unit in southern Colombia named "Tetuán Limestone", have allowed the comparison between planktic foraminifera interval zones in Colombia: Ticinella primula and Biticinella breggiensis, with late

  1. SOIL TEST INTERPRETATIONS RECOMMENDATIONS HANDBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    1 SOIL TEST INTERPRETATIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS HANDBOOK Originally written 1983 By Daryl D..................................................20 SOIL ACIDITY AND LIMESTONE...............................................27 EXCHANGEABLE MAGNESIUM No. Page No. I. Nitrogen rate adjustments based upon soil texture, organic matter, and time of major

  2. ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrell, G.C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No. AP-52, 1969. "Scrubber Survey: a Lime/Limestone Trend,"New York, 1971. IIWest Scrubber System Study,1I Calvert,EPA-650/2-75-047. IIVenturi Scrubber Performance,1I Calvert,

  3. WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    . II humus (organic matter) washed down- hill by the rains that fall upon the land.' When sulpher. Limestone, marble and colomite are particularly susceptible to corrosion by sulphates. Calcium

  4. Relative Habitat Value Of Alternative Substrates Used In Oyster Reef Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Lindsey Marie

    2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    and in limited supply. This study incorporated field and laboratory experiments to assess the relative habitat value of alternative substrates (crushed concrete, porcelain, crushed limestone, and river rock, as well as oyster shell) for larval oyster recruitment...

  5. Ornamental Stones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrell, James A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ornamental stones of ancient Egypt comprise a large andknown, but certainly from Egypt’s limestone region in orroyal statues and stelae of Egypt’s 25 th Dynasty and, in

  6. Observations on the capability of the Criner fault, southern Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, Shawn Collin

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the present study suggest that the Criner fault is an old tectonic feature with a deceptively youthful geomorphic appearance. Differential erosion has likely exhumed the Criner fault-line scarp in the resistant Ordovician limestone of the Criner Hills...

  7. Effects of burial history, rock ductility and recovery magnitude on inversion of normal faulted strata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhle, Nathan John

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inversion of normal faults at different burial depths is studied using physical models constructed with rock and deformed at confining pressure. Models consist of a 1 cm thick limestone layer above a fault dipping 70° in a rigid medium...

  8. Characterization of Geomechanical Poroelastic Parameters in Tight Rocks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen Valdes, Clotilde Raquel

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    . Experimental procedures under drained, undrained and unjacketed conditions were initially completed in Berea Sandstone. Then, Indiana Limestone, Westerly Granite and Welded Tuff specimens were tested in order to obtain Skempton’s pore pressure parameter B, Biot...

  9. ERASURE OF FIRST-ORDER TRIBUTARIES VIA CLIMATE CHANGE: LESSONS FOR MARS FROM EARTH. Ted A. Maxwell, J.A. Grant, B.A. Campbell, R. Irwin III, M. Bourke and A. Johnston, Center for Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourke, Mary C.

    infilling, landscape lowering and stabilization by development of a lag surface, and planation due to sand and Libya, and on the limestone plateau that separates the western Desert of Egypt with the Nile valley

  10. The effect of drainage reorganization on paleoaltimetry studies: An example from the Paleogene Laramide foreland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, SJ; Wiegand, BA; Carroll, AR; Chamberlain, CP

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    microfossils of the oil shale of the Green River Formationinterbedded limestone, marl, oil shale (kerogen-rich marl)is delineated by oil shale and tuff of the Mahogany Zone

  11. Micromorphology and Stable Isotope Geochemistry of Historical Pedogenic Siderite Formed in PAH-Contaminated Alluvial Clay Soils, Tennessee, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Driese, S.G.; Ludvigson, Greg A.; Roberts, Jennifer A.; Fowle, David A.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Smith, Jon Jay; Vulava, V.M.; McKay, L.D.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alluvial clay soil samples from six boreholes advanced to depths of 400–450 cm (top of limestone bedrock) from the Chattanooga Coke Plant (CCP) site were examined micromorphologically and geochemically in order to determine if pedogenic siderite (Fe...

  12. ReproducedfromJournalofEnvironmentalQuality.PublishedbyASA,CSSA,andSSSA.Allcopyrightsreserved. Ecosystem Function in Alluvial Tailings after Biosolids and Lime Addition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    JournalofEnvironmentalQuality.PublishedbyASA,CSSA,andSSSA.Allcopyrightsreserved. Ecosystem Function in Alluvial Tailings after Biosolids and Lime Addition Sally Brown,* Mark Sprenger, this site requires an alternative assessment meth-Municipal biosolids and agricultural limestone were

  13. A comparison of 137 Cs radioactivity in localized evergreen and deciduous plant species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rangel, Ruben Canales

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) requires the CPSES to routinely sample broadleaf vegetation in place of milk samples. Few commercial dairies exist in the vicinity. Broadleaf tree species are scarce because the climate and local limestone geology...

  14. Carbon and Water Cycling in a Texas Hill Country Woodland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamps, Ray Herbert

    2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Two tree species, Plateau live oak (Quercus fusiformis) and Ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei) survive and thrive in a dense woodland on thin soil overlying massive limestone formations in the Texas Hill Country with recurrent annual summer drought...

  15. Characterization of Rodessa Formation Reservoir (Lower Cretaceous) in Van Field, Van Zandt County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Triyana, Yanyan

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    limestone and sandstone have been altered significantly by diagenetic processes that include micritization, cementation, dissolution, neomorphism and compaction. Dissolution is the main factor that resulted in enhanced porosity and permeability while...

  16. Investigation of the benefits of carbonate cementation due to addition of low percentage of hydrated lime in the base courses of pavements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhuiyan, Jasim Uddin

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Texas, limestone and caliche soil, were tested extensively to examine the effect of carbonate cementation due to the addition of small percentages of lime. Testing included mineralogical analysis of the two materials, strength analysis in terms of texas...

  17. Collateral damage: Evolution with displacement of fracture distribution and secondary fault strands in fault damage zones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savage, Heather M.; Brodsky, Emily E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    8 m fault 14 m fault Lonewolf Wadi Araba Carboneras Caletasiltstone, conglomerate Wadi As Sir Limestone gneiss schistFaulkner et al. , 2003], and Wadi Araba [Du Bernard et al. ,

  18. Effects of interlayer slip on multilayered folds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casarta, Lawrence Joseph

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    composed of Coconino Sandstone (brittle) or Indiana Limestone (ductile) interlayered with lead (very ductile) are folded by layer parallel compression at a confining pressure of 100 MPa, temperature of 24 C and axial displacement rate of 10 3 cm... differential stress-axial shortening curves. a, and b, specimens composed of Coconino Sandstone and lead. c, specimens composed of Indiana Limestone and lead. Each curve is for a different specimen a and b. Schematic illustration of double hinged...

  19. Paleoenvironmental analysis of biohermal facies, Mississippian Lake Valley formation, northern Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Roy Edwin

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Devonian strata and consists of 15 to 60 feet of interbedded, gray, nodular, argillaceous limestone and soft, light gray, calcareous shale thinning southward (Laudon and Bowsher, 1949; and Pray, 1961). The Andrecito Member of the Lake Valley Formation... consists of calcareous shale, thinly-bedded argillaceous limestone, well-sorted crinoidal calcarenites, and thin quartzose siltstone. The unit is 20 to 35 feet thick and thins southward (Pray, 1961). The Alamogordo Member is a medium gray, cherty...

  20. Geology of the West Mason area, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polk, Ted Pritchard

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Creek limestone bedding following page 26 XI. Point Peak thin bedded shales. following page 29 XII. Point Peak shale beds and small bioherms. . following page 29 XIII. Fig. 1: Point Peak reef structure Fig. Z: Point Peak bioherm and "cabbage heads..." following page 29 XIV. Fig. 1: Point Peak bioherrn and bedding. . . following page 29 Fig. 2: Point Peak weathered out bioherrns XV. Point Peak shale bench. . following page 29 XVI. Fig. 1; San Saba limestone bedding on weathered slope. Fig. 2: San...

  1. Depth-gradient analysis of the Colony Creek Cycle (late Pennsylvanian) of north Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Noel Lynne

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chairman of Advisory Coamittee: Dr. Thomas E. Yancey Late Pennsylvanian depositional cycles consisting of transgres- sive and regressive sequences, and containing thin limestones overlain by thick shales which are in turn overlain by sandstones and... and the Colorado River valley, and has a similar vertical stratigra- phic succession of lithologies in both areas. This succession consists of 1) a thin transgressive limestone, 2) phosphatic dark shale, 3) gray shales with abundant fossils, 4) mixed shale...

  2. Stratigraphic and Geographic Bryozoan Abundance Gradients in the Calcareous Shales of the Wreford Megacyclothem (Lower Permian, Kansas)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pachut, J. F.; Cuffey, Roger J.

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS August 1999 Number 10 STRATIGRAPHIC AND GEOGRAPHIC BRYOZOAN ABUNDANCE GRADIENTS IN THE CALCAREOUS SHALES OF THE WREFORD MEGACYCLOTHEM (LOWER PERMIAN, KANSAS) Joseph F. Pachut and Roger J... or taphonomic processes. With minor exceptions involving the uppermost Speiser Shale and Schroyer Limestone Member of the Wreford Limestone, detrended correspondence analysis did not segregate any distinctive groupings of beds or lithologies. Speiser assemblages...

  3. Vegetable Gardening in Containers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masabni, Joseph; Cotner, Sam

    2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    physical support in order to grow healthy plants. A good growing media must also drain well. Synthetic or soilless mixes are well suited for vegetable container gardening and may be composed of sawdust, wood chips, peat moss, perlite, or vermiculite... by mixing horticultural grade vermiculite, peat moss, limestone, superphosphate and garden fertilizer. To 1 bushel each of vermiculite and peat moss, add 10 tablespoons of limestone, 5 tablespoons of 0-20-0 (superphosphate) and 1 cup of garden fertil- izer...

  4. Structural relations along the western end of the Arrowhead Fault, Muddy Mountains, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temple, Vernon James Jay

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , resembling "drag" effects related to horizontal movement on the Arrowhead fault, are interpreted as the re- sult of a drape-folded fold. The Summit thrust, a local northwesterly trending fault at the eastern end of the study area, is interpreted... Bonanza King Formation Dunderb erg Shale Buffington Formation Ordovician System Monocline Valley Formation Devonian System Muddy Peak Limestone Mississippian Series Rogers Spring Limestone vii xiii 12 12 12 12 13 1) 23 25 25 26 26 26...

  5. Geology of the Cedar Mountain area, Llano County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dewitt, Gary Ray

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mountain area. A part of Cedar Mountain was mapped by Barnes (1956) while studying the lead resources of central Texas. The report also in- cludes a brief discussion of buried topography and the genesis of the Hickory Sandstone. Absolute age... massif, In a later report (1848) he described a Carboniferous lime- stone having abundant black "silex" (possibly Marble Falls Limestone), and widespread "Silurian limestones, " Shumard (1861) described rocks of the "Primordial Zone" of Tex...

  6. Isotopic composition of brachiopod shells as indicators of Pennsylvanian marine paleoenvironment of North America 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mii, Horng-Sheng

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shawnee (houp, with total thickness of 6. 9 m, are well exposed in Waverly quarry, Waverly County, Kansas (Figs. 1, 7). The Heebner Shale is a black, fissile, and phosphatic shale. The Plattsmouth Limestone is light gray with wavy bedding and some thin... brachiopod shells in order to examine temporal and regional paleoenvironmental variations in the Late Pennsylvanian epicontinental seas of North America. Samples were collected from the Missourian to Virgilian shales or shales interbedded with limestones...

  7. Depth-gradient analysis of the Colony Creek Cycle (late Pennsylvanian) of north Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Noel Lynne

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chairman of Advisory Coamittee: Dr. Thomas E. Yancey Late Pennsylvanian depositional cycles consisting of transgres- sive and regressive sequences, and containing thin limestones overlain by thick shales which are in turn overlain by sandstones and... and the Colorado River valley, and has a similar vertical stratigra- phic succession of lithologies in both areas. This succession consists of 1) a thin transgressive limestone, 2) phosphatic dark shale, 3) gray shales with abundant fossils, 4) mixed shale...

  8. Geology of the West Mason area, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polk, Ted Pritchard

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Creek limestone bedding following page 26 XI. Point Peak thin bedded shales. following page 29 XII. Point Peak shale beds and small bioherms. . following page 29 XIII. Fig. 1: Point Peak reef structure Fig. Z: Point Peak bioherm and "cabbage heads..." following page 29 XIV. Fig. 1: Point Peak bioherrn and bedding. . . following page 29 Fig. 2: Point Peak weathered out bioherrns XV. Point Peak shale bench. . following page 29 XVI. Fig. 1; San Saba limestone bedding on weathered slope. Fig. 2: San...

  9. New synchronous compensators for the Nelson River HVDC system; Planning requirements and specifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thio, C.V.; Davies, J.B. (Manitoba Hydro, Winnipeg, Manitoba (CA))

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first units of Limestone Generating Station, the third plant on the Lower Nelson River in northern Manitoba, will come into service in the fall of 1990. Additional var compensation equipment is required at the inverter end of the Nelson River HVdc system to accommodate power from Limestone. This paper describes the system requirements of and the overall specification for the synchronous compensators selected to supply the reactive power and voltage support.

  10. Depositional environment of Red Fork sandstones, deep Anadarko Basin, western Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whiting, Philip Howard

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    analysis of each thin section consisted of a grid point-count of 125 points for composition and 100 points for monocrystalline quartz size. The composi- tional data were normalized with respect to the detrital component of the sample. Grain size... separated by thin limestone beds. All formation contacts within the Cherokee Group are conformable while tne group is bounded below by a major unconformity on top of the Atokan Series. The younger Marmaton Group limestones lie conformably above...

  11. A Lower Ordovician sponge/algal facies in the southern United States and its counterparts elsewhere in North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alberstadt, L. (Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (USA)); Repetski, J.E. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (USA))

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface Ordovician rocks in the Black Warrior Basin, Mississippi Embayment, and the eastern part of the Arkoma Basin reflect a different depositional history than coeval rocks exposed in the Nashville Basin, Ozark Dome, and southern Appalachians. The succession consists of four informal lithologic units. From top to bottom these are: (1) Stones River limestones, (2) upper dolostone, (3) sponge/algal limestones characterized by the presence of Nuia, and (4) lower dolostone. Of these, the sponge/algal limestone unit is the most atypical. It has a conspicuous biotic assemblage which can be recognized petrographically in well cuttings. The diagnostic fossil allochems are: sponges, sponge spicules, Nuia, Girvanella, and Sphaerocodium. Conodonts from the sponge/algal limestones are probably entirely Early Ordovician (Canadian) and include cold- and deep-water species found in the North Atlantic Province, whereas those in the overlying dolostones represent exclusively warm-water, shelf environments. The conodonts in the Black Warrior Basin suggest that an unconformity between Lower and Middle Ordovician carbonates (Knox unconformity) does not exist in much of that region. The sponge/algal limestones represent a different facies than their coeval shelf rocks in the interior of the continent. The limestone contains a distinctive biotic assemblage recognized in Lower Ordovician rocks in Newfoundland, in the Arbuckle and Wichita mountains of Oklahoma, in West Texas, and in the Great Basin of Nevada and Utah.

  12. Biomass-Derived Hydrogen from a Thermally Ballasted Gasifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Slipstream #12;Approach: Indirectly heated gasifier · Conventional fluidized bed gasification ­ Combustion fluidizes the bed during combustion · Steam fluidizes the bed during pyrolysis · Gasifier temperature varies: Gas Conditioning · Guard bed for trace contaminant removal ­ Fixed bed of dolomite · Steam reformer

  13. The Use of Lime in Fish Ponds1 Andy M. Lazur, Charles E. Cichra and Craig Watson2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    small fish are being reared. Calcite and dolomite increase the total hardness, total alkalinity, and p desirable for most freshwater fish. Water in ponds reflects the quality of the soils in which they are located. In acid soils, ponds typically have low total alkalinity, total hardness, and pH. Total hardness

  14. Analyzing Porosity using Petrographic Imaging Methods: Key for Petrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdaniel, Kathleen

    2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    . Recrystallization with the filling of void space and growth of calcite and dolomite crystals is also shown in numerous images. Images under Choquette and Pray’s carbonate porosity classification system are dominated by non-fabric selective vuggy porosity... Archie’s Equation ................................................................................................. 20 III RESULTS ............................................................................................................. 24...

  15. Removing of Formation Damage and Enhancement of Formation Productivity Using Environmentally Friendly Chemicals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahmoud, Mohamed Ahmed Nasr Eldin

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    (GLDA) a newly developed environmentally friendly chelate was examined as stand-alone stimulation fluid in deep oil and gas wells. In this study we used GLDA to stimulate carbonate cores (calcite and dolomite). GLDA was also used to stimulate and remove...

  16. The Investigation on Fibrous Veins and Their Host from Mt. Ida, Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Jae Won

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    I have studied syntectonic veins from shales and coarse calcareous sands of the Ordovician Womble Shale, Benton uplift, Arkansas. All veins are composed of calcite with minor quartz and trace feldspar and dolomite or high-Mg calcite in the coarser...

  17. Z .Tunnelling and Underground Space Technology 16 2001 107 114 Experimental investigation on the breakage of hard rock by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 1988a,b; Kerr, 1988; Lewis et al., 1997 . Nowadays, PDC bits can be used successfully in drilling, volcanic material or old dolomite so far. In order to apply PDC bits in drilling very hard U Corresponding jets; PDC cutters 1. Introduction Since the introduction of PDC bits in the mid-1970s, tremendous

  18. Oil and Gas Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Joseph V.

    , oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics Products 23. Sloan dolomite quarry 24. Weiser gypsum quarry Oil Fields 1. Blackburn field 2. North WillowMetals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada

  19. Improved oil recovery in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs of Kansas - near term -- Class 2. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, T.; Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate incremental reserves from Osagian and Meramecian dolomite reservoirs in western Kansas through application of reservoir characterization to identify areas of unrecovered mobile petroleum. Specific reservoirs targeted are the Schaben Field in Ness County and the Bindley Field in Hodgeman County.

  20. DESCRITTIVE DELLA CARTA GEOLOGICA D'ITALIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doglioni, Carlo

    and use of fossil energy sources, underground storage of natural gas during summer for the re- use during FIELD TRIP Stili strutturali ed escursione nelle Dolomiti di CARLO DOGLIONI & EUGENIO CARMINATI topics of a field trip in the Dolomites (Southern Alps, northeast Italy). The main issues will be related

  1. Dept. of Soil A.J. Bussan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    remember, gypsum will not change pH! TOMATO #12;LIMING MATERIALS Dolomitic = CaCO3·MgCO3 Calcitic = CaCO3 Fly ash = CaO, Ca(OH2), CaCO3 Gypsum = CaSO4 CaCO3 + 2H+ = Ca2+ + CO2 + H2O The carbonate affects

  2. Natural attenuation processes applying to antimony: A study in the abandoned antimony mine in Goesdorf, Luxembourg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belzile, Nelson

    September 2009 Keywords: Antimony Goesdorf Valentinite Antimony minerals Oxalate buffer extraction have pH values between 7 and 8 because the mineralization itself contains calcite and dolomite. This study combines the identification of minerals in the supergene zone with the application of bulk

  3. Optimization of a CO2 flood design Wesson Field - west Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia Quijada, Marylena

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Denver Unit of Wasson Field, located in Gaines and Yoakum Counties in west Texas, produces oil from the San Andres dolomite at a depth of 5,000 ft. Wasson Field is part of the Permian Basin and is one of the largest petroleum-producing basins...

  4. The effects of soil type and chemical treatment on nickel speciation in refinery enriched soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The effects of soil type and chemical treatment on nickel speciation in refinery enriched soils Aerial deposition of Ni from a refinery in Port Colborne, Ontario, Canada has resulted in the enrichment in vegetable crops grown in the vicinity of the refinery. Conversely, dolomitic lime- stone additions resulted

  5. Christmas Island lagoonal lakes, models for the deposition of carbonateevaporiteorganic laminated sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ratio in evaporitic salinas, results from both a lack of limitation of calcium, magnesium and carbonate (calcite, dolomite) layers are encountered in numerous sedimentary basins worldwide. Two main types, or spatial association with deep deposited series: for example in salt ponds, evaporative salinas or salt

  6. Palaeoenvironmental reconstruction of a middle Miocene alluvial fan to cyclic shallow lacustrine depositional system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    with tabular and/or laminated carbonate beds; and (4) mudflat­shallow lake facies showing a remarkable cyclical. The cyclic mudflat­shallow lake succession, as exposed in the Orera composite section (OCS), is dominantly on the lacustrine mudflat and on climate. The dolomite intervals accumulated during lake-level highstands with Mg

  7. Contributions to the Paleontology of New Jersey (II) STOP 5: GINGERBREAD CASTLE STROMATOLITES, HAMBURG, NJ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainforth, Emma C.

    Allentown Dolomite (Middle Cambrian ­ lowermost Ordovician), a shallow water, nearshore carbonate energy environments. The higher energy environment is also reinforced by the many storm layers present larger ooids. Dark gray rip-up clasts occur near the interface of the two layers. Figure 4. Edgewise

  8. APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, 0099-2240/97/$04.00 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morel, François M. M.

    sediments (28), the formation of placer gold (30), and the precipitation of dolomite at low tempera- tures of the microbial world has expanded in recent years with the discoveries that microbes can use a variety environments, such as geothermal res- ervoir fluids and hot springs, and has been assumed to be abiotic (7). We

  9. Removing of Formation Damage and Enhancement of Formation Productivity Using Environmentally Friendly Chemicals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahmoud, Mohamed Ahmed Nasr Eldin

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    in the dolomite core as it is a good chelate for magnesium. Coreflood experiments showed that at high pH values (pH =11) GLDA, HEDTA, and EDTA were almost the same in increasing the permeability of both Berea and Bandera sandstone cores. GLDA, HEDTA, and EDTA were...

  10. Annual Logging Symposium, June 19-23, 2010 Formation Evaluation in the Bakken Complex Using Laboratory Core Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    reservoirs, such as the Bakken Shale and its adjoining formations, the Three Forks dolomite, Sanish mudstone Using Laboratory Core Data and Advanced Logging Technologies Sandeep Ramakrishna, Ron Balliet, Danny and Lower Bakken Shales are organic rich source rocks. Hydrocarbon fluid identification, volumes

  11. PEER-REVIEWED PUBLICATIONS: Land, L. S., 1964, Eolian cross-bedding in the beach dune environment, Sapelo Island, Georgia.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    , Sedimentation in a meandering estuary. Sedimentology, v. 6, p. 191-207. Land, L. S., 1966, Diagenesis from a fossil water table. Sedimentology, v. 14, p. 175-185. Land, L. S., and Epstein, S., 1970, Late Pleistocene diagenesis and dolomitization, North Jamaica. Sedimentology, v. 14, p. 184-200. Land, L. S

  12. The Bakken - An Unconventional Petroleum and Reservoir System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarg, J.

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated geologic and geophysical study of the Bakken Petroleum System, in the Williston basin of North Dakota and Montana indicates that: (1) dolomite is needed for good reservoir performance in the Middle Bakken; (2) regional and local fractures play a significant role in enhancing permeability and well production, and it is important to recognize both because local fractures will dominate in on-structure locations; and (3) the organic-rich Bakken shale serves as both a source and reservoir rock. The Middle Bakken Member of the Bakken Formation is the target for horizontal drilling. The mineralogy across all the Middle Bakken lithofacies is very similar and is dominated by dolomite, calcite, and quartz. This Member is comprised of six lithofacies: (A) muddy lime wackestone, (B) bioturbated, argillaceous, calcareous, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (C) planar to symmetrically ripple to undulose laminated, shaly, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (D) contorted to massive fine-grained sandstone, to low angle, planar cross-laminated sandstone with thin discontinuous shale laminations, (E) finely inter-laminated, bioturbated, dolomitic mudstone and dolomitic siltstone/sandstone to calcitic, whole fossil, dolomitic lime wackestone, and (F) bioturbated, shaly, dolomitic siltstone. Lithofacies B, C, D, and E can all be reservoirs, if quartz and dolomite-rich (facies D) or dolomitized (facies B, C, E). Porosity averages 4-8%, permeability averages 0.001-0.01 mD or less. Dolomitic facies porosity is intercrystalline and tends to be greater than 6%. Permeability may reach values of 0.15 mD or greater. This appears to be a determinant of high productive wells in Elm Coulee, Parshall, and Sanish fields. Lithofacies G is organic-rich, pyritic brown/black mudstone and comprises the Bakken shales. These shales are siliceous, which increases brittleness and enhances fracture potential. Mechanical properties of the Bakken reveal that the shales have similar effective stress as the Middle Bakken suggesting that the shale will not contain induced fractures, and will contribute hydrocarbons from interconnected micro-fractures. Organic-rich shale impedance increases with a reduction in porosity and an increase in kerogen stiffness during the burial maturation process. Maturation can be directly related to impedance, and should be seismically mappable. Fractures enhance permeability and production. Regional fractures form an orthogonal set with a dominant NE-SW trend, and a less prominent NW-SE trend. Many horizontal 1 direction to intersect these fractures. Local structures formed by basement tectonics or salt dissolution generate both hinge parallel and hinge oblique fractures that may overprint and dominate the regional fracture signature. Horizontal microfractures formed by oil expulsion in the Bakken shales, and connected and opened by hydrofracturing provide permeability pathways for oil flow into wells that have been hydro-fractured in the Middle Bakken lithofacies. Results from the lithofacies, mineral, and fracture analyses of this study were used to construct a dual porosity Petrel geo-model for a portion of the Elm Coulee Field. In this field, dolomitization enhances reservoir porosity and permeability. First year cumulative production helps locate areas of high well productivity and in deriving fracture swarm distribution. A fracture model was developed based on high productivity well distribution, and regional fracture distribution, and was combined with favorable matrix properties to build a dual porosity geo-model.

  13. The Bakken-An Unconventional Petroleum and Reservoir System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frederick Sarg

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated geologic and geophysical study of the Bakken Petroleum System, in the Williston basin of North Dakota and Montana indicates that: (1) dolomite is needed for good reservoir performance in the Middle Bakken; (2) regional and local fractures play a significant role in enhancing permeability and well production, and it is important to recognize both because local fractures will dominate in on-structure locations; and (3) the organic-rich Bakken shale serves as both a source and reservoir rock. The Middle Bakken Member of the Bakken Formation is the target for horizontal drilling. The mineralogy across all the Middle Bakken lithofacies is very similar and is dominated by dolomite, calcite, and quartz. This Member is comprised of six lithofacies: (A) muddy lime wackestone, (B) bioturbated, argillaceous, calcareous, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (C) planar to symmetrically ripple to undulose laminated, shaly, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (D) contorted to massive fine-grained sandstone, to low angle, planar cross-laminated sandstone with thin discontinuous shale laminations, (E) finely inter-laminated, bioturbated, dolomitic mudstone and dolomitic siltstone/sandstone to calcitic, whole fossil, dolomitic lime wackestone, and (F) bioturbated, shaly, dolomitic siltstone. Lithofacies B, C, D, and E can all be reservoirs, if quartz and dolomite-rich (facies D) or dolomitized (facies B, C, E). Porosity averages 4-8%, permeability averages 0.001-0.01 mD or less. Dolomitic facies porosity is intercrystalline and tends to be greater than 6%. Permeability may reach values of 0.15 mD or greater. This appears to be a determinant of high productive wells in Elm Coulee, Parshall, and Sanish fields. Lithofacies G is organic-rich, pyritic brown/black mudstone and comprises the Bakken shales. These shales are siliceous, which increases brittleness and enhances fracture potential. Mechanical properties of the Bakken reveal that the shales have similar effective stress as the Middle Bakken suggesting that the shale will not contain induced fractures, and will contribute hydrocarbons from interconnected micro-fractures. Organic-rich shale impedance increases with a reduction in porosity and an increase in kerogen stiffness during the burial maturation process. Maturation can be directly related to impedance, and should be seismically mappable. Fractures enhance permeability and production. Regional fractures form an orthogonal set with a dominant NE-SW trend parallel to Ï?1, and a less prominent NW-SE trend. Many horizontal wells are drilled perpendicular to the Ï?1 direction to intersect these fractures. Local structures formed by basement tectonics or salt dissolution generate both hinge parallel and hinge oblique fractures that may overprint and dominate the regional fracture signature. Horizontal microfractures formed by oil expulsion in the Bakken shales, and connected and opened by hydrofracturing provide permeability pathways for oil flow into wells that have been hydro-fractured in the Middle Bakken lithofacies. Results from the lithofacies, mineral, and fracture analyses of this study were used to construct a dual porosity Petrel geo-model for a portion of the Elm Coulee Field. In this field, dolomitization enhances reservoir porosity and permeability. First year cumulative production helps locate areas of high well productivity and in deriving fracture swarm distribution. A fracture model was developed based on high productivity well distribution, and regional fracture distribution, and was combined with favorable matrix properties to build a dual porosity geo-model.

  14. Investigating Dual Language Models: A Case Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luevanos-Clemente, Ruby Nicole

    2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The general purpose of this research was to identify the characteristics, along with differences, of the dual language (DL) programs in elementary schools in two central schools in Texas. A secondary purpose was to analyze test scores over time...

  15. Physical formulation and numerical algorithm for simulating N ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Dong

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 5, 2014 ... Media 82 (2010) 463–483. .... [41] K.A. Smith, F.J. Solis, D.L. Chopp, A projection method for motion of triple juncations by level sets, Interfaces ...

  16. Fabrication of Controlled Release Devices Using Supercritical Antisolvent Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Lai Yeng

    In this study, the supercritical antisolvent with enhanced mass transfer method (SASEM) is used to fabricate micro and nanoparticles of biocompatible and biodegradable polymer PLGA (poly DL lactide co glycolic acid). This ...

  17. 1www.aquaticinvaders.org Aquatic Invaders Volume 17 Number 3 Vol.17, No.3, July-September 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Fanslow DL, Foley AJ III, Lang GA, Eadie BJ, Quigley MA. 2006. Continued disappearance of the benthic. Eadie 1 and Michael A. Quigley 1 1 Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, NOAA; 2205

  18. Normal Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    User

    NORMAL DlSTRlBUTION TABLE. Entries represent the area under the standardized normal distribution from -w to z, Pr(Z

  19. Comparing SNePS with Topbraid/Pellet SNeRG Technical Note 42

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Stuart C.

    Comparing SNePS with Topbraid/Pellet SNeRG Technical Note 42 Michael Kandefer and Stuart C. Shapiro Editing Tool (Top Quadrant Inc. 2007) using the Pellet OWL DL Reasoner (Clark & Parsia, LLC 2007

  20. How Wood Chip Size Affects Pretreatment Effectiveness of Woody Biomass for Biological Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Jerry

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Klass, D.L. , 1998. Biomass for Renewable Energy, Fuels and48% of U.S. renewable energy was from biomass, but half ofof Ash in Biomass. National Renewable Energy laboratory,

  1. Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leighty, Wayne

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Weimer, D.L. (1984) Oil prices shock, market response,OPEC behavior and world oil prices (pp. 175-185) London:many decades. Recent high oil prices have caused oil-holding

  2. No Significant Impact Effluent Reduction Los Alamos National...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    L. W. Hacker, T.E. Calhoun, and D.L. Young 1978, Soil Survey o f Los Alamos County, New Mexico, LA-6779-MS, UC- 1 1. Raymer, D. F., and J. R. Biggs 1994, Comparisons o f Small...

  3. Effects of calcium carbonate particulate releasing surgical anchors on bone and tendon healing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medeiros, Jordan-Ryan J. I. K

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Calaxo ® screw, developed by Smith and Nephew, is a novel biomedical composite composed of poly-DL-lactide-co-glycolide (PLLA:PGA) 85:15 and calcium carbonate particulates. Comparisons to an identical surgical anchor ...

  4. ASC eNews (June 2014)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3 T.G. Trucano, L.P. Swiler, T. Igusa, W.L. Oberkampf and M. Pilch, Reliability Engineering and System Safety 91, 1331 (2006). 4 D.L. Preston and D.C. Wallace, Solid State...

  5. DOE/ID-Number

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Report UCRL-ID-133846. Walker, J.S. 2009. The Road to Yucca Mountain. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press. Warner, D.L. 1972. Survey of Industrial Waste Injection...

  6. ILDS

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003176IBMPC00 Intelligent Leak Detection System  https://www.dropbox.com/sh/aycss2bffzmur10/AAAJvqH8IKmrA93kngsAy45qa?dl=0 

  7. Managing novel forest ecosystems: understanding the past and present to build a resilient future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasnow, Kevin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1997. The effects of elk on aspen in the winter range inRestoration of quaking aspen woodlands invaded by westernR.B. and D.L. Bartos. 2001. Aspen ecosystems: objectives for

  8. NITROGEN BALANCE IN INTENSIVE AGRICULTURE IN THE NORTH CHINA PLAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuming; Hu, Chunsheng; Zhang, Jiabao; Chen, Deli

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chen DL, White RE, Chalk PM, Heng LK, Fisher R, Helyar KR.NIAES , 1994. pp. 209-234. Heng LK, White RE, Helyar KR,water balance (SWB) model (Heng et al. 2001) were conducted.

  9. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 91-213-2123, G. T. Jones Tire and Battery Distributing Inc. , Birmingham, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gittleman, J.; Estacio, P.; O'Brien, D.; Montopoli, M.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a request for technical assistance from the Alabama Health Department, possible hazardous working conditions at the G.T. Jones Tire and Battery Distributing Company (SIC-5093), Birmingham, Alabama were evaluated. The company employed 15 persons in battery breaking and recycling. Twelve of the workers had blood lead (7439921) levels over 60 micrograms/deciliter (microg/dl) and the average of the last three blood levels exceeded 50microg/dl for 13 of the employees. Blood lead levels greater than 60 were associated with biochemical evidence of impaired heme synthesis and impaired renal function. Fourteen workers had elevated zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) levels over 100microg/dl consistent with moderate lead poisoning. Three had ZPPs over 600 microg/dl, consistent with severe lead poisoning. The authors conclude that a health hazard existed from overexposure to lead. The authors recommend measures to reduce exposures.

  10. Archaeology 2.0: New Approaches to Communication and Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansa, Eric C.; Kansa, Sarah Whitcher; Watrall, Ethan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ACM Conference on Digital Libraries (DL ’98), ed. I. Witten,Personal Data in a Large Digital Library. Proceedings of theAdvanced Technology for Digital Libraries. Retrieved from

  11. ?-adrenergic and serotoninergic control of diet-induced thermogenesis in birds.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    - experimental lines, oral administration of DL-propranolol, a non-specific P-blocking agent (PPL, 5 mg effect of propranolol (DFF+PPL) was also studied in females of both lines (table I). The anorectic effect

  12. An efficient algorithm for incompressible N-phase flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Dong

    2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 7, 2014 ... Media 82 (2010) 463–483. .... [53] K.A. Smith, F.J. Solis, D.L. Chopp, A projection method for motion of triple junctions by level sets, Interfaces ...

  13. LS-4~ GROUND VIBRATION MEASUREMENTS NEAR THE SITE OF THE PROPOSED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ANL LIGHT SYNCHROTRON RADIATION FACILITY by D.L. McCown and R. Bowen Geoscience and Engineering Energy and Environmental Systems Division January 23, 1986 SUMMARY LS-4'l D. L....

  14. Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS; HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; USA Authors Applegate, J.K.; Donaldson, P.R.; Hinkley, D.L.; Wallace and T.L. Published...

  15. EROSION-CORROSION-WEAR PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Alan V.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MD, Oct. 1979. dl. Oil Shale Retort Components" A. Levy andCorrosion of Metals in Oil Shale Retorts,'' AS! v! WESTEC 'of metals in coal and oil shale conver- sion environments

  16. Temporal variation of residential pesticide use and comparison of two survey platforms: a longitudinal study among households with young children in Northern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Xiangmei (May); Bennett, Deborah H; Ritz, Beate; Tancredi, Daniel J; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005, 113:123–136. Vogt R, Bennett D, Cassady D, Frost J,Health 2012, 11:83. Wu XM, Bennett DH, Ritz B, Cassady DL,48:3109–3119. Moran RE, Bennett DH, Tancredi D, Wu XM, Ritz

  17. CHI 99 15-20 MAY 1999 Papers Testing Pointing Device Performance and User

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKenzie, Scott

    the International Standards Organization (ISO) has proposed a standard entitled IS0 9241Ergonomic Requirementsfor, Part 9 Draft International Standard for testing computerpointing devicesproposesanevaluation is in D&l International Standardversion and is currently awaiting a vote of member organizations

  18. EROSION-CORROSION-WEAR PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Alan V.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    will also be conducted in shale oil product material. 1979MD, Oct. 1979. dl. Oil Shale Retort Components" A. Levy andof metals in coal and oil shale conver- sion environments

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    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azevedo, Ricardo

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