Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dl dolomitic limestone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Sulfation reactions of limestone/dolomite and Nahcolite/Trona  

SciTech Connect

Sulfation rate measurements for both calcined limestone/dolomite and Nahcolite/Trona have been found to conform to the exponentially decaying expression r = r{sub o}e{sup {minus}ax} where r{sub o} is the initial rate of reaction and x is the extent of conversion of the solid sorbents. For limestone/dolomite, the above rate expression is valid for the early part of the sulfation process while for Nahcolite/Trona, the expression can be applied to the entire sulfation process. The initial rate was found to follow the Arrhenius expression and is proportional to the concentration of SO{sub 2}. The decay parameter, a, obtained for both limestone and dolomite related to the SO{sub 2} concentration and exponentially to the square root of the absolute reaction temperature. The sorptive capacity of limestone/dolomite was correlated to chemical composition and pore size distribution. Reactivities of Nahcolite/Trona were found to be one to two orders of magnitude greater than that of limestone and dolomite and the rate of decay versus conversion was much less significant.

Chang, E.Y.Y.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Niagara Limestone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Niagara Limestone Niagara Limestone Nature Bulletin No. 282-A November 11, 1967 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation NIAGARA LIMESTONE Chicago stands at the crossroads of America -- the heart of the Middle West -- and one of the most important natural resources upon which it depends is the Niagara limestone beneath it. The bedrock in this region consists of layer upon layer of limestones, shales and sandstones stacked almost a half mile thick on top of the ancient granite, once molten, that formed the original surface of the earth before oceans formed and life appeared. The Niagara limestone is the uppermost layer here but few of us are aware of it because it is covered with soil and ground up rock -- glacial drift -- ranging from a few feet to a hundred or more feet in depth.

3

Energetics of Sedimentary Dolomites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... To aid in the understanding of this phenomena, the enthalpies of formation of sedimentary non-stoichiometric dolomite samples have been ...

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

4

Doppler Lidar (DL) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The Doppler lidar (DL) is an active remote sensing instrument that provides range- and time-resolved measurements of radial velocity and attenuated backscatter. The principle of operation is similar to radar in that pulses of energy are transmitted into the atmosphere; the energy scattered back to the transceiver is collected and measured as a time-resolved signal. From the time delay between each outgoing transmitted pulse and the backscattered signal, the distance to the scatterer is inferred. The radial or line-of-sight velocity of the scatterers is determined from the Doppler frequency shift of the backscattered radiation. The DL uses a heterodyne detection technique in which the return signal is mixed with a reference laser beam (i.e., local oscillator) of known frequency. An onboard signal processing computer then determines the Doppler frequency shift from the spectra of the heterodyne signal. The energy content of the Doppler spectra can also be used to determine attenuated backscatter.

Newsom, RK

2012-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

5

Experimental deformation of natural and synthetic dolomite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural and hot isostatically pressed dolomite aggregates were experimentally deformed at effective pressures of Pe = 50 ?? 400 MPa, temperatures of 400 ?? 850??C, and strain rates of ?& = 1.2x10-4 s-1 to 1.2x10-7 s-1. Coarse- and fine-grained dolomite deformed at low temperature (T ? 700??C for coarse-grained natural dolomite, T < 700??C for fine-grained natural and synthetic dolomite) exhibit mechanical behavior that is nearly plastic; differential stresses are insensitive to strain rate, fitted either by a power law no?????????=??????31&& with n values that range from 12 to 49 or an exponential law ([31exp )] ??????=o&& with exponential law term ? values from 0.023 to 0.079 MPa-1. Microstructures of samples deformed at low temperatures include mechanical twins, and undulatory extinction suggesting that twin glide and dislocation slip are the predominant deformation mechanisms. At high temperatures (T ? 800??C) flow strengths of coarse- and fine-grained dolomite depend more strongly on strain-rate and exhibit pronounced temperature dependencies. Microstructures of coarse-grained dolomite samples deformed at T ? 800??C include undulatory extinction and fine recrystallized grains suggesting that recovery and dynamic recrystallization contribute to dislocation creep at these conditions. By comparison with lower temperature deformation, mechanical twinning is unimportant. Fine-grained synthetic dolomite deformed at high temperature (T ? 700??C) exhibits nearly linear (Newtonian) viscous behavior, with n = 1.28 (??0.15) consistent with grain boundary (Coble) diffusion creep. At low temperatures (T ? 700??C) coarse-grained dolomite exhibits higher strengths at higher temperatures which cannot be described by an Arrhenius relation, while fine-grained dolomite strengths show little or no temperature dependence. At high temperatures (T ? 800??C), dislocation creep of coarse-grained dolomite can be described by a thermally activated power law ??????????????????=RTHno*31exp??????&& with H*/n = 60 kJ/mol, or by an exponential law ()[]??????????=RTHo*31expexp?????&& with H*/? = 25447 kJ/mol. At high temperatures, diffusion creep of fine-grained synthetic dolomite can be described by ?????????????????????????=RTHdno*313exp??????&& with H* = 280 ??45 kJ/mol. Taken together, the flow laws for coarse- and fine-grained dolomites constrain the high temperature conditions over which crystal plasticity, dislocation creep, and diffusion creep dominate.

Davis, Nathan Ernest

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Wet-limestone scrubbing fundamentals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The article examines important concepts of wet-limestone scrubbing. It also addresses the topic of by-product disposal. 3 refs., 1 fig.

Buecker, B.

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

DL-36361 UC-414 I  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DL-36361 DL-36361 UC-414 I * Discovery of the Most Distant Supernovae and the Quest for L l Gerson Goldhaber and Saul Perlmutter Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and Center for Particle Astrophysics University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 Silvia Gabi, Ariel Goobar, Alex Kim, Mathew Kim, and Reynald Pain Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California Berkeley, CA 94720 Carl Pennypacker and Ivan Small Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and Space Sciences Laboratory University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 Brian Boyle, Richard Ellis, and Richard McMahon Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge, United Kingdom and Peter Bunclarlc, Dave Carter, and Roberto Terlevich Royal Greenwich Observatory, Cambridge, United Kingdom May 1994 T h i s work w a s supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098,

8

The Mississippian Leadville Limestone Exploration Play, Utah and Colorado-Exploration Techniques and Studies for Independents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mississippian (late Kinderhookian to early Meramecian) Leadville Limestone is a shallow, open-marine, carbonate-shelf deposit. The Leadville has produced over 53 million barrels (8.4 million m{sup 3}) of oil/condensate from seven fields in the Paradox fold and fault belt of the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. The environmentally sensitive, 7500-square-mile (19,400 km{sup 2}) area that makes up the fold and fault belt is relatively unexplored. Only independent producers operate and continue to hunt for Leadville oil targets in the region. The overall goal of this study is to assist these independents by (1) developing and demonstrating techniques and exploration methods never tried on the Leadville Limestone, (2) targeting areas for exploration, (3) increasing deliverability from new and old Leadville fields through detailed reservoir characterization, (4) reducing exploration costs and risk especially in environmentally sensitive areas, and (5) adding new oil discoveries and reserves. The final results will hopefully reduce exploration costs and risks, especially in environmentally sensitive areas, and add new oil discoveries and reserves. The study consists of three sections: (1) description of lithofacies and diagenetic history of the Leadville at Lisbon field, San Juan County, Utah, (2) methodology and results of a surface geochemical survey conducted over the Lisbon and Lightning Draw Southeast fields (and areas in between) and identification of oil-prone areas using epifluorescence in well cuttings from regional wells, and (3) determination of regional lithofacies, description of modern and outcrop depositional analogs, and estimation of potential oil migration directions (evaluating the middle Paleozoic hydrodynamic pressure regime and water chemistry). Leadville lithofacies at Libon field include open marine (crinoidal banks or shoals and Waulsortian-type buildups), oolitic and peloid shoals, and middle shelf. Rock units with open-marine and restricted-marine facies constitute a significant reservoir potential, having both effective porosity and permeability when dissolution of skeletal grains, followed by dolomitization, has occurred. Two major types of diagenetic dolomite are observed in the Leadville Limestone at Lisbon field: (1) tight 'early' dolomite consisting of very fine grained (100-250 {micro}m), rhombic and saddle crystals that discordantly replace limestone and earlier very fine grained dolomite. Predating or concomitant with late dolomite formation are pervasive leaching episodes that produced vugs and extensive microporosity. Most reservoir rocks within Lisbon field appear to be associated with the second, late type of dolomitization and associated leaching events. Other diagenetic products include pyrobitumen, syntaxial cement, sulfide minerals, anhydrite cement and replacement, and late macrocalcite. Fracturing (solution enlarged) and brecciation (autobrecciation) caused by hydrofracturing are widespread within Lisbon field. Sediment-filled cavities, related to karstification of the exposed Leadville, are present in the upper third of the formation. Pyrobitumen and sulfide minerals appear to coat most crystal faces of the rhombic and saddle dolomites. The fluid inclusion and mineral relationships suggest the following sequence of events: (1) dolomite precipitation, (2) anhydrite deposition, (3) anhydrite dissolution and quartz precipitation, (4) dolomite dissolution and late calcite precipitation, (5) trapping of a mobile oil phase, and (6) formation of bitumen. Fluid inclusions in calcite and dolomite display variable liquid to vapor ratios suggesting reequilibration at elevated temperatures (50 C). Fluid salinities exceed 10 weight percent NaCl equivalent. Low ice melting temperatures of quartz- and calcite-hosted inclusions suggest chemically complex Ca-Mg-bearing brines associated with evaporite deposits were responsible for mineral deposition. The overall conclusion from th

Thomas Chidsey

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

9

The Mississippian Leadville Limestone Exploration Play, Utah and Colorado-Exploration Techniques and Studies for Independents  

SciTech Connect

The Mississippian (late Kinderhookian to early Meramecian) Leadville Limestone is a shallow, open-marine, carbonate-shelf deposit. The Leadville has produced over 53 million barrels (8.4 million m{sup 3}) of oil/condensate from seven fields in the Paradox fold and fault belt of the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. The environmentally sensitive, 7500-square-mile (19,400 km{sup 2}) area that makes up the fold and fault belt is relatively unexplored. Only independent producers operate and continue to hunt for Leadville oil targets in the region. The overall goal of this study is to assist these independents by (1) developing and demonstrating techniques and exploration methods never tried on the Leadville Limestone, (2) targeting areas for exploration, (3) increasing deliverability from new and old Leadville fields through detailed reservoir characterization, (4) reducing exploration costs and risk especially in environmentally sensitive areas, and (5) adding new oil discoveries and reserves. The final results will hopefully reduce exploration costs and risks, especially in environmentally sensitive areas, and add new oil discoveries and reserves. The study consists of three sections: (1) description of lithofacies and diagenetic history of the Leadville at Lisbon field, San Juan County, Utah, (2) methodology and results of a surface geochemical survey conducted over the Lisbon and Lightning Draw Southeast fields (and areas in between) and identification of oil-prone areas using epifluorescence in well cuttings from regional wells, and (3) determination of regional lithofacies, description of modern and outcrop depositional analogs, and estimation of potential oil migration directions (evaluating the middle Paleozoic hydrodynamic pressure regime and water chemistry). Leadville lithofacies at Libon field include open marine (crinoidal banks or shoals and Waulsortian-type buildups), oolitic and peloid shoals, and middle shelf. Rock units with open-marine and restricted-marine facies constitute a significant reservoir potential, having both effective porosity and permeability when dissolution of skeletal grains, followed by dolomitization, has occurred. Two major types of diagenetic dolomite are observed in the Leadville Limestone at Lisbon field: (1) tight 'early' dolomite consisting of very fine grained (<5 {micro}m), interlocking crystals that faithfully preserve depositional fabrics; and (2) porous, coarser (>100-250 {micro}m), rhombic and saddle crystals that discordantly replace limestone and earlier very fine grained dolomite. Predating or concomitant with late dolomite formation are pervasive leaching episodes that produced vugs and extensive microporosity. Most reservoir rocks within Lisbon field appear to be associated with the second, late type of dolomitization and associated leaching events. Other diagenetic products include pyrobitumen, syntaxial cement, sulfide minerals, anhydrite cement and replacement, and late macrocalcite. Fracturing (solution enlarged) and brecciation (autobrecciation) caused by hydrofracturing are widespread within Lisbon field. Sediment-filled cavities, related to karstification of the exposed Leadville, are present in the upper third of the formation. Pyrobitumen and sulfide minerals appear to coat most crystal faces of the rhombic and saddle dolomites. The fluid inclusion and mineral relationships suggest the following sequence of events: (1) dolomite precipitation, (2) anhydrite deposition, (3) anhydrite dissolution and quartz precipitation, (4) dolomite dissolution and late calcite precipitation, (5) trapping of a mobile oil phase, and (6) formation of bitumen. Fluid inclusions in calcite and dolomite display variable liquid to vapor ratios suggesting reequilibration at elevated temperatures (50 C). Fluid salinities exceed 10 weight percent NaCl equivalent. Low ice melting temperatures of quartz- and calcite-hosted inclusions suggest chemically complex Ca-Mg-bearing brines associated with evaporite deposits were responsible for mineral deposition. The overall conclusion from th

Thomas Chidsey

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

10

The Fossils of Niagara Limestone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sights -- a mile wide and 300 feet deep. Niagara Limestone shows no trace of fishes or other backboned animals because these had not yet appeared on the earth at the time...

11

DL_POLY Molecular Simulation Package  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 8, 2008 ... DL_POLY is a general purpose serial and parallel molecular dynamics simulation package developed at Daresbury Laboratory by W. Smith,...

12

Data repair of inconsistent DL-programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonmonotonic Description Logic (DL) programs support rule-based reasoning on top of Description Logic ontologies, using a well-defined query interface. However, the interaction of the rules and the ontology may cause inconsistency such that no answer ...

Thomas Eiter, Michael Fink, Daria Stepanova

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

ITP Mining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Mining Industry: Chapter 9: Limestone and Crushed Rock  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 Limestone and Crushed Rock Crushed rock is one of the most accessible natural resources and a major basic raw material. It is used in construction, agriculture, and other industries using complex chemical and metallurgical processes. Despite the low value of its basic products, the crushed rock industry is a major contributor to and an indicator of the economic well being of the nation. Forms Of Crushed Rock About three-quarters of the crushed stone production is limestone and dolomite, followed by, in descending order of tonnage: granite, traprock, sandstone and quartzite, miscellaneous stone, marble, slate, calcareous marl, shell, volcanic cinder and scoria. Limestone, one of the largest produced crushed rock, is a sedimentary rock composed

14

Compression wave studies in Blair dolomite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dynamic compression wave studies have been conducted on Blair dolomite in the stress range of 0-7.0 GPa. Impact techniques were used to generate stress impulse input functions, and diffuse surface laser interferometry provided the dynamic instrumentation. Experimental particle velocity profiles obtained by this method were coupled with the conservation laws of mass and momentum to determine the stress-strain and stress-modulus constitutive properties of the material. Comparison between dynamic and quasistatic uniaxial stress-strain curves uncovered significant differences. Energy dissipated in a complete load and unload cycle differed by almost an order of magnitude and the longitudinal moduli differed by as much as a factor of two. Blair dolomite was observed to yield under dynamic loading at 2.5 GPa. Below 2.5 GPa the loading waves had a finite risetime and exhibited steady propagation. A finite linear viscoelastic constitutive model satisfactorily predicted the observed wave propagation. We speculate that dynamic properties of preexisting cracks provides a physical mechanism for both the rate dependent steady wave behavior and the difference between dynamic and quasistatic response.

Grady, D.E.; Hollenbach, R.E.; Schuler, K.W.; Callender, J.F.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Dolomite III: A new candidate lower mantle carbonate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dolomite is a major constituent of subducted carbonates; therefore evaluation of its phase stability and equation of state at high pressures and temperatures is important for understanding the deep Earth carbon cycle. X-ray diffraction experiments in the diamond anvil cell show that Ca{sub 0.988}Mg{sub 0.918}Fe{sub 0.078}Mn{sub 0.016}(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} dolomite transforms to dolomite-II at {approx}17 GPa and 300 K and then upon laser-heating transforms to a new monoclinic phase (dolomite-III), that is observed between 36 and 83 GPa. Both high-pressure polymorphs are stable up to 1500 K, indicating that addition of minor Fe stabilizes dolomite to Earth's deep-mantle conditions.

Mao, Zhu; Armentrout, Matt; Rainey, Emma; Manning, Craig E.; Dera, Przemyslaw; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Kavner, Abby (UCLA); (UC)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

16

Summary of Research through Phase II/Year 2 of Initially Approved 3 Phase/3 Year Project - Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin  

SciTech Connect

This final scientific/technical report covers the first 2 years (Phases I and II of an originally planned 3 Year/3 Phase program). The project was focused on evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin. The characterization of select dolomite reservoirs was the major focus of our efforts in Phases I and II of the project. Structural mapping and log analysis in the Dundee (Devonian) and Trenton/Black River (Ordovician) suggest a close spatial relationship among gross dolomite distribution and regional-scale, wrench fault-related NW-SE and NE-SW structural trends. A high temperature origin for much of the dolomite in these 2 studied intervals (based upon fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and stable isotopic analyses,) coupled with persistent association of this dolomite in reservoirs coincident with wrench fault-related features, is strong evidence for these reservoirs being influenced by hydrothermal dolomitization. In the Niagaran (Silurian), there is a general trend of increasing dolomitization shelfward, with limestone predominant in more basinward positions. A major finding is that facies types, when analyzed at a detailed level, are directly related to reservoir porosity and permeability in these dolomites which increases the predictability of reservoir quality in these units. This pattern is consistent with our original hypothesis of primary facies control on dolomitization and resulting reservoir quality at some level. The identification of distinct and predictable vertical stacking patterns within a hierarchical sequence and cycle framework provides a high degree of confidence at this point that the results should be exportable throughout the basin. Much of the data synthesis and modeling for the project was scheduled to be part of Year 3/Phase III, but the discontinuation of funding after Year 2 precluded those efforts. Therefore, the results presented in this document are not final, and in many cases represent a report of 'progress to date' as numerous tasks were scheduled to extend into Year 3.

G. Grammer

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

17

New Limestone-Gypsum Flue Gas Desulfuization Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new wet FGD processes which SO2 was absorbed in the spray tower using granular limestone simultaneously adding acetic acid had been proposed. The main difference compared to conventional wet FGD process was to utilize granular limestone directly as ... Keywords: new wet FGD, bubbling reactor, granular limestone, acetic acid, SO2

Sheng-yu Liu; Bin Qu; Jin Gao; Jian-ying Liu; Zhi-xiang Ye; Cheng-hua Xu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Limestone, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Limestone, Oklahoma: Energy Resources Limestone, Oklahoma: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.3159295°, -95.7491501° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.3159295,"lon":-95.7491501,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

19

CO2 MITIGATION VIA ACCELERATED LIMESTONE WEATHERING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The climate and environmental impacts of our current, carbon-intensive energy usage demands that effective and practical energy alternatives and CO2 mitigation strategies be found. As part of this effort, various means of capturing and storing CO2 generated from fossil-fuel-based energy production are being investigated. One of the proposed methods involves a geochemistry-based capture and sequestration process that hydrates point-source, waste CO2 with water to produce a carbonic acid solution. This in turn is reacted and neutralized with limestone, thus converting the original CO2 gas to calcium bicarbonate in solution, the overall reaction being:

Rau, G H; Knauss, K G; Langer, W H; Caldeira, K G

2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

20

Laboratory Investigations in Support of Carbon Dioxide-Limestone...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MA 01854 617-253-6595 eeadams@mit.edu Laboratory InvestIgatIons In support of Carbon DIoxIDe-LImestone sequestratIon In the oCean Background Many approaches have been proposed...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dl dolomitic limestone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Limestone and Ash Storage Silos and Lime Preparation Equipment, Part  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Limestone and Ash Storage Silos and Lime Preparation Equipment, Part Limestone and Ash Storage Silos and Lime Preparation Equipment, Part of the System to Inject Limestone Sorbent for SO, Control. Nucla, CO Nucla...continued Before being repowered, the plant consisted of three 12 MWe coal stoker- fired units built in 1959, which were taken out of service in 1984 due to low efficiency and high fuel cost. Antici- pating a need for additional power in the early 1990s. and after review of many power generation alternatives, CUEA started constmction of the re- powered Nucla CFB plant in Novem- ber 1984 and completed the project in May 1987. The original boilers were replaced with a new Fympower Corp. CFB bailer, a new high pressure 74 MWe steam turbine generator was installed, the three original 12 MWe steam turbines were

22

Evaluation of the Impact of Limestone on Gypsum Crystal Habit in Wet FGD Scrubbers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes the results of a laboratory program focused on determining what key limestone components are responsible for impacting wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproduct gypsum properties. Tests were conducted using several commercial limestone samples for which documented full-scale limestone forced oxidation wet FGD operating experience exists. These include limestone samples known to produce FGD gypsum with both good and poor crystallization ...

2012-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

23

Dolomitization and dedolomitization models in a fractured reservoir, Reed City oil field, Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon production in the Michigan basin is essentially from pinnacle reefs or fractured reservoirs. The epigenetically formed porous dolomite reservoir rock is intimately related to the shear faults (channelways for rising high Mg/Ca ratio fluids) and to the resulting shear folds, the latter showing dolomite/calcite ratios increasing generally from outer closure to the fold axes. The Reed City field (anticline) of western Michigan represents a dramatic exception to this picture with the dolomite/calcite ratio increasing from outer closure to maximum part way up the limbs then decreasing to the axis. This lowest zone is the only unit not dedolomitized, a fact perhaps commensurate with its low stratigraphic position at the bottom of (and apparently beyond the reach of) the descending high-calcium, low-magnesium waters what brought about the dedolomitization. The dedolomitization model would call for a shallow water to exposed oxidizing environment, possible with the position of this area astride the West Michigan Barrier that separates a lagoonal facies from a more open sea facies to the east. Thus, waters with a high Ca/Mg ratio passed down the same shear faults that earlier were channelways for the rising high Mg/Ca ratio waters. On the bases of isopach, structure and dolomite/calcite (Isodol) maps, one can piece together a reasonably chronological sequence of pre-Dundee shear faulting and folding, post-Traverse upward migration of dolomitizing fluids, upward migration of hydrocarbons along the shear faults, downward-moving dedolomitizing fluids, and a later episode of faulting (especially shear cross-faults).

Carlton, R.R.; Prouty, C.E.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Modified dry limestone process for control of sulfur dioxide emissions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for removing sulfur oxides from flue gas comprise cooling and conditioning the hot flue gas to increase the degree of water vapor saturation prior to passage through a bed of substantially dry carbonate chips or lumps, e.g., crushed limestone. The reaction products form as a thick layer of sulfites and sulfates on the surface of the chips which is easily removed by agitation to restore the reactive surface of the chips.

Shale, Correll C. (Morgantown, WV); Cross, William G. (Morgantown, WV)

1976-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

25

Modified Murnaghan equation of state applied to shock compression of silica, basalt, and dolomite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An equation of state previously used by the author is developed further and applied to geologic media. The equation is of the same form as the Murnaghan equation of state, but with the elastic constant terms replaced by the cohesive energy density (internal pressure), and the exponential term given as a sum of the Gruneisen parameter and the gaseous adiabatic exponent. Data for shock compression of silica, basalt, and dolomite are analyzed according to the equation.

Rogers, L.A.

1965-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

26

DOE/SC-ARM-13-003 ARM Lead Mentor Selection Process DL Sisterson  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 ARM Lead Mentor Selection Process DL Sisterson March 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States...

27

Mercury Control Demonstration Projects Cover Photos: * Top: Limestone Power Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 FEBRUARY 2008 6 FEBRUARY 2008 Mercury Control Demonstration Projects Cover Photos: * Top: Limestone Power Plant * Bottom left: AES Greenidge Power Plant * Bottom right: Presque Isle Power Plant A report on three projects conducted under separate cooperative agreements between the U.S. Department of Energy and: * Consol Energy * Pegasus Technologies * We Energies  Mercury Control Demonstration Projects Executive Summary ............................................................................ 4 Background ......................................................................................... 5 Mercury Removal Projects ................................................................ 7 TOXECON(tm) Retrofit For Mercury and Multi-Pollutant Control on Three 90-MW Coal-Fired Boilers ........................................7

28

Prediction of compressive and tensile strength of limestone via genetic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate determination of compressive and tensile strength of limestone is an important subject for the design of geotechnical structures. Although there are several classical approaches in the literature for strength prediction their predictive accuracy ... Keywords: Genetic programming, Limestone, Prediction, Strength of materials

Adil Baykaso?lu; Hamza Gll; Hanifi anak?; Lale zbak?r

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Interpretations of Tracer Tests Performed in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site  

SciTech Connect

This report provides (1) an overview of all tracer testing conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WPP) site, (2) a detailed description of the important information about the 1995-96 tracer tests and the current interpretations of the data, and (3) a summary of the knowledge gained to date through tracer testing in the Culebra. Tracer tests have been used to identify transport processes occurring within the Culebra and quantify relevant parameters for use in performance assessment of the WIPP. The data, especially those from the tests performed in 1995-96, provide valuable insight into transport processes within the Culebra. Interpretations of the tracer tests in combination with geologic information, hydraulic-test information, and laboratory studies have resulted in a greatly improved conceptual model of transport processes within the Culebra. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is low (< 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a single-porosity medium in which advection occurs largely through the primary porosity of the dolomite matrix. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is high (> 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a heterogeneous, layered, fractured medium in which advection occurs largely through fractures and solutes diffuse between fractures and matrix at multiple rates. The variations in diffusion rate can be attributed to both variations in fracture spacing (or the spacing of advective pathways) and matrix heterogeneity. Flow and transport appear to be concentrated in the lower Culebra. At all locations, diffusion is the dominant transport process in the portions of the matrix that tracer does not access by flow.

MEIGS,LUCY C.; BEAUHEIM,RICHARD L.; JONES,TOYA L.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Minimum Temperatures, Diurnal Temperature Ranges, and Temperature Inversions in Limestone Sinkholes of Different Sizes and Shapes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air temperature data from five enclosed limestone sinkholes of various sizes and shapes on the Hetzkogel Plateau near Lunz, Austria (1300 m MSL), have been analyzed to determine the effect of sinkhole geometry on temperature minima, diurnal ...

C. D. Whiteman; T. Haiden; B. Pospichal; S. Eisenbach; R. Steinacker

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

u.s. Dl1PARUIFNT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dl1PARUIFNT OF ENERGY Dl1PARUIFNT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION Page I of2 STATE: TX RECIPIENT:E1 Paso, TX PROJECT PV Solar Demonstration Project ARRA-EECBG-City of EI Paso, TX TITLE: Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-OOOOO13 DE-EEOOOO964 GFQ-0000964-OO3 G0964 Based on my review orlhe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authoriJ'£d under DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the rollowing determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.16 Solar photovoltalc systems The installation, modification, operation, and removal of commercially available solar pholovoltaic systems located on a building or other structure (such as rooftop, parking lot or facility, and mounted to

32

Optimization of Trona/Limestone Injection for SO2 Control in Coal-Fired Boilers  

SciTech Connect

Mobotec USA develops and markets air pollution control systems for utility boilers and other combustion systems. They have a particular interest in technologies that can reduce NOx, SOx, and mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers, and have been investigating the injection of sorbents such as limestone and trona into a boiler to reduce SOx and Hg emissions. WRI proposed to use the Combustion Test Facility (CTF) to enable Mobotec to conduct a thorough evaluation of limestone and trona injection for SO{sub 2} control. The overall goal of the project was to characterize the SO{sub 2} reductions resulting from the injection of limestone and trona into the CTF when fired with a high-sulfur eastern bituminous coal used in one of Mobotec's Midwest installations. Results revealed that when limestone was injected at Ca:S molar ratios of 1.5 to 3.0, the resulting SO{sub 2} reductions were 35-55%. It is believed that further reductions can be attained with improved mixing of the sorbent with the combustion gases. When limestone was added to the coal, at Ca:S molar ratios of 0.5 to 1.5, the SO{sub 2} reductions were 13-21%. The lower reductions were attributed to dead-burning of the sorbent in the high temperature flame zone. In cases where limestone was both injected into the furnace and added to the coal, the total SO{sub 2} reductions for a given Ca:S molar ratio were similar to the reductions for furnace injection only. The injection of trona into the mid-furnace zone, for Na:S molar ratios of 1.4 to 2.4, resulted in SO{sub 2} reductions of 29-43%. Limestone injection did not produce any slag deposits on an ash deposition probe while trona injection resulted in noticeable slag deposition.

None

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Interpretations of Tracer Tests Performed in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides (1) an overview of all tracer testing conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WPP) site, (2) a detailed description of the important information about the 1995-96 tracer tests and the current interpretations of the data, and (3) a summary of the knowledge gained to date through tracer testing in the Culebra. Tracer tests have been used to identify transport processes occurring within the Culebra and quantify relevant parameters for use in performance assessment of the WIPP. The data, especially those from the tests performed in 1995-96, provide valuable insight into transport processes within the Culebra. Interpretations of the tracer tests in combination with geologic information, hydraulic-test information, and laboratory studies have resulted in a greatly improved conceptual model of transport processes within the Culebra. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is low ( 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a heterogeneous, layered, fractured medium in which advection occurs largely through fractures and solutes diffuse between fractures and matrix at multiple rates. The variations in diffusion rate can be attributed to both variations in fracture spacing (or the spacing of advective pathways) and matrix heterogeneity. Flow and transport appear to be concentrated in the lower Culebra. At all locations, diffusion is the dominant transport process in the portions of the matrix that tracer does not access by flow.

MEIGS,LUCY C.; BEAUHEIM,RICHARD L.; JONES,TOYA L.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Laboratory column experiments for radionuclide adsorption studies of the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation  

SciTech Connect

Radionuclide transport experiments were carried out using intact cores obtained from the Culebra member of the Rustler Formation inside the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Air Intake Shaft. Twenty-seven separate tests are reported here and include experiments with {sup 3}H, {sup 22}Na, {sup 241}Am, {sup 239}Np, {sup 228}Th, {sup 232}U and {sup 241}Pu, and two brine types, AIS and ERDA 6. The {sup 3}H was bound as water and provides a measure of advection, dispersion, and water self-diffusion. The other tracers were injected as dissolved ions at concentrations below solubility limits, except for americium. The objective of the intact rock column flow experiments is to demonstrate and quantify transport retardation coefficients, (R) for the actinides Pu, Am, U, Th and Np, in intact core samples of the Culebra Dolomite. The measured R values are used to estimate partition coefficients, (kd) for the solute species. Those kd values may be compared to values obtained from empirical and mechanistic adsorption batch experiments, to provide predictions of actinide retardation in the Culebra. Three parameters that may influence actinide R values were varied in the experiments; core, brine and flow rate. Testing five separate core samples from four different core borings provided an indication of sample variability. While most testing was performed with Culebra brine, limited tests were carried out with a Salado brine to evaluate the effect of intrusion of those lower waters. Varying flow rate provided an indication of rate dependent solute interactions such as sorption kinetics.

Lucero, D.A.; Heath, C.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brown, G.O. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States). Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering Dept.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

x?? =J*A**?w7?DL??FADm*?!,*?Kha V*x**+1? ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

x???=J*A**?w7?DL??FADm*?!,*?Kha V*x**+1?*?C??6M*? ?o~֥e?/*??a?*9?*u????? ?^??I;)N. ...

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

36

Reducing Energy-Related CO2 Emissions Using Accelerated Limestone Weathering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Following earlier descriptions, the use and impacts of accelerated weathering of limestone AWL; reaction: CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O + CaCO{sub 3} {yields} Ca{sup 2+} + 2(HCO{sub 3}{sup -}) as a CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration method is further explored. Since ready access to the ocean is likely an essential requirement for AWL, it is shown that significant limestone resources are relatively close to a majority of CO{sub 2}-emitting power plants along the coastal US. Furthermore, waste fines, representing more than 20% of current US crushed limestone production (>10{sup 9} tonnes/yr), could be used in many instances as an inexpensive or free source of AWL carbonate. With limestone transportation to coastal sites then as the dominant cost variable, CO{sub 2} sequestration (plus capture) costs of $3-$4/tonne are achievable in certain locations. While there is vastly more limestone and water on earth than that required for AWL to capture and sequester all fossil fuel CO{sub 2} production, the transportation cost of bringing limestone, seawater, and waste CO{sub 2} into contact likely limits the method's applicability to perhaps 10-20% of US point-source emissions. Using a bench-scale laboratory reactor, it is shown that CO{sub 2} sequestration rates of 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -5} moles/sec per m{sup 2} of limestone surface area are readily achievable using seawater. This translates into reaction densities as high as 2 x 10{sup -2} tonnes CO{sub 2} m{sup -3}day{sup -1}, highly dependent on limestone particle size, solution turbulence and flow, and CO{sub 2} concentration. Modeling of AWL end-solution disposal in the ocean shows significantly reduced effects on ocean pH and carbonate chemistry relative to those caused by direct CO{sub 2} disposal into the atmosphere or ocean. In fact the increase in ocean Ca{sup 2+} and bicarbonate offered by AWL should significantly enhance the growth of corals and other marine calcifiers whose health is currently being threatened by anthropogenic CO{sub 2} invasion and pH reduction in the ocean.

Rau, G H; Knauss, K G; Langer, W H; Caldeira, K

2004-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

37

Alternative method for producing organic fertiliser from anaerobic digestion liquor and limestone powder: High shear Wet Granulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? ? ??? ? ?? Alternative method for producing organic fertiliser from anaerobic digestion liquor.M. Walker, Alternative method for producing organic fertiliser from anaerobic digestion liquor and limestone method for producing organic fertiliser from Anaerobic Digestion liquor and limestone powder: High Shear

Paxton, Anthony T.

38

U.S. Dl1PARl'MENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AG EMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

r-.u..~ r-.u..~ , U.S. Dl1PARl'MENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AG EMENT CENTER NEPA DEl'ElU.,nNAl'ION RECIPIENT:WA Dept. of Commerce PROJECT TITLE: Washington State Ferries Biodiesel Project· Phase II Page 1 of3 STATE: WA Funding Opportunity Announcement Number ProcuR'mentlnstrument Number NEPA Control Number em Number DE-FOA-OOOOO52 EEOOOO139 GF0-0000139-039 EE139 Based on my review orlhe Information concerning the propostd action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 45I.1A), I have made tbe rollowing determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: B5.22 Alternative fuel vehicle fueling stations The installation, modification, operation, and removal of alternative fuel vehicle fueling stations (such as for compressed

39

ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH Al\rD SAFETY DlVlSlON  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

em IVIL, u-3 em IVIL, u-3 1' 1L, I -' I ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH Al\rD SAFETY DlVlSlON 1956 1. H.# fL22 Industrial Hygiene or Medical Dept. Sample Nor& 3 Date Collected- 5117 by --Route to CES CES r Location IQJKER-PEMJNS Co- Type of Sample-waternalyzed for F Alpha Remarks -&I GG -- u - Beta Samples of water discharged to river during Steam clean- No, Ra ing of equipment. Oil PH Be Th Sample No. Hour Sample Description (RT Please analyze for gm/U/gal. BP-1 P- RO-Kneader BP-2 K- N-Kneader BP-3 Omera Feeder - __-- .___ -- i ___- ------I - 1 I . ----.--- - ------ .-___ _- I I - 3" - 1 ' : i ' Nt! w-d Analytical Chemistry Section: - Date Received 5-21-56 bY %b. Date Reported 5-2 Z-56 by&b. Method of Analysis Fluorimeter

40

EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CDITER Nl!PA Dl!Tl!Rl\llNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

... ... ~ . u.s DEPAR lENT OFl!NERG' EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CDITER Nl!PA Dl!Tl!Rl\llNATION Page 1 of2 RECIPIENT:Stanford University STATE: CA PROJECf TITLE: In·Situ X·Ray Analysis of Rapid Thermal Processing for Thin·FiI Solar Cells: Closing the Gap between Production and Laboratory Efficiency Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE·FOA-0000654 Procurement Instrument Number DE·EE0005951 NEPA Control Number em Number GFQ-0005951·001 G05951 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4SI.IA), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APP~:NDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering, analysis, and dissemination 81.31 Installation or

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dl dolomitic limestone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Dl!PARThlENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT \1A~AGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

~"'-'~' ~"'-'~' u.s. Dl!PARThlENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT \1A~AGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETEIU.llNATION Page 1 of2 REel PIENT:County of Somerset STATE: NJ PROJECT TITl.E : Somerset County Renewable Energy Initiative Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-EEOOO3199 GFOOOO3199-001 G03199 BaSC'd on my review o!tbe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officrr (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following detenninatioo: ex, EA, [IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.16 Solar photovoltaic systems The installation, modification , operation, and removal of commercially available solar photoyoltaic systems located on a building or other structure (such as rooftop. parking lot Of facility

42

A Novel Treatment for Acid Mine Drainage Utilizing Reclaimed Limestone Residual  

SciTech Connect

The viability of utilizing Reclaimed Limestone Residual (RLR) to remediate Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) was investigated. Physical and chemical characterization of RLR showed that it is composed of various minerals that contain significant quantities of limestone or calcium bearing compounds that can be exploited for acid neutralization. Acid Neutralization Potential (ANP) test results showed that RLR has a neutralization potential of approximately 83% as calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}). Neutralization tests with most of the heavy metals associated with AMD showed removal efficiencies of over 99%. An unexpected benefit of utilizing RLR was the removal of hexavalent chromium Cr (VI) from the aqueous phase. Due to an elevation in pH by RLR most AMD heavy metals are removed from solution by precipitation as their metal hydroxides. Cr (VI) however is not removed by pH elevation and therefore subsequent ongoing tests to elucidate the mechanism responsible for this reaction were conducted.

Horace K. Moo-Young; Charles E. Ochola

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

New microtextural criterion for differentiation of compaction and early cementation in fine-grained limestones  

SciTech Connect

Mechanisms of porosity reduction in fine-grained limestones (micrites), the most abundant type of limestone, have been difficult to evaluate because of the fine crystal sizes. Scanning electron microscopy reveals common minute voids termed microfenestrae ({approximately} 1.5-40{mu}m diameter) in Holocene lime muds from all marine carbonate environments studied. Experimental compaction of lime muds greatly reduces abundance of microfenestrae at pressures less than 10 bar. Thus, the abundance of cement-filled microfenestrae in micrites appears to be a widely applicable criterion for recognition of the extent of cementation prior to significant compaction in any given micrite. Microfenestrae in most Phanerozoic micrites studied are about as common as in Holocene lime muds, suggesting that early cementation is a more important mechanism in micrite porosity reduction than recent views have suggested.

Lasemi, Z.; Boardman, M.R. (Miami Univ., Oxford OH (USA)); Sandberg, P.A. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Molecular dynamics in a grid computing environment: experiences using DL_POLY_3 within the eMinerals escience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular dynamics in a grid computing environment: experiences using DL_POLY_3 within the e how molecular-scale simulations can be performed using grid computing. The potential for running many gained by the UK eMinerals project [1] in developing grid computing methods for molecular simulations

Cambridge, University of

45

Characterisation of hydraulic fractures in limestones using X-ray microtomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic tension fractures were produced in porous limestones using a specially designed hydraulic cell. The 3D geometry of the samples was imaged using X-ray computed microtomography before and after fracturation. Using these data, it was possible to estimate the permeability tensor of the core samples, extract the path of the rupture and compare it to the heterogeneities initially present in the rock.

Renard, Francois; Desrues, Jacques; Plougonven, Erwan; Ougier-Simonin, Audrey

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH AhD SAFETY DlVlSlDN  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH AhD SAFETY DlVlSlDN I -. . Industrial Hygiene or Medical Dept. 1956 I. H.# 984 Sample Nos. l2 Date Collected- o/2g by&- Route to J" Location SSi4.X CUiTn! CXJitP. Type of Sample&-dust Analyzed for F Alpha x Remarks P~UXC~JGIi.' ON. 14lCI11~ U Beta - IIoll0Wi.n~ slucs - NO, Ra Oil PH Be Th Sample No. 7573p Hour Sample Description 1355 CZ Orxxator sets slul: into place, closes shield over machine S starts &ill. oil coolant flows through hollow drill ____ 3 is rebounded back through an openiq covers 1 cor.lp N9 8775 Analytical Chemistry Section: Date Received 7-2-66 by hb Date Reported 74X& bY IIR Method of Analysis Alpha sdntillation cam 2 % ' CJly Counting Data: BKGD .27 c/min GE0 4o% /min 1 I c- d/ill/M 3

47

DEPXRTMEKT OF ENV]RO~:MENTAL F'ROTECTION DlVklOh OF  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

. * . * @.+<, .-- v 7, -e -5 u i' ;. - - : ,.:,, 4-.1M-4. a". : ' - l-1 &dp d 3-m 3jPr5Py DEPXRTMEKT OF ENV]RO~:MENTAL F'ROTECTION DlVklOh OF ~NVIR0N~Eh~A.L OUR' tiIn - . BUREAU OF R&DllmcN t=ROTE~lOH ' 1 ,_ jBD 5cOTCH ROAD. ~R~%~obi. fd. 1. 08628 .' - ._ -_ _ . . : S=_srterrjer 27, 1977 - ,. _ :.- ,_..I \ L . x=- a-. JEC): f' eust C--l L-9 ,c:c- -*r 2ze E&f&y _3=iz=Et=g cr;i\' ==Siq ' ---res"LE;, c2iiIps - de- ~-z7~~to3, Bew --d Jersey DE540 3ez' -- . w- Tecsk: i 25, 1577, A&=!= --t' -jD,r= of

48

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER N1!PA Dl!1'ElU.llNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

N1!PA Dl!1'ElU.llNATION N1!PA Dl!1'ElU.llNATION RECIPIENT:City of Perth Amboy PROJECT TITLE : Municipal Complex Solar Power Project Page 1 of2 STATE: NJ Funding Opportunity Announl::ement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number elD Number Congressionally Directed Project DE· EEOOO3172 GF0-0003172..Q01 EE3172 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as N[PA Compliance Officer (authoro.ed under DOE Order451.1A),1 have made tbe following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 8 5.1 Adions to oonserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentratIOns of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

49

Pilot-plant technical assessment of wet flue gas desulfurization using limestone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study was performed on a countercurrent pilot-scale packed scrubber for wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD). The flow rate of the treated flue gas was around 300 Nm{sup 3}/h, so the pilot-plant capacity is one of the largest with respect to other published studies on a pilot-plant wet FGD. The tests were carried out at an SO{sub 2} inlet concentration of 2000 ppm by changing the recycle slurry pH to around 4.8 and the L/G ratio to between 7.5 and 15. Three types of limestone were tested, obtaining desulfurization efficiencies from 59 to 99%. We show the importance of choosing an appropriate limestone in order to get a better performance from the FGD plant. Thus, it is important to know the reactivity (on a laboratory scale) and the sorbent utilization (on a pilot-plant scale) in order to identify if a limestone is reactive enough and to compare it with another type. In addition, by using the transfer-unit concept, a function has been obtained for the desulfurization efficiency, using the L/G ratio and the recycle slurry pH as independent variables. The Ca/S molar ratio is related to these and to the SO{sub 2} removal efficiency. This function, together with a simplified function of the operation variable cost, allows us to determine the pair (L/G ratio and pH) to achieve the desired SO{sub 2} removal with the minimum operation cost. Finally, the variable operation costs between packed towers and spray scrubbers have been compared, using as a basis the pilot packed tower and the industrial spray column at the Compostilla Power Station's FGD plant (in Leon, Spain).

Ortiz, F.J.G.; Vidal, F.; Ollero, P.; Salvador, L.; Cortes, V.; Gimenez, A. [University of Seville, Seville (Spain)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin  

SciTech Connect

This topical report covers the year 2 of the subject 3-year grant, evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin (Ordovician Trenton-Black River Formations; Silurian Niagara Group; and the Devonian Dundee Formation). The characterization of select dolomite reservoirs has been the major focus of our efforts in Phase II/Year 2. Fields have been prioritized based upon the availability of rock data for interpretation of depositional environments, fracture density and distribution as well as thin section, geochemical, and petrophysical analyses. Structural mapping and log analysis in the Dundee (Devonian) and Trenton/Black River (Ordovician) suggest a close spatial relationship among gross dolomite distribution and regional-scale, wrench fault related NW-SE and NE-SW structural trends. A high temperature origin for much of the dolomite in the 3 studied intervals (based upon initial fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and stable isotopic analyses,) coupled with persistent association of this dolomite in reservoirs coincident with wrench fault-related features, is strong evidence for these reservoirs being influenced by hydrothermal dolomitization. For the Niagaran (Silurian), a comprehensive high resolution sequence stratigraphic framework has been developed for a pinnacle reef in the northern reef trend where we had 100% core coverage throughout the reef section. Major findings to date are that facies types, when analyzed at a detailed level, have direct links to reservoir porosity and permeability in these dolomites. This pattern is consistent with our original hypothesis of primary facies control on dolomitization and resulting reservoir quality at some level. The identification of distinct and predictable vertical stacking patterns within a hierarchical sequence and cycle framework provides a high degree of confidence at this point that results will be exportable throughout the basin. Ten petrophysically significant facies have been described in the northern reef trend, providing significantly more resolution than the standard 4-6 that are used most often in the basin (e.g. Gill, 1977). Initial petrophysical characterization (sonic velocity analysis under confining pressures) shows a clear pattern that is dependent upon facies and resulting pore architecture. Primary facies is a key factor in the ultimate diagenetic modification of the rock and the resulting pore architecture. Facies with good porosity and permeability clearly show relatively slow velocity values as would be expected, and low porosity and permeability samples exhibit fast sonic velocity values, again as expected. What is significant is that some facies that have high porosity values, either measured directly or from wireline logs, also have very fast sonic velocity values. This is due to these facies having a pore architecture characterized by more localized pores (vugs, molds or fractures) that are not in communication.

G. Michael Grammer

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

51

Method of activating limestone for enhanced capture of sulfur from post combustion gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Calcium based sulfur sorbent is prepared in a highly reactive form for use in removing gaseous sulfur species from coal combustion gases by heating finely divided limestone particles at a temperature of at least 2,000 K for a period of 5 to 50 milliseconds and quenching the particles by bringing them to a temperature below 1,400 K before they become sintered. For application to a coal combustion system, the quenching step may be carried out in the post coal combustion zone along with the reaction of the particles with sulfur. The initial heating step is performed outside of the zone because of the high temperatures required in that step, which would result in decomposition of the calcium-sulfur product.

Abichandan, J.S.; Holcombe, N.T.; Litka, A.F.; Woodroffe, J.A.

1991-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

52

Model predictive control of a wet limestone flue gas desulfurization pilot plant  

SciTech Connect

A model predictive control (MPC) strategy based on a dynamic matrix (DMC) is designed and applied to a wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (WLFGD) pilot plant to evaluate what enhancement in control performance can be achieved with respect to a conventional decentralized feedback control strategy. The results reveal that MPC can significantly improve both reference tracking and disturbance rejection. For disturbance rejection, the main control objective in WLFGD plants, selection of tuning parameters and sample time, is of paramount importance due to the fast effect of the main disturbance (inlet SO{sub 2} load to the absorber) on the most important controlled variable (outlet flue gas SO{sub 2} concentration). The proposed MPC strategy can be easily applied to full-scale WLFGD plants.

Perales, A.L.V.; Ollero, P.; Ortiz, F.J.G.; Gomez-Barea, A. [University of Seville, Seville (Spain). Dept. of Chemical & Environmental Engineering

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

Controllability analysis and decentralized control of a wet limestone flue gas desulfurization plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presently, decentralized feedback control is the only control strategy used in wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (WLFGD) plants. Proper tuning of this control strategy is becoming an important issue in WLFGD plants because more stringent SO{sub 2} regulations have come into force recently. Controllability analysis is a highly valuable tool for proper design of control systems, but it has not been applied to WLFGD plants so far. In this paper a decentralized control strategy is designed and applied to a WLFGD pilot plant taking into account the conclusions of a controllability analysis. The results reveal that good SO{sub 2} control in WLFGD plants can be achieved mainly because the main disturbance of the process is well-aligned with the plant and interactions between control loops are beneficial to SO{sub 2} control.

Perales, A.L.V.; Ortiz, F.J.G.; Ollero, P.; Gil, F.M. [University of Seville, Seville (Spain)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Facies development and porosity relationships in Dundee Limestone of Gladwin County, Michigan  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian of the Michigan basin was a time of transgressive seas and extensive carbonate deposition, including coral and stromatoporoid buildups. Deposited during the Middle Devonian, the Dundee Limestone represents deposition in subtidal, intertidal, and restricted environments. The Buckeye oil field, located in south-central Gladwin County, is a combined stratigraphic and structural carbonate trap that produces from a series of intertonguing patch reefs, fringing sand bodies, and intertidal island fenestral zones. The major reef-building organisms include stromatoporoids, corals, calcareous algae, brachiopods, and crinoids, with the stromatoporoids providing the major framework. The patch-reef facies is composed of massive stromatoporoid boundstones that contain primary intraparticle porosity. The fringing grainstone sands are composed of coarse crinoid and brachiopod skeletal debris that have interparticle porosity. The intertidal island zone found in the North Buckeye field is represented by a pelletal packstone that has abundant fenestral porosity.

Montgomery, E.L.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Limestone treatment for sulfur dioxide removal. (Latest citations from the EI compendex*plus database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of limestone for the control of sulfur dioxide emmisions in flue gases. The various designs for flue gas desulfurization are discussed, including dry fluidized beds and wet scrubbers. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

U.S. DEPARTIl1ENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA Dl!TFR1ITNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENT OF ENERGY ENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA Dl!TFR1ITNATION RECIPIENT:Colorado School of Mines Page 1 on STATE: CO PROJECT TITLE: Time-lapse Joint Inversion of GEOphysical Data and its Application to Geothermal Prospecting GEODE Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DOE DE-FOA-OOOO522 Procurement Instrument Number OE-EEOOO5513 NEPA Control Number em Number GFO-o005513-Q01 0 Based on my review ofthe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA), 1 have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 1nformation ga thering, a nalysis, a nd d issem ination Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visils, and audits), data analysis

57

PMC·Fr.. U.S. Dl?PARThIENT OFFNFRGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CE~TER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fr.. Fr.. U.S. Dl?PARThIENT OFFNFRGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CE~TER Nl!PA DF=llNATION RECIPIENT:Oregon Stale University-NNMREC PROJECT TITLE : Pacific Marine Energy Center FY2012 Funding Page 1 of3 STATE: OR Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number G098030 DE-FG36-08GOI8179 GFO-GOI8179-004 G018179 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451. 1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Inform ation gathering, analys is, and disseminatlon A1 1 Technical advice and assistance to organizations Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visits, and

58

RECIPIENT:QDOE U.S. Dl1PARTlIIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

QDOE QDOE U.S. Dl1PARTlIIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER Nl!PA DETERMINATION Page 1 of2 STATE: OR PROJECT TITL.E : SEP ARRA - Deployment of Innovative Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy - Agriculture - Dufur & HanncrCantrell Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Pro<:uremeniinstruml.'nt Number NEPA Control Number elD Number OE-FOA-OOOOOS2 EEOOOO140 GF0-0000140-001 EE140 Based on my review of the Information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4SUA), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: De~cription: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy. demonstrate potential energy oonservalion, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations o

59

DEPARThIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA Dl!1'FIt1.fiNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARThIENT OF ENERGY DEPARThIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA Dl!1'FIt1.fiNATION RECIPIENT:Biomass Energy Resource Center PROJECf TITLE: Biomass Energy Resource Center - Core and Program Support Page 1 of2 STATE: VT Funding Opportunity Annoum:emenl Number Procu~ment Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number COP DE-FG36-06G086103,AOO4 GFO-G086103-003 0 Based on my review oflhl' information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (aulhoru.ed under DOE Order 451.1A), I bne made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPF..NDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited 10, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply and

60

Reaction of Calcite and Dolomite with In-Situ Gelled Acids, Organic Acids, and Environmentally Friendly Chelating Agent (GLDA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Well stimulation is the treatment remedy when oil/gas productivity decreases to unacceptable economical limits. Well stimulation can be carried out through either "Matrix Acidizing" or fracturing with both "Hydraulic Fracturing" and "Acid Fracturing" techniques. "Matrix Acidizing" and "Acid Fracturing" applications involve injecting an acid to react with the formation and dissolve some of the minerals present and recover or increase the permeability. The permeability enhancement is achieved by creating conductive channels "wormholes" in case of "Matrix Acidizing" or creating uneven etching pattern in case of "Acid Fracturing" treatments. In both cases, and to design a treatment successfully, it is necessary to determine the distance that the live acid will be able to penetrate inside the formation, which in turn, determines the volume of the acid needed to carry out the treatment. This distance can be obtained through lab experiments, if formation cores are available, or estimated by modeling the treatment. The successful model will depend on several chemical and physical processes that take place including: the acid transport to the surface of the rock, the speed of the reaction of the acid with the rock, which is often referred to as "Reaction Rate", and the acid leak-off. The parameters describing these processes such as acid diffusion coefficient and reaction kinetics have to be determined experimentally to ensure accurate and reliable modeling. Hydrochloric acid and simple organic acids such as acetic and citric acids have been used extensively for stimulation treatments. The diffusion and reaction kinetics of these acids, in a straight form, were investigated thoroughly in literature. However, solely these acids are used in a simple form in the field. Acid systems such as gelled, crosslinked gelled, surfactant-based, foam-based, or emulsified acids are used to either retard the reaction rate or to enhance acid diversion. Literature review shows that additional work is needed to understand the reaction and report the diffusion and kinetics of these systems with carbonate. In addition, a new chelating agent (GLDA) was recently introduced as a stand-alone stimulating fluid. The kinetics and the mass transfer properties of this acid were not studied before. Therefore, the objective of this work is to study the reaction of different acid systems with calcite and dolomite and report the mass transport and kinetic data experimentally. Lactic acid, a chelating agent (GLDA), and in-situ gelled HCl-formic acids were investigated in this study. In some cases, rheology measurements and core flood experiments were conducted. The data were combined with the reaction study to understand the behavior of these acids and examine their efficiency if injected in the formation.

Rabie, Ahmed 1978-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dl dolomitic limestone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Recycle/reuse of boiler chemical cleaning wastes in wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiler chemical cleaning wastes (BCCW) are generated by the periodic waterside cleaning of utility boilers to remove metallic deposits from boiler tube surfaces. Depending on boiler metallurgy, BCCW generally contain high concentrations of iron and copper or both, as well as other heavy metals such as chromium, lead, nickel, and zinc. BCCW treatment and disposal methods include precipitation, coponding in an ash pond, evaporation in the fireside of an operating boiler (for organic solvents), and contracted off-site disposal. Depending on the type of BCCW chemical treatment methods achieve varying degrees of success. BCCW which contain organic chelating agents can be especially difficult to treat to national pollutant discharge elimination system (NPDES) limits (1 mg/L for both iron and copper) with conventional lime precipitation.Research is being done to evaluate different BCCW treatment and disposal methods. One waste management option under consideration is reuse of BCCW in utility wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. To investigate this option, a series of laboratory tests were performed in which five different types of BCCW were added to the reaction tank of EPRI's bench-scale wet limestone FGD system. This paper presents the results and conclusions from this study.

Stohs, M.; Owens, D.R. (Radian Corp. (US)); Micheletti, W. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (USA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Soiling patterns on a tall limestone building: Changes over 60 years  

SciTech Connect

Soiling of limestone caused by air pollution has been studied at the Cathedral of Learning on the University of Pittsburgh campus. The Cathedral was constructed in the 1930s during a period of heavy pollution in Pittsburgh, PA. Archival photographs show that the building became soiled while it was still under construction. Reductions in air pollutant concentrations began in the late 1940s and 1950s and have continued to the present day. Concurrent with decreasing pollution, soiled areas of the stone have been slowly washed by rain, leaving a white, eroded surface. The patterns of white areas in archival photographs of the building are consistent with computer modeling of rain impingement showing greater wash off rates at higher elevations and on the corners of the building. Winds during the rainstorms are predominantly form the quadrant SW to NW at this location, and wind speeds as well as rain intensities are greater when winds are from this quadrant as compared with other quadrants; the sides of the building facing these directions are much less soiled than the opposing sides. Overall, these results suggest that rain washing of soiled areas on buildings occurs over a period of decades, in contrast to the process of soiling that occurs much more rapidly.

Davidson, C.I.; Tang, W.; Finger, S.; Etyemezian, V.; Striegel, M.F.; Sherwood, S.I.

2000-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

ARM - Instrument - dl  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PGH M1 Browse Data ARIES Observatory, Nainital, Uttarkhand, India PVC M1 Browse Data Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF 1 Contact(s) Rob Newsom (509) 372-6020 rob.newsom@pnnl...

64

DL Visualize - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 8, 2008 ... The code also provides a simple method of generating LEED patterns from complex surfaces and can provide both single domain and multiple...

65

LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS IN SUPPORT OF CARBON DIOXIDE-LIMESTONE SEQUESTRATION IN THE OCEAN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This semi-annual progress reports includes further findings on CO{sub 2}-in-Water (C/W) emulsions stabilized by fine particles. In previous reports we described C/W emulsions using pulverized limestone (CaCO{sub 3}), flyash, and a pulverized magnesium silicate mineral, lizardite, Mg{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}, which has a similar composition as the more abundant mineral, serpentine. All these materials formed stable emulsions consisting of droplets of liquid or supercritical CO{sub 2} coated with a sheath of particles dispersed in water. During this semi-annual period we experimented with pulverized beach sand (10-20 {micro}m particle diameter). Pulverized sand produced an emulsion similar to the previously used materials. The globules are heavier than water, thus they accumulate at the bottom of the water column. Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis revealed that the sand particles consisted mainly of SiO{sub 2}. Sand is one of the most abundant materials on earth, so the economic and energy penalties of using it for ocean sequestration consist mainly of the cost of transporting the sand to the user, the capital and operating costs of the pulverizer, and the energy expenditure for mining, shipping and grinding the sand. Most likely, sand powder would be innocuous to marine organisms if released together with CO{sub 2} in the deep ocean. We examined the effects of methanol (MeOH) and monoethanolamine (MEA) on emulsion formation. These solvents are currently used for pre- and post-combustion capture of CO{sub 2}. A fraction of the solvents may be captured together with CO{sub 2}. A volume fraction of 5% of these solvents in a mix of CO{sub 2}/CaCO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O had no apparent effect on emulsion formation. Previously we have shown that a 3.5% by weight of common salt (NaCl) in water, simulating seawater, also had no appreciable effect on emulsion formation. We investigated the formation of inverted emulsions, where water droplets coated with pulverized materials are dispersed in liquid or supercritical CO{sub 2}. This is a Water-in-CO{sub 2} emulsion (W/C) stabilized by particles. For a W/C emulsion it is necessary to employ hydrophobic particles, where the particles are primarily wetted by CO{sub 2}. We used the following hydrophobic particles: carbon black, coal dust, and Teflon. All materials were either obtained as fine particles or ground to 10-20 {micro}m size. All these hydrophobic particles produced a stable W/C emulsion.

Dan Golomb; Eugene Barry; David Ryan; Carl Lawton; Peter Swett; Huishan Duan; Matthew Woodcock

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Chemical alteration of limestone and marble samples exposed to acid rain and weathering in the eastern United States, 1984--1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a long-term program that began in 1984, limestone and marble briquettes have been exposed to both anthropogenic acid deposition and natural weathering of four field sites in the eastern United States. Similar tests began at an Ohio site in 1986. Effects of exposure on the briquettes and other materials at the sites are evaluated periodically by several federal agencies cooperating in the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). A primary contribution of Argonne National Laboratory to the NAPAP has been chemical analysis to determine changes in the samples caused by exposure to the environment. Wet chemical analysis was used to detect sulfates, nitrates, fluorides, chlorides, and a series of metal cations in sequential layers of stone removed from the briquettes after field exposure. Results from the first four years of the program indicate that rinsing by rain keeps skyward-facing stone relatively clean of reaction products, especially sulfate, the most abundant product. On groundward-facing samples, sulfate concentrations increased linearly with exposure time, and values were proportional to atmospheric SO{sub 2} concentrations at the site. Sulfate concentrations in groundward samples were much higher in limestone than in marble, because of the greater porosity of the limestone. A steep sulfate gradient was seen in both sample types from the surface to the interior. On skyward surfaces, material losses per rain event due to complete dissolution of accumulated sulfates were approximately equal to concentrations measured in runoff. Preexposed limestone samples had sulfate accumulations deep in their interiors, while fresh, unexposed limestone did not. No substantial changes in cation accumulations wee detected in either limestone or marble.

Reimann, K.J.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Phase I (Year 1) Summary of Research--Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This topical report covers the first 12 months of the subject 3-year grant, evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin (Ordovician Trenton-Black River Formations; Silurian Niagara Group; and the Devonian Dundee Formation). Phase I tasks, including Developing a Reservoir Catalog for selected dolomite reservoirs in the Michigan Basin, Characterization of Dolomite Reservoirs in Representative Fields and Technology Transfer have all been initiated and progress is consistent with our original scheduling. The development of a reservoir catalog for the 3 subject formations in the Michigan Basin has been a primary focus of our efforts during Phase I. As part of this effort, we currently have scanned some 13,000 wireline logs, and compiled in excess of 940 key references and 275 reprints that cover reservoir aspects of the 3 intervals in the Michigan Basin. A summary evaluation of the data in these publications is currently ongoing, with the Silurian Niagara Group being handled as a first priority. In addition, full production and reservoir parameter data bases obtained from available data sources have been developed for the 3 intervals in Excel and Microsoft Access data bases. We currently have an excess of 25 million cells of data for wells in the Basin. All Task 2 objectives are on time and on target for Phase I per our original proposal. Our mapping efforts to date, which have focused in large part on the Devonian Dundee Formation, have important implications for both new exploration plays and improved enhanced recovery methods in the Dundee ''play'' in Michigan--i.e. the interpreted fracture-related dolomitization control on the distribution of hydrocarbon reservoirs. In an exploration context, high-resolution structure mapping using quality-controlled well data should provide leads to convergence zones of fault/fracture trends that are not necessarily related to structural elevation. Further work in Phase II will be focused on delineating the relative contribution to fracture-only dolomitization to that which occurs in conjunction with primary facies and/or sequence stratigraphic framework.

G. Michael Grammer

2005-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

68

Numerical modeling of carbon dioxide sequestration on the rate of pressure solution creep in limestone: Preliminary results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When carbon dioxide (CO2) is injected into an aquifer or a depleted geological reservoir, its dissolution into solution results in acidification of the pore waters. As a consequence, the pore waters become more reactive, which leads to enhanced dissolution-precipitation processes and a modification of the mechanical and hydrological properties of the rock. This effect is especially important for limestones given that the solubility and reactivity of carbonates is strongly dependent on pH and the partial pressure of CO2. The main mechanism that couples dissolution, precipitation and rock matrix deformation is commonly referred to as intergranular pressure solution creep (IPS) or pervasive pressure solution creep (PSC). This process involves dissolution at intergranular grain contacts subject to elevated stress, diffusion of dissolved material in an intergranular fluid, and precipitation in pore spaces subject to lower stress. This leads to an overall and pervasive reduction in porosity due to both grain indent...

Renard, Francois; Hellmann, Roland; Collombet, Marielle; Guen, Yvi Le

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kentucky Illinois Basin outline 0 30 60 15 Miles Glacial deposits Limestone Sandstone Shale Dolomite Precambrian granite and ryolite Enhanced Oil Recovery Enhanced oil recovery...

70

Formation of Zn-rich phyllosilicate, Zn-layered double hydroxide and hydrozincite in contaminated calcareous soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pH (CaCl 2 ) GLO LUC2 BAS Limestone Dolomite Limestone TOC (Five soils (GLO, TAL, BAS, LAUS, SIS) had developed frommaterial >2 mm of SIS, LAUS and BAS, white (WP) and reddish-

Jacquat, Olivier

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Control of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions from Pulverized Coal-Fired Boilers by Dry Removal with Lime and Limestone Sorbants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past decade increasing concern over the potential environmental impact associated with the emissions of both gaseous and particulate pollutants has resulted in the promulgation of strict regulatory standards governing such emissions. In this regard, particular attention has been placed upon the control of sulfur dioxide (SO2) from major fuel burning installations. The provisions of the 1977 Amendments to the Clean Air Act which relate to the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) and the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) have made consideration of this problem of significant additional importance in the context of increased coal utilization. There exist three general methods for the control of sulfur dioxide emissions from pulverized coal-fired boiler equipment. These are: (1) coal cleaning to remove pyritic sulfur, (2) conventional wet, nonregenerable scrubbing with alkaline slurry and solution processes, and (3) dry processes which involve direct introduction of lime or limestone into the firebox, or a spray dryer operated with nonregenerable alkaline sorbents coupled with a fabric filter collector. Equipment requirements, SO2 removal criteria, general economics, and potential applications of these latter two approaches within category (3) will be discussed.

Schwartz, M. H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Analysis of reservoir heterogeneities due to shallowing-upward cycles in carbonate rocks of the Pennsylvanian Wahoo Limestone of Northeastern Alaska. Annual report, October 1990--September 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project is to develop an integrated database to characterize reservoir heterogeneities resulting from numerous small-scale shallowing-upward cycles (parasequences) comprising the carboniferous Pennsylvanian Wahoo Limestone. The Wahoo Limestone is the upper formation of an extensive carbonate platform sequence of the Carboniferous Lisburne Group which is widely exposed in the Brooks Range and is a widespread hydrocarbon reservoir unit in the subsurface of the North Slope of Alaska. A principal goal is to determine lateral and vertical variations in the complex mosaic of carbonate facies comprising the Wahoo Limestone. This report presents the preliminary results of research accomplished by a team of specialists in carbonate petrology, biostratigraphy, and diagenesis during the 1990--1991 fiscal year.It includes a summary of regional geological framework studies, a discussion conodont analyses, an overview of diagenetic studies, a brief description of progress in computerized database development, and appendices containing some of the new data on petrographic analyses, conodont analyses, and locality and sample information. Our correlation scheme, which uses cyclic stratigraphy, biostratigraphy, and cement stratigraphy, will allow interpretation of the depositional history and paleogeographic evolution of the region. We have developed predictive facies models and will make paleogeographic maps to illustrate different stages in the history of the Wahoo carbonate ramp. Our detailed analyses of the Wahoo Limestone will provide a basis for interpreting correlative rocks in the adjacent subsurface of the coastal plain of ANWR, a potential hydrocarbon lease-sale area. In a broader sense, our work will provide an excellent generic example of carbonate shallowing-upward cycles which typify carbonate sediments.

Watts, K.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Analysis of reservoir heterogeneities due to shallowing-upward cycles in carbonate rocks of the Pennsylvanian Wahoo Limestone of Northeastern Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project is to develop an integrated database to characterize reservoir heterogeneities resulting from numerous small-scale shallowing-upward cycles (parasequences) comprising the carboniferous Pennsylvanian Wahoo Limestone. The Wahoo Limestone is the upper formation of an extensive carbonate platform sequence of the Carboniferous Lisburne Group which is widely exposed in the Brooks Range and is a widespread hydrocarbon reservoir unit in the subsurface of the North Slope of Alaska. A principal goal is to determine lateral and vertical variations in the complex mosaic of carbonate facies comprising the Wahoo Limestone. This report presents the preliminary results of research accomplished by a team of specialists in carbonate petrology, biostratigraphy, and diagenesis during the 1990--1991 fiscal year.It includes a summary of regional geological framework studies, a discussion conodont analyses, an overview of diagenetic studies, a brief description of progress in computerized database development, and appendices containing some of the new data on petrographic analyses, conodont analyses, and locality and sample information. Our correlation scheme, which uses cyclic stratigraphy, biostratigraphy, and cement stratigraphy, will allow interpretation of the depositional history and paleogeographic evolution of the region. We have developed predictive facies models and will make paleogeographic maps to illustrate different stages in the history of the Wahoo carbonate ramp. Our detailed analyses of the Wahoo Limestone will provide a basis for interpreting correlative rocks in the adjacent subsurface of the coastal plain of ANWR, a potential hydrocarbon lease-sale area. In a broader sense, our work will provide an excellent generic example of carbonate shallowing-upward cycles which typify carbonate sediments.

Watts, K.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

U.S. DI!PARThlENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER Nl!PA Dl1TImfiNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PARThlENT OF ENERGY PARThlENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER Nl!PA Dl1TImfiNATION RECIPIENT: BeIi Geospace, Inc Page 1 of2 STATE: TX PROJECT TITLE: Geothermal Technology Advancement for Rapid Development of Resources in the U.S. Funding OpportunUy Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number em Number DE·FQA'()()()()S22 OE-EEOOO5515 GF0-0005515-001 G05515 Bued on my review oftbe information concerning the proposro action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Ordtr 4SI.IA), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description : A9 Information gathering, analysis, and dissemination Information gathering (induding, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visits. and audits), data analysis

75

S Limestone Nicholasville  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-F Cooperstown Apartments Arboretum Stoll Field Colum bia Ave Elizabeth St UniversityAve DIY DIY DIY DIY DIY DIY Proposed Shared Use Trail Bicycle Rack DIY Bicycle Repair Station Visit Links Below for Additional

Hayes, Jane E.

76

Annual Logging Symposium, June 19-23, 2010 Formation Evaluation in the Bakken Complex Using Laboratory Core Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

complex include the Middle Bakken dolomitic sand/siltstone and the Three Forks dolomite. The Upper basin (Energy Information Administration, 2006). The tight Mississippian age Lodgepole Limestone fine sand). Some of the samples were found to contain fractures. Fig. 8 Ternary diagram of sandstone

77

TEAM0.5DL.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0.5 0.5 Core Status: new users must complete 2 training sessions and pass a sample exchange exam to work independently during Core sessions (regular work hours). Flex Status: core users must complete 5 Core sessions and pass a driving test to work during Flex sessions (evening and weekend hours). All TEAM 0.5 scheduling must be coordinated through Peter Ercius at Percius@lbl.gov. You may be assigned only two sessions per month. CORE LICENSE Safety  Understand emergency shut-down procedure  Demonstrate handling of the column valves  Point out where emergency contact numbers are posted  Know how to contact NCEM staff for support Instrument preparation  Show how to check basic vacuum functionality and target pressure values  (Gun: 1, Liner: 18-20 and Octagon: < 10)

78

Microsoft Word - mitchell-dl.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterizing Particle Size, Water Path and Photon Characterizing Particle Size, Water Path and Photon Tunneling in Ice and Water Clouds David L. Mitchell Atmospheric Sciences Division Desert Research Institute Reno, Nevada Robert P. d'Entremont Satellite Meteorology Group Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Massachusetts Abstract Global information of ice water path (IWP) in ice clouds is urgently needed for testing of global climate models (GCMs) and other applications, but satellite retrievals of IWP are still in the developing stages, and tend to have large uncertainties (e.g. factor of 3 or more). Results of a new retrieval method are presented here that may have relatively low uncertainties, using several thermal-radiance channels. Recent research indicates that ice-cloud radiative properties depend on more than effective diameter

79

CM200DL-Final.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CM200 CM200 Core Status: new users must complete 2 trouble free training sessions and pass the drivers test to work independently during Core sessions. Flex Status: core users must complete 5 trouble free sessions to work during Flex sessions. To reserve a CM200 session, go to www/ncem.lbl.gov, click on "Microscope Scheduling", use proposal number and password to log in. You may only sign up for one Core session at a time. To cancel a session, email your request to the technical staff in charge of the microscope. CORE LICENSE TEST Safety  Understand emergency shut down procedure  Know emergency contact numbers  Know where LN protective equipment is  Find updated operating instruction and notice (?) Instrument Preparation  Check V7 closed and SSC on and in cooling

80

Finding all justifications of OWL DL entailments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Finding the justifications of an entailment (that is, all the minimal set of axioms sufficient to produce an entailment) has emerged as a key inference service for the Web Ontology Language (OWL). Justifications are essential for debugging unsatisfiable ... Keywords: OWL ontology explanation, debugging, justifications

Aditya Kalyanpur; Bijan Parsia; Matthew Horridge; Evren Sirin

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dl dolomitic limestone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Limestone Powder Enhances Performance of 'Green' ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in greenhouse gas emissions, energy use, construction ... at the same time, reduce costs for concrete ... Ternary blends for controlling cost and carbon ...

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

82

JOURNALDE PHYSIQUEIV Colloque C7, suppldmentau Journal de Physique 111,Volume 3, novembre 1993  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a melt. The raw materials, sand, limestone, aragonite, dolomite, soda ash, alumina, and recycled glass are fed into the furnacesthrough a continuous or intermittentfeeding system. The charge reacts and melts,efficiency,pollutionand equipmentdurabilityawarenessgavea strongmotivationfor the development of sophisticated modelling procedures able to handle

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

83

Creating a Geologic Play Book for Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary isopach and facies maps, combined with a literature review, were used to develop a sequence of basin geometry, architecture and facies development during Cambrian and Ordovician time. The main architectural features--basins, sub basins and platforms--were identified and mapped as their positions shifted with time. This is significant because a better understanding of the control of basin geometry and architecture on the distribution of key facies and on subsequent reservoir development in Ordovician carbonates within the Trenton and Black River is essential for future exploration planning. Good exploration potential is thought to exist along the entire platform margin, where clean grainstones were deposited in skeletal shoals from Indiana thorough Ohio and Ontario into Pennsylvania. The best reservoir facies for the development of hydrothermal dolomites appears to be these clean carbonates. This conclusion is supported by observations taken in existing fields in Indiana, Ontario, Ohio and New York. In contrast, Trenton-Black River production in Kentucky and West Virginia has been from fractured, but non-dolomitized, limestone reservoirs. Facies maps indicate that these limestones were deposited under conditions that led to a higher argillaceous content than the cleaner limestones deposited in higher-energy environments along platform margins. However, even in the broad area of argillaceous limestones, clean limestone buildups have been observed in eastern outcrops and, if present and dolomitized in the subsurface, may provide additional exploration targets. Structure and isopach maps developed as part of the structural and seismic study supported the basin architecture and geometry conclusions, and from them some structural control on the location of architectural features may be inferred. This portion of the study eventually will lead to a determination of the timing relative to fracturing, dolomitization and hydrocarbon charging of reservoirs in the Trenton and Black River carbonates. The focus of this effort will shift in the next few months from regional to more detailed structural analyses. This new effort will include topics such as the determination of the source of the hot, dolomitizing fluids that created hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in the Black River, and the probable migration paths of these fluids. Faults of suitable age, orientation and location to be relevant for hydrothermal dolomite creation in the Trenton-Black River play will be isolated and mapped, and potential fairways delineated. A detailed study of hydrothermal alteration of carbonate reservoirs was completed and is discussed at length in this report. New ideas that were developed from this research were combined with a literature review and existing concepts to develop a model for the development of hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in the study area. Fault-related hydrothermal alteration is a key component of this model. Hydrothermal alteration produces a spectrum of features in reservoirs, ranging from leached limestone and microporosity to matrix dolomite, saddle dolomite-lined breccias, zebra fabrics and fractures. Mineralization probably occurred during the pressure drop associated with the rise of fluids up the fault system, and is due to the mixing of hydrothermal fluids with cooler, in situ fluids. Once they began to cool themselves, the hydrothermal fluids, which had a lower pH and higher salinity than formation fluids, were capable of leaching the host limestones. Microporosity is common in leached limestones, and it is likely that it was formed, in some cases, during hydrothermal alteration. Dolomite leaching occurs near the end of the paragenetic sequence, and may significantly enhance porosity. However, leaching of dolomite typically is followed by the precipitation of calcite or anhydrite, which reduces porosity. A final conclusion is that hydrothermal alteration may be more common than previously thought, and some features previously attributed to other processes may be in fact be hydrothermal in origin. Production d

Douglas G. Patchen; Taury Smith; Ron Riley; Mark Baranoski; David Harris; John Hickman; John Bocan; Michael Hohn

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

84

LIGHT EMITTING DlODE TESTING AND ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the work done to analyze the optical output of a Light Emitting Diode. This diode consists' of a Monsanto MV2 LED chip in an MV50 package. A calculator based instrumentation system is described including programming techniques used to reduce and display data. A Light Instrumentation System with specially designed fiber optic cables is described which gathers data for processing by the calculator based instrumentation system. Future work will include analysis of the RCA 8571 Photomultiplier Tube.

Bowers, J L; Allen, T E

1973-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Forgetting for knowledge bases in DL-Lite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To support the reuse and combination of ontologies in Semantic Web applications, it is often necessary to obtain smaller ontologies from existing larger ontologies. In particular, applications may require the omission of certain terms, e. g., concept ... Keywords: 68T30, Description logics, Forgetting, Ontology

Zhe Wang; Kewen Wang; Rodney Topor; Jeff Z. Pan

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

dlCC Opt: Optimization Software for Renewable Energy Projects  

There are numerous options for renewable energy systems development. Location, size, type of system, and a number of other criteria need to be ...

87

Synthesis and development of processes for the recovery of sulfur from acid gases. Part 1, Development of a high-temperature process for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gas using limestone -- thermodynamic and kinetic considerations; Part 2, Development of a zero-emissions process for recovery of sulfur from acid gas streams  

SciTech Connect

Limestone can be used more effectively as a sorbent for H{sub 2}S in high-temperature gas-cleaning applications if it is prevented from undergoing calcination. Sorption of H{sub 2}S by limestone is impeded by sintering of the product CaS layer. Sintering of CaS is catalyzed by CO{sub 2}, but is not affected by N{sub 2} or H{sub 2}. The kinetics of CaS sintering was determined for the temperature range 750--900{degrees}C. When hydrogen sulfide is heated above 600{degrees}C in the presence of carbon dioxide elemental sulfur is formed. The rate-limiting step of elemental sulfur formation is thermal decomposition of H{sub 2}S. Part of the hydrogen thereby produced reacts with CO{sub 2}, forming CO via the water-gas-shift reaction. The equilibrium of H{sub 2}S decomposition is therefore shifted to favor the formation of elemental sulfur. The main byproduct is COS, formed by a reaction between CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S that is analogous to the water-gas-shift reaction. Smaller amounts of SO{sub 2} and CS{sub 2} also form. Molybdenum disulfide is a strong catalyst for H{sub 2}S decomposition in the presence of CO{sub 2}. A process for recovery of sulfur from H{sub 2}S using this chemistry is as follows: Hydrogen sulfide is heated in a high-temperature reactor in the presence of CO{sub 2} and a suitable catalyst. The primary products of the overall reaction are S{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Rapid quenching of the reaction mixture to roughly 600{degrees}C prevents loss Of S{sub 2} during cooling. Carbonyl sulfide is removed from the product gas by hydrolysis back to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S. Unreacted CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S are removed from the product gas and recycled to the reactor, leaving a gas consisting chiefly of H{sub 2} and CO, which recovers the hydrogen value from the H{sub 2}S. This process is economically favorable compared to the existing sulfur-recovery technology and allows emissions of sulfur-containing gases to be controlled to very low levels.

Towler, G.P.; Lynn, S.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Characterization of the Dundee formation, Winterfield Field, Clare County, Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Devonian Dundee Formation of the Winterfield field was originally developed in the late 1930`s and early 1940`s and rapid production helped support the U.S. war effort. Poor completion and production practices may have caused the field to have been inefficiently developed, and wells prematurely watered out due to water coning. Production occurs in porous dolomitized {open_quotes}chimneys{close_quotes} where they extend above the oil-water contact within the otherwise {open_quotes}tight{close_quotes} limestone. Cross plots of the PEF (Photoelectric) log and the LLD (deep lateral) log separate the porous, oil-saturated dolomite from water-saturated dolomites and the {open_quotes}tight{close_quotes} limestone. The PEF distinguishes the lithologies (dolomite and limestone) and the LLD separates the fluids (water and oil); other useful logs are the CNL and GR to indicate porous and shale zones respectively. The dolomite {open_quotes}chimneys{close_quotes} are small in scale, less than 60` high and can be laterally discontinuous between wells on 40 acres spacing. The dolomite zones tend to have good porosity and permeability; the API gravity of the oil is 44.2 and the reservoir is produced by a strong, constant water drive. Initial production tests on some wells indicate the ability to produce up to nearly 2000 barrels per day (BOPD). Wells drilled in the 1980`s to the deeper Richfield intercepted and isolated oil pocket in the Dundee off structure, prompting further drilling activity; subsequent production has significantly added to the cumulative production in the field. Due to the heterogeneity of the reservoir, the strong water drive, the low density of the oil and the relatively high permeabilities, the reservoir and others like it are ideal candidates for horizontal drain technology. The horizontal wells could link {open_quotes}chimney`s{close_quotes} that have previously been untapped, significantly adding to the total production of these Dundee fields.

Chittick, S.; Salotti, C.; Wood, J.R. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Limestone County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7800072°, -86.9423801° 7800072°, -86.9423801° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.7800072,"lon":-86.9423801,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

90

Limestone Creek, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6.9428352°, -80.1411545° 6.9428352°, -80.1411545° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.9428352,"lon":-80.1411545,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

91

Limestone County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5461078°, -96.663812° 5461078°, -96.663812° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.5461078,"lon":-96.663812,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

92

Comprehensive Effect of Coke Breeze and Limestone Particle Size ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical Enrichment of Precious Metals in Iron Sulfides Using Microwave Energy Chloridizing ... Co-Gasification Behavior of Metallurgical Coke with High and Low Reactivity .... Thermal Plasma Torches for Metallurgical Applications.

93

Fine limestone additions to regulate setting in high volume fly ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... [11] ASTM C618-08a. Standard specification for coal fly ash and raw or calcined natural pozzolan for use in concrete; 2008. ...

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

94

Microstructures and Rheology of a Limestone-Shale Thrust Fault  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Copper Creek thrust fault in the southern Appalachians places Cambrian over Ordovician sedimentary strata. The fault accommodated displacement of 15-20 km at 100-180 C. Along the hanging wall-footwall contact, microstructures within a ~2 cm thick calcite and shale shear zone suggest that calcite, not shale, controlled the rheology of the shear zone rocks. While shale deformed brittley, plasticity-induced fracturing in calcite resulted in ultrafine-grained (shale into the shear zone, shows the evolution of rheology within the shear zone. Sedimentary laminations 1 cm below the shear zone are cut by minor faults, stylolites, and fault-parallel and perpendicular calcite veins. At vein intersections, calcite grain size is reduced (to ~0.3 ?m), and microstructures include inter-and-intragranular fractures, four-grain junctions, and interpenetrating boundaries. Porosity rises to 6 percent from shale clasts (5-350 ?m) lie within an ultrafine-grained calcite (shale matrix. Ultrafinegrained calcite (shale. Calcite vein microstructures suggest veins continued to form during deformation. Fractures at twin-twin and twin-grain boundary intersections suggest grain size reduction by plasticity-induced fracturing, resulting in <1 ?m grains. Interpenetrating boundaries, four-grain junctions, and no LPO indicate the ultrafine-grained calcite deformed by viscous grain boundary sliding. The evolution of the ultrafine-grain shear zone rocks by a combination of plastic and brittle processes and the deformation of the interconnected network of ultrafine-grained calcite by viscous GBS enabled a large displacement along a narrow fault zone.

Wells, Rachel Kristen

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Static Model for Converter Steelmaking by Using Limestone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A partition model for carbon dioxide reacting with [C], [Si], [Mn] and [Fe] is established .... Factors Affecting the Mixing Characteristics of Molten Steel in the RH...

96

Influence of pre-Mississippian paleogeology on Carboniferous Lisburne Group, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, northeastern Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Carboniferous Lisburne Group of northern Alaska formed an extensive carbonate platform, which was later deformed as part of the Brooks Range fold and thrust belt. In the northeast, the Lisburne Group is parautochthonous and analogous to that at Prudhoe Bay. The Lisburne's paleogeography and facies relationships pertain to assessment of the petroleum potential of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). The Franklinian paleogeology, unconformably underlying the Ellesmerial sequence, has influenced sedimentation patterns in the Lisburne Group. The transgressive Endicott Group (Kekiktuk conglomerate and Kayak Shale) and Lisburne Group thin northward over Franklinian basement highs. In the Sadlerochit Mountains, the Katakturuk Dolomite formed a paleotopographic high over which the Endicott Group pinched out and the Lisburne Group thinned. Shallow-marine oolitic grainstone developed in the cyclic Pennsylvanian Wahoo Limestone. To the south in the Shublik Mountains, a repeated sequence of Katakturuk Dolomite and the Nanook Limestone were lower, so the Endicott Group lapped over the area and was later overlain by comparable Lisburne Group rocks. In the Fourth Range, the Lisburne Group is thicker and limestones also occur in the upper Endicott Group. Oolitic grainstone in the Wahoo Limestone is rare, and broad ooid shoals apparently pinched out into deeper water carbonates on a southward sloping carbonate ramp.

Watts, K.F.; Carlson, R.; Imm, T.; Gruzlovic, P.; Hanks, C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Release of gas from heated oil shale and from mixtures of dolomite and quartz  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments and calculations were performed to determine the amount of gas released from heated oil shale. It is known that kerogen, a component of oil shale, releases gas when heated. When the temperature is increased, the kerogen yields not only gas but char, a solid that reacts with steam and CO/sub 2/ (by-products of heated shale) to yield H/sub 2/ and CO. It was found that as much as 200 moles of CO and H/sub 2/ could be produced by the reaction of 1 kg of kerogen with steam at 1200/sup 0/C. Another of the gas-releasing components of oil shale, carbonate minerals, begins to decompose at 500/sup 0/C; decomposition is complete at about 700/sup 0/C after 1000 hr. The minerals begin to decompose at a lower temperature in steam. Reactions among carbonates and silicates resulted in the release of CO/sub 2/ even under high CO/sub 2/ pressure.

Taylor, R.W.

1976-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

98

HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company have assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The characterization phase of the project is utilizing geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. This model will be used to define a field deployment plan that Goldrus, a small independent oil company, will implement by drilling both vertical and horizontal wells during the demonstration phase of the project. Additional reservoir data are being gathered during the demonstration phase to improve the accuracy of the reservoir model. The results of the demonstration will being closely monitored to provide a basis for improving the design of the HPAI field deployment plan. The results of the reservoir characterization field demonstration and monitoring program will be documented and widely disseminated to facilitate adoption of this technology by oil operators in the Permian Basin and elsewhere in the U.S.

Robert Loucks; Steve Ruppel; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jon Olsen; Deanna Combs; Dhiraj Dembla; Leonel Gomez

2003-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

99

CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION  

SciTech Connect

The Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Research Consortium has made significant progress toward their goal of producing a geologic play book for the Trenton-Black River gas play. The final product will include a resource assessment model of Trenton-Black River reservoirs; possible fairways within which to concentrate further studies and seismic programs; and a model for the origin of Trenton-Black River hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs. All seismic data available to the consortium have been examined. Synthetic seismograms constructed for specific wells have enabled researchers to correlate the tops of 15 stratigraphic units determined from well logs to seismic profiles in New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky. In addition, three surfaces for the area have been depth converted, gridded and mapped. A 16-layer velocity model has been developed to help constrain time-to-depth conversions. Considerable progress was made in fault trend delineation and seismic-stratigraphic correlation within the project area. Isopach maps and a network of gamma-ray cross sections supplemented with core descriptions allowed researchers to more clearly define the architecture of the basin during Middle and Late Ordovician time, the control of basin architecture on carbonate and shale deposition and eventually, the location of reservoirs in Trenton Limestone and Black River Group carbonates. The basin architecture itself may be structurally controlled, and this fault-related structural control along platform margins influenced the formation of hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in original limestone facies deposited in high energy environments. This resulted in productive trends along the northwest margin of the Trenton platform in Ohio. The continuation of this platform margin into New York should provide further areas with good exploration potential. The focus of the petrographic study shifted from cataloging a broad spectrum of carbonate rocks that occur in the Trenton-Black River interval to delineation of regional limestone diagenesis in the basin. A consistent basin-wide pattern of marine and burial diagenesis that resulted in relatively low porosity and permeability in the subtidal facies of these rocks has been documented across the study area. Six diagenetic stages have been recognized: four marine diagenesis stages and two burial diagenesis stages. This dominance of extensive marine and burial diagenesis yielded rocks with low reservoir potential, with the exception of fractured limestone and dolostone reservoirs. Commercial amounts of porosity, permeability and petroleum accumulation appear to be restricted to areas where secondary porosity developed in association with hydrothermal fluid flow along faults and fractures related to basement tectonics. A broad range of geochemical and fluid inclusion analyses have aided in a better understanding of the origin of the dolomites in the Trenton and Black River Groups over the study area. The results of these analyses support a hydrothermal origin for all of the various dolomite types found to date. The fluid inclusion data suggest that all of the dolomite types analyzed formed from hot saline brines. The dolomite is enriched in iron and manganese, which supports a subsurface origin for the dolomitizing brine. Strontium isotope data suggest that the fluids passed through basement rocks or immature siliciclastic rocks prior to forming the dolomites. All of these data suggest a hot, subsurface origin for the dolomites. The project database continued to be redesigned, developed and deployed. Production data are being reformatted for standard relational database management system requirements. Use of the project intranet by industry partners essentially doubled during the reporting period.

Douglas G. Patchen; Katharine Lee Avary; John M. Bocan; Michael Hohn; John B. Hickman; Paul D. Lake; James A. Drahovzal; Christopher D. Laughrey; Jaime Kostelnik; Taury Smith; Ron Riley; Mark Baranoski

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

The Sugar Creek zinc deposit, Jackson Co. TN -- Exploration history, geology and mineralization  

SciTech Connect

During the 60's and 70's zinc exploration of central TN and KY was active. The Sugar Creek Project was one of several investigated by Exxon. The discovery hole, Cu 15, was drilled in early 1973. The Sugar Creek Zinc Deposit was acquired by Independence Mining Co. in 1986 and I.M.C. has subsequently completed additional drilling, both stepout and confirmation holes. A total of 137 holes for 300,833 ft have been drilled. The Sugar Creek deposit is a typical Tennessee zinc deposit (Mississippi Valley Type) which occurs in solution collapse breccias in the Lower Ordovician, Knox Dolomite. The Knox consists of fine grained dolomite with interlayered limestones and crystalline dolomite. Only scattered residual limestone is found in the Sugar Creek area. Collapse breccias have formed which control zinc deposition and are similar to other TN Zn. deposits. At Sugar Creek the types of breccias include: a vertically exaggerated glory hole breakthrough breccia which extends to within 137 ft. of the Knox unconformity, has 500 ft. of zinc mineralization with 8 significant zinc intervals; holes with stacked zinc intervals interpreted to be sides of breakthrough breccia; and single zinc intervals in laterally positioned bedded mineral zones. A total of 99 holes were drilled in the more intense mineralized areas. The ratio of ore to non ore holes is nearly 1 to 1. The mineralization is typical M.V.T. with predominantly sphalerite and only minor occurrences of galena, fluorite, pyrite, etc.

Reinbold, G.; Moran, A.V.; Stevens, D.L. (Independence Mining Co. Inc., Reno, NV (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dl dolomitic limestone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

u.s. Dl!PARThIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PARThIENT OF ENERGY PARThIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION Page 1 of2 RECIPIENT: University of Oregon STATE: OR PROJECT TITLE: Vapor Transport Deposition for Thin Film III-V Photovoltaics fo'unding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA..()()()()654 DE-EEOOO5957 GF0-0005957·0Q1 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NI<:PA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination : ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering, analysis, and dissemination Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visits, and audits). data analysis (including, but not limited to, computer modeling), document preparation

102

u.s. Dl!PAR1'M:ENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PAR1'M:ENT OF ENERGY PAR1'M:ENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlIIINATION RECIPIENT :University of California San Diego PROJECT TITL.E: San Diego Center for Algae Biotechnology Page 1 of2 STATE: CA Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instnlment Number NEPA Control Number em Number EEOOO3142 GF0-10-582 EE3142 Based on my review ortbe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorukd under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 83.6 Siting . construction (or modification), operation, and deoommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations (for example. preparation of chemical standards and sample analYSIS):

103

u.s. Dl!PARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER Nl!PA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PARTMENT OF ENERGY PARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER Nl!PA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:WA Dept of Commerce Page 1 of3 STATE: WA PROJECT TITLE: SEP ARRA · WSU Anaerobic Digester - Nutrient Recovery Technology - Vander Haak Dairy Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number EEOOOO139 GF0-0000139-040 0 Based on my review of the Information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4S1.1A), I have made tbe following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering, analysis, and dissemination Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visils, and audits), data analysis (including

104

AHDC FACT SHEET 1 DL-1030 5/06 TRANSTRACHEAL WASH PROCEDURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University In Partnership with the NYS Dept of Ag & Markets US Postal Service enough, coughing by the animal may flip the tip toward the larynx, resulting in a pharyngeal wash

Keinan, Alon

105

3.1.1.2 Feed Processing and Handling DL2 Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This milestone report is the deliverable for our Feed Processing and Handling project. It includes results of wet biomass feedstock analysis, slurry pumping information, fungal processing to produce a lignin-rich biorefinery residue and two subcontracted efforts to quantify the amount of wet biomass feedstocks currently available within the corn processing and paper processing industries.

Elliott, Douglas C.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Wend, Christopher F.

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

106

REACTIVITY LIFETIME. TEST RESULTS DL-S-225(T-612118A). Section I, Second Performance  

SciTech Connect

The performance, reliability, stability, and reactivity lifetime variations of the Shippingport PWR are determined under normal steady state conditions. These characteristics are studied over a period of 758 EFPH, at a power level of about 60 Mw(e). Flux-tilt corrections and plant operations during this time are described. (T.F.H.)

1959-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Query Answering over DL ABoxes: How to Pick the Relevant Symbols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in ALCF. Some longer proofs have been moved to the appendix. 2 Preliminaries We consider various DLs. An analogous statement fails, e.g., for ALCF. To see this, take T = { ( 1 r) A} and = {r}. Then A is IQ thus also CQ-) relevance, and a NExpTimeNP upper bound; for ALCF, we prove undecidability of IQ

Wolter, Frank

108

Query Answering over DL ABoxes: How to Pick the Relevant Symbols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is decidable in ALC and ALCI, but relevance regarding instance queries is unde- cidable in ALCF and relevance.g., for ALCF. To see this, take T = { ( 1 r) A} and = {r}. Then A is IQ- and CQ-relevant with UNA due of IQ- (and thus also CQ-) relevance, and a NExpTimeNP upper bound; for ALCF, we prove undecidability

Lutz, Carsten

109

Ontology-driven relational query formulation using the semantic and assertional capabilities of OWL-DL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work investigates the extent to which domain knowledge, expressed in a domain ontology, can assist end-users in formulating relational queries that can be executed over a complex relational database. In this regard, an ontology-driven query formulation ... Keywords: Data retrieval, Domain knowledge, Information systems, Ontology, Query formulation

K. Munir; M. Odeh; R. Mcclatchey

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Geochemistry of Precambrian carbonates: 3-shelf seas and non-marine environments of the Archean  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive whole-rock study of mineralogical, chemical, and isotopic attributes of Archean carbonates suggests that their lithologies and facies have been controlled by tectonic setting. In the first two papers of this series they have shown that the dominant lithology of sedimentary carbonates in greenstone belt settings is limestone. In this paper the authors suggest that the Archean shelf sequences are mostly dolostone, and the contemporaneous lacustrine playa lakes are characterized by limestone facies. The present study is of the shelf environments of the Archean, represented by the Pongola Supergroup of South Africa and the Hamersley Group of Australia. The lacustrine playa examples have been sampled from the Ventersdorp Supergroup of South Africa and the Fortescue Group of Australia. Geological, trace element, and oxygen isotope considerations of the shelf carbonates suggest that their original mineralogy may have been aragonite and that the Pongola dolostones probably represent a direct dolomitization product of this precursor. In contrast, the stabilization of the Hamersley carbonates may have involved an additional step of transformation of a metastable precursor into limestone prior to dolomitization.

Veizer, J. (Univ. of Ottawa, Ontario (Canada) Ruhr Universitaet, Bochum (West Germany)); Clayton, R.N. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (USA)); Hinton, R.W. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (USA) Grant Institute of Geology, Edinburgh (England)); von Brunn, V. (Univ. of Natal Pietermaritzburg (South Africa)); Mason, T.R. (Univ. of Natal, Durban (South Africa)); Buck, S.G. (Anglo-American Corp. of South Africa Ltd., Welkom (South Africa)); Hoefs, J. (Geochemisches Institut der Universitaet, Goettingen (West Germany))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

REVIVING ABANDONED RESERVOIRS WITH HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company have assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The characterization phase of the project is utilizing geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. This model will be used to define a field deployment plant that Goldrus, a small independent oil company, will implement by drilling both vertical and horizontal wells during the demonstration phase of the project. Additional reservoir data are being gathered during the demonstration phase to improve the accuracy of the reservoir model. The results of the demonstration are being closely monitored to provide a basis for improving the design of the HPAI field deployment plan. The results of the reservoir characterization field demonstration and monitoring program will be documented and widely disseminated to facilitate adoption of this technology by oil operators in the Permian Basin and elsewhere in the US.

Robert Loucks; Steve Ruppel; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jon Olsen; Deanna Combs; Dhiraj Dembla; Leonel Gomez

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

REVIVING ABANDONED RESERVOIRS WITH HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) and Goldrus Producing Company have assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The characterization phase of the project is utilizing geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) and the Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. This model will be used to define a field deployment plan that Goldrus, a small independent oil company, will implement by drilling both vertical and horizontal wells during the demonstration phase of the project. Additional reservoir data were to be generated during the demonstration phase to improve the accuracy of the reservoir model. The demonstration phase has been delayed by Goldrus because of funding problems. Since the first of the year, Goldrus has been active in searching for partners to help finance the project. To this end it has commissioned several small consulting studies to technically support its effort to secure a partner. After financial support is obtained, the demonstration phase of the project will proceed. Since just after the beginning of the year, BEG has curtailed project activities and spending of DOE funds except for the continued support of one engineering student. This student has now completed his work and has written a thesis describing his research (titled ''Stimulating enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in west Texas light oil reservoir''). We plan to recommence our work on the project as soon as the operator obtains necessary funding to carry out the demonstration phase of the project. In order to complete all activities specified in the proposal, it will be necessary to request an extension of the project from the originally defined completion date. We are confident that Goldrus will obtain the necessary funding to continue and that we can complete the project if an extension is granted. We strongly believe that the results of this study will provide the impetus for a new approach to enhanced oil recovery in the Permian Basin and elsewhere in the United States.

Robert Loucks; Steve Ruppel; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jon Olson; Deanna Combs; Dhiraj Dembla

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

REVIVING ABANDONED RESERVOIRS WITH HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR  

SciTech Connect

The field operator, Goldrus Producing Company, has been unable to secure funding needed to continue the field demonstration phase of the project. Accordingly, we have temporarily halted all project activities until necessary funding is obtained. Goldrus felt confident that funds could be acquired by third quarter 2005 at which time it would have been necessary to request a project extension to complete the originally designed study. A project extension was granted but it appears Goldrus will have difficulty securing funds. We Bureau of Economic Geology are investigating a new approach on how to fulfill our initial objectives of promoting high-pressure air injection of Ellenburger reservoirs.

Robert Loucks; Stephen C. Ruppel

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Reviving Abandoned Reservoirs with High-Pressure Air Injection: Application in a Fractured and Karsted Dolomite Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

The field operator, Goldrus Producing Company, has been unable to secure funding needed to continue the field demonstration phase of the project. Accordingly, we have temporarily halted all project activities until necessary funding is obtained. Goldrus is confident that funds can be acquired by third quarter 2005 at which time it will be necessary to request a project extension to complete the originally designed study.

Robert Loucks; Stephen C. Ruppel

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

115

REVIVING ABANDONED RESERVOIRS WITH HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) and Goldrus Producing Company have assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The characterization phase of the project is utilizing geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) and the Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. This model will be used to define a field deployment plan that Goldrus, a small independent oil company, will implement by drilling both vertical and horizontal wells during the demonstration phase of the project. Additional reservoir data were to be generated during the demonstration phase to improve the accuracy of the reservoir model. The demonstration phase has been delayed by Goldrus because of funding problems. Since the first of the year, Goldrus has been active in searching for partners to help finance the project. After financial support is obtained, the demonstration phase of the project will proceed. Since just after the beginning of the year, BEG has curtailed project activities and spending of DOE funds except for the continued support of one engineering student. This student has now completed his work and his thesis was reported on in the last semi-annual report. We plan to recommence our work on the project as soon as the operator obtains necessary funding to carry out the demonstration phase of the project. In order to complete all activities specified in the proposal, we requested and received an extension of the project to September 30, 2005. We are confident that Goldrus will obtain the necessary funding to continue and that we can complete the project by the end of the extension data. We strongly believe that the results of this study will provide the impetus for a new approach to enhanced oil recovery in the Permian Basin and elsewhere in the United States.

Robert Loucks; Steve Ruppel; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jon Olson

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Disseminated `jigsaw piece' dolomite in Upper Jurassic shelf sandstones, Central North Sea: an example of cement growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Geology and Geophysics, University of Edinburgh, Grant Institute, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JW, UK àIsotope §Department of Geology and Petroleum Geology, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UE, UK ABSTRACT Unusual by late diagenetic ankerite, and bulk samples display stable isotope compositions that lie on a mixing

Haszeldine, Stuart

117

Reviving Abandoned Reservoirs with High-Pressure Air Injection: Application in a Fractured and Karsted Dolomite Reservoir  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the United States contain vast volumes of remaining oil that is not being effectively recovered. This oil resource constitutes a huge target for the development and application of modern, cost-effective technologies for producing oil. Chief among the barriers to the recovery of this oil are the high costs of designing and implementing conventional advanced recovery technologies in these mature, in many cases pressure-depleted, reservoirs. An additional, increasingly significant barrier is the lack of vital technical expertise necessary for the application of these technologies. This lack of expertise is especially notable among the small operators and independents that operate many of these mature, yet oil-rich, reservoirs. We addressed these barriers to more effective oil recovery by developing, testing, applying, and documenting an innovative technology that can be used by even the smallest operator to significantly increase the flow of oil from mature U.S. reservoirs. The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The Permian Basin, the largest oil-bearing basin in North America, contains more than 70 billion barrels of remaining oil in place and is an ideal venue to validate this technology. We have demonstrated the potential of HPAI for oil-recovery improvement in preliminary laboratory tests and a reservoir pilot project. To more completely test the technology, this project emphasized detailed characterization of reservoir properties, which were integrated to access the effectiveness and economics of HPAI. The characterization phase of the project utilized geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. The successful development of HPAI technology has tremendous potential for increasing the flow of oil from deep carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin, a target resource that can be conservatively estimated at more than 1.5 billion barrels. Successful implementation in the field chosen for demonstration, for example, could result in the recovery of more than 34 million barrels of oil that will not otherwise be produced. Geological and petrophysical analysis of available data at Barnhart field reveals the following important observations: (1) the Barnhart Ellenburger reservoir is similar to most other Ellenburger reservoirs in terms of depositional facies, diagenesis, and petrophysical attributes; (2) the reservoir is characterized by low to moderate matrix porosity much like most other Ellenburger reservoirs in the Permian Basin; (3) karst processes (cave formation, infill, and collapse) have substantially altered stratigraphic architecture and reservoir properties; (4) porosity and permeability increase with depth and may be associated with the degree of karst-related diagenesis; (5) tectonic fractures overprint the reservoir, improving overall connectivity; (6) oil-saturation profiles show that the oil-water contact (OWC) is as much as 125 ft lower than previous estimations; (7) production history and trends suggest that this reservoir is very similar to other solution-gas-drive reservoirs in the Permian Basin; and (8) reservoir simulation study showed that the Barnhart reservoir is a good candidate for HPAI and that application of horizontal-well technology can improve ultimate resource recovery from the reservoir.

Robert Loucks; Stephen C. Ruppel; Dembla Dhiraj; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jeff Kane; Jon Olson; John A. Jackson; Katherine G. Jackson

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

118

Geoscience/engineering characterization of the interwell environment in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico - petrophysical characterization of the South Cowden Grayburg Reservoir, Ector County, Texas. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Reservoir performance of the South Cowden Grayburg field suggests that only 21 percent of the original oil in place has been recovered. The purpose of this study is to construct a realistic reservoir model to be used to predict the location of the remaining mobile oil. Construction of reservoir models for fluid-flow simulation of carbonate reservoirs is difficult because they typically have complicated and unpredictable permeability patterns. Much of the difficulty results from the degree to which diagenetic overprinting masks depositional textures and patterns. For example, the task of constructing a reservoir model of a limestone reservoir that has undergone only cementation and compaction is easier than constructing a model of a karsted reservoir that has undergone cavern formation and collapse as well as cementation and compaction. The Permian-age carbonate-ramp reservoirs in the Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico, are typically anhydritic dolomitized limestone. Because the dolomitization occurred soon after deposition, depositional fabrics and patterns are often retained, and a reservoir model can be constructed using depositional concepts. Recent studies of the San Andres outcrop in the Guadalupe Mountains and the Seminole San Andres reservoir in the Permian Basin illustrate how depositional fabrics and patterns can be used to construct a reservoir model when depositional features are retained.

Lucia, F.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Stratigraphic and structural framework of ellesmerian and older sequences in Sadlerochit and Shublik Mountains, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), northeastern Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed geological mapping (1:25,000 scale) and stratigraphic reconstructions in the Sadlerochit and Shublik Mountains of northeastern Alaska, immediately south of the ANWR coastal plain, indicate a compressive structural province dominated by major thrust-ramp-related anticlinal uplifts. The Katakturuk Dolomite, a Proterozoic sequence, has been subdivided into 15 lithostratigraphic units that can be traced the entire length of both the Sadlerochit and Shublik Mountains. Overlying the Katakturuk Dolomite in these ranges in the Middle Devonian to Cambrian or older Nanook Limestone. In the Early Mississippian a major erosional event produced the pre-Mississippian unconformity upon which a Mississippian through Triassic sequence was deposited: Kayak Shale; Lisburne Group carbonates; and Sadlerochit Group clastic rocks. In the northern Sadlerochit Mountains, basal units of the Mississippian Alapah Limestone lie on the pre-Mississippian unconformity with no intervening Kayak Shale. The basal Alapah contains lithologies derived from the rock units on which it rests, indicating that the contact between the Alapah and the underlying units is depositional.

Robinson, M.S.; Decker, J.; Clough, J.G.; Dillon, J.T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Stratigraphic and structural framework of Ellesmerian and older sequences in Sadlerochit and Shublik Mountains, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), northeastern Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed geological mapping (1:25,000 scale) and stratigraphic reconstructions in the Sadlerochit and Shublik Mountains of northeastern Alaska, immediately south of the ANWR coastal plain, indicate a compressive structural province dominated by major thrust-ramp-related anticlinal uplifts. The Katakturuk Dolomite, a Proterozoic sequence, has been subdivided into 15 lithostratigraphic units that can be traced the entire length of both the Sadlerochit and Shublik Mountains. Overlying the Katakturuk Dolomite in these ranges is the Middle Devonian to Cambrian or older Nanook Limestone. In the Early Mississippian a major erosional event produced the pre-Mississippian unconformity upon which a Mississippian through Triassic sequence was deposited: (A) Kayak Shale; (B) Lisburne Group carbonates; and (C) Sadlerochit Group clastic rocks. In the northern Sadlerochit Mountains, basal units of the Mississippian Alapah Limestone lie on the pre-Mississippian unconformity with no intervening Kayak Shale. The basal Alapah contains lithologies derived from the rocks units on which it rests, indicating that the contact between the Alapah and the underlying units is depositional. A regional decollement, localized along the pre-Mississippian unconformity in the Kayak Shale, is not a significant detachment surface north of the Shublik Mountains because the Kayak Shale is depositionally discontinuous and thin in the Sadlerochit Mountains.

Robinson, M.S.; Decker, J.; Clough, J.G.; Dillon, J.T.; Wallace, W.K.; Crowder, K.; Watts, K. (Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, Fairbanks (USA))

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dl dolomitic limestone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

NITROGEN, LIMESTONE AND PHOSPHOGYPSUM EFFECTS IN SOME LATOSOL CHARACTERISTICS AND GLADIOLUS DEVELOPMENT.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work was developed in Gardening at UFMS (Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul) NCA (Ncleo Experimental de Cincias Agrrias), from September 2004 to (more)

MARCELO GANCEDO

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

NITROGEN, LIMESTONE AND PHOSPHOGYPSUM EFFECTS IN SOME LATOSOL CHARACTERISTICS AND GLADIOLUS DEVELOPMENT.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Este trabalho foi desenvolvido na rea de Jardinocultura do Ncleo Experimental de Cincias Agrrias da UFMS, durante o perodo de setembro de 2004 a fevereiro (more)

MARCELO GANCEDO

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Permian {open_quotes}Wolfcamp{close_quotes} limestone reservoirs: Powell Ranch field, Eastern Midland Basin  

SciTech Connect

Deep-water carbonate channel reservoirs form important oil reservoirs along the toe of the Eastern Shelf of the Permian basin in west Texas. In northwestern Glasscock County, these `Wolfcamp` reservoirs are Leonardian (Early Permian) in age and define high-energy channels incised into surrounding carbonate detritus and basinal shale. Porous grain-flow material filling these channels, along with encasing detritus, was derived from the shallow shelf located six miles to the east. Reservoirs are in packstone and grainstone facies and have significant interparticle and moldic porosity. Relevant exploration began in the 1960s, but expanded slowly thereafter due to lack of success caused by complex patterns of channel occurrence. Results of a three-dimensional (3-D) seismic survey conducted in 1990 have greatly enhanced the identification and mapping of productive channels in the Powell Ranch field complex. Wells in this complex are capable of flowing 400-1200 bbl of oil per day, and have reserves ranging from 0.2 to 1.3 MBO. The new 3-D data have improved the relevant geologic model and dramatically increased rates of drilling success. Application of such data to this setting offers a potential model for other parts of the Permian basin.

Montgomery, S.L. [Petroleum Consultant, Seattle, WA (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Permian `Wolfcamp` limestone reservoirs: Powell ranch field, eastern Midland basin: Discussion  

SciTech Connect

The {open_quotes}E&P Notes{close_quotes} paper by S.L. Montgomery (1996) on Wolfcamp resedimented carbonates in the Permian basin concerns an exploration play with the potential for significant reserves; however, its economic importance and geological complexity, and the question of whether his model can be extended to other areas in the Permian basin warrant this discussion.

Mazzullo, S.J. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Stabilization and/or regeneration of spent sorbents from coal gasification. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this investigation was to determine the effects of SO{sub 2} partial pressure and reaction temperature on the conversion of sulfide containing solid wastes from coal gasifiers to stable and environmentally acceptable calcium sulfate, while preventing the release of sulfur dioxide during the stabilization step. An additional objective of this study was to investigate the use of the Spent Sorbent Regeneration Process (SSRP) to regenerate spent Ca-based sorbent, from a fluidized-bed gasifier with in-bed sulfur capture, for recycling to the gasifier. To achieve these objectives, selected samples of partially sulfided sorbents were reacted with oxygen and SO{sub 2} at various operating conditions and the extent of CaS and CaO conversion were determined. Partially sulfided dolomite was used in sulfidation/regeneration over several cycles and the regeneration efficiency and sorbent reactivity were determined after each cycle. The results of the stabilization tests show that partially sulfided Ca-based sorbents (both limestone and dolomite) can be sulfated at temperatures above 1500{degrees}F resulting in high CaS conversion without release of SO{sub 2} producing environmentally acceptable material for disposal in landfills. The results also indicate that spent dolomite can be regenerated in the SSRP process, in successive cycles, with high regeneration efficiency without loss of reactivity toward hydrogen sulfide.

Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H.; Wangerow, J.R. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

A shape memory stent of poly(e-caprolactone-co-DL-lactide) copolymer for potential treatment of esophageal stenosis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flour (wheat flour, niacin, reduced iron, thiamin, monoitrate, riboflavin, folate) - sugar - soy flour

Grunlan, Melissa A.

127

Virtual Grids: Resource Abstractions for Grid Applications 8/9/2004 The Virtual Grid Description Language: vgDL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of distributed grid application? - What resource models are sufficient to enable expression by the programmer CNode Execution DatabasesDatabases Figure 5. Parallel Workers and Databases EOL (EOL3) Smart-Distributed Databases Databases Figure 6. Smart-Distributed EOL (EOL4) Data Smart Distributed EOL (EOL5) EOL5 has all

Chien, Andrew A.

128

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fluid-Bed Gasifier/Modular Gas Cleanup Rig Fluid-Bed Gasifier/Modular Gas Cleanup Rig NETL is developing a technology base for tomorrow's highly efficient, near-zero-emissions power plants including FutureGen. One of the promising technologies NETL is pursuing is advanced fluidized-bed combustion (FBC). Pressurized FBC (PFBC) systems use a mixture of burning coal, a sorbent such as limestone or dolomite, and jets of air to produce a high-pressure gas stream at temperatures that can drive a gas turbine. Steam generated from the heat in the fluidized bed may be sent to a steam turbine, creating a highly efficient combined-cycle system. Removing and recovering particulates and contaminants from the gas and steam are accomplished in treatment vessels once combustion has occurred. PFBC may also play a role in hydrogen fuel production.

129

Reclamation of abandoned surface coal mined land using flue gas desulfurization products  

SciTech Connect

Details are given of a field-scale research project where the Fleming site, in Ohio, of highly degraded and acid-forming abandoned surface coal-mined land, was reclaimed using a dry flue gas desulfurization product from an atmospheric fluidized bed combustion burner at a General Motors plant Pontiac, MI, which burned eastern Ohio coal and used dolomitic limestone for desulfurization. Plots were seeded with a mixture of grasses, wheat and clover, in 1994 and soil and water samples were analysed in 1995 and in 2009. It was found that FGD-treated plots promoted good regenerative growth, similar to that in plots using more concentrated re-soil material. The FGD treatment also greatly improved overall water quality. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Chen, L.; Kost, D.; Dick, W.A. [Ohio State University, OH (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Concealed evaporite basin drilled in Arizona  

SciTech Connect

The White Mountains of Arizona are a high forested plateau underlain by volcanic rocks of Late Pliocene and Quaternary age on the south margin of the Colorado plateau province. Elevations range from 6,000--11,590 ft, with winter snow and summer rain but ideal conditions for much of the year. There was no evidence of a Permian evaporite basin concealed beneath the White Mountain volcanic field until 1993, when the Tonto 1 Alpine-Federal, a geothermal test well, was drilled. This test did not encounter thermal waters, but it did encounter a surprisingly thick and unexpected sequence of anhydrite, dolomite, and petroliferous limestone assigned to the Supai (Yeso) formation of Permian age. The Tonto test was continuously cored through the Permian section, providing invaluable information that is now stored at the Arizona Geological Survey in Tucson. The paper describes the area geology and the concealed basin.

Rauzi, S.L. [Arizona Geological Survey, Tucson, AZ (United States)

1996-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

131

Coke briquettes  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a briquette suitable for use as an auxiliary fuel in a shaft furnace for melting of mineral in the manufacture of mineral wool which comprises: 30-75% by weight, based on the dry weight of the briquettes, of particles of coke fines or coal fines or both, the fines consisting essentially of particles having a particle size of from 2 to 25 mm; at least 7% by weight, based on the dry weight of the briquette, of a hydraulic binder; and at least 15% by weight, based on the dry weight of the briquette, of a fine grain oxidic mineral component selected from the group consisting of sand, slag, stone powder, fly ash, limestone powder, dolomite powder, silicon dioxide, and waste material from mineral wool manufacturer, the fine grain oxidic mineral component having a particle size of less than 2 mm.

Anderson, D.B.; Juhlin, N.J.W.; Gillenium, C.I.; Kjell-Berger, O.; Brinck, O.R.

1987-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

132

Influence of pre-Mississippian paleogeology on Carboniferous Lisburne Group, Arctic National Wildlife refuge, northeastern Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Carboniferous Lisburne Group of northern Alaska formed an extensive carbonate platform, which was later deformed as part of the Brooks Range fold and thrust belt. In the northeast, the Lisburne Group is parautochthonous and analogous to that at Prudhoe Bay. The Lisburne's paleogeography and facies relationships pertain to assessment of the petroleum potential of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). The Franklinian paleogeology, unconformably underlying the Ellesmerian sequence, has influenced sedimentation patterns in the Lisburne Group. The transgressive Endicott Group (Kekiktuk Conglomerate and Kayak, Shale) and Lisburne Group thin northward over Franklinian basement highs. In the Sadlerochit Mountains, the Katakturuk Dolomite formed a paleotopographic high over which the Endicott Group inched out and the Lisburne Group thinned. Shallow-marine oolitic grainstone developed in the cyclic Pennsylvanian Wahoo Limestone.

Watts, K.F.; Carlson, R.; Imm, T.; Gruzlovic, P.; Hanks, C.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Mexico's giant fields, 1978-1988 decade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Twenty giant oil and gas fields were discovered in Mexico during the period of 1978-1988. The fields, located in adjacent areas, are described in terms of stratigraphy, tectonics, and general characteristics of the reservoirs. Production and reserves figures are also included. The two main oil productive areas in Mexico, Chiapas-Tabasco and offshore Campeche Sound, contribute 92% of Mexico's Mesozoic production. Production comes from Upper Jurassic carbonates; Cretaceous calcareous breccias, limestones, and dolomites; and from lower Paleocene calcareous breccias. The fields represented include 11 from the Chiapas-Tabasco area (Agave, Paredon, Iris, Giraldas, Cardenas, Jujo, Bellota, Tecominoacan, Muspac, Sen, and Luna) and nine from the the Campeche Sound area (Abkatun, Ku, Chuc, Ek, Pol, Malob, Caan, Uech, and Batab).

Acevedo, J.S.; Pemex, A.B.S.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Results of deep exploratory drilling between long and Newark Valleys, White Pine County, Nevada - implications for oil migration in the nearby Yankee gold mine paleohydrothermal system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In mid-1992, a consortium headed by Pioneer Oil and Gas (Midvale, Utah) drilled a deep (6700 ft) exploratory well in the southern Ruby Mountains-Buck Mountain are near the Alligator Ridge mining district in White Pine County, Nevada. The test well is located 1.5 mi southwest of USMX, Inc.'s, Yankee gold mine, an open-pit operation centered on a Carlin-type, sediment-hosted gold orebody noteworthy for containing abundant, fracture-controlled live oil. The Pioneer well as dry, but intersected much of the same stratigraphic section hosting gold at Yankee, thereby providing valuable clues to mechanisms of oil migration at this unusual, oil-bearing precious-metal deposit. Most of the gold at Yankee is hosted by the Devonian Pilot Shale, with a basal argillaceous limestone containing the bulk of the deposit's live oil. The equivalent section in the Pioneer wildcat well is a silty calcareous dolomite. Whereas the basal Pilot limestone at Yankee is rich in thick, locally gold- and arsenic-anomalous calcite veins and modules hosting abundant oil-bearing fluid inclusion, the basal Pilot dolomite in the Pioneer well contains only a few thin calcite-pyrite veinlets devoid of fluid inclusions. Moreover, the Yankee calcite veins have the same light-stable-isotope signatures as hydrothermal carbonate veins near or elsewhere in the Alligator Ridge district. These relationships imply that oil at Yankee migrated in the same hydrothermal system responsible for gold mineralization. Such systems elsewhere in the eastern Basin and Range, given favorable source rocks, traps, seals, and migratory pathways, might well have formed not only gold deposits, but also rich, spatially coincident oil reservoirs.

Pinnell, M.L. (Pioneer Oil and Gas, Midvale, UT (United States)); Hulen, J.B. (Univ. of Utah Research Institute, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); Cox, J.W. (USMX, Reno, NV (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

The use of FBC wastes in the reclamation of coal slurry solids. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) is a relatively new technology that is used commercially for the combustion of coal. In Illinois, this technology is valuable because it allows the combustion of Illinois high sulfur coal without pollution of the atmosphere with vast quantities of sulfur oxides. In FBC, coal is mixed with limestone or dolomite either before injection into the combustion chamber or in the combustion chamber. As the coal burns, sulfur in the coal is oxidized to SO{sub 2} and this is trapped by reaction with the limestone or dolomite to form gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O). Solid by-products from FBC are generally a mixture of calcium oxide, gypsum, coal ash, and unburned coal. The present research project is designed to provide initial data on one possible use of FBC waste. FBC wastes from five different locations in the Illinois are mixed with coal slurry solids from two different coal preparation plants at Illinois coal mines. In mixtures of FBC waste and coal slurry solids, the alkaline components of the FBC waste are expected to react with acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in the coal slurry solid. An objective of this research is to determine the chemical composition of aqueous leachates from mixtures of FBC wastes, generated under various operating conditions, and the coal slurry solids. These data will be used in future research into the ability of such mixtures to support seed germination and plant growth. The ultimate of this and future research is to determine whether mixed FBC waste and coal slurry solids can be slurry pond reclamation.

Dreher, G.B.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

The use of FBC wastes in the reclamation of coal slurry solids  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) is a relatively new technology that is used commercially for the combustion of coal. In Illinois, this technology is valuable because it allows the combustion of Illinois high sulfur coal without pollution of the atmosphere with vast quantities of sulfur oxides. In FBC, coal is mixed with limestone or dolomite either before injection into the combustion chamber or in the combustion chamber. As the coal burns, sulfur in the coal is oxidized to SO{sub 2} and this is trapped by reaction with the limestone or dolomite to form gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{center dot}2H{sub 2}O). Solid by-products from FBC are generally a mixture of calcium oxide, gypsum, coal ash, and unburned coal. The present research project is designed to provide initial data on one possible use of FBC waste. FBC wastes from five different locations in the Illinois are mixed with coal slurry solids from two different coal preparation plants at Illinois coal mines. In mixtures of FBC waste and coal slurry solids, the alkaline components of the FBC waste are expected to react with acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in the coal slurry solid. An objective of this research is to determine the chemical composition of aqueous leachates from mixtures of FBC wastes, generated under various operating conditions, and the coal slurry solids. These data will be used in future research into the ability of such mixtures to support seed germination and plant growth. The ultimate of this and future research is to determine whether mixed FBC waste and coal slurry solids can be slurry pond reclamation.

Dreher, G.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Developing an exploration model by investigating the geological controls on reservoir production within the Fort Scott limestone, Ness county, Kansas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ness County, Kansas is situated along the western flank of the Central Kansas uplift, and has been an active center of oil exploration since the (more)

Flenthrope, Christopher

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Wall-rock alteration and uranium mineralization in parts of Thomas Range Mining District, San Juan County, Utah, and its significance in mineral exploration  

SciTech Connect

Several important uranium deposits associated with fluorspar and beryllium are located in parts of Thomas Range area. the mineralization is found in dolomites and dolomitic limestones of Paleozoic age and sandstones, tuffs, and rhyolites belonging to the Tertiary Spor Mountain and Topaz Mountain Formations. The pipes, veins, and nodules of fluorspar are replaced by uranium. Veins and disseminations of radioactive fluorspar and opal and overgrowths of secondary minerals are found in rhyolites, tuffs, carbonate rocks, and breccias. The radioactivity in sandstones and conglomerates emanates from weeksite, beta-uranophane, zircon, gummite, and zircon. It also occurs as highly oxidized rare aphanitic grains disseminated in a few ore deposits. The results of the present investigations may influence the initiation of future exploration programs in the Thomas Range mining district. Hydrothermal fluids of deep-seated magmatic origin rich in U, V, Th, Be, and F reacted with the country rocks. The nature and sequence of wall-rock alteration and its paragenetic relationship with the ores have been determined. The mineralization is confined to the altered zones. The ore bodies in the sedimentary rocks and the breccias are located in the fault zones. More than 1000 faults are present in the area, greatly complicating mineral prospecting. The wall-rock alteration is very conspicuous and can be used as a valuable tool in mineral exploration.

Mohammad, H.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Application of coiled-tubing-drilling technology on a deep underpressured gas reservoir  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Upper-Mississippian Elkton formation is a dolomitized shallow-water carbonate consisting of dense limestones and porous dolomites. The Elkton was deposited in an open-shelf environment as crinoid grainstones, coral packstones, and lime muds. Deposition of impermeable shales and siltstones of the Lower Cretaceous created the lateral and updip seals. Reservoir thickness can be up to 20 m, with porosities reaching 20% and averaging 10%. The reservoir gas contains approximately 0.5% hydrogen sulfide. Well 11-18 was to be completed in the Harmatten Elkton pool. The pool went on production in 1967 at an initial pressure of 23,500 kPa. At the current pressure of 16,800 kPa, the remaining reserves are underpressured at 6.5 kPa/m, and underbalanced horizontal drilling was selected as the most suitable technique for exploiting remaining reserves. Coiled-tubing (CT) technology was selected to ensure continuous underbalanced conditions and maintain proper well control while drilling. The paper describes the equipment, CT drilling summary, and drilling issues.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales -- Sulfur control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This topical report on Sulfur Control'' presents the results of work conducted by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), and the Ohio State University (OSU) to develop three novel approaches for desulfurization that have shown good potential with coal and could be cost-effective for oil shales. These are (1) In-Bed Sulfur Capture using different sorbents (IGT), (2) Electrostatic Desulfurization (IIT), and (3) Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification (OSU and IGT). The objective of the task on In-Bed Sulfur Capture was to determine the effectiveness of different sorbents (that is, limestone, calcined limestone, dolomite, and siderite) for capturing sulfur (as H{sub 2}S) in the reactor during hydroretorting. The objective of the task on Electrostatic Desulfurization was to determine the operating conditions necessary to achieve a high degree of sulfur removal and kerogen recovery in IIT's electrostatic separator. The objectives of the task on Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification were to (1) isolate microbial cultures and evaluate their ability to desulfurize and denitrify shale, (2) conduct laboratory-scale batch and continuous tests to improve and enhance microbial removal of these components, and (3) determine the effects of processing parameters, such as shale slurry concentration, solids settling characteristics, agitation rate, and pH on the process.

Roberts, M.J.; Abbasian, J.; Akin, C.; Lau, F.S.; Maka, A.; Mensinger, M.C.; Punwani, D.V.; Rue, D.M. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)); Gidaspow, D.; Gupta, R.; Wasan, D.T. (Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States)); Pfister, R.M.: Krieger, E.J. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dl dolomitic limestone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales -- Sulfur control. Topical report for Subtask 3.1, In-bed sulfur capture tests; Subtask 3.2, Electrostatic desulfurization; Subtask 3.3, Microbial desulfurization and denitrification  

SciTech Connect

This topical report on ``Sulfur Control`` presents the results of work conducted by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), and the Ohio State University (OSU) to develop three novel approaches for desulfurization that have shown good potential with coal and could be cost-effective for oil shales. These are (1) In-Bed Sulfur Capture using different sorbents (IGT), (2) Electrostatic Desulfurization (IIT), and (3) Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification (OSU and IGT). The objective of the task on In-Bed Sulfur Capture was to determine the effectiveness of different sorbents (that is, limestone, calcined limestone, dolomite, and siderite) for capturing sulfur (as H{sub 2}S) in the reactor during hydroretorting. The objective of the task on Electrostatic Desulfurization was to determine the operating conditions necessary to achieve a high degree of sulfur removal and kerogen recovery in IIT`s electrostatic separator. The objectives of the task on Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification were to (1) isolate microbial cultures and evaluate their ability to desulfurize and denitrify shale, (2) conduct laboratory-scale batch and continuous tests to improve and enhance microbial removal of these components, and (3) determine the effects of processing parameters, such as shale slurry concentration, solids settling characteristics, agitation rate, and pH on the process.

Roberts, M.J.; Abbasian, J.; Akin, C.; Lau, F.S.; Maka, A.; Mensinger, M.C.; Punwani, D.V.; Rue, D.M. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Gidaspow, D.; Gupta, R.; Wasan, D.T. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States); Pfister, R.M.: Krieger, E.J. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and nitrogen oxides (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison's Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0[sub 2] removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0[sub 2] emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

143

LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration. [Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison`s Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0{sub 2} removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0{sub 2} emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

144

Dear Swapan, I'm leaving DL today. My wife, my son, and I all want to tell you thank you very much  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

appreciate every kindness of all people in the laboratory. By the way, DIY abilities of UK people are so

145

Effects of diesel fuel combustion-modifier additives on In-cylinder soot formation in a heavy-duty Dl diesel engine.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based on a phenomenological model of diesel combustion and pollutant-formation processes, a number of fuel additives that could potentially reduce in-cylinder soot formation by altering combustion chemistry have been identified. These fuel additives, or ''combustion modifiers'', included ethanol and ethylene glycol dimethyl ether, polyethylene glycol dinitrate (a cetane improver), succinimide (a dispersant), as well as nitromethane and another nitro-compound mixture. To better understand the chemical and physical mechanisms by which these combustion modifiers may affect soot formation in diesel engines, in-cylinder soot and diffusion flame lift-off were measured, using an optically-accessible, heavy-duty, direct-injection diesel engine. A line-of-sight laser extinction diagnostic was employed to measure the relative soot concentration within the diesel jets (''jetsoot'') as well as the rates of deposition of soot on the piston bowl-rim (''wall-soot''). An OH chemiluminescence imaging technique was utilized to measure the lift-off lengths of the diesel diffusion flames so that fresh oxygen entrainment rates could be compared among the fuels. Measurements were obtained at two operating conditions, using blends of a base commercial diesel fuel with various combinations of the fuel additives. The ethanol additive, at 10% by mass, reduced jet-soot by up to 15%, and reduced wall-soot by 30-40%. The other fuel additives also affected in-cylinder soot, but unlike the ethanol blends, changes in in-cylinder soot could be attributed solely to differences in the ignition delay. No statistically-significant differences in the diesel flame lift-off lengths were observed among any of the fuel additive formulations at the operating conditions examined in this study. Accordingly, the observed differences in in-cylinder soot among the fuel formulations cannot be attributed to differences in fresh oxygen entrainment upstream of the soot-formation zones after ignition.

Musculus, Mark P. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Dietz, Jeff (The Lubrizol Corp.)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF 'rHF. HAWAllAN ISLANDS, 751 prepare them usually by dl'ying. Most of this work is done on Hawaii, the district  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inspector, receives a salary of $30 per month as keeper and $60 per month as inspector. There are also an assistant market keeper at $25 per month, an assistant fish inspector at $40 per month, and one laborer the words" iced fish." The inspector is directed #12;COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OJ

147

Development of a Geologic Exploration Model foe the Permo-Pennsylvanian Petroleum System in South-Central Montana  

SciTech Connect

Eolian sands are the main Pennsylvanian Tensleep Sandstone reservoir rocks, and were deposited in a near-shore environment interbedded with near-shore marine and sabkha calcareous and dolomitic rocks. Within the Tensleep, numerous cycles are characterized by basal marine or sabkha calcareous sandstone or dolomitic sandstone overlain by porous and permeable eolian sandstone, which in turn is capped by marine sandstone. The cycles represent the interplay of near-shore marine, sabkha, and eolian environments. On the west side of the project area, both the lower and upper Tensleep are present and the total thickness reaches a maximum of about 240 ft. The lower Tensleep is 100 to 120 ft thick and consists of a sequence of repeating cycles of limey shallow marine sandstone, sandy limestone, and sandy dolomite. The upper Tensleep is generally characterized by cycles of sandy limestone or dolomite, overlain by light-colored, eolian dune sandstone capped by marine limey sandstone. In the central and eastern parts of the project area, only the lower Tensleep is present, but here eolian sandstones are in cycles much like those in the west in the upper Tensleep. The lower Tensleep is quite variable in thickness, ranging from about 25 ft to over 200 ft. Oil accumulations in the Tensleep are best described as structurally modified paleostratigraphic accumulations. At Frannie Field, the irregular oil column can be explained by a post-Tensleep channel scour on the west flank of the anticline. On the Powder River Basin side of the project area, the Soap Creek and Lodge Grass Fields produce from the Permo-Pennsylvanian system. In these two fields, erosional remnants of eolian sandstone control the production, similar to the situation at Frannie Field. At Soap Creek the trap is enhanced by structural closure. In the Lodge Grass area, Tensleep oil is trapped in preserved dunes in the footwall of a Laramide reverse fault. Oil generation and migration was early. Two hypotheses have been presented: migration occurred (1) before mid-Jurassic erosion produced a major regional unconformity or (2) about 82 million years ago. Migration pre-Laramide occurred because oil in both the Bighorn Basin and the Powder River Basin are part of the same petroleum system. Geochemical analyses of oils from producing fields across the region show the oils are all similar and have the same source and generation history. No Phosphoria source rocks exist in the project area of south-central Montana, requiring that oil migrated from distant source areas, probably in central and southwestern Wyoming. Oil shows and production in the Tensleep are absent in the northern part of the project area. This appears to be controlled by the merging of the top of the Tensleep Sandstone and the Jurassic unconformity (top of the Triassic Chugwater Formation). There should be potential for the discovery of oil in Tensleep stratigraphic traps or combination traps everywhere south of the Jurassic-Pennsylvanian Isopach zero contour except where the Tensleep has been exposed by uplift and erosion. Known Tensleep fields in south-central Montana are generally small in area, which agrees with outcrop studies that show eolian dune sequences are generally quite small in lateral extent, on the order of 10 to 40 acres. Although existing fields are small in area, they are very productive; individual wells will probably make 300,000 to 500,000 barrels of oil. In the project area, hydrodynamic considerations are important. All the existing Tensleep fields have active water drives. In many cases, the reservoir pressure today is as it was when initially discovered. In areas of high structural complexity, such as the Lodge Grass-Crow Agency fault and the Lake Basin fault zone, significant structural closure may be necessary to trap oil because of the strong hydrodynamic influence exerted by the underlying Madison Formation aquifer.

David A. Lopez

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

148

Wettability and Oil Recovery by Imbibition and Viscous Displacement from Fractured and Heterogeneous Carbonates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About one-half of U.S. oil reserves are held in carbonate formations. The remaining oil in carbonate reservoirs is regarded as the major domestic target for improved oil recovery. Carbonate reservoirs are often fractured and have great complexity even at the core scale. Formation evaluation and prediction is often subject to great uncertainty. This study addresses quantification of crude oil/brine/rock interactions and the impact of reservoir heterogeneity on oil recovery by spontaneous imbibition and viscous displacement from pore to field scale. Wettability-alteration characteristics of crude oils were measured at calcite and dolomite surfaces and related to the properties of the crude oils through asphaltene content, acid and base numbers, and refractive index. Oil recovery was investigated for a selection of limestones and dolomites that cover over three orders of magnitude in permeability and a factor of four variation in porosity. Wettability control was achieved by adsorption from crude oils obtained from producing carbonate reservoirs. The induced wettability states were compared with those measured for reservoir cores. The prepared cores were used to investigate oil recovery by spontaneous imbibition and viscous displacement. The results of imbibition tests were used in wettability characterization and to develop mass transfer functions for application in reservoir simulation of fractured carbonates. Studies of viscous displacement in carbonates focused on the unexpected but repeatedly observed sensitivity of oil recovery to injection rate. The main variables were pore structure, mobility ratio, and wettability. The potential for improved oil recovery from rate-sensitive carbonate reservoirs by increased injection pressure, increased injectivity, decreased well spacing or reduction of interfacial tension was evaluated.

Norman R. Morrow; Jill Buckley

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Technology transfer report: feasibility study for the use of geothermal brine in the Ashdod area, Israel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hydrothermal potential of the Ashdod area, Israel, was evaluated to determine its suitability as the low grade energy source required to operate the Ashdod desalination plant. An estimated 1250 cubic meters per hour of 120/sup 0/C brine would be adequate to supply the hot water necessary for operating the desalination plant. Considerable interest in oil exploration in the Ashdod area resulted in the drilling of six wells into the Jurassic formations by Oil Exploration (Investments) Ltd. (OEL) in 1976-1980. A small amount of oil was found in two wells, Ashdod 2 and 5. The remaining wells were abandoned as ''dry holes''. Evaluation of the drill cuttings, cores, and the electric logs defined two lithologic units of potential interest for hydrothermal exploitation, the Zohar and Shderot Dolomites. Investigation of the hydrothermal potential of the Jurassic formations underlying the Ashdod area has revealed that the aquifer temperatures range between 85 and 92/sup 0/C. The hydrologic parameters are not well defined; however the matrix permeability of the dolomites and limestones is probably between 1 and 10 md. This is insufficient permeability for a large scale pumping operation such as the one required to operate the desalination plant. Therefore, successful utilization of the resource requires the presence of significant fractures and/or connected vugs in the formation. The very low well productivity and formation plugging may indicate that permeability of the fracture zones may easily be impaired, suggesting that the fracture zones are not suitable production intervals. Until a test is conducted on a properly completed well, it is not possible to evaluate the deliverability of wells tapping these aquifers. 14 refs., 8 figs.

Benson, S.M.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Waterflood and Enhanced Oil Recovery Studies using Saline Water and Dilute Surfactants in Carbonate Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water injection has been practiced to displace the hydrocarbons towards adjacent wells and to support the reservoir pressure at or above the bubble point. Recently, waterflooding in sandstone reservoirs, as secondary and tertiary modes, proved to decrease the residual oil saturation. In calcareous rocks, water from various resources (deep formation, seawater, shallow beds, lakes and rivers) is generally injected in different oil fields. The ions interactions between water molecules, salts ions, oil components, and carbonate minerals are still ambiguous. Various substances are usually added before or during water injection to enhance oil recovery such as dilute surfactant. Various methods were used including surface charge (zeta potential), static and dynamic contact angle, core flooding, inductively coupled plasma spectrometry, CAT scan, and geochemical simulation. Limestone and dolomite particles were prepared at different wettability conditions to mimic the actual carbonate reservoirs. In addition to seawater and dilute seawater (50, 20, 10, and 1 vol%), formation brine, shallow aquifer water, deionized water and different crude oil samples were used throughout this study. The crude oil/water/carbonates interactions were also investigated using short and long (50 cm) limestone and dolomite rocks at different wettability and temperature conditions. The aqueous ion interactions were extensively monitored via measuring their concentrations using advanced analytical techniques. The activity of the free ions, complexes, and ion pairs in aqueous solutions were simulated at high temperatures and pressures using OLI electrolyte simulation software. Dilute seawater decreased the residual oil saturation in some of the coreflood tests. Hydration and dehydration processes through decreasing and increasing salinity showed no impact on calcite wettability. Effect of individual ions (Ca, Mg, and Na) and dilute seawater injection on oil recovery was insignificant in compare to the dilute surfactant solutions (0.1 wt%). The reaction mechanisms were confirmed to be adsorption of hydroxide ions, complexes and ion pairs at the interface which subsequently altered the surface potential from positive to negative. Results in this study indicate multistage waterflooding can enhance oil recovery in the field under certain conditions. Mixed streams simulation results suggest unexpected ions interactions (NaCO3-1, HSO4-1, NaSO4-1 and SO4-2) with various activities trends especially at high temperatures.

Alotaibi, Mohammed

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing vertical wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the first half of the fourth project year (April 6 through October 5, 2003). The work included (1) analysis of well-test data and oil production from Cherokee and Bug fields, San Juan County, Utah, and (2) diagenetic evaluation of stable isotopes from the upper Ismay and lower Desert Creek zones of the Paradox Formation in the Blanding sub-basin, Utah. Production ''sweet spots'' and potential horizontal drilling candidates were identified for Cherokee and Bug fields. In Cherokee field, the most productive wells are located in the thickest part of the mound facies of the upper Ismay zone, where microporosity is well developed. In Bug field, the most productive wells are located structurally downdip from the updip porosity pinch out in the dolomitized lower Desert Creek zone, where micro-box-work porosity is well developed. Microporosity and micro-box-work porosity have the greatest hydrocarbon storage and flow capacity, and potential horizontal drilling target in these fields. Diagenesis is the main control on the quality of Ismay and Desert Creek reservoirs. Most of the carbonates present within the lower Desert Creek and Ismay have retained a marine-influenced carbon isotope geochemistry throughout marine cementation as well as through post-burial recycling of marine carbonate components during dolomitization, stylolitization, dissolution, and late cementation. Meteoric waters do not appear to have had any effect on the composition of the dolomites in these zones. Light oxygen values obtained from reservoir samples for wells located along the margins or flanks of Bug field may be indicative of exposure to higher temperatures, to fluids depleted in {sup 18}O relative to sea water, or to hypersaline waters during burial diagenesis. The samples from Bug field with the lightest oxygen isotope compositions are from wells that have produced significantly greater amounts of hydrocarbons. There is no significant difference between the oxygen isotope compositions from lower Desert Creek dolomite samples in Bug field and the upper Ismay limestones and dolomites from Cherokee field. Carbon isotopic compositions for samples from Patterson Canyon field can be divided into two populations: isotopically heavier mound cement and isotopically lighter oolite and banded cement. Technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting a booth display of project materials at the annual national convention of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, a technical presentation, a core workshop, and publications. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan

2003-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

152

Coontail fluorite rhythmites of southern Illinois: evidence for episodic basin dewatering  

SciTech Connect

Stratiform coontail ore of the Cave-in-Rock fluorite district, southern Illinois, display conspicuous, rhythmic banded textures similar to those reported in many MVT deposits throughout the world (e.g., east Tennessee, USA; Silesian-Cracow Region, Poland; and northern Baffin Island, Canada). Banding is expressed by the rhythmic alteration of two types of layers: detrital layers of fluorite mottled with particulate gangue dolomite and quartz, and layers of clear, crystalline fluorspar. Both are now composed principally of fluorite but differ in color, fabric and outline. In the past, this rhythmic banding has generally been attributed to fine-scale replacement of a primary host rock stratification or to cyclic replacement of host carbonates by a fluid of oscillating chemistry. Detailed megascopic and microscopic studies of these ores and their carbonate host real that ore bands were not derived by fine-scale in situ limestone replacement. Detrital bands contain hydraulically transported, sorted and graded, allochthonous debris derived by dissolution and disaggregation of host limestone and overlying shale. The banded fabric thus represents a cyclic interplay of chemical and hydraulic processes active during hydrothermal ore mineralization. Coontail ore bodies evidently formed in a hydrothermal spelean system, whose laterally sinuous trace reflects localization of hydrothermal activity where feeder faults intersected relatively impermeable roof-rock shales. The banded nature of these ores testifies to the ability of Mississippi Valley-type hydrothermal solutions to both create and fill their own open spaces. Moreover, the rhythmic nature of coontail ores suggests a prolonged and pulsating mineralization best explained by episodic dewatering of the Illinois Basin.

Cowan, C.A.; Kelly, W.C.; Wilkinson, B.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Sintering and reactivity of CaCO{sub 3}-based sorbents for in situ CO{sub 2} capture in fluidized beds under realistic calcination conditions  

SciTech Connect

Sintering during calcination/carbonation may introduce substantial economic penalties for a CO{sub 2} looping cycle using limestone/dolomite-derived sorbents. Cyclic carbonation and calcination reactions were investigated for CO{sub 2} capture under fluidized bed combustion (FBC) conditions. The cyclic carbonation characteristics of CaCO{sub 3}-derived sorbents were compared at various calcination temperatures (700-925{sup o} C) and different gas stream compositions: pure -2 and a realistic calciner environment where high concentrations of CO{sub 2}>80-90% are expected. The conditions during carbonation were 700 {sup o}C and 15% CO{sub 2} in N{sub 2} and 0.18% or 0.50% SO{sub 2} in selected tests. Up to 20 calcination/carbonation cycles were conducted using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) apparatus. Three Canadian limestones were tested: Kelly Rock, Havelock, and Cadomin, using a prescreened particle size range of 400-650 {mu} m. Calcined Kelly Rock and Cadomin samples were hydrated by steam and examined. Sorbent reactivity was reduced whenever SO{sub 2} was introduced to either the calcining or carbonation streams. The multicyclic capture capacity of CaO for CO{sub 2} was substantially reduced at high concentrations of CO{sub 2} during the sorbent regeneration process and carbonation conversion of the Kelly Rock sample obtained after 20 cycles was only 10.5%. Hydrated sorbents performed better for CO{sub 2} capture but showed deterioration following calcination in high CO{sub 2} gas streams indicating that high CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} levels in the gas stream lead to lower CaO conversion because of enhanced sintering and irreversible formation of CaSO{sub 4}.

Lu, D.Y.; Hughes, R.W.; Anthony, E.J.; Manovic, V. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Comparative study of the reactions of metal oxides and carbonates with H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. Final technical report, September 1990--February 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project had been the investigation of the effects of pore structure on the capacity of porous metal oxides for removal of gaseous pollutants from flue gases of power plants (SO{sub 2}) and hot coal gas (primarily H{sub 2}S). Porous calcines obtained from natural precursors (limestones and dolomites) and sorbents based on zinc oxide were used as model systems in our experimental studies, which included reactivity evolution experiments and pore structure characterization using a variety of methods. The key idea behind this project was to appropriately exploit the differences of the sulfidation and sulfation reactions (for instance, different molar volumes of solid products) to elucidate the dependence of the sorptive capacity of a porous sorbent on its physical microstructure. In order to be able to proceed faster and more productively on the analysis of the above defined problem, it was decided to employ in our studies solids whose reaction with SO{sub 2} (limestone calcines) or H{sub 2}S (sorbents based on zinc oxide) had been investigated in detail in past studies by our research group. Reactivity vs time or conversion vs time studies were conducted using thermogravimetry and fixed-bed and fluidized-bed reactors. The pore structure of partially reacted samples collected at selected time instants or conversion levels was analyzed by gas adsorption and mercury porosimetry. For better characterization of the pore structure of the solid samples, we also carried out intraparticle diffusivity measurements by the peak-broadening (chromatographic) method, using a system developed for this purpose in our laboratory. In the context of this part of the project, we also conducted a detailed theoretical investigation of the measurement of effective diffusivities in porous solids using the diffusion-cell method.

Sotirchos, S.V.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

TIDD PFBC Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

In fluidized bed combustion, coal and sorbent (dolomite or limestone) are fed into a boiler in which air, entering from the bottom, maintains the bed material in a highly turbulent suspended state called fluidization. This turbulence creates good contact between the air and fuel, allowing for high combustion efficiency and excellent adsorption of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) during the combustion process. In PFBC applications, pressurized air is supplied to the combustor. Pressurizing the air concentrates a larger quantity of oxygen per unit volume. This results in a lower velocity of air through the fuel bed. The lower velocity reduces the total height required for the bed and freeboard above the bed. Also, a smaller plan area is required for the bed area as compared to an atmospheric fluidized bed. This has the advantage of requiring a much smaller pressure vessel to contain the boiler enclosure. The mean bed temperature of a pressurized fluidized bed combustor is typically maintained in the range 1540 to 1580 F. This is well below the ash fusion temperature of coal, yet above the ignition temperature of the coal. Advantages of the low bed temperature are no slag formation and a reduction of NO{sub x} emissions to less than half that of a conventional boiler. The Tidd Plant is a combined cycle pressurized fluidized bed combustion system with a topping gas cycle and a bottoming steam cycle.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Study of well logs from Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Union Oil Company drilled four geothermal test wells in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA between 1975 and 1979. A fairly complete suite of well logs were recorded for the three deeper holes, and these data are presented as composite well log plots in this report. The composite well log plots have facilitated the interpretation of limestone, dolomite, sandstone, quartz-monzonite, serpentine, and volcanic lithologies and the identification of numerous fractures. This has been especially helpful because of the extensive lost circulaton zones and poor cuttings recovery. Intraformational flow was identified by a fluid migration-temperature tracer log at depth in CFSU 31-33. Well log crossplots were computed to assist in lithologic identification and the determination of physical properties for specific depth intervals in a given hole. The presence of hydrous minerals sometimes results in neutron porosity somewhat higher than the true nonfracture porosity, which is generally less than 4%. Permeability is clearly controlled by fractures. A maximum well temperature of 178.9/sup 0/C, low flow rates and low probable percent flash indicate these wells are subeconomic for electric generation at present. The well log study has substantially improved our understanding of the reservoir as presently drilled.

Glenn, W.E.; Ross, H.P.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

In situ bioremediation in Europe  

SciTech Connect

Site remediation activity in Europe is increasing, even if not at the forced pace of the US. Although there is a better understanding of the benefits of bioremediation than of other approaches, especially about in situ bioremediation of contaminated soils, relatively few projects have been carried out full-scale in Europe or in the US. Some engineering companies and large industrial companies in Europe are investigating bioremediation and biotreatment technologies, in some cases to solve their internal waste problems. Technologies related to the application of microorganisms to the soil, release of nutrients into the soil, and enhancement of microbial decontamination are being tested through various additives such as surfactants, ion exchange resins, limestone, or dolomite. New equipment has been developed for crushing and mixing or injecting and sparging the microorganisms, as have new reactor technologies (e.g., rotating aerator reactors, biometal sludge reactors, and special mobile containers for simultaneous storage, transportation, and biodegradation of contaminated soil). Some work has also been done with immobilized enzymes to support and restore enzymatic activities related to partial or total xenobiotic decontamination. Finally, some major programs funded by public and private institutions confirm that increasing numbers of firms have a working interest in bioremediation.

Porta, A. [Battelle Europe, Geneva (CH); Young, J.K.; Molton, P.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (US)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Style and age of tectonism of Sadlerochit Mountains of Franklin Mountains, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pre-Tertiary rocks north of the Franklin Mountains and south of the coastal plain in ANWR can be subdivided into two major structural units: (1) basement - Neruokpuk Formation, Nanook Limestone, and Katakturuk Dolomite - and (2) Lower Mississippian to Upper Cretaceous sedimentary rocks. Basement rocks underwent intense deformation prior to deposition of Lower Mississippian rocks; locally the contact is structural. Crustal shortening at the structural level exposed was accommodated primarily by concentric folding. Axial planes of major folds generally strike N70/sup 0/-90/sup 0/E and dip 50/sup 0/-80/sup 0/S, indicating north vergence, and can be subdivided into two groups: east-northeast trending and east trending. Major folds plunge subhorizontally and continue laterally for up to 10 mi (15 km). Exposed reverse faults show relatively small amounts of throw (ANWR, constrain the principal post-Mississippian deformation, a phase of north-south compression to have occurred between the mid-Eocene and the present. East-trending folds suggest two deformational events. Relative timing of these events, based on field data, is equivocal.

Leiggi, P.A.; Russell, B.J.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Horizontal well success spurs more Devonian work in Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of this DOE-sponsored project was to drill a horizontal demonstration well in order to test the viability of using horizontal wells to recover bypassed oil from the Dundee reservoir in Crystal field. In addition, a modern log suite through the entire Dundee formation and a conventional core through the productive interval, the oil/water contact, and the upper part of the water leg were to be obtained. During the early years of Dundee development in central Michigan, it was common practice to drill only a short distance below the cap limestone into the top of the Dundee porosity zone before completing a well in order to prevent lost circulation and blowouts in vuggy and fractured dolomites and to avoid penetration of the oil/water contact and minimize water coning. As a result, the characteristics of the Dundee reservoir in central Michigan are poorly known and the decision to attempt an improved recovery program in Crystal field had to be based on field volumetrics, individual well productivities, and well development/abandonment histories. The new core and log data from the demonstration well will provide an important anchor point for regional Dundee reservoir characterization studies.

Wood, J.R.; Allan, J.R.; Huntoon, J.E.; Pennington, W.D. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Harrison, W.B. III [Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo, MI (United States); Taylor, E.; Tester, C.J. [Cronus Development Corp., Traverse City, MI (United States)

1996-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

160

Geothermal resource assessment for North Dakota. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Temperatures in four geothermal aquifers, inyan Kara (Cretaceous), Mission Canyon (Mississippian), Duperow (Devonian), and Red River (Ordovician) are in the range for low and moderate temperature geothermal resources within an area of about 130,000 km{sup 2} in North Dakota. The accessible resource base is 13,500 x 10{sup 18} J., which, assuming a recovery factor of 0.001, may represent a greater quantity of recoverable energy than is present in the basin in the form of petroleum. A synthesis of heat flow, thermal conductivity, and stratigraphic data was found to be significantly more accurate in determining formation temperatures than the use of linear temperature gradients derived from bottom hole temperature data. The thermal structure of the Williston Basin is determined by the thermal conductivities of four principal lithologies: Tertiary silts and sands (1.6 W/m/K), Mesozoic shales (1.2 W/m/K), Paleozoic limestones (3.2 W/m/K), and Paleozoic dolomites (3.5 W/m/K). The stratigraphic placement of these lithologies leads to a complex, multi-component geothermal gradient which precludes use of any single component gradient for accurate determination of subsurface temperatures.

Gosnold, William D. Jr.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dl dolomitic limestone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Geothermal resource assessment for North Dakota. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Temperatures in four geothermal aquifers, Inyan Kara (Cretaceous), Mission Canyon (Mississippian), Duperow (Devonian), and Red River (Ordovician) are in the range for low and moderate temperature geothermal resources within an area of about 130,000 km/sup 2/ in North Dakota. The accessible resource base is 13,500 x 10/sup 18/ J., which, assuming a recovery factor of 0.001, may represent a greater quantity of recoverable energy than is present in the basin in the form of petroleum. A synthesis of heat flow, thermal conductivity, and stratigraphic data was found to be significantly more accurate in determining formation temperatures than the use of linear temperature gradients derived from bottom hole temperature data. The thermal structure of the Williston Basin is determined by the thermal conductivities of four principal lithologies: Tertiary silts and sands (1.6 W/m/K), Mesozoic shales (1.2 W/m/K), Paleozoic limestones (3.2 W/m/K), and Paleozoic dolomites (3.5 W/m/K). The stratigraphic placement of these lithologies leads to a complex, multicomponent geothermal gradient which precludes use of any single component gradient for accurate determination of subsurface temperatures.

Gosnold, W.D. Jr.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Corona driven air propulsion for cooling of electronics F. Yang, N.E. Jewell-Larsen, D.L. Brown, K. Pendergrass, D.A. Parker, I.A. Krichtafovitch*, A.V. Mamishev  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation with low noise, static filtration [5], air sterilization [6], and no moving parts. These ideal Abstract: The possibility of building a high voltage electrostatic air pump for cooling of microelectronics is investigated. Existing cooling technology no longer provides adequate heat dissipation due to excessive heat

Mamishev, Alexander

163

A Measurement of CP-violation Parameters in B0B0barMixing using Partially Reconstructed D^{*-}l^+ nu_l Events at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

CP violation in B{sup 0}{bar B}{sup 0} mixing is characterized by the value of the parameter |q/p| being different from 1, and the Standard Model predicts this difference to be smaller than 10{sup -3}. We present a measurement of this parameter using a partial reconstruction of one of the B mesons in the semileptonic channel D*{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}, where only the hard lepton and the soft pion from the D*{sup -} {yields} {bar D}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -} decay are reconstructed. The flavor of the other B is determined by means of lepton tagging. The determination of |q/p| is then performed with a fit to the proper time difference of the two B decays. We use a luminosity of 200.8 fb{sup -1}, collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetrical-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, in the period 1999-2004. We obtain the preliminary result: |q/p| - 1 = (6.5 {+-} 3.4(stat.) {+-} 2.0(syst.)) {center_dot} 10{sup -3}.

Aubert, B.

2006-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

164

Abundance of fin whales in West Greenland in 2007 M.P. HEIDE-JRGENSEN*, K.L. LAIDRE*+, M. SIMON*, M.L. BURT$, D.L. BORCHERS$ AND M. RASMUSSEN#  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WORDS: FIN WHALE; ABUNDANCE ESTIMATE; SURVEY-AERIAL; WEST GREENLAND; NORTHERN HEMISPHERE Jørgensen et al­4,296) than the aerial survey (Heide-Jørgensen et al., 2007). In 2004, the IWC's Scientific Committee whales in West Greenland. Here we report on an aerial survey of fin whales conducted off West Greenland

Laidre, Kristin L.

165

ALTERING CLIMATE Basic Climatology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of painted surfaces, including cars Deterioration of stone, particularly marble and limestone Corrosion energy: wind, solar, geothermal Electric vehicles Restore damaged environments Limestone may be added

166

GEOL 102: Historical Geology Exam 1 Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithostratigraphic Grammar: Morrison Formation, Karoo Supergroup, Keyser Limestone, etc. Intertonguing Isochrony vs

Holtz Jr., Thomas R.

167

Effects of Heat Treatment and Chemistry on the Long-Term Phase ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

D.L. Anton, T. Khan, R.D. Kissinger, D.L. Klarstrom. The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society, .... q SUBBOLVUS Q FREE x SUBSOLVUS o-. 0 SUPERSOLVUS.

168

Formation of Serrated Grain Boundaries and Their Effect on the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

D.L. Anton, T. Khan, R.D. Kissinger, D.L. Klarstrom. The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society, .... q 0 . A CPrecip. thickness>. 0. 3. @

169

IMPROVING CO2 EFFICIENCY FOR RECOVERING OIL IN HETEROGENEOUS RESERVOIRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second annual report of ''Improving CO{sub 2} Efficiency for Recovery Oil in Heterogeneous Reservoirs'' presents results of laboratory studies with related analytical models for improved oil recovery. All studies have been undertaken with the intention to optimize utilization and extend the practice of CO{sub 2} flooding to a wider range of reservoirs. Many items presented in this report are applicable to other interest areas: e.g. gas injection and production, greenhouse gas sequestration, chemical flooding, reservoir damage, etc. Major areas of studies include reduction of CO{sub 2} mobility to improve conformance, determining and understanding injectivity changes in particular injectivity loses, and modeling process mechanisms determined in the first two areas. Interfacial tension (IFT) between a high-pressure, high-temperature CO{sub 2} and brine/surfactant and foam stability are used to assess and screen surfactant systems. In this work the effects of salinity, pressure, temperature, surfactant concentration, and the presence of oil on IFT and CO{sub 2} foam stability were determined on the surfactant (CD1045{trademark}). Temperature, pressure, and surfactant concentration effected both IFT and foam stability while oil destabilized the foam, but did not destroy it. Calcium lignosulfonate (CLS) can be used as a sacrificial and an enhancing agent. This work indicates that on Berea sandstone CLS concentration, brine salinity, and temperature are dominant affects on both adsorption and desorption and that adsorption is not totally reversible. Additionally, CLS adsorption was tested on five minerals common to oil reservoirs; it was found that CLS concentration, salinity, temperature, and mineral type had significant effects on adsorption. The adsorption density from most to least was: bentonite > kaolinite > dolomite > calcite > silica. This work demonstrates the extent of dissolution and precipitation from co-injection of CO{sub 2} and brine in limestone core. Metal tracers in the brine were used as markers to identify precipitation location and extent. This indicated possible causes of permanent permeability changes in the core and thus in a reservoir. Core segment porosity, permeability, chemical and back-scattered electron imaging, and chemical titrations were all used for qualitative and quantitative determination of compositional and injectivity changes. Also, injectivity effects of high flow rate near a wellbore and stress changes were shown on five different cores (two Berea sandstones, two Indiana limestones, and one Dakota sandstone).

Reid B. Grigg

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY CO2 STORAGE PROJECT - PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF DEEP SALINE RESERVOIRS AND COAL SEAMS  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the geologic setting for the Deep Saline Reservoirs and Coal Seams in the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} Storage Project area. The object of the current project is to site and design a CO{sub 2} injection facility. A location near New Haven, WV, has been selected for the project. To assess geologic storage reservoirs at the site, regional and site-specific geology were reviewed. Geologic reports, deep well logs, hydraulic tests, and geologic maps were reviewed for the area. Only one well within 25 miles of the site penetrates the deeper sedimentary rocks, so there is a large amount of uncertainty regarding the deep geology at the site. New Haven is located along the Ohio River on the border of West Virginia and Ohio. Topography in the area is flat in the river valley but rugged away from the Ohio River floodplain. The Ohio River Valley incises 50-100 ft into bedrock in the area. The area of interest lies within the Appalachian Plateau, on the western edge of the Appalachian Mountain chain. Within the Appalachian Basin, sedimentary rocks are 3,000 to 20,000 ft deep and slope toward the southeast. The rock formations consist of alternating layers of shale, limestone, dolomite, and sandstone overlying dense metamorphic continental shield rocks. The Rome Trough is the major structural feature in the area, and there may be some faults associated with the trough in the Ohio-West Virginia Hinge Zone. The area has a low earthquake hazard with few historical earthquakes. Target injection reservoirs include the basal sandstone/Lower Maryville and the Rose Run Sandstone. The basal sandstone is an informal name for sandstones that overlie metamorphic shield rock. Regional geology indicates that the unit is at a depth of approximately 9,100 ft below the surface at the project site and associated with the Maryville Formation. Overall thickness appears to be 50-100 ft. The Rose Run Sandstone is another potential reservoir. The unit is located approximately 1,100 ft above the basal sandstone and is 100-200 ft thick. The storage capacity estimates for a 20-mile radius from the injection well ranged from 39-78 million tons (Mt) for each formation. Several other oil and gas plays have hydraulic properties conducive for injection, but the formations are generally only 5-50 ft thick in the study area. Overlying the injection reservoirs are thick sequences of dense, impermeable dolomite, limestone, and shale. These layers provide containment above the potential injection reservoirs. In general, it appears that the containment layers are much thicker and extensive than the injection intervals. Other physical parameters for the study area appear to be typical for the region. Anticipated pressures at maximum depths are approximately 4,100 psi based on a 0.45 psi/ft pressure gradient. Temperatures are likely to be 150 F. Groundwater flow is slow and complex in deep formations. Regional flow directions appear to be toward the west-northwest at less than 1 ft per year within the basal sandstone. Vertical gradients are downward in the study area. A review of brine geochemistry indicates that formation fluids have high salinity and dissolved solids. Total dissolved solids ranges from 200,000-325,000 mg/L in the deep reservoirs. Brine chemistry is similar throughout the different formations, suggesting extensive mixing in a mature basin. Unconsolidated sediments in the Ohio River Valley are the primary source of drinking water in the study area.

Michael J. Mudd; Howard Johnson; Charles Christopher; T.S. Ramakrishnan, Ph.D.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

IMPROVING CO2 EFFICIENCY FOR RECOVERING OIL IN HETEROGENEOUS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

The third annual report of ''Improving CO{sub 2} Efficiency for Recovery Oil in Heterogeneous Reservoirs'' presents results of laboratory studies with related analytical models for improved oil recovery. All studies were designed to optimize utilization and extend the practice of CO{sub 2} flooding to a wider range of reservoirs. Chapter 1 describes the behavior at low concentrations of the surfactant Chaser International CD1045{trademark} (CD) versus different salinity, pressure and temperature. Results of studies on the effects of pH and polymer (hydrolyzed polyacrylamide?HPAM) and CO{sub 2} foam stability after adsorption in the core are also reported. Calcium lignosulfonate (CLS) transport mechanisms through sandstone, description of the adsorption of CD and CD/CLS onto three porous media (sandstone, limestone and dolomite) and five minerals, and the effect of adsorption on foam stability are also reported. In Chapter 2, the adsorption kinetics of CLS in porous Berea sandstone and non-porous minerals are compared by monitoring adsorption density change with time. Results show that adsorption requires a much longer time for the porous versus non-porous medium. CLS adsorption onto sandstone can be divided into three regions: adsorption controlled by dispersion, adsorption controlled by diffusion and adsorption equilibrium. NaI tracer used to characterize the sandstone had similar trends to earlier results for the CLS desorption process, suggesting a dual porosity model to simulate flow through Berea sandstone. The kinetics and equilibrium test for CD adsorption onto five non-porous minerals and three porous media are reported in Chapter 3. CD adsorption and desorption onto non-porous minerals can be established in less than one hour with adsorption densities ranging from 0.4 to 1.2 mg of CD per g of mineral in decreasing order of montmorillonite, dolomite, kaolinite, silica and calcite. The surfactant adsorption onto three porous media takes much longer than one hour, with Berea sandstone requiring the longest time. In Chapter 4, comparisons of static adsorption of CLS, CD, and CLS/CD mixtures onto five pure minerals showed that the presence of CLS decreased the adsorption of CD onto the five minerals by 20 to 70%. Dynamic CLS/CD mixture adsorption tests onto Berea sandstone and Indian limestone cores showed that competitive adsorption between CD and CLS generally takes several days to reach equilibrium. Foam stability and interfacial tension tests on both injected and effluent samples were performed which showed that both foam stability and IFT decreased due to adsorption. Also it appears that there is a chromatographic effect on the surfactants in flow through porous media. Progress was realized in developing general equations for stress sensitivity on non-Darcy parameters (permeability and non-Darcy coefficient), and the multiphase flow induced by a high flow rate was confirmed as a mechanism for injectivity loss in CO{sub 2} flooding. In Chapter 5, a general equation is defined based on 60 general equations of permeability stress sensitivity and non-Darcy coefficient stress sensitivity and definitions of nominal permeability, nominal non-Darcy coefficient, permeability stress sensitivity, and non-Darcy coefficient stress sensitivity. The equations of stress sensitivity are independent of pressure, temperature, and rock properties and existing empirical correlations of the nominal permeability and nominal non-Darcy coefficient can be used when laboratory data are not available. This provides a tool to quantify the change of permeability and non-Darcy coefficient due to change of effective stress resulted from reservoir injection and/or production.

Reid B. Grigg; Robert K. Svec; Zhengwen Zeng; Baojun Bai; Yi Liu

2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

172

Experimental Determination of Ca-Silicate Dissolution Rates: A Source of Calcium for Geologic CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The international scientific community recognizes that greenhouse gases have the potential to influence climate, and that potential changes in sea level and weather patterns would be largely deleterious. Because CO{sub 2} is emitted in such large quantities and its atmospheric concentration has been consistently rising throughout the recent past, it is only prudent to focus attention on reducing its emission and on developing strategies for its removal from the atmosphere [1]. A variety of removal methods have been suggested ranging from deep-sea disposal, to recycling to methanol, and to conversion to solid carbonate [2]. Problems appear to remain with all these strategies, and more work is needed to develop an acceptable, efficient method or set of methods. The idea of converting the gas to solid carbonate is particularly appealing, because on a human time scale, this is permanent disposal. The reaction of CO{sub 2} and water with unstable silicate minerals to produce more stable silicates (e.g., clays) and solid carbonates is the natural weathering process which is a dominant part of the long-term global geochemical cycling process (e.g., [3]). The Earth's large deposits of limestone and dolomite (the two primary forms of carbonate rock) represent the Earth's natural response to volcanic CO{sub 2} emissions over much of planetary history. Recently, the suggestion was made to utilize the reaction of CO{sub 2} with silicate minerals that occurs naturally during chemical-weathering within deep sedimentary basins [4] or in aquifers [1] as a basis for removal.

Carroll, S A; Knauss, K G

2001-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

173

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 5. Geochemistry and geologic setting of the thermal waters of the northern Cache Valley area, Franklin County, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal waters of the north-south trending graben structure known as northern Cache Valley in southeastern Idaho were sampled during the summer and fall of 1973. Geologic and gravity data for the area indicate fault control for nearly all thermal water occurrences. Thermal-water discharges are generally restricted to the course of the Bear River with few known in areas away from the river. Spring deposits in the form of travertine may not be indications of low temperature thermal waters because abundant limestone and dolomite make up the geologic framework. Much gas, believed to consist mostly of carbon dioxide, is being evolved from many of the springs. The hottest water is found near Battle Creek and Squaw hot springs approximately 4 kilometers northwest of the town of Preston. Metoric waters descend along fault planes, fractures, and fissures to depths at which they are heated by increasing rock temperatures (geothermal gradient of 5/sup 0/C per 100 meters). Due to decreased density, the heated waters rise along the same or adjacent fault planes to the surface. The quartz equilibrium geochemical thermometer applied to the thermal water discharges indicates temperatures approaching 150/sup 0/C may be encountered by deep drilling. Mixing models, based on quartz solubility, indicate higher aquifer temperatures than the quartz equilibrium thermometer, but chloride concentration vs. temperature plots are not linear. The sodium-potassium-calcium geochemical thermometer indicates higher temperatures than quartz equilibrium and mixing models. The thermal waters are higher in total dissolved solids (12,000 to 13,000 milligrams per liter) than are known elsewhere in Idaho and represent potential pollution hazards should large scale withdrawal be attempted.

Mitchell, J.C.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Tracer-level radioactive pilot-scale test of in situ vitrification for the stabilization of contaminated soil sites at ORNL  

SciTech Connect

A field demonstration of in situ vitrification (ISV) was completed in May 1991, and produced approximately 12 Mg of melted earthen materials containing 12.7 mCi of radioactivity within 500 g of sludge in amodel of an old seepage trench waste disposal unit. Past waste disposal operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have left several contaminated seepage sites. In planning for remediation of such sites, ISV technology has been identified as a leading candidate because of the high risks associated with any retrieval option and because of the usual high quality of vitreous waste form. Major isotopes placed in the test trench were [sup 137]Cs and [sup 90]Sr, with lesser amounts of [sup 6O]Co, [sup 241]Am, and [sup 239,240]Pu. A total of 29 MWh of electrical power was delivered to the ground over a 5-day period producing a melt depth of 8.5 ft. During melting, 2.4% of the [sup 137]Cs volatilized from the melt into an off-gas containment hood and was captured quantitatively on a high efficiency particulate air filter. No volatilization of [sup 90]Sr, [sup 241]Am, or [sup 239,240]Pu was detected and > 99.993% retention of these isotopes in the melt was estimated. The use of added rare earth tracers (Ce, La, and Nd), as surrogates for transuranic isotopes, led to estimated melt retentions of >99.9995% during the test. The molten material, composed of the native soil and dolomitic limestone used for filling the test trench, reached a processing temperature of 1500[degrees]C. Standardized leaching procedures using Product Consistency Testing indicated that the ISV product has excellent characteristics relative to other vitreous nuclear waste forms.

Spalding, B.P.; Jacobs, G.K.; Naney, M.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Dunbar, N.W. (New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro, NM (United States)); Tixier, J.S.; Powell, T.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Tracer-level radioactive pilot-scale test of in situ vitrification for the stabilization of contaminated soil sites at ORNL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field demonstration of in situ vitrification (ISV) was completed in May 1991, and produced approximately 12 Mg of melted earthen materials containing 12.7 mCi of radioactivity within 500 g of sludge in amodel of an old seepage trench waste disposal unit. Past waste disposal operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have left several contaminated seepage sites. In planning for remediation of such sites, ISV technology has been identified as a leading candidate because of the high risks associated with any retrieval option and because of the usual high quality of vitreous waste form. Major isotopes placed in the test trench were {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr, with lesser amounts of {sup 6O}Co, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 239,240}Pu. A total of 29 MWh of electrical power was delivered to the ground over a 5-day period producing a melt depth of 8.5 ft. During melting, 2.4% of the {sup 137}Cs volatilized from the melt into an off-gas containment hood and was captured quantitatively on a high efficiency particulate air filter. No volatilization of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 241}Am, or {sup 239,240}Pu was detected and > 99.993% retention of these isotopes in the melt was estimated. The use of added rare earth tracers (Ce, La, and Nd), as surrogates for transuranic isotopes, led to estimated melt retentions of >99.9995% during the test. The molten material, composed of the native soil and dolomitic limestone used for filling the test trench, reached a processing temperature of 1500{degrees}C. Standardized leaching procedures using Product Consistency Testing indicated that the ISV product has excellent characteristics relative to other vitreous nuclear waste forms.

Spalding, B.P.; Jacobs, G.K.; Naney, M.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dunbar, N.W. [New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro, NM (United States); Tixier, J.S.; Powell, T.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Hydrology and geochemistry of thermal springs of the appalachians  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal springs in nine areas in the Appalachians from Georgia to New York were studied in 1975 and 1976 using satellite imagery, local well and spring data, and results of current and early studies by other investigators. All the springs investigated discharge from folded and faulted sandstone or carbonate rocks in valley areas. Where geologic structure is relatively uncomplicated, ground water discharging from thermal springs probably has circulated to great depths roughly parallel to the strike of the bedding and has moved upward rapidly where a fault or faults cross the bedding. Hydrologic and chemical data suggest that most of the water discharging from warm springs in the Devonian Oriskany Sandstone is derived from recharge entering and circulating through that formation. The discharge at springs where temperature fluctuates very little is primarily water from deep circulation. The discharge at springs where temperature fluctuates widely is warm water mixed with variable proportions of shallow-circulating cool water. Observed temperatures of the warm springs range from 18/sup 0/ to 41/sup 0/C; the highest chemical thermometer temperature is 84/sup 0/C. Agreement among observed, chalcedony, and cation temperatures of the warmest springs suggests reservoir temperatures of 30/sup 0/ to 50/sup 0/C. Dissolved helium, arsenic, potassium, and delta/sup 18/O are considered as geothermal indicators. Tritium analyses are used to calculate fractions of old and modern components of mixed waters. Computer calculations of carbonate saturation indices show (1) considerable undersaturation in silica-rock warm spring waters and (2) carbonate equilibrium in the limestone and dolomite thermal waters. Better values of saturation indices are obtained when analyzed carbon dioxide rather than field pH is used in the computer input data. A method is described for adjusting delta/sup 13/C to correct for carbon dioxide outgassing from water samples.

Hobba, W.A. Jr.; Fisher, D.W.; Pearson, F.J. Jr.; Chemerys, J.C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Geochemistry, isotopic composition and origin of fluids emanating from mud volcanoes in the Copper River Basin, Alaska. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two compositionally different groups of mud volcanoes exist in the Copper River Basin: the Tolsona group which discharges Na-Ca rich, HCO/sub 3/-SO/sub 4/ poor saline waters accompanied by small amounts of gas, composed predominately of CH/sub 4/ and N/sub 2/; and the Klawasi group which discharges Ca poor, Na-HCO/sub 3/ rich saline waters accompanied by enormous amounts of CO/sub 2/. The Tolsona-type water chemistry and isotopic composition could have been produced through the following processes: dilution of original interstitial seawaters with paleo-meteoric waters, possibly during a period of uplift in the mid-Cretaceous; loss of HCO/sub 3/ and SO/sub 4/ and modification of other constituent concentrations by shale-membrane filtration; further depletion of Mg, K, HCO/sub 3/, and SO/sub 4/, and enrichment in Ca and Sr through dolomitization, hydrolysis, and clay-forming processes; and leaching of B, I, Li, and SiO/sub 2/ from marine sediments. Compared to the Tolsona waters, the Klawasi waters are strongly enriched in Li, Na, K, Mg, HCO/sub 3/, SO/sub 4/, B, SiO/sub 2/ and delta/sup 18/O and strongly depleted in Ca, Sr and D. The Klawasi wates also contain high concentrations of arsenic (10 to 48 ppM). The differences in fluid chemistry between Klawasi and Tolsona can be explained as the result of the interaction of fluids derived from a magmatic intrusion and contact decarbonation of limestone beds underlying the Klawasi area with overlying Tolsona-type formation waters.

Motyka, R.J.; Hawkins, D.B.; Poreda, R.J.; Jeffries, A.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Completion Report for Well ER-12-3 Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa - Shoshone Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well ER-12-3 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in March and April 2005 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Rainier Mesa-Shoshone Mountain Corrective Action Unit. The overall purpose of the well was to gather subsurface data to better characterize the hydrogeology of central Rainier Mesa, especially in the older Tertiary volcanic rocks and Paleozoic sedimentary rocks. The main 47.0-centimeter hole was drilled to a depth of 799.2 meters and cased with 33.97-centimeter casing to 743.1 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters, and the well was drilled to a total depth of 1,496.0 meters. The completion string consisted of 13.97-centimeter stainless steel casing, with two slotted intervals open to the lower carbonate aquifer, suspended from 19.37-centimeter carbon steel casing. A piezometer string was installed outside the 33.97-centimeter casing to a depth of 467.1 meters to monitor a zone of perched water within the Tertiary volcanic section. Data gathered during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters (extra cuttings samples were collected from the Paleozoic rocks for paleontological analyses), sidewall core samples from 35 depths, various geophysical logs, and water level measurements. These data indicate that the well penetrated 674.2 meters of Tertiary volcanic rocks and 821.7 meters of Paleozoic dolomite and limestone. Forty-nine days after the well was completed, but prior to well development and testing, the water level inside the main hole was tagged at the depth of 949.1 meters, and the water level inside the piezometer string was tagged at 379.9 meters.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada Corporation

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Density logging and density of rocks in Rainier Mesa Area, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Density logs from all 35 vertical drill holes in the Rainier Mesa area in which logs were obtained were evaluated and the distribution of densities of units in the geologic section was derived. Densities were obtained in only 10 holes in which calibrated logging tools had been run. The logs from an additional 10 holes were calibrated with core. Densities vary from nearly 1 g/cc in tunnel bed 5 to over 2.8 g/cc in the dolomitic rocks. Log densities were found to agree well with core data in those subunits (chiefly within tunnel beds 3 and 4) where an adequate number of core measurements were available for comparison. Lithologic correlations based on density log signatures were found to extend for more than 8 km in several units and subunits in the area. Although the volcanic rocks in the Rainier Mesa area are comprised of a wider spectrum of minerals than the petroliferous rocks generally involved in most commercial logging applications, grain density may be estimated with good accuracy with only a knowledge of glass and zeolite content. The variability of the Z/A ratio of the matrix in these volcanic rocks is also negligible compared to the value of 0.5 generally assumed in density logging. However, due to the assumptions made concerning the Z/A of water in deriving the output of commercial density tools, one should be aware of the errors inherent in assuming that recorded log densities are true densities. These errors are normally small, being less than 3 percent for compensated limestone'' tools and 2 percent for tools which output electron density. 35 refs., 25 figs., 12 tabs.

Carroll, R.D.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Effects of low temperature preheating on the pyrolysis products from blocks of oil shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Oil shale is a sedimentary rock composed of inorganic and organic fractions. The inorganic minerals contained in oil shale include: dolomite, calcite, quartz, i1 lite, (more)

Alston, David W.

1905-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dl dolomitic limestone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

General Category  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

tools covered in limestone. The shape and size are the same as the ones we find made of flint or chart. Can flint artifacts become encased in limestone? Replies: Not likely. Pieces...

182

Cretaceous petroleum system of the Khasib and Tannuma oil ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Gas chromatography, palynomorph constituents, and maturation .... mainly shale and limestone of Jurassic Late BathonianEarly. Callovian Sargelo

183

Carbon Offsetting: An Efficient Way to Reduce Emissions or to Avoid Reducing Emissions? An Investigation and Analysis of Offsetting Design and Practice in India and China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production process starts with the transport of limestone and other materials containing oxides, normally clay or shale,

Haya, Barbara

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

A GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL STUDY OF THE BACA GEOTHERMAL FIELD, VALLES CALDERA, NEW MEXICO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shales, sandstones, and limestones (this layer is probably a significant storage reservoir and may be a major production

Wilt, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Deterioration of Iowa Highway Concrete Pavements: A ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Coarse aggregate is a crushed limestone and the sand is a blend of quartz, feldspar, and shale. Occasional cracking related ...

2001-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

186

NIST Stone Test Wall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... purposes. There are many varieties of the common types used in building, such as marble, limestone, sandstone, and granite. ...

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

187

Stone Test Wall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... purposes. There are many varieties of the common types used in building, such as marble, limestone, sandstone, and granite. ...

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

188

NIST Manuscript Publication Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Title: Using Limestone to Reduce Set Retardation in High Volume Fly Ash Mixtures: Improving Constructability for Sustainability. ...

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

189

9.-REI'ORT OF EXPLORATIONS MADE IN. MISSOURI AND ARKANSAS DURING 1889; WITH AN ACCOUNT OF THE FISHES OBSEWEI) IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

limestone, containing much chert ond flint. The flint breaks up into angular pieces which cover the bottom

190

Chicxulub impact predates the K-T boundary mass extinction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

foraminifera in marls and limestones above the impact breccia of PEMEX well C1 located near the center

Keller, Gerta

191

Formation Damage due to CO2 Sequestration in Saline Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration is defined as the removal of gas that would be emitted into the atmosphere and its subsequent storage in a safe, sound place. CO2 sequestration in underground formations is currently being considered to reduce the amount of CO2 emitted into the atmosphere. However, a better understanding of the chemical and physical interactions between CO2, water, and formation rock is necessary before sequestration. These interactions can be evaluated by the change in mineral content in the water before and after injection, or from the change in well injectivity during CO2 injection. It may affect the permeability positively due to rock dissolution, or negatively due to precipitation. Several physical and chemical processes cover the CO2 injection operations; multiphase flow in porous media is represented by the flow of the brine and CO2, solute transportation is represented by CO2 dissolution in the brine forming weak carbonic acid, dissolution-deposition kinetics can be seen in the rock dissolution by the carbonic acid and the deposition of the reaction products, hydrodynamic instabilities due to displacement of less viscous brine with more viscous CO2 (viscous fingering), capillary effects and upward movement of CO2 due to gravity effect. The objective of the proposed work is to correlate the formation damage to the other variables, i.e. pressure, temperature, formation rock type, rock porosity, water composition, sulfates concentration in the water, CO2 volume injected, water volume injected, CO2 to water volumetric ratio, CO2 injection rate, and water injection rate. In order to achieve the proposed objective, lab experiments will be conducted on different rock types (carbonates, limestone and dolomite, and sandstone) under pressure and temperature that simulate the field conditions. CO2 will be used at the supercritical phase and different CO2-water-rock chemical interactions will be addressed. Quantitative analysis of the experimental results using a geochemical simulator (CMG-GEM) will also be performed. The results showed that for carbonate cores, maintaining the CO2/brine volumetric ratio above 1.0 reduced bicarbonate formation in the formation brine and helped in minimizing precipitation of calcium carbonate. Additionally, increasing cycle volume in WAG injection reduced the damage introduced to the core. Sulfate precipitation during CO2 sequestration was primarily controlled by temperature. For formation brine with high total dissolved solids (TDS), calcium sulfate precipitation occurs, even at a low sulfate concentration. For dolomite rock, temperature, injection flow rate, and injection scheme don't have a clear impact on the core permeability, the main factor that affects the change in core permeability is the initial core permeability. Sandstone cores showed significant damage; between 35% and 55% loss in core permeability was observed after CO2 injection. For shorter WAG injection the damage was higher; decreasing the brine volume injected per cycle, decreased the damage. At higher temperatures, 200 and 250 degrees F, more damage was noted than at 70 degrees F.

Mohamed, Ibrahim 1984-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

A computational study of pre-synaptic re-uptake of dopamine on phosphorylation of DARPP-32  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The activity of mid brain dopamine (DA) neurons resembles the reward prediction error signal of the Temporal Difference (TD) model. Dopamine acting at Dl receptor activates adenylate cyclase through the coupling of Dl receptors with Gs/olf. ...

Shesharao M. Wanjerkhede; Raju S. Bapi

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Determination of Single Crystal Elastic Constants From DS- and DR ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

D.L. Anton, T. Khan, R.D. Kissinger, D.L. Klarstrom ... is determined by the two angles 8 and Q. The constants S,,, Su, and S,, characterize the elastic behaviour of...

194

Effect of Elastic Interaction Energy on the Distribution of Coherent ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

D.L. Anton, T. Khan, R.D. Kissinger, D.L. Klarstrom ..... Y. Wang, L.-Q. Chen, and A. G. Khachaturyan, Shape Evolution of a Precipitate during Strain-. Induced...

195

Influence of High Temperature Elastic-Plastic Small Crack Growth ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

D.L. Anton, T. Khan, R.D. Kissinger, D.L. Klarstrom .... of some of the conditions is still present. This indicates that the global plasticity is. 1o-2. 1 o+ . q. 0. 0. II. 0.

196

Anisotropy of High Temperature Deformation of Single Crystal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edited by S.D. Antolovich, R.W. Stusrud, R.A. MacKay,. D.L. Anton, T. Khan, R.D. Kissinger, D.L. Klarstmm. The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society, 1992. 609...

197

Plasma Cold Hearth Remelting of UDIMET tradmark Alloy 718  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edited by S.D. Antolovich, R.W. Stusrud, R.A. MacKay,. D.L. Anton, T. Khan, R.D. Kissinger, D.L. Klarstrom. The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society, 1992. 195...

198

Development of an Analytical Model Predicting Microstructure and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

D.L. Anton, T. Khan, R.D. Kissinger, D.L. Klarstrom. The Minerals, Metals & Materials ... law is of the following form: (r?-s)*fl. = A * (Ce/r)lfl * tlfl * exp(-Q/3RT). (

199

Fatigue Crack Propagation in Single Crystal CMSX-2 at Elevated ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

D.L. Anton, T. Khan, R.D. Kissinger, D.L. Klarstrom. The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society, 1992 .... damaged q interface. The SEM stereo pair in Fin. 8 clearly...

200

The Microstructural Response of As-HIP P/M U-720 to ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edited by SD. Antolovich, R.W. Stusrud, R.A. MacKay,. D.L. Anton, T. Khan, R.D. Kissinger, D.L. Klarstrom. The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society, 1992. 93...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dl dolomitic limestone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

P.O. Box 751, Portland, OR 97207-0751 503-725-3511, Toll free: 1-800-547-8887  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(DL) ­ Your Training Solution ContinuingEducationCredits(CEUs,PDHs,etc) PROSPECT Courses by Community effectively * DistanceLearning(DL)­YourTraining Solution * Continuing Education Credits (CEUs, PDHs, etc, continuing education credits(CEUs

Bertini, Robert L.

202

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Sequestration Potential of the North Michigan Silurian Reef CO2 Sequestration Potential of the North Michigan Silurian Reef CO2 Sequestration Potential of the North Michigan Silurian Reef Authors: Brian Toelle, Chaoqing Yang (speaker), and Tracee Imai, Schlumberger Ltd. Venue: Eastern Section of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists 2007 Annual Meeting, Lexington, KY, September 16–18, 2007 (http://www.uky.edu/KGS/esaapg07/ [external site]). Abstract: The Northern Silurian Reef trend of the Michigan Basin was developed within the stratigraphic unit historically referred to as the Niagaran Brown. Within the past few years this unit was renamed the Guelph Formation. Over 700 reefs make up this trend, with some of these being over 300 acres in size and having produced more than 5 million barrels of oil. Estimates of the total amount of hydrocarbons produced for the entire trend have been reported to be as much as nearly a half a billion barrels. The U.S. Department of Energy has funded a study of an ongoing enhanced oil recovery project being conducted on a reef within this trend and entailing CO2 injection. The Charlton 30/31 reef, located in Otsego County, MI, like many other reefs in the play, was discovered and developed during the 1970s and 1980s. This field has completed its primary production phase, during which six wells produced 2.6 million of the field’s estimated 7 million barrels of oil in place. This reservoir is characterized as a low-porosity, low-permeability limestone matrix with irregular dolomitized intervals providing a secondary network of higher porosity and permeability, which controls fluid flow throughout the reservoir. The estimated average porosity in this reef is just slightly over 6 percent. As part of this study, the reservoir attributes identified at the Charlton 30/31 reef were extended to the entire Northern Reef Trend in order to determine its CO2 sequestration capacity. Additionally, the potential oil recovery has been estimated.

203

Combustion Engineering Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Repowering Project -- Clean Coal II Project. Annual report, November 20, 1990--December 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The IGCC system will consist of CE`s air-blown, entrained-flow, two-stage, pressurized coal gasifier; an advanced hot gas cleanup process; a combustion turbine adapted to use low-Btu coal gas; and all necessary coal handling equipment. The IGCC will include CE`s slogging, entrained-flow, gasifier operating in a pressurized mode and using air as the oxidant. The hot gas will be cleaned of particulate matter (char) which is recycled back to the gasifier. After particulate removal, the product gas will be cleaned of sulfur prior to burning in a gas turbine. The proposed project includes design and demonstration of two advanced hot gas cleanup processes for removal of sulfur from the product gas of the gasifier. The primary sulfur removal method features a newly developed moving-bed zinc ferrite system downstream of the gasifier. The process data from these pilot tests is expected to be sufficient for the design of a full-scale system to be used in the proposed demonstration. A second complementary process is in situ desulfurization achieved by adding limestone or dolomite directly to the coal feed. The benefit, should such an approach prove viable, is that the downstream cleanup system could be reduced in size. In this plant, the gasifier will be producing a low-Btu gas (LBG). The LBG will be used as fuel in a standard GE gas turbine to produce power. This gas turbine will have the capability to fire LBG and natural gas (for start-up). Since firing LBG uses less air than natural gas, the gas turbine air compressor will have extra capacity. This extra compressed air will be used to pressurize the gasifier and supply the air needed in the gasification process. The plant is made of three major blocks of equipment as shown in Figure 2. They are the fuel gas island which includes the gasifier and gas cleanup, gas turbine power block, and the steam turbine block which includes the steam turbine and the HRSG.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Geomechanical Analysis and Design Considerations for Thin-Bedded Salt Caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bedded salt formations located throughout the United States are layered and interspersed with non-salt materials such as anhydrite, shale, dolomite and limestone. The salt layers often contain significant impurities. GRI and DOE have initialized this research proposal in order to increase the gas storage capabilities by providing operators with improved geotechnical design and operating guidelines for thin bedded salt caverns. Terralog has summarized the geologic conditions, pressure conditions, and critical design factors that may lead to: (1) Fracture in heterogeneous materials; (2) Differential deformation and bedding plane slip; (3) Propagation of damage around single and multiple cavern; and (4) Improved design recommendations for single and multiple cavern configurations in various bedded salt environments. The existing caverns within both the Permian Basin Complex and the Michigan and Appalachian Basins are normally found between 300 m to 1,000 m (1,000 ft to 3,300 ft) depth depending on local geology and salt dissolution depth. Currently, active cavern operations are found in the Midland and Anadarko Basins within the Permian Basin Complex and in the Appalachian and Michigan Basins. The Palo Duro and Delaware Basins within the Permian Basin Complex also offer salt cavern development potential. Terralog developed a number of numerical models for caverns located in thin bedded salt. A modified creep viscoplastic model has been developed and implemented in Flac3D to simulate the response of salt at the Permian, Michigan and Appalachian Basins. The formulation of the viscoplastic salt model, which is based on an empirical creep law developed for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Program, is combined with the Drucker-Prager model to include the formation of damage and failure. The Permian salt lab test data provided by Pfeifle et al. 1983, are used to validate the assumptions made in the material model development. For the actual cavern simulations two baseline models are developed for single and multiple caverns, respectively. Different parameters that affect damage propagation and deformation of salt cavern, such as cavern pressure, operating conditions, cavern height/diameter ratio, overburden stiffness and roof thickness are analyzed and the respective results summarized. For multiple horizontal caverns numerical models are developed to determine the cavern interaction and the minimum safe center to center distance. A step by step methodology for operators to assess critical cavern design parameters for thin bedded salt formations is also presented.

Michael S. Bruno

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Improving Gas Flooding Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

This study focuses on laboratory studies with related analytical and numerical models, as well as work with operators for field tests to enhance our understanding of and capabilities for more efficient enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Much of the work has been performed at reservoir conditions. This includes a bubble chamber and several core flood apparatus developed or modified to measure interfacial tension (IFT), critical micelle concentration (CMC), foam durability, surfactant sorption at reservoir conditions, and pressure and temperature effects on foam systems.Carbon dioxide and N{sub 2} systems have been considered, under both miscible and immiscible conditions. The injection of CO2 into brine-saturated sandstone and carbonate core results in brine saturation reduction in the range of 62 to 82% brine in the tests presented in this paper. In each test, over 90% of the reduction occurred with less than 0.5 PV of CO{sub 2} injected, with very little additional brine production after 0.5 PV of CO{sub 2} injected. Adsorption of all considered surfactant is a significant problem. Most of the effect is reversible, but the amount required for foaming is large in terms of volume and cost for all considered surfactants. Some foams increase resistance to the value beyond what is practical in the reservoir. Sandstone, limestone, and dolomite core samples were tested. Dissolution of reservoir rock and/or cement, especially carbonates, under acid conditions of CO2 injection is a potential problem in CO2 injection into geological formations. Another potential change in reservoir injectivity and productivity will be the precipitation of dissolved carbonates as the brine flows and pressure decreases. The results of this report provide methods for determining surfactant sorption and can be used to aid in the determination of surfactant requirements for reservoir use in a CO{sub 2}-foam flood for mobility control. It also provides data to be used to determine rock permeability changes during CO{sub 2} flooding due to saturation changes, dissolution, and precipitation.

Reid Grigg; Robert Svec; Zheng Zeng; Alexander Mikhalin; Yi Lin; Guoqiang Yin; Solomon Ampir; Rashid Kassim

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

Carbon Sequestration Monitoring Activities  

SciTech Connect

In its 'Carbon Sequestration Technology Roadmap and Program Plan 2007' the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) identified as a major objective extended field tests to fully characterize potential carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage sites and to demonstrate the long-term storage of sequestered carbon (p. 5). Among the challenges in this area are 'improved understanding of CO{sub 2} flow and trapping within the reservoir and the development and deployment of technologies such as simulation models and monitoring systems' (p. 20). The University of Wyoming (UW), following consultations with the NETL, the Wyoming State Geological Survey, and the Governor's office, identified potential for geologic sequestration of impure carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in deep reservoirs of the Moxa Arch. The Moxa Arch is a 120-mile long north-south trending anticline plunging beneath the Wyoming Thrust Belt on the north and bounded on the south by the Uinta Mountains. Several oil and gas fields along the Moxa Arch contain accumulations of natural CO{sub 2}. The largest of these is the La Barge Platform, which encompasses approximately 800 square miles. Several formations may be suitable for storage of impure CO{sub 2} gas, foremost among them the Madison Limestone, Bighorn Dolomite, and Nugget Sandstone. This project responded to the challenges described above by preparing a geological site characterization study on the Moxa Arch. The project included four priority research areas: (A) geological characterization of geologic structure of the Arch, the fault, and fracture patterns of the target formations and caprocks, (B) experimental characterization of carbon dioxide-brine-rock reactions that may occur, (C) optimization of geophysical and numerical models necessary for measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV), and (D) a preliminary performance assessment. Research work to accomplish these goals was coordinated by one administrative task under the direction of Dr. Carol Frost, Professor of Geology and Geophysics (Task 1.0), and one task devoted to designing and creating an interdisciplinary, project-specific carbon cyberinfrastructure to support collaborative carbon dioxide sequestration research among University of Wyoming scientists and their collaborators, performed by Jeff Hammerlinck, Director of the Wyoming Geographic Information Science Center at the University of Wyoming (Task 1.5). The results of these tasks are presented in the Introduction and in Chapter 1, respectively.

Carol Frost

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

207

Optimizing Fracture Treatments in a Mississippian "Chat" Reservoir, South-Central Kansas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is a collaboration of Woolsey Petroleum Corporation (a small independent operator) and the Kansas Geological Survey. The project will investigate geologic and engineering factors critical for designing hydraulic fracture treatments in Mississippian ''chat'' reservoirs. Mississippian reservoirs, including the chat, account for 159 million m3 (1 billion barrels) of the cumulative oil produced in Kansas. Mississippian reservoirs presently represent {approx}40% of the state's 5.6*106m3 (35 million barrels) annual production. Although geographically widespread, the ''chat'' is a heterogeneous reservoir composed of chert, cherty dolomite, and argillaceous limestone. Fractured chert with micro-moldic porosity is the best reservoir in this 18- to 30-m-thick (60- to 100-ft) unit. The chat will be cored in an infill well in the Medicine Lodge North field (417,638 m3 [2,626,858 bbls] oil; 217,811,000 m3 [7,692,010 mcf] gas cumulative production; discovered 1954). The core and modern wireline logs will provide geological and petrophysical data for designing a fracture treatment. Optimum hydraulic fracturing design is poorly defined in the chat, with poor correlation of treatment size to production increase. To establish new geologic and petrophysical guidelines for these treatments, data from core petrophysics, wireline logs, and oil-field maps will be input to a fracture-treatment simulation program. Parameters will be established for optimal size of the treatment and geologic characteristics of the predicted fracturing. The fracturing will be performed and subsequent wellsite tests will ascertain the results for comparison to predictions. A reservoir simulation program will then predict the rate and volumetric increase in production. Comparison of the predicted increase in production with that of reality, and the hypothetical fracturing behavior of the reservoir with that of its actual behavior, will serve as tests of the geologic and petrophysical characterization of the oil field. After this feedback, a second well will be cored and logged, and procedure will be repeated to test characteristics determined to be critical for designing cost-effective fracture treatments. Most oil and gas production in Kansas, and that of the Midcontinent oil industry, is dominated by small companies. The overwhelming majority of these independent operators employ less than 20 people. These companies have limited scientific and engineering expertise and they are increasingly needing guidelines and technical examples that will help them to not be wasteful of their limited financial resources and petroleum reserves. To aid these operators, the technology transfer capabilities of the Kansas Geological Survey will disseminate the results of this study to the local, regional, and national oil industry. Internet access, seminars, presentations, and publications by Woolsey Petroleum Company and Kansas Geological Survey geologists and engineers are anticipated.

K. David Newell; Saibal Bhattacharya; Alan Byrnes; W. Lynn Watney; Willard Guy

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Completion Report for Well ER-16-1 Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa - Shoshone Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well ER-16-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in June and July 2005 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Rainier Mesa-Shoshone Mountain Corrective Action Unit, Number 99. The overall purpose of the well was to gather subsurface data to better characterize the hydrogeology of the Shoshone Mountain area, especially in the older Tertiary and pre-Tertiary strata. The main 46.99-centimeter hole was drilled to a depth of 702.9 meters and cased with 33.97-centimeter casing to 663.7 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters, and the well was drilled to total depth of 1,220.7 meters. A completion string set at the depth of 1,162.4 meters consisted of 13.97-centimeter stainless-steel casing, with one continuous slotted interval open to the lower carbonate aquifer. The fluid level in the borehole soon dropped, so the borehole was deepened in July 2006. To deepen the borehole, the slotted section was cemented and a 12.1-centimeter hole was drilled through the bottom of the completion string to the new total depth of 1,391.7 meters, which is 171.0 meters deeper than the original borehole. A string of 6.03-centimeter carbon-steel tubing with one continuous slotted interval at 1,361.8 to 1,381.4 meters, and open to the lower carbonate aquifer, was installed in the well with no gravel packing or cement, to serve as a monitoring string. Data gathered during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters (extra cuttings samples were collected from the Paleozoic rocks for paleontological analyses), sidewall core samples from 37 depths, various geophysical logs, and water level measurements. These data indicate that the well penetrated 646.8 meters of Tertiary volcanic rocks and 744.9 meters of Paleozoic dolomite, quartzite, shale, and limestone. Three weeks after the monitoring string was installed, the water level was tagged at the drill hole depth of 1,271.9 meters, which equates to an estimated elevation of 761.7 meters, accounting for the borehole angle.

NSTec Geology Services

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

HYDRAULIC CALCULATIONS FOR A MODIFIED IN-SITU RETORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. C. , 1974), 2. Oil Shale Tract C-b: Materials (AshlandRiver, containing the oil shale; and the Wasatch foundationof dolomitic marlstone (oil shale) and soluble materials.

Hall, W.G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

I  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the way up-the north-facing I slope of the moraine. The site is underlain by sandy, silty, clay till I to about 13'0 fi, beneath which occurs dolom.itic bedrock of...

211

CX-006239: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX-006239: Categorical Exclusion Determination Structure Replacement, Guernsey Rural Substation to Limestone Substation, Platte County, Wyoming CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date:...

212

Expanding Professional Horizons  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Horizons collaboration put him in contact with an environmental study - using atomic force microscopy - examining limestone (calcium carbonate) dissolution and its...

213

Natural Science Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

producers of oil, coal, limestone, clay, silica sand, and that unique mineral -- fluorspar - - we recommend our bulletins about them, "Teaching Mineral Conservation"...

214

VT PowerPoint Template2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

injection site * Determine optimal sensor array Aneth - Reservoir Information * Aneth oil field, discovered in 1956 * Limestone * Permeability: 3-30 mD * Porosity: 10.2% *...

215

NIST Tech Beat - May 18, 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... New Initiative Will Map US Measurement Needs. ... Indiana Limestone: NIST's First and Latest SRM. ... everything from high-performance wind tunnels to ...

216

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Epifluorescence Techniques The Use of Epifluorescence Techniques to Determine Potential Oil-Prone Areas in the Mississippian Leadville Limestone, Northern Paradox Basin, Utah...

217

On the Description and Greatness of Mexico City: A Translation of Book 4, Chapters 24 and 25, of Francisco Cervantes de Salazar's Crnica de la conquista de la Nueva Espaa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

very strong with two tall limestone towers. The entire housetower in the city it was a great relief for the travelers to see it rising so tall;

Bono, Dianne M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Impact of formation properties and well design on cumulative gas production from Devonian Shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Devonian Shale refers to all the shale strata sandwiched between two different formations; the younger Berea sandstone above it and the older limestone termed Onondaga (more)

Ita, Jacques.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Scanning electron microscopy imaging of hydraulic cement ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Cement clinker is manufactured from a finely-ground, homogenized blend of limestone, shale and iron ore sintered in a rotary kiln to temperatures ...

2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

220

Production of Ordinary Portland Cement(OPC) from NALCO Red Mud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Ordinary Portland Cement(OPC) from NALCO Red Mud has been successfully developed from a raw mix containing limestone, red mud,shale and fine coal.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dl dolomitic limestone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Red Mud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 1, 2011... Cement(OPC) from NALCO Red Mud has been successfully developed from a raw mix containing limestone, red mud,shale and fine coal.

222

Three-dimensional shape analysis of coarse aggregates ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Rock/Mineral Identification. IN. Natural river gravel. Indiana. Limestone,shale- siltstone, siliceous (eg, quartz, chert). AZ/az. Natural river gravel. Arizona ...

2005-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

223

NIST Manuscript Publication Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... There are many varieties of the common types used in building such as types used in building such as marble, limestone, sandstone, and granite. ...

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

NETL: Control Technology - Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enhanced Mercury Control URS Corporation will demonstrate the use of an additive in wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems to prevent oxidized mercury that...

225

DISCLAIMER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

suggestion of Dr. Grebe is t o explode the nuclear device in limestone carrying oil shale. some calcium carbide will be formed. carbide needs exceedingly high temperatures,...

226

Subsurface Site Characterization  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

and limestone. The Green River Formation is the primary formation of interest for oil shale development in the region. Quaternary-age deposits of alluvium, mudflows, talus...

227

WISE Home Energy Program (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The WISE Home Energy Program provides up to 750 in energy efficiency rebates for homeowners in Cullman, Madison, Jefferson, Shelby, Morgan, Limestone and Lawrence counties. A...

228

Alabama Profile - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The three reactors at the Browns Ferry nuclear power plant in Limestone ... Production: Alabama: ... designed to produce 520,000 metric tons of wood pellets ...

229

Transient response of flow-direction-switching vapor-phase biofilters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pellet ?Celite R-635? Compost-isolite-limestone Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes UF UF Polyurethane foam Peat-bark-wood

Wright, W F; Schroeder, E D; Chang, Daniel P.Y.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Social boundaries and state formation in ancient Edom : a comparative ceramic approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1: Lower Cretaceous Shales....355 B. PetrographicGroup 6: Lower Cretaceous Shale with Micaceous clay-along the Dolmite-Limestone-Shale (DLS) rock formations. B.

Smith, Neil G.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Geophysical Constraints on Sediment Dispersal Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modest because the source rock lithology is limestone-consis- tent with its source rock composition and longsources of silica in sediments are the weathering of rocks

Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Geophysical constraints on sediment dispersal systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modest because the source rock lithology is limestone-consis- tent with its source rock composition and longsources of silica in sediments are the weathering of rocks

Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers; Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

A Brief Summary of Dictionary Learning Based Approach for Classification (revised)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This note presents some representative methods which are based on dictionary learning (DL) for classification. We do not review the sophisticated methods or frameworks that involve DL for classification, such as online DL and spatial pyramid matching (SPM), but rather, we concentrate on the direct DL-based classification methods. Here, the "so-called direct DL-based method" is the approach directly deals with DL framework by adding some meaningful penalty terms. By listing some representative methods, we can roughly divide them into two categories, i.e. (1) directly making the dictionary discriminative and (2) forcing the sparse coefficients discriminative to push the discrimination power of the dictionary. From this taxonomy, we can expect some extensions of them as future researches.

Kong, Shu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

A Brief Summary of Dictionary Learning Based Approach for Classification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This note presents some representative methods which are based on dictionary learning (DL) for classification. We do not review the sophisticated methods or frameworks that involve DL for classification, such as online DL and spatial pyramid matching (SPM), but rather, we concentrate on the direct DL-based classification methods. Here, the "so-called direct DL-based method" is the approach directly deals with DL framework by adding some meaningful penalty terms. By listing some representative methods, we can roughly divide them into two categories, i.e. (1) directly making the dictionary discriminative and (2) forcing the sparse coefficients discriminative to push the discrimination power of the dictionary. From this taxonomy, we can expect some extensions of them as future researches.

Shu, Kong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF A 2-D POTENTIAL ENSTROPHY CONSERVING NUMERICAL OCEAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in each demand level, i.e. Ptdl grid , and the emission factor of the grid, i.e. Egrid. The total XNdl dl ¼ 1 sdl ? 2 4Egrid ? P grid t;dl þ XNb i ¼ 1 X dg Edg ? P dg i;t;dl 3 5 (13) 3. The proposed.7714 Table 2 Data used in the study. Parameter Unit Value T year 10 Np 50 Str MVA 40 Egrid kg emissions

Ketefian, Gerard

236

Volume 12, Number 10 26 October 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of shale/coal and evaporite/limestone lithologies intruded by LIPs? We use the shale/coal dominated Karoo in the Karoo Basin [Svensen et al., 2007; Aarnes et al., 2011], and 2) sill emplacement in limestones Ecca Group in the Eastern Karoo Basin [McElwain et al., 2005; Svensen et al., 2007]. We use the same

Svensen, Henrik

237

A publication of the Department of Geology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Strawberry River, in section 22, T. 2 S, R. 12 W. In addition to limestone, tan and red quartzose sand- stone, with float and rubble of sand- stone predominant. Orthoquartzite and limestone are gen- erally more resistant and friable, and at times calcareous. Orthoquartzites are hard and tight and appear to comprise most

Seamons, Kent E.

238

Experiments of Sulfur Removal in 1MW Poly-Generation System with Partial Gasification and Combustion Combined  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study on sulfur release and adsorption during coal partial gasification and combustion is conducted in a 1MW circulating fluidized bed (CFB) poly-generation system. Limestone is added to gasifier as a sorbent of sulfur produced, where ... Keywords: partial gasification, poly-generation, recycled coal gas, limestone, desulfurization

Qin Hong; Wang Qing; Wang Qinhui; Luo Zhongyang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Effects of Glucocorticoid Receptor Small Interfering RNA Delivered Using Poly Lactic-Co-Glycolic Acid Microparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cells. FEBS Lett 22, 2869, 2006. 38. Coutu, D.L., Franc¸ois, M., and Galipeau, J. Inhibition of cellular

Salem, Aliasger K.

240

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synchrotron sources see : http:www.dl.ac.uk A field in expansion Free Electron Lasers (FEL) see : http:www.lightsources.org New technologies + New techniques Better...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dl dolomitic limestone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Production of Hydrogen byPhotovolta...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolysis Project ID: 132 Principal Investigator: DL Block Purpose Compare the cost of hydrogen produced using photo electric chemical systems to the cost of hydrogen...

242

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Ohio |...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ohio Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Dayton Power & Light (DL&L) Information for Businesses Duke Energy (Ohio) Information for...

243

David L. Greene - Research Staff - Center for Transportation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from transportation. Modeling energy transitions for transportation. Analysis of oil dependence and energy security. Significant Publications: Greene, D.L., K.G. Duleep,...

244

SRI2013 | Workshop 3 - Facility Upgrades and High ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 11:45 12:15, Christoph Steier (LBNL) DL-ALS, a potential soft x-ray, diffraction-limited upgrade of the Advanced Light Source. ...

245

Publications Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Measurement of k0-factors for Prompt Gamma-Ray Activation Analysis Published ... DL Schweickart Abstract: A new Surface-mediated burst mode of ...

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

246

Journal of Research Volume 83  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Photovoltaic technique for measuring resistivity variations of high resistivity silicon slices, p. 265 Blackburn, DL http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/jres ...

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

247

The Magnesium Problem in Superalloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

by lack of fundamental data. Electra Slag Remelting. Ichihashi ..... "Handbook of Binary Phase Diagrams", Genium Publ. Corp.,. 1984. 't. 17. D.L. Sponseller,.

248

Appl Phys A DOI 10.1007/s00339-012-6920-8  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 1882 (2005) 26. S. Sapp, S. Nuebben, Y.B. Losovyj, P. Jeppson, D.L. Schulz, A.N. Caruso, Appl. Phys

Yoon, Jun-Bo

249

Physiological responses of young thoroughbred horses to intermittent high-intensity treadmill training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

age or extent of previous training in young horses or theirat the outset of the training. Endnotes a Mustang 2200,References 1. Evans DL: Training thoroughbred racehorses. In

Ohmura, Hajime; Matsui, Akira; Hada, Tetsuro; Jones, James H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Technology@TMS: Online Article  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MatDL is implementing an information infrastructure, which provides content and services to support the integration of education and research in materials...

251

MODELING AND PILOT SCALE STUDIES OF THE HYS CYCLE ELECTROLYZER  

Dedicated MEA R&D Program (coll. with PEM component team of CEA-Grenoble) Catalysts evaluations (with ref separator and diffusion layers) Separator and DL upgrade

252

LCLS CDR Chapter 7 - Accelerator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The dominant error, which will likely arise in DL2, is anomalous linear dispersion or beta mismatch. Quadrupole field strength errors are the most likely cause. The various...

253

An Absorbed-Dose/Dose-Rate Dependence for the Alanine ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Natl. Inst. Stand. Technol. 99, 121-141 (1994). [3] JC Humphreys, JM Puhl, SM Seltzer, WL McLaughlin, MF Desrosiers, DL Bensen, and ML Walker ...

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

254

NIST Part 3.pmd  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Sung, L., Ho, DL, Michaels, CA, Nguyen, D., Jean, Y. C. Nguyen, T., Surface ... MP, Ravel, B., Huang, Q., Willard, MA, Cheng, SF, Das, BN, Stroud, RM ...

2003-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

255

Superalloys Conference Proceedings Archive - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Additional, D.L., Ellis. Superalloys 2000 ... Effect of Microstructure (and Heat Treatment) on the 649C Properties of Advanced P/M Superalloy Disk Materials...

256

NBS TECHNICAL NOTE 611  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... [3] Haydon, G. W. , Lucas, DL , and Kirby, R. C., Predicted coverage of WWV Fort Collins for 10 and 100 kilowatts (Unpublished report). ...

2002-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

257

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact of Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe Measured Ice Crystals on the Community Atmospheric Model D.L. Mitchell, and D. Ivanova Desert Research Institute Reno, Nevada P....

258

Reducing Greenhouse Emissions and Fuel Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ethanol, methanol, compressed natural gas, liquefied propaneelectric vehicle CNGV: compressed natural gas vehicle Dl CIgasoline vehicles. Compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles

Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

PUBLICATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Jacobson, DL, Arif, M., Bergmann, L., Ioffe, A., Development of the ... G., Thompson, A., Gefter, WB, Schnall, MD, Leigh, JS, Ventilation/Perfusion of ...

2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

260

V.: GLOO: A Graphical Query Language for OWL Ontologies. OWLED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The database usability experience has shown that visual query languages tend to be superior to textual languages in many aspects. By applying this principle in the context of ontologies, we present GLOO, a graphical query language for OWL-DL ontologies. GLOO maps diagrammatic queries to DL based query languages such as nRQL, which is offered by the OWL-DL reasoner Racer. GLOO hides the complexity of a DL query language from users and allows them to query OWL ontologies with less difficulty. 1

Amineh Fadhil; Volker Haarslev

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dl dolomitic limestone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

ARM - Instrument Handbooks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bucket Rain Gauge DISDROMETER 2009 Doppler Lidar DL 2012 Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System ECOR 2011 Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station EBBR 2011 G-Band (183 GHz)...

262

Health Literacy Among Parents of Pediatric Patients Seen in the Emergency Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003. Western Journal of Emergency Medicine Volume IX, no .DL, St. Peter RF. Routine emergency department use for sicklargely been absent from the emergency medicine literature.

Tran, T. Paul; Robinson, Laura M; Keebler, John R; Walker, Richard A; Wadman, Michael C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Report Tunneling Cost Reduction Study prepared for Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratories has a need to review the costs of constructing the very long tunnels which would be required for housing the equipment for the proposed Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) project. Current tunneling costs are high, and the identification of potential means of significantly reducing them, and thereby helping to keep overall project costs within an acceptable budget, has assumed great importance. Fermilab has contracted with The Robbins Company to provide an up-to-date appraisal of tunneling technology, and to review the potential for substantially improving currently the state-of-practice performance and construction costs in particular. The Robbins Company was chosen for this task because of its long and successful experience in hard rock mechanical tunnel boring. In the past 40 years, Robbins has manufactured over 250 tunneling machines, the vast majority for hard rock applications. In addition to also supplying back-up equipment, Robbins has recently established a division dedicated to the manufacture of continuous conveying equipment for the efficient support of tunneling operations. The study extends beyond the tunnel boring machine (TBM) itself, and into the critical area of the logistics of the support of the machine as it advances, including manpower. It is restricted to proven methods using conventional technology, and its potential for incremental but meaningful improvement, rather than examining exotic and undeveloped means of rock excavation that have been proposed from time to time by the technical community. This is the first phase of what is expected to be a number of studies in increasing depth of technical detail, and as such has been restricted to the issues connected with the initial 34 kilometer circumference booster tunnel, and not the proposed 500 kilometer circumference tunnel housing the VLHC itself. The booster tunnel is entirely sited within low to medium strength limestone and dolomite formations, typical of the Chicago area. The rock is generally competent with widely spaced jointing, and slowdown of the operation for the installation of rock support is expected to be minimal. The tunneling system will have to be equipped with the necessary equipment for an efficient response to poor rock conditions however. Because the ground conditions are expected to be very favorable, a state-of-the-art TBM should have no difficulty in excavating at a high penetration rate of 10 meters per hour or more in rock of the average of the range of strengths stated to exist. Disc cutter changes will be few as the rock has very low abrasivity. However, experience has shown that overall tunneling rates are a relatively low percentage of the machine's penetration rate capability. Therefore the main focus of improvement is guaranteeing that the support systems, including mucking and advance of the utilities do not impede the operation. Improved mechanization of the support systems, along with automation where practicable to reduce manpower, is seen as the best means of raising the overall speed of the operation, and reducing its cost. The first phase of the study is mainly involved with establishing the baseline for current performance, and in identifying areas of improvement. It contains information on existing machine design concepts and provides data on many aspects of the mechanical tunneling process, including costs and labor requirements. While it contains suggestions for technical improvements of the various system, the time limitations of this phase have not permitted any detailed concept development. This should be a major part of the next phase.

1999-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

264

IMPROVING CO2 EFFICIENCY FOR RECOVERING OIL IN HETEROGENEOUS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

This document is the First Annual Report for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No., a three-year contract entitled: ''Improving CO{sub 2} Efficiency for Recovering Oil in Heterogeneous Reservoirs.'' The research improved our knowledge and understanding of CO{sub 2} flooding and includes work in the areas of injectivity and mobility control. The bulk of this work has been performed by the New Mexico Petroleum Recovery Research Center, a research division of New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. This report covers the reporting period of September 28, 2001 and September 27, 2002. Injectivity continues to be a concern to the industry. During this period we have contacted most of the CO{sub 2} operators in the Permian Basin and talked again about their problems in this area. This report has a summary of what we found. It is a given that carbonate mineral dissolution and deposition occur in a formation in geologic time and are expected to some degree in carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) floods. Water-alternating-gas (WAG) core flood experiments conducted on limestone and dolomite core plugs confirm that these processes can occur over relatively short time periods (hours to days) and in close proximity to each other. Results from laboratory CO{sub 2}-brine flow experiments performed in rock core were used to calibrate a reactive transport simulator. The calibrated model is being used to estimate in situ effects of a range of possible sequestration options in depleted oil/gas reservoirs. The code applied in this study is a combination of the well known TOUGH2 simulator, for coupled groundwater/brine and heat flow, with the chemistry code TRANS for chemically reactive transport. Variability in response among rock types suggests that CO{sub 2} injection will induce ranges of transient and spatially dependent changes in intrinsic rock permeability and porosity. Determining the effect of matrix changes on CO{sub 2} mobility is crucial in evaluating the efficacy and potential environmental implications of storing CO{sub 2} in the subsurface. Chemical cost reductions are identified that are derived from the synergistic effects of cosurfactant systems using a good foaming agent and a less expensive poor foaming agent. The required good foaming agent is reduced by at least 75%. Also the effect on injectivity is reduced by as much as 50% using the cosurfactant system, compared to a previously used surfactant system. Mobility control of injected CO{sub 2} for improved oil recovery can be achieved with significant reduction in the chemical cost of SAG, improved injectivity of SAG, and improved economics of CO{sub 2} injection project when compared to reported systems. Our past work has identified a number of mobility control agents to use for CO{sub 2}-foam flooding. In particular the combination of the good foaming agent CD 1045 and a sacrificial agent and cosurfactant lignosulfonate. This work scrutinizes the methods that we are using to determine the efficiency of the sacrificial agents and cosurfactant systems. These have required concentration determinations and reusing core samples. Here, we report some of the problems that have been found and some interesting effects that must be considered.

Reid B. Grigg; Robert K. Svec

2002-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

265

Evaluating the Influence of Pore Architecture and Initial Saturation on Wettability and Relative Permeability in Heterogeneous, Shallow-Shelf Carbonates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thin (3-40 ft thick), heterogeneous, limestone and dolomite reservoirs, deposited in shallow-shelf environments, represent a significant fraction of the reservoirs in the U.S. midcontinent and worldwide. In Kansas, reservoirs of the Arbuckle, Mississippian, and Lansing-Kansas City formations account for over 73% of the 6.3 BBO cumulative oil produced over the last century. For these reservoirs basic petrophysical properties (e.g., porosity, absolute permeability, capillary pressure, residual oil saturation to waterflood, resistivity, and relative permeability) vary significantly horizontally, vertically, and with scale of measurement. Many of these reservoirs produce from structures of less than 30-60 ft, and being located in the capillary pressure transition zone, exhibit vertically variable initial saturations and relative permeability properties. Rather than being simpler to model because of their small size, these reservoirs challenge characterization and simulation methodology and illustrate issues that are less apparent in larger reservoirs where transition zone effects are minor and most of the reservoir is at saturations near S{sub wirr}. These issues are further augmented by the presence of variable moldic porosity and possible intermediate to mixed wettability and the influence of these on capillary pressure and relative permeability. Understanding how capillary-pressure properties change with rock lithology and, in turn, within transition zones, and how relative permeability and residual oil saturation to waterflood change through the transition zone is critical to successful reservoir management and as advanced waterflood and improved and enhanced recovery methods are planned and implemented. Major aspects of the proposed study involve a series of tasks to measure data to reveal the nature of how wettability and drainage and imbibition oil-water relative permeability change with pore architecture and initial water saturation. Focus is placed on carbonate reservoirs of widely varying moldic pore systems that represent the major of reservoirs in Kansas and are important nationally and worldwide. A goal of the project is to measure wettability, using representative oils from Kansas fields, on a wide range of moldic-porosity lithofacies that are representative of Kansas and midcontinent shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs. This investigation will discern the relative influence of wetting and pore architecture. In the midcontinent, reservoir water saturations are frequently greater than 'irreducible' because many reservoirs are largely in the capillary transition zone. This can change the imbibition oil-water relative permeability relations. Ignoring wettability and transition-zone relative permeabilities in reservoir modeling can lead to over- and under-prediction of oil recovery and recovery rates, and less effective improved recovery management. A goal of this project is to measure drainage and imbibition oil-water relative permeabilities for a large representative range of lithofacies at differ ent initial water saturations to obtain relations that can be applied everywhere in the reservoir. The practical importance of these relative permeability and wettability models will be demonstrated by using reservoir simulation studies on theoretical/generic and actual reservoir architectures. The project further seeks to evaluate how input of these new models affects reservoir simulation results at varying scales. A principal goal is to obtain data that will allow us to create models that will show how to accurately simulate flow in the shallow-structure, complex carbonate reservoirs that lie in the transition zone. Tasks involved to meet the project objectives include collection and consolidation of available data into a publicly accessible relational digital database and collection of oil and rock samples from carbonate fields around the state (Task 1). Basic properties of these rocks and oils will be measured and used in wettability tests. Comparison will be performed between crude and synthetic oil wettability and

Alan P. Byrnes; Saibal Bhattacharya; John Victorine; Ken Stalder

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

266

Evaluating the Influence of Pore Architecture and Initial Saturation on Wettability and Relative Permeability in Heterogeneous, Shallow-Shelf Carbonates  

SciTech Connect

Thin (3-40 ft thick), heterogeneous, limestone and dolomite reservoirs, deposited in shallow-shelf environments, represent a significant fraction of the reservoirs in the U.S. midcontinent and worldwide. In Kansas, reservoirs of the Arbuckle, Mississippian, and Lansing-Kansas City formations account for over 73% of the 6.3 BBO cumulative oil produced over the last century. For these reservoirs basic petrophysical properties (e.g., porosity, absolute permeability, capillary pressure, residual oil saturation to waterflood, resistivity, and relative permeability) vary significantly horizontally, vertically, and with scale of measurement. Many of these reservoirs produce from structures of less than 30-60 ft, and being located in the capillary pressure transition zone, exhibit vertically variable initial saturations and relative permeability properties. Rather than being simpler to model because of their small size, these reservoirs challenge characterization and simulation methodology and illustrate issues that are less apparent in larger reservoirs where transition zone effects are minor and most of the reservoir is at saturations near S{sub wirr}. These issues are further augmented by the presence of variable moldic porosity and possible intermediate to mixed wettability and the influence of these on capillary pressure and relative permeability. Understanding how capillary-pressure properties change with rock lithology and, in turn, within transition zones, and how relative permeability and residual oil saturation to waterflood change through the transition zone is critical to successful reservoir management and as advanced waterflood and improved and enhanced recovery methods are planned and implemented. Major aspects of the proposed study involve a series of tasks to measure data to reveal the nature of how wettability and drainage and imbibition oil-water relative permeability change with pore architecture and initial water saturation. Focus is placed on carbonate reservoirs of widely varying moldic pore systems that represent the major of reservoirs in Kansas and are important nationally and worldwide. A goal of the project is to measure wettability, using representative oils from Kansas fields, on a wide range of moldic-porosity lithofacies that are representative of Kansas and midcontinent shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs. This investigation will discern the relative influence of wetting and pore architecture. In the midcontinent, reservoir water saturations are frequently greater than 'irreducible' because many reservoirs are largely in the capillary transition zone. This can change the imbibition oil-water relative permeability relations. Ignoring wettability and transition-zone relative permeabilities in reservoir modeling can lead to over- and under-prediction of oil recovery and recovery rates, and less effective improved recovery management. A goal of this project is to measure drainage and imbibition oil-water relative permeabilities for a large representative range of lithofacies at differ ent initial water saturations to obtain relations that can be applied everywhere in the reservoir. The practical importance of these relative permeability and wettability models will be demonstrated by using reservoir simulation studies on theoretical/generic and actual reservoir architectures. The project further seeks to evaluate how input of these new models affects reservoir simulation results at varying scales. A principal goal is to obtain data that will allow us to create models that will show how to accurately simulate flow in the shallow-structure, complex carbonate reservoirs that lie in the transition zone. Tasks involved to meet the project objectives include collection and consolidation of available data into a publicly accessible relational digital database and collection of oil and rock samples from carbonate fields around the state (Task 1). Basic properties of these rocks and oils will be measured and used in wettability tests. Comparison will be performed between crude and synthetic oil wettability and

Alan P. Byrnes; Saibal Bhattacharya; John Victorine; Ken Stalder

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

267

Ground Motion Studies at NuMI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ground motion can cause significant deterioration in the luminosity of a linear collider. Vibration of numerous focusing magnets causes continuous misalignments, which makes the beam emittance grow. For this reason, understanding the seismic vibration of all potential LC sites is essential and related efforts in many sites are ongoing. In this document we summarize the results from the studies specific to Fermilab grounds as requested by the LC project leader at FNAL, Shekhar Mishra in FY04-FY06. The Northwestern group focused on how the ground motion effects vary with depth. Knowledge of depth dependence of the seismic activity is needed in order to decide how deep the LC tunnel should be at sites like Fermilab. The measurements were made in the NuMI tunnel, see Figure 1. We take advantage of the fact that from the beginning to the end of the tunnel there is a height difference of about 350 ft and that there are about five different types of dolomite layers. The support received allowed to pay for three months of salary of Michal Szleper. During this period he worked a 100% of his time in this project. That include one week of preparation: 2.5 months of data taking and data analysis during the full period of the project in order to guarantee that we were recording high quality data. We extended our previous work and made more systematic measurements, which included detailed studies on stability of the vibration amplitudes at different depths over long periods of time. As a consequence, a better control and more efficient averaging out of the daytime variation effects were possible, and a better study of other time dependences before the actual depth dependence was obtained. Those initial measurements were made at the surface and are summarized in Figure 2. All measurements are made with equipment that we already had (two broadband seismometers KS200 from GEOTECH and DL-24 portable data recorder). The offline data analysis took advantage of the full Fourier spectra information and the noise was properly subtracted. The basic formalism is summarized if Figure 3. The second objective was to make a measurement deeper under ground (Target hall, Absorber hall and Minos hall - 150 ft to 350 ft), which previous studies did not cover. All results are summarized in Figure 3 and 4. The measurements were covering a frequency range between 0.1 to 50 Hz. The data was taken continuously for at least a period of two weeks in each of the locations. We concluded that the dependence on depth is weak, if any, for frequencies above 1 Hz and not visible at all at lower frequencies. Most of the attenuation (factor of about 2-3) and damping of ground motion that is due to cultural activity at the surface is not detectable once we are below 150 ft underground. Therefore, accelerator currently under consideration can be build at the depth and there is no need to go deeper underground is built at Fermi National Laboratory.

Mayda M. Velasco; Michal Szleper

2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

268

The Structure of N18  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

D.L. Anton, T. Khan, R.D. Kissinger, D.L. Klarstrom. The Minerals, Metals .... q a 43. 2 42-. Itz. A. Q. 41 -. 0. 100. 200. 300. 400. 40. 500. 600. 600. 700 dC/dt. 800.

269

MoSi2 and Other Silicides as High Temperature Structural Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... R.W. Stusrud, R.A. MacKay,. D.L. Anton, T. Khan, R.D. Kissinger, D.L. Klarstmm ..... 'I. 3 10-S d. 5. Q. H. 3 10= g. 5. E a. E m-7. 'E 5, .- z. 10-8 '. 5 c:3si MoSi2. //II.

270

Digital Library Evaluation by Analysis of User Retrieval Patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a methodology to evaluate the impact of a Digital Library's (DL) collection and the characteristics of its user community by an analysis of user retrieval patterns. Patterns of journal and document co-retrievals are reconstructed from DL server ...

Johan Bollen; Somasekhar Vemulapalli; Weining Xu

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

????????? " !#?? %$& ??% ('0)2 134 (?? %$5 067 ??8 9 ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??????n0 ? u??? ?iup?t? ?d??l gsiqpg?f??rY }?g q??frY m?r lY ???? l gsi?}o?f?? thp l {g?frs?? mY?jl {k?& rona i ??f}dl tepgr7 p?mY?jg t?}...

272

f-SROIQ(G): an expressive fuzzy Description Logic supporting fuzzy data type group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To satisfy the need of representing and reasoning with fuzzy knowledge and fuzzy data information in the context of the Semantic Web, an expressive fuzzy Description Logic (DL) named f-SROIQ(G) is proposed in this paper. The fuzzy DL f-SROIQ(G) ... Keywords: f-SROIQ(G), fuzzy data type group, fuzzy description logic

Li Yan; Fu Zhang; Z. M. Ma

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Performance Characteristics of Hybrid MPI/OpenMP Implementations of NAS Parallel Benchmarks SP and BT on Large-scale Multicore Clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by a Description Logic ALCF(D) which provides feature chains and a concrete domain extension for quantitative aggregates can in fact be met by a particular DL called ALCF(D) (for the DL nomenclature see [Baader et al & Hanschke 92] with the language ALCF(D) (i.e., ALC with feature agreements and concrete domains

274

Evaluation of a personalized digital library based on cognitive styles: Adaptivity vs. adaptability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Personalization can be addressed by adaptability and adaptivity, which have different advantages and disadvantages. This study investigates how digital library (DL) users react to these two techniques. More specifically, we develop a personalized DL ... Keywords: Cognitive styles, Digital libraries, Individual differences, Personalization

Enrique Frias-Martinez; Sherry Y. Chen; Xiaohui Liu

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Specification of Ontologies in CASL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. In this paper we present methods to generate a Description Logic (DL) theory from a given First Order Logic (FOL) theory, such that each DL axiom is entailed by the given FOL theory. This is obtained by transforming the given FOL formulas. If this method is applied to an ontology specification in FOL, the resulting

Klaus Lttich

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Efficient description logic reasoning in prolog: The dlog system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional algorithms for description logic (DL) instance retrieval are inefficient for large amounts of underlying data. As DL is becoming more and more popular in areas such as the Semantic Web and information integration, it is very important to ... Keywords: description logic, large data sets, logic programming, open world, resolution

Gergely Lukcsy; Pter Szeredi

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Carbon Dioxide-Water Emulsions for Enhanced Oil Recovery and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project involves the use of an innovative new invention ? Particle Stabilized Emulsions (PSEs) of Carbon Dioxide-in-Water and Water-in-Carbon Dioxide for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide. The EOR emulsion would be injected into a semi-depleted oil reservoir such as Dover 33 in Otsego County, Michigan. It is expected that the emulsion would dislocate the stranded heavy crude oil from the rock granule surfaces, reduce its viscosity, and increase its mobility. The advancing emulsion front should provide viscosity control which drives the reduced-viscosity oil toward the production wells. The make-up of the emulsion would be subsequently changed so it interacts with the surrounding rock minerals in order to enhance mineralization, thereby providing permanent sequestration of the injected CO{sub 2}. In Phase 1 of the project, the following tasks were accomplished: 1. Perform laboratory scale (mL/min) refinements on existing procedures for producing liquid carbon dioxide-in-water (C/W) and water-in-liquid carbon dioxide (W/C) emulsion stabilized by hydrophilic and hydrophobic fine particles, respectively, using a Kenics-type static mixer. 2. Design and cost evaluate scaled up (gal/min) C/W and W/C emulsification systems to be deployed in Phase 2 at the Otsego County semi-depleted oil field. 3. Design the modifications necessary to the present CO{sub 2} flooding system at Otsego County for emulsion injection. 4. Design monitoring and verification systems to be deployed in Phase 2 for measuring potential leakage of CO{sub 2} after emulsion injection. 5. Design production protocol to assess enhanced oil recovery with emulsion injection compared to present recovery with neat CO{sub 2} flooding. 6. Obtain Federal and State permits for emulsion injection. Initial research focused on creating particle stabilized emulsions with the smallest possible globule size so that the emulsion can penetrate even low-permeability crude oilcontaining formations or saline aquifers. The term ?globule? refers to the water or liquid carbon dioxide droplets sheathed with ultrafine particles dispersed in the continuous external medium, liquid CO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O, respectively. The key to obtaining very small globules is the shear force acting on the two intermixing fluids, and the use of ultrafine stabilizing particles or nanoparticles. We found that using Kenics-type static mixers with a shear rate in the range of 2700 to 9800 s{sup -1} and nanoparticles between 100-300 nm produced globule sizes in the 10 to 20 ?m range. Particle stabilized emulsions with that kind of globule size should easily penetrate oil-bearing formations or saline aquifers where the pore and throat size can be on the order of 50 ?m or larger. Subsequent research focused on creating particle stabilized emulsions that are deemed particularly suitable for Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide. Based on a survey of the literature an emulsion consisting of 70% by volume of water, 30% by volume of liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide, and 2% by weight of finely pulverized limestone (CaCO{sub 3}) was selected as the most promising agent for permanent sequestration of CO{sub 2}. In order to assure penetration of the emulsion into tight formations of sandstone or other silicate rocks and carbonate or dolomite rock, it is necessary to use an emulsion consisting of the smallest possible globule size. In previous reports we described a high shear static mixer that can create such small globules. In addition to the high shear mixer, it is also necessary that the emulsion stabilizing particles be in the submicron size, preferably in the range of 0.1 to 0.2 ?m (100 to 200 nm) size. We found a commercial source of such pulverized limestone particles, in addition we purchased under this DOE Project a particle grinding apparatus that can provide particles in the desired size range. Additional work focused on attempts to generate particle stabilized emulsions with a flow through, static mixer based apparatus under a variety

Ryan, David; Golomb, Dan; Shi, Guang; Shih, Cherry; Lewczuk, Rob; Miksch, Joshua; Manmode, Rahul; Mulagapati, Srihariraju; Malepati, Chetankurmar

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

278

Managing Chemistry Underground: Is Co-Sequestration an Option in Selected Formations?  

SciTech Connect

Geochemical simulations indicate that, although co-injection of CO2 and SO2 in glauconitic sandstone may not result in the permanent sequestration of SO2, other formations are more favorable. In a predominantly dolomite formation, dissolution of calcite, and to a lesser extent, dolomite will provide Ca in solution to promote the precipitation of anhydrite, thus removing the SO2 from solution. In basalt, dissolution of basaltic glass under acidic conditions provides Ca and Fe in solution which promote the sequestration of SO2 as anhydrite and eventually, pyrite.

Bacon, Diana H.; Murphy, Ellyn M.

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

279

Commercial Exploitation and the Origin of Residual Oil Zones: Developing a Case History in the Permian Basin of New Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developing a Case History in the Permian Basin of New Mexico and West Texas A large new resource of recoverable oil has been identified in the San Andres dolomite Formation. Residual Oil Zones, ROZs, up to 300 thick containing 20-40 % oil in pores of the dolomitic reservoir are present both below and between presently productive fields. The oil in the ROZs is residual, i.e., not recoverable by primary production methods or water flooding, but oil is recoverable using enhanced oil recovery (EOR) methods such as CO2 EOR. Although preliminary at this stage, the estimated oil in place in the ROZs

Basin Of New Mexico; West Texas; West Texas; Dr. Robert Trentham; L. Steven Melzer; David Vance; Arcadis U. S

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Inversion Breakup in Small Rocky Mountain and Alpine Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparisons are made between the postsunrise breakup of temperature inversions in two similar closed basins in very different climate settings, one in the eastern Alps and one in the Rocky Mountains. The small, high-altitude, limestone sinkholes ...

C. David Whiteman; Bernhard Pospichal; Stefan Eisenbach; Philipp Weihs; Craig B. Clements; Reinhold Steinacker; Erich Mursch-Radlgruber; Manfred Dorninger

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dl dolomitic limestone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A Sinkhole Field Experiment in the Eastern Alps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because sinkholes are an excellent natural laboratory for studying processes leading to the formation, maintenance, and dissipation of temperature inversions, an extended set of meteorological field experiments was conducted in limestone ...

R. Steinacker; M. Dorninger; B. Pospichal; S. Eisenbach; A. M. Holzer; C. D. Whiteman; P. Weihs; E. Mursch-Radlgruber; K. Baumann

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Comparison of Vertical Soundings and Sidewall Air Temperature Measurements in a Small Alpine Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tethered balloon soundings from two sites on the floor of a 1-km-diameter limestone sinkhole in the eastern Alps are compared with pseudovertical temperature soundings from three lines of temperature dataloggers on the basin's northwest, ...

C. David Whiteman; Stefan Eisenbach; Bernhard Pospichal; Reinhold Steinacker

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Spent Shale Grouting of Abandoned In-Situ Oil Shale Retorts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production of portland cement from a 1.8:1 mixture of limestone and raw oil shale.oil production and result in a new, high-risk tech- nology while modification of as-received spent shale

Fox, J.P.; Persoff, P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for New and Retrofit Coal-Fired Power Plants - Phase II Phase II efforts will consist of paper studies, bench-scale research of assessing properties of limestone powders, cold...

285

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sandstone blocks and limestone facing (mostly missing), Pyramid of Khufu (largest) is as tall as a 50-story building 3200 BC, Egypt Brooklyn Bridge Steel cable and masonry piers,...

286

Cold-Air-Pool Structure and Evolution in a Mountain Basin: Peter Sinks, Utah  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evolution of potential temperature and wind structure during the buildup of nocturnal cold-air pools was investigated during clear, dry, September nights in Utah's Peter Sinks basin, a 1-km-diameter limestone sinkhole that holds the Utah ...

Craig B. Clements; C. David Whiteman; John D. Horel

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Information Sheet updated March 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

glacial age and near- surface bedrock deposits. These eight states have similar geologic conditions, efficiently utilizing, and managing water and mineral resources --sand and gravel and limestone deposits; · Siting new facilities --manufacturing and transportation infrastructure; · Protecting the environment

Polly, David

288

Two Line Subject Title One Line Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Baseline for Fossil Energy Power Plants study, Volume 1: Bituminous Coal and Natural Gas to Electricity; NETL, May 2007. PC Boiler (No SCR) Steam Bag Filter Wet Limestone FGD...

289

INNOVATIVE EXPERIMENTAL SETUP FOR THE PARALLEL OPERATION OF MULTIPLE BENCH SCALE BIOTRICKLING FILTERS FOR WASTE AIR TREATMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBKI vapors in air during passage through compost-based biofilters served an equivolume mixture of compost and polystyrene spheres. Acid-neutralizing components (probably limestone) were

290

Developments in Bioremediation of Soils and Sediments Polluted with Metals and Radionuclides: 2. Field Research on Bioremediation of Metals and Radionuclides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Made Biosolids Mixtures and Composts. Innovative Clean-upto limestone and biosolids compost amendment of a zinc andof kitchen middens and compost piles dates back to 6000 B.C,

Hazen, Terry C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

ORNL/EIS-121/V3 GEOLOGICAL AND 6E0CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF URANIUM...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

marlstone, limestone, claystone, shale, siltstone, sandstone, trona beds, and oil shale. Maximum uranium content is 0.15 percent and P205 is 18.2 percent. Average for the...

292

Competing Models for the Timing of Cryogenian Glaciation: Evidence From the Kingston Peak Formation, Southeastern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003, S. Am. Symp. Isotope Geology 4, Nature PublishingCarbon Isotopes and Limestone Cement: Geology (Boulder), v.isotope exchange during polymetamorphism in the Panamint Mountains, California, USA: Journal of Metamorphic Geology,

Mrofka, David Douglas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Granulation of Molten Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structural and Morphological Characterization of a Natural Graphite After Application of ... Neutralization of Smelter Gases with Limestone in a Countercurrent Multiple ... Reduction of Nickel Oxide from Liquid Slags with Carbon and Silicon [pp.

294

Using Radiocarbon Dating to Establish the Age of Iron-Based Artifacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In addition to fossil fuels such as coal and coke, other carbon sources such as geological carbonates (e.g., limestone and siderite), shell, or old wood (which are

295

Mining Regulations (Missouri)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation applies to all mines in this state engaged in the mining or extraction of minerals for commercial purposes, except barite, marble, limestone, and sand and gravel, or the...

296

Industrial Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Frequently used rubber linings in other industries...Application Lining Power industry Scrubber towers Blended chlorobutyl Limestone slurry tanks Blended chlorobutyl Slurry piping Blended chlorobutyl 60 Shore A hardness natural rubber Seawater cooling water

297

The Olive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

it was first domesticated, was probably on the limestone hills near the sea between Greece and Syria. The wild olive is a rather straggling small tree or bush with thorny...

298

Stone Description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

United States, New York, Limestone, Sandy Hill, 8RA6, 26828, y, Front Face (South), Dscf0268_6.jpg. No 8RA6 is: Description. dark gray. fine grain. ...

299

Acidization of a Direct Heat Hydrothermal Well and its Potential in Developing Additional Direct Heat Projects  

SciTech Connect

A matrix acid treatment on a limestone formation in a low temperature hydrothermal production well in South Dakota has resulted in a 40% increase in heat (BTU) available for use in space heating a hospital. The results of this experimental treatment on the Madison Limestone suggest a significant potential may exist for similar applications, particularly throughout the western United States. This paper presents the results of the acid treatment, suggests other possible areas for similar application, and analyzes the economics for successful treatments.

Dolenc, M.R.; Strawn, J. A.; Prestwich, S.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Description Logic TBoxes: Model-Theoretic Characterizations and Rewritability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We characterize the expressive power of description logic (DL) TBoxes, both for expressive DLs such as ALC and ALCQIO and lightweight DLs such as DL-Lite and EL. Our characterizations are relative to first-order logic, based on a wide range of semantic notions such as bisimulation, equisimulation, disjoint union, and direct product. We exemplify the use of the characterizations by a first study of the following novel family of decision problems: given a TBox T formulated in a DL L, decide whether T can be equivalently rewritten as a TBox in the fragment L ? of L.

Carsten Lutz; Robert Piro; Frank Wolter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dl dolomitic limestone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Improved oil recovery in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs of Kansas - near term -- Class 2. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate incremental reserves from Osagian and Meramecian dolomite reservoirs in western Kansas through application of reservoir characterization to identify areas of unrecovered mobile petroleum. Specific reservoirs targeted are the Schaben Field in Ness County and the Bindley Field in Hodgeman County.

Carr, T.; Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

A spatial agent-based model for assessing strategies of adaptation to climate and tourism demand changes in an alpine tourism destination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A vast body of literature suggests that the European Alpine Region is amongst the most sensitive socio-ecosystems to climate change impacts. Our model represents the winter tourism socio-ecosystem of Auronzo di Cadore, located in the Dolomites (Italy), ... Keywords: Adaptation strategies, Alpine tourism, Climate change, Social simulation, Spatial agent-based model

Stefano Balbi, Carlo Giupponi, Pascal Perez, Marco Alberti

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

e-GTRSRS101Proceedings of the 15th Central Hardwood Forest Conference e-GTRSRS101Proceedings of the 15th Central Hardwood Forest Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from dolomitic bedrock. Plant extractable water (water held between 0 and -.5 MPa) for the upper meter and others 00a) were measured or estimated for all years and treatments. Weather data including air on cumulative annual tree growth data and shrink/swell patterns capable of being measured by dendrometer bands

304

The rotation model for the opening of the Canada Basin of the Arctic Ocean pre-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stromatolites, giant wave rip- ples, and decameters of pseudomorphosed former aragonite crystal fans, rests Katakturuk Dolomite, as the Cam- brian Saline River Formation rests on the ca. 723 Ma Natkusiak Formation) away from the Cana- dian Arctic islands about a pole in the Mack- enzie River Delta (Hamilton, 1970

Schrag, Daniel

305

The Bakken-An Unconventional Petroleum and Reservoir System  

SciTech Connect

An integrated geologic and geophysical study of the Bakken Petroleum System, in the Williston basin of North Dakota and Montana indicates that: (1) dolomite is needed for good reservoir performance in the Middle Bakken; (2) regional and local fractures play a significant role in enhancing permeability and well production, and it is important to recognize both because local fractures will dominate in on-structure locations; and (3) the organic-rich Bakken shale serves as both a source and reservoir rock. The Middle Bakken Member of the Bakken Formation is the target for horizontal drilling. The mineralogy across all the Middle Bakken lithofacies is very similar and is dominated by dolomite, calcite, and quartz. This Member is comprised of six lithofacies: (A) muddy lime wackestone, (B) bioturbated, argillaceous, calcareous, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (C) planar to symmetrically ripple to undulose laminated, shaly, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (D) contorted to massive fine-grained sandstone, to low angle, planar cross-laminated sandstone with thin discontinuous shale laminations, (E) finely inter-laminated, bioturbated, dolomitic mudstone and dolomitic siltstone/sandstone to calcitic, whole fossil, dolomitic lime wackestone, and (F) bioturbated, shaly, dolomitic siltstone. Lithofacies B, C, D, and E can all be reservoirs, if quartz and dolomite-rich (facies D) or dolomitized (facies B, C, E). Porosity averages 4-8%, permeability averages 0.001-0.01 mD or less. Dolomitic facies porosity is intercrystalline and tends to be greater than 6%. Permeability may reach values of 0.15 mD or greater. This appears to be a determinant of high productive wells in Elm Coulee, Parshall, and Sanish fields. Lithofacies G is organic-rich, pyritic brown/black mudstone and comprises the Bakken shales. These shales are siliceous, which increases brittleness and enhances fracture potential. Mechanical properties of the Bakken reveal that the shales have similar effective stress as the Middle Bakken suggesting that the shale will not contain induced fractures, and will contribute hydrocarbons from interconnected micro-fractures. Organic-rich shale impedance increases with a reduction in porosity and an increase in kerogen stiffness during the burial maturation process. Maturation can be directly related to impedance, and should be seismically mappable. Fractures enhance permeability and production. Regional fractures form an orthogonal set with a dominant NE-SW trend parallel to ?1, and a less prominent NW-SE trend. Many horizontal wells are drilled perpendicular to the ?1 direction to intersect these fractures. Local structures formed by basement tectonics or salt dissolution generate both hinge parallel and hinge oblique fractures that may overprint and dominate the regional fracture signature. Horizontal microfractures formed by oil expulsion in the Bakken shales, and connected and opened by hydrofracturing provide permeability pathways for oil flow into wells that have been hydro-fractured in the Middle Bakken lithofacies. Results from the lithofacies, mineral, and fracture analyses of this study were used to construct a dual porosity Petrel geo-model for a portion of the Elm Coulee Field. In this field, dolomitization enhances reservoir porosity and permeability. First year cumulative production helps locate areas of high well productivity and in deriving fracture swarm distribution. A fracture model was developed based on high productivity well distribution, and regional fracture distribution, and was combined with favorable matrix properties to build a dual porosity geo-model.

Frederick Sarg

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

The Bakken - An Unconventional Petroleum and Reservoir System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated geologic and geophysical study of the Bakken Petroleum System, in the Williston basin of North Dakota and Montana indicates that: (1) dolomite is needed for good reservoir performance in the Middle Bakken; (2) regional and local fractures play a significant role in enhancing permeability and well production, and it is important to recognize both because local fractures will dominate in on-structure locations; and (3) the organic-rich Bakken shale serves as both a source and reservoir rock. The Middle Bakken Member of the Bakken Formation is the target for horizontal drilling. The mineralogy across all the Middle Bakken lithofacies is very similar and is dominated by dolomite, calcite, and quartz. This Member is comprised of six lithofacies: (A) muddy lime wackestone, (B) bioturbated, argillaceous, calcareous, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (C) planar to symmetrically ripple to undulose laminated, shaly, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (D) contorted to massive fine-grained sandstone, to low angle, planar cross-laminated sandstone with thin discontinuous shale laminations, (E) finely inter-laminated, bioturbated, dolomitic mudstone and dolomitic siltstone/sandstone to calcitic, whole fossil, dolomitic lime wackestone, and (F) bioturbated, shaly, dolomitic siltstone. Lithofacies B, C, D, and E can all be reservoirs, if quartz and dolomite-rich (facies D) or dolomitized (facies B, C, E). Porosity averages 4-8%, permeability averages 0.001-0.01 mD or less. Dolomitic facies porosity is intercrystalline and tends to be greater than 6%. Permeability may reach values of 0.15 mD or greater. This appears to be a determinant of high productive wells in Elm Coulee, Parshall, and Sanish fields. Lithofacies G is organic-rich, pyritic brown/black mudstone and comprises the Bakken shales. These shales are siliceous, which increases brittleness and enhances fracture potential. Mechanical properties of the Bakken reveal that the shales have similar effective stress as the Middle Bakken suggesting that the shale will not contain induced fractures, and will contribute hydrocarbons from interconnected micro-fractures. Organic-rich shale impedance increases with a reduction in porosity and an increase in kerogen stiffness during the burial maturation process. Maturation can be directly related to impedance, and should be seismically mappable. Fractures enhance permeability and production. Regional fractures form an orthogonal set with a dominant NE-SW trend, and a less prominent NW-SE trend. Many horizontal 1 direction to intersect these fractures. Local structures formed by basement tectonics or salt dissolution generate both hinge parallel and hinge oblique fractures that may overprint and dominate the regional fracture signature. Horizontal microfractures formed by oil expulsion in the Bakken shales, and connected and opened by hydrofracturing provide permeability pathways for oil flow into wells that have been hydro-fractured in the Middle Bakken lithofacies. Results from the lithofacies, mineral, and fracture analyses of this study were used to construct a dual porosity Petrel geo-model for a portion of the Elm Coulee Field. In this field, dolomitization enhances reservoir porosity and permeability. First year cumulative production helps locate areas of high well productivity and in deriving fracture swarm distribution. A fracture model was developed based on high productivity well distribution, and regional fracture distribution, and was combined with favorable matrix properties to build a dual porosity geo-model.

Sarg, J.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

307

PARS II New Contractor Information for Interconnection Security...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the tables below and return this form to the PARS II Support Team at DL-CF-40PARS2Support@hq.doe.gov. Contractor Point of Contact Information Name Position CompanyOrganization...

308

Microstructural Conditions Contributing to Fatigue Variability in P/M ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Antolovich, R:W. Stusrud, R.A. MacKay, D.L. Anton, T. Khan,. R.D. Kissinger ... 165-171, 2002. 11. Wang, Q., Chiang, F. P., Experimental Characterization of.

309

Solidification Modeling of Complex Shaped Single Crystal Turbine ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

T. Khan, R.D. Kissinger, D.L. Klarstmm. The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society, ..... casting feeding ability during the last stage of s@Q$jcat~,l~~~ controlled.

310

Aspects of the ecology and behaviour of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in Santa Monica Bay, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D.L. 1999. Inshore and offshore bottlenose dolphin (Tursiopsin deeper waters further offshore (>0.5km). No correlationsschools observed inshore and offshore in the bay, with the

Bearzi, Maddalena

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Individual Reuse in Description Logic Reasoning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tableau calculi are the state-of-the-art for reasoning in description logics (DL). Despite recent improvements, tableau-based reasoners still cannot process certain knowledge bases (KBs), mainly because they end up building very large models. To address ...

Boris Motik; Ian Horrocks

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Sipping fuel and saving lives: increasing fuel economy without sacrificing safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

delays plans to boost fuel economy of its SUVs. Wall St.without impacting fuel economy. Honda Motor Company, OctoberGreene, D.L. 2006. Fuel economy policy and highway safety.

Gordon, Deborah; Greene, David L.; Ross, Marc H.; Wenzel, Tom P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

EROSION-CORROSION-WEAR PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MD, Oct. 1979. dl. Oil Shale Retort Components" A. Levy andis a lubricating liquid such as an oil will be analyticallywill also be conducted in shale oil product material. 1979

Levy, Alan V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

+ , J.K.; Donaldson + , P.R.; Kinkley + , D.L.; Wallace + , T.L. + Document type Book + FoafPage http:scienceaccelerator.govdsalink.html?collectionCodeDOE-ECD&searchId...

315

Volume 52, number 3 CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 15 December 1977 MULTIPHOTON IONIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

observe the disappearance/appearance of light from the matter-radiation interaction. An alternative, beam species The output from a nitrogen-pumped (~5 pps) tuna- ble dye laser (Molectron Dl-200) crosses

Zare, Richard N.

316

ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET hlul ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH ANI SAFETY...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

hlul ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH ANI SAFETY DlVlSlON Industrial Hygiene or Medical Dept. 1956 I. H. 1093 Sample Nos. 9 -Date Collected- 812 by-LLP Route to I"? Lo,--tionrOGERS...

317

Radiation Leukaemogenesis at Low Doses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

myeloid leukaemia development at high and low doses. References 1. Cook WD, McCaw BJ, Herring C, John DL, Foote SJ, Nutt SL and Adams JM (2004). PU.1 is a suppressor of myeloid...

318

Dynamics of a Submesoscale Surface Ocean Density Front  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

609-625. Thomas, L.N. , Tandon, A. , and Mahadevan, A. 2007.C1): Mahadevan, A. , and Tandon, A. 2006. An analysis ofpp. 397405. Nagai, T. , Tandon, A. , and Rudnick, D.L.

Abramczyk, Marshall

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Appendix B - Control Points  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B B Control Points B.1 Injector Control Points Qty Type Device 2 Magnet Bend magnet - DL1 bend 9 Magnet Quad magnet 10 Magnet X-Y Corrector Pair 2 Magnet Solenoid 2 Magnet...

320

Julian Szekely Memorial Symposium on Materials Processing ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste Treatment in a Plasma Vitrification Reactor [pp. 551-569] D.F. McLaughlin, S.V. Dighe, and D.L. Keairns. Formation of Plasma-Sprayed Oxide Coatings...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dl dolomitic limestone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A Comparison of Harwell & FWT Alanine Temperature ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0969-806X(00)00275-9 [10] JC Humphreys, JM Puhl, SM Seltzer, WL McLaughlin, MF Desrosiers, VY Nagy, DL Bensen ...

2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

322

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Retrieval of Ice Water Path Using Thermal Channels Mitchell, D.L. (a), d'Entremont, R.P. (b), Stackhouse, P.W., Jr. (c), and Heymsfield, A.J. (d), Desert Research Institute (a),...

323

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Retrieval of Ice Water Path, Ice Particle Size, and Shape Mitchell, D.L., Arnott, W.P., and Ivanova, D.C., Desert Research Institute Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)...

324

EROSION-CORROSION-WEAR PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MD, Oct. 1979. dl. Oil Shale Retort Components" A. Levy andCorrosion of Metals in Oil Shale Retorts,'' AS! v! WESTEC 'exposed in in-situ oil shale retorting envirorunents is

Levy, Alan V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Thermal Characterization of Nanostructures and Advanced Engineered Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

T. and Achimov, D. , Heat Conduction Mechanisms and PhononD.G. and Pop, E. , Heat Conduction Across Monolayer andand Nika, D.L. , Heat Conduction Properties of Graphene and

Goyal, Vivek Kumar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thomas, D.L. A review of water intake screen:tng options forcapacity of cooling water intake structures for minimizingw the bottom of the warm water intake which The horizontal

Sullivan, S.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

3D Surface Representations The computing community recognizes the tremendous impact that data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. Continued. New S~nbol * DI 7Bir2 * DI 7Byul * D17Byu2 DI 7Cphl DI7Cph2 Dl7Cph3 D17Cph4 * D17Dcw40

Scarlatos, Lori

328

EROSION-CORROSION-WEAR PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MD, Oct. 1979. dl. Oil Shale Retort Components" A. Levy andwill also be conducted in shale oil product material. 1979Corrosion of Metals in Oil Shale Retorts,'' AS! v! WESTEC '

Levy, Alan V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Transcriptional regulation of antimicrobial peptide induction by NF-[kappa]B family members during the Drosophila melanogaster immune response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dl), a member of the NF-kB family, through degradation ofworks in conjunction with NF-kB members to regulate fat bodystandard deviation. (C). Role of fly NF-kB proteins in AttA

Busse, Matthew Schmidt

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Weimer, D.L. (1984) Oil prices shock, market response,OPEC behavior and world oil prices (pp. 175-185) London:many decades. Recent high oil prices have caused oil-holding

Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Forecasting the Locations of Future Large Earthquakes: An Analysis and Verification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

its uses in earthquake forecasting, Pure Appl. Geophys. 162,D.L. (2005), Earthquake forecasting and its veri?ca- tion,hazard assessment and forecasting, Pure Appl. Geophys. 157,

Shcherbakov, Robert; Turcotte, Donald L.; Rundle, John B.; Tiampo, Kristy F.; Holliday, James R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Characterization of Root-Knot Nematode Resistance in Cowpea and Utilization of Cross-Species Platforms in Legume Genomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Platforms in Legume Genomics A Dissertation submitted inSpecies Platforms in Legume Genomics by Sayan Das Doctor ofrich space of cowpea. BMC Genomics 9:107. Trudgill DL, Bala

Das, Sayan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Licensing stop place before laterals : a study of acoustic cues relevant to the perception of stop-lateral sequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In phonological analyses of both adult and child language, a *dl constraint has frequently been used as a shorthand to indicate that coronal stops are dispreferred before laterals (Dinnsen et al. 2001). This dispreference ...

Michaels, Jennifer M. (Jennifer Marie)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

CENTRAL NEVADA-16 January  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

CENTRAL NEVADA-16 January 1970 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE Dl"'TERIOR GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Federal Center. Denver. Colorado 80225 PRELIMINARY REPORT ON TliE GEOLOGIC EFFECTS OF...

335

Publications 1999 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from Oxygen International Conference on Applications with Neutrons, June 1999, Crete, Greece (1999) A. Fessler, A.J.M. Plompen and D.L. Smith Measurement of (n,Xp), (n,a), and...

336

Determining the Publication Impact of a Digital Library  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We attempt to assess the publicatin impact of a digital library (DL) of aerospace scientific and technical information (STI). The Langley Technical Report Server (LTRS) is a digital library of over 1,400 electronic publications authored by NASA Langley ...

Kaplan Nancy R.; Nelson Michael L.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Phylogeny and adaptive evolution of the brain-development gene microcephalin (MCPH1) in cetaceans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Wilgenbusch JC, Warren DL, Swofford DL: AWTY (are we there yet?): a system for graphical exploration of MCMC convergence in Bayesian phylogenetics. Bioinformatics 2008, 24:581-583. 69 Jeffers LJ, Coull BJ, Stack SJ, Morrison CG: Distinct BRCT domains in Mcph1... to their intricate behavioral repertoire and to their use of echolocation [11], which requires production and processing of high frequency sounds to perceive spatial relationships in the surrounding liquid environment [2]. Odontocete cetaceans also are distinguished...

McGowen, Michael R; Montgomery, Stephen H; Clark, Clay; Gatesy, John

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

338

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in-Water Emulsion Stabilized by Pulverized Limestone for Benign in-Water Emulsion Stabilized by Pulverized Limestone for Benign Ocean Storage D. Golomb, * E. Barry, D. Ryan, C. Lawton, P. Swett University of Massachusetts Lowell R. Warzinski, R. Lynn US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory Abstract When ordinary seawater and liquid carbon dioxide are mixed in the presence of pulverized limestone (CaCO 3 ), a macro-emulsion is formed. The emulsion consists of liquid CO 2 droplets sheathed with a monolayer of calcite crystals dispersed in water. The sheath of crystals prevents the coalescence of the CO 2 droplets. The emulsion has a gross density that is greater than seawater, therefore upon release from a pipe the emulsion plume will sink deeper into the density-stratified ocean while entraining ambient

339

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Mississippi Leadville Limestone Exploration Play of Utah and Colorado-Exploration Techniques and Studies for Independents The Mississippi Leadville Limestone Exploration Play of Utah and Colorado-Exploration Techniques and Studies for Independents DE-FC26-03NT15424 Project Goal The overall goals of this study are to 1) develop and demonstrate techniques and exploration methods never tried on the Leadville Limestone; 2) target areas for exploration; 3) increase deliverability from new and old Leadville fields through detailed reservoir characterization; 4) reduce exploration costs and risk, especially in environmentally sensitive areas; and 5) add new oil discoveries and reserves. The project is being conducted in two phases, each with specific objectives. The objective of Phase 1 (Budget Period I) is to conduct a case study of the Leadville reservoir at Lisbon field (the largest Leadville producer) in San Juan County, UT, in order understand the reservoir characteristics and facies that can be applied regionally.

340

How does this stack up for removing SO/sub 2/ and particles  

SciTech Connect

Coal-fired boiler emissions are usually controlled by one of the following methods: (1) a high velocity spray tower for flue gas desulfurization (FGD) installed downstream of a dry electrostatic precipitator, or a baghouse which removes the fly ash. Lime or limestone is used for neutralization; (2) a high energy venturi scrubber for fly ash removal followed by a high velocity spray tower for FGD. The alkaline ash, with lime or limestone added is used for neutralization and saves alkali costs. Peabody Process Systems has been investigating an additional system comprising a low pressure drop gas quencher and an FRG spray tower with a Wet Tubular Precipitator (WTP) installed on top of the spray tower. The alkalinity in the ash, augmented with lime or limestone, can be used for neutralization if the full fly ash load goes into the tower.

Bakke, E.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dl dolomitic limestone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Electric utility engineer`s FGD manual -- Volume 1: FGD process design. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Part 1 of the Electric Utility Engineer`s Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Manual emphasizes the chemical and physical processes that form the basis for design and operation of lime- and limestone-based FGD systems applied to coal- or oil-fired steam electric generating stations. The objectives of Part 1 are: to provide a description of the chemical and physical design basis for lime- and limestone-based wet FGD systems; to identify and discuss the various process design parameters and process options that must be considered in developing a specification for a new FGD system; and to provide utility engineers with process knowledge useful for operating and optimizing a lime- or limestone-based wet FGD system.

NONE

1996-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

342

A 32-month gasifier mechanistic study and downstream unit process development program for the pressurized ash-agglomerating fluidized bed gasification system: Quarterly report, January 1-March 31, 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Work is underway at KRW Energy Systems to develop operating experience and process performance information for a pressurized fluidized-bed agglomerating-ash coal gasification system. The KRW Process Development Unit at Waltz Mill, PA, will be operated from 1985 through 1987 to test (1) an in-bed desulfurization and alkali removal system, and (2) an external hot gas zinc ferrite desulfurization system, and (3) an intergrated in-bed/external-bed system to provide for collection and anaylsis of mechanistic process data. An exploratory test(TP-036-1) was conducted in December 1984 on the newly installed in-bed desulfurization system. Five set points were completed, including an initial air-blown baseline set point without dolomite and four in the dolomite, desulfurization mode. An evaluation of spent reactivity decreased rapidly as the utilization during TP-036-1 indicated that sorbent reactivity decreased rapidly as the utilization of the sorbent approached 60%. 31 figs., 18 tabs.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Drilling history and stratigraphic correlation of Rose Run sandstone of northeastern Ohio  

SciTech Connect

To date, 40 known tests have penetrated the Knox unconformity in Ashtabula, Lake, Trumbull, Geauga, and Portage Counties, Ohio. Prior to 1980, there were only 22 tests. Of these, only 10 penetrated and logged rocks older than the Rose Run sandstone. In the period 1980-1986, two Rose Run discoveries were drilled, one in New Lyme Township of Ashtabula County and one in Burton Township of Geauga County. Both discovery wells have been offset. Attempts have been made to correlate these two areas with older tests in northeastern Ohio and with the Rose Run sandstones of Coshocton County. In northeastern Ohio, preliminary studies indicate a Rose Run sandstone and/or dolomite interval approximately 100 ft thick. The upper 50 ft is predominantly sandstone and the lower 50 ft changes locally from sandstone to dolomite. The upper sandy member can be correlated to the A, B, and C sandstone units of Coshocton County.

Moyer, C.C.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

ADVANCED CHARACTERIZATION OF FRACTURED RESERVOIRS IN CARBONATE ROCKS: THE MICHIGAN BASIN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the study was to collect and analyze existing data on the Michigan Basin for fracture patterns on scales ranging form thin section to basin. The data acquisition phase has been successfully concluded with the compilation of several large digital databases containing nearly all the existing information on formation tops, lithology and hydrocarbon production over the entire Michigan Basin. These databases represent the cumulative result of over 80 years of drilling and exploration. Plotting and examination of these data show that contrary to most depictions, the Michigan Basin is in fact extensively faulted and fractured, particularly in the central portion of the basin. This is in contrast to most of the existing work on the Michigan Basin, which tends to show relatively simple structure with few or minor faults. It also appears that these fractures and faults control the Paleozoic sediment deposition, the subsequent hydrocarbon traps and very likely the regional dolomitization patterns. Recent work has revealed that a detailed fracture pattern exists in the interior of the Central Michigan Basin, which is related to the mid-continent gravity high. The inference is that early Precambrian, ({approx}1 Ga) rifting events presumed by many to account for the gravity anomaly subsequently controlled Paleozoic sedimentation and later hydrocarbon accumulation. There is a systematic relationship between the faults and a number of gas and oil reservoirs: major hydrocarbon accumulations consistently occur in small anticlines on the upthrown side of the faults. The main tools used in this study to map the fault/fracture patterns are detailed, close-interval (CI = 10 feet) contouring of the formation top picks accompanied by a new way of visualizing the data using a special color spectrum to bring out the third dimension. In addition, recent improvements in visualization and contouring software were instrumental in the study. Dolomitization is common in the Michigan Basin, and it is crucial in developing reservoir quality rocks in some fields. Data on the occurrence of dolomite was extracted from driller's reports for all reported occurrences in Michigan, nearly 50 fields and over 500 wells. A digital database was developed containing the geographic location of all these wells (latitude-longitude) as well as the elevation of the first encounter of dolomite in the field/reservoir. Analysis shows that these dolomite occurrences are largely confined to the center of the basin, but with some exceptions, such as N. Adams Field. Further, some of the dolomite occurrences show a definite relationship to the fracture pattern described above, suggesting a genetic relationship that needs further work. Other accomplishments of this past reporting period include obtaining a complete land grid for the State of Michigan and further processing of the high and medium resolution DEM files. We also have measured new fluid inclusion data on dolomites from several fields that suggest that the dolomitization occurred at temperatures between 100 and 150 C. Finally, we have extracted the lithologic data for about 5000 wells and are in the process of integrating this data into the overall model for the Michigan Basin.

James R. Wood; William B. Harrison

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Copper Ridge Group is a Cambrian dolomite in the lower part of the Copper Ridge Group is a Cambrian dolomite in the lower part of the Knox Supergroup. It is overlain by Beekmantown Group carbonates and equivalents in western Kentucky and Indiana and is separated from the Beekmantown by the Rose Run Sandstone in northeastern Kentucky and Ohio. The Copper Ridge overlies the Eau Claire Formation, which overlies the Mount Simon Sandstone. The Mount Simon is a target for CO 2 sequestration in much of Midcontinent. In Kentucky, however, the Mt Simon is present only north of the Rough Creek and Rome Fault Zones. The Copper Ridge is regionally extensive. It is more than 2,500 ft deep in all but the central part of the state (shown in gray on the maps). Thicknesses of the Copper Ridge range from 1,000 to more than 7,000 feet at depths up to

346

Method for enhancing the desulfurization of hot coal gas in a fluid-bed coal gasifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus for providing additional desulfurization of the hot gas produced in a fluid-bed coal gasifier, within the gasifier. A fluid-bed of iron oxide is located inside the gasifier above the gasification bed in a fluid-bed coal gasifier in which in-bed desulfurization by lime/limestone takes place. The product gases leave the gasification bed typically at 1600.degree. to 1800.degree. F. and are partially quenched with water to 1000.degree. to 1200.degree. F. before entering the iron oxide bed. The iron oxide bed provides additional desulfurization beyond that provided by the lime/limestone.

Grindley, Thomas (Morgantown, WV)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Method and apparatus for enhancing the desulfurization of hot coal gas in a fluid-bed coal gasifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus for providing additional desulfurization of the hot gas produced in a fluid-bed coal gasifier, within the gasifier is described. A fluid-bed of iron oxide is located inside the gasifier above the gasification bed in a fluid-bed coal gasifier in which in-bed desulfurization by lime/limestone takes place. The product gases leave the gasification bed typically at 1600 to 1800 F and are partially quenched with water to 1000 to 1200 F before entering the iron oxide bed. The iron oxide bed provides additional desulfurization beyond that provided by the lime /limestone. 1 fig.

Grindley, T.

1988-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

348

International Earth Science Colloquium on the Aegean Region (1-5 October 2012, zmir, Turkey)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by a white efflorescent crust of halite crystals containing trona (Na(CO3) (HCO3).2H2O), gaylussite (Na2Ca accompanying halite. They can be grouped as Na-bearing carbonates (trona (Na(CO3)(HCO3).2H2O); nahcolite (Na formed by a sandy mixture with halite and ulexite, and minor amounts of dolomite, calcite, trona, gypsum

Seyitoðlu, Gürol

349

Sedimentation of shelf sandstones in Queen Formation, McFarland and Means fields, central basin platform of Permian basin  

SciTech Connect

The Queen Formation is a sequence of carbonates, evaporites, and sandstones of Permian (Guadalupian) age that is found across the subsurface of the Central Basin platform of the Permian basin. The formation is a major hydrocarbon reservoir in this region, and its primary reservoir facies are porous shelf sandstones and dolomites. Cores and well logs from McFarland and Means fields (on the northwest margin of the Central Basin platform) were examined to determine the sedimentary history of the shelf sandstones.

Malicse, A.; Mazzullo, J.; Holley, C.; Mazzullo, S.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Three body kinematic endpoints in SUSY models with non-universal Higgs masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L, cL) ? gq 1.5% (uR, cR) ? gq 2.3% g ? ?1 qq 6.8% (uL, cL) ? ?+1 q 63% g ? ?01qq 2.2% (uL, cL) ? ?+2 q 2.5% g ? ?02qq 3.4% (dL, sL) ? ?01q 2.1% (dR, sR) ? ?01q 98% (dL, sL) ? ?02q 30% (dR, sR) ? ?02q 1% (dL, sL) ? ?... 04q 2.7% (dL, sL) ? ??1 q 56% (dL, sL) ? ??2 q 8% b1 ? ?01b 3.6% t1 ? ?01t 17% b1 ? ?02b 26% t1 ? ?02t 13% b1 ? ?03b 2.2% t1 ? ?+1 b 50% b1 ? ?04b 2.3% t1 ? ?+2 b 20% b1 ? ??1 t 36% b1 ? ??2 t 26% b1 ? t1W 3.8% t2 ? t1h 3...

Lester, Christopher G; Parker, Michael A; White, Martin J

351

Low-fat diet and regular, supervised physical exercise in patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease: reduction of stress-induced myocardial ischemia  

SciTech Connect

The effects of physical exercise and normalization of serum lipoproteins on stress-induced myocardial ischemia were studied in 18 patients with coronary artery disease, stable angina pectoris, and mild hypercholesterolemia (total serum cholesterol 242 +/- 32 mg/dl). These patients underwent a combined regimen of low-fat/low-cholesterol diet and regular, supervised physical exercise at high intensity for 12 months. At 1 year serum lipoproteins has been lowered to ideal levels (serum cholesterol 202 +/- 31 mg/dl, low-density lipoproteins 130 +/- 30 mg/dl, very low-density lipoproteins 22 +/- 15 mg/dl, serum triglycerides 105 (69 to 304) mg/dl) and physical work capacity was improved by 21% (p less than .01). No significant effect was noted on high-density lipoproteins, probably as a result of the low-fat/high-carbohydrate diet. Stress-induced myocardial ischemia, as assessed by thallium-201 scintigraphy, was decreased by 54% (p less than .05) despite higher myocardial oxygen consumption. Eighteen patients matched for age and severity of coronary artery disease served as a control group and ''usual medical care'' was rendered by their private physicians. No significant changes with respect to serum lipoproteins, physical work capacity, maximal rate-pressure product, or stress-induced myocardial ischemia were observed in this group. These data indicate that regular physical exercise at high intensity, lowered body weight, and normalization of serum lipoproteins may alleviate compromised myocardial perfusion during stress.

Schuler, G.; Schlierf, G.; Wirth, A.; Mautner, H.P.; Scheurlen, H.; Thumm, M.; Roth, H.; Schwarz, F.; Kohlmeier, M.; Mehmel, H.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

North African dust and its relation to paleoclimate recorded in a sediment core from Northwest Providence Channel, Bahamas  

SciTech Connect

Studies of the vertical distribution of insoluble residue in an 11.7 meter core recovered from 665m water depth within Northwest Providence Channel, Bahamas demonstrate cyclic fluctuations in the content and mineralogy of the insoluble residue. The insoluble residue consists of chlorite, montmorillonite, illite and kaolinite with alternating layers enriched in chlorite or montmorillonite. These fluctuations in the character of insoluble residue correspond to fluctuations of the record of oxygen isotopes and foraminiferal assemblages (paleoclimate) and of carbonate mineralogy (sea level). During glacial periods, insoluble residue concentration is high, dolomite is present and quartz, plagioclase and chlorite concentrations increase. During interglacial periods, insoluble residue concentration is low, dolomite is absent and quartz, plagioclase and chlorite concentration decreases while montmorillonite concentration increases. The source of the insoluble residue is dust derived from North Africa and transported by the Saharan Air Layer coupled with the Northeast Trades. During glacial periods, the source of the dust is the dolomite-rich southern North Africa region. This shift of the dust source suggests that the trade winds transporting the dust during glacial periods also shifted southward or expanded or both.

Eaton, M.R.; Boardman, M.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Basic Data Report for Drillhole SNL-12 (C-2954)  

SciTech Connect

SNL-12 (permitted by the New Mexico State Engineer as C-2954) was drilled to provide geological data and hydrological testing of the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation near the margin of dissolution of halite in the upper part of the Salado south of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). SNL-12 is located in the southeast quarter of section 20, T23S, R31E, in eastern Eddy County, New Mexico. SNL-12 was drilled to a total depth of 905 ft below the ground level. Below surface dune sand and the Berino soil, SNL-12 encountered, in order, the Mescalero caliche, Gatu?a, Dewey Lake, Rustler, and uppermost Salado Formations. Two intervals were cored: (1) from the lower Forty-niner Member through the Magenta Dolomite and into the upper Tamarisk Member; and (2) from the lower Tamarisk Member through the Culebra Dolomite and Los Meda?os Members and into the uppermost Salado Formation. Geophysical logs were acquired from the open hole to total depth, and the drillhole was successfully completed with a screened interval open across the Culebra. At SNL-12, the uppermost Salado cores display displacive halite crystals in clastic-rich units below an amalgamated sulfate at the top of the formation. There is no indication of thinning of the upper Salado due to postdepositional dissolution, and this is consistent with predrilling expectations.

Dennis W. Powers, Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

354

OPTIMIZING PERFORMANCE OF THE HESKETT STATION  

SciTech Connect

The overall conclusion from this work is that a switch from river sand bed material to limestone at the R.M. Heskett Station would provide substantial benefits to MDU. A switch to limestone would increase the fuel flexibility of the unit, allowing fuels higher in both sodium and sulfur to be burned. The limestone bed can tolerate a much higher buildup of sodium in the bed without agglomeration, allowing either the bed turnover rate to be reduced to half the current sand feed rate for a fuel with equivalent sodium or allow a higher sodium fuel to be burned with limestone feed rates equivalent to the current sand feed rate. Both stack and ambient SO{sub 2} emissions can be controlled. A small improvement in boiler efficiency should be achievable by operating at lower excess oxygen levels at low load. This reduction in oxygen will also lower NO{sub x} emissions, providing a margin of safety for meeting emission standards. No detrimental effects of using limestone at the Heskett Station were uncovered as a result of the test burn. Some specific conclusions from this work include the following: The bed material feed rate can be reduced from the current rate of 5.4% of the coal feed rate (57.4 tons of sand/day) to 2.5% of the coal feed rate (27 tons of limestone/day). This will result in an annual savings of approximately $200,000. (1) SO{sub 2} emissions at the recommended feed rate would be approximately 250 ppm (0.82 lb/MMBtu) using a similar lignite. Based on the cost of the limestones, SO{sub 2} allowances could be generated at a cost of $60/ton SO{sub 2} , leaving a large profit margin for the sale of allowances. The addition of limestone at the same rate currently used for sand feed could generate $455,000 net income if allowances are sold at $200/ton SO2 . (2) At full-load operation, unburned carbon losses increase significantly at excess oxygen levels below 2.8%. No efficiency gains are expected at high-load operation by switching from sand to limestone. By reducing the oxygen level at low load to 8.5%, an efficiency gain of approximately 1.2% could be realized, equating to $25,000 to $30,000 in annual savings. (3) A reduction of 25 tons/day total ash (bed material plus fly ash) will be realized by using limestone at the recommended feed rate compared to the current sand feed rate. No measurable change in volume would be realized because of the lower bulk density of the limestone-derived material.

Michael D. Mann; Ann K. Henderson

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

e00605-13.full.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clostridium Clostridium sp. Strain DL-VIII, a Novel Solventogenic Clostridium Species Isolated from Anaerobic Sludge Safiyh Taghavi, a,b Javier A. Izquierdo, a Daniel van der Lelie a,b Center for Agricultural and Environmental Biosolutions, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA a ; Biosciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York, USA b We report the genome sequence of Clostridium sp. strain DL-VIII, a novel Gram-positive, endospore-forming, solventogenic bacterium isolated from activated anaerobic sludge of a wastewater treatment plant. Aside from a complete sol operon, the 6,477,357-bp genome of DL-VIII reveals genes for several unique enzymes with applications in lignocellulose degradation, in- cluding two phenolic acid decarboxylases. Received 5 July 2013 Accepted 11 July 2013 Published 8 August 2013 Citation Taghavi S,

356

Cliff Hagan Baseball Stadium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIY DIY DIYS Limestone Nicholasville S Upper Ave of Cham pions Euclid Ave University Dr CooperDr Alumni Dr VirginiaAve Huguelet Dr M axwell Dr WallerAve University Ct W oodland Ave E High St Rose St DIY (3.5 mi) Proposed Shared Use Trail (0.4 mi) !(l Bicycle Rack DIY Bicycle Repair Station 0 1

Hayes, Jane E.

357

Pressure Buildup and Brine Migration During CO2 Storage in Multilayered Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have extremely low liquid and gas permeabilities in the hardened state · can be modified to suit of limestone (or chalk) and clay (or shale) in a rotary kiln. The maximum kiln temperature reaches ca.1450o C The Lurgi slagging gasification process has been developed to convert coal into substitute natural gas

Zhou, Quanlin

358

Mark B. Snyder, Ph.D., P.E., Engineering Consultant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

consumption of raw materials Cement, aggregates, steel Lower energy consumption Raw material processing!! Eliminate the need for maintenance Used 600 mm of clean granular material Limit material passing #10 sieve. Limit limestone content of gravels to 20%, with incentives to reduce to 10% Incentives for use of Class

359

Joint development normal to regional compression during exural-ow folding: the Lilstock buttress anticline, Somerset, England  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Joint development normal to regional compression during ¯exural-¯ow folding: the Lilstock buttress. At Lilstock Beach, joint sets in Lower Jurassic limestone beds cluster about the trend of the hinge of the Lilstock buttress anticline. In horizontal and gently north-dipping beds, J3 joints ( 295±2858 strike

Engelder, Terry

360

INTRODUCTION Red wood ants play an important role in the ecology of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will be used to compare the biological and economic benefits relative to traditional limestone mounds. EXPECTED BENEFITS: The project will enhance the productivity of the state's primary and secondary fish nursery areas and will benefit recreationally and commercially important finfish species, such as gag, black sea bass, sheepshead

Thomas, Len

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dl dolomitic limestone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

US Army Corps of Engineers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mine in Freestone, Leon, and Limestone Counties, Texas by Texas Westmoreland Coal Company. APPLICANT 96° 12' 36" W. The Jewett Mine began extracting lignite (coal) in 1985. The project areaUS Army Corps of Engineers Fort Worth District Public Notice Applicant: Texas Westmoreland Coal

US Army Corps of Engineers

362

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 27, Part 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Spieker and Ree- side (1925, p. 443) for exposures near the Blackhawk coal mine On the eastern front Huntington Creek, just south of Little Swens Canyon. East of the mapped area, where coal is being mined fromTertiary floodplains. Nonmarine limestone and thin layen of coal occur in the lacustrine middle pan of the formation

Seamons, Kent E.

363

(Created 1/13) UNL Environmental Health and Safety (402) 472-4925 http://ehs.unl.edu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as an extinguishing agent. Use sand or powdered limestone to smother the fire. Hazards of Substances that Emit identity, physical state, and quantity used are available. These techniques range from use of gas-tight syringes to glove boxes. If using a gas tight syringe technique, use a syringe with ample extra volume

Farritor, Shane

364

BULLETIN OF MARINE SCIENCE, 75(2): 295320, 2004 295Bulletin of Marine Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

") islands in the central Bahamas. The Bahamian archi- pelago is made up of shallow-water carbonate limestone resources. The typical pattern of development on these carbonate islands requires completely clearing the site of all vegetation, and leveling the rocky terrain, with fill if necessary. Threats to nearshore

Sealey, Kathleen Sullivan

365

Ultrafine calcium aerosol: Generation and use of a sorbent for sulfur in coal combustion. Volume 2, Economics: Final report, August 1, 1988--October 31, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this study is to determine the cost effectiveness of using calcium-hydroxide powder sorbent in a commercial power plant flue gas desulfurization (FGD) application. The cost analysis methodology found herein is a direct application of the one found in the January 1986 report, ``Economic Evaluation of Dry-Injection Flue Gas Desulfurization Technology by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The EPRI study addresses the economic issue of installing a dry-injection FGD system on a 1000 MW (2-500 MW units) power plant using sodium-rich powder sorbents derived from nahcolite and trona ores. In this report`s treatment, the calcium-based derivatives of hydrated limestone are compared directly to nahcolite and trona for both low and high sulfur coals. This type of evaluation is allowable due to the similar material handling properties of 1/4 inch hydrated limestone in comparison to those properties for nahcolite and trona. Thus, this report repeats the EPRI cost analysis for a slightly modified limestone-based FGD design. Note that the calculation methodology is not discussed, in this report as it has already been outlined in the EPRI study. Instead, Appendices A and B contain copies of the calculation spreadsheets based on the EPRI method for the hydrated limestone system.

Alam, M.K.; Nahar, N.U.; Stewart, G.D.; Prudich, M.E. [comps.] [Ohio Coal Research Center, Athens, OH (United States)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Proceedings of the 17th Biennial Waste Processing Conference MINIMIZING EMISSIONS FROM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of choice at Davis is Trona, sodium sesquacarbonate, a natural sodium based acid gas control reagent lime or sodium bicarbonate. TIle stD chiometric Trona addition iate is 155 Ib/hr based upon historic powdered limestone in the llmtace throat, Trona and powdered hydrated lime injection belore and aller

Columbia University

367

The Paradoxical Success of Fuzzy Logic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of choice at Davis is Trona, sodium sesquacarbonate, a natural sodium based acid gas control reagent lime or sodium bicarbonate. TIle stD chiometric Trona addition iate is 155 Ib/hr based upon historic powdered limestone in the llmtace throat, Trona and powdered hydrated lime injection belore and aller

Baltes, Jacky

368

The influence of igneous intrusions on the peak temperatures of host rocks: Finite-time emplacement, evaporation, dehydration, and decarbonation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a 13-m-thick basic sill and its limestone host rocks of the Permian Irati Formation from the Parana Basin, South America, as an example, this paper presents a numerical investigation based on heat conduction models on the effect of the emplacement ... Keywords: Dehydration and decarbonation, Evaporation, Igneous intrusions, Intrusion mechanism, Peak temperature

Dayong Wang; Yongchen Song; Yu Liu; Minglong Zhao; Tian Qi; Weiguo Liu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Method for the production of cementitious compositions and aggregate derivatives from said compositions, and cementitious compositions and aggregates produced thereby  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method for preparing synthetic shaped cementitious compositions having high quality even without the addition of high energy binders, such as portland cement, through the use of the spent residue from a fluidized combustion bed of the type wherein limestone particles are suspended in a fluidized medium and sulfur oxides are captured, and pulverized coal fly ash.

Minnick, L. John (Box 271, Plymouth Meeting, PA 19462)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

A POSSIBILITY OF UTILIZING RADIOACTIVE ISOTOPES FOR THE AUTOMATION OF THE CONCENTRATION OF OIL SHALE  

SciTech Connect

Possibilities of utilizing isotopes for the concentration of oil shale are analyzed. Computations are given of some characteristics of oil shale and limestone (the chemical composition according to elements, the linear and massabsorption coefficients, etc.) as well as some approximate computations of the size of the pieces of oil shale in which concentration can be effected with the aid of isotopes. (auth)

Braun, I.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Investigation of Flue Gas Desulfurization Chemical Process Problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An understanding of flue gas desulfurization process chemistry is crucial in troubleshooting problems in operating FGD systems. This report discusses a variety of problems and solutions associated with process chemistry for 25 different wet FGD systems, including lime/limestone and double alkali processes. Among the problems addressed are SO2 removal, mist eliminator scaling, poor solids dewatering, and water management.

1990-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

372

RESPONSE OF UNCRACKED DRYWALL JOINTS AND PANELS TO BLAST VIBRATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Indiana, the other near a limestone quarry in Florida ­ to blast- induced ground motion and air of possible crack extension Autonomous Crack Measurement (ACM) is based on measurement of micrometer changes mechanics foundation for the ACM approach. Just as splitting wood requires the "V" from the wedge

373

The CretaceousTertiary Mass Extinction, Chicxulub Impact,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) and Meyerhoff et al. (1994) described Cretaceous assemblages in limestones over- lying breccias in Yucatan Pemex-examined the geophysical logs, sedimentology, and biostratigraphy of seven Pemex wells from northern Yucatan and concluded is often not available for study in PEMEX or UNAM wells. As noted earlier, Cretaceous planktic

Keller, Gerta

374

Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal-energy storage. Volume 3. Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains two appendices to the main report. The first lists the aquifers in the 12 geographic regions of the USA and characterizes each as containing sands and gravels or limestones or volcanic rock. The second appendix tabulates the hydrologic characteristics of each aquifer. (LCL)

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Blind and pointed Sunyaev-Zel'dovich observations with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and such observations reveal the variation in the scale factor as a function of redshift. The redshift is determined from supernovae emission/absorption lines from 1 + z = ?obs ?em = a(tobs) a(tem) , (1.24) where ?em is the wavelength of emitted light, ?obs... is the wavelength of observed light, a(tem) and a(tobs) are the scale factors at the redshift of the emitting object and the observer respectively. For a flat Universe luminosity distance, dL, is given by dL = c(1 + z) H0 ? z 0 dz ? ?M (1 + z)3 + ?? , (1...

Shimwell, Timothy William

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

376

Improving Between-Shot Fusion Data Analysis with Parallel Structures  

SciTech Connect

In the Phase I project we concentrated on three technical objectives to demonstrate the feasibility of the Phase II project: (1) the development of a parallel MDSplus data handler, (2) the parallelization of existing fusion data analysis packages, and (3) the development of techniques to automatically generate parallelized code using pre-compiler directives. We summarize the results of the Phase I research for each of these objectives below. We also describe below additional accomplishments related to the development of the TaskDL and mpiDL parallelization packages.

CHET NIETER

2005-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

377

Interference management in multiple-antenna wireless networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

frequency-division duplexing (FDD) since it enables flexibleHence, in addition to the FDD mode, the third-generationCSI CSMA/CA CTS dB DCA DL FCA FDD FIFO GPS IADCA IEEE i.i.d.

Spyropoulos, Ioannis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Understanding Research Trends in Conferences using Bongshin Lee 1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

libraries such as the ACM Digital Library (DL) [1] provide broad bibliographical and full-text access across papers, authors, and references. PaperLens was developed to visualize 8 years (1995-2002) of Info of CHI? What is the relationship between a given set of researchers? The IEEE InfoVis 2004 Conference

Hunt, Galen

379

Digital Libraries and Knowledge Organization Dagobert Soergel1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of their jour- nals, books, and reference works. Free access to bibliographic data, paid access to full text databases, qualifies as a DL: it provides access to bibliographic databases that link to the full text of documents, full-text databases, and substantive databases with data on companies, chemical compounds, etc

Soergel, Dagobert

380

Numerical study of 2D heat transfer in a scraped surface heat exchanger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical study of 2D heat transfer in a scraped surface heat exchanger K.-H. Sun a,*, D.L. Pyle heat exchanger with non- Newtonian power law fluids is undertaken. Numerical results are generated of scraped surface heat exchanger design are assessed in the light of the results. ? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dl dolomitic limestone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Formalizing production systems with rule-based ontologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we proposed a new semantics for the combination of production systems with arbitraryDL ontologies. Unlike previous approaches, the semantics presented here allow looping rules and can handle inconsistencies produced by the ... Keywords: knowledge representation, ontologies, production systems, transaction logic, well-founded semantics

Martn Rezk; Michael Kifer

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Khesbn no. 83-84 - April 1976 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rf IJNIJ,ID -p)1.tD ly)'t ;rti '.ly . -tlt NtyU'? .ty! 2 toyll ll'35n llD lyl 'lyur'"rti ''ly'l .rrtt Pr3DlD '1 lDrtD]19:T,Dylyblyt Eyl p$ rti! lyllyr lxt D')FED. 'lyENlt, .

Admin, LAYCC

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Bharatiya Darshanme Nirvana Ka Svarup - Ek Adhyayan (A Study on Nirvana)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.&CfiP!CfiIl! - mlT 4 (2) 't1RtI" ~ CflTl:f if ~ I 3Td": ~ ~ ~ WIT ~ I r@ fcl~o.&tr\\ll ~ I (2) ~ ~ RtI" m-m ~ I ~ ~ ~ l1 r ?lifl., ~ ~ I ~ CflTl:f cF IDU dl1R1J! wf...

Yogi, P. G.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Quantitive Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer 91:233-244. Collins, W.D., P.J. Rasch, B.A. Boville, J.J. Hack, J.R. McCaa, D.L. Williamson, B.P. Briegleb, C.M. Bitz, S.-J. Lin,...

385

Atmospheric measurements of carbonyl sulfide, dimethyl sulfide, and carbon disulfide using the electron capture sulfur detector  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of atmospheric dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbonyl sulfide (COS), and carbon disulfide (CS2) were conducted over the Atlantic Ocean on board the NASA Electra aircraft during the Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation (CITE 3) project using the electron capture sulfur detector (ECD-S). The system employed cryogenic preconcentration of air samples, gas chromatographic separation, catalytic fluorination, and electron capture detection. Samples collected for DMS analysis were scrubbed of oxidants with NaOH impregnated glass fiber filters to preconcentration. The detection limits (DL) of the system for COS, DMS, and CS2 were 5, 5, and 2 ppt, respectively. COS concentrations ranged from 404 to 603 ppt with a mean of 489 ppt for measurements over the North Atlantic Ocean (31 deg N to 41 deg N), and from 395 to 437 ppt with a mean of 419 ppt for measurements over the Tropical Atlantic Ocean (11 deg S to 2 deg N). DMS concentrations in the lower marine boundary layer, below 600-m altitude, ranged from below DL to 150 ppt from flights over the North Atlantic, and from 9 to 104 ppt over the Tropical Atlantic. CS2 concentrations ranged from below DL to 29 ppt over the North Atlantic. Almost all CS2 measurements over the Tropical Atlantic were below DL.

Johnson, J.E.; Bates, T.S. [NOAA, Seattle, WA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Dynamic Resource Allocation in Disaster Response: Tradeoffs in Wildfire Suppression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic Resource Allocation in Disaster Response: Tradeoffs in Wildfire Suppression Nada Petrovic1: Petrovic N, Alderson DL, Carlson JM (2012) Dynamic Resource Allocation in Disaster Response: Tradeoffs with the allocation of limited resources to mitigate the impact of natural disasters inspire fundamentally new

Carlson, Jean

387

Research Publications of James L. Terry Marmar, E.S. and Terry, J.L. eds, "Atomic Processes in Plasmas", AIP Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.Yu.; Rosenberg, M.; Mendis, D.A.; Yu, J.H.; Roquemore, A.L.; West, W.P.; Terry, J.L., IEEE International.D.; Mendis, D.A.; Bray, B.D.; Rudakov, D.L.; Yu, J.H.; West, W.P.; Roquemore, A.L.; Skinner, C.H.; Terry, J

Terry, Jim

388

SHA-3 Conference, February 2009, AURORA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... DD LL DD L DL DD BLL pp r B h BB loo cc kk ccciphh ee r BB ll ockcipp herr vv svv svv ss DD MMM vv ss . DD M DD M vv ss . DD MM vss vs.. vss . ...

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

389

Stat 503-1 Lecture 1 Mon. Aug. 22, 2011 Course Information and Policies [go over, office hours and midterm dates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1.6) Study the relationships of body size and energy expenditure. Researchers measured fat-free body mass and 24-hour energy expenditure (repeated twice) for seven men. #12;2 Subject Energy- expenditure (in Kcal consumption and cholesterol levels (mg/dl). #12;3 - Study 2: Match subjects with gender, similar age

Xie, Jun

390

2011JINST6P10009 PUBLISHED BY IOP PUBLISHING FOR SISSA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the venerable NRL Plasma Formulary by J.D. Huba [1], originally inspired by D.L. Book. Handbooks by A. Anders [2/Ions/Radiators), or by section they belong to (Fundamental/Waves/Collisions/Spectros- copy/Radiation) using the "ViewShow Species

391

Khesbn no. 85-86 - September 1976 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 l! 'tbl 'js]'l llynD"]fl ttl lyDlP ''lyil$ .ttrD lirtl'rtlytll'lbt ltrl 'rtO? li: ill)ttl'1v''1S! yJttl irN ']yl! yr-s "::*' =:ii$ :':,:-;)? )'i ttl"ti .j-t"l'T itlS'ilAt$D -J$

Admin, LAYCC

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Khesbn no. 87-88 - April 1977 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TR? ;..1::_: ,u/ 'Y l. ! > ,)'ttl:Nt nub ,tytitJD D)'tt::l*l[D llttu[t rR t]l Dtl Dy ttl| 'r'bgtt 1:g JtrtDlN r Df lyloybynx DXt Pi2 lyDti2yr ix"ttl-u ly Nl ]tl lyD:yB trllt y'

Admin, LAYCC

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. Vol. 609 2000 Materials Research Society Comparison of Structural Properties and Solar Cell Performance of a-Si:H Films Prepared  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fabrication of the nip structure, the devices were completed by evaporative deposition of indium tin oxide. Capangpangan, D. Tsu and A. Chan of ECD, R. Reedy, L. Gedvillas and J. Webb of the National Renewable Energy 13.56 and 70 MHz PECVD Methods S.J. Jones*, D.L. Williamson**, T. Liu*, X. Deng*, and M. Izu* *Energy

Deng, Xunming

394

SMar khams 'bom rnam snang ngam/ lha 'dus rnam snang gi skor la cung zad gleng ba  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

^-d]-dl^en-nz#-V-wr-[*c-e[]- [}rn-]n-V-wr-[*-N(c-R#-[qc-ye-t#e-zdC#-X^c-xr-xr-N^v-h$v-xr-en$rn- z[^e ![*-*n-w(r-e#n-p(e-fc-z[#-Vz#-[qc-ye-ef-e]n-x#e-t#e-zdC#-dc-f- ]^n-[e(rn-Wr-! fh]-fz-#-vf-[^-N^-d]-[*-[e-]#-f-ac-Nr-fj[-[r- [*z#-N^-zw(c! [*-fn-dl*rn-fw]-]#-dg]-a(-nC... (-x#]-h$v-#n-an-[*-dl#]-[qc-ye-dfn-ac-Nn! X^-fh]-[*-[e- vn-d([-W#-x$v-eC-^we-[r-[^n-fhfn-f#-z[}-dz#-]r-[^-X-d;z-q(r-uz-b^en- X*]-[*-u#-Vz#-X-y*-eo#r-;d-x([-f*[-(en-p$d-]zr-! x$v-zd(-l*n-az#-w$v-[^- f-ac-Nr-fj[-W#-N^-d]-dl*rn-x...

Tsering, Tashi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Universitatsbibliothek Heidelberg Plock 107-109 Postfach 105749  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- Wirkung / hrsg. Burkhardt Lindner ; unter mitarb. von Thomas Küpper und Timo Skrandies. ­ Stuttgart : J-PHILO*BLUM The dl Blumenberg, Hans. ­ Theorie der Lebenswelt / Hans Blumenberg ; hrsg. von Manfred Sommer"] / [Goethe-Institut. Mit Ill. von Marie Marcks. Hrsg. von Jutta Limbach]. ­ Ismaning : Hueber, 2008. ­ 151 S

Heermann, Dieter W.

396

SUPPRESSION OF ENERGETIC ELECTRON TRANSPORT IN FLARES BY DOUBLE LAYERS  

SciTech Connect

During flares and coronal mass ejections, energetic electrons from coronal sources typically have very long lifetimes compared to the transit times across the systems, suggesting confinement in the source region. Particle-in-cell simulations are carried out to explore the mechanisms of energetic electron transport from the corona to the chromosphere and possible confinement. We set up an initial system of pre-accelerated hot electrons in contact with ambient cold electrons along the local magnetic field and let it evolve over time. Suppression of transport by a nonlinear, highly localized electrostatic electric field (in the form of a double layer) is observed after a short phase of free-streaming by hot electrons. The double layer (DL) emerges at the contact of the two electron populations. It is driven by an ion-electron streaming instability due to the drift of the back-streaming return current electrons interacting with the ions. The DL grows over time and supports a significant drop in temperature and hence reduces heat flux between the two regions that is sustained for the duration of the simulation. This study shows that transport suppression begins when the energetic electrons start to propagate away from a coronal acceleration site. It also implies confinement of energetic electrons with kinetic energies less than the electrostatic energy of the DL for the DL lifetime, which is much longer than the electron transit time through the source region.

Li, T. C.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

397

Video recommendations for the open video project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a DL multimedia recommender system implemented for the Open Video project. Recommendations are generated by a spreading activation algorithm operating on a video network created from log download sequences. We compared the system's recommendations ... Keywords: digital library, log data, recommender system

Johan Bollen; Michael L. Nelson; Raquel Araujo; Gary Geisler

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Balance and Recharge Monitoring at the Hanford Site ­ FY 2010 Status Report MJ Fayer RS Herrington DL Saunders D Felmy October 2010 #12;#12;PNNL-19945 Soil Water Balance and Recharge Monitoring at the Hanford locations on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. From late fall to early spring of FY 2010

399

arXiv:hep-ex/0310030v212Jan2004 Constraints on Nucleon Decay via "Invisible" Modes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water,7 C.J. Virtue,5 B.L. Wall,14 D. Waller,3 C.E. Waltham,1 H. Wan Chan Tseung,8 D.L. Wark,11 N. West,8 J.B. Wilhelmy,7 J.F. Wilkerson,14 J.R. Wilson,8 P. Wittich,9 J.M. Wouters,7 M. Yeh,2 and K. Zuber8

400

arXiv:nucl-ex/0502021v125Feb2005 XXX/XXX-XXX Electron Energy Spectra, Fluxes, and Day-Night Asymmetries of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water,7 C.J. Virtue,5 B.L. Wall,15 D. Waller,3 C.E. Waltham,1 H. Wan Chan Tseung,9 D.L. Wark,12, q J. Wendland,1 N. West,9 J.F. Wilkerson,15 J.R. Wilson,9, r P. Wittich,10 J.M. Wouters,7 A. Wright,11 M. Yeh,2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dl dolomitic limestone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation of a current-free double layer in an expanding plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional particle-in-cell code using Monte Carlo collision techniques (MCC/PIC) for both ions and electrons is used to simulate our earlier experimental results which showed that a current-free electric double layer (DL) can form in a plasma expanding along a diverging magnetic field. These results differ from previous experimental or simulation systems where the double layers are driven by a current or by imposed potential differences. Both experiment and simulation show accelerated ions with energies up to about 60 eV on the low potential side of the plasma. A new numerical method is added to the conventional PIC scheme to simulate inductive electron heating, as distinct from the more common capacitively driven simulations. A loss process is introduced along the axis of the simulation to mimic the density decrease along the axis of an expanding plasma in a diverging magnetic field. The results from the MCC/PIC presented here suggest that the expansion rate compared to the ionization frequency is a critical parameter for the existence of the DL. For the DL to be absolutely current free, the source wall has to be allowed to charge: having both ends of the simulation at the same potential always resulted in a current flow. Also, the effect of the neutral pressure and of the size of the diffusion chamber are investigated. Finally we show that this particular type of DL has electrons in Boltzmann equilibrium and that it creates a supersonic ion beam.

Meige, Albert; Boswell, Rod W.; Charles, Christine; Turner, Miles M. [Space Plasma and Plasma Processing, Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Australian Capital Territory, 0200 (Australia); Plasma Research Laboratory, School of Physical Sciences and National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology, Dublin City University, Dublin (Ireland)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

Fusions of Description Logics and Abstract Description Franz Baader 1 Carsten Lutz 1 Holger Sturm 2 Frank Wolter 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the DLs (i) ALCF , which extends the basic DL ALC by functional roles (features) and the same descriptions is known to be decidable [30, 44, 3]. However, their union ALCF +;?;t has an undecidable subsumption problem [5]. This undecidability result depends on the fact that, in ALCF +;?;t , the role

Wolter, Frank

403

An Overview of Tableau Algorithms for Description Logics Franz Baader (baader@cs.rwthaachen.de) and Ulrike Sattler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as ALCN and ALCQ), there are extensions for which it fails. One such example is the language ALCF , which. More precisely, in ALCF , a set N F #18; NR of feature names is fixed, and a feature chain u = f 1 #1) #1; #1; #1; ). The DL ALCF is obtained from ALC by allowing for feature names in value

Baader, Franz

404

Employing description logics in Ambient Intelligence for modeling and reasoning about complex situations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ambient Intelligence systems need to represent information about their environment and recognize relevant situations to perform appropriate actions proactively and autonomously. The context information gathered by these systems comes with imperfections ... Keywords: OWL DL, Situation-awareness, description logics, modeling context information, reasoning services

Thomas Springer; Anni-Yasmin Turhan

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Fusions of Description Logics Franz Baader and Carsten Lutz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the fusion is still decidable. As an example, we consider the DLs (i) ALCF , which extends the basic DL ALC, subsumption of concept descriptions is known to be decidable [9, 11, 1]. However, their union ALCF +;?;t has an undecidable subsumption problem [2]. This undecidability result depends on the fact that, in ALCF +;?

Baader, Franz

406

Non-Uniform Data Complexity of Query Answering in Description Logics Carsten Lutz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-P/coNP-dichotomy theorem for ALCF ontologies. 1 Introduction In recent years, the use of ontologies to access instance data the basic ex- pressive DL ALC, its extensions ALCI with inverse roles and ALCF with functional roles show that there is no PTIME/coNP-dichotomy for CQ-answering w.r.t. ALCF-TBoxes (unless PTIME = NP

Wolter, Frank

407

Beth definability in expressive description logics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Beth definability property, a well-known property from classical logic, is investigated in the context of description logics (DLs): if a general LTBox implicitly defines an L-concept in terms of a given signature, where L is a DL, then does there ...

Balder Ten Cate; Enrico Franconi; ?nan Seylan

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Particle-Field Decomposition and Domain Decomposition in Parallel Particle-In-Cell Beam Dynamics Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.CI(v) (a)} Figure 1: Syntax and Semantics for the ALCF Description Logic migrate to other entities) in ALCF--where F extends ALC with the future temporal modality--and then proving that such a KB in ALCF can be captured by an ERV T diagram. The paper is organized as follows. The temporal DL ALCF

Li, Xiaoye Sherry

409

Econnections of abstract description systems Oliver Kutz a , Carsten Lutz b , Frank Wolter a ,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for basic members of the ALC family to un- decidable for ALC extended with functional roles (ALCF). Note for ALCF, which should be contrasted with the decidability of query entailment and containment in this DL with and without the UNA. An analogous statement fails for ALCF, e.g. because the ABox A = {f(a, b), f(a, b )}, f

Baader, Franz

410

NExpTime-complete Description Logics with Concrete Domains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the fusion is still decidable. As an example, we consider the DLs (i) ALCF , which extends the basic DL ALC). However, their union ALCF +;?;t has an undecidable subsumption problem (Baader et al., 1993). This undecidability result depends on the fact that, in ALCF +;?;t , the role constructors transitive closure

Lutz, Carsten

411

Query and Predicate Emptiness in Description Logics Franz Baader  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for basic members of the ALC family to un- decidable for ALC extended with functional roles (ALCF). Note for ALCF, which should be contrasted with the decidability of query entailment and containment in this DL with and without the UNA. An analogous statement fails for ALCF, e.g. because the ABox A = {f(a, b), f(a, b )}, f

Wolter, Frank

412

A MEASUREMENT OF ANISOTROPY IN THE COSMIC BACKGROUND RADIATION ON A LARGE ANGULAR SCALE AT 33 GHz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relative to the 3K Radiation D.l Pilot's Flight Operationsradiation in the , direction. i is the direction of Ihc antenna on ihc pilot'spilot's left, checking the sign conventions. Table IV.1 - Measurements of Anisotropy of 3K Radiation,

Gorenstein, M.V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Limnol. Ocwnogr.. M(6), 1990, 1230-1237 Q 1990. by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and plant fragments of various sizes. This atmospheric fallout ofP wasgreatestnear the shoreline of - 11-13 ymol P mm-2d-l of lake surface in midsummer. The input of P from atmospheric fallout was highly directly the input of P by atmospheric fallout, we deployed a series of floating atmospheric deposition

Likens, Gene E.

414

Cell, Vol. 63, 97-107, October 5, 1990, Copyright 0 1990 by Cell Press Reduced DNA Polytenization of a Minichromosome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed Learning (DL) ­ Your Training Solution Continuing Education Credits (CEUs, PDHs, etc) Summary Education Credits (CEUs, PDHs, etc) * Summary of PROSPECT courses by Community of Practice (CoP) 2a PROSPECT credits (CEUs, PDUs, etc) if applicable; tuition amounts and proposed locations and dates of each course

Karpen, Gary

415

US Army Corps of Engineers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed Learning (DL) ­ Your Training Solution Continuing Education Credits (CEUs, PDHs, etc) Summary Education Credits (CEUs, PDHs, etc) * Summary of PROSPECT courses by Community of Practice (CoP) 2a PROSPECT credits (CEUs, PDUs, etc) if applicable; tuition amounts and proposed locations and dates of each course

US Army Corps of Engineers

416

Soil Liquefaction Response in Mid-America Evaluated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed Learning (DL) ­ Your Training Solution Continuing Education Credits (CEUs, PDHs, etc) Summary Education Credits (CEUs, PDHs, etc) * Summary of PROSPECT courses by Community of Practice (CoP) 2a PROSPECT credits (CEUs, PDUs, etc) if applicable; tuition amounts and proposed locations and dates of each course

Mayne, Paul W.

417

P.O. Box 751, Portland, OR 97207-0751 503-725-3511, Toll free: 1-800-547-8887  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed Learning (DL) ­ Your Training Solution Continuing Education Credits (CEUs, PDHs, etc) Summary Education Credits (CEUs, PDHs, etc) * Summary of PROSPECT courses by Community of Practice (CoP) 2a PROSPECT credits (CEUs, PDUs, etc) if applicable; tuition amounts and proposed locations and dates of each course

Bertini, Robert L.

418

Extending Globus to support Multicast Transmission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.escience.cam.ac.uk Cardiff agents-comsc.grid.cf.ac.uk Daresbury gridmon.dl.ac.uk Glasgow cordelia.nesc.gla.ac.uk Imperial mariner.lesc.doc.ic.ac.uk Manchester vermont.mvc.mcc.ac.uk Newcastle ramshope.ncl.ac.uk Oxford esci1.oucs.ox.ac.uk Rutherford gridmon...

Jeacle, Karl; Crowcroft, Jon

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

419

VOLUME 13, NUMBER 6 AUDIOLOGY TODAY 37 A M O M E N T O F S C I E N C E  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

met at the University of Washington to discuss the mechanisms underlying acoustic injury, pro- tection, there is a period of time between acoustic exposure and the onset of permanent injury. This window of opportunity, Boone JL, Jackson RL, Wester DC, Hoffer ME, Lambert DC, Charon CC, Ding DL, McBride D. Reduction

Tremblay, Kelly

420

A D.C. Formulation of Value-at-Risk constrained Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

historical asset returns from representative market indices are performed to apply the ... (V@R, see e.g. [19]) is an important topic for modern financial risk manage- ...... ProLiant DL 585 with 32GB RAM using Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5, the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dl dolomitic limestone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Short communication: Reasoning with part-part relations in a description logic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose an extension of the SROIQ description logic (DL) in order to support part-part relations among concepts in knowledge representation. The proposed extension introduces a conjunction of a pair of role inclusion axioms (RIAs) and ... Keywords: Description logic, Manufacturing, Ontology, Part-part relation, Tableau algorithm

Nenad Krdavac; Dragan Gaevi?

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Bulletin of Tibetology: Volume 21 Number 1 : Full issue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

58-70 (in the restoration counted as stanzas 14-16) runs as follows: 16 ~ =it iftfctfitt1t4 ~ ~If..qa \\1"6", I at ICfll~i Oio/ffidtZf ~: 'E1fd(l: ~: I...

Namgyal Institute of Tibetology

1985-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

423

Age-dating implications from the morphologic, petrologic, and isotopic investigations of a calcic soil, Terrell County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fine grained calcic soil has developed upon Pliocene-Miocene alluvial gravels derived from Cretaceous limestone of the Stockton Plateau and Paleozoic limestone, chert, and novaculite from the Marathon uplift. This soil is located in an area classified by the Soil Conservation Service as having "marginal" conditions for calcic soil development. Establishing pedogenesis as the mechanism of carbonate accumulation will allow the use of a calcic soil developmental index to obtain age-dates in this "marginal" area. The soil has a 109 cm thick Stage IV K horizon at depths of 68-80 cm. In gravelly areas of the soil a 15-20 cm thick laminar Km horizon caps the K horizon. Microprobe analyses on portions of the Km horizon show that CACO, is the dominant material present and displaced the clays forming laminar and pisolith features. The carbonate chemistry is dominated by CaCO3 (98% by weight) with minor amounts of MgCO3 (0.7% by weight). Two stable C and 0 isotope transacts sampled at I and 2.5 mm intervals across the laminated Km horizon were analyzed, The comparison of individual laminae within two transacts shows that individual laminae have a distinct isotopic signature and correlate with depth. Bulk isotopic analyses were run on the K horizon and local Cretaceous (Segovia) limestone. 8"O differences between the K horizons (-3.0 to-1.7%o) and local limestone (-6.1 to-4.9[ ]) indicate the Km and K horizon carbonates are the result of soil processes. Transects across limestone clasts within the Km horizon show a 8"O shift of 2-49voo across the soil-rock interface. After ruling out atmospheric mixing and isotopic inheritance from limestone as factors influencing isotopic composition, the 8"C results (-3.4 to 1.4%o) are interpreted as reflecting carbonate precipitation in a C4 vegetative environment. This C4 environment remained dominant throughout Km horizon deposition. These results imply pedogenesis is responsible for the carbonate in the soil. Thus, a calcic soil development index can be response applied to obtain an age-date. The index analysis of the K horizon yields an average amount of secondary carbonate of 92 g/CM2 in the soil resulting in an average soil development age of 180 ?20 Kyr.

Jolley, Darren Manning

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Evaluation of the radionuclide tracer test conducted at the project Gnome Underground Nuclear Test Site, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

A radionuclide tracer test was conducted in 1963 by the U.S. Geological Survey at the Project Gnome underground nuclear test site, approximately 40 km southeast of Carlsbad, New Mexico. The tracer study was carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) to study the transport behavior of radionuclides in fractured rock aquifers. The Culebra Dolomite was chosen for the test because it was considered to be a reasonable analogue of the fractured carbonate aquifer at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the principal location of U.S. underground nuclear tests. Project Gnome was one of a small number of underground nuclear tests conducted by the AEC at sites distant from the NTS. The Gnome device was detonated on December 10, 1961 in an evaporate unit at a depth of 360 m below ground surface. Recently, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) implemented an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close these offsite nuclear test areas. An early step in this process is performance of a preliminary risk analysis of the hazard posed by each site. The Desert Research Institute has performed preliminary hydrologic risk evaluations for the groundwater transport pathway at Gnome. That evaluation included the radioactive tracer test as a possible source because the test introduced radionuclides directly into the Culebra Dolomite, which is the only aquifer at the site. This report presents a preliminary evaluation of the radionuclide tracer test as a source for radionuclide migration in the Culebra Dolomite. The results of this study will assist in planning site characterization activities and refining estimates of the radionuclide source for comprehensive models of groundwater transport st the Gnome site.

Pohll, G.; Pohlmann, K.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Geochemistry and migration of contaminants at the Weldon Spring chemical plant site, St. Charles County, Missouri, 1989--91  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Investigations were conducted by the US Geological Survey in cooperation with the US Department of Energy at the Weldon Spring chemical plant site to determine the geochemistry of the shallow aquifer and geochemical controls on the migration of uranium and other constituents from the raffinate (waste) pits. Water-quality analyses from monitoring wells at the site and vicinity property indicate that water in the shallow aquifer is a calcium magnesium bicarbonate type that is at equilibrium with respect to calcite and slightly supersaturated with respect to dolomite.

Schumacher, J.G.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

High pressure drilling system triples ROPS, stymies bit wear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent West Texas field tests of an experiental high-pressure drilling system have nearly tripled typical penetration rates in hard dolomite while putting virtually no visible wear on the bits, even those designed for much softer formations. With this drilling system, developed by FlowDril Corp. of Kent, Wash., and their joint-venture partner Grace Drilling Co., clarified drilling fluids (minimum solids) are pressurized to nearly 30,000 psi and directed to the bottom of the hole through a special nozzle attached to the drill bit. The action of this high pressure stream augments the bit's job, resulting in higher ROPs and decreased bit wear.

Killalea, M.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

objective of this project is to develop a permeable active amendment concrete (PAAC) consisting of apatite, limestone, organoclays, zeolite, sand, objective of this project is to develop a permeable active amendment concrete (PAAC) consisting of apatite, limestone, organoclays, zeolite, sand, and cement. The amendments will be incorporated in a concrete matrix by replacing a portion of the crushed stone or sand in traditional pervious concrete. PAAC has the potential to produce a barrier that combines high structural integrity with the ability to stabilize a variety of contaminants. A permeable active amendment concrete (PAAC) for contaminant remediation and erosion control Savannah River Site Aiken South Carolina TC-A-2010-00235, Rev.1 Sep 9, 2011 Andrew R. Grainger Digitally signed by Andrew R. Grainger DN: cn=Andrew R. Grainger, o=DOE-SR, ou=EQMD, email=drew.grainger@srs.gov, c=US Date: 2011.09.12 17:34:44

428

Environmental performance of air staged combustor with flue gas recirculation to burn coal/biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The environmental and thermal performance of a 1.07 m diameter, 440 kW atmospheric fluidized bed combustor operated at 700{degrees}C-920{degrees}C and burning coal was studied. Flue gas recirculation was incorporated to enhance the thermal performance and air staging was used to control emissions of SO{sub 2}, CO, NO{sub x} and N{sub 2}O. Studies focused on the effect of excess air, firing rate, and use of sorbent on system performance. The recirculation-staging mode with limestone had the highest thermal efficiency (0.67) using the firing equation. Emission data showed that flue gas recirculation (ratio of 0.7) significantly reduced NO{sub x} emissions; and that use of limestone sorbent at a Ca/S ratio of 3 reduced SO{sub 2} emissions by 64% to approximately 0.310 g/MJ.

Anuar, S.H.; Keener, H.M.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

429

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pore-Network Model Applied to Wormhole Formation in Limestone Pore-Network Model Applied to Wormhole Formation in Limestone Resulting from Injection of Carbon Dioxide Ioannis N. Tsimpanogiannis, Peter C. Lichtner, and Chuan Lu Hydrology, Geochemistry and Geology Group, EES-6 Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS T003, Los Alamos, NM, 87545. ABSTRACT Pore-scale spatial heterogeneities can have a significant effect on flow and reaction, in some cases resulting in the formation of "wormholes" through reactive instabilities. In this work a 3-D pore-network model is used to investigate phenomena occurring at the pore scale during geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide. Recently we have modified the reactive flow and transport code FLOTRAN to accommodate a pore network model for fully saturated conditions. FLOTRAN is based on continuum scale mass and energy

430

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The objective of this project is to develop a permeable active amendment concrete (PAAC) consisting of apatite, limestone, organoclays, zeolite, sand, The objective of this project is to develop a permeable active amendment concrete (PAAC) consisting of apatite, limestone, organoclays, zeolite, sand, and cement. The amendments will be incorporated in a concrete matrix by replacing a portion of the crushed stone or sand in traditional pervious concrete. PAAC has the potential to produce a barrier that combines high structural integrity with the ability to stabilize a variety of contaminants. A permeable active amendment concrete (PAAC) for contaminant remediation and erosion control Savannah River Site Aiken South Carolina TC-A-2010-00235, Rev.0 Jan 5, 2011 Andrew R. Grainger Digitally signed by Andrew R. Grainger DN: cn=Andrew R. Grainger, o=DOE-SR, ou=EQMD, email=drew.grainger@srs.gov, c=US Date: 2011.01.25 17:38:18

431

Wising Up Uncle Sam to Cybertricks | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wising Up Uncle Sam to Cybertricks Wising Up Uncle Sam to Cybertricks Wising Up Uncle Sam to Cybertricks November 22, 2011 - 12:15pm Addthis Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s main entrance is marked by a limestone sign. Several new buildings visible in the background house more than 1,000 of the lab’s 4,300 employees. | Photo courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory's main entrance is marked by a limestone sign. Several new buildings visible in the background house more than 1,000 of the lab's 4,300 employees. | Photo courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory Daniel B. Poneman Daniel B. Poneman Deputy Secretary of Energy "As in many arenas, security in cyberspace is not just a government imperative, it is a societal endeavor." Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel B. Poneman

432

Moving granular-bed filter development program, Option III: Development of moving granular-bed filter technology for multi-contaminant control. Task 14: Test plan; Topical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental test plan has been prepared for DOE/METC review and approval to develop a filter media suitable for multi-contaminant control in granular-bed filter (GBF) applications. The plan includes identification, development, and demonstration of methods for enhanced media morphology, chemical reactivity, and mechanical strength. The test plan includes media preparation methods, physical and chemical characterization methods for fresh and reacted media, media evaluation criteria, details of test and analytical equipment, and test matrix of the proposed media testing. A filter media composed of agglomerated limestone and clay was determined to be the best candidate for multi-contaminate control in GBF operation. The combined limestone/clay agglomerate has the potential to remove sulfur and alkali species, in addition to particulate, and possibly halogens and trace heavy metals from coal process streams.

Haas, J.C.; Olivo, C.A.; Wilson, K.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Soil stabilization using oil shale solid wastes: Laboratory evaluation of engineering properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil shale solid wastes were evaluated for possible use as soil stabilizers. A laboratory study was conducted and consisted of the following tests on compacted samples of soil treated with water and spent oil shale: unconfined compressive strength, moisture-density relationships, wet-dry and freeze-thaw durability, and resilient modulus. Significant increases in strength, durability, and resilient modulus were obtained by treating a silty sand with combusted western oil shale. Moderate increases in strength, durability, and resilient modulus were obtained by treating a highly plastic clay with combusted western oil shale. Solid waste from eastern shale can be used for soil stabilization if limestone is added during combustion. Without limestone, eastern oil shale waste exhibits little or no cementation. The testing methods, results, and recommendations for mix design of spent shale-stabilized pavement subgrades are presented. 11 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

Turner, J.P.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion. Technical progress report, April--June 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design activities for this report period included: (1) Mechanical. Stress analysis calculations were performed on the steam/water pressure piping. Pipe support design and drawings were completed by Duke Fluor Daniel. The fluid bed distributor bubble cap design was revisited and changes made for ease of maintenance. (2) Electrical and Instrumentation. Control and instrumentation scheme proposed earlier, was based on independent single loop controllers. After careful review, it is decided to go for state of art distributed control system (DCS) which uses programmable logic controllers (PLC). In addition, coal/limestone pickup hopper fabrication was completed during this period and shipped to the site. The coal/limestone floating caps have been made at MTCI and ready for shipping. All major equipment installation was completed. The pulse combustor steam/water jacket and air plenum were installed. Construction of control room building was just completed.

NONE

1995-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

435

SOLAR NEUTRINOS. II. EXPERIMENTAL  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for observing solar neutrinos from the reaction Cl/ sup 37/( nu ,e/sup -/)Ar/sup 37/ in C/sub 2/Cl/sub 4/. Two 5 00-gal tanks of C/ sub 2/Cl/sub 4/ were placed in a limestone mine (1800 m.w.e.) and the resulting Ar/sup 37/ activity induced by cosmic mesons( mu ) was measured to determine the necessary conditions for solar neutrino observations. (R.E.U.)

Davis, R. Jr.

1964-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

436

Microsoft Word - E2CAC945.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JEWETT - COMMENTS AND RESPONSES JEWETT - COMMENTS AND RESPONSES NOVEMBER 2007 13-291 Jewett, Texas Table of Comments J1. Darden, Mary Landon..........................................................................................................13-293 J2. Darden, Robert.....................................................................................................................13-295 J3. Brazos Valley Council of Governments (Wilkerson, Tom) ................................................13-297 J4. Willis and Allen Construction (Allen, Jerry A.)..................................................................13-298 J5. Limestone County Sheriff (Wilson, Dennis D.) ..................................................................13-300 J6. Commissioner, Texas Railroad Commission (Williams, Michael)

437

Regional assessment of geothermal potential along the Balcones and Luling-Mexia-Talco Fault Zones, Central Texas. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A region-wide inventory and assessment of aquifers known to yield warm water (greater than 90/sup 0/F, 32/sup 0/C) is presented. This study was conducted to ascertain the potential for obtaining geothermal energy for space heating and water heating. The aquifers investigated include the Hosston/Trinity Sands, the Hensel Sand, the Paluxy Sand, the Edwards Limestone, and the Woodbine Sand. Each aquifer was examined in terms of its stratigraphic and structural framework and its hydrogeological properties. (MHR)

Woodruff, C.M. Jr.; McBride, M.W.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE  

SciTech Connect

Low cost material is needed for grouting abandoned retorts. Experimental work has shown that a hydraulic cement can be produced from Lurgi spent shale by mixing it in a 1:1 weight ratio with limestone and heating one hour at 1000C. With 5% added gypsum, strengths up to 25.8 MPa are obtained. This cement could make an economical addition up to about 10% to spent shale grout mixes, or be used in ordinary cement applications.

Mehta, P.K.; Persoff, P.; Fox, J.P.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Development of Mercury Oxidation Catalyst for Enhanced Mercury Capture by Wet FGD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes recent progress on a mercury control technology development program co-funded by EPRI, the U.S. Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), and several EPRI-member companies. The mercury control process under development uses catalysts installed downstream of the air heater and particulate control device to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) ...

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

440

Air Toxics Control by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update on three tasks associated with the EPRI project, Air Toxics Control by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Systems. The first task is an investigation of the factors that influence and control the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) at which a limestone forced oxidation FGD system operates. Both a literature review and a numerical analysis of full-scale wet FGD data were conducted. Results from this task are presented and discussed in Section 2 of the ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dl dolomitic limestone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Method for scavenging mercury  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

Chang, Shih-ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, Shou-heng (Kaohsiung, TW); Liu, Zhao-rong (Bejing, CN); Yan, Naiqiang (Burkeley, CA)

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

442

Method for scavenging mercury  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting of flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, Shou-Heng (Kaohsiung, TW); Liu, Zhao-Rong (Beijing, CN); Yan, Naiqiang (Berkeley, CA)

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

443

Method for scavenging mercury  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting of flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

Chang, Shih-ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, Shou-heng (Kaohsiung, TW); Liu, Zhao-rong (Beijing, CN); Yan, Naiqiang (Berkeley, CA)

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

444

Lab Safety Training Manual Environmental  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

circumstances, including those associated with harsh weather, variable mix proportions, and tight production Quantity Unit Description Rock 1138 kg/m3 12.7mm (½") Crushed Limestone Sand 610 kg/m3 Natural Concrete River Sand Water 147 kg/m3 Potable Cement 398 kg/m3 Type III Fly Ash 187 kg/m3 Class C Retarder 1.0 kg

445

Mass Finishing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 8 Operating conditions for mass finishing...Brass screw-machine parts Aluminum oxide or granite 6.4-19 0.25-0.75 [MathExpression] -6 Light matte or bright Light cutting (a) Brass stampings or screws (b) Limestone 3.2-13 0.13-0.50 2-6 Bright (a) Submerged tumbling is used for fragile and precision parts. (b) Screw-machine parts...

446

Program on Technology Innovation: Feasibility of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Fuel AnalysisPhase II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the first phase of this project, researchers evaluated the capabilities of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for fuel characterization in gasification applications. A LIBS system was assembled and optimized to identify and measure the elemental spectra from the following gasifier feedstocks: bituminous coal, lignite coal, and petroleum coke, including three blends of coal and pet coke as well as coal treated with limestone. Laboratory LIBS data were acquired and processed using artificial ne...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

447

The demonstration of an advanced cyclone coal combustor, with internal sulfur, nitrogen, and ash control for the conversion of a 23 MMBTU/hour oil fired boiler to pulverized coal  

SciTech Connect

This work contains to the final report of the demonstration of an advanced cyclone coal combustor. Titles include: Chronological Description of the Clean Coal Project Tests,'' Statistical Analysis of Operating Data for the Coal Tech Combustor,'' Photographic History of the Project,'' Results of Slag Analysis by PA DER Module 1 Procedure,'' Properties of the Coals Limestone Used in the Test Effort,'' Results of the Solid Waste Sampling Performed on the Coal Tech Combustor by an Independent Contractor During the February 1990 Tests.'' (VC)

Zauderer, B.; Fleming, E.S.

1991-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

448

Method for producing H.sub.2 using a rotating drum reactor with a pulse jet heat source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing hydrogen by an endothermic steam-carbon reaction using a rotating drum reactor and a pulse jet combustor. The pulse jet combustor uses coal dust as a fuel to provide reaction temperatures of 1300.degree. to 1400.degree. F. Low-rank coal, water, limestone and catalyst are fed into the drum reactor where they are heated, tumbled and reacted. Part of the reaction product from the rotating drum reactor is hydrogen which can be utilized in suitable devices.

Paulson, Leland E. (Morgantown, WV)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Cave Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cave Animals Cave Animals Nature Bulletin No. 95 December 14, 1946 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation CAVE ANIMALS Our Senior Naturalist, with a group of scientists exploring one of the big limestone quarries southwest of Chicago, found several dozen strange animals where a small underground stream pours from a seam in the rock wall. They were nearly an inch long, slender, with legs on both ends and snow white. That was a rare discovery because they were Blind Amphipods -- small members of the crayfish family that live their entire lives in secret subterranean waters. A large part of the United States is underlain by limestone, sometimes hundreds of feet thick, often close to the surface as it is here. Surface water gradually seeps down through crevices in this limestone and along horizontal seams, dissolving the rock to form channels that grow larger and larger. As the centuries pass, these form underground rivers and the caves so common in some parts of this country.

450

Amplitude and frequency experimental field measurements of a rotating?imbalance seismic source associated with changes in lithology surrounding a borehole  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field measurements of the vibration amplitude of a rotating?imbalance seismic source in a liquid?filled borehole are described. The borehole was a cased oil well that had been characterized by gamma?ray cement bond and compensated neutron litho?density/gamma?ray logs. The well logs indicated an abrupt transition from shale to limestone at a depth of 2638 ft. The vibration amplitude and frequency of a rotating?imbalance seismic source was measured versus applied voltage as the source was raised from 2654 to 2618 ft through the shalelimestone transition. It was observed that the vibration amplitude changed by approximately 10% in magnitude and the frequency changed approximately 15% as the source passed the shalelimestone transition. The measurements were compared to predictions provided by a two?dimensional analytical model of a rotating?imbalance source located in a liquid?filled bore hole. It was observed that the sensitivity of the experimentally measured vibration amplitude of the seismic source to the properties of the surrounding geologic media was an order of magnitude greater than that predicted by the two?dimensional analytical model.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Effect of cofiring coal and biofuel with sewage sludge on alkali problems in a circulating fluidized bed boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cofiring experiments were performed in a 12 MW circulating fluidized bed boiler. The fuel combinations were biofuel (wood+straw), coal+biofuel, coal+sewage sludge+biofuel, and sewage sludge+biofuel. Limestone or chlorine (PVC) was added in separate experiments. Effects of feed composition on bed ash and fly ash were examined. The composition of flue gas was measured, including on-line measurement of alkali chlorides. Deposits were collected on a probe simulating a superheater tube. It was found that the fuel combination, as well as addition of limestone, has little effect on the alkali fraction in bed ash, while chlorine decreases the alkali fraction in bed ash. Sewage sludge practically eliminates alkali chlorides in flue gas and deposits. Addition of enough limestone to coal and sludge for elimination of the SO{sub 2} emission does not change the effect of chlorine. Chlorine addition increases the alkali chloride in flue gas, but no chlorine was found in the deposits with sewage sludge as a cofuel. Cofiring of coal and biofuel lowers the alkali chloride concentration in the flue gas to about a third compared with that of pure biofuel. This is not affected by addition of lime or chlorine. It is concluded that aluminum compounds in coal and sludge are more important than sulfur to reduce the level of KCl in flue gas and deposits. 24 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

K.O. Davidsson; L.-E. Aamand; A.-L. Elled; B. Leckner [Chalmers University of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Department of Energy and Environment

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

HIGH SO2 REMOVAL EFFICIENCY TESTING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report describes the results of performance tests at six full-scale wet lime- and limestone-reagent flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The objective of these tests was to evaluate the effectiveness of low capital cost sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal upgrades for existing FGD systems as an option for complying with the provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The upgrade options tested at the limestone-reagent systems included the use of organic acid additives (dibasic acid (DBA) and/or sodium formate) as well as increased reagent ratio (higher excess limestone levels in the recirculating slurry solids) and absorber liquid-to-gas ratio. One system also tested operating at higher flue gas velocities to allow the existing FGD system to treat flue gas from an adjacent, unscrubbed unit. Upgrade options for the one lime-based system tested included increased absorber venturi pressure drop and increased sulfite concentration in the recirculating slurry liquor.

Gary M. Blythe; James L. Phillips

1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

Organic geochemical evaluations of bituminous rock and coals in Miocene Himmetoglu basin (Bolu, Turkey)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The studied area is a lake basin located in Bolu basin in Turkey. In the basin, from Upper Cretaceous to Upper Miocene 3,000-m thickness sediments were deposited. Upper Miocene Himmetoglu formation consisted of sandstone, claystone, and marl. To the middle level of the formation are located coal, bituminous limestone, and bituminous shales. In the basin, there are two coal beds whose thicknesses range from 1 to 13 m. The coals are easily breakable and black in color. In the coal beds exists some bituminous limestone and bituminous shales, and their thicknesses are between 5 and 45 cm. The amount of organic matter of the bituminous rocks from the Upper Miocene Himmetoglu formation are between 6.83 and 56.34 wt%, and the amount of organic matter of the bituminous limestone from the formation are between 13.58 and 57.16 wt%. These values indicate that these rocks have very good source potential. According to hydrogen index (HI), S2/S3, HI-T{sub max}, and HI-OI (oxygen index) parameters, kerogen types of the bituminous rocks and coals belonging to Upper Miocene Himmetoglu formation are Type I, Type II, and Type III. In accordance with HI, S2/S3, HI-T{sub max}, and HI-OI parameters, the bituminous rocks and coals from the Upper Miocene Himmetoglu formation are mostly immature.

Sari, A.; Geze, Y. [Ankara University, Ankara (Turkey). Faculty of Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin for the applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented process for simultaneous gas recovery and water disposal in production wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted a geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin to evaluate the applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented process for gas recovery and water disposal in production wells. A review of available publications was conducted to identify, (1) natural gas reservoirs which generate large quantities of gas and water, and (2) underground injection zones for produced water. Research efforts were focused on unconventional natural gas formations. The Antrim Shale is a Devonian gas shale which produces gas and large quantities of water. Total 1992 production from 2,626 wells was 74,209,916 Mcf of gas and 25,795,334 bbl of water. The Middle Devonian Dundee Limestone is a major injection zone for produced water. ``Waterless completion`` wells have been completed in the Antrim Shale for gas recovery and in the Dundee Limestone for water disposal. Jack McIntyre`s patented process has potential application for the recovery of gas from the Antrim Shale and simultaneous injection of produced water into the Dundee Limestone.

Maryn, S.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

REFINING AND END USE STUDY OF COAL LIQUIDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two direct coal liquids were evaluated by linear programming analysis to determine their value as petroleum refinery feedstock. The first liquid, DL1, was produced from bitiuminous coal using the Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc.(HTI) two-stage hydrogenation process in Proof of Concept Run No.1, POC-1. The second liquid, DL2,was produced from sub-bituminous coal using a three-stage HTI process in Proof of Concept Run No. 2, POC-2; the third stage being a severe hydrogenation process. A linear programming (LP) model was developed which simulates a generic 150,000 barrel per day refinery in the Midwest U.S. Data from upgrading tests conducted on the coal liquids and related petroleum fractions in the pilot plant testing phase of the Refining and End Use Study was inputed into the model. The coal liquids were compared against a generic petroleum crude feedstock. under two scenarios. In the first scenario, it was assumed that the refinery capacity and product slate/volumes were fixed. The coal liquids would be used to replace a portion of the generic crude. The LP results showed that the DL1 material had essentially the same value as the generic crude. Due to its higher quality, the DL2 material had a value of approximately 0.60 $/barrel higher than the petroleum crude. In the second scenario, it was assumed that a market opportunity exists to increase production by one-third. This requires a refinery expansion. The feedstock for this scenario could be either 100% petroleum crude or a combination of petroleum crude and the direct coal liquids. Linear programming analysis showed that the capital cost of the refinery expansion was significantly less when coal liquids are utilized. In addition, the pilot plant testing showed that both of the direct coal liquids demonstrated superior catalytic cracking and naphtha reforming yields. Depending on the coal liquid flow rate, the value of the DL1 material was 2.5-4.0 $/barrel greater than the base petroleum crude, while the DL2 material was 3.0-4.0 /barrel higher than the crude. Co-processing the coal liquids with lower quality, less expensive petroleum crudes that have higher sulfur, resid and metals contents was also examined. The coal liquids have higher values under this scenario, but the values are dependent on the prices of the alternative crudes.

NONE

1998-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

456

Systems analysis, long-term radionuclide transport, and dose assessments, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), southeastern New Mexico, September 1989  

SciTech Connect

This study supports the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement and has two main objectives. First, it describes current ideas about the characteristics and potential impacts of the disturbed-rock zone (DRZ) known to develop with time around excavations at the WIPP horizon. Second, it presents new calculations of radionuclide migration within and from the WIPP repository for steady-state undisturbed conditions and for two cases that consider human intrusion into the repository. At the WIPP, the presence of a DRZ has been confirmed by geophysical studies, gas-flow tests, and direct observations. The DRZ will allow gas or brine from waste-emplacement panels to bypass panel seals and flow into adjacent portions of the underground workings unless preventive measures are taken. Revised calculations of the undisturbed performance of the repository indicate that no radionuclides will be released into the Culebra Dolomite within the regulatory period of 10,000 years. The human-intrusion calculations included here assume a connection between the WIPP repository, an occurrence of pressurized brine within the underlying Castile Formation, and the overlying Culebra Dolomite. 61 refs., 40 figs., 16 tabs.

Lappin, A.R.; Hunter, R.L.; Davies, P.B.; Borns, D.J. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Reeves, M.; Pickens, J. (Intera Technologies, Inc., Austin, TX (USA)); Iuzzolino, H.J. (Geo-Centers, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Dessicant materials screening for backfill in a salt repository  

SciTech Connect

Maintaining an anhydrous environment around nuclear waste stored in a salt repository is a concern which can be alleviated by using a desiccant material for backfilling. Such a desiccant should desiccate a brine yet be non deliquescent, the hydrated product should have moderate thermal stability, and the desiccant should have a high capacity and be readily available. From a literature search MgO and CaO were identified for detailed study. These oxides, and an intimate mixture of the two obtained by calcining dolomite, were used in experiments to further determine their suitability. They proved to be excellent desiccants with a high water capacity. The hydrates of both have moderate thermal stability and a high water content. Both MgO and CaO react in an alkaline chloride brine forming oxychloride compounds with different waters of crystallization. Some of these compounds are the Sorel Cements. CaO hydrates to Ca(OH)/sub 2/ which carbonates with CO/sub 2/ in air to form CaCO/sub 3/ and release the hydrated water. Thus the intimate mixture of CaO and MgO from calcined dolomite may serve as a desiccant and remove CO/sub 2/ from the repository atmosphere.

Simpson, D.R.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Basic data report for drillholes at the H-11 complex (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-WIPP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Drillholes H-11b1, H-11b2, and H-11b3 were drilled from August to December 1983 for site characterization and hydrologic studies of the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Upper Permian Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico. In October 1984, the three wells were subjected to a series of pumping tests designed to develop the wells, provide information on hydraulic communication between the wells, provide hydraulic properties information, and to obtain water samples for quality of water measurements. Based on these tests, it was determined that this location would provide an excellent pad to conduct a convergent-flow non-sorbing tracer test in the Culebra dolomite. In 1988, a fourth hole (H-11b4) was drilled at this complex to provide a tracer-injection hole for the H-11 convergent-flow tracer test and to provide an additional point at which the hydraulic response of the Culebra H-11 multipad pumping test could be monitored. A suite of geophysical logs was run on the drillholes and was used to identify different lithologies and aided in interpretation of the hydraulic tests. 4 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

Mercer, J.W. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Snyder, R.P. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Analysis of solutes in groundwaters from the Rustler Formation at and near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site  

SciTech Connect

Between 1976 and 1986, groundwater samples from more than 60 locations in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site were collected and analyzed for a variety of major, minor, and trace solutes. Most of the samples were from the Rustler Formation (the Culebra Dolomite, the Magenta Dolomite, or the zone at the contact between the Rustler and underlying Salado Formations) or the Dewey Lake Red Beds. The analytical data from the laboratories are presented here with accompanying discussions of sample collection methods, supporting field measurements, and laboratory analytical methods. A comparison of four data sets and a preliminary evaluation of the data for the major solutes (Cl{sup {minus}}, SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2}, Na, K, Ca, and Mg) shows that the data for samples analyzed by UNC/Bendix for SNL seem to be the most reliable, but that at some locations, samples representative of the native, unperturbed groundwater have not been collected. At other locations, the water chemistry has apparently changed between sampling episodes.

Robinson, K.L.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Secondary porosity and hydrocarbon reservoirs in Lower-Middle Miocene Sandstones, southern San Joaquin basin, California  

SciTech Connect

Immature lower to middle Miocene marine sandstones constitute important reservoir rocks in many southern San Joaquin basin oil fields. Surface samples from the east and west margins of the basin and subsurface samples from Round Mountain, Belridge, and Coalinga fields were examined. These localities have undergone recurrent uplift since middle Tertiary time and maximum burial probably did not exceed 2500-3000 m. Diagenetic features common to east- and west-side sandstones include phosphatization, early calcite cementation, pressure solution and replacement of silicate grains by calcite cement, framework grain dissolution and creation of secondary porosity, and replacement of biotite and hornblende by chlorite. Differences include recrystallization and dolomitization of early calcite on the west side, and massive carbonate dissolution followed by extensive crushing and pressure solution of silicate grains and late replacement of plagioclase by calcite and calcite by hematite on the east side. Replacement of biotite by chlorite occurred only in the deepest samples on either side of the basin. Basinwide differences in diagenesis reflect different tectonic evolutions between east and west sides of the basin. Local variations in diagenetic patterns are pronounced in all areas and are controlled by initial sediment composition. For example, in one core from Coalinga early calcite cement, recrystallized calcite cement, and dolomitized calcite cement are interbedded over the 60-m interval sampled. Hydrocarbons in all samples reside mainly in secondary pores created by cement and framework-grain dissolution, underscoring the importance of diagenesis in creating reservoirs in this basin.

Horton, R.A. Jr.; Menzie, R.J. Jr.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dl dolomitic limestone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Reaction kinetics for remodeling oil shale retorting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results from recent laboratory kinetic studies at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) on gasification, pyrolysis, and mineral reactions in oil shale are presented. The specific pyrolysis reactions investigated include the decomposition of kerogen, the evolution of oil, hydrogen and C/sub 2/ plus C/sub 3/ hydrocarbons and the formation of a carbonaceous residue. Data describing the evolution of H/sub 2/ and CH/sub 4/ during secondary pyrolysis of the carbonaceous residue are also presented. The mineral reaction kinetics discussed include the decomposition and/or reaction (with silica or silicates) of calcite, dolomite, dawsonite and nahcolite. Rate equations describing the effects of CO/sub 2/ and steam on the reactions of calcite and dolomite are presented. Finally, kinetics describing gasification of the carbonaceous residue by CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/O are examined. The above kinetic data are summarized in a set of rate expressions that can be used in numerical modeling of oil shale retorting. The rate equations are general enough for modeling both in-situ and surface retorting processes.

Campbell, J.H.; Burnham, A.K.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Preliminary study of uranium in Pennsylvanian and lower Permian strata in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana, and the Northern Great Plains  

SciTech Connect

Persistent and widespread radiometric anomalies occur in Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian strata in the subsurface of the northern Great Plains and the Powder River Basin. The primary host lithology of these anomalies is shale interbedded with sandstone, dolomite, and dolomitic sandstone. Samples from the project area indicate that uranium is responsible for some anomalies. In some samples there seems to be a correlation between high uranium content and high organic-carbon content, which possibly indicates that carbonaceous material acted as a trapping mechanism in some strata. The Pennsylvanian and Permian rocks studied are predominantly marine carbonates and clastics, but there are rocks of fluvial origin in the basal Pennsylvanian of Montana, North Dakota, and South Dakota and in the Pennsylvanian and Permian deposits on the east flank of the Laramie Mountains. Fine-grained clastic rocks that flank the Chadron arch in western Nebraska are possibly of continental origin. The trend of the Chadron arch approximately parallels the trend of radiometric anomalies in the subsurface Permian-Pennsylvanian section. Possible source areas for uranium in the sediments studied were pre-Pennsylvanian strata of the Canadian Shield and Precambrian igneous rocks of the Ancestral Rocky Mountains.

Dunagan, J.F. Jr.; Kadish, K.A.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Experimental study of fracture development in multilayers of contrasting strength and ductility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of mean ductility, interlayer thickness, and magnitude of shortening on fracture development in bedded rock was investigated by shortening multilayer cylinders (5 cm dia.) 4 to 14% normal to layering in a triaxial apparatus. Multilayers were constructed by stacking two 1.4-cm thick layers of Berea Sandstone (relatively strong and brittle) with interlayers of Indiana Limestone (relatively weak and ductile). Thickness of the interlayer between the sandstone was 30%, 100%, or 150% of the thickness of the sandstone layer. Mean ductility was varied by shortening at confining pressures (Pc) of 5, 25, 50, and 100 MPa. Sandstone layers fracture at all conditions. Fractures have preferred orientation symmetric to the cylinder axis, and display systematic spacing. At the lowest Pc and mean ductility, fractures in the sandstone are dominantly opening mode (joints) and mixed mode fractures oriented at high angles to layer boundaries. At greater Pc and mean ductility, fractures are dominantly shear mode (faults) and display conjugate geometry. Average dihedral angle of the conjugates increases from 16 to 67 degrees with increase in mean ductility. Maximum fracture density in the sandstone occurs at intermediate mean ductility and maximum interlayer thickness. Fractures propagate from the sandstone into the limestone and may link across the limestone interlayer as shortening is increased. Linkage is enhanced with decreasing mean ductility and interlayer thickness, and increasing shortening. At high mean ductility, fractures are confined to the sandstone layers. Limestone deforms by faulting and compactive cataclastic flow at low and high mean ductility, respectively. Faults in limestone are more variable in orientation and display larger dihedral angles than in the sandstone. Fracture mode and orientation are consistent with Mohr-Coulomb failure, and a spatially heterogeneous stress state where the most tensile stress occurs in the sandstone. Types of fracture networks in multilayer sequences with moderate ductility contrast vary from joints and faults, refracted faults, to faults and flow with increasing mean ductility. Fracture spacing depends on layer and interlayer thickness, mean ductility and ductility contrast, and magnitude of shortening.

Cubuk, Pelin

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Production by  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production by Photovoltaic-powered Electrolysis Production by Photovoltaic-powered Electrolysis Project Summary Full Title: Production of Hydrogen by Photovoltaic-powered Electrolysis Project ID: 91 Principal Investigator: D.L. Block Keywords: Hydrogen production; electrolysis; photovoltaic (PV) Purpose To evaluate hydrogen production from photovoltaic (PV)-powered electrolysis. Performer Principal Investigator: D.L. Block Organization: Florida Solar Energy Center Address: 1679 Clearlake Road Cocoa, FL 32922 Telephone: 321-638-1001 Email: block@fsec.ucf.edu Sponsor(s) Name: Michael Ashworth Organization: Florida Energy Office Name: Neil Rossmeissl Organization: DOE/Advanced Utilities Concepts Division Name: H.T. Everett Organization: NASA/Kennedy Space Center Project Description Type of Project: Analysis Category: Hydrogen Fuel Pathways

465

Listening to Customers: How Deliberative Polling Helped Build 1,000 MW of New Renewable Energy Projects in Texas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 * NREL/TP-620-33177 3 * NREL/TP-620-33177 Listening to Customers: How Deliberative Polling Helped Build 1,000 MW of New Renewable Energy Projects in Texas R.L. Lehr Attorney W. Guild, Ph.D. The Guild Group, Inc. D.L. Thomas, Ph.D. Dennis Thomas and Associates B.G. Swezey National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 June 2003 * NREL/TP-620-33177 Listening to Customers: How Deliberative Polling Helped Build 1,000 MW of New Renewable Energy Projects in Texas R.L. Lehr Attorney W. Guild, Ph.D. The Guild Group, Inc. D.L. Thomas, Ph.D. Dennis Thomas and Associates

466

PNNL-21731  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

731 731 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program - Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants KL Simmons HM Hashemian P Ramuhalli R Konnick DL Brenchley S Ray JB Coble September 2012 PNNL-21731 Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program - Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants KL Simmons HM Hashemian 1 P Ramuhalli R Konnick 2 DL Brenchley S Ray 3 JB Coble September 2012 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

467

Mr. Carl Schafer Director of Environmental Policy  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Cont'dl Cont'dl DEPARTMENT OF THE DEFENSE INSTALLATIONS/FACILITIES Installation/Facility MED/AEC Activity Naval Research Laboratory (Former Anacostia Naval Air Station) Washington,. DC Nellis Air Force,Base (*I Las Vegas, NV Conducted research and.development activi,ties on thermal diffusion. A.pilot plant (S-50 Plant).was built at the former Anacostia Naval ./Y Air Station to separate uranium isotopes by ;,~!,c liquid thermal diffusion. A letter dated 26 Aug 1969 from the Commanding Officer, Lake Mead Base, to the Commander Field Command, Sandia Base indicates a wet and a dry waste disposal area for radioactive materials on the installation. The site was visited by personnel from the Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office in September 1983. Specifics of quantity and

468

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Change Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

four data sets from the Carbon four data sets from the Carbon Dynamics and Nutrient Dynamics science themes, components of the LBA-ECO Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). LBA-ECO CD-36 South American Land Data Assimilation System Atmospheric Forcing Data . Data set prepared by L.G.G. de Goncalves, W.J. Shuttleworth, D. Vila, E. Larroza, M.J. Bottino, D.L. Herdies, J.A. Aravequia, J.G. de Mattos, D.L. Toll, M. Rodell and P. Houser. This data set provides South American Land Data Assimilation System (SALDAS) atmospheric forcing data necessary for land surface modeling for South America. The data were derived by combining modeled and observation based sources.The forcing data cover the entire continent of South America at 0.125 degree resolution and are built around the model-calculated values of

469

NEPA Environmental Impact Statement Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

'''11111,,,,, '''11111,,,,, 1111111111111 1111111111111 1111111111111 IEIFJI''''V'"II Il!'cl11'"dl II$,A, II IP''JI''I[,F1,lllII . . ..I 1),,,/l,ll~~,p,,,,,c"][ mu,,,,, , I ,I,l,,dl S"II',14 II11 . . . ..lll I111'''fl11"ll" " '" : ~l,,it( , ,,,,,, IE'G (o ?'.4;()) I Jrlitw"i !Stiml%i Glrlf~kfe''rlrllTrllF''rll'l lrl~([?!l~lltllrl[lrll'lc!lrllil 'Oil Ihllw'q'y ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................... llr\llrllll~ll!! llr~llfllll'lllll' lllrclllLlllrlll 'lll\ll 111,,111 111'''rlll I[)l,lx s e! p t c! '[[l Ill (E! lr 2 '9 ,, :1,9 '9 ;[1 m: !%crwitwia II 0fifiItmr3 and 11-iemki of lFie IM {Or'ga In izatiorl !s (Iikit iltt

470

Neutron Scattering Conference Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conference Archive Conference Archive A new portal for neutron scattering has just been established at neutronsources.org. The information contained here in the Neutron Scattering Web has been transferred to the new site. We will leave the current content here for archival purposes but no new content will be added. We encourage everyone interested in neutron scattering to take full advantage of this exciting new resource for our community. Neutronsources.org 2000 | 2001 | 2002 | 2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 2000 June 12-14, 2000 Workshop on "New Opportunities for Better User Group Software (NOBUGS III)" Location Daresbury Laboratory, Cheshire, UK Contact Mark Enderby, Daresbury Laboratory Email M.J.Enderby@dl.ac.uk URL http://nobugs.dl.ac.uk/

471

EER-CONCEPTOOL: a Reasonable Environment for Schema and Ontology Sharing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a system which supports knowledge sharing through the articulation of the overlapping components in two or more schemas or ontologies. EER-CONCEPTOOL uses Description Logics (DLs) to formalise and capture some relevant features of knowledge described using an Enhanced Entity-Relationship (EER) model. We describe how DL-based reasoning can provide a relevant part of the semiautomated deductive support needed to specify the articulation (i.e. the shared content) of two EER knowledge bases. We also show how a more effective level of support can be provided by the EER-CONCEPTOOL architecture, which combines DL-based deductions with lexical analysis and heuristic inferences. We illustrate the approach to knowledge articulation in our system by way of an example. 1.

Helmut Meisel; Ernesto Compatangelo

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Major Oil Plays in Utah and Vicinity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play. This report covers research activities for the sixth quarter of the project (October 1 through December 31, 2003). This work included describing outcrop analogs for the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone and Mississippian Leadville Limestone, major oil producers in the thrust belt and Paradox Basin, respectively, and analyzing best practices used in the southern Green River Formation play of the Uinta Basin. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view of reservoir petrophysics, facies characteristics, and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. In the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province, the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone produces from subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the low-porosity limestone beds are extensively fractured and sealed by overlying argillaceous and non-fractured units. The best outcrop analogs for Twin Creek reservoirs are found at Devils Slide and near t