National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for disturb hazardous substances

  1. Hazardous and radioactive substances in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazardous and radioactive substances in danisH Marine Waters Ingela Dahllöf & Jesper H. Andersen University #12;#12;Hazardous and radioactive substances in danisH Marine Waters #12;#12;Hazardous Hazardous and radioactive substances in danisH Marine Waters status and teMporal trends #12;Hazardous

  2. Title 40 CFR 300 National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Title 40 CFR 300 National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal...

  3. Hazard Communication Definitions Chemical means any substance or mixture of substances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    Hazard Communication Definitions Chemical means any substance or mixture of substances Container that contains a hazardous chemical. Exposure or exposed means that an employee is subjected in the course of employment to a chemical that is a physical or health hazard and includes potential (e.g. accidental

  4. Hazardous-Substance Generator, Transporter and Disposer Liability under the Federal and California Superfunds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vernon, James; Dennis, Patrick W.

    1981-01-01

    Carpenter-Presley-Tanner Hazardous Substance Account Act ofincluding spills and hazardous- waste disposal sites thatlabel for the disposal of hazardous wastes. Id. at 607. The

  5. ROYAL HOLLOWAY, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON THE CONTROL OF SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    ROYAL HOLLOWAY, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON THE CONTROL OF SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH REGULATIONS 2002's arrangements for the management of hazardous substances as defined in the Control of Substances Hazardous who may be affected by the work of the College to substances hazardous to health is either prevented

  6. Funding Opportunity: Superfund Hazardous Substance Research and Training Program Sponsor: National Institute of Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Funding Opportunity: Superfund Hazardous Substance Research and Training Program (P42) Sponsor Sciences (NIEHS) is announcing the continuation of the Superfund Hazardous Substance Research and Training techniques for the detection, assessment, and evaluation of the effect on human health of hazardous

  7. Funding Opportunity: Superfund Hazardous Substance Research and Training Program (P42)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Funding Opportunity: Superfund Hazardous Substance Research and Training Program (P42) Sponsor (NIEHS) is announcing the continuation of the Superfund Hazardous Substance Research and Training Program techniques for the detection, assessment, and evaluation of the effect on human health of hazardous

  8. Cross-functional environmental initiatives : addressing Restriction of Hazardous Substance (RoHS) technical challenges at Sun Microsystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenlaw, Tamara

    2005-01-01

    The European Union (EU) passed the Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) Directive, effective January 2006, banning the sale of electronics equipment containing lead and five other hazardous substances into EU countries. ...

  9. PROHIBITION AGAINST THE DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES TO THE SANITARY SEWER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    PROHIBITION AGAINST THE DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES TO THE SANITARY SEWER Please be aware put down our sinks and into the sewer. We need to be particularly careful of solvents and acids to the environment. · Pose a hazard to unsuspecting employees working within the sewer system. · Cause a violation

  10. On the estimation of hazard potential for chemical substances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melhem, G.A.; Shanley, E.S. [Arthur D. Little, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)] [Arthur D. Little, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    There is considerable interest in means for predicting reactivity hazard potential from chemical structure. Such means are intended to provide measures of the likelihood that a given chemical composition can undergo rapid self-reaction, i.e., that it can detonate or deflagrate. The means to be discussed are most useful in predicting behavior under unconfined conditions. As they are computational in nature, they can be deployed quickly and easily to wide ranges of compositions, whether or not these have ever been made. Comparison with better-known compositions is facilitated and can provide additional guidance. In this paper we provide critical reviews of some commonly used hazard evaluation systems, including the oxygen balance system, and ASTM CHETAH. We also provide a review of our recent studies aimed at the development of more powerful screening systems. 6 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Pharmaceutical waste may be a hazardous chemical waste, controlled substance or biomedical waste. Proper classification is necessary to be in compliance with the laws regulating each waste type.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Steven C.

    Pharmaceutical waste may be a hazardous chemical waste, controlled substance or biomedical waste. Hazardous Chemical Pharmaceutical Waste: A number of common pharmaceuticals are regulated as hazardous or more of the EPA characteristics of a hazardous chemical waste are also regulated as a hazardous

  12. Respiratory symptoms among glass bottle makers exposed to stannic chloride solution and other potentially hazardous substances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levy, B.S.; Davis, F.; Johnson, B.

    1985-04-01

    Concern about upper respiratory tract irritation and other symptoms among workers at a glass bottle manufacturing plant led to an epidemiologic and an industrial hygiene survey. Questionnaire responses from 35 hot end and 53 cold end workers indicated that the incidence of wheezing, chest pain, dyspnea on exertion, and cough was significantly elevated among hot end workers. Among both smokers and nonsmokers, hot end workers reported higher, but not significantly higher, rates of wheezing and chest pain. Among smokers, hot end workers reported significantly higher rates of dyspnea on exertion and cough than did cold end workers. Data suggest that reported exposure to stannic chloride solution likely caused these symptoms. The industrial hygiene survey, conducted when stannic chloride use had been reduced, cleaning had been done, and ventilation improved, focused on measuring air contaminants that might possibly cause symptoms. Levels of hydrogen chloride, which apparently was formed by the combination of stannic chloride and water in the presence of heat, were elevated. The finding of increased prevalence of respiratory symptoms among hot end workers was consistent with this exposure. Recommendations were made to reduce hazardous exposures at this plant. Individuals responsible for occupational health should be aware that relatively benign substances, such as stannic chloride and water, can combine spontaneously to form hazardous substances.

  13. Investigation of measuring hazardous substances in printed circuit boards using the micro-focus X-ray fluorescence screening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, M L; Fakhrtdinov, R; Grigoriev, M; Quan, B S; Le, Z C; Roshchupkin, D

    2014-01-01

    Printed circuit boards (PCBs) are widely used in most electrical and electronic equipments or products. Hazardous substances such as Pb, Hg, Cd, etc, can be present in high concentrations in PCBs and the degradation and release of these substances poses a huge threat to humans and the environment. To investigation the chemical composition of PCBs in domestic market of China, a practical micro-focus X-ray fluorescence system is setup to make the elements analysis, especially for detecting hazardous substances. Collimator is adopted to focus the X-ray emitted from X-ray tube. BRUKER X-ray detector with proportional counter is used to detect the emitted fluorescence from the PCB samples. Both single layer PCB samples and double layers PCB samples made of epoxy glass fiber are purchased from the domestic market of China. Besides, a MC55 wireless communication module made by SIEMENS in Germany is used as the reference material. Experimental results from the fluorescence spectrums of the testing points of PCB sampl...

  14. HAZARD COMMUNICATION PROGRAM The______________________________ Department has developed a Hazard Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuanlin

    HAZARD COMMUNICATION PROGRAM The______________________________ Department has developed a Hazard about chemical hazards and other hazardous substances via our comprehensive Hazard Communication Program. The Hazard Communication Program will include: WORKPLACE CHEMICAL LIST MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS CONTAINER

  15. Apparatus and methods for monitoring the concentrations of hazardous airborne substances, especially lead

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaromb, Solomon

    2004-07-13

    Air is sampled at a rate in excess of 100 L/min, preferably at 200-300 L/min, so as to collect therefrom a substantial fraction, i.e., at least 20%, preferably 60-100%, of airborne particulates. A substance of interest (analyte), such as lead, is rapidly solubilized from the the collected particulates into a sample of liquid extractant, and the concentration of the analyte in the extractant sample is determined. The high-rate air sampling and particulate collection may be effected with a high-throughput filter cartridge or with a recently developed portable high-throughput liquid-absorption air sampler. Rapid solubilization of lead is achieved by a liquid extractant comprising 0.1-1 M of acetic acid or acetate, preferably at a pH of 5 or less and preferably with inclusion of 1-10% of hydrogen peroxide. Rapid determination of the lead content in the liquid extractant may be effected with a colorimetric or an electroanalytical analyzer.

  16. Hazardous Substance Release Reporting Under CERCLA, EPCR {section}304 and DOE Emergency Management System (EMS) and DOE Occurrence Reporting Requirements. Environmental Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Traceski, T.T.

    1994-06-01

    Releases of various substances from DOE facilities may be subject to reporting requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), as well as DOE`s internal ``Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information`` and the ``Emergency Management System`` (EMS). CERCLA and EPCPA are Federal laws that require immediate reporting of a release of a Hazardous Substance (HS) and an Extremely Hazardous Substance (EHS), respectively, in a Reportable Quantity (RQ) or more within a 24-hour period. This guidance uses a flowchart, supplemental information, and tables to provide an overview of the process to be followed, and more detailed explanations of the actions that must be performed, when chemical releases of HSs, EHSs, pollutants, or contaminants occur at DOE facilities. This guidance should be used in conjunction with, rather than in lieu of, applicable laws, regulations, and DOE Orders. Relevant laws, regulations, and DOE Orders are referenced throughout this guidance.

  17. MARSHALL UNIVERSITY HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanyal, Suman

    /16/2005 1 #12;Marshall University Hazardous Waste Program POLICY STATEMENT- Hazardous Materials Management of the Hazardous Waste Management Program is to ensure that proper handling and legal disposal of hazardous wastes Management Program will apply to the following: 1. Any liquid, semi-solid, solid or gaseous substance defined

  18. Four: Evaluating Reforms in the Implementation of Hazardous Waste Policies in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cutter, W. Bowman; DeShazo, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    THE IMPLEMENTATION OF HAZARDOUS WASTE POLICIES IN CALIFORNIAfrom the release of hazardous waste and toxic substances.The mishandling of hazardous waste by industry has created

  19. GUIDELINES FOR HANDLING HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    GUIDELINES FOR HANDLING HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL WASTE The proper management of hazardous waste and regulatory compliance are achieved: 1. Make sure that no hazardous materials are placed into regular solid in the departmental chemical hygiene plan (CHP) before you begin to use hazardous substances. 3. Make sure you know

  20. Guidance Note 052 RISK ASSESSMENTS FOR HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidance Note 052 RISK ASSESSMENTS FOR HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS as required under the CONTROL OF SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH REGULATIONS (COSHH) and the DANGEROUS SUBSTANCES AND EXPLOSIVE ATMOSPHERES Involving the Use of Hazardous Chemicals. COSHH requires health risks to be assessed and controlled

  1. Hazard Communication Program 1.0 REFERENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Hazard Communication Program 1.0 REFERENCE California Code of Regulations, Title 8, Sections 337 the properties and potential safety and health hazards of the materials which they use or to which they are exposed. Employees who use or may be exposed to potentially hazardous substances or harmful physical

  2. Sleep disturbances in psoriasis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    AB, Dann F, Menter A. Psoriasis and the metabolic syndrome.Sleep disturbances in psoriasis Brandon G Shutty 1 DO,Abstract BACKGROUND: Psoriasis negatively impacts sleep, but

  3. MINIREVIEWS Neighborhood Effects, Disturbance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    severity is the proportion of trees killed during a disturbance. Interactions between neighbor- hood (continuous change, in those forests dominated by species with neutral-negative neigh- borhood effects). We by many ecologists. Continuous succes- sional change due to frequent disturbance, climate change, canopy

  4. 6/6/2014 1 of 6 OHS 11-033 revision Animal Research Protocols Involving Hazardous Chemicals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    OHS 11-033 revision Animal Research Protocols Involving Hazardous Chemicals I. OVERVIEW Hazardous Chemicals: Known or suspect carcinogens, reproductive toxins or other highly toxic substances (e. Reference the SU Chemical Hygiene Plan for hazardous chemical definitions. Potential Exposures: Research

  5. Transportation of Hazardous Evidentiary Material.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborn, Douglas.

    2005-06-01

    This document describes the specimen and transportation containers currently available for use with hazardous and infectious materials. A detailed comparison of advantages, disadvantages, and costs of the different technologies is included. Short- and long-term recommendations are also provided.3 DraftDraftDraftExecutive SummaryThe Federal Bureau of Investigation's Hazardous Materials Response Unit currently has hazardous material transport containers for shipping 1-quart paint cans and small amounts of contaminated forensic evidence, but the containers may not be able to maintain their integrity under accident conditions or for some types of hazardous materials. This report provides guidance and recommendations on the availability of packages for the safe and secure transport of evidence consisting of or contaminated with hazardous chemicals or infectious materials. Only non-bulk containers were considered because these are appropriate for transport on small aircraft. This report will addresses packaging and transportation concerns for Hazardous Classes 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 9 materials. If the evidence is known or suspected of belonging to one of these Hazardous Classes, it must be packaged in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR Part 173. The anthrax scare of several years ago, and less well publicized incidents involving unknown and uncharacterized substances, has required that suspicious substances be sent to appropriate analytical laboratories for analysis and characterization. Transportation of potentially hazardous or infectious material to an appropriate analytical laboratory requires transport containers that maintain both the biological and chemical integrity of the substance in question. As a rule, only relatively small quantities will be available for analysis. Appropriate transportation packaging is needed that will maintain the integrity of the substance, will not allow biological alteration, will not react chemically with the substance being shipped, and will otherwise maintain it as nearly as possible in its original condition.The recommendations provided are short-term solutions to the problems of shipping evidence, and have considered only currently commercially available containers. These containers may not be appropriate for all cases. Design, testing, and certification of new transportation containers would be necessary to provide a container appropriate for all cases.Table 1 provides a summary of the recommendations for each class of hazardous material.Table 1: Summary of RecommendationsContainerCost1-quart paint can with ArmlockTM seal ringLabelMaster(r)%242.90 eachHazard Class 3, 4, 5, 8, or 9 Small ContainersTC Hazardous Material Transport ContainerCurrently in Use4 DraftDraftDraftTable 1: Summary of Recommendations (continued)ContainerCost55-gallon open or closed-head steel drumsAll-Pak, Inc.%2458.28 - %2473.62 eachHazard Class 3, 4, 5, 8, or 9 Large Containers95-gallon poly overpack LabelMaster(r)%24194.50 each1-liter glass container with plastic coatingLabelMaster(r)%243.35 - %243.70 eachHazard Class 6 Division 6.1 Poisonous by Inhalation (PIH) Small ContainersTC Hazardous Material Transport ContainerCurrently in Use20 to 55-gallon PIH overpacksLabelMaster(r)%24142.50 - %24170.50 eachHazard Class 6 Division 6.1 Poisonous by Inhalation (PIH) Large Containers65 to 95-gallon poly overpacksLabelMaster(r)%24163.30 - %24194.50 each1-liter transparent containerCurrently in UseHazard Class 6 Division 6.2 Infectious Material Small ContainersInfectious Substance ShipperSource Packaging of NE, Inc.%24336.00 eachNone Commercially AvailableN/AHazard Class 6 Division 6.2 Infectious Material Large ContainersNone Commercially Available N/A5

  6. Disposal of Hazardous Medical Waste Policy and Procedures Commencement Date: 27 November, 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disposal of Hazardous Medical Waste Policy and Procedures Commencement Date: 27 November, 1996 containing or used in work involving cytotoxic substances. Hazardous Medical Waste Means any substance, edges, points or protuberances capable of cutting or penetrating the skin. 5. POLICY STATEMENT Hazardous

  7. Guidance Document Quick Guide to Assess Risk for Hazardous Chemicals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidance Document Quick Guide to Assess Risk for Hazardous Chemicals The following outline provides) or other sources of information. In cases where substances with significant or unusual potential hazards of experience and the degree of potential hazard associated with the proposed experiment, it may be necessary

  8. Hazards Survey and Hazards Assessments

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21

    This volume is to assist DOE Operations/Field Offices and operating contractors in complying with the DOE O 151.1 requirement that Hazards Surveys and facility-specific Hazards Assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-2.

  9. 300 Area Disturbance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LL Hale; MK Wright; NA Cadoret

    1999-01-07

    The objective of this study was to define areas of previous disturbance in the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to eliminate these areas from the cultural resource review process, reduce cultural resource monitoring costs, and allow cultural resource specialists to focus on areas where subsurface disturbance is minimal or nonexistent. Research into available sources suggests that impacts from excavations have been significant wherever the following construction activities have occurred: building basements and pits, waste ponds, burial grounds, trenches, installation of subsurface pipelines, power poles, water hydrants, and well construction. Beyond the areas just mentioned, substrates in the' 300 Area consist of a complex, multidimen- sional mosaic composed of undisturbed stratigraphy, backfill, and disturbed sediments; Four Geographic Information System (GIS) maps were created to display known areas of disturbance in the 300 Area. These maps contain information gleaned from a variety of sources, but the primary sources include the Hanford GIS database system, engineer drawings, and historic maps. In addition to these maps, several assumptions can be made about areas of disturbance in the 300 Area as a result of this study: o o Buried pipelines are not always located where they are mapped. As a result, cultural resource monitors or specialists should not depend on maps depicting subsurface pipelines for accurate locations of previous disturbance. Temporary roads built in the early 1940s were placed on layers of sand and gravel 8 to 12 in. thick. Given this information, it is likely that substrates beneath these early roads are only minimally disturbed. Building foundations ranged from concrete slabs no more than 6 to 8 in. thick to deeply excavated pits and basements. Buildings constructed with slab foundations are more numerous than may be expected, and minimally disturbed substrates may be expected in these locations. Historic black and white photographs provide a partial record of some excavations, including trenches, building basements, and material lay-down yards. Estimates of excavation depth and width can be made, but these estimates are not accurate enough to pinpoint the exact location where the disturbedhmdisturbed interface is located (e.g., camera angles were such that depths and/or widths of excavations could not be accurately determined or estimated). In spite of these limitations, these photographs provide essential information. Aerial and historic low-level photographs have captured what appears to be backfill throughout much of the eastern portion of the 300 Area-near the Columbia River shoreline. This layer of fill has likely afforded some protection for the natural landscape buried beneath the fill. This assumption fits nicely with the intermittent and inadvertent discoveries of hearths and stone tools documented through the years in this part of the 300 Area. Conversely, leveling of sand dunes appears to be substantial in the northwestern portion of the 300 Area during the early stages of development. o Project files and engineer drawings do not contain information on any impromptu but necessary adjustments made on the ground during project implementation-after the design phase. Further, many projects are planned and mapped but never implemented-this information is also not often placed in project files. Specific recommendations for a 300 Area cultural resource monitoring strategy are contained in the final section of this document. In general, it is recommended that monitoring continue for all projects located within 400 m of the Columbia River. The 400-m zone is culturally sensitive and likely retains some of the most intact buried substrates in the 300 Area.

  10. Waveguide disturbance detection method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A. (Albany, CA); Nihei, Kurt T. (Oakland, CA); Myer, Larry R. (Benicia, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A method for detection of a disturbance in a waveguide comprising transmitting a wavefield having symmetric and antisymmetric components from a horizontally and/or vertically polarized source and/or pressure source disposed symmetrically with respect to the longitudinal central axis of the waveguide at one end of the waveguide, recording the horizontal and/or vertical component or a pressure of the wavefield with a vertical array of receivers disposed at the opposite end of the waveguide, separating the wavenumber transform of the wavefield into the symmetric and antisymmetric components, integrating the symmetric and antisymmetric components over a broad frequency range, and comparing the magnitude of the symmetric components and the antisymmetric components to an expected magnitude for the symmetric components and the antisymmetric components for a waveguide of uniform thickness and properties thereby determining whether or not a disturbance is present inside the waveguide.

  11. Disturbed core Undisturbed soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Batch Disturbed core Undisturbed soil column Pedon Field Watershed Multi-scale modeling .001-1 m3 1-10 m3 10-10,000 m3 >10,000 m3 Unraveling the influence of scale on organic C transport Soil through deep soil profiles may be the "missing" C flux in global budgets. Jardine, P.M., M.A. Mayes, J. R

  12. Safety Requirements for the Packaging and Transportation of Hazardous Materials, Hazardous Substances, and Hazardous Wastes

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1985-07-09

    Cancels Chapter 3 of DOE 5480.1A. Canceled by DOE O 460.1 of 9-27-1995 and by DOE N 251.4 & Para. 9c canceled by DOE O 231.1 of 9-30-1995.

  13. Hazard evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vervalin, C.H.

    1986-12-01

    Recent major disasters in the hydrocarbon processing industry (HPI) have inspired renewed interest in the fine-tuning of hazard evaluation methods. In addition to traditional risk-study methods, the computer promises eventual expert systems to vastly improve the speed of assembling and using loss-prevention information. But currently, the computerization of hazard evaluation finds the HPI taking a back seat to aerospace/nuclear industries. The complexity of creating computer databases and expert systems has not-however-kept some HPI companies from plunging in. Arabian American Oil Co. (Aramco) has used computer-generated information in working with probabilistic risk analysis. Westinghouse has used its risk-analysis experience in the nuclear field to build a computer-based program for HPI clients. An Exxon plant has a huge data bank as the basis for its Hazard Loss Information System.

  14. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals, accidentally spilled, or released. In addition to laboratory chemicals, hazardous materials may include common not involve highly toxic or noxious hazardous materials, a fire, or an injury requiring medical attention

  15. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals I do if there is a small spill in the area and personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up, or there is a small spill where personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up or an appropriate spill kit

  16. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals I do if there is a small spill in the area and personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up spill where personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up or an appropriate spill kit

  17. Reproductive Hazards in the Lab Reproductive Hazards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Reproductive Hazards in the Lab Reproductive Hazards The term reproductive hazard refers to agents healthy children. Reproductive hazards may have harmful effects on libido, sexual behavior, or sperm the effects of reproductive hazards may be reversible for the parent, the effects on the fetus or offspring

  18. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals I do if there is a small spill in the area and personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up or an appropriate spill kit is not available? Call 561

  19. If you have established that your waste is hazardous or may be hazardous the next step is to identify the "Risk Phrases" that apply to each component in the waste.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddharthan, Advaith

    If you have established that your waste is hazardous or may be hazardous the next step. Use the Approved Supply List (available from HSE books). This shows hazard information are aiming to clarify the following: · the categories of danger exhibited by the substance (Hazard Groups

  20. HAZARDOUS WASTE [Written Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    HAZARDOUS WASTE MANUAL [Written Program] Cornell University [10/7/13 #12;Hazardous Waste Program................................................... 8 3.0 MINIMIZING HAZARDOUS WASTE GENERATION.........................................................10 4.0 HAZARDOUS WASTE GENERATOR REQUIREMENTS.....................................................10

  1. What is Hazardous Hazardous waste is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    What is Hazardous Waste? Hazardous waste is any product charac- terized or labeled as toxic may be harmful to human health and/ or the environment. Hazardous Waste Disposal EH&S x7233 E.calrecycle.ca.gov www.earth911.com Campus Hazardous Waste Roundup Roundups conducted the last week of: January April

  2. Hazardous Location

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-DoseOptions for Accidental Releases of Hazardous Gases090041

  3. A question of substance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gitlin, Jane M

    1986-01-01

    During the week of January 27th to February 2nd, 1986 a design symposium was held in the Department of Architecture at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. This symposium, entitled "An Architecture of Substance" was ...

  4. Title 40 CFR 300 National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)Open EnergyTinox JumpInformationAgreements with

  5. Transporting Hazardous Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transporting Hazardous Materials The procedures given below apply to all materials that are considered to be hazardous by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Consult your...

  6. Modified hazard ranking system for sites with mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes. User manual.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawley, K.A.; Peloquin, R.A.; Stenner, R.D.

    1986-04-01

    This document describes both the original Hazard Ranking System and the modified Hazard Ranking System as they are to be used in evaluating the relative potential for uncontrolled hazardous substance facilities to cause human health or safety problems or ecological or environmental damage. Detailed instructions for using the mHRS/HRS computer code are provided, along with instructions for performing the calculations by hand. Uniform application of the ranking system will permit the DOE to identify those releases of hazardous substances that pose the greatest hazard to humans or the environment. However, the mHRS/HRS by itself cannot establish priorities for the allocation of funds for remedial action. The mHRS/HRS is a means for applying uniform technical judgment regarding the potential hazards presented by a facility relative to other facilities. It does not address the feasibility, desirability, or degree of cleanup required. Neither does it deal with the readiness or ability of a state to carry out such remedial action, as may be indicated, or to meet other conditions prescribed in CERCLA. 13 refs., 13 figs., 27 tabs.

  7. Revisiting Disturbance: A New Guide for Keeping Dry Mixed Conifer Forests Healthy through Fuel Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Revisiting Disturbance: A New Guide for Keeping Dry Mixed Conifer Forests Healthy through Fuel Management January/February 2014 · ISSUE 9 SUMMARY Planning for hazardous fuels reduction can be challenging and implementing fuel treatments, the Rocky Mountain Research Station, with support from the Joint Fire Science

  8. Climate Change and Forest Disturbances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dale, Virginia H.; Joyce, Linda A.; McNulty, Steve; Neilson, Ronald P.; Ayres, Matthew P.; Flannigan, Michael D.; Hanson, Paul J.; Irland, Lloyd C.; Lugo, Ariel E.; Peterson, Chris J.; Simberloff, Daniel; Swanson, Frederick J.; Stocks, Brian J.; Wotton, B. Michael; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2001-01-01

    , and recreation. Some disturbances can be functions of both nat- ural and human conditions (e.g., forest fire ignition and spread) (Figure 2). Virginia H. Dale (e-mail: vhd@ornl.gov) is a senior scientist and Paul J. Hanson is a research scientist...

  9. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNEX Q HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE #12;ANNEX Q - HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE 03/10/2014 v.2.0 Page Q-1 PROMULGATION STATEMENT Annex Q: Hazardous Materials Emergency Response, and contents within, is a guide to how the University conducts a response specific to a hazardous materials

  10. Track 3: Exposure Hazards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 3: Exposure Hazards

  11. Proceedings Hazards and Disasters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hai

    Proceedings Hazards and Disasters Researchers Meeting of the Boulder, Colorado July 11­12, 2007 #12;Hazards and Disasters Researchers Meeting Beginning in 1997, hazards and disaster researchers gathered in the field of hazards and disasters. As a new feature of this year's meeting, short papers based

  12. Hazardous Waste Management Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Pengcheng

    Hazardous Waste Management Training Persons (including faculty, staff and students) working with hazardous materials should receive annual training that addresses storage, use, and disposal of hazardous before handling hazardous waste. Departments are re- quired to keep records of training for as long

  13. The Control of Reproductive Hazards in the Workplace: A Prescription for Prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashford, Nicholas

    1983-01-01

    As workers become more aware that occupational exposure to toxic substances can impair their ability to bring healthy children into the world. they will begin to focus on legal mechanisms for reducing reproductive hazards ...

  14. Disturbance Rejection for Nonlinear Systems Zongxuan Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsao, Tsu-Chin

    Disturbance Rejection for Nonlinear Systems Zongxuan Sun Research and Development Center General result for a class of minimum phase nonlinear systems with linear disturbances. Sun and Tsao (1999, 2001

  15. CONTROLLABILITY MEASURES FOR DISTURBANCE Sigurd Skogestad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    of combined disturbances in the frequency domain using the singular value decomposition. Skogestad and MorariCONTROLLABILITY MEASURES FOR DISTURBANCE REJECTION Sigurd Skogestad and Erik A. Wol Chemical-in" disturbance rejection capabilities than others, that is, their dynamic resilience controllability with respect

  16. Toxic Substances Control Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Toxic Substances Control Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  17. Adaptive Rejection of Narrow Band Disturbance in Hard Disk Drives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Qixing

    2009-01-01

    of attenuating low frequency disturbances. There are several0 Hz to reject low frequency disturbances, but the resultingattenuation at the disturbance frequency. We can also notice

  18. Ecosystem carbon storage capacity as affected by disturbance...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and tausub 1 is the residence time of the carbon pool affected by disturbances (biomass pool in this study). The disturbance regime is characterized by the mean disturbance...

  19. Hazardous Waste Management (Delaware)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The act authorizes the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environment Control (DNREC) to regulate hazardous waste and create a program to manage sources of hazardous waste. The act...

  20. Hazard analysis results report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemi, B.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-30

    This document describes and defines the Hazard Analysis Results for the Tank Waste Remediation System Final Safety Analysis Report.

  1. HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT REFERENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT REFERENCE GUIDE Prepared by Environment, Health and Safety Office@caltech.edu http://safety.caltech.edu #12;Hazardous Waste Management Reference Guide Page 2 of 36 TABLE OF CONTENTS Satellite Accumulation Area 9 Waste Accumulation Facility 10 HAZARDOUS WASTE CONTAINER MANAGEMENT Labeling

  2. Effect of sample disturbance in opalinus clay shales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pei, Jianyong, 1975-

    2004-01-01

    The sample disturbance problem for different geomaterials is reviewed in this thesis. A general discussion on the disturbance sources and complexities of the disturbance problem is followed by detailed reviews on disturbance ...

  3. Pulse homodyne field disturbance sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1997-10-28

    A field disturbance sensor operates with relatively low power, provides an adjustable operating range, is not hypersensitive at close range, allows co-location of multiple sensors, and is inexpensive to manufacture. The sensor includes a transmitter that transmits a sequence of transmitted bursts of electromagnetic energy. The transmitter frequency is modulated at an intermediate frequency. The sequence of bursts has a burst repetition rate, and each burst has a burst width and comprises a number of cycles at a transmitter frequency. The sensor includes a receiver which receives electromagnetic energy at the transmitter frequency, and includes a mixer which mixes a transmitted burst with reflections of the same transmitted burst to produce an intermediate frequency signal. Circuitry, responsive to the intermediate frequency signal indicates disturbances in the sensor field. Because the mixer mixes the transmitted burst with reflections of the transmitted burst, the burst width defines the sensor range. The burst repetition rate is randomly or pseudo-randomly modulated so that bursts in the sequence of bursts have a phase which varies. A second range-defining mode transmits two radio frequency bursts, where the time spacing between the bursts defines the maximum range divided by two. 12 figs.

  4. Pulse homodyne field disturbance sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A field disturbance sensor operates with relatively low power, provides an adjustable operating range, is not hypersensitive at close range, allows co-location of multiple sensors, and is inexpensive to manufacture. The sensor includes a transmitter that transmits a sequence of transmitted bursts of electromagnetic energy. The transmitter frequency is modulated at an intermediate frequency. The sequence of bursts has a burst repetition rate, and each burst has a burst width and comprises a number of cycles at a transmitter frequency. The sensor includes a receiver which receives electromagnetic energy at the transmitter frequency, and includes a mixer which mixes a transmitted burst with reflections of the same transmitted burst to produce an intermediate frequency signal. Circuitry, responsive to the intermediate frequency signal indicates disturbances in the sensor field. Because the mixer mixes the transmitted burst with reflections of the transmitted burst, the burst width defines the sensor range. The burst repetition rate is randomly or pseudo-randomly modulated so that bursts in the sequence of bursts have a phase which varies. A second range-defining mode transmits two radio frequency bursts, where the time spacing between the bursts defines the maximum range divided by two.

  5. HAZARDOUS WASTE LABEL DEPAUL UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefer, Marcus

    HAZARDOUS WASTE LABEL DEPAUL UNIVERSITY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY 5-4170 Corrosive Non- Hazardous Ignitable Reactive Toxic Oxidizer Other ( explain ) Generator Building Dept. HAZARDOUS WASTE LABEL DEPAUL UNIVERSITY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY 5-4170 HAZARDOUS WASTE LABEL DEPAUL UNIVERSITY

  6. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 91-338-2187, IMC Corporation, Sterlington, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiefer, M.; Tepper, A.; Miller, R.

    1992-03-01

    In response to a request from an authorized representative of the Construction and General Laborers Union, Local 762, an investigation was made of potential hazards for asbestos abatement contract workers at IMC Corporation, (SIC-2869), Sterlington, Louisiana. The IMC facility consisted of two ammonia facilities, a nitroparaffin (NP) facility, and a NP derivatives facility. An explosion occurred on May 1, 1991 in the NP facility, caused by a faulty compressor. During the post explosion renovation activities, an asbestos abatement firm was working on site due to the large amounts of asbestos (1332214) insulation which had been disturbed by the explosion. Records indicated that several workers complained of ill effects and odors on June 17 and 19. The incidents were investigated but no chemical exposure explanation was found. Routine and complaint based industrial hygiene monitoring was primarily area monitoring and not substance specific. Of the 25 workers interviewed, 22 had symptoms they felt were related to their work at IMC. The symptoms included those of the upper respiratory tract, central nervous system, and gastrointestinal system. The most common included diarrhea, nausea, headache, dizziness, and cough, each experienced by significantly more than half the subjects. The symptoms could not be linked conclusively to any specific chemical release, job task, work location, or food or drink source.

  7. WORKPLACE HAZARD ASSESSMENT Location: Task

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    WORKPLACE HAZARD ASSESSMENT Location: Task: Performed by: Date: This form may be used as an aid in performing hazard assessment. Review listed hazard classifications, identify all hazards, possible hazards and their sources. Hazard classification listing is not intended to be complete but is provided as a guide

  8. The Ecology of Risk in a Sunbelt City: A Multi-Hazard Analysis Amy Nelson, Bob Bolin, Ed Hackett, David Pijawka, Ed Sadalla, Diane Sicotte, Eric Matranga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    in the Phoenix, Arizona metropolitan area. The key focus is on the locations of hazardous industrial and toxic, and Disposal Facilities for hazardous substances, and Superfund sites are inequitably located in areas of potential risks produced by the colligation of point-source hazards in areas with disadvantaged populations

  9. Hazard Analysis Database Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GAULT, G.W.

    1999-10-13

    The Hazard Analysis Database was developed in conjunction with the hazard analysis activities conducted in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). The FSAR is part of the approved TWRS Authorization Basis (AB). This document describes, identifies, and defines the contents and structure of the TWRS FSAR Hazard Analysis Database and documents the configuration control changes made to the database. The TWRS Hazard Analysis Database contains the collection of information generated during the initial hazard evaluations and the subsequent hazard and accident analysis activities. The database supports the preparation of Chapters 3,4, and 5 of the TWRS FSAR and the USQ process and consists of two major, interrelated data sets: (1) Hazard Evaluation Database--Data from the results of the hazard evaluations; and (2) Hazard Topography Database--Data from the system familiarization and hazard identification.

  10. RECORD OF DESIGNATED SUBSTANCE ASSESSMENT SUBSTANCE: LEAD (plates and Gamma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    RECORD OF DESIGNATED SUBSTANCE ASSESSMENT SUBSTANCE: LEAD (plates and Gamma Source holder) DATE Direct / Indirect Per Month / Year Lead Mechanical Indirect No change Engineering CONCLUSIONS Read the plant? Product Title: Lead Type of Container: none Size of Container: not applicable 2. Is this form

  11. Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

  12. Hazard communication program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, E.A.

    1994-10-04

    Implements Internal Publication No. WHC-IP-0914. Section 1.1, providing management and employee guidance for working with hazardous chemicals and physical agents.

  13. Optimal Plant Shaping for High Bandwidth Disturbance Rejection in Discrete Disturbance Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    Chen and Masayoshi Tomizuka Abstract-- The Q-filter cut-off frequency in a Disturbance Observer (DOB to a small value. From the disturbance rejection point of view, the higher the cut-off frequency c@me.berkeley.edu robust compensator to attenuate the low frequency disturbance and to provide the required robust perfor

  14. Chapter 1 -Hazard Communication Hazard Communication and Training Act

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Training Act require employers to inform workers about hazardous chemicals in their work areas13 Chapter 1 - Hazard Communication Hazard Communication and Training Act The Hazard Communication and Safety (EH&S) to administer a program to comply with this law. Hazardous Chemicals Index EH&S maintains

  15. An OSHA based approach to safety analysis for nonradiological hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yurconic, M.

    1992-08-01

    The PNL method for chemical hazard classification defines major hazards by means of a list of hazardous substances (or chemical groups) with associated trigger quantities. In addition, the functional characteristics of the facility being classified is also be factored into the classification. In this way, installations defined as major hazard will only be those which have the potential for causing very serious incidents both on and off site. Because of the diversity of operations involving chemicals, it may not be possible to restrict major hazard facilities to certain types of operations. However, this hazard classification method recognizes that in the industrial sector major hazards are most commonly associated with activities involving very large quantities of chemicals and inherently energetic processes. These include operations like petrochemical plants, chemical production, LPG storage, explosives manufacturing, and facilities which use chlorine, ammonia, or other highly toxic gases in bulk quantities. The basis for this methodology is derived from concepts used by OSHA in its proposed chemical process safety standard, the Dow Fire and Explosion Index Hazard Classification Guide, and the International Labor Office`s program on chemical safety. For the purpose of identifying major hazard facilities, this method uses two sorting criteria, (1) facility function and processes and (2) quantity of substances to identify facilities requiringclassification. Then, a measure of chemical energy potential (material factor) is used to identify high hazard class facilities.

  16. An OSHA based approach to safety analysis for nonradiological hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yurconic, M.

    1992-08-01

    The PNL method for chemical hazard classification defines major hazards by means of a list of hazardous substances (or chemical groups) with associated trigger quantities. In addition, the functional characteristics of the facility being classified is also be factored into the classification. In this way, installations defined as major hazard will only be those which have the potential for causing very serious incidents both on and off site. Because of the diversity of operations involving chemicals, it may not be possible to restrict major hazard facilities to certain types of operations. However, this hazard classification method recognizes that in the industrial sector major hazards are most commonly associated with activities involving very large quantities of chemicals and inherently energetic processes. These include operations like petrochemical plants, chemical production, LPG storage, explosives manufacturing, and facilities which use chlorine, ammonia, or other highly toxic gases in bulk quantities. The basis for this methodology is derived from concepts used by OSHA in its proposed chemical process safety standard, the Dow Fire and Explosion Index Hazard Classification Guide, and the International Labor Office's program on chemical safety. For the purpose of identifying major hazard facilities, this method uses two sorting criteria, (1) facility function and processes and (2) quantity of substances to identify facilities requiringclassification. Then, a measure of chemical energy potential (material factor) is used to identify high hazard class facilities.

  17. Hazard Communication at Purdue University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    Hazard Communication at Purdue University Radiological and Environmental Management Written APPENDICES A OSHA Health Hazard Definitions B OSHA Method Of Hazard Determination C Expanded List Completed Work Area Forms HCP-4, HCP-5, HCP-8 I Health Hazard Warning Information 1. Health Hazard Rating 2

  18. WEATHER HAZARDS Basic Climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WEATHER HAZARDS Basic Climatology Colorado Climate Center Funding provided by NOAA Sectoral) Wildfires (Jun 02) Recent Declared Disasters in Colorado No Map from FEMA provided #12;National Weather and Warnings Outlook Indicates that hazardous weather may develop ­ useful to those who need considerable

  19. Federal Substance Abuse Testing Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-01-30

    The Order establishes the requirements and responsibilities for the DOE Federal Substance Abuse Testing Program which covers drug and alcohol testing. Supersedes DOE O 3792.3 Chg 1.

  20. Hazardous Waste Management (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New Mexico Environment Department's Hazardous Waste Bureau is responsible for the management of hazardous waste in the state. The Bureau enforces the rules established by the Environmental...

  1. Soil Disturbance from an Integrated Mechanical Forest Fuel Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    Soil Disturbance from an Integrated Mechanical Forest Fuel Reduction Operation in Southwest Oregon1 literature has quantified harvesting system effectiveness or soil disturbance concerns from such operations. This paper reports results of soil disturbance generated from an integrated forest harvesting

  2. Adaptive Algorithms for the Rejection of Sinusoidal Disturbances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas, Scott C.

    Adaptive Algorithms for the Rejection of Sinusoidal Disturbances with Unknown Frequency Marc Bodson Abstract Two algorithms are presented for the rejection of sinusoidal disturbances with un­ known frequency presented in which frequency estimation and disturbance cancellation are performed simultaneously. Ap

  3. Information-Disturbance theorem and Uncertainty Relation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takayuki Miyadera; Hideki Imai

    2007-07-31

    It has been shown that Information-Disturbance theorem can play an important role in security proof of quantum cryptography. The theorem is by itself interesting since it can be regarded as an information theoretic version of uncertainty principle. It, however, has been able to treat restricted situations. In this paper, the restriction on the source is abandoned, and a general information-disturbance theorem is obtained. The theorem relates information gain by Eve with information gain by Bob.

  4. Analysis of Periodic GrowthDisturbance Models Timothy C. Reluga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reluga, Tim

    and may include forest fires, volcanic eruptions, and hurricanes, occur quickly, perhaps over a period succession around disturbances like forest fires. Andrewartha and Birch (1978) proposed that disturbances

  5. Hazard Communication Site Specific Information Sheet Hazard Communication Program (HCP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    Hazard Communication Site Specific Information Sheet Hazard Communication Program (HCP) Site Specific Information The responsible party for a unit/area should complete this section to make the Hazard Communication Program site specific. The responsible party will ensure that the Hazard Communication Program

  6. Automated Job Hazards Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AJHA Program - The Automated Job Hazard Analysis (AJHA) computer program is part of an enhanced work planning process employed at the Department of Energy's Hanford worksite. The AJHA system is routinely used to performed evaluations for medium and high risk work, and in the development of corrective maintenance work packages at the site. The tool is designed to ensure that workers are fully involved in identifying the hazards, requirements, and controls associated with tasks.

  7. K Basin Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PECH, S.H.

    2000-08-23

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  8. HAZARD ANALYSIS SOFTWARE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sommer, S; Tinh Tran, T

    2008-04-08

    Washington Safety Management Solutions, LLC developed web-based software to improve the efficiency and consistency of hazard identification and analysis, control selection and classification, and to standardize analysis reporting at Savannah River Site. In the new nuclear age, information technology provides methods to improve the efficiency of the documented safety analysis development process which includes hazard analysis activities. This software provides a web interface that interacts with a relational database to support analysis, record data, and to ensure reporting consistency. A team of subject matter experts participated in a series of meetings to review the associated processes and procedures for requirements and standard practices. Through these meetings, a set of software requirements were developed and compiled into a requirements traceability matrix from which software could be developed. The software was tested to ensure compliance with the requirements. Training was provided to the hazard analysis leads. Hazard analysis teams using the software have verified its operability. The software has been classified as NQA-1, Level D, as it supports the analysis team but does not perform the analysis. The software can be transported to other sites with alternate risk schemes. The software is being used to support the development of 14 hazard analyses. User responses have been positive with a number of suggestions for improvement which are being incorporated as time permits. The software has enforced a uniform implementation of the site procedures. The software has significantly improved the efficiency and standardization of the hazard analysis process.

  9. Hazardous Working Policy November 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    for: The management of University workers performing hazardous tasks or working in hazardous areas;2 Hazardous Areas: are areas where a University worker may be exposed to risks that are considered greater1 Hazardous Working Policy November 2012 Introduction The University of Surrey acknowledges

  10. State of Colorado Wildfire Hazard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    State of Colorado Wildfire Hazard Mitigation Plan Colorado Multi-Hazards Mitigation Plan July 2002 and importance of the August 1995 Wildfire Hazard Mitigation Plan and its predecessors as foundation documents on which to build and judge progress in wildfire hazard mitigation. The text version of the 1995 Plan

  11. Chemical process hazards analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

  12. Identification of Aircraft Hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Ashley

    2006-12-08

    Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174235], Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based upon limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and upon crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a monitored geologic repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain, using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987 [DIRS 103124], Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of identified aircraft hazards based upon the criteria that apply to Category 1 and Category 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 [DIRS 176544] (Section 4). The scope of this report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the repository at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (Section 7).

  13. Leibniz: a metaphysic of substances 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernier, Mark Christopher

    2006-08-16

    substance is the union of body and soul, and he dedicates much of his thought to understanding the mystery of this union. However, there is a divide among scholars over what he proposes as a solution. Many have judged that for Leibniz... and Phenomenalism," Studia Leibnitiana 18 (1986): 38-51. 6 can be no union between a body and soul (that is, a corporeal substance) if there are no bodies to be unified with souls. There is only the non-material. So in answer to the question "what...

  14. Hazardous fluid leak detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Harold E. (Las Vegas, NV); McLaurin, Felder M. (Las Vegas, NV); Ortiz, Monico (Las Vegas, NV); Huth, William A. (Las Vegas, NV)

    1996-01-01

    A device or system for monitoring for the presence of leaks from a hazardous fluid is disclosed which uses two electrodes immersed in deionized water. A gas is passed through an enclosed space in which a hazardous fluid is contained. Any fumes, vapors, etc. escaping from the containment of the hazardous fluid in the enclosed space are entrained in the gas passing through the enclosed space and transported to a closed vessel containing deionized water and two electrodes partially immersed in the deionized water. The electrodes are connected in series with a power source and a signal, whereby when a sufficient number of ions enter the water from the gas being bubbled through it (indicative of a leak), the water will begin to conduct, thereby allowing current to flow through the water from one electrode to the other electrode to complete the circuit and activate the signal.

  15. In many locations, disturbance is an important factor affecting the haul-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    disturbance. In addition to aircraft, sources of disturbance include boats, seismic exploration, pedestrians

  16. Substance and Skepticism in Hume's Treatise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Nathan Robert

    2011-04-25

    as regards substance and the immateriality of the soul. An amendment to the Theologians' arguments examines the advantage of substituting the concept of `action' for the concept of `modification' in arguments for the existence of substance. Hume rejects both...

  17. Missouri Hazardous Waste Management Law (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Hazardous Waste Program, administered by the Hazardous Waste Management Commission in the Department of Natural Resources, regulates the processing, transportation, and disposal of hazardous...

  18. Hazardous waste sites and housing appreciation rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCluskey, Jill; Rausser, Gordon C.

    2000-01-01

    WORKING PAPER NO. 906 HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES AND HOUSINGEconomics January 2000 Hazardous Waste Sites and Housingand RF. Anderson, Hazardous waste sites: the credibility

  19. Geological Hazards Labs Spring 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Po

    Geological Hazards Labs Spring 2010 TA: En-Jui Lee (http://www.gg.uwyo.edu/ggstudent/elee8/site - An Indispensible Tool in Hazard Planning 3 26/1; 27/1 Lab 2: Geologic Maps - Mapping the Hazards 4 2/2; 3/2 Lab 3: Population - People at Risk 5 9/2; 10/2 Lab 4: Plate Tectonics - Locating Geologic Hazards 6 16/2; 17/2 Lab 5

  20. Written Hazard Communication (HAZCOM) Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    chemicals The potential hazards of chemicals in the work area How to protect yourself from these potential for their respective work areas MSDS's shall be maintained by each department for all hazardous chemicals&S office has developed several employee training modules for specific work areas and hazardous materials

  1. Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS Items that could cut or puncture skin or trash- can without any treatment. Hazardous Glass and Plastic: Items that can puncture, cut or scratch if disposed a significant hazard. Bags of misc. plasticware that has been autoclaved to remove bio contamination. Syringe

  2. Hazard Sampling Dialog General Layout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Tao

    1 Hazard Sampling Dialog General Layout The dialog's purpose is to display information about the hazardous material being sampled by the UGV so either the system or the UV specialist can identify the risk level of the hazard. The dialog is associated with the hazmat reading icons (Table 1). Components

  3. Appendix C: Hazardous Property Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddharthan, Advaith

    Appendix C: Hazardous Property Assessment The aim of this appendix is to: · give advice on the hazards properties H1 to H14 identified in Annex III of the HWD; · provide assessment methods and threshold concentrations for the hazards; and · advise on which test methods should be considered

  4. Project plan, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center: Project 95L-EWT-100

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borgeson, M.E.

    1994-11-09

    The Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center will provide for classroom lectures and hands-on practical training in realistic situations for workers and emergency responders who are tasked with handling and cleanup of toxic substances. The primary objective of the HAMMER project is to provide hands-on training and classroom facilities for hazardous material workers and emergency responders. This project will also contribute towards complying with the planning and training provisions of recent legislation. In March 1989 Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Safety and Health Administration 1910 Rules and National Fire Protection Association Standard 472 defined professional requirements for responders to hazardous materials incidents. Two general types of training are addressed for hazardous materials: training for hazardous waste site workers and managers, and training for emergency response organizations.

  5. PUREX facility hazards assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, L.N.

    1994-09-23

    This report documents the hazards assessment for the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX) located on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. Operation of PUREX is the responsibility of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). This hazards assessment was conducted to provide the emergency planning technical basis for PUREX. DOE Order 5500.3A requires an emergency planning hazards assessment for each facility that has the potential to reach or exceed the lowest level emergency classification. In October of 1990, WHC was directed to place PUREX in standby. In December of 1992 the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management authorized the termination of PUREX and directed DOE-RL to proceed with shutdown planning and terminal clean out activities. Prior to this action, its mission was to reprocess irradiated fuels for the recovery of uranium and plutonium. The present mission is to establish a passively safe and environmentally secure configuration at the PUREX facility and to preserve that condition for 10 years. The ten year time frame represents the typical duration expended to define, authorize and initiate follow-on decommissioning and decontamination activities.

  6. Chicago Office NEPA Tracking Number U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    safety, and health? 2. Require the sitting, construction or major expansion of waste treatment, storage, or u disposal facilities? 3. Disturb hazardous substances,...

  7. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities...

  8. Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Safety Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Presented by Kevin R. Blackwell, Radioactive Materials Program Manager. Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials...

  9. The radioactive Substances (Testing Instruments) Exemption Order 1962 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keith, Joseph

    1962-01-01

    STATUTORY INSTRUMENTS 1962 No. 2643 ATOMIC ENERGY AND RADIOACTIVE SUBSTANCES The Radioactive Substances (Testing Instruments) Exemption Order 1962

  10. The radioactive Substances (Irradiated Material) Exemption Order 1962 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Keith

    1962-01-01

    STATUTORY INSTRUMENTS 1962 No. 2647 ATOMIC ENERGY AND RADIOACTIVE SUBSTANCES The Radioactive Substances (Irradiated Material) Exemption Order 1962

  11. The radioactive Substances (Civil Defence) Exemption Order 1962 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keith, Joseph

    1962-01-01

    STATUTORY INSTRUMENTS 1962 No. 2641 ATOMIC ENERGY AND RADIOACTIVE SUBSTANCES The Radioactive Substances (Civil Defence) Exemption Order 1962

  12. The radioactive Substances (Uranium and Thorium) Exemption Order 1962 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Keith

    1962-01-01

    STATUTORY INSTRUMENTS 1962 No.2710 ATOMIC ENERGY AND RADIOACTIVE SUBSTANCES The Radioactive Substances (Uranium and Thorium) Exemption Order 1962

  13. University of California, Irvine Environmental Health and Safety www.ehs.uci.edu Questions Call: (949) 824-6200 Version 2.0 Only substances that meet all of the following criteria are allowed down the sanitary sewer drain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    the sanitary sewer drain: 1. Non-hazardous · No radioactive waste · No hazardous chemical waste · No untreated if a substance is allowed to go down the sanitary sewer drain at UCI. Material Common drain disposal questions Compounds · Other Chemicals Material Can it go down the sanitary sewer drain? Waste Management Biomedical

  14. Hazardous Waste Management Overview The Five L's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    Hazardous Waste Management Overview The Five L's CoLLect CoLLect all hazardous chemical waste are unsure if your chemical waste is a Hazardous Waste, consult EH&S at hazmat@columbia.edu. DO NOT - Dispose of Hazardous Waste inappropriately or prior to determining its hazards. Hazardous Waste must never

  15. Tracking and disturbance rejection for passive nonlinear systems Bayu Jayawardhana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sontag, Eduardo

    signals of frequency . If the reference and disturbance signals are periodic, then the internal modelTracking and disturbance rejection for passive nonlinear systems Bayu Jayawardhana Abstract tracking of constant reference signal and disturbance rejection of a finite superposition of sine waves

  16. Disturbance and Landscape Dynamics The Rocky Mountains, Lander's Peak, 1863

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    environment. (Pickett and White 1985) Defining and Quantifying Disturbance #12;Frequency - number a specified time. Defining and Quantifying Disturbance #12;Frequency: none Frequency: 250-500 yrs SeverityBioe 515 Disturbance and Landscape Dynamics #12;The Rocky Mountains, Lander's Peak, 1863 Albert

  17. Fire and Sudden Oak Death in Coast Redwood Forests: Effects of Two Distinct Disturbances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramage, Benjamin Sean

    2011-01-01

    2009. Effects of disturbance frequency, species traits andinclude disturbance type, frequency, scale/size, intensity,frequency, intensity), or they may result from entirely new disturbance

  18. Disturbance Cancellation by State Derivative Feedback with Application to Ramp-Connected Surface Effect Ships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basturk, Halil I.

    for only single frequency wave disturbance. This feature ofsinusoidal disturbances with unknown frequency,” Automatica,soidal disturbances with unknown frequency,” Automatica, 33,

  19. Realtime controller tuning for periodic disturbance rejection with application to active noise control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinney, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    precisely model the disturbance frequency and therefore manyknowledge of the disturbance frequency. To overcome this,perturbations in the disturbance frequency. Steinbuch [2002

  20. Hazards assessment for the Hazardous Waste Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knudsen, J.K.; Calley, M.B.

    1994-04-01

    This report documents the hazards assessment for the Hazardous Waste Storage Facility (HWSF) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The hazards assessment was performed to ensure that this facility complies with DOE and company requirements pertaining to emergency planning and preparedness for operational emergencies. The hazards assessment identifies and analyzes hazards that are significant enough to warrant consideration in a facility`s operational emergency management program. The area surrounding HWSF, the buildings and structures at HWSF, and the processes used at HWSF are described in this report. All nonradiological hazardous materials at the HWSF were identified (radiological hazardous materials are not stored at HWSF) and screened against threshold quantities according to DOE Order 5500.3A guidance. Two of the identified hazardous materials exceeded their specified threshold quantity. This report discusses the potential release scenarios and consequences associated with an accidental release for each of the two identified hazardous materials, lead and mercury. Emergency considerations, such as emergency planning zones, emergency classes, protective actions, and emergency action levels, are also discussed based on the analysis of potential consequences. Evaluation of the potential consequences indicated that the highest emergency class for operational emergencies at the HWSF would be a Site Area Emergency.

  1. Methods of contacting substances and microsystem contactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward E [Kennewick, WA; Rassat, Scot D [Benton City, WA; Stenkamp, Victoria S [Richland, WA

    2005-05-22

    A microchannel contactor and methods of contacting substances in microchannel apparatus are described. Some preferred embodiments are combined with microchannel heat exchange.

  2. Federal program for regulating highly hazardous materials finally takes off

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lessard, P.C. [Block Environmental Services Inc., Pleasant Hill, CA (United States)

    1996-11-01

    The Risk Management Program (RMP) rule, Section 112(r) of the Clean Air Act (CAA), was signed on May 24 and finalized on June 20. RMP is one of the most comprehensive, technically based regulatory programs for preventing, detecting and responding to accidental hazardous materials releases to have been issued in recent times. Although facilities have three years to comply, EPA estimates that the rule will affect an estimated 66,000 facilities that store highly hazardous or acutely toxic materials. The 1990 CAA Amendments are designed to prevent accidental releases of highly hazardous chemicals from stationary sources. Two significant regulatory programs that have emerged from the revised CAA are the Process Safety Management (PSM) standard and RMP. PSM is designed to protect employees and regulated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. RMP`s purpose is to protect the public and the environment from highly hazardous chemicals. It authorizes EPA to create a list of substances (distinct from the list generated under PSM) known to cause serious adverse effects and to implement a program for accidental chemical release prevention.

  3. Hazard Lewis Farms Collection Binghamton University Libraries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Hazard Lewis Farms Collection Binghamton University Libraries Special Collections Hazard Lewis and University Archives #12;Hazard Lewis Farms Collection Biographical Note The Hazard Lewis Farm was situated Hazard Lewis, one of the early pioneer settlers of Broome County. Colonel Lewis at one time with Christor

  4. HAZARD ALERT ENVIRONMENT HEALTH AND SAFETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    HAZARD ALERT ENVIRONMENT HEALTH AND SAFETY EH&S Hazard Alert - 2010.06.18 HAZARD ALERT ­ Reaction Manual. http://www.ucalgary.ca/safety/files/safety/LaboratoryFumeHoodUserStandard.pdf #12;HAZARD ALERT ENVIRONMENT HEALTH AND SAFETY EH&S Hazard Alert - 2010.06.18 In the recent incident the sash was closed while

  5. REPORT NO. 8 radiation hazards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REPORT NO. 8 REVISED guidance for the control of radiation hazards in uranium mining SEPTEMBER 1967 OF RADIATION HAZARDS IN URANIUM MINING SEPTEMBER 1967 Staff Report of the FEDERAL RADIATION COUNCIL #12;FEDERAL...... .... .._ _.... Section I. Introduction. . . Section II. The Radiation Environment AssociatedWith Uranium Mining. Section

  6. HEALTH AND HAZARD ASSESSMENT QUESTIONNAIRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Andrew J.

    1 HEALTH AND HAZARD ASSESSMENT QUESTIONNAIRE The information on this form will be kept strictly the property of the University Health Service of the University of Newcastle. The University of Newcastle is committed to achieving a safe and healthy workplace for its staff. Based on the completed Health and Hazard

  7. Hazardous Waste Management Standards and Regulations (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act states the standards and regulations for the management of hazardous waste. No person shall construct, modify or operate a hazardous waste facility or otherwise dispose of hazardous waste...

  8. Columbia University Hazardous Waste Room Inspection Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    Storage Area Hazardous Waste Room Inspection Report Location: Bldg. Room: Date: Inspected ByColumbia University Hazardous Waste Room Inspection Report Flammable Storage Area Lack Pack always closed while holding hazardous wastes? Comment: 12. Are containers labeled? Date

  9. Simulating the Impacts of Disturbances on Forest Carbon Cycling...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    America: Processes, Data, Models, and Challenges Disturbances disrupt the forest structures and alter forest resources, substrate availability, or the physical environment....

  10. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Potential for anthropogenic disturbances to influence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchings, Jeffrey A.

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Potential for anthropogenic disturbances to influence evolutionary change that resulted from hydropower dam construction, some juveniles now migrate as yearlings, but more interestingly

  11. Electric Disturbance Events (OE-417) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electric Emergency Incident and Disturbance Report (Form OE-417) collects information on electric incidents and emergencies. The Department of Energy uses the information to...

  12. Advanced Membrane Systems: Recovering Wasteful and Hazardous...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Membrane Systems: Recovering Wasteful and Hazardous Fuel Vapors at the Gasoline Tank Advanced Membrane Systems: Recovering Wasteful and Hazardous Fuel Vapors at the...

  13. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Conroy U S Department of Transportation - 1 - U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety...

  14. Sandia Energy - Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Photovoltaics Solar Market Transformation Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool Solar...

  15. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolker, A.; Sarofim, A.F.; Palmer, C.A.; Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Lighty, J.; Veranth, J.; Helble, J.J.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Ames, M.R.; Finkelman, R.; Mamani-Paco, M.; Sterling, R.; Mroczkowsky, S.J.; Panagiotou, T.; Seames, W.

    1999-05-10

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UK), the University of Connecticut (UC), the University of Utah (UU) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environ-mental Research Center (EERC) to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NOx combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI's existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). This report covers the reporting period from 1 January 1999 to 31 March 1999. During this period, a full Program Review Meeting was held at the University of Arizona. At this meeting, the progress of each group was reviewed, plans for the following 9 month period were discussed, and action items (principally associated with the transfer of samples and reports among the various investigators) were identified.

  16. The radioactive Substances (Testing Instruments) Exemption (Scotland)Order 1962 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, Michael

    1962-01-01

    STATUTORY INSTRUMENTS 1962 No. 2764 (S. 124) ATOMIC ENERGY AND RADIOACTIVE SUBSTANCES The Radioactive Substances (Testing instruments) Exemption (Scotland) Order 1962

  17. The radioactive Substances (Prepared Uranium Thorium Compounds) Exemption Order 1962 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Keith

    1962-01-01

    STATUTORY INSTRUMENTS 1962 No. 2711 ATOMIC ENERGY AND RADIOACI1VE SUBSTANCES The Radioactive Substances (prepared Uranium and Thorium Compounds) Exemption Order 1962

  18. Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facility...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facility Compliance Agreement Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facility Compliance Agreement Toxic...

  19. Health Hazards in Indoor Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logue, Jennifer M.

    2012-01-01

    Health Hazards in Indoor Air. In Proceedings of the 2010for VOCs from post-1990 indoor air concentration studies inUnion project on indoor air pollutants. Allergy, 2008. 63(

  20. Toxic hazards of underground excavation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.; Chitnis, V.; Damasian, M.; Lemm, M.; Popplesdorf, N.; Ryan, T.; Saban, C.; Cohen, J.; Smith, C.; Ciminesi, F.

    1982-09-01

    Inadvertent intrusion into natural or man-made toxic or hazardous material deposits as a consequence of activities such as mining, excavation or tunnelling has resulted in numerous deaths and injuries in this country. This study is a preliminary investigation to identify and document instances of such fatal or injurious intrusion. An objective is to provide useful insights and information related to potential hazards due to future intrusion into underground radioactive-waste-disposal facilities. The methodology used in this study includes literature review and correspondence with appropriate government agencies and organizations. Key categories of intrusion hazards are asphyxiation, methane, hydrogen sulfide, silica and asbestos, naturally occurring radionuclides, and various mine or waste dump related hazards.

  1. LOG HAZARD REGRESSION Huiying Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heckman, Nancy E.

    LOG HAZARD REGRESSION by Huiying Sun Ph.D, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, CHINA, 1991 .................................................................... .................................................................... .................................................................... .................................................................... THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA September, 1999 c flHuiying Sun, 1999 #12; Abstract We propose using

  2. Rev. Date: June 6, 2013 1 Particularly Hazardous Substances Class SOP Chemical Class Standard Operating Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    -Butadiene diepoxide 2. Synthesis of di-hydroxyl di-nitrate from 1,3-butadiene diepoxide. Chemical(s) Use(s) Isoprene 1. Making 5 ppm isoprene gas mixture in N2 1,3. Used as an NMR solvent pyrromethene 597 (2,6-di-tert- butyl-8-nonyl-1,3

  3. JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND HEALTH Part A--Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockne, Karl J.

    be promising for in situ bioremediation following NAPL extraction. Key Words: Reductive dechlorination; Bioremediation; Ethyl lactate; Perchloroethene; Tetrachloroethene; Chloroethene; Green chemistry; Solvent- water aquifers and may exist as dense nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) due to their higher density

  4. Program to monitor Department of Energy workers exposed to hazardous and radioactive substances

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuildingBudget | Department PrimusPetroleumProgram1st4thTITLE 50

  5. Preliminary hazards analysis -- vitrification process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coordes, D.; Ruggieri, M.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P.

    1994-06-01

    This paper presents a Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for mixed waste vitrification by joule heating. The purpose of performing a PHA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PHA is then followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title 1 and 2 design. The PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during the facility`s construction and testing. It should be completed before routine operation of the facility commences. This PHA addresses the first four chapters of the safety analysis process, in accordance with the requirements of DOE Safety Guidelines in SG 830.110. The hazards associated with vitrification processes are evaluated using standard safety analysis methods which include: identification of credible potential hazardous energy sources; identification of preventative features of the facility or system; identification of mitigative features; and analyses of credible hazards. Maximal facility inventories of radioactive and hazardous materials are postulated to evaluate worst case accident consequences. These inventories were based on DOE-STD-1027-92 guidance and the surrogate waste streams defined by Mayberry, et al. Radiological assessments indicate that a facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous materials assessment indicates that a Mixed Waste Vitrification facility will be a Low Hazard facility having minimal impacts to offsite personnel and the environment.

  6. Bibliography of work on the photocatalytic removal of hazardous compounds from water and air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, D.M.

    1994-05-01

    This is a bibliography of information in the open literature on work that has been done to date on the photocatalytic oxidation of compounds, principally organic compounds. The goal of the listing is removing hazardous oompounds from water or air. It contains lists of substances and literature citations. The bibliography includes information obtained through the middle of 1993 and some selected references for the balance of that year.

  7. Climate and coastal dune vegetation: disturbance, recovery, and succession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Thomas E.

    Climate and coastal dune vegetation: disturbance, recovery, and succession Thomas E. Miller Æ Elise. Foredune, interdune, and backdune habitats common to most coastal dunes have very different vegetation deterministic trajectories. Keywords Dune habitats Á Succession Á Disturbance Á Coastal vegetation Á Hurricane Á

  8. Design of Vibration Absorbers for Step Motions and Step Disturbances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singhose, William

    Design of Vibration Absorbers for Step Motions and Step Disturbances Joel Fortgang William Singhose Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 Mechanical or from external disturbances. The technique of adding a vibration ab- sorber has proven useful

  9. ORIGINAL PAPER Winter westerly disturbance dynamics and precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Charles

    ORIGINAL PAPER Winter westerly disturbance dynamics and precipitation in the western Himalaya, allowing for a comprehensive study of the factors that relate WWD to orographic precipitation of disturbances, the state of the background environ- ment during their propagation, and precipitation totals

  10. Toxicities of selected substances to freshwater biota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hohreiter, D.W.

    1980-05-01

    The amount of data available concerning the toxicity of various substances to freshwater biota is so large that it is difficult to use in a practical situation, such as environmental impact assessment. In this document, summary tables are presented showing acute and/or chronic toxicity of selected substances for various groups of aquatic biota. Each entry is referenced to its original source so that details concerning experimental conditions may be consulted. In addition, general information concerning factors modifying toxicity, synergisms, evidence of bioaccumulation, and water quality standards and criteria for the selected substances is given. The final table is a general toxicity table designed to provide an easily accessible and general indication of toxicity of selected substances in aquatic systems.

  11. System and method for identifying, reporting, and evaluating presence of substance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Maurice (Kansas City, MO); Lusby, Michael (Kansas City, MO); Van Hook, Arthur (Lotawana, MO); Cook, Charles J. (Raytown, MO); Wenski, Edward G. (Lenexa, KS); Solyom, David (Overland Park, KS)

    2012-02-14

    A system and method for identifying, reporting, and evaluating a presence of a solid, liquid, gas, or other substance of interest, particularly a dangerous, hazardous, or otherwise threatening chemical, biological, or radioactive substance. The system comprises one or more substantially automated, location self-aware remote sensing units; a control unit; and one or more data processing and storage servers. Data is collected by the remote sensing units and transmitted to the control unit; the control unit generates and uploads a report incorporating the data to the servers; and thereafter the report is available for review by a hierarchy of responsive and evaluative authorities via a wide area network. The evaluative authorities include a group of relevant experts who may be widely or even globally distributed.

  12. System and method for identifying, reporting, and evaluating presence of substance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Maurice (Kansas City, MO); Lusby, Michael (Kansas City, MO); Van Hook, Arthur (Lake Lotawana, MO); Cook, Charles J. (Raytown, MO); Wenski, Edward G. (Lenexa, KS); Solyom, David (Overland Park, KS)

    2006-10-24

    A system and method for identifying, reporting, and evaluating a presence of a solid, liquid, gas, or other substance of interest, particularly a dangerous, hazardous, or otherwise threatening chemical, biological, or radioactive substance. The system comprises one or more substantially automated, location self-aware remote sensing units; a control unit; and one or more data processing and storage servers. Data is collected by the remote sensing units and transmitted to the control unit; the control unit generates and uploads a report incorporating the data to the servers; and thereafter the report is available for review by a hierarchy of responsive and evaluative authorities via a wide area network. The evaluative authorities include a group of relevant experts who may be widely or even globally distributed.

  13. System And Method For Identifying, Reporting, And Evaluating Presence Of Substance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Maurice (Kansas City, MO); Lusby, Michael (Kansas City, MO); Hook, Arthur Van (Lake Lotawana, MO); Cook, Charles J. (Raytown, MO); Wenski, Edward G. (Lenexa, KS); Solyom, David (Overland Park, KS)

    2005-09-20

    A system and method for identifying, reporting, and evaluating a presence of a solid, liquid, gas, or other substance of interest, particularly a dangerous, hazardous, or otherwise threatening chemical, biological, or radioactive substance. The system comprises one or more substantially automated, location self-aware remote sensing units; a control unit; and one or more data processing and storage servers. Data is collected by the remote sensing units and transmitted to the control unit; the control unit generates and uploads a report incorporating the data to the servers; and thereafter the report is available for review by a hierarchy of responsive and evaluative authorities via a wide area network. The evaluative authorities include a group of relevant experts who may be widely or even globally distributed.

  14. Hazardous Materials Alert Departmental Contact(s)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Hazardous Materials Alert Departmental Contact(s): Name ___________________________________________________________________________________ Hazardous Materials Alert If the release of a hazardous chemical or gas is affecting people in your area yourself at risk. 2. isOlATE the hazardous material by clearing the area, close the doors. If safe to do so

  15. LEARNERS GUIDE FOR RESPONSIBLE HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portman, Douglas

    1 LEARNERS GUIDE FOR RESPONSIBLE HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL WASTE MANAGEMENT UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER the effects of improper hazardous waste management and disposal. Each person who works with hazardous is managed by the Hazardous Waste Management Unit (HWMU) of Facilities and Services. To contact HWMU dial x

  16. Hazard % free free espresso Over Run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dill, David L.

    Total Products Hazard­ Hazard­ % free free espresso­ Over­ Run­ name in/out Method exact head time 5 0 1 dme­fast­opt 5/3 8 8 0 1 Table 2. Comparison of Hazard­Free Logic Minimization with espresso­level hazard­free minimization prob­ lem for several reasons: the general problem has not pre­ viously been

  17. CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY 12.A GENERAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    EM 385-1-1 XX Jun 13 12-1 SECTION 12 CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY 12.A GENERAL 12.A.01 When working on or near any system that produces, uses, or stores hazardous energy, a hazardous energy control program (HECP) is required see 12.B. Hazardous energy is any energy, including but not limited to mechanical (e

  18. CRAD, Hazardous Waste Management- December 4, 2007

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hazardous Waste Management Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 64-30)

  19. Hydrothermal Liquefaction Treatment Preliminary Hazard Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowry, Peter P.; Wagner, Katie A.

    2015-08-31

    A preliminary hazard assessment was completed during February 2015 to evaluate the conceptual design of the modular hydrothermal liquefaction treatment system. The hazard assessment was performed in 2 stages. An initial assessment utilizing Hazard Identification and Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) techniques identified areas with significant or unique hazards (process safety-related hazards) that fall outside of the normal operating envelope of PNNL and warranted additional analysis. The subsequent assessment was based on a qualitative What-If analysis. This analysis was augmented, as necessary, by additional quantitative analysis for scenarios involving a release of hazardous material or energy with the potential for affecting the public.

  20. Household Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    over a larger area and releases them into the air. Pouring hazardous liquids on the ground can poisonHousehold Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion should be considered hazardous. You cannot treat hazardous wastes like other kinds of garbage

  1. Increasing Resiliency to Natural Hazards: A Strategic Plan for the Multi-Hazards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleskes, Joe

    Increasing Resiliency to Natural Hazards: A Strategic Plan for the Multi-Hazards Demonstration Survey #12;#12;Increasing Resiliency to Natural Hazards--A Strategic Plan for the Multi-Hazards on the USGS--the Federal source for science about the Earth, its natural and living resources, natural hazards

  2. Activity Hazard Assessment 6.0 Page 1 of 6 Activity Hazard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluwihare, Lihini

    Activity Hazard Assessment 6.0 Page 1 of 6 Activity Hazard Assessment Tool This form must Hazard Assessment specific to activities in their laboratories. The Activity Hazard Assessment identifies hazards to employees and specifies personal protective equipment (PPE) to protect employees during work

  3. Laboratory Hazard Assessment Tool UC Laboratory Hazard Assessment v11 UC Regents Page 1 of 28

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluwihare, Lihini

    Laboratory Hazard Assessment Tool UC Laboratory Hazard Assessment v11 © UC Regents Page 1 of 28 This Laboratory Hazard Assessment Tool (LHAT) facilitates identification of hazards and identifies the Personal or personnel. The LHAT will provide a summary report of hazards present in the laboratory and the PPE

  4. Criteria and Processes for the Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous and Non-Hazardous Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominick, J

    2008-12-18

    This document details Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) criteria and processes for determining if potentially volumetrically contaminated or potentially surface contaminated wastes are to be managed as material containing residual radioactivity or as non-radioactive. This document updates and replaces UCRL-AR-109662, Criteria and Procedures for the Certification of Nonradioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 1), also known as 'The Moratorium', and follows the guidance found in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) document, Performance Objective for Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 2). The 1992 Moratorium document (UCRL-AR-109662) is three volumes and 703 pages. The first volume provides an overview of the certification process and lists the key radioanalytical methods and their associated Limits of Sensitivities. Volumes Two and Three contain supporting documents and include over 30 operating procedures, QA plans, training documents and organizational charts that describe the hazardous and radioactive waste management system in place in 1992. This current document is intended to update the previous Moratorium documents and to serve as the top-tier LLNL institutional Moratorium document. The 1992 Moratorium document was restricted to certification of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), State and Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) hazardous waste from Radioactive Material Management Areas (RMMA). This still remains the primary focus of the Moratorium; however, this document increases the scope to allow use of this methodology to certify other LLNL wastes and materials destined for off-site disposal, transfer, and re-use including non-hazardous wastes and wastes generated outside of RMMAs with the potential for DOE added radioactivity. The LLNL organization that authorizes off-site transfer/disposal of a material or waste stream is responsible for implementing the requirements of this document. The LLNL Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) organization is responsible for the review and maintenance of this document. It should be noted that the DOE metal recycling moratorium is still in effect and is implemented as outlined in reference 17 when metals are being dispositioned for disposal/re-use/recycling off-site. This document follows the same methodology as described in the previously approved 1992 Moratorium document. Generator knowledge and certification are the primary means of characterization. Sampling and analysis are used when there is insufficient knowledge of a waste to determine if it contains added radioactivity. Table 1 (page 12) presents a list of LLNL's analytical methods for evaluating volumetrically contaminated waste and updates the reasonably achievable analytical-method-specific Minimum Detectable Concentrations (MDCs) for various matrices. Results from sampling and analysis are compared against the maximum MDCs for the given analytical method and the sample specific MDC to determine if the sample contains DOE added volumetric radioactivity. The evaluation of an item that has a physical form, and history of use, such that accessible surfaces may be potentially contaminated, is based on DOE Order 5400.5 (Reference 3), and its associated implementation guidance document DOE G 441.1-XX, Control and Release of Property with Residual Radioactive Material (Reference 4). The guidance document was made available for use via DOE Memorandum (Reference 5). Waste and materials containing residual radioactivity transferred off-site must meet the receiving facilities Waste Acceptance Criteria (if applicable) and be in compliance with other applicable federal or state requirements.

  5. Effects of hazardous wastes on housing and urban development and mitigation of impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, K.R.; Conrad, E.T.; Kane, P.F.; McLaughlin, M.W.; Morgan, J.T.

    1980-10-10

    This report determines the nature and scope of the hazardous waste problem affecting HUD programs and community development and redevelopment activities. It defines the problem and develops categories of hazardous wastes most applicable to HUD. The report identifies sources of hazardous waste and gives examples of their impacts. The role of HUD and other agencies in controlling hazardous waste is reviewed, and recommendations are made for mitigating known and potential impacts. Three case studies -- in Dover Township and Elizabeth, N.J., and in Richmond, Va., illustrate the wide range of impacts made possible because of improper handling of or lack of appreciation for hazardous substances. The report suggests that a Hazard Identification Guidebook be developed, similar to others addressing housing safety and noise assessment, that would require HUD personnel to carry out a number of investigations on and around a site. This process is briefly described here and could serve as a basis for a guidebook. Flow charts illustrate this process. Tables and 23 references are supplied.

  6. Volcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, Guatemala 1111

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    Volcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, Guatemala 11111 Open-File Report 01­431Open-File Report 01

  7. Waste Issues Associated with the Safe Movement of Hazardous Chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dare, J. H.; Cournoyer, M. E.

    2002-02-26

    Moving hazardous chemicals presents the risk of exposure for workers engaged in the activity and others that might be in the immediate area. Adverse affects are specific to the chemicals and can range from minor skin, eye, or mucous membrane irritation, to burns, respiratory distress, nervous system dysfunction, or even death. A case study is presented where in the interest of waste minimization; original shipping packaging was removed from a glass bottle of nitric acid, while moving corrosive liquid through a security protocol into a Radiological Control Area (RCA). During the transfer, the glass bottle broke. The resulting release of nitric acid possibly exposed 12 employees with one employee being admitted overnight at a hospital for observation. This is a clear example of administrative controls to reduce the generation of suspect radioactive waste being implemented at the expense of employee health. As a result of this event, material handling procedures that assure the safe movement of hazardous chemicals through a security protocol into a radiological control area were developed. Specifically, hazardous material must be transferred using original shipping containers and packaging. While this represents the potential to increase the generation of suspect radioactive waste in a radiological controlled area, arguments are presented that justify this change. Security protocols for accidental releases are also discussed. In summary, the 12th rule of ''Green Chemistry'' (Inherently Safer Chemistry for Accident Prevention) should be followed: the form of a substance used in a chemical process (Movement of Hazardous Chemicals) should be chosen to minimize the potential for chemical accidents, including releases.

  8. A meta-analysis of soil microbial biomass responses to forest disturbances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holden, Sandra R; Treseder, Kathleen K

    2013-01-01

    linked increases in disturbance frequency will affect soilthe frequency and severity of forest disturbances, withfrequency and severity of distur- bance events in forests. Our results imply that these disturbance

  9. Geographic patterns of diversity in streams are predicted by a multivariate model of disturbance and productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardinale, Bradley J; Hillebrand, H; Charles, D F

    2006-01-01

    of productivity and disturbance frequency, and an increasing= ?4.81, P disturbance frequency (b 4 = ?4.57 ±stream lati- tude and disturbance frequency (r = 0.03, P =

  10. University of Nevada, Reno Plant Community Invasibility in Riparian Landscapes: Role of Disturbance,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weisberg, Peter J.

    , diversions, and inter-basin water transfers alter disturbance regimes (flood frequency, magnitude, timingUniversity of Nevada, Reno Plant Community Invasibility in Riparian Landscapes: Role of Disturbance GRACE MORTENSON entitled Plant Community Invasibility in Riparian Landscapes: Role of Disturbance

  11. The steady-state mosaic of disturbance and succession across an old-growth Central Amazon forest landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    on return frequencies for episodic disturbances, a balancereturn frequency of succession-inducing disturbances, variesEpisodic disturbance events with return frequencies greater

  12. Particle transport and energization associated with disturbed magnetospheric events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Particle transport and energization associated with disturbed magnetospheric events Sorin Zaharia field locations and are energized because of magnetic mo­ ment conservation. The most energized is based on an Earthward propagating electromagnetic field pulse: par­ ticles are energized via

  13. Particle transport and energization associated with disturbed magnetospheric events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Particle transport and energization associated with disturbed magnetospheric events Sorin Zaharia field locations and are energized because of magnetic mo- ment conservation. The most energized propagating electromagnetic field pulse: par- ticles are energized via the betatron acceleration mechanism

  14. Drilling and coring methods that minimize the disturbance of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Drilling and coring methods that minimize the disturbance of cuttings, core, and rock formation in the unsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada Hammermeister, D.P.; Blout, D.O.;...

  15. Title III hazardous air pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, R.

    1995-12-31

    The author presents an overview of the key provisions of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The key provisions include the following: 112(b) -- 189 Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP); 112(a) -- Major Source: 10 TPY/25 TPY; 112(d) -- Application of MACT; 112(g) -- Modifications; 112(I) -- State Program; 112(j) -- The Hammer; and 112(r) -- Accidental Release Provisions.

  16. A Green Laser Pointer Hazard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jemellie Galang; Allesandro Restelli; Edward W. Hagley; Charles W. Clark

    2010-08-09

    An inexpensive green laser pointer was found to emit 20 mW of infrared radiation during normal use. This is potentially a serious hazard that would not be noticed by most users of such pointers. We find that this infrared emission derives from the design of the pointer, and describe a simple method of testing for infrared emissions using common household items.

  17. Abatement of Air Pollution: Hazardous Air Pollutants (Connecticut...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    allowable stack concentrations and hazard limiting values for the emission of hazardous air pollutants. The regulations also discuss sampling procedures for hazardous air...

  18. Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials More Documents & Publications The...

  19. Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials More Documents & Publications...

  20. Chlorine Gas: An Evolving Hazardous Material Threat and Unconventional Weapon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Robert; Wills, Brandon; Kang, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Chlorine Gas: An Evolving Hazardous Material Threat andChlorine gas represents a hazardous material threat fromrepresents a persistent hazardous material (HAZMAT) threat.

  1. Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Management Act (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act contains regulations for safe disposal of hazardous waste, and establishes that a valid license is required to collect, transport, store, treat, use, or dispose of hazardous waste. Short...

  2. Owning Hazard, A Tragedy Barbara Young Welke*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    693 Owning Hazard, A Tragedy Barbara Young Welke* In Memory of Frances Young Welke (March 21, 1992 in the ownership of hazard from the individuals who suffered injury, to the enterprises involved in manufacturing

  3. Characterizations of the Proportional (Reversed) Hazard Class

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Debasis

    Characterizations of the Proportional (Reversed) Hazard Class Debasis Kundu Department Abstract In this paper we provide two simple characterizations of the proportional (reversed) hazard class, generalized exponential, Rayleigh, Burr type X, exponentiated Weibull belong to the proportional (reversed

  4. Suggested Approaches for Probabilistic Flooding Hazard Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Suggested Approaches for Probabilistic Flooding Hazard Assessment Ahmed “Jemie” Dababneh, Ph.D., P.E. and Jeffrey Oskamp, E.I.T. Presentation for U.S. Department of Energy Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting October 22, 2014

  5. University of Florida Hazard Communication Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    in the following areas with regard to the inventoried hazardous chemicals to which I am exposed: a. The chemical involving them in my work area. c. The proper and safe handling of the hazardous chemicals. d. The location chemicals. f. The physical and health hazards of the chemicals in my work area. g. Methods to protect myself

  6. CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY Table Of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    EM 385-1-1 XX Sep 13 i Section 12 CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY Table Of Contents Section: Page 12.A General.................. .............................................. ... .12-1 12.B Hazardous Energy.......................................................12-6 #12;EM 385-1-1 XX Sep 13 12-1 SECTION 12 CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY 12.A GENERAL 12.A.01 When

  7. Hazard & Disaster Management College of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Hazard & Disaster Management College of Science 09 For further information about the University Postgraduate Programmes #12;PostgraduateProgrammes in Hazard & Disaster Management Postgraduate Diploma - BSc by risk management. These programmes aim to develop skills of hazard and disaster management through

  8. Hazardous Waste Management Overview The Five L's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    Hazardous Waste Management Overview The Five L's CoLLect CoLLect all hazardous chemical waste and submit a chemical waste pick-up request form for proper disposal. Periodically evaluate your chemical are unsure if your chemical waste is a Hazardous Waste, consult EH&S at hazmat@columbia.edu. DO

  9. Multivariate Distributions with Proportional Reversed Hazard Marginals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Debasis

    Multivariate Distributions with Proportional Reversed Hazard Marginals Debasis Kundu1 & Manuel Franco2 & Juana-Maria Vivo3 Abstract Several univariate proportional reversed hazard models have been a class of bivariate models with proportional reversed hazard marginals. It is observed that the proposed

  10. SEISMIC HAZARD AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT IN TURRIALBA, COSTA RICA Seismic hazard and vulnerability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SEISMIC HAZARD AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT IN TURRIALBA, COSTA RICA I Seismic hazard and vulnerability assessment in Turrialba, Costa Rica Rafael German Urban Lamadrid March 2002 #12;SEISMIC HAZARD AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT IN TURRIALBA, COSTA RICA II Seismic hazard and vulnerability assessment in Turrialba

  11. This document details how to manage hazardous waste with multiple hazards. Waste Management Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    This document details how to manage hazardous waste with multiple hazards. Waste Management Procedures · Always manage hazardous waste as the highest ranked waste in the hazardous waste hierarchy Waste Solids Place in solid radioactive waste box. Radioactive Waste Liquids Place in liquid radioactive

  12. Focus Sheet | Hazardous Waste Checklist How to be ready for state hazardous waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    storage cabinet. Avoid accumulating a lot of waste ­ keep areas clear. EPO ­ Hazardous Waste Checklist 07Focus Sheet | Hazardous Waste Checklist How to be ready for state hazardous waste inspectors. See a hazardous waste inspection. ons, rrosive. n hemicals? ical waste. Waste-like chemicals have als Are you

  13. Risoe International Energy conference, May 2003 New Energy, new hazard ?New Energy, new hazard ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risoe International Energy conference, May 2003 New Energy, new hazard ?New Energy, new hazard technologies expectations 3. Does hydrogen introduce any new hazard ? 4. Are fuel cell safe ? 5. Is there any organisation, ! Area of interest : - industrial hazard (fire and explosion), - chronic pollution (air, soil

  14. Simulation of landscape disturbances and the effect of climatic change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, W.L.

    1993-01-29

    The purpose of this research is to understand how changes in climate may affect the structure of landscapes that are subject to periodic disturbances. A general model useful for examining the linkage between climatic change and landscape change has been developed. The model makes use of synoptic climatic data, a geographical information system (GRASS), field data on the location of disturbance patches, simulation code written in the SIMSCRIPT language, and a set of landscape structure analysis programs written specifically for this research project. A simplified version of the model, lacking the climatic driver, has been used to analyze how changes in disturbance regimes (in this case settlement and fire suppression) affect landscape change. Landscape change lagged in its response to changes in the disturbance regime, but the lags differed depending upon the character of the change and the particular measure considered. The model will now be modified for use in a specific setting to analyze the effects of changes in climate on the structure of flood-disturbed patches along the Animas River, Colorado.

  15. Detection device for hazardous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Partin, Judy K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grey, Alan E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01

    A detection device that is activated by the interaction of a hazardous chcal with a coating interactive with said chemical on an optical fiber thereby reducing the amount of light passing through the fiber to a light detector. A combination of optical filters separates the light into a signal beam and a reference beam which after detection, appropriate amplification, and comparison with preset internal signals, activates an alarm means if a predetermined level of contaminant is observed.

  16. Detection device for hazardous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Partin, Judy K.; Grey, Alan E.

    1994-04-05

    A detection device that is activated by the interaction of a hazardous chcal with a coating interactive with said chemical on an optical fiber thereby reducing the amount of light passing through the fiber to a light detector. A combination of optical filters separates the light into a signal beam and a reference beam which after detection, appropriate amplification, and comparison with preset internal signals, activates an alarm means if a predetermined level of contaminant is observed.

  17. Hazard Avoidance in Wireless Sensor and Actor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivakumar, Raghupathy

    Hazard Avoidance in Wireless Sensor and Actor Networks Ramanuja Vedantham Zhenyun Zhuang Prof [Akyildiz'04] Network Low bandwidth (Hazards Hazards undesirable changes in the environment Reason for hazards Different latencies For different sensors and actors

  18. The Globally Harmonized System for Hazard Communication (GHS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capogna, Luca

    The Globally Harmonized System for Hazard Communication (GHS) University of Arkansas Facilities groups. · GHS is based on major existing systems around the world, including OSHA's Hazard Communication to hazard communication, providing agreed upon criteria for classification of chemical hazards

  19. OIKOS 92: 215224. Copenhagen 2001 Sequence effects of disturbance on community structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukami, Tadashi

    on the frequency or intensity of disturbance, probably reflecting the influence of the intermediate disturbance. This divergence occurred even under the same frequency and intensity of disturbance. These results suggestOIKOS 92: 215­224. Copenhagen 2001 Sequence effects of disturbance on community structure Tadashi

  20. Self-tuning for disturbance transmission decoupling in active vehicle suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Ken

    sources of disturbance inputs to a vehicle suspension. One is a high frequency road disturbance due frequency load disturbance is typically due to load and inertial forces experienced by, or generatedSelf-tuning for disturbance transmission decoupling in active vehicle suspensions Mark C. Readman

  1. vol. 157, no. 5 the american naturalist may 2001 Disturbance Regimes and Life-History Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -history the- ory. "Disturbance regime" is defined in terms of disturbance timing, frequency, predictability 1988; Turner et al. 1998) have suggested that the frequency of disturbances relative to an organismvol. 157, no. 5 the american naturalist may 2001 Disturbance Regimes and Life-History Evolution

  2. Waste Toolkit A-Z Electrical (non-hazardous)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melham, Tom

    Waste Toolkit A-Z Electrical (non-hazardous) What are non-hazardous electrical items? Non-hazardous of non-haz WEEE? Departments must make their own arrangements (and pay for) for the collection of non-hazardous not be used for the disposal of non-hazardous waste. What is considered hazardous? If your waste is classified

  3. Revegetation studies on oil shale related disturbances in Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redente, E.F.; Cook, C.W.

    1982-06-01

    An interdisciplinary research project was initiated in 1976 to provide both basic and applied information that would aid in the reestablishment of natural functioning ecosystems on land disturbances associated with energy development. The approach included field, laboratory, and greenhouse experiments designed to provide both structural and functional information about disturbed ecological systems in the semiarid west. This report presents results from the sixth year of the study. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each of the 4 studies reported for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  4. Hazard Labeling Elements 1. Product identifier: how the hazardous chemical is identified. This can be (but is not

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Hazard Labeling Elements 1. Product identifier: how the hazardous chemical is identified. This can of severity of hazard and alert the reader to a potential hazard on the label. There are only two signal words, "Danger" and "Warning." Within a specific hazard class, "Danger" is used for the more severe hazards

  5. NGNP SITE 2 HAZARDS ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne Moe

    2011-10-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project initiated at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) by the U.S. Department of Energy pursuant to the 2005 Energy Policy Act, is based on research and development activities supported by the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative. The principal objective of the NGNP Project is to support commercialization of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology. The HTGR is a helium-cooled and graphite-moderated reactor that can operate at temperatures much higher than those of conventional light water reactor (LWR) technologies. Accordingly, it can be applied in many industrial applications as a substitute for burning fossil fuels, such as natural gas, to generate process heat in addition to producing electricity, which is the principal application of current LWRs. Nuclear energy in the form of LWRs has been used in the U.S. and internationally principally for the generation of electricity. However, because the HTGR operates at higher temperatures than LWRs, it can be used to displace the use of fossil fuels in many industrial applications. It also provides a carbon emission-free energy supply. For example, the energy needs for the recovery and refining of petroleum, for the petrochemical industry and for production of transportation fuels and feedstocks using coal conversion processes require process heat provided at temperatures approaching 800 C. This temperature range is readily achieved by the HTGR technology. This report summarizes a site assessment authorized by INL under the NGNP Project to determine hazards and potential challenges that site owners and HTGR designers need to be aware of when developing the HTGR design for co-location at industrial facilities, and to evaluate the site for suitability considering certain site characteristics. The objectives of the NGNP site hazard assessments are to do an initial screening of representative sites in order to identify potential challenges and restraints to be addressed in design and licensing processes; assure the HTGR technology can be deployed at variety of sites for a range of applications; evaluate potential sites for potential hazards and describe some of the actions necessary to mitigate impacts of hazards; and, provide key insights that can inform the plant design process. The report presents a summary of the process methodology and the results of an assessment of hazards typical of a class of candidate sites for the potential deployment of HTGR reactor technology. The assessment considered health and safety, and other important siting characteristics to determine the potential impact of identified hazards and potential challenges presented by the location for this technology. A four reactor module nuclear plant (2000 to 2400 MW thermal), that co-generates steam, electricity for general use in the plant, and hot gas for use in a nearby chemical processing facility, to provide the requisite performance and reliability was assumed for the assessment.

  6. Hazardous and Radioactive Mixed Waste

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1982-12-31

    To establish hazardous waste management procedures for facilities operated under authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (AEA). The procedures will follow. to the extent practicable, regulations issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). Although Department of Energy (DOE) operations conducted under authority other than the AEA are subject to EPA or State regulations conforming with RCRA, facilities administered under the authority of the AEA are not bound by such requirements.

  7. ORIGINAL PAPER Disturbances to great bustards (Otis tarda)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seoane, Javier

    is essential to design management plans for species or areas of special conservation interest (Ramírez Sanz et on birds have shown that human- induced disturbances may affect the energy budget of individuals (Tucker 1969; Riddington et al. 1996), their foraging efficiency (Burger and Gochfeld 1991; Burger 1994

  8. Rill erosion in natural and disturbed forests: 1. Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    , but measurements of the runoff and erosion at the rill scale are uncommon. Simulated rill erosion experiments were and agricultural use, and forest disturbances that increase erosion have a broad human impact. [3] Various forms of agriculture, timber harvest, wildfire, and construction. Ero- sion experiments under natural

  9. Coseismic ionospheric disturbances triggered by the ChiChi earthquake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yuh-Ing

    Coseismic ionospheric disturbances triggered by the ChiChi earthquake J. Y. Liu,1,2 H. F. Tsai,3 C on 20 September 1999, a large earthquake of magnitude Mw 7.6 struck the central Taiwan near a small townChi earthquake. When the CIDs travel away from the origin on the Earth surface and then propagate

  10. Simulation of landscape disturbances and the effect of climatic change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, W.L.

    1993-04-01

    Altering the natural disturbance regime of a landscape produces changes in the structure of that landscape as the landscape adjusts to the new disturbance regime. A computer simulation model was designed to enable analyses of the longterm changes to be expected in landscapes as their disturbance regime changes. The model, DISPATCH, is the first dynamic spatial simulation model built around a geographical information system (GIS). The model also includes a new set of programs, the r.le programs, that is the first set of programs designed for calculating landscape structure measures within a GIS. The DISPATCH model was used, to analyze the effects of human alterations of disturbance regimes and global change on landscape structure. Landscapes do not adjust quickly to these alterations based on available data. Landscapes subjected to warming or to longterm fire suppression experience a decline in patch richness, Shannon diversity, the amount of edge and contrast, but an increase in distance between patches, angular second moment (texture measure) and patch size. In contrast, landscapes subjected to cooling, the short-term effects of fire suppression, fragmentation, or traditional prescribed burning tend to respond with increasing richness, Shannon diversity, edge, and contrast, but declining distance, angular second moment, and size. The pattern of response is different at different scales, with important implications for species.

  11. the wave model A traveling wave is an organized disturbance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winokur, Michael

    1 waves the wave model A traveling wave is an organized disturbance propagating at a well-defined wave speed v. · In transverse waves the particles of the medium move perpendicular to the direction of wave propagation. · In longitudinal waves the particles of the medium move parallel to the direction

  12. Sensitivity of climate mitigation strategies to natural disturbances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Page, Yannick LB; Hurtt, George; Thomson, Allison M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Patel, Pralit L.; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Janetos, Anthony C.

    2013-02-19

    The present and future concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide depends on both anthropogenic and natural sources and sinks of carbon. Most proposed climate mitigation strategies rely on a progressive transition to carbon12 efficient technologies to reduce industrial emissions, substantially supported by policies to maintain or enhance the terrestrial carbon stock in forests and other ecosystems. This strategy may be challenged if terrestrial sequestration capacity is affected by future climate feedbacks, but how and to what extent is little understood. Here, we show that climate mitigation strategies are highly sensitive to future natural disturbance rates (e.g. fires, hurricanes, droughts), because of potential effect of disturbances on the terrestrial carbon balance. Generally, altered disturbance rates affect the pace of societal and technological transitions required to achieve the mitigation target, with substantial consequences on the energy sector and on the global economy. Understanding the future dynamics and consequences of natural disturbances on terrestrial carbon balance is thus essential for developing robust climate mitigation strategies and policies

  13. Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Safety Rail Routing Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing Presentation made by Kevin Blackwell for the NTSF annual meeting held from May 14-16,...

  14. CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Duck O.

    Biological Safety Officer Ergonomic Specialist 2723 Radiation Safety 2250 Facilities Management Office 2125. ANNUAL REVIEW AND EVALUATION OF EFFECTIVENESS OF THE CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN 9. HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN

  15. Hazardous Waste Management System-General (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides general regulations regarding hazardous waste, including landfills. Specific passages refer to the...

  16. Identification of Hazards, 3/9/95

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's hazards identification programs.  Surveillance activities encompass maintenance and implementation of safety...

  17. Mr. James Bearzi Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bearzi Hazardous Waste Bureau Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O . Box 3090 Carlsbad. New Mexico 88221 May 26, 2009 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 E. Rodeo...

  18. Hazardous Material Packaging for Transport - Administrative Procedures

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1986-09-30

    To establ1sh administrative procedures for the certification and use of radioactive and other hazardous materials packaging by the Department of Energy (DOE).

  19. Vermont Conditionally Exempt Generator Handbook: A Hazardous...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conditionally Exempt Generator Handbook: A Hazardous Waste Management Guide for Smaller Vermont Business Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  20. Hazards Control, 3/9/35

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's programs and policy for establishing controls to mitigate hazards affecting the public, worker, and...

  1. Substance Abuse Testing Program | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutory Authority for anStudy: Algae CouldSubstance Abuse Testing

  2. Lessons learned from the EG&G consolidated hazardous waste subcontract and ESH&Q liability assessment process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N.J.

    1995-03-01

    Hazardous waste transportation, treatment, recycling, and disposal contracts were first consolidated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in 1992 by EG&G Idaho, Inc. At that time, disposition of Resource, Conservation and Recovery Act hazardous waste, Toxic Substance Control Act waste, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act hazardous substances and contaminated media, and recyclable hazardous materials was consolidated under five subcontracts. The wastes were generated by five different INEL M&O contractors, under the direction of three different Department of Energy field offices. The consolidated contract reduced the number of facilities handling INEL waste from 27 to 8 qualified treatment, storage, and disposal facilities, with brokers specifically prohibited. This reduced associated transportation costs, amount and cost of contractual paperwork, and environmental liability exposure. EG&G reviewed this approach and proposed a consolidated hazardous waste subcontract be formed for the major EG&G managed DOE sites: INEL, Mound, Rocky Flats, Nevada Test Site, and 10 satellite facilities. After obtaining concurrence from DOE Headquarters, this effort began in March 1992 and was completed with the award of two master task subcontracts in October and November 1993. In addition, the effort included a team to evaluate the apparent awardee`s facilities for environment, safety, health, and quality (ESH&Q) and financial liability status. This report documents the evaluation of the process used to prepare, bid, and award the EG&G consolidated hazardous waste transportation, treatment, recycling, and/or disposal subcontracts and associated ESH&Q and financial liability assessments; document the strengths and weaknesses of the process; and propose improvements that would expedite and enhance the process for other DOE installations that used the process and for the re-bid of the consolidated subcontract, scheduled for 1997.

  3. Hazardous Chemical Waste Management Reference Guide for Laboratories 9 1 Identification of Hazardous Chemical Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    Hazardous Chemical Waste Management Reference Guide for Laboratories 9 1 · Identification of Hazardous Chemical Waste OBJECTIVES Do you know how to do the following? If you do, skip ahead to Minimization of Hazardous Waste section. If you do not, continue on in this section. · Determine whether

  4. Journal of Hazardous Materials 132 (2006) 98110 Assessment of environmental radon hazard using human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    2006-01-01

    Journal of Hazardous Materials 132 (2006) 98­110 Assessment of environmental radon hazard using Abstract Radon is a natural radioactive gas derived from geological materials. It has been estimated to assess the health hazard from environmental radon is reviewed. A short history of dosimetric models

  5. Fire and explosion hazards of oil shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The US Bureau of Mines publication presents the results of investigations into the fire and explosion hazards of oil shale rocks and dust. Three areas have been examined: the explosibility and ignitability of oil shale dust clouds, the fire hazards of oil shale dust layers on hot surfaces, and the ignitability and extinguishment of oil shale rubble piles. 10 refs., 54 figs., 29 tabs.

  6. Avoiding Mold Hazards In Your Flooded Home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avoiding Mold Hazards In Your Flooded Home A flood-damaged home requires special attention to avoid or correct a mold population explosion. Mold is likely to multiply on materials that stay wet for more than two or three days. The longer mold is allowed to grow, the greater the hazard and the harder

  7. Energy and solid/hazardous waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-12-01

    This report addresses the past and potential future solid and hazardous waste impacts from energy development, and summarizes the major environmental, legislation applicable to solid and hazardous waste generation and disposal. A glossary of terms and acronyms used to describe and measure solid waste impacts of energy development is included. (PSB)

  8. Variation in physiological responses of forest trees to disturbance: implications for future forest carbon and management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Alexis S.

    2012-05-31

    Rapid environmental change in recent decades has challenged Ecologists to focus on understanding ecosystem response and physiological functioning in the face of increased disturbances. Understanding physiological responses of trees to disturbance...

  9. Major Disturbance Events in Terrestrial Ecosystems Detected using Global Satellite Data Sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vipin

    disturbance events, we estimate that nearly 9 Pg of carbon could have been lost from the terrestrial biosphere, hurricanes, floods, droughts, lava flows, and ice storms. Biogenic disturbance categories include the impacts

  10. Some effects of metastable substance observed in erosive discharges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emelin, S E

    2002-01-01

    The brief characteristic of a place and state of modern experimental investigations of a ball lightning on the basis of metastable substance is given.

  11. Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Toxic Substance Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (TSCA-UE- FFCA), February 20, 1992 State Kentucky Agreement Type Compliance Agreement Legal...

  12. Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Toxic Substance Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (TSCA-UE- FFCA), February 20, 1992 State Ohio Agreement Type Compliance Agreement Legal...

  13. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 8, 577586, 2008 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/8/577/2008/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 8, 577­586, 2008 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/8 Hazards and Earth System Sciences Integrated approach for coastal hazards and risks in Sri Lanka M. Garcin the importance of knowledge and the taking into account of coastal hazards. Sri Lanka was one of the countries

  14. LAB HAZARD CHECKLIST Please check the hazards that are associated with your lab and complete the section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    LAB HAZARD CHECKLIST Please check the hazards that are associated with your lab and complete of Environmental Health and Safety. HAZARDS: Biological Hazard ­ Biosafety levels 2 or 3 organisms present Laser Radiation Hazards ­Any work involving class 3b or 4 lasers Flammable Gas ­ Compressed gas cylinders

  15. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 553561, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/553/2006/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 553­561, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/553/2006/ © Author(s) 2006. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Natural Hazards and Earth System Introduction Risk consists of hazard and vulnerability. We can define "hazard" like "a threatening event

  16. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 637651, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/637/2006/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 637­651, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/637/2006/ © Author(s) 2006. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Natural Hazards and Earth System Hazards and Landscape (BFW), Department of Natural Hazards and Alpine Timberline, Innsbruck, Austria 3

  17. Hazard Priority and Remediation Hazards are prioritized according to the severity of the resulting injury, potential damage, and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Hazard Priority and Remediation Hazards are prioritized according to the severity of the resulting injury, potential damage, and the probability of occurrence. Imminent and serious procedures or hazards Description Correction Date 1 EMERGENCY HAZARD Emergency Hazards threaten life safety or health, property

  18. Vibration Isolation with High Strain Shape Memory Alloy Actuators: Case of the impulse disturbance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayward, Vincent

    disturbance, while an active stage is used to aug- ment low frequency damping and provide attenuationVibration Isolation with High Strain Shape Memory Alloy Actuators: Case of the impulse disturbance disturbance on a mass to be isolated from vibrations. The vibration isolation testbed consists of a `strong

  19. Oecologia (2000) 124:270279 Springer-Verlag 2000 Abstract Disturbance frequency, intensity, and areal ex-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCabe, Declan

    2000-01-01

    Oecologia (2000) 124:270­279 © Springer-Verlag 2000 Abstract Disturbance frequency, intensity The intensity, frequency, and area of disturbance may de- termine the abundance and species richness of an assem for recoloniza- tion. If disturbance frequency is greater than the rate of competitive exclusion, diversity may

  20. CONTROLLABILITY MEASURES FOR DISTURBANCE Sigurd Skogestad \\Lambda and Erik A. Wolff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    limitations. 6. Maximum disturbance range For all six problems we obtain frequency­dependent measures and Matsubara (1985) discuss the direction of combined disturbances in the frequency domain using the singularCONTROLLABILITY MEASURES FOR DISTURBANCE REJECTION Sigurd Skogestad \\Lambda and Erik A. Wolff

  1. 778 Forest Science 49(5) 2003 Spatial and Temporal Disturbance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rentch, James

    with gaps disturbance frequency and size distribution of canopy gaps suggest to large and small openings. The absence of significant changes in overstory disturbance frequencies disturbance frequencies. He also provided a helpful review of the initial draft. Scientific Article No. 2842

  2. Author's personal copy Canopy disturbance and tree recruitment over two centuries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pederson, Neil

    , particularly reconstructing disturbance size, shape, frequency, and severity, is fundamental for developmentAuthor's personal copy Canopy disturbance and tree recruitment over two centuries in a managed 2007 Abstract Disturbance history was reconstructed across an 11300 ha managed longleaf pine (Pinus

  3. On Disturbance Propagation in Vehicle Formations with Inter-vehicle Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Vijay

    of the frequency response magnitude of the transfer function from a deterministic disturbance at the leadingOn Disturbance Propagation in Vehicle Formations with Inter-vehicle Communication Yingbo Zhao, Paolo Minero, and Vijay Gupta Abstract-- This paper focuses on disturbance propagation in a formation

  4. THE HISTORY OF HUMAN DISTURBANCE IN FOREST ECOSYSTEMS OF SOUTHERN INDIANA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    conditions and influenced the frequency and intensity of disturbances, such as fire. The interplay THE HISTORY OF HUMAN DISTURBANCE IN FOREST ECOSYSTEMS OF SOUTHERN INDIANA Michael A. Jenkins1 Abstract.--The forests of southern Indiana have been shaped and defined by anthropogenic disturbance

  5. Vibration Suppression and Optimal Repetitive Disturbance Rejection Control in Semi-Nyquist Frequency Region using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujimoto, Hiroshi

    suppression and disturbance rejec- tion even in the semi-Nyquist frequency region. First, the continuous and to reject disturbance in high frequency re- gion because the Nyquist frequency is relatively low-sample performance to reject disturbance in the semi-Nyquist frequency region [6]. On the other hand, authors

  6. First decadal response to treatment in a disturbance-based silviculture experiment in Maine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Robert G.

    ) in central Maine, that was designed to emulate the annual 1% disturbance frequency typicalFirst decadal response to treatment in a disturbance-based silviculture experiment in Maine Justin 3 April 2011 Available online xxxx Keywords: Irregular shelterwood Expanding gap Disturbance

  7. SYNTHESIS Disturbance-driven changes in the variability of ecological patterns and processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraterrigo, Jennifer

    by considering disturbance extent, frequency and intensity, as well as ecosystem recovery, and thereby capturesREVIEW AND SYNTHESIS Disturbance-driven changes in the variability of ecological patterns Understanding how disturbance shapes the dynamics of ecological systems is of fundamental importance in ecology

  8. Species traits predict the effects of disturbance and productivity on diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddad, Nick

    that ­ alone or in concert ­ increasing disturbance intensity or frequency, or decreasing productivity, reducedLETTER SpeciesÕ traits predict the effects of disturbance and productivity on diversity Nick M, University of Colorado, UCB 334, Boulder CO 80309, USA. Abstract Disturbance is an important factor

  9. 3) What makes a species invasive? i) Disturbance and land use hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    changes in the extent and frequency of disturbance to an ecosystem #12;3) What makes a species invasive? i3) What makes a species invasive? i) Disturbance and land use hypothesis Basic concepts: · Many;3) What makes a species invasive? i) Disturbance and land use hypothesis Basic concepts: · Invasive

  10. Final Report Survey of Hazardous Trees on Marine Corps Depot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    1 Final Report Survey of Hazardous Trees on Marine Corps Depot Parris Island, South ............................................................................................................................... 10 Hazard Rating and Attributes ................................................................................................................... 26 #12;3 Abstract Surveying for hazardous trees is the first step

  11. A Hazardous Inquiry: The Rashomon Effect at Love Canal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortunato, Mary Beth

    2000-01-01

    Review: A Hazardous Inquiry: The Rashomon Effect at LoveUSA Mazur, Allan. A Hazardous Inquiry: The Rashomon EffectISBN 0674748336. A Hazardous Inquiry: The Rashomon Effect at

  12. Audit of Selected Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program Costs...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Selected Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program Costs, ER-B-97-04 Audit of Selected Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program Costs, ER-B-97-04 Audit of Selected Hazardous...

  13. Hazardous constituent source term. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-17

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has several facilities that either generate and/or store transuranic (TRU)-waste from weapons program research and production. Much of this waste also contains hazardous waste constituents as regulated under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Toxicity characteristic metals in the waste principally include lead, occurring in leaded rubber gloves and shielding. Other RCRA metals may occur as contaminants in pyrochemical salt, soil, debris, and sludge and solidified liquids, as well as in equipment resulting from decontamination and decommissioning activities. Volatile organic compounds (VOCS) contaminate many waste forms as a residue adsorbed on surfaces or occur in sludge and solidified liquids. Due to the presence of these hazardous constituents, applicable disposal regulations include land disposal restrictions established by Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA). The DOE plans to dispose of TRU-mixed waste from the weapons program in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by demonstrating no-migration of hazardous constituents. This paper documents the current technical basis for methodologies proposed to develop a post-closure RCRA hazardous constituent source term. For the purposes of demonstrating no-migration, the hazardous constituent source term is defined as the quantities of hazardous constituents that are available for transport after repository closure. Development of the source term is only one of several activities that will be involved in the no-migration demonstration. The demonstration will also include uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of contaminant transport.

  14. Apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Robert C. W. (Martinez, GA)

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for incinerating wastes, including an incinerator having a combustion chamber, a fluidtight shell enclosing the combustion chamber, an afterburner, an off-gas particulate removal system and an emergency off-gas cooling system. The region between the inner surface of the shell and the outer surface of the combustion chamber forms a cavity. Air is supplied to the cavity and heated as it passes over the outer surface of the combustion chamber. Heated air is drawn from the cavity and mixed with fuel for input into the combustion chamber. The pressure in the cavity is maintained at least approximately 2.5 cm WC (about 1" WC) higher than the pressure in the combustion chamber. Gases cannot leak from the combustion chamber since the pressure outside the chamber (inside the cavity) is higher than the pressure inside the chamber. The apparatus can be used to treat any combustible wastes, including biological wastes, toxic materials, low level radioactive wastes, and mixed hazardous and low level transuranic wastes.

  15. Apparatus for transporting hazardous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Osterman, Robert A. (Canonsburg, PA); Cox, Robert (West Mifflin, PA)

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method are provided for selectively receiving, transporting, and releasing one or more radioactive or other hazardous samples for analysis on a differential thermal analysis (DTA) apparatus. The apparatus includes a portable sample transporting apparatus for storing and transporting the samples and includes a support assembly for supporting the transporting apparatus when a sample is transferred to the DTA apparatus. The transporting apparatus includes a storage member which includes a plurality of storage chambers arrayed circumferentially with respect to a central axis. An adjustable top door is located on the top side of the storage member, and the top door includes a channel capable of being selectively placed in registration with the respective storage chambers thereby permitting the samples to selectively enter the respective storage chambers. The top door, when closed, isolates the respective samples within the storage chambers. A plurality of spring-biased bottom doors are located on the bottom sides of the respective storage chambers. The bottom doors isolate the samples in the respective storage chambers when the bottom doors are in the closed position. The bottom doors permit the samples to leave the respective storage chambers from the bottom side when the respective bottom doors are in respective open positions. The bottom doors permit the samples to be loaded into the respective storage chambers after the analysis for storage and transport to a permanent storage location.

  16. Apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, R.C.W.

    1994-12-20

    An apparatus is described for incinerating wastes, including an incinerator having a combustion chamber, a fluid-tight shell enclosing the combustion chamber, an afterburner, an off-gas particulate removal system and an emergency off-gas cooling system. The region between the inner surface of the shell and the outer surface of the combustion chamber forms a cavity. Air is supplied to the cavity and heated as it passes over the outer surface of the combustion chamber. Heated air is drawn from the cavity and mixed with fuel for input into the combustion chamber. The pressure in the cavity is maintained at least approximately 2.5 cm WC higher than the pressure in the combustion chamber. Gases cannot leak from the combustion chamber since the pressure outside the chamber (inside the cavity) is higher than the pressure inside the chamber. The apparatus can be used to treat any combustible wastes, including biological wastes, toxic materials, low level radioactive wastes, and mixed hazardous and low level transuranic wastes. 1 figure.

  17. CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of...

  18. Approaches for Developing Uniform Hazard Spectra at Critical...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hazard Spectra at Critical Facilities Preliminary Assessment of the Impact of 2014 Seismic Study on WTP Design Evaluation of the SRS Seismic Hazard Considering the EPRI 2013...

  19. Order Module--self-study program: HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    self-study program: HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE Order Module--self-study program: HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE This module will discuss...

  20. DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria for DOE...

  1. Operating Experience Level 3, OSHA's Revised Hazard Communication...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    June 5, 2012 OE-3 2012-04: OSHA's Revised Hazard Communication Standard This Operating Experience Level 3 provides informaiton on the OSHA Revised Hazard Communication Standard. On...

  2. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, Waste Analysis Plan The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, Waste Analysis Plan This...

  3. Review of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Requirements Currently...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Review of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Requirements Currently Applied to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) Review of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH)...

  4. Globalization and Hazardous Waste Management: From Brown to Green?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Kate

    2002-01-01

    perspectives on hazardous waste management. London: Academicproblems of hazardous waste management at a global level. ”future in toxic waste management: lessons from Europe. New

  5. A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    hazards caused by explosive volcanic activity. The hazard posed by fine silicate ash with long residence time in the atmosphere is probably much less serious than...

  6. Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with Comparisons to Other Source Emissions Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with...

  7. Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schiffbauer, William H. (Connellsville, PA); Ganoe, Carl W. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1999-01-01

    A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation thereof. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine.

  8. Hazards Control Department annual technology review, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, R.V.; Anderson, K.J.

    1988-07-01

    This document describes some of the research performed in the LLNL Hazards Control Department from October 1986 to September 1987. The sections in the Annual report cover scientific concerns in the areas of Health Physics, Industrial Hygiene, Industrial Safety, Aerosol Science, Resource Management, Dosimetry and Radiation Physics, Criticality Safety, and Fire Science. For a broader overview of the types of work performed in the Hazards Control Department, we have also compiled a selection of abstracts of recent publications by Hazards Control employees. Individual reports are processed separately for the data base.

  9. Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schiffbauer, W.H.; Ganoe, C.W.

    1999-08-17

    A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine. 3 figs.

  10. Hazardous waste operational plan for site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, R.S.

    1982-02-12

    This plan outlines the procedures and operations used at LLNL's Site 300 for the management of the hazardous waste generated. This waste consists primarily of depleted uranium (a by-product of U-235 enrichment), beryllium, small quantities of analytical chemicals, industrial type waste such as solvents, cleaning acids, photographic chemicals, etc., and explosives. This plan details the operations generating this waste, the proper handling of this material and the procedures used to treat or dispose of the hazardous waste. A considerable amount of information found in this plan was extracted from the Site 300 Safety and Operational Manual written by Site 300 Facility personnel and the Hazards Control Department.

  11. Ozone-depleting substances and the greenhouse gases HFCs, PFCs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozone-depleting substances and the greenhouse gases HFCs, PFCs and SF6 Danish consumption contribution to the debate on environmental policy in Denmark. #12;3 Contents 1 SUMMARY 5 1.1 OZONE OZONE-DEPLETING SUBSTANCES 19 3.1 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS 19 3.1.1 CFCs 19 3.1.2 Tetrachloromethane 19 3

  12. PlantHealthandSoilChangeswithHumic SubstanceApplications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    (Pettit, 2004). Commercially available humic substances are extracted from composts, coal and peat (Quilty, 2011). They are available in liquid and granular forms. Liquid humic substances are applied to the soil or incorporated into the soil (Quilty, 2011). Suggested application rates for liquids range from 0.4-12 L per acre

  13. Effect of Initial Disturbance on The Detonation Front Structure of a Narrow Duct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dou, Hua-Shu

    2010-01-01

    The effect of an initial disturbance on the detonation front structure in a narrow duct is studied by three-dimensional numerical simulation. The numerical method used includes a high resolution fifth-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme for spatial discretization, coupled with a third order total variation diminishing Runge-Kutta time stepping method. Two types of disturbances are used for the initial perturbation. One is a random disturbance which is imposed on the whole area of the detonation front, and the other is a symmetrical disturbance imposed within a band along the diagonal direction on the front. The results show that the two types of disturbances lead to different processes. For the random disturbance, the detonation front evolves into a stable spinning detonation. For the symmetrical diagonal disturbance, the detonation front displays a diagonal pattern at an early stage, but this pattern is unstable. It breaks down after a short while and it finally evolves into a spinning detonati...

  14. Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Was te Bureau Depa rtment of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad , New Mexico 88221 NOV 0 5 2013 New Mexico Environment...

  15. Hazardous Materials Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-04-20

    The Order establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of offsite shipments and onsite transfers of radioactive and other hazardous materials, and for modal transportation.

  16. Process safety management for highly hazardous chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    Purpose of this document is to assist US DOE contractors who work with threshold quantities of highly hazardous chemicals (HHCs), flammable liquids or gases, or explosives in successfully implementing the requirements of OSHA Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119). Purpose of this rule is to prevent releases of HHCs that have the potential to cause catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures.

  17. Canister storage building hazard analysis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krahn, D.E.; Garvin, L.J.

    1997-07-01

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) hazard analysis to support the final CSB safety analysis report (SAR) and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Report, and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  18. Evaluation of bulk paint worker exposure to solvents at household hazardous waste collection events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron, M.

    1995-09-01

    In fiscal year 93/94, over 250 governmental agencies were involved in the collection of household hazardous wastes in the State of California. During that time, over 3,237,000 lbs. of oil based paint were collected in 9,640 drums. Most of this was in lab pack drums, which can only hold up to 20 one gallon cans. Cost for disposal of such drums is approximately $1000. In contrast, during the same year, 1,228,000 lbs. of flammable liquid were collected in 2,098 drums in bulk form. Incineration of bulked flammable liquids is approximately $135 per drum. Clearly, it is most cost effective to bulk flammable liquids at household hazardous waste events. Currently, this is the procedure used at most Temporary Household Hazardous Waste Collection Facilities (THHWCFs). THHWCFs are regulated by the Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) under the new Permit-by Rule Regulations. These regulations specify certain requirements regarding traffic flow, emergency response notifications and prevention of exposure to the public. The regulations require that THHWCF operators bulk wastes only when the public is not present. [22 CCR, section 67450.4 (e) (2) (A)].Santa Clara County Environmental Health Department sponsors local THHWCF`s and does it`s own bulking. In order to save time and money, a variance from the regulation was requested and an employee monitoring program was initiated to determine actual exposure to workers. Results are presented.

  19. Recent developments in lead based cleanup criteria at hazardous waste sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahlert, W.K.; Williams, B.C. [Lawler, Matusky, & Skelly Engineers, Pearl River, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This paper briefly compares the requirements and application of two guidance documents issued by the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) to address soil lead contamination. The Office of Solid Waste & Emergency Response (OSWER) Revised Interim Soil Lead Guidance recommends a risk-based screening level for lead in soil for residential use and the use of the Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetics Model to evaluate potential risks to humans from environmental exposure to lead at hazardous waste sites in residential settings. The Office of Prevention, Pesticides, and Toxic Substances (OPPTS) issued guidelines to reduce lead-based paint hazards, including lead contaminated soils in residential areas. Both of these guidance documents identify 400 ppm as the level in soil below which no further action is necessary. However, the OPPTS guidance identifies concentrations between 400-5000 ppm as the levels in soil which necessitate only interim controls. In the past, the final record of decision issued by the US EPA for most Superfund sites, where the primary contaminant of concern was lead, used the OSWER guidance to determine the final lead cleanup level for the site. In many cases the RODs issued by EPA required the removal of lead contaminated soils that contained levels of lead between 400-5000 ppm. Even though the OPPTS guidance is applicable to residential areas where soils have been contaminanted with lead as a result of LBP, if applied to hazardous waste sites many remedial actions required by EPA in the past would not be necessary under this guidance.

  20. Rules and Regulations for Hazardous Waste Management (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations establish permitting and operational requirements for hazardous waste facilities. They are designed to minimize...

  1. NIH POLICY MANUAL 3015 -Admittance of Minors to Hazardous Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    NIH POLICY MANUAL 3015 - Admittance of Minors to Hazardous Areas Issuing Office: OD/OM/ORS/DOHS 301 on admittance of minors to hazardous work areas that may contain inherently or potentially hazardous chemicals. Definitions: 1. Hazardous Area ­ Any area that poses an actual or potential risk of illness or injury

  2. Coding Hazardous Tree Failures for a Data Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Terms: hazard trees; hazard reduction; recreation areas; urban forestry; safety standards; dataCoding Hazardous Tree Failures for a Data Management System Lee A. Paine PACIFIC SOUTHWEST hazardous tree failures for a data management system. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-29, 108 p., illus. Pacific

  3. The University of Texas at Dallas Texas Hazardous Communication Act

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    The University of Texas at Dallas Texas Hazardous Communication Act Handbook #12;TEXAS HAZARDOUS IV. Texas Hazard Communication Act Exemptions V. Implementation A. Employee Rights Under the Act Explanation IX. Written Hazard Communication Program A. Manufacturers' Labels and Other Forms of Warning B

  4. Hazardous Material Code Identification NFPA 704, 1996 Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    Hazardous Material Code Identification NFPA 704, 1996 Edition Identification of Health Hazard Color offer no hazard. 00 Materials that will not burn. 00 Materials that in themselves are normally stable DAMAGE TO LIVING TISSUE. MATERIALS POSSESSING RADIOACTIVITY HAZARDS. The identification systems

  5. NIH POLICY MANUAL 3034 -Working with Hazardous Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    NIH POLICY MANUAL 3034 - Working with Hazardous Materials Issuing Office: ORS/DOHS (301) 496 and procedure governing work with hazardous chemicals as described in the NIH Hazard Communication Program page. A. Purpose: This chapter establishes the NIH policy for working with hazardous chemicals

  6. General Safety Guidelines for Bio-Hazardous Waste Disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    General Safety Guidelines for Bio-Hazardous Waste Disposal · Determine if you have a Bio-Hazardous, cell cultures, Petri dishes, and etc. NOT fitting the category 1 description. · ALL BIO-HAZARDOUS WASTE OF CATEGORY 1 NEEDS TO BE TREATED BY AUTOCLAVE OR WITH HIV/HBV KILLING AGENT BEFORE PICK-UP · Bio-hazardous

  7. Hazard Communication -Regulatory Compliance 1/17/2013 a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Hazard Communication - Regulatory Compliance 1/17/2013 a OSHA has updated their Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR 1910.1200) and requires that all employees that work with Hazardous Chemicals this standard applies are required to receive an updated training as new chemical hazards are introduced

  8. University of Twente hazardous wast regulations 1 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Twente, Universiteit

    1 University of Twente hazardous wast regulations 1 Introduction Effective from June 2011 the collection of hazardous waste has been outsourced to van Gansewinkel. The hazardous waste is collected that the hazardous waste is to be offered directly to the collector by the parties offering waste at a designated

  9. Disposing of Hazardous Waste EPA Compliance Fact Sheet: Revision 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wikswo, John

    Disposing of Hazardous Waste EPA Compliance Fact Sheet: Revision 1 Vanderbilt Environmental Health and Safety Telephone: 322-2057 Fax: 343-4957 After hours pager: 835-4965 www.safety.vanderbilt.edu HAZARDOUS WASTE COLLECTION PROGRAM VEHS has implemented a Hazardous Waste Collection Program to collect hazardous

  10. Hazardous Waste Management Compliance Guidelines INTRODUCTION AND SCOPE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisslein, Martin

    Hazardous Waste Management Compliance Guidelines INTRODUCTION AND SCOPE Arizona State University Management, generate a variety of hazardous chemical wastes. ASU is classified as a hazardous waste generator) and has been assigned an EPA identification number (AZD042017723). As a hazardous waste generator facility

  11. DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop- Opening Remarks & Agenda

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop - Opening Remarks & Agenda October 25-26, 2011 Germantown, MD

  12. Method of removing and detoxifying a phosphorus-based substance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Steindler, M.J.

    1985-05-21

    A method of removing a phosphorus-based poisonous substance from water contaminated is presented. In addition, the toxicity of the phosphorus-based substance is also subsequently destroyed. A water-immiscible organic solvent is first immobilized on a supported liquid membrane before the contaminated water is contacted with one side of the supported liquid membrane to absorb the phosphorus-based substance in the organic solvent. The other side of the supported liquid membrane is contacted with a hydroxy-affording strong base to react with phosphorus-based solvated species to form a non-toxic product.

  13. Role of Soil Disturbances in Determining Post-Harvest Plant1 Biodiversity and Invasive Weed Distributions2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) disturbance frequency, and (4) the severity9 of the disturbance. Both frequency and severity are important1 Role of Soil Disturbances in Determining Post-Harvest Plant1 Biodiversity and Invasive Weed Telephone: +01-928-556-2176, FAX +01-928-556-21308 9 SHORT TITLE: Soil Disturbances, Biodiversity

  14. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 7, 607614, 2007 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/7/607/2007/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 7, 607­614, 2007 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/7/607/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences A probabilistic approach for earthquake hazard assessment of the Province of Eskis¸ehir, Turkey A

  15. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 13, 11431158, 2013 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/13/1143/2013/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 13, 1143­1158, 2013 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/13 Hazards and Earth System Sciences OpenAccess G Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics OpenAccess Atmospheric OpenAcces Time-dependent probabilistic seismic hazard assessment and its application to Hualien City

  16. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 471483, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/471/2006/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 471­483, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/471/2006/ © Author(s) 2006. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences Integrating public risk perception into formal natural hazard risk assessment Th. Plattner1, T

  17. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 8, 539558, 2008 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/8/539/2008/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 8, 539­558, 2008 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/8 Hazards and Earth System Sciences Spatial variability and potential impacts of climate change on flood and debris flow hazard zone mapping and implications for risk management H. Staffler1, R. Pollinger2, A

  18. Natural Hazards and Effects on Local Populations: Applications of NSF MARGINS research to hazards mitigation in Central America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Jeffrey S.

    Natural Hazards and Effects on Local Populations: Applications of NSF MARGINS research to hazards (Co-chair: NSF MARGINS Central American Geologic Hazards Working Group, 2001) In: Silver, E. and Dixon Zone and Subduction Factory Initiatives, 15 p., 2001. Natural Hazards & Effects on Local Populations

  19. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 7, 283288, 2007 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/7/283/2007/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 7, 283­288, 2007 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/7/283/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences Physical vulnerability modelling in natural hazard risk assessment J. Douglas BRGM ­ ARN/RIS, 3

  20. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 13, 19291943, 2013 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/13/1929/2013/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 13, 1929­1943, 2013 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/13/1929/2013/ doi:10.5194/nhess-13-1929-2013 © Author(s) 2013. CC Attribution 3.0 License. cess Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences OpenAccess A method for multi-hazard mapping in poorly known volcanic areas

  1. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 7, 495506, 2007 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/7/495/2007/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 7, 495­506, 2007 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/7/495/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Natural Hazards and Earth System as a function of the hazard, the elements at risk and the vul- nerability. From a natural sciences perspective

  2. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 293302, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/293/2006/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 293­302, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/293/2006/ © Author(s) 2006. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences A conceptual approach to the use of Cost Benefit and Multi Criteria Analysis in natural hazard

  3. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 779802, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/779/2006/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 779­802, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/779/2006/ © Author(s) 2006. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Natural Hazards and Earth System actions or events. Within the project "CEDIM ­ Risk Map Germany ­ Man-made Hazards" it is intended

  4. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 185193, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/185/2006/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 185­193, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/185/2006/ © Author(s) 2006. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences Geomorphological mapping and geophysical profiling for the evaluation of natural hazards

  5. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 7, 185193, 2007 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/7/185/2007/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 7, 185­193, 2007 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/7/185/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences Validation of landslide hazard assessment by means of GPS monitoring technique ­ a case study

  6. UC Irvine Construction Related Hazardous Waste Some construction related wastes are hazardous and require special handling. Examples of such wastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    UC Irvine Construction Related Hazardous Waste Scope Some construction related wastes are hazardous the hazardous waste manifest. Process 1. When a construction project will generate hazardous wastes, the project and require special handling. Examples of such wastes include: · Asbestos Containing Materials · Mercury

  7. The radioactive Substances (Uranium and Thorium) Exemption (Scotland)Order 1962 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, Michael

    1962-01-01

    STATUTORY INSTRUMENTS 1962 No. 2766 (S. 126) ATOMIC ENERGY AND RADIOACTIVE SUBSTANCES The Radioactive Substances (Uranium and Thorium) Exemption (Scotland) Order 1962

  8. The radioactive Substances (Prepared Uranium and Thorium Compounds) Exemption (Scotland)Order 1962 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, Michael

    1962-01-01

    STATUTORY INSTRUMENTS 1962 No. 2772 (S. 132) ATOMIC ENERGY AND RADIOACTIVE SUBSTANCES The Radioactive Substances (Prepared Uranium and Thorium Compounds) Exemption (Scotland) Order 1962

  9. The Radioactive Substances Act 1948 Appropriate Minister Designation (No. 2) order 1964 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agnew, W.G

    1964-01-01

    STATUTORY INSTRUMENTS 1964 No. 1576 ATOMIC ENERGY AND RADIOACTIVE SUBSTANCES The Radioactive Substances Act 1948 Appropriate Minister Designation (No. 2) Order 1964

  10. Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wasserman, Stephen R. (Darien, IL); Anderson, Kenneth B. (Lisle, IL); Song, Kang (Woodridge, IL); Yuchs, Steven E. (Naperville, IL); Marshall, Christopher L. (Naperville, IL)

    1998-01-01

    A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate.

  11. HAZARDOUS DRUG SAFETY AND HEALTH PLAN FOR HANDLING ANTINEOPLASTIC OTHER HAZARDOUS DRUGS IN CLINICAL ENVIRONMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Duck O.

    HAZARDOUS DRUG SAFETY AND HEALTH PLAN FOR HANDLING ANTINEOPLASTIC AND OTHER HAZARDOUS DRUGS IN CLINICAL ENVIRONMENTS (5/3/2013) Introduction Drugs have a successful history of use in treating diseases and are responsible for many medical advances over the past century. However, virtually every drug has side effects

  12. Natural Phenomena Hazards Modeling Project: Seismic Hazard Models for Department of Energy Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coats, D.W.; Murray, R.C.

    1984-11-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed seismic and wind hazard models for the Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS), Department of Energy (DOE). The work is part of a three-phase effort aimed at establishing uniform building design criteria for seismic and wind hazards at DOE sites throughout the US. In Phase 1, LLNL gathered information on the sites and their critical facilities, including nuclear reactors, fuel-reprocessing plants, high-level waste storage and treatment facilities, and special nuclear material facilities. In Phase 2, development of seismic and wind hazard models, was initiated. These hazard models express the annual probability that the site will experience an earthquake or wind speed greater than some specified magnitude. This report summarizes the final seismic hazard models and response spectra recommended for each site and the methodology used to develop these models. 15 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  13. Computational study of the vibrating disturbances to the lung function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kholodov, A S; Nadolsky, A A; Shushlebin, A N

    2007-01-01

    Frequently during its lifetime a human organism is subjected to the acoustical and similar to them vibrating impacts. Under the certain conditions such influence may cause physiological changes in the organs functioning. Thus the study of the oscillatory mechanical impacts to the organism is very important task of the numerical physiology. It allows to investigate the endurance limits of the organism and to develop protective measures in order to extend them. The noise nuisances affects to the most parts of the organism disrupting their functions. The vibrating disturbances caused to the lung function as one of the most sensitive to the acoustical impacts is considered in this work. The model proposed to describe the air motion in trachea-bronchial tree is based on the one dimensional no-linear theory including mass and momentum conservation for the air flow in flexible tubes.

  14. Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Thomas L. McCall, Jr. http:www.em.doe.govffaaortsca.html 4252001 Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities Compliance Agree.. Page 12 of 26 Deputy...

  15. Self-revegetation of disturbed ground in the deserts of Nevada and Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rickard, W.H.; Sauer, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    Plant cover established without purposeful soil preparation or seeding was measured on ground disturbed by plowing in Washington and by aboveground nuclear explosions in Nevada. After a time lapse of three decades in Washington and two decades in Nevada, fewer species were self-established on the disturbed ground than the nearby undisturbed ground. Alien annual plants were the dominants on the disturbed ground. Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) dominated abandoned fields in Washington, and filaree (Erodium cicutarium) dominated disturbed ground in Nevada. Perennial grasses and shrubs appeared to be more successful as invaders in Nevada than in Washington. This distinction is attributed to the superior competitive ability of cheatgrass in Washington.

  16. Small-scale disturbance and regeneration dynamics in a neotropical mangrove forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battles, John

    , TIMOTHY J. FAHEY and JOHN J. BATTLES* Department of Natural Resources, Cornell University, Fernow Hall, given the present disturbance regime. Field observations indicated that the peat mat collapses

  17. Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    2010 Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in2007), Comparison of carbon dioxide fluxes over three borealharvest influence carbon dioxide fluxes of black spruce

  18. Management Tools for Aquatic Systems: The Role of Periodic Hydraulic Disturbances on Planktonic Communities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyukates, Yesim; Roelke, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Environmental disturbances in aquatic systems alter phytoplankton community structure, diversity and biomass (Hutchinson, 1961). For example, laboratory experiments and field studies have shown that episodic flushing and ...

  19. Challenges to Introducing and Managing Disturbance Regimes for Holocarpha macradenia, an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holl, Karen

    Challenges to Introducing and Managing Disturbance Regimes for Holocarpha macradenia, an Endangered sites to test the effects of clipping frequency and litter accumulation on seed germination, seedling

  20. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crespi, C.L.; Thilly, W.G.

    1999-08-10

    The present invention pertains to a line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity). Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. The invention also includes mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics. 3 figs.

  1. TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT FOR NATURAL EVENT HAZARDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRIPPS, L.J.

    2006-07-31

    This technical basis document was developed to support the documented safety analysis (DSA) and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for natural event hazard (NEH)-initiated accidents. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous conditions based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers, because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls.

  2. Waste Stream Disposal Pharmacy Quick Sheet (6/16/14) Also pharmacy employees must complete SABA "Medication Waste Stream Disposal" Non-hazardous Hazardous Additional Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Additional Waste Disposal Location Green Bins for Non-hazardous waste Black Bins must complete SABA "Medication Waste Stream Disposal" Non-hazardous Hazardous for Hazardous Waste Yellow Trace Chemo Disposal Bin Red Sharps Bins Red

  3. Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coyne, Martin J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Fiscus, Gregory M. (McMurray, PA); Sammel, Alfred G. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1998-01-01

    A system for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut.

  4. Hanford Site radioactive hazardous materials packaging directory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, T.L.

    1995-12-01

    The Hanford Site Radioactive Hazardous Materials Packaging Directory (RHMPD) provides information concerning packagings owned or routinely leased by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for offsite shipments or onsite transfers of hazardous materials. Specific information is provided for selected packagings including the following: general description; approval documents/specifications (Certificates of Compliance and Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging); technical information (drawing numbers and dimensions); approved contents; areas of operation; and general information. Packaging Operations & Development (PO&D) maintains the RHMPD and may be contacted for additional information or assistance in obtaining referenced documentation or assistance concerning packaging selection, availability, and usage.

  5. Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coyne, M.J.; Fiscus, G.M.; Sammel, A.G.

    1998-10-06

    A system is described for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut. 8 figs.

  6. Robots, systems, and methods for hazard evaluation and visualization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Curtis W.; Bruemmer, David J.; Walton, Miles C.; Hartley, Robert S.; Gertman, David I.; Kinoshita, Robert A.; Whetten, Jonathan

    2013-01-15

    A robot includes a hazard sensor, a locomotor, and a system controller. The robot senses a hazard intensity at a location of the robot, moves to a new location in response to the hazard intensity, and autonomously repeats the sensing and moving to determine multiple hazard levels at multiple locations. The robot may also include a communicator to communicate the multiple hazard levels to a remote controller. The remote controller includes a communicator for sending user commands to the robot and receiving the hazard levels from the robot. A graphical user interface displays an environment map of the environment proximate the robot and a scale for indicating a hazard intensity. A hazard indicator corresponds to a robot position in the environment map and graphically indicates the hazard intensity at the robot position relative to the scale.

  7. Modified Hazard Ranking System/Hazard Ranking System for sites with mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes: Software documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenner, R.D.; Peloquin, R.A.; Hawley, K.A.

    1986-11-01

    The mHRS/HRS software package was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under contract with the Department of Energy (DOE) to provide a uniform method for DOE facilities to use in performing their Conservation Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Phase I Modified Hazard Ranking System or Hazard Ranking System evaluations. The program is designed to remove the tedium and potential for error associated with the performing of hand calculations and the interpreting of information on tables and in reference books when performing an evaluation. The software package is designed to operate on a microcomputer (IBM PC, PC/XT, or PC/AT, or a compatible system) using either a dual floppy disk drive or a hard disk storage system. It is written in the dBASE III language and operates using the dBASE III system. Although the mHRS/HRS software package was developed for use at DOE facilities, it has direct applicability to the performing of CERCLA Phase I evaluations for any facility contaminated by hazardous waste. The software can perform evaluations using either the modified hazard ranking system methodology developed by DOE/PNL, the hazard ranking system methodology developed by EPA/MITRE Corp., or a combination of the two. This document is a companion manual to the mHRS/HRS user manual. It is intended for the programmer who must maintain the software package and for those interested in the computer implementation. This manual documents the system logic, computer programs, and data files that comprise the package. Hardware and software implementation requirements are discussed. In addition, hand calculations of three sample situations (problems) with associated computer runs used for the verification of program calculations are included.

  8. Hazard Communication Standard Pictogram As of June 1, 2015, the Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) will require pictograms on labels to alert users of the chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazard Communication Standard Pictogram As of June 1, 2015, the Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) will require pictograms on labels to alert users of the chemical hazards to which they may be exposed. Each hazard(s). The pictogram on the label is determined by the chemical hazard classification. HCS Pictograms

  9. PPE Certification of Hazard Assessment Dept: Area: Job Classification/Task

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    PPE 7 Appendix A PPE Certification of Hazard Assessment Dept: Area: Job Classification/Task: HAZARDS (Circle Hazards) Describe Specific Hazards Identify Type of PPE Required for the Hazards Eye Hazard Impact Penetration Dust Chemical Radiation Heat Bioaerosols Projectiles Head Hazard Burn Electric

  10. Preliminary Hazards Analysis Plasma Hearth Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aycock, M.; Coordes, D.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P.

    1993-11-01

    This Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) follows the requirements of United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23 (DOE, 1992a), DOE Order 5480.21 (DOE, 1991d), DOE Order 5480.22 (DOE, 1992c), DOE Order 5481.1B (DOE, 1986), and the guidance provided in DOE Standards DOE-STD-1027-92 (DOE, 1992b). Consideration is given to ft proposed regulations published as 10 CFR 830 (DOE, 1993) and DOE Safety Guide SG 830.110 (DOE, 1992b). The purpose of performing a PRA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PRA then is followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title I and II design. This PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during construction, testing, and acceptance and completed before routine operation. Radiological assessments indicate that a PHP facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous material assessments indicate that a PHP facility will be a Low Hazard facility having no significant impacts either onsite or offsite to personnel and the environment.

  11. Natural Hazards Journal of the International

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    only and shall not be self- archived in electronic repositories. If you wish to self-archive your work of many of those working toward natural hazards reduction, especially in developing countries and risk-reduction efforts. This awareness may result in (1) selecting simple designs that use local

  12. Hazardous and Radioactive Mixed Waste Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1989-02-22

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) hazardous and radioactive mixed waste policies and requirements and to implement the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) within the framework of the environmental programs established under DOE O 5400.1. This directive does not cancel any directives.

  13. PUBLICATIONS OF THE VOLCANO HAZARDS PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Geophysical Research Letters, v. 25, p. 3397-3400. Bacon, C. R., Bruggman, P. E., Christiansen, R. L., Clynne-423. Bacon, C. R., Gunn, S. H., Lanphere, M. A., and Wooden, J. L., 1994, Multiple isotopic components-1556. Bacon, C. R., Mastin, L. G., Scott, K. M., and Nathenson, Manuel, 1997, Volcano and earthquake hazards

  14. Freeze Concentration Applied to Hazardous Waste Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruemekorf, R.

    2000-01-01

    Ages. Potable water from seawater was recorded in the 17th century. Today this technology is emerging as a new unit operation for the recovery ofwater from RCRA hazardous waste streams. Typical streams are high in water content and contain soluble...

  15. Appendix B: Wastes and Potential Hazards for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddharthan, Advaith

    of minerals including gypsum, salt, potash, asbestos, graphite, fluorite, calcite, clay, sand and gravel or their compounds and should be considered under the following hazards: H5 to H7, H10, H11, or H14. 01 05 drilling muds and other drilling wastes 01 05 05* oil-containing drilling muds and wastes M Oil-containing muds

  16. Fire disturbance and forest structure in an old-growth Pinus ponderosa forest, southern Cascades, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Alan

    Fire disturbance and forest structure in an old-growth Pinus ponderosa forest, southern Cascades, USA Alan H. Taylor Abstract Questions: Did fire regimes in old-growth Pinus ponderosa forest change a pattern of continuous regeneration or is regeneration episodic and related to fire disturbance or fire

  17. Aalborg Universitet Disturbance Control of the Hydraulic Brake in a Wind Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zhenyu

    Aalborg Universitet Disturbance Control of the Hydraulic Brake in a Wind Turbine Jepsen, Frank Brake in a Wind Turbine. In Energy Conference and Exhibition (EnergyCon), 2010 IEEE International . (pp from vbn.aau.dk on: juli 07, 2015 #12;Disturbance Control of the Hydraulic Brake in a Wind Turbine

  18. Two results on compressor surge control with disturbance rejection Jan Tommy Gravdahl and Olav Egeland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravdahl, Jan Tommy

    ] that the surge model of 7], which was derived for an axial compression system and is going to be usedTwo results on compressor surge control with disturbance rejection Jan Tommy Gravdahl and Olav- bilities. First, constant disturbances are included in the Greitzer model, and adaptive backstepping is em

  19. FOREST LIGHT AND STRUCTURE IN RELATION TO DISTURBANCES: COMPARING MOUNTAIN PINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FOREST LIGHT AND STRUCTURE IN RELATION TO DISTURBANCES: COMPARING MOUNTAIN PINE BEETLE, WILDFIRE of Thesis: Forest light and structure in relation to disturbances: comparing mountain pine beetle, wildfire light environment and structure of lodgepole pine forests in the southern interior of British Columbia

  20. Interactive effects of disturbance and nitrogen availability on phosphorus dynamics of southern Appalachian forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraterrigo, Jennifer

    Interactive effects of disturbance and nitrogen availability on phosphorus dynamics of southern Abstract Understanding the main and interactive effects of chronically altered resource availability and disturbance on phosphorus (P) availability is increas- ingly important in light of the rapid pace at which

  1. Adaptive Disturbance Rejection in the Presence of Uncertain Resonance Mode in Hard Disk Drives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Shuzhi Sam

    Adaptive Disturbance Rejection in the Presence of Uncertain Resonance Mode in Hard Disk Drives Fan to provide stronger capability of disturbance suppression. The scheme does not require any extra excitation margin at high frequency subject to the variation of the resonance frequency and the peak gain

  2. L1=Q Approach for efficient computation of disturbance rejection measures for feedback control q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    L1=Q Approach for efficient computation of disturbance rejection measures for feedback control q of disturbance rejection measures, which are useful for assessing the dynamic operability of the process. Using L1 optimal control theory, we consider the cases of steady-state, frequency-wise and dynamic systems

  3. Mechanism of air entrainment by a disturbed liquid jet C. D. Ohl,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    Mechanism of air entrainment by a disturbed liquid jet C. D. Ohl,a) H. N. Og~uz, and A disturbances on a falling jet are a powerful agent for air entrainment at the free surface of a liquid pool, rather than a crest. It is found that no air is entrained in this case. The paper concludes with some

  4. Bibliography of work on the heterogeneous photocatalytic removal of hazardous compounds from water and air, Update Number 2 to October 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, D.M.

    1997-01-01

    The Solar Industrial Program has developed processes that destroy hazardous substances in or remove them from water and air. The processes of interest in this report are based on the application of heterogeneous photocatalysts, principally titanium dioxide or modifications thereof, but work on other heterogeneous catalysts is included in this compilation. This report continues bibliographies that were published in May, 1994, and October, 1995. The previous reports included 663 and 574 citations, respectively. This update contains an additional 518 references. These were published during the period from June 1995 to October 1996, or are references from prior years that were not included in the previous reports. The work generally focuses on removing hazardous contaminants from air or water to meet environmental or health regulations. This report also references work on properties of semiconductor photocatalysts and applications of photocatalytic chemistry in organic synthesis. This report follows the same organization as the previous publications. The first part provides citations for work done in a few broad categories that are generic to the process. Three tables provide references to work on specific substances. The first table lists organic compounds that are included in various lists of hazardous substances identified by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The second table lists compounds not included in those categories, but which have been treated in a photocatalytic process. The third table covers inorganic compounds that are on EPA lists of hazardous materials or that have been treated by a photocatalytic process. A short update on companies that are active in providing products or services based on photocatalytic processes is provided.

  5. Experimental quantum key distribution without monitoring signal disturbance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiroki Takesue; Toshihiko Sasaki; Kiyoshi Tamaki; Masato Koashi

    2015-05-29

    Since the invention of Bennett-Brassard 1984 (BB84) protocol, many quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols have been proposed and some protocols are operated even in field environments. One of the striking features of QKD is that QKD protocols are provably secure unlike cryptography based on computational complexity assumptions. It has been believed that, to guarantee the security of QKD, Alice and Bob have to monitor the statistics of the measurement outcomes which are used to determine the amount of the privacy amplification to generate a key. Recently a new type of QKD protocol, called round robin differential phase shift (RRDPS) protocol, was proposed, and remarkably this protocol can generate a key without monitoring any statistics of the measurement outcomes. Here we report an experimental realization of the RRDPS protocol. We used a setup in which Bob randomly chooses one from four interferometers with different pulse delays so that he could implement phase difference measurements for all possible combinations with five-pulse time-bin states. Using the setup, we successfully distributed keys over 30 km of fiber, making this the first QKD experiment that does not rely on signal disturbance monitoring.

  6. Exact propagating nonlinear singular disturbances in strongly coupled dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Amita; Tiwari, Sanat Kumar; Kaw, Predhiman; Sen, Abhijit [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)

    2014-08-15

    The dynamical response of the strongly coupled dusty plasma medium has recently been described by utilizing the Generalized Hydrodynamic (GHD) model equations. The GHD equations capture the visco-elastic properties of the medium and have been successful in predicting a host of phenomena (e.g., existence of novel transverse shear waves in the fluid medium, modification of longitudinal wave dispersion by elastic effects, etc.) which have found experimental confirmation. In this paper, the nonlinear longitudinal response of the medium governed by GHD equations in strong coupling limit is discussed analytically. The structure of the equations rules out the balance between dispersion and nonlinearity, thereby, forbidding soliton formation. However, a host of new varieties of nonlinear solutions are found to exist, which have singular spatial profiles and yet have conservative properties. For instance, existence of novel conservative shock structures with zero strength is demonstrated, waves whose breaking produces no dissipation in the medium are observed, propagating solutions which produce cusp like singularities can exist and so on. It is suggested that simulations and experiments should look for these novel nonlinear structures in the large amplitude strong coupling limit of longitudinal disturbances in dusty plasmas.

  7. Four: Evaluating Reforms in the Implementation of Hazardous Waste Policies in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cutter, W. Bowman; DeShazo, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    in four areas: storage tanks, hazardous waste generatingprograms in hazardous waste and other areas. This resultof hazardous waste laws, requiring that every area be under

  8. Hazardous Waste Contamination: Implications for Commercial/Industrial Land Transactions in Silicon Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scholz, Diane

    1989-01-01

    Magazine (October). Hazardous Waste Contamination, ScholzPatton. 1 988. State Hazardous Waste and Property TransferForbes. 1 985. "Hazardous Waste Problems: Implications for

  9. Anywhere But Here: An Introduction to State Control of Hazardous Waste Facility Location

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarlock, Dan A.

    1981-01-01

    State Control Of Hazardous- Waste Facility Location A. Danautonomy over the location of hazardous-waste managementa hazardous-waste facility-siting process is the location of

  10. Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wasserman, S.R.; Anderson, K.B.; Song, K.; Yuchs, S.E.; Marshall, C.L.

    1998-04-28

    A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate. 3 figs.

  11. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety Design Guide Mercury used in many laboratory areas on campus. All laboratory areas and former laboratory areas should. Cleanup by a hazardous materials contractor is required before demolition or construction can begin

  12. New Mexico: Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool Maximizes Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Mexico: Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool Maximizes Energy Production, Wins R&D 100 Award New Mexico: Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool Maximizes Energy Production, Wins R&D 100...

  13. Hazardous devices teams showcase skills at Robot Rodeo June 24...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hazardous devices teams showcase skills at Robot Rodeo June 24-27 Hazardous devices teams showcase skills at Robot Rodeo June 24-27 Bomb squads compete in timed scenarios at Los...

  14. Hazardous waste management in the Texas construction industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprinkle, Donald Lee

    1991-01-01

    This pilot study reports the statewide, regulatory compliance of general construction contractors in Texas who generated regulated amounts of hazardous waste during 1990, defined by existing state and federal hazardous-waste-management regulations...

  15. ORISE Resources: Hospital All-Hazards Self-Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    partners with CDC to develop Hospital All-Hazards Self-Assessment to identify gaps in planning efforts The Hospital All-Hazards Self-Assessment, or HAH, is designed to help...

  16. A Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis Update Review for Two...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis Update Review for Two DOE Sites and NGA-East Project Overview and Status A Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis Update Review for Two DOE...

  17. Reducing Physical Hazards: Encouraging Inherently Safer Production (Chapter 17)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashford, Nicholas A.

    Physical hazards differ from hazards related to the toxicity of chemicals and materials in a number of ways. Their origin is the sudden and accidental release of chemicals and/ or energy - that is, chemical accidents, ...

  18. Clarification of Institutional Controls at the Rocky Flats Site Central Operable Unit and Implementation of the Soil Disturbance Review Plan - 13053

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiSalvo, Rick; Surovchak, Scott; Spreng, Carl; Moritz, Vera

    2013-07-01

    Cleanup and closure of DOE's Rocky Flats Site in Colorado, which was placed on the CERCLA National Priority List in 1989, was accomplished under CERCLA, RCRA, and the Colorado Hazardous Waste Act (CHWA). The physical cleanup work was completed in late 2005 and all buildings and other structures that composed the Rocky Flats industrial complex were removed from the surface, but remnants remain in the subsurface. Other remaining features include two landfills closed in place with covers, four groundwater treatment systems, and surface water and groundwater monitoring systems. Under the 2006 Corrective Action Decision/Record of Decision for Rocky Flats Plant (US DOE) Peripheral Operable Unit and the Central Operable Unit (CAD/ROD), the response actions selected for the Central Operable Unit (OU) are institutional controls (ICs), physical controls, and continued monitoring and maintenance. The objectives of these ICs were to prevent unacceptable exposure to remaining subsurface contamination and to prevent contaminants from mobilizing to surface water and to prevent interfering with the proper functioning of the engineered components of the remedy. An amendment in 2011 of the 2006 CAD/ROD clarified the ICs to prevent misinterpretation that would prohibit work to manage and maintain the Central OU property. The 2011 amendment incorporated a protocol for a Soil Disturbance Review Plan for work subject to ICs that requires approval from the State and public notification by DOE prior to conducting approved soil-disturbing work. (authors)

  19. Permit Fees for Hazardous Waste Material Management (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations describe applicable fees for permit application, modification, and transfer for permits related to hazardous waste management.

  20. 340 Waste handling Facility Hazard Categorization and Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. J. Rodovsky

    2010-10-25

    The analysis presented in this document provides the basis for categorizing the facility as less than Hazard Category 3.

  1. A Probabilistic Approach to Site-Specific, Hazard-Consistent...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Flooding Hazard Assessment State of Practice Approaches in Geomorphology, Geochronology and Probabilistic Analyses for Addressing Fault Capability at Nuclear Facilities...

  2. Variate Generation for the Accelerated Life and Proportional Hazards Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leemis, Larry

    Variate Generation for the Accelerated Life and Proportional Hazards Models Lawrence M. Leemis by a factor (z), variates are generated by t = H-1 0 (- log(u)) (z) . In the proportional hazards model The accelerated life and proportional hazards lifetime models are used to account for the effects of covariates

  3. A Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis of Northeast India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar

    .1193/1.2163914 INTRODUCTION Seismic hazard analysis plays an important role in the earthquake-resistant design of structuresA Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis of Northeast India Sandip Das,a... Ishwer D. Gupta,b... and Vinay K. Guptaa... Seismic hazard maps have been prepared for Northeast India based on the uniform

  4. Hazards assessment for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calley, M.B.; Jones, J.L. Jr.

    1994-09-19

    This report documents the hazards assessment for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, which is operated by EG&G Idaho, Inc., for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The hazards assessment was performed to ensure that this facility complies with DOE and company requirements pertaining to emergency planning and preparedness for operational emergencies. DOE Order 5500.3A requires that a facility-specific hazards assessment be performed to provide the technical basis for facility emergency planning efforts. This hazards assessment was conducted in accordance with DOE Headquarters and DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) guidance to comply with DOE Order 5500.3A. The hazards assessment identifies and analyzes hazards that are significant enough to warrant consideration in a facility`s operational emergency management program. This hazards assessment describes the WERF, the area surrounding WERF, associated buildings and structures at WERF, and the processes performed at WERF. All radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials stored, used, or produced at WERF were identified and screened. Even though the screening process indicated that the hazardous materials could be screened from further analysis because the inventory of radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials were below the screening thresholds specified by DOE and DOE-ID guidance for DOE Order 5500.3A, the nonradiological hazardous materials were analyzed further because it was felt that the nonradiological hazardous material screening thresholds were too high.

  5. Compliance of Hazardous Waste Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAAs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Compliance of Hazardous Waste Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAAs) All Hazardous waste generated to be chemically hazardous and shall be kept in a Satellite Accumulation Area (SAA). The safety coordinator will keep a list of all SAA's in the division and must be notified before an accumulation area

  6. TAMU HAZARD COMMUNICATION PROGRAM Revised: 9/1/12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    TAMU HAZARD COMMUNICATION PROGRAM Revised: 9/1/12 WORK AREA SPECIFIC TRAINING Department of Chemistry Attendance Record I hereby acknowledge receipt of the Texas A&M University (TAMU) Hazard. information on hazardous chemicals known to be present in the employee's work area and to which the employee

  7. Chemical and Hazardous Materials Department of Environmental Health and Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    Chemical and Hazardous Materials Safety Department of Environmental Health and Safety 800 West information useful in the recognition, evaluation, and control of workplace hazards and environmental factors safety, fire safety, and hazardous waste disposal. Many chemicals have properties that make them

  8. The Law of Hazardous Waste: CERCLA, RCRA, & Common Law Claims

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Law 273.4 The Law of Hazardous Waste: CERCLA, RCRA, & Common Law Claims (Fall 2006) Units: 3 CCN (2 of Hazardous Waste Disposal and Remediation (2d ed. 2005) Syllabus Class 1 ­ August 22 Claims Based on Common: 1. Miller & Johnston The Law of Hazardous Waste Disposal and Remediation 2. Ch. III, Intro to RCRA

  9. Hazardous Materials Shipping Policy for Laboratories Policy Statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    Page 1 Hazardous Materials Shipping Policy for Laboratories Policy Statement In order to ensure compliance with all regulations governing transportation of hazardous materials, all University faculty, staff, and students who work in laboratories and intend to ship hazardous materials from the University

  10. Hazardous Waste Collection in Safety Cans HOW DOES THIS WORK?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Hazardous Waste Collection in Safety Cans HOW DOES THIS WORK? o Labs that generate large volumes of solvent hazardous waste can contact EHS @ 255-8200 for approval of the use of safety cans. Once EHS approves the use we will provide the can. o A hang pocket will be placed on the can that states "Hazardous

  11. The Law of Hazardous Waste: CERCLA, RCRA, & Common Law Claims

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Law 273.4 The Law of Hazardous Waste: CERCLA, RCRA, & Common Law Claims (Fall 2008) Units: 3 CCN (2, The Law of Hazardous Waste Disposal and Remediation (2d ed. 2005) Syllabus Class 1 ­ August 19 Claims on Federal Law: 1. Miller & Johnston The Law of Hazardous Waste Disposal and Remediation 2. Ch. III, Intro

  12. HAZARDOUS MATERIAL SAFETY Effective Date: January 1, 1992

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    HAZARDOUS MATERIAL SAFETY PROCEDURES Effective Date: January 1, 1992 Revised Date: March 1993 UT Memphis shall implement a program that protects its employees from hazardous chemical in accordance with Section 1910.1200 of the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA), entitled ³Hazard Communication

  13. Lab 4: Plate Tectonics Locating Geologic Hazards Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Po

    1 Lab 4: Plate Tectonics ­ Locating Geologic Hazards Introduction The likelihood of major geologic hazards associated with the lithosphere, such as earthquakes and volcanoes, is not uniform around provides a ready explanation for the distribution of these types of geologic hazards. It is useful

  14. Diesel particles -a health hazard 1 Diesel particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diesel particles - a health hazard 1 Diesel particles - a health hazard #12;The Danish Ecological Council - August 20042 Diesel particles - a health hazard ISBN: 87-89843-61-4 Text by: Christian Ege 33150777 Fax no.: +45 33150971 E-mail: info@ecocouncil.dk www.ecocouncil.dk #12;Diesel particles - a health

  15. Training Package on National Scale Multi Hazard Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Training Package on National Scale Multi Hazard Risk Assessment Theory Book National Scale Multi Hazard Risk Assessment By Cees van Westen, Michiel Damen and Wim Feringa University Twente, Faculty-EAST National Scale Multi-Hazard Risk Assessment Date: 2013-11-18 2 Note about the PPRD EAST project This manual

  16. Proportional Hazards Regression with Unknown Link Function By WEI WANG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jane-Ling

    Proportional Hazards Regression with Unknown Link Function By WEI WANG Harvard Medical School@amss.ac.cn The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong qhwang@hku.hk Summary Proportional hazards regression model assumes of the covariates. Traditional ap- proaches, such as the Cox proportional hazards model, focus on estimating

  17. Split driveshaft pump for hazardous fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, II, Thomas P. (Aiken, SC); Purohit, Jwalit J. (Evans, GA); Fazio, John M. (Orchard Park, NY)

    1995-01-01

    A pump having a split driveshaft for use in pumping hazardous fluids wherein only one driveshaft becomes contaminated by the fluid while the second remains isolated from the fluid. The pump has a first portion and a second portion. The first portion contains a pump motor, the first driveshaft, a support pedestal, and vapor barriers and seals. The second portion contains a second, self-lubricating driveshaft and an impeller. The first and second driveshafts are connected together by a releasable coupling. A shield and a slinger deployed below the coupling prevent fluid from the second portion from reaching the first portion. In operation, only the second assembly comes into contact with the fluid being pumped, so the risk of contamination of the first portion by the hazardous fluid is reduced. The first assembly can be removed for repairs or routine maintenance by decoupling the first and second driveshafts and disconnecting the motor from the casing.

  18. Rapid deployable global sensing hazard alert system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cordaro, Joseph V; Tibrea, Steven L; Shull, Davis J; Coleman, Jerry T; Shuler, James M

    2015-04-28

    A rapid deployable global sensing hazard alert system and associated methods of operation are provided. An exemplary system includes a central command, a wireless backhaul network, and a remote monitoring unit. The remote monitoring unit can include a positioning system configured to determine a position of the remote monitoring unit based on one or more signals received from one or more satellites located in Low Earth Orbit. The wireless backhaul network can provide bidirectional communication capability independent of cellular telecommunication networks and the Internet. An exemplary method includes instructing at least one of a plurality of remote monitoring units to provide an alert based at least in part on a location of a hazard and a plurality of positions respectively associated with the plurality of remote monitoring units.

  19. Use of short-term test systems for the prediction of the hazard represented by potential chemical carcinogens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, L.R.; Jones, T.D.; Easterly, C.E.; Walsh, P.J.

    1990-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that results from short-term bioassays will ultimately provide information that will be useful for human health hazard assessment. Historically, the validity of the short-term tests has been assessed using the framework of the epidemiologic/medical screens. In this context, the results of the carcinogen (long-term) bioassay is generally used as the standard. However, this approach is widely recognized as being biased and, because it employs qualitative data, cannot be used to assist in isolating those compounds which may represent a more significant toxicologic hazard than others. In contrast, the goal of this research is to address the problem of evaluating the utility of the short-term tests for hazard assessment using an alternative method of investigation. Chemicals were selected mostly from the list of carcinogens published by the International Agency for Research on Carcinogens (IARC); a few other chemicals commonly recognized as hazardous were included. Tumorigenicity and mutagenicity data on 52 chemicals were obtained from the Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS) and were analyzed using a relative potency approach. The data were evaluated in a format which allowed for a comparison of the ranking of the mutagenic relative potencies of the compounds (as estimated using short-term data) vs. the ranking of the tumorigenic relative potencies (as estimated from the chronic bioassays). Although this was a preliminary investigation, it offers evidence that the short-term tests systems may be of utility in ranking the hazards represented by chemicals which may contribute to increased carcinogenesis in humans as a result of occupational or environmental exposures. 177 refs., 8 tabs.

  20. Seal inlet disturbance boundary conditions for rotordynamic models and influence of some off-design conditions on labyrinth rotordynamic instability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xi, Jinxiang

    2007-04-25

    Systematic parametric studies were performed to better understand seal-inlet rotordynamics. A CFD-perturbation model was employed to compute the seal-inlet flow disturbance quantities. Seal inlet disturbance boundary ...

  1. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 12, 31913208, 2012 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/12/3191/2012/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldfinger, Chris

    for hazards, stratigraphy and turbidite lithology C. H. Nelson1, J. Guti´errez Pastor1, C. Goldfinger2, and C 2012 Abstract. We summarize the importance of great earth- quakes (Mw 8) for hazards, stratigraphy estimate of minimum recurrence times, which are the most important for seismic hazards risk analysis

  2. University of Texas at Arlington Exhibit 2 Hazardous Communication Program C. EMPLOYEE SITE-SPECIFIC HAZARD COMMUNICATION TRAINING ("WORK AREA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    -SPECIFIC HAZARD COMMUNICATION TRAINING ("WORK AREA SPECIFIC") Information specific to the employee's particular to be in the employee's work area(s): · the location of hazardous chemicals, · safe handling · warning signsUniversity of Texas at Arlington Exhibit 2 Hazardous Communication Program C. EMPLOYEE SITE

  3. HAZARDOUS WASTE SATELLITE ACCUMULATION AREA REQUIREMENTS 1. Mark all waste containers conspicuously with the words "Hazardous Waste."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    HAZARDOUS WASTE SATELLITE ACCUMULATION AREA REQUIREMENTS 1. Mark all waste containers conspicuously. Decontaminate 5. Dispose of cleanup debris as Hazardous Waste Chemical Spill ­ major 1. Evacuate area, isolate with the words "Hazardous Waste." 2. Label all containers accurately, indicating the constituents and approximate

  4. Vitrification of hazardous and radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickford, D.F.; Schumacher, R.

    1995-12-31

    Vitrification offers many attractive waste stabilization options. Versatility of waste compositions, as well as the inherent durability of a glass waste form, have made vitrification the treatment of choice for high-level radioactive wastes. Adapting the technology to other hazardous and radioactive waste streams will provide an environmentally acceptable solution to many of the waste challenges that face the public today. This document reviews various types and technologies involved in vitrification.

  5. Dark matter as a cancer hazard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chashchina, Olga

    2015-01-01

    We comment on the paper "Dark Matter collisions with the Human Body" by K.~Freese and C.~Savage (Phys.\\ Lett.\\ B {\\bf 717}, 25 (2012) [arXiv:1204.1339]) and describe a dark matter model for which the results of the previous paper do not apply. Within this mirror dark matter model, potentially hazardous objects, mirror micrometeorites, can exist potentially leading to diseases triggered by multiple mutations, such as cancer.

  6. Dark matter as a cancer hazard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olga Chashchina; Zurab Silagadze

    2015-09-17

    We comment on the paper "Dark Matter collisions with the Human Body" by K.~Freese and C.~Savage (Phys.\\ Lett.\\ B {\\bf 717}, 25 (2012) [arXiv:1204.1339]) and describe a dark matter model for which the results of the previous paper do not apply. Within this mirror dark matter model, potentially hazardous objects, mirror micrometeorites, can exist potentially leading to diseases triggered by multiple mutations, such as cancer.

  7. Staged mold for encapsulating hazardous wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Unger, Samuel L. (Los Angeles, CA); Telles, Rodney W. (Alhambra, CA); Lubowitz, Hyman R. (Rolling Hills Estates, CA)

    1990-01-01

    A staged mold for stabilizing hazardous wastes for final disposal by molding an agglomerate of the hazardous wastes and encapsulating the agglomerate. Three stages are employed in the process. In the first stage, a first mold body is positioned on a first mold base, a mixture of the hazardous wastes and a thermosetting plastic is loaded into the mold, the mixture is mechanically compressed, heat is applied to cure the mixture to form a rigid agglomerate, and the first mold body is removed leaving the agglomerate sitting on the first mold base. In the second stage, a clamshell second mold body is positioned around the agglomerate and the first mold base, a powdered thermoplastic resin is poured on top of the agglomerate and in the gap between the sides of the agglomerate and the second mold body, the thermoplastic is compressed, heat is applied to melt the thermoplastic, and the plastic is cooled jacketing the agglomerate on the top and sides. In the third stage, the mold with the jacketed agglomerate is inverted, the first mold base is removed exposing the former bottom of the agglomerate, powdered thermoplastic is poured over the former bottom, the first mold base is replaced to compress the thermoplastic, heat is applied to melt the new thermoplastic and the top part of the jacket on the sides, the plastic is cooled jacketing the bottom and fusing with the jacketing on the sides to complete the seamless encapsulation of the agglomerate.

  8. Staged mold for encapsulating hazardous wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Unger, Samuel L. (Los Angeles, CA); Telles, Rodney W. (Alhambra, CA); Lubowitz, Hyman R. (Rolling Hills Estates, CA)

    1988-01-01

    A staged mold for stabilizing hazardous wastes for final disposal by molding an agglomerate of the hazardous wastes and encapsulating the agglomerate. Three stages are employed in the process. In the first stage, a first mold body is positioned on a first mold base, a mixture of the hazardous wastes and a thermosetting plastic is loaded into the mold, the mixture is mechanically compressed, heat is applied to cure the mixture to form a rigid agglomerate, and the first mold body is removed leaving the agglomerate sitting on the first mold base. In the second stage, a clamshell second mold body is positioned around the agglomerate and the first mold base, a powdered thermoplastic resin is poured on top of the agglomerate and in the gap between the sides of the agglomerate and the second mold body, the thermoplastic is compressed, heat is applied to melt the thermoplastic, and the plastic is cooled jacketing the agglomerate on the top and sides. In the third stage, the mold with the jacketed agglomerate is inverted, the first mold base is removed exposing the former bottom of the agglomerate, powdered thermoplastic is poured over the former bottom, the first mold base is replaced to compress the thermoplastic, heat is applied to melt the new thermoplastic and the top part of the jacket on the sides, the plastic is cooled jacketing the bottom and fusing with the jacketing on the sides to complete the seamless encapsulation of the agglomerate.

  9. Seismic hazard analysis at Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGuire, R.K.

    1993-10-01

    A probabilistic seismic hazard analysis is being conducted for the DOE Rocky Flats Plant, Jefferson County, Colorado. This is part of the overall review of the seismic exposure to facilities being conducted by DOE. The study has four major elements. (1) The historical seismicity in Colorado is being reviewed and synthesized to estimate historical rates of earthquake activity in the region of the site. (2) The geologic and tectonic evidence in Colorado and along the Front Range is being reviewed to determine appropriate seismic zones, potentially active faults, and constraints on fault slip rates. (3) Earthquake ground motion equations are being derived based on seismological knowledge of the earth`s crust. Site specific soil amplification factors are also being developed using on-site shear wave velocity measurements. (4) The probability of exceedence of various seismic ground motion levels is being calculated based on the inputs developed on tectonic sources, faults, ground motion, and soil amplification. Deterministic ground motion estimates are also being made. This study is a state-of-the-art analysis of seismic hazard. It incorporates uncertainties in the major aspects governing seismic hazard, and has a documented basis founded on solid data interpretations for the ranges of inputs used. The results will be a valid basis on which to evaluate plant structures, equipment, and components for seismic effects.

  10. Stream dynamics are controlled by a combination of abiotic and biotic factors.Disturbances such as floods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .Disturbances such as floods control the characteristics of stream ecosystems and com- munities, creating a dynamic and complex

  11. Identification of chemical hazards for security risk analysis activities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaeger, Calvin Dell

    2005-01-01

    The presentation outline of this paper is: (1) How identification of chemical hazards fits into a security risk analysis approach; (2) Techniques for target identification; and (3) Identification of chemical hazards by different organizations. The summary is: (1) There are a number of different methodologies used within the chemical industry which identify chemical hazards: (a) Some develop a manual listing of potential targets based on published lists of hazardous chemicals or chemicals of concern, 'expert opinion' or known hazards. (b) Others develop a prioritized list based on chemicals found at a facility and consequence analysis (offsite release affecting population, theft of material, product tampering). (2) Identification of chemical hazards should include not only intrinsic properties of the chemicals but also potential reactive chemical hazards and potential use for activities off-site.

  12. Hurricane Disturbance Alters Secondary Forest Recovery in Puerto Rico Dan F.B. Flynn1,7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uriarte, Maria

    Hurricane Disturbance Alters Secondary Forest Recovery in Puerto Rico Dan F.B. Flynn1,7 , Mar structure and composition. How introduced species respond to disturbances such as hurricanes in post-agriculture forest recovery is of particular interest. To examine the effects of hurricane disturbance and previous

  13. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BALTIMORE COUNTY SUBSTANCE ABUSE POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biswas, Animikh

    UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BALTIMORE COUNTY SUBSTANCE ABUSE POLICY AND CAMPUS PLAN The use and students of the University of Maryland Baltimore County. I. GUIDELINES A. The University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC), as an employer, strives to maintain a workplace free from the illegal use

  14. Molecular structure in soil humic substances: The new view

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, Rebecca; Sposito, Garrison

    2005-04-21

    A critical examination of published data obtained primarily from recent nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy, electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, and pyrolysis studies reveals an evolving new view of the molecular structure of soil humic substances. According to the new view, humic substances are collections of diverse, relatively low molecular mass components forming dynamic associations stabilized by hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds. These associations are capable of organizing into micellar structures in suitable aqueous environments. Humic components display contrasting molecular motional behavior and may be spatially segregated on a scale of nanometers. Within this new structural context, these components comprise any molecules intimately associated with a humic substance, such that they cannot be separated effectively by chemical or physical methods. Thus biomolecules strongly bound within humic fractions are by definition humic components, a conclusion that necessarily calls into question key biogeochemical pathways traditionally thought to be required for the formation of humic substances. Further research is needed to elucidate the intermolecular interactions that link humic components into supramolecular associations and to establish the pathways by which these associations emerge from the degradation of organic litter.

  15. Hazard Communication (Worker Right to Know) As a UW employee, you have the right to know about hazards to which you may be exposed as part

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    Hazard Communication (Worker Right to Know) As a UW employee, you have the right to know about hazards to which you may be exposed as part of your work assignment. The University's Hazard Communication: * Identity of the hazardous chemical(s), * Appropriate hazard warnings, and * Manufacturer

  16. Spatial patterns of ice storm disturbance in the forested landscape of Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rachel E.

    2009-05-15

    Large-extent ice storms have received relatively little attention from researchers. This research investigates the effects of abiotic and biotic factors on the spatial patterns of ice storm disturbance on a forested landscape. This investigation...

  17. 16 Disturbance in Boreal Peatlands Merritt R. Turetsky and Vincent St. Louis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turetsky, Merritt

    ), largely owing to agricultural inten- sification, pollution, energy and forestry practices, and urban) pollution. Disturbance can be defined as discrete events in space and time that disrupt ecosystem structure

  18. Classification of power quality disturbances using time-frequency ambiguity plane and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mamishev, Alexander

    shows promise for further development of a fully automated power quality monitoring system equipment places increasingly more stringent demands on the quality of electric power suppliedClassification of power quality disturbances using time-frequency ambiguity plane and neural

  19. Machine Learning for Power System Disturbance and Cyber-attack Discrimination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borges, Raymond Charles; Beaver, Justin M; Buckner, Mark A; Morris, Thomas; Adhikari, Uttam; Pan, Shengyi

    2014-01-01

    Power system disturbances are inherently complex and can be attributed to a wide range of sources, including both natural and man-made events. Currently, the power system operators are heavily relied on to make decisions regarding the causes of experienced disturbances and the appropriate course of action as a response. In the case of cyber-attacks against a power system, human judgment is less certain since there is an overt attempt to disguise the attack and deceive the operators as to the true state of the system. To enable the human decision maker, we explore the viability of machine learning as a means for discriminating types of power system disturbances, and focus specifically on detecting cyber-attacks where deception is a core tenet of the event. We evaluate various machine learning methods as disturbance discriminators and discuss the practical implications for deploying machine learning systems as an enhancement to existing power system architectures.

  20. Comparison of disturbed and undisturbed wetland communities using vegetation, aquatic macroinvertebrate and landscape analyses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Irene H

    1994-01-01

    macroinvertebrate sampling of riffle and still habitats in both areas found differences in pollution tolerant families. Water quality variables of temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, nitrates and phosphates were not determined to be different at the disturbed...

  1. Numerical assessment of stability criteria from disturbance energies in gaseous combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicoud, Franck

    Numerical assessment of stability criteria from disturbance energies in gaseous combustion A, which corresponds to a ducted, laminar premixed propane-air flame, is used to assess the different terms

  2. OPNET/Simulink Based Testbed for Disturbance Detection in the Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadi, Mohammad A. H.; Dasgupta, Dipankar; Ali, Mohammad Hassan; Abercrombie, Robert K

    2015-01-01

    The important backbone of the smart grid is the cyber/information infrastructure, which is primarily used to communicate with different grid components. A smart grid is a complex cyber physical system containing a numerous and variety number of sources, devices, controllers and loads. Therefore, the smart grid is vulnerable to grid related disturbances. For such dynamic system, disturbance and intrusion detection is a paramount issue. This paper presents a Simulink and Opnet based co-simulated platform to carry out a cyber-intrusion in cyber network for modern power systems and the smart grid. The IEEE 30 bus power system model is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the simulated testbed. The experiments were performed by disturbing the circuit breakers reclosing time through a cyber-attack. Different disturbance situations in the considered test system are considered and the results indicate the effectiveness of the proposed co-simulated scheme.

  3. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Disturbance Filtering and Identification on the Naval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Disturbance Filtering and Identification and Aeronautical Engineering, University of California, Davis Corresponding Author, Professor Sanjay S. Joshi, Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, University of California, Davis, Bainer Hall, 1

  4. Mechanical characteristics of folds in Upper Cretaceous strata in the Disturbed Belt of northwestern Montana 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Pat Kader

    1974-01-01

    MECHANICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF FOLDS IN UPPER CRETACEOUS STRATA IN THE DISTURBED BELT OF NORTHWESTERN MONTANA A Thesis by PAT KADER GILBERT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1974 Major Subject: Geology MECHANICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF FOLDS IN UPPER CRETACEOUS STRATA IN THE DISTURBED BELT OF NORTHWESTERN MONTANA A Thesis by PAT KADER GILBERT Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman...

  5. Decision analysis for INEL hazardous waste storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, L.A.; Roach, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    In mid-November 1993, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Waste Reduction Operations Complex (WROC) Manager requested that the INEL Hazardous Waste Type Manager perform a decision analysis to determine whether or not a new Hazardous Waste Storage Facility (HWSF) was needed to store INEL hazardous waste (HW). In response to this request, a team was formed to perform a decision analysis for recommending the best configuration for storage of INEL HW. Personnel who participated in the decision analysis are listed in Appendix B. The results of the analysis indicate that the existing HWSF is not the best configuration for storage of INEL HW. The analysis detailed in Appendix C concludes that the best HW storage configuration would be to modify and use a portion of the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) Waste Storage Building (WWSB), PBF-623 (Alternative 3). This facility was constructed in 1991 to serve as a waste staging facility for WERF incineration. The modifications include an extension of the current Room 105 across the south end of the WWSB and installing heating, ventilation, and bay curbing, which would provide approximately 1,600 ft{sup 2} of isolated HW storage area. Negotiations with the State to discuss aisle space requirements along with modifications to WWSB operating procedures are also necessary. The process to begin utilizing the WWSB for HW storage includes planned closure of the HWSF, modification to the WWSB, and relocation of the HW inventory. The cost to modify the WWSB can be funded by a reallocation of funding currently identified to correct HWSF deficiencies.

  6. Encapsulation of hazardous wastes into agglomerates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guloy, A.

    1992-01-28

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using the cementitious properties and agglomeration characteristics of coal conversion byproducts to encapsulate and immobilize hazardous waste materials. The intention was to establish an economical way of co-utilization and co-disposal of wastes. In addition, it may aid in the eradication of air pollution problems associated with the fine-powdery nature of fly ash. Encapsulation into agglomerates is a novel approach of treating toxic waste. Although encapsulation itself is not a new concept, existing methods employ high-cost resins that render them economically unfeasible. In this investigation, the toxic waste was contained in a concrete-like matrix whereby fly ash and other cementitious waste materials were utilized. The method incorporates the principles of solidification, stabilization and agglomeration. Another aspect of the study is the evaluation of the agglomeration as possible lightweight aggregates. Since fly ash is commercially used as an aggregate, it would be interesting to study the effect of incorporating toxic wastes in the strength development of the granules. In the investigation, the fly ash self-cementation process was applied to electroplating sludges as the toxic waste. The process hoped to provide a basis for delisting of the waste as hazardous and, thereby greatly minimize the cost of its disposal. Owing to the stringent regulatory requirements for hauling and disposal of hazardous waste, the cost of disposal is significant. The current practice for disposal is solidifying the waste with portland cement and dumping the hardened material in the landfill where the cost varies between $700--950/ton. Partially replacing portland cement with fly ash in concrete has proven beneficial, therefore applying the same principles in the treatment of toxic waste looked very promising.

  7. Method for warning of radiological and chemical substances using detection paints on a vehicle surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA)

    2012-03-13

    A system for warning of corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances. The system comprises painting a surface with a paint or coating that includes an indicator material and monitoring the surface for indications of the corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances.

  8. Evaluation of ferrocyanide/nitrate explosive hazard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cady, H.H.

    1992-06-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory agreed to assist Pacific Northwest Laboratory in the Ferrocyanide Safety Evaluation Program by helping to evaluate the explosive hazard of several mixtures of simulated ferrocyanide waste-tank sludge containing sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate. This report is an evaluation of the small-scale safety tests used to assess the safety of these materials from an explosive point of view. These tests show that these materials are not initiated by mechanical insult, and they require an external heat source before any exothermic chemical reaction can be observed.

  9. NRS 459 Hazardous Waste | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI Ventures Ltd Jump to: navigation, search59 Hazardous Waste Jump to:

  10. Mr. James Bearzi Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMissionStressMove data fromMoving We'reBearzi Hazardous

  11. Wastes Hazardous or Solid | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw, Poland: EnergyPage Edit HistoryWastes Hazardous or Solid

  12. Hazardous Material Shipments | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-DoseOptions for Accidental Releases of Hazardous

  13. Sandia Energy - Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)GeothermalFuel Magnetization and Laser(TSPEAR &SolarSolar Glare Hazard

  14. Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites UT-B Contracts Div Page 1 of 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites UT-B Contracts Div July 2006 Page 1 of 1 work-place-sub-abuse-ext-july06.doc WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES (July 2006) (a) The Seller shall, consistent with 10 CFR part 707, Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites, incorporated herein by reference

  15. Determining risks for hazardous material operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cournoyer, M. E.; Dare, J. H.

    2002-01-01

    Integrated Safety Management (ISM) is structured to manage and control work at the activity level. Fundamental to ISM is that all work will be performed safely while meeting the applicable institutional-, facility-, and activity-level expectations. High and medium initial risk activities require certain levels of independent peer and/or Environmental, Health & Safety subject matter expert reviews prior to authorization. A key responsibility of line management and chemical workers is to assign initial risk adequately, so that the proper reviews are obtained. Thus, the effectiveness of an ISM system is largely dependent upon the adequacy and accuracy of this initial risk determination. In the following presentation, a Risk Determination Model (RDM) is presented for physical, health and ecological hazards associated with materials. Magnitude of exposure (Le., dose or concentration), frequency, duration, and quantity are the four factors most difficult to capture in a research and development setting. They are factored into the determination, as a function of the quantity of material. Quantity and magnitude of exposure components are simplified by using boundary criteria. This RDM will promote conformity and consistency in the assignment of risk to hazardous material activities. In conclusion, the risk assessors (line manager and chemical worker) should be capable of more accurately assessing the risk of exposure to a specific chemical with regard to the employee, public, and the environment.

  16. Method and apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korenberg, Jacob (York, PA)

    1990-01-01

    An incineration apparatus and method for disposal of infectious hazardous waste including a fluidized bed reactor containing a bed of granular material. The reactor includes a first chamber, a second chamber, and a vertical partition separating the first and second chambers. A pressurized stream of air is supplied to the reactor at a sufficient velocity to fluidize the granular material in both the first and second chambers. Waste materials to be incinerated are fed into the first chamber of the fluidized bed, the fine waste materials being initially incinerated in the first chamber and subsequently circulated over the partition to the second chamber wherein further incineration occurs. Coarse waste materials are removed from the first chamber, comminuted, and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. Any partially incinerated waste materials and ash from the bottom of the second chamber are removed and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. This process is repeated until all infectious hazardous waste has been completely incinerated.

  17. Management of hazardous medical waste in Croatia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinkovic, Natalija Vitale, Ksenija; Holcer, Natasa Janev; Dzakula, Aleksandar; Pavic, Tomo

    2008-07-01

    This article provides a review of hazardous medical waste production and its management in Croatia. Even though Croatian regulations define all steps in the waste management chain, implementation of those steps is one of the country's greatest issues. Improper practice is evident from the point of waste production to final disposal. The biggest producers of hazardous medical waste are hospitals that do not implement existing legislation, due to the lack of education and funds. Information on quantities, type and flow of medical waste are inadequate, as is sanitary control. We propose an integrated approach to medical waste management based on a hierarchical structure from the point of generation to its disposal. Priority is given to the reduction of the amounts and potential for harm. Where this is not possible, management includes reduction by sorting and separating, pretreatment on site, safe transportation, final treatment and sanitary disposal. Preferred methods should be the least harmful for human health and the environment. Integrated medical waste management could greatly reduce quantities and consequently financial strains. Landfilling is the predominant route of disposal in Croatia, although the authors believe that incineration is the most appropriate method. In a country such as Croatia, a number of small incinerators would be the most economical solution.

  18. Fire hazard analysis for the fuel supply shutdown storage buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REMAIZE, J.A.

    2000-09-27

    The purpose of a fire hazards analysis (FHA) is to comprehensively assess the risk from fire and other perils within individual fire areas in a DOE facility in relation to proposed fire protection so as to ascertain whether the objectives of DOE 5480.7A, Fire Protection, are met. This Fire Hazards Analysis was prepared as required by HNF-PRO-350, Fire Hazards Analysis Requirements, (Reference 7) for a portion of the 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility.

  19. Automating Risk Assessments of Hazardous Material Shipments for Transportation Routes and Mode Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbara H. Dolphin; William D. RIchins; Stephen R. Novascone

    2010-10-01

    The METEOR project at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) successfully addresses the difficult problem in risk assessment analyses of combining the results from bounding deterministic simulation results with probabilistic (Monte Carlo) risk assessment techniques. This paper describes a software suite designed to perform sensitivity and cost/benefit analyses on selected transportation routes and vehicles to minimize risk associated with the shipment of hazardous materials. METEOR uses Monte Carlo techniques to estimate the probability of an accidental release of a hazardous substance along a proposed transportation route. A METEOR user selects the mode of transportation, origin and destination points, and charts the route using interactive graphics. Inputs to METEOR (many selections built in) include crash rates for the specific aircraft, soil/rock type and population densities over the proposed route, and bounding limits for potential accident types (velocity, temperature, etc.). New vehicle, materials, and location data are added when available. If the risk estimates are unacceptable, the risks associated with alternate transportation modes or routes can be quickly evaluated and compared. Systematic optimizing methods will provide the user with the route and vehicle selection identified with the lowest risk of hazardous material release. The effects of a selected range of potential accidents such as vehicle impact, fire, fuel explosions, excessive containment pressure, flooding, etc. are evaluated primarily using hydrocodes capable of accurately simulating the material response of critical containment components. Bounding conditions that represent credible accidents (i.e; for an impact event, velocity, orientations, and soil conditions) are used as input parameters to the hydrocode models yielding correlation functions relating accident parameters to component damage. The Monte Carlo algorithms use random number generators to make selections at the various decision points such as; crash, location, etc. For each pass through the routines, when a crash is randomly selected, crash parameters are then used to determine if failure has occurred using either external look up tables, correlations functions from deterministic calculations, or built in data libraries. The effectiveness of the software was recently demonstrated in safety analyses of the transportation of radioisotope systems for the US Dept. of Energy. These methods are readily adaptable to estimating risks associated with a variety of hazardous shipments such as spent nuclear fuel, explosives, and chemicals.

  20. Forceful Fluid: Scientists Discover a Starchy Substance with Oily Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Researchers at the Energy Department’s Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) set out to find the proper mix of fluids needed to cap the powerful flow of oil that can occur during a spill, an objective that was principally driven by the failure of the top-kill method during last year's oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. You'll be surprised what starchy substance made the grade.

  1. Moderate forest disturbance as a stringent test for gap and big-leaf models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Fisk, Justin P.; Holm, Jennifer; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Bohrer, Gil; Gough, Christopher

    2015-01-27

    Disturbance-induced tree mortality is a key factor regulating the carbon balance of a forest, but tree mortality and its subsequent effects are poorly represented processes in terrestrial ecosystem models. It is thus unclear whether models can robustly simulate moderate (non-catastrophic) disturbances, which tend to increase biological and structural complexity and are increasingly common in aging US forests. We tested whether three forest ecosystem models – Biome-BGC (BioGeochemical Cycles), a classic big-leaf model, and the ZELIG and ED (Ecosystem Demography) gap-oriented models – could reproduce the resilience to moderate disturbance observed in an experimentally manipulated forest (the Forest Accelerated Succession Experimentmore »in northern Michigan, USA, in which 38% of canopy dominants were stem girdled and compared to control plots). Each model was parameterized, spun up, and disturbed following similar protocols and run for 5 years post-disturbance. The models replicated observed declines in aboveground biomass well. Biome-BGC captured the timing and rebound of observed leaf area index (LAI), while ZELIG and ED correctly estimated the magnitude of LAI decline. None of the models fully captured the observed post-disturbance C fluxes, in particular gross primary production or net primary production (NPP). Biome-BGC NPP was correctly resilient but for the wrong reasons, and could not match the absolute observational values. ZELIG and ED, in contrast, exhibited large, unobserved drops in NPP and net ecosystem production. The biological mechanisms proposed to explain the observed rapid resilience of the C cycle are typically not incorporated by these or other models. It is thus an open question whether most ecosystem models will simulate correctly the gradual and less extensive tree mortality characteristic of moderate disturbances.« less

  2. Moderate forest disturbance as a stringent test for gap and big-leaf models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Fisk, Justin P.; Holm, Jennifer; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Bohrer, Gil; Gough, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Disturbance-induced tree mortality is a key factor regulating the carbon balance of a forest, but tree mortality and its subsequent effects are poorly represented processes in terrestrial ecosystem models. It is thus unclear whether models can robustly simulate moderate (non-catastrophic) disturbances, which tend to increase biological and structural complexity and are increasingly common in aging US forests. We tested whether three forest ecosystem models – Biome-BGC (BioGeochemical Cycles), a classic big-leaf model, and the ZELIG and ED (Ecosystem Demography) gap-oriented models – could reproduce the resilience to moderate disturbance observed in an experimentally manipulated forest (the Forest Accelerated Succession Experiment in northern Michigan, USA, in which 38% of canopy dominants were stem girdled and compared to control plots). Each model was parameterized, spun up, and disturbed following similar protocols and run for 5 years post-disturbance. The models replicated observed declines in aboveground biomass well. Biome-BGC captured the timing and rebound of observed leaf area index (LAI), while ZELIG and ED correctly estimated the magnitude of LAI decline. None of the models fully captured the observed post-disturbance C fluxes, in particular gross primary production or net primary production (NPP). Biome-BGC NPP was correctly resilient but for the wrong reasons, and could not match the absolute observational values. ZELIG and ED, in contrast, exhibited large, unobserved drops in NPP and net ecosystem production. The biological mechanisms proposed to explain the observed rapid resilience of the C cycle are typically not incorporated by these or other models. It is thus an open question whether most ecosystem models will simulate correctly the gradual and less extensive tree mortality characteristic of moderate disturbances.

  3. October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - Wednesday...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Flooding Hazard Assessment Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility (PF-4) Seismic Safety Implementation of DOE NPH Requirements at the Thomas Jefferson National...

  4. Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Geological hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staub, W.P.; Reed, R.M.

    1995-03-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on geologic hazards during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. This report presents a review of current information on geologic hazards in the Hawaiian Islands. Interrelationships among these hazards are discussed. Probabilities of occurrence of given geologic hazards are provided in various regions where sufficient geologic or historical data are available. Most of the information contained herein is compiled from recent US Geological Survey (USGS) publications and USGS open-file reports related to this project. This report describes the natural geologic hazards present in the area and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. Geologic hazards originate both onshore and offshore. Onshore geologic hazards such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, surface rupture, landslides, uplift and subsidence occur mainly on the southern third of the island of Hawaii (hereinafter referred to as Hawaii). Offshore geologic hazards are more widely distributed throughout the Hawaiian Islands. Examples of offshore geologic hazards are submarine landslides, turbidity currents, and seismic sea waves (tsunamis).

  5. EIS-0286: Hanford Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement (HSW EIS) analyzes the proposed waste management practices at the Hanford Site.

  6. Program Review, Workplace Inspections, Hazards Analysis And Abatement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document provides guidance information and suggested procedures for performing program review, workplace inspections, hazards analysis, and abatement, successfully at DOE Federal employee worksites.

  7. Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis Presented by B&W Technical Services, Pantex and Pro2Serve October, 2011

  8. Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    www.mdpi.comjournalremotesensing Article Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and Arizona Using Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Jungho Im 1, *, John R....

  9. Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Class 1 Permit Modification Notification to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste...

  10. Dust: A major environmental hazard on the earth's moon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiken, G.; Vaniman, D.; Lehnert, B.

    1990-01-01

    On the Earth's Moon, obvious hazards to humans and machines are created by extreme temperature fluctuations, low gravity, and the virtual absence of any atmosphere. The most important other environmental factor is ionizing radiation. Less obvious environmental hazards that must be considered before establishing a manned presence on the lunar surface are the hazards from micrometeoroid bombardment, the nuisance of electro-statically-charged lunar dust, and an alien visual environment without familiar clues. Before man can establish lunar bases and lunar mining operations, and continue the exploration of that planet, we must develop a means of mitigating these hazards. 4 refs.

  11. NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT Hazardous Waste Burealt SUSANA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT Hazardous Waste Burealt SUSANA MARTINEZ Governor 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 875056303 Phone (50S) 476-6000 Fax...

  12. Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Subject: Notification of Planned Physical Alteration to the Permitted Facility, Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, Number: NM4890139088-TSDF Dear Mr. Kieling: The purpose of...

  13. Mr. John E. Kieling, Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Field Office (CBFO) and Nuclear Waste Partnership LLC (NWP). Co-Permittees of Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF), implemented the Resource Conservation and...

  14. Fact Sheet, Preliminary Notice of Violation: Four Hazardous Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    located in Los Alamos, New Mexico. Fact Sheet, Preliminary Notice of Violation: Four Hazardous Energy Control Events at LANL More Documents & Publications Preliminary Notice of...

  15. Order Module--self-study program: HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the criterion test. Before continuing, you should obtain a copy of the regulation at Hazardous waste operations and emergency response or through the course manager. You may need...

  16. Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau Departmen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to characterize and certify waste in accordance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit. The report contains the results of the recertification audit...

  17. Los Alamos National Laboratory Hazardous Waste Facility Permit...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Draft Community Relations Plan CommentSuggestion Form Instructions for completing the form: Please reference the section in the plan that your...

  18. Mr. Steve lappe, Project Leader Hazardous Materials Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lappe, Project Leader Hazardous Materials Bureau Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P o. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 FEB I 3110 New Mexico Environment Department...

  19. Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Office 2 3 TITLE: 4 Revised Draft Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact 5 Statement, Richland, Benton County, Washington (DOE...

  20. Revised Draft Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous)...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Operations Office TITLE: Revised Draft Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement, Richland, Benton County, Washington (DOE...

  1. Final Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Richland Operations Office TITLE: Final Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement, Richland, Benton County, Washington (DOE...

  2. Modeling Exposure to Persistent Chemicals in Hazard and Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowan-Ellsberry, Christina E.

    2010-01-01

    Chemicals in Hazard and Risk Assessment Christina E. Cowan-implications for chemical risk assessment. J Environ MonitJM. 2006. Screening level risk assessment model for chemical

  3. ORS 466 - Storage, Treatment, and Disposal of Hazardous Waste...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History ORS 466 - Storage, Treatment, and Disposal of Hazardous Waste and Materials Jump to: navigation, search...

  4. Oregon Procedure and Criteria for Hazardous Waste Treatment,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oregon Procedure and Criteria for Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage or Disposal Permits Fact Sheet Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Permitting...

  5. Natural hazard phenomena and mitigation -- 1995; PVP-Volume 308...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    hazard phenomena and mitigation -- 1995; PVP-Volume 308. DOE facilities programsdesign criteria and methods for: Impact, wave, high frequency, and seismic loads Citation...

  6. Ozone-depleting-substance control and phase-out plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nickels, J.M.; Brown, M.J.

    1994-07-01

    Title VI of the Federal Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 requires regulation of the use and disposal of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) (e.g., Halon, Freon). Several important federal regulations have been promulgated that affect the use of such substances at the Hanford Site. On April 23, 1993, Executive Order (EO) 12843, Procurement Requirements and Policies for Federal Agencies for Ozone-Depleting Substances (EPA 1993) was issued for Federal facilities to conform to the new US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations implementing the Clean Air Act of 1963 (CAA), Section 613, as amended. To implement the requirements of Title VI the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL), issued a directive to the Hanford Site contractors on May 25, 1994 (Wisness 1994). The directive assigns Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) the lead in coordinating the development of a sitewide comprehensive implementation plan to be drafted by July 29, 1994 and completed by September 30, 1994. The implementation plan will address several areas where immediate compliance action is required. It will identify all current uses of ODSs and inventories, document the remaining useful life of equipment that contains ODS chemicals, provide a phase-out schedule, and provide a strategy that will be implemented consistently by all the Hanford Site contractors. This plan also addresses the critical and required elements of Federal regulations, the EO, and US Department of Energy (DOE) guidance. This plan is intended to establish a sitewide management system to address the clean air requirements.

  7. Method and apparatus for injecting a substance into the bloodstream of a subject

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Bennett, G.W.; Duncan, C.C.; Ducote, L.W.

    1983-10-18

    An apparatus and method is disclosed for injecting a substance, such as a radiopharmaceutical, into the bloodstream of a subject. The apparatus comprises an injection means, such as a servo controlled syringe, a means for measuring the concentration of that substance in the subject's bloodstream, and means for controlling the injection in response to the measurement so that the concentration of the substance follows a predetermined function of time. The apparatus of the subject invention functions to inject a substance into a subject's bloodstream at a rate controlled by an error signal proportional to the difference between the concentration of the substance in the subject's bloodstream and the predetermined function. 2 figs.

  8. A complete electrical hazard classification system and its application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, Lloyd B; Cartelli, Laura

    2009-01-01

    The Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace, NFPA 70E, and relevant OSHA electrical safety standards evolved to address the hazards of 60-Hz power that are faced primarily by electricians, linemen, and others performing facility and utility work. This leaves a substantial gap in the management of electrical hazards in Research and Development (R&D) and specialized high voltage and high power equipment. Examples include lasers, accelerators, capacitor banks, electroplating systems, induction and dielectric heating systems, etc. Although all such systems are fed by 50/60 Hz alternating current (ac) power, we find substantial use of direct current (dc) electrical energy, and the use of capacitors, inductors, batteries, and radiofrequency (RF) power. The electrical hazards of these forms of electricity and their systems are different than for 50160 Hz power. Over the past 10 years there has been an effort to develop a method of classifying all of the electrical hazards found in all types of R&D and utilization equipment. Examples of the variation of these hazards from NFPA 70E include (a) high voltage can be harmless, if the available current is sufficiently low, (b) low voltage can be harmful if the available current/power is high, (c) high voltage capacitor hazards are unique and include severe reflex action, affects on the heart, and tissue damage, and (d) arc flash hazard analysis for dc and capacitor systems are not provided in existing standards. This work has led to a comprehensive electrical hazard classification system that is based on various research conducted over the past 100 years, on analysis of such systems in R&D, and on decades of experience. Initially, national electrical safety codes required the qualified worker only to know the source voltage to determine the shock hazard. Later, as arc flash hazards were understood, the fault current and clearing time were needed. These items are still insufficient to fully characterize all types of electrical hazards. The new comprehensive electrical hazard classification system uses a combination of voltage, shock current available, fault current available, power, energy, and waveform to classify all forms of electrical hazards. Based on this electrical hazard classification system, many new tools have been developed, including (a) work controls for these hazards, (b) better selection of PPE for R&D work, (c) improved training, and (d) a new Severity Ranking Tool that is used to rank electrical accidents and incidents with various forms of electrical energy.

  9. Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Geological Hazards (DRAFT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staub, W.P.

    1994-06-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on geologic hazards during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 1994 (Fed Regis. 5925638) withdrawing its Notice of Intent (Fed Regis. 575433) of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated This report presents a review of current information on geologic hazards in the Hawaiian Islands. Interrelationships among these hazards are discussed. Probabilities of occurrence of given geologic hazards are provided in various regions where sufficient geologic or historical data are available. Most of the information contained herein is compiled from recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) publications and open-file reports. This report describes the natural geologic hazards present in the area and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. Geologic hazards originate both onshore and offshore. Onshore geologic hazards such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, surface rupture, landslides, uplift, and subsidence occur mainly on the southern third of the island of Hawaii (hereinafter referred to as Hawaii). Offshore geologic hazards are more widely distributed throughout the Hawaiian Islands. Examples of offshore geologic hazards are submarine landslides, turbidity currents, and seismic sea waves (tsunamis). First, overviews of volcanic and earthquake activity, and details of offshore geologic hazards is provided for the Hawaiian Islands. Then, a more detailed discussion of onshore geologic hazards is presented with special emphasis on the southern third of Hawaii and the east rift zone of Kilauea.

  10. Predicting the Spread of Disturbance across Heterogeneous Landscapes Monica G. Turner; Robert H. Gardner; Virginia H. Dale; Robert V. O'Neill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    % of the landscape were sensitive to disturbance frequency but showed little response to changes in disturbance intensity and less sensitive to disturbance frequency. These dominant habitats were alsovery easily fragmented by disturbances of moderate intensity and low frequency. Implications of these results for the man

  11. Method for disposing of hazardous wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burton, Frederick G. (West Richland, WA); Cataldo, Dominic A. (Kennewick, WA); Cline, John F. (Prosser, WA); Skiens, W. Eugene (Richland, WA)

    1995-01-01

    A method and system for long-term control of root growth without killing the plants bearing those roots involves incorporating a 2,6-dinitroaniline in a polymer and disposing the polymer in an area in which root control is desired. This results in controlled release of the substituted aniline herbicide over a period of many years. Herbicides of this class have the property of preventing root elongation without translocating into other parts of the plant. The herbicide may be encapsulated in the polymer or mixed with it. The polymer-herbicide mixture may be formed into pellets, sheets, pipe gaskets, pipes for carrying water, or various other forms. The invention may be applied to other protection of buried hazardous wastes, protection of underground pipes, prevention of root intrusion beneath slabs, the dwarfing of trees or shrubs and other applications. The preferred herbicide is 4-difluoromethyl-N,N-dipropyl- 2,6-dinitro-aniline, commonly known as trifluralin.

  12. Hazardous Gas Production by Alpha Particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay A. LaVerne, Principal Investigator

    2001-11-26

    This project focused on the production of hazardous gases in the radiolysis of solid organic matrices, such as polymers and resins, that may be associated with transuranic waste material. Self-radiolysis of radioactive waste is a serious environmental problem because it can lead to a change in the composition of the materials in storage containers and possibly jeopardize their integrity. Experimental determination of gaseous yields is of immediate practical importance in the engineering and maintenance of containers for waste materials. Fundamental knowledge on the radiation chemical processes occurring in these systems allows one to predict outcomes in materials or mixtures not specifically examined, which is a great aid in the management of the variety of waste materials currently overseen by Environmental Management.

  13. Potential health hazards of radiation. Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-05-19

    During World War II and the Cold War, the federal government developed and operated industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over 100 sites. Some of these sites processed uranium and vanadium, and upon closure, left behind millions of cubic yards of mill tailings on the sites and throughout the nearby communities. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) administers the cleanup of these areas to minimize the risks to the public and environment from exposure to the tailings and the radon gas they produce.

  14. 327 Building fire hazards analysis implementation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BARILO, N.F.

    1999-05-10

    In March 1998, the 327 Building Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) (Reference 1) was approved by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-E) for implementation by B and W Hanford Company (BWC). The purpose of the FHA was to identify gaps in compliance with DOE Order 5480.7A (Reference 2) and Richland Operations Office Implementation Directive (RLID) 5480.7 (Reference 3), especially in regard to loss limitation. The FHA identified compliance gaps in five areas and provided nine recommendations (11 items) to bring the 327 Building into compliance. A status is provided for each recommendation in this document. BWHC will use this Implementation Plan to bring the 327 Building and its operation into compliance with DOE Order 5480.7A and IUD 5480.7.

  15. Hazards of explosives dusts: Particle size effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cashdollar, K L; Hertzberg, M; Green, G M

    1992-02-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, the Bureau of Mines has investigated the hazards of military explosives dispersed as dust clouds in a 20-L test chamber. In this report, the effect of particle size for HMX, HNS, RDX, TATB, and TNT explosives dusts is studied in detail. The explosibility data for these dusts are also compared to those for pure fuel dusts. The data show that all of the sizes of the explosives dusts that were studied were capable of sustaining explosions as dust clouds dispersed in air. The finest sizes (<10 [mu]m) of explosives dusts were less reactive than the intermediate sizes (20 to 60 [mu]m); this is opposite to the particle size effect observed previously for the pure fuel dusts. At the largest sizes studied, the explosives dusts become somewhat less reactive as dispersed dust clouds. The six sizes of the HMX dust were also studied as dust clouds dispersed in nitrogen.

  16. Ground freezing for containment of hazardous waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayles, F.N.; Iskandar, I.K.

    1998-07-01

    The freezing of ground for the containment of subsurface hazardous waste is a promising method that is environmentally friendly and offers a safe alternative to other methods of waste retention in many cases. The frozen soil method offers two concepts for retaining waste. One concept is to freeze the entire waste area into a solid block of frozen soil thus locking the waste in situ. For small areas where the contaminated soil does not include vessels that would rupture from frost action, this concept may be simpler to install. A second concept, of course, is to create a frozen soil barrier to confine the waste within prescribed unfrozen soil boundaries; initial research in this area was funded by EPA, Cincinnati, OH, and the Army Corps of Engineers. The paper discusses advantages and limitations, a case study from Oak Ridge, TN, and a mesh generation program that simulates the cryogenic technology.

  17. Standard Operating Procedures Template for Highly Hazardous Chemicals Title of Procedure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Standard Operating Procedures Template for Highly Hazardous Chemicals Title of Procedure: Date/Date: Risk Assessment Hazardous Chemicals: (List chemicals used. Include chemical name, common name and abbreviation) Potential Hazard(s): (Describe the potential hazards associated with the chemicals

  18. Guidance manual for hazardous waste incinerator permits. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-07-01

    The manual provides guidance to the permit writer for designating facility - specific operating conditions necessary to comply with the RCRA standards for hazardous waste incinerators. Each section of the incineration regulation is addressed, including: waste analysis, designation of principal organic hazardous constituents and requirements for operation, inspection and monitoring. Guidance is also provided for evaluating incinerator performance data and trial burn procedures.

  19. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety Design Guide Site of specifications for projects in areas with site contamination. Overview Many locations on University of Washington industrial activities such as fuel storage or dispensing or hazardous material spills prior to University

  20. Former Hazardous Waste Management Facility -Perimeter Soils Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Former Hazardous Waste Management Facility - Perimeter Soils Update Brookhaven National Laboratory Division #12;2 Background Cesium -137 contamination found outside the Former Hazardous Waste Management Facility (FHWMF) fence line in late 2005 American Reinvestment Recovery Act funded clean-up of areas

  1. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety Design Guide Fluorescent are hazardous waste, so take care to ensure the tubes remain intact during removal and storage. Fluorescent offsite locations, the EH&S Environmental Programs Office (EPO) will arrange directly with the recycling

  2. PROOF COPY 001403EQS Tsunami Hazards Associated with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Synolakis, Costas E.

    PROOF COPY 001403EQS PROOF COPY 001403EQS Tsunami Hazards Associated with the Catalina Fault the tsunami hazard associated with the Catalina Fault off- shore of southern California. Realistic faulting scenarios with moment magnitudes ranging between 7.0 and 7.6 are used as initial conditions for tsunami

  3. Zurich`s hazard analysis process: A systematic team approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frei, H.

    1997-06-01

    The Zurich method of hazard analysis (ZHA) is a process designed to facilitate the systematic identification, assessment and reduction or elimination of hazard and risk in almost any product, system or process. It has been particularly successful as a front-end screening tool in the petrochemical, chemical, and pharmaceutical industries. The complexity and the regulation of these industries and the requirement for management of change have created a demand for highly efficient, yet thorough, hazard analysis techniques capable of capturing and managing the total risk perspective while clearly illuminating the risk priorities. Only when these priorities have been segregated and economically addressed as an organization fully leveraged the power of any hazard analysis tool. This paper will outline the Zurich Hazard Analysis process and will highlight the elements and strategies central to its success as an efficient, yet thorough methodology.

  4. Ionization source utilizing a jet disturber in combination with an ion funnel and method of operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA); Kim, Taeman (Richland, WA); Tang, Keqi (Richland, WA); Udseth, Harold R. (Richland, WA)

    2003-06-24

    A jet disturber used in combination with an ion funnel to focus ions and other charged particles generated at or near atmospheric pressure into a relatively low pressure region, which allows increased conductance of the ions and other charged particles. The jet disturber is positioned within an ion funnel and may be interfaced with a multi-capillary inlet juxtaposed between an ion source and the interior of an instrument maintained at near atmospheric pressure. The invention finds particular advantages when deployed to improve the ion transmission between an electrospray ionization source and the first vacuum stage of a mass spectrometer.

  5. Plant reestablishment after soil disturbance: Effects of soils, treatment, and time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, C.A.; Alford, K.; McIlveny, G.; Tijerina, A.

    1993-11-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory examined plant growth and establishment on 16 sites where severe land disturbance had taken place. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the relative effectiveness of the different methods in term of their effects on establishment of native and alien plants. Disturbances ranged from 1 to 50 years in age. Revegetation using native plants had been attempted at 14 of the sites; the remainder were abandoned without any further management. Revegetation efforts variously included seeding, fertilizer application, mulching with various organic sources, compost application, application of Warden silt loam topsoil over sand and gravel soils, and moderate irrigation.

  6. Hazard Resilient Coastal Communities 2010 Annual Report Due to shrinking budgets, the Hazard Resilient Coastal Communities (HRCC) focus team convened via

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazard Resilient Coastal Communities 2010 Annual Report Due to shrinking budgets, the Hazard. Hazard Mitigation & Adaptation Planning Sea Grant engages stakeholders and educates them on preparing for natural hazards and planning for adaptation to projected impacts from climate change. By improving

  7. R/V Thomas G. Thompson Hazardous Material Storage and Inventory Sheet All hazardous material must be inventoried and accounted for by a Marine Technician BEFORE being

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    R/V Thomas G. Thompson Hazardous Material Storage and Inventory Sheet · All hazardous material must and placarded in accordance with the IMDG Code, CFRs and MARPOL 73/78. · All hazardous material to be brought hazardous material containers, no matter how small or how many, must be labeled with the name and phone

  8. Steps for Chemical "Hazardous Waste" Removal 1. Complete a Green Hazardous Waste tag and attach to waste container. This is required for each individual item to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Steps for Chemical "Hazardous Waste" Removal 1. Complete a Green Hazardous Waste tag and attach by calling 5-8200 or by e-mailing waste_tech@cornell.edu ) 2. Place all Hazardous Waste containers into a UN. Leave top copy of Hazardous Waste tag in the box with the items to be removed 4. Submit a request

  9. SECTION 12-HAZARD COMMUNICATION PROGRAM (HCP) 29 CFR Section 1920-"Hazardous Communications" states that, "the purpose of this section is to ensure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selmic, Sandra

    144 SECTION 12- HAZARD COMMUNICATION PROGRAM (HCP) 29 CFR Section 1920- "Hazardous Communications" states that, "the purpose of this section is to ensure that the hazards of all chemicals produced or imported are evaluated, and that information concerning their hazards is transmitted to employers

  10. Feasibility Studies on Disturbance Feedforward Techniques to Improve Wind Turbine Load Mitigation Performance: January 2009 -- January 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laks, J.H.; Dunne, F.; Pao, L. Y.

    2010-12-01

    This study investigates disturbance feedforward and preview control to better understand the best possible improvement in load mitigation using advanced wind measurement techniques.

  11. Automated process for solvent separation of organic/inorganic substance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schweighardt, F.K.

    1986-07-29

    There is described an automated process for the solvent separation of organic/inorganic substances that operates continuously and unattended and eliminates potential errors resulting from subjectivity and the aging of the sample during analysis. In the process, metered amounts of one or more solvents are passed sequentially through a filter containing the sample under the direction of a microprocessor control apparatus. The mixture in the filter is agitated by ultrasonic cavitation for a timed period and the filtrate is collected. The filtrate of each solvent extraction is collected individually and the residue on the filter element is collected to complete the extraction process. 4 figs.

  12. Automated process for solvent separation of organic/inorganic substance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schweighardt, Frank K. (Upper Macungie, PA)

    1986-01-01

    There is described an automated process for the solvent separation of organic/inorganic substances that operates continuously and unattended and eliminates potential errors resulting from subjectivity and the aging of the sample during analysis. In the process, metered amounts of one or more solvents are passed sequentially through a filter containing the sample under the direction of a microprocessor control apparatus. The mixture in the filter is agitated by ultrasonic cavitation for a timed period and the filtrate is collected. The filtrate of each solvent extraction is collected individually and the residue on the filter element is collected to complete the extraction process.

  13. Integrating Chemical Hazard Assessment into the Design of Inherently Safer Processes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Yuan

    2012-02-14

    Reactive hazard associated with chemicals is a major safety issue in process industries. This kind of hazard has caused the occurrence of many accidents, leading to fatalities, injuries, property damage and environment pollution. Reactive hazards...

  14. Example of a Category B Shipment with Dry Ice Infectious Substance,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    the UN3373 (Category B) hazard shipping label, this label must be 50 x 50 mm for all packages. 5. Proper (opposing) sides of the package. 7. Include Class 9 Miscellaneous Hazard label. 8. Class 9 Shipping Label 60x55 mm for small packages). Must be an orange label with black text. #12;Hazard labels for small

  15. WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit - 2008 Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kehrman, R.F.; Most, W.A.

    2008-07-01

    Important new changes to the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) were implemented during 2007. The challenge was to implement these changes without impacting shipping schedules. Many of the changes required advanced preparation and coordination in order to transition to the new waste analysis paradigm, both at the generator sites and at the WIPP without interrupting the flow of waste to the disposal facility. Not only did aspects of waste characterization change, but also a new Permittees' confirmation program was created. Implementing the latter change required that new equipment and facilities be obtained, personnel hired, trained and qualified, and operating procedures written and approved without interruption to the contact-handled (CH) transuranic (TRU) waste shipping schedule. This was all accomplished successfully with no delayed or cancelled shipments. Looking forward to 2008 and beyond, proposed changes that will deal with waste in the DOE TRU waste complex is larger than the TRUPACT-IIs can handle. Size reduction of the waste would lead to unnecessary exposure risk and ultimately create more waste. The WIPP is working to have the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) certify the TRUPACT-III. The TRUPACT-III will be able to accommodate larger sized TRU mixed waste. Along with this new NRC-certified shipping cask, a new disposal container, the Standard Large Box, must be proposed in a permit modification. Containers for disposal of TRU mixed waste at the WIPP must meet the DOT 7A standards and be filtered. Additionally, as the TRUPACT-III/Standard Large Box loads and unloads from the end of the shipping cask, the proposed modification will add horizontal waste handling techniques to WIPP's vertical CH TRU waste handling operations. Another major focus will be the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit reapplication. The WIPP received its HWFP in October of 1999 for a term of ten years. The regulations and the HWFP require that a new permit application be submitted 180-days before the expiration date of the HWFP. At that time, the WIPP will request only one significant change, the permitting of Panel 8 to receive TRU mixed waste. (author)

  16. Hazard screening application guide. Safety Analysis Report Update Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-06-01

    The basic purpose of hazard screening is to group precesses, facilities, and proposed modifications according to the magnitude of their hazards so as to determine the need for and extent of follow on safety analysis. A hazard is defined as a material, energy source, or operation that has the potential to cause injury or illness in human beings. The purpose of this document is to give guidance and provide standard methods for performing hazard screening. Hazard screening is applied to new and existing facilities and processes as well as to proposed modifications to existing facilities and processes. The hazard screening process evaluates an identified hazards in terms of the effects on people, both on-site and off-site. The process uses bounding analyses with no credit given for mitigation of an accident with the exception of certain containers meeting DOT specifications. The process is restricted to human safety issues only. Environmental effects are addressed by the environmental program. Interfaces with environmental organizations will be established in order to share information.

  17. Development of a Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toshiaki Sakai; Tomoyoshi Takeda; Hiroshi Soraoka; Ken Yanagisawa [Tokyo Electric Power Company (Japan); Tadashi Annaka [Tokyo Electric Power Services Co., Ltd, 3-3, Higashiueno 3-Chome, Taito-ku, Tokyo 110-0015 (Japan)

    2006-07-01

    It is meaningful for tsunami assessment to evaluate phenomena beyond the design basis as well as seismic design. Because once we set the design basis tsunami height, we still have possibilities tsunami height may exceeds the determined design tsunami height due to uncertainties regarding the tsunami phenomena. Probabilistic tsunami risk assessment consists of estimating for tsunami hazard and fragility of structures and executing system analysis. In this report, we apply a method for probabilistic tsunami hazard analysis (PTHA). We introduce a logic tree approach to estimate tsunami hazard curves (relationships between tsunami height and probability of excess) and present an example for Japan. Examples of tsunami hazard curves are illustrated, and uncertainty in the tsunami hazard is displayed by 5-, 16-, 50-, 84- and 95-percentile and mean hazard curves. The result of PTHA will be used for quantitative assessment of the tsunami risk for important facilities located on coastal area. Tsunami hazard curves are the reasonable input data for structures and system analysis. However the evaluation method for estimating fragility of structures and the procedure of system analysis is now being developed. (authors)

  18. Investigation of single-substance horizontal two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickinson, D.A.; Maeder, P.F.

    1984-03-01

    Despite the abundance of work in the field of two-phase flow, it seems as though a consensus has not been reached on some of the fundamental points. Although exceptions exist, adequate physical interpretation of the flow seems to be hindered either by complexity of analysis or, in the opposite extreme, the trend toward limited-range analysis and correlations. The dissertation presents the derivation of basic conservation equations for the phases. The combined equations are used to examine the phenomenon of slip and its practical limitations, the Fanno line for single-substance flow and the effect of slip on choking. Equations for critical mass flux in the presence of slip are derived. The Mach, Reynolds and Froude numbers based on conditions at flashing are introduced as the characteristic parameters, and the importance of compressibility in single-substance two-phase flow is discussed. Experimental measurements of pressure change and void fraction for flow in the highly compressible range (.5 < Ma < 1) are presented. The working fluid is Refrigerant R-114, at room temperature, in a test section of diameter 5 cm and length 8 m. The effect of the Froude and Mach numbers is examined. The experimental facility is operated intermittently with running times of approximately two minutes and is instrumented for rapid measurements using a computer data acquisition and control system. A description of the facility and procedure is provided.

  19. Change in biomass of benthic and planktonic algae along a disturbance gradient for 24 Great

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMaster University

    Change in biomass of benthic and planktonic algae along a disturbance gradient for 24 Great Lakes. The PC1 site score was significantly related to both periphyton and phytoplankton biomass, respectively accounted for 18% of the variation in epiphyton biomass. Periphytic and epiphytic biomass were negatively

  20. Primary Research Paper Effects of pulsed and pressed disturbances on the benthic invertebrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIntosh, Angus

    January 2005 Key words: Cayuga Inlet, channelization, coal spill, human disturbance, long-term recovery community following a coal spill in a small stream in northeastern USA Matthew P. Harper1 & Barbara L, stream invertebrates Abstract In September 1999, a coal-carrying train derailed and spilled 180

  1. Long-period pulses Motivation Developed program Results Long-period disturbances in records of Swiss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Long-period pulses Motivation Developed program Results Long-period disturbances in records 2014 #12;Long-period pulses Motivation Developed program Results Index 1 Long-period pulses in records 2 Motivation for the study 3 Developed program 4 Results #12;Long-period pulses Motivation Developed

  2. Navy Leadership Disturbed by "Spice" Usage Rise Navy leaders are expressing alarm at recent statistics that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navy Leadership Disturbed by "Spice" Usage Rise Navy leaders are expressing alarm at recent, mimicking the chemical compounds found in the drug. These products are banned for Navy personnel (NAVADMIN) 108/10 in March 2010, which reemphasized the Navy's drug policy, the U.S. Navy has been

  3. Underrepresentation of Hispanic/Latino Students Identified with Emotional Disturbance in IDEIA: What's the Teacher's Role? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massa, Idalia

    2011-10-21

    given that numerous federal sources report that H/L students continue a disturbing trend of struggling academically as well as being at a higher risk for poor mental health outcomes such as elevated levels of depression, anxiety, and suicidality when...

  4. A potential mechanism for disturbance-mediated channel migration in a southeastern United States salt marsh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lottig, Noah R.

    salt marsh Noah R. Lottig, Justin M. Fox University of Wisconsin-Madison Center for Limnology 680 North September 2006; accepted 8 September 2006 Available online 27 October 2006 Abstract Coastal salt marsh tidal Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Wrack; Disturbance; Salt marsh tidal creek; Channel migration

  5. Increase of monoterpene emissions from a pine plantation as a result of mechanical disturbances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    Increase of monoterpene emissions from a pine plantation as a result of mechanical disturbances and emission rates of monoterpenes were measured above a ponderosa pine plantation in the Sierra Nevada chemistry. The increase was mostly because of higher basal emission rates, but small changes

  6. Analysis of Electric Power System Disturbance Data Jie Chen James S. Thorp Manu Parashar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . A fuse model using DC load flow and fuse protection is presented to simulating the cascading events in power transmission networks. Some initial simulation results are shown to be consistent with NERC data disturbances. 1. Introduction Electric power transmission networks are complex systems which undergo non

  7. Response of soil invertebrates to disturbance across three resource regions in North Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    Response of soil invertebrates to disturbance across three resource regions in North Carolina M. E Pathology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA Present address: D. A. Neher :T. R (2009) 152:283­298 DOI 10.1007/s10661-008-0315-5 M. E. Barbercheck Department of Entomology, North

  8. Validation of a STATCOM Transient Stability Model through Small-Disturbance Stability Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cañizares, Claudio A.

    . INTRODUCTION Power system operators are constantly striving to keep power networks secure by guaranteeing models. For instance, the TS models proposed for a series of Flexible AC Transmission Systems (FACTS used in small-disturbance stability studies of large, interconnected power grids as well as microgrids

  9. Bioavailability of organic matter in a highly disturbed estuary: The role of detrital and algal resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    organic carbon derived primarily from internal phytoplankton production is the dominant food supply of detrital and algal organic matter to the metazoan food web in this large estuarine ecosystem. BackgroundBioavailability of organic matter in a highly disturbed estuary: The role of detrital and algal

  10. Nordic Society Oikos Predicting the Spread of Disturbance across Heterogeneous Landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    . Dale and Robert V. O'Neill Turner,M. G., Gardner,R. H., Dale, V. H. andO'Neill,R. V. 1989.Predictingthe the disturbanceintensityandfrequency. M. G. Turner,R. H. Gardner,V.H. DaleandR. V. O'Neill,EnvironmentalSciences Division landscape pattern and disturbance. Landscape hetero- geneity may enhance (e.g., Turner and Bratton 1987

  11. Land Rehabilitation programs1 teach individuals how to monitor, protect, and restore disturbed landscapes to natural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Land Rehabilitation programs1 teach individuals how to monitor, protect, and restore disturbed knowledge of land rehabilitation processes, are able to critically analyze and solve problems, and can work in teams to develop and implement effective land management strategies. Studies in Land Rehabilitation

  12. Fifth Billings symposium on disturbed land rehabilitation. Volume I: Hardrock waste, analytical and revegetation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1990-12-31

    This publication contains Volume I of the proceedings of the Symposium on Disturbed Land Rehabilitation held in Billings, Montana, March 25-30, 1990. Sessions were held on the following topics: Tailings rehabilitation; Cyanide; Other hardrock rehabilitation; Revegetation; Selenium; and, Geostatistical, GIS and Data Base Management. Those papers of specific interest are indexed separately in this data base.

  13. Disturbances in the US electric grid associated with geomagnetic Carolus J. Schrijver* and Sarah D. Mitchell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    & Coetzee 2007). Despite the known impact of large space weather events on the electrical power grid (see, eDisturbances in the US electric grid associated with geomagnetic activity Carolus J. Schrijver on the US electric power grid for the period from 1992 through 2010. We find, with more than 3r significance

  14. Modeling of the interactions between forest vegetation, disturbances, and sediment yields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    Modeling of the interactions between forest vegetation, disturbances, and sediment yields Erkan on the frequency and magnitude of sediment delivery from a small watershed ($3.9 km2 ) in the Idaho batholith weathering and the divergence of diffusive sediment transport on hillslopes. Soil removal is due to episodic

  15. Stability of steady gravity waves generated by a moving localised pressure disturbance in water of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stability of steady gravity waves generated by a moving localised pressure disturbance in water-dimensional surface waves generated by an applied steadily moving localized pressure distribution over water of finite is ignored, and has applications for the modelling of waves generated by ships. The flow parameters

  16. Assessment of Proportional-Integral Control Loop Performance for Input Load Disturbance Rejection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jiandong

    Assessment of Proportional-Integral Control Loop Performance for Input Load Disturbance Rejection: This paper studies the performance assessment of proportional-integral (PI) control loops in terms and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed performance index. 1. INTRODUCTION Proportional

  17. ASPECTS OF SENSORY CUES AND PROPULSION IN MARINE ZOOPLANKTON HYDRODYNAMIC DISTURBANCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    colleagues (Environmental Fluid Mechanics and Biology graduate students) for their input and adviceASPECTS OF SENSORY CUES AND PROPULSION IN MARINE ZOOPLANKTON HYDRODYNAMIC DISTURBANCES A Thesis Institute of Technology December 2009 #12;ASPECTS OF SENSORY CUES AND PROPULSION IN MARINE ZOOPLANKTON

  18. A disturbance of nonlinear interdependence in scalp EEG of subjects with first episode schizophrenia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breakspear, Michael

    A disturbance of nonlinear interdependence in scalp EEG of subjects with first episode of dynamical interdependence to scalp EEG data. EEG data were collected from 40 subjects with a first episode was applied to six pairs of bipolar electrodes in each subject. The topographic organization

  19. The Relative Importance of Snow Avalanche Disturbance and Thinning on Canopy Plant Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Edward A.

    of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use, available at http://www.jstor.org/page/info the discovery and use of these resources. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support avalanches; thinning. Introduction Natural disturbances are postulated to be one of the important forces

  20. China's coal price disturbances: Observations, explanations, and implications for global energy economies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    China's coal price disturbances: Observations, explanations, and implications for global energy I G H T S c Since China decontrolled its coal prices, the price of coal has risen steadily in China, accompanied by unusual volatility. c Relatively high and volatile coal prices have triggered widespread power