Sample records for distributor tariffs represent

  1. U.S. Agricultural Production Affected by Mexican Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U.S. Agricultural Production Affected by Mexican Tariffs CNAS Issue Brief 2011-02 March 17, 2011 was eliminated. Mexico retaliated on March 18, 2009 by imposing tariffs on selected U.S. agricultural exports 17, 2010, with agricultural goods representing 71 percent of all products under tariff. Tariffs

  2. Tariffs with Dynamic Supply Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, Larry

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Giannini FDN iibrary TARIFFS WITH DYNAMIC SUPPLY RESWNSEpaper studies the optimal tariff in a dynamic framework. Thesellers, the optimal tariff is dynam- ically inconsistent;

  3. Feed-in Tariff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In September 2009, the Hawaii Public Utilities Commission (PUC) issued a decision that established a feed-in tariff in Hawaii. The feed-in tariff is offered by the three investor-owned utilities:...

  4. The Tariff Analysis Project: A database and analysis platform for electricity tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, K.; White, R.; Bolduc, C.; Fisher, D.; Rosenquist, G.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The TARIFF table . . . . . . . . . . . . .user_id f_name l_name email pwd tele contact created tariff_add tariff_edit tariff_edit_publish tariff_delete tariff_

  5. Gas distributor for fluidized bed coal gasifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Worley, Arthur C. (Mt. Tabor, NJ); Zboray, James A. (Irvine, CA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas distributor for distributing high temperature reaction gases to a fluidized bed of coal particles in a coal gasification process. The distributor includes a pipe with a refractory reinforced lining and a plurality of openings in the lining through which gas is fed into the bed. These feed openings have an expanding tapered shape in the downstream or exhaust direction which aids in reducing the velocity of the gas jets as they enter the bed.

  6. Evaluation of evolving residential electricity tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Judy

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    residential electricity tariffs Judy Lai, Nicholas DeForest,residential electricity tariffs Judy Lai – Senior Researchfrom the current 5-tiered tariff to time variable pricing,

  7. BPA files reciprocity tariff

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 12 BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Friday, March 30, 2012 CONTACT: Doug Johnson, 503-230-5840 or 503-230-5131 BPA files reciprocity tariff Portland, Ore. -...

  8. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimization Under Various Electricity Tariffs Firestone,Optimization Under Various Electricity Tariffs Table of3 2.1 Electricity Tariff

  9. Feed-In Tariff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: The California general feed-in tariff was amended by [http://leginfo.ca.gov/pub/09-10/bill/sen/sb_0001-0050/sb_32_bill_2009091... SB 32] of 2009 and [http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/pub/11-12...

  10. EMBODIED CARBON TARIFFS Christoph Bhringer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EMBODIED CARBON TARIFFS Christoph Böhringer Jared C. Carbone Thomas F. Rutherford Revised: August 2013 Abstract Embodied carbon tariffs tax the direct and indirect carbon emissions embodied in trade -- an idea popularized by countries seeking to extend the reach of domestic carbon regu- lations. We

  11. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under Various Electricity Tariffs Firestone, R. , Creighton,Under Various Electricity Tariffs Table of Contents Table of3 2.1 Electricity Tariff

  12. The Value of Distributed Generation under Different Tariff Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Magnus Maribu, Karl; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilities Inc. 2004 “Tariffs and Regulatory Documents. ”under RTP rates and with the standby tariff. Figure 3.energy cost under various tariffs Utility Electricity Bill

  13. Tariffs Can Be Structured to Encourage Photovoltaic Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tariffs Can Be Structured to Encourage Photovoltaic Energyamong available commercial tariffs, however, the reductionhowever, these “PV-friendly” tariffs would not be optimal

  14. NIPSCO- Feed-In Tariff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NIPSCO is now offering a feed-in tariff program for customers who generate electricity from solar, wind, biomass, or new hydroelectric facilities. All NIPSCO electric customers in good standing are...

  15. Characterization of Hall effect thruster propellant distributors with flame visualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Mitchell

    . The technique is demonstrated for three propellant distributors us- ing a propane-air mixture at reservoir an ignition kernel in lean methane/air mixtures under engine conditions Phys. Fluids 24, 105108 (2012

  16. FINALCONSULTANTREPORT CALIFORNIA FEED-IN TARIFF DESIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINALCONSULTANTREPORT CALIFORNIA FEED-IN TARIFF DESIGN AND POLICY OPTIONS Prepared For CALIFORNIA FEED-IN TARIFF DESIGN AND POLICY OPTIONS The following correction has been made to the Consultant Report, California Feed-in Tariff Design and Policy Options, that was originally posted on the Energy

  17. Distributional effects of trade and tariffs between and within countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobal, Martin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    18 (1-2): 83-100. ———.1992. Tariff protection and imperfect18 ( 1-2): 83-100. ———.1992. Tariff protection and imperfectdue to a rise in domestic tariffs is written as follow In

  18. Evaluation of evolving residential electricity tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Judy

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electricity tariffs Judy Lai – Senior Research Associate Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Rd MS90R1121 Berkeley CA 94720 USA

  19. The Tariff Analysis Project: A Database and Analysis Platform...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Tariff Analysis Project: A Database and Analysis Platform for Electricity Tariffs Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Policy...

  20. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    time of use United States Postal Service v Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization Under Various Electricity Tariffs

  1. Tariffs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scheduling, System Control & Dispatch SP-SD3 Reactive Supply & Voltage Control SP-RS3 Energy Imbalance SP-EI3 Regulation & Frequency Response SP-FR3 Spinning & Supplemental...

  2. Water and Waste Water Tariffs for New Residential Construction in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Diane; Lutz, James

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water and Waste Water Tariffs for New ResidentialApril 2006 Water and Waste Water Tariffs for New Residentialwater and waste water tariffs in California cities and

  3. Building China's Information Technology Industry: Tariff Policy and China's Accession to the WTO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borrus, Michael; Cohen, Stephen

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology Industry: Tariff Policy and China's Accession toand thereby eliminate China's tariffs on semiconductors,make further substantial tariff reductions. A major issue

  4. The Effects of Electricity Tariff Structure on Distributed Generation Adoption in New York State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sources under various tariffs no inv. inv. standby no inv.The Effects of Electricity Tariff Structure on Distributedthe greatest. Standby tariffs tend to encourage installing

  5. Feed-in Tariff Program (Ontario, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Feed-in Tariff (FIT) Program is a guaranteed funding structure that combines stable, competitive prices and long-term contracts for energy generated using renewable resources. Homeowners,...

  6. Renewable Market Adjusting Tariff (ReMAT)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: Program Period 6 for the Re-MAT program began in September 2014. The feed-in tariff program for bioenergy projects was established by SB 1122 but will require action by the CPUC before it is...

  7. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    purchase abs. cooling offset electric supply (kW) hourTariffs electric supply (kW) abs. cooling offset purchasecooling offset Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization Under Various Electricity Tariffs electric supply (

  8. Tariffs of ETH Zurich Multimedia Services January 30th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    Tariffs of ETH Zurich Multimedia Services January 30th , 2014 MMS policy ITS-MMS services / personnel, travel expenses, etc.). 3. Tariffs for Digitisation and Transcoding of audio- and video material

  9. The Tariff Analysis Project: A database and analysis platform forelectricity tariffs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, K.; White, R.; Bolduc, C.; Fisher, D.; Rosenquist, G.

    2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Much of the work done in energy research involves ananalysis of the costs and benefits of energy-saving technologies andother measures from the perspective of the consumer. The economic valuein particular depends on the price of energy (electricity, gas or otherfuel), which varies significantly both for different types of consumers,and for different regions of the country. Ideally, to provide accurateinformation about the economic value of energy savings, prices should becomputed directly from real tariffs as defined by utility companies. Alarge number of utility tariffs are now available freely over the web,but the complexity and diversity of tariff structures presents aconsiderable barrier to using them in practice. The goal of the TariffAnalysis Project (TAP) is to collect andarchive a statistically completesample of real utility tariffs, and build a set of database and web toolsthat make this information relatively easy to use in cost-benefitanalysis. This report presentsa detailed picture of the current TAPdatabase structure and web interface. While TAP has been designed tohandle tariffs for any kind of utility service, the focus here is onelectric utilities withinthe United States. Electricity tariffs can bevery complicated, so the database structures that have been built toaccommodate them are quite flexible and can be easily generalized toother commodities.

  10. Tariff Reform in the Presence of Sector-specific Distortions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BEGHIN, JOHN C; Karp, Larry

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chosen the highest or lowest tariff. gives: ASSUMPTION 1'.the optimal .distortion (tariff, or (tQ dZ T dt - sQ d y Tsensitive to existing fixed tariffs t = in f i nr.s a and

  11. Observed Temperature Effects on Hourly Residential Electric Load Reduction in Response to an Experimental Critical Peak Pricing Tariff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herter, Karen B.; McAuliffe, Patrick K.; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Critical Peak Pricing Tariff Karen Herter ab* , Patrickunder critical peak pricing tariffs tested in the 2003-2004The 15-month experimental tariff gave customers a discounted

  12. The Value of Distributed Generation under Different TariffStructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, Ryan; Magnus Maribu, Karl; Marnay, Chris

    2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed generation (DG) may play a key role in a modern energy system because it can improve energy efficiency. Reductions in the energy bill, and therefore DG attractiveness, depend on the electricity tariff structure; a system created before widespread adoption of distributed generation. Tariffs have been designed to recover costs equitably amongst customers with similar consumption patterns. Recently, electric utilities began to question the equity of this electricity pricing structure for standby service. In particular, the utilities do not feel that DG customers are paying their fair share of transmission and distribution costs - traditionally recovered through a volumetric($/kWh) mechanism - under existing tariff structures. In response, new tariff structures with higher fixed costs for DG have been implemented in New York and in California. This work analyzes the effects of different electricity tariff structures on DG adoption. First, the effects of the new standby tariffs in New York are analyzed in different regions. Next generalized tariffs are constructed, and the sensitivity to varying levels of the volumetric and the demand ($/kW, i.e. maximum rate) charge component are analyzed on New York's standard and standby tariff as well as California's standby tariff. As expected, DG profitability is reduced with standby tariffs, but often marginally. The new standby structures tend to promote smaller base load systems. The amount of time-of-day variability of volumetric pricing seems to have little effect on DG economics.

  13. Feed-In Tariffs and similar programs

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feed-in tariffs (FITs) are a policy mechanism used to encourage deployment of renewable electricity technologies. FITs are used to a limited extent around the United States as listed. A FIT program typically guarantees that customers who own a FIT-eligible renewable electricity generation facility, such as a roof-top solar photovoltaic system, will receive a set price from their utility for all of the electricity they generate and provide to the grid.

  14. The Effects of Electricity Tariff Structure on Distributed Generation Adoption in New York State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    volumetric price, TOU – time of use tariff: volumetric priceService, Time of Use Rates parent tariff Jan 03 Customertime of use United States Environmental Protection Agency xv The Effects of Electricity Tariff

  15. Impact of Large Scale Energy Efficiency Programs On Consumer Tariffs and Utility Finances in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhyankar, Nikit

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EE programs result in a tariff hike, non-participants lose,but they benefit in case of tariff reduction. References FY 2009-10 and ARR and Tariff Proposal for FY 2010-11:

  16. Customer Response to RTP in Competitive Markets: A Study of Niagara Mohawk's Standard Offer Tariff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Richard N.; Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Neenan, Bernie; Hopper, Nicole

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Niagara Mohawk’s Standard Offer Tariff * Richard N. BoisvertThis default-service commodity tariff (“SC-3A Option One”)electricity usage data, tariff history, basic customer

  17. Renewable and Non-Renewable Resources Tariff RNR-7 (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Renewable and Non-Renewable Resource tariff is authorized by the Georgia Public Service Commission (PSC), which requires that the investor owned utility, Georgia Power Company, purchase...

  18. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    utility experience with RTP tariffs is described in 3. Distributed GenerationUtilities Commission, Division of Ratepayer Advocates have also provided support on related work. Distributed Generation

  19. FEED-IN TARIFFS AND OFFSHORE WIND POWER DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    FEED-IN TARIFFS AND OFFSHORE WIND POWER DEVELOPMENT Prepared by Jon Lilley, Blaise Sheridan, Dawn.......................................................................................................................... 25 FERC Clarification as Applied to Offshore Wind........................................................................................................................ 28 #12; 3 Feed-in Tariffs and Offshore Wind Power Development Prepared Pursuant to DOE Grant Em

  20. Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2011 Liquid Nitrogen Packed Column Distributor Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    concepts for a liquid nitrogen distributor for a packed distillation column. The design team at Penn State distillation column design. Approach The design team first gathered customer specifications from Air ProductsPENNSTATE Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2011 Liquid Nitrogen Packed Column

  1. A Tariff for Reactive Power - IEEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kueck, John D [ORNL; Tufon, Christopher [Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Isemonger, Alan [California Independent System Operator; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a suggested tariff or payment for the local supply of reactive power from distributed energy resources. The authors consider four sample customers, and estimate the cost of supply of reactive power for each customer. The power system savings from the local supply of reactive power are also estimated for a hypothetical circuit. It is found that reactive power for local voltage regulation could be supplied to the distribution system economically by customers when new inverters are installed. The inverter would be supplied with a power factor of 0.8, and would be capable of local voltage regulation to a schedule supplied by the utility. Inverters are now installed with photovoltaic systems, fuel cells and microturbines, and adjustable-speed motor drives.

  2. Assessment of Distributed Energy Adoption in Commercial Buildings: Part 1: An Analysis of Policy, Building Loads, Tariff Design, and Technology Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan; Nishida, Masaru; Gao, Weijun; Marnay, Chris

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Policy, Building loads, Tariff Design, and Technologyof Policy, Building loads, Tariff Design, and Technologygiven prevailing utility tariffs, site electrical and

  3. Electricity Network Tariff Architectures: A Comparison of Four OECD Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakhrani, Vivek

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study is motivated by the question “what is the optimal tariff design?” While we do not offer an answer to this question, we use the different designs in four select countries to illuminate the issues involved in ...

  4. Energy Prices, Tariffs, Taxes and Subsidies in Ukraine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Meredydd

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For many years, electricity, gas and district heating tariffs for residential consumers were very low in Ukraine; until recently, they were even lower than in neighbouring countries such as Russia. The increases in gas and electricity tariffs, implemented in 2006, are an important step toward sustainable pricing levels; however, electricity and natural gas (especially for households) are still priced below the long-run marginal cost. The problem seems even more serious in district heating and nuclear power. According to the Ministry of Construction, district heating tariffs, on average, cover about 80% of costs. Current electricity prices do not fully include the capital costs of power stations, which are particularly high for nuclear power. Although the tariff for nuclear electricity generation includes a small decommissioning charge, it has not been sufficient to accumulate necessary funds for nuclear plants decommissioning.

  5. Community-Based Energy Development (C-BED) Tariff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under the Community-Based Energy Development (C-BED) Tariff, each public utility in Minnesota is required to file with the state Public Utilities Commission (PUC) to create a 20-year power purchase...

  6. PSEG Long Island- Solar Initiative Feed-in Tariff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The PSEG Long Island Feed-in Tariff II (FIT II) program provides fixed payments for electricity produced by approved photovoltaic systems over a fixed period of time. The program operates under a...

  7. LADWP- Feed-in Tariff (FiT) Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LADWP is providing a Feed-in Tariff (FiT) program to support the development of renewable energy projects in its territory. All technologies eligible for compliance with the state's renewables po...

  8. Impact of Energy Imbalance Tariff on Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, Y.; Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the results of a study that uses actual wind power data and actual energy prices to analyze the impact of an energy imbalance tariff imposed by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on wind power.

  9. Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricityprices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; VanBuskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of a survey and analysis ofelectricity tariffs and marginal electricity prices for commercialbuildings. The tariff data come from a survey of 90 utilities and 250tariffs for non-residential customers collected in 2004 as part of theTariff Analysis Project at LBNL. The goals of this analysis are toprovide useful summary data on the marginal electricity prices commercialcustomers actually see, and insight into the factors that are mostimportant in determining prices under different circumstances. We providea new, empirically-based definition of several marginal prices: theeffective marginal price and energy-only anddemand-only prices, andderive a simple formula that expresses the dependence of the effectivemarginal price on the marginal load factor. The latter is a variable thatcan be used to characterize the load impacts of a particular end-use orefficiency measure. We calculate all these prices for eleven regionswithin the continental U.S.

  10. Community Feed-in Tariff (Nova Scotia, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Community Feed-In Tariff Program (COMFIT) is designed to increase local ownership of small-scale energy projects in Nova Scotia. The program provides an opportunity for community-based power...

  11. Representing Information Collections for Visual Cognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koh, Eunyee

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 1. Yahoo Buzz with ResultDistributor . . . . . . . . . . 99 B. Balancing the Search Processing with Results . . . . . . . 99 C. ResultDistributor Evaluation with Mixed-Initiative Com- position... of text surrogate candidates in the Complete Set. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 15 2D PCA scatter plot of image surrogate candidates in the Com- plete Set...

  12. Strategic Rate Design: The Role of Industrial Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenblum, J. I.; House, R.

    STRA TEGIC RA TE DESIGN: THE ROLE OF INDUSTRIAL TARIFFS Jeffrey 1. Rosenblum Rate Design Section Public Utility Commission of Texas Austin, Texas ABSTRACT Strategic rate design refers to the use of deliberate pricing strategies... occurred in cogeneration capacity in Texas. The utilities use their rate tariffs strategically to influence the growth of self-generation. This paper will discuss several aspects of strategic rate design to influence industrial energy sales (measured...

  13. A quantitative analysis of the effects of tariff and non-tariff barriers on U.S. - Mexico poultry trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magana Lemus, David

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the inception of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) in 1994, tariff restriction to U.S. poultry products entering the Mexican market has decreased significantly. While poultry trade from the U.S. to Mexico has increased...

  14. Test of candidate light distributors for the muon (g$-$2) laser calibration system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Anastasi; D. Babusci; F. Baffigi; G. Cantatore; D. Cauz; G. Corradi; S. Dabagov; G. Di Sciascio; R. Di Stefano; C. Ferrari; A. T. Fienberg; A. Fioretti; L. Fulgentini; C. Gabbanini; L. A. Gizzi; D. Hampai; D. W. Hertzog; M. Iacovacci; M. Karuza; J. Kaspar; P. Koester; L. Labate; S. Mastroianni; D. Moricciani; G. Pauletta; L. Santi; G. Venanzoni

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new muon (g-2) experiment E989 at Fermilab will be equipped with a laser calibration system for all the 1296 channels of the calorimeters. An integrating sphere and an alternative system based on an engineered diffuser have been considered as possible light distributors for the experiment. We present here a detailed comparison of the two based on temporal response, spatial uniformity, transmittance and time stability.

  15. Test of candidate light distributors for the muon (g$-$2) laser calibration system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anastasi, A; Baffigi, F; Cantatore, G; Cauz, D; Corradi, G; Dabagov, S; Di Sciascio, G; Di Stefano, R; Ferrari, C; Fienberg, A T; Fioretti, A; Fulgentini, L; Gabbanini, C; Gizzi, L A; Hampai, D; Hertzog, D W; Iacovacci, M; Karuza, M; Kaspar, J; Koester, P; Labate, L; Mastroianni, S; Moricciani, D; Pauletta, G; Santi, L; Venanzoni, G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new muon (g-2) experiment E989 at Fermilab will be equipped with a laser calibration system for all the 1296 channels of the calorimeters. An integrating sphere and an alternative system based on an engineered diffuser have been considered as possible light distributors for the experiment. We present here a detailed comparison of the two based on temporal response, spatial uniformity, transmittance and time stability.

  16. Market and behavioral barriers to energy efficiency: A preliminary evaluation of the case for tariff financing in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujita, K. Sydny

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    evaluation of the case for tariff financing in California K.evaluation of the case for tariff financing in California K.7   PART 2: EVALUATION OF TARIFF FINANCING IN

  17. Quality Matters: Some Remarks on Internet Service Provisioning and Tariff Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varaiya, Pravin

    Quality Matters: Some Remarks on Internet Service Provisioning and Tariff Design£ J¨orn AltmannÝ Bj on demand to derive some consequences for Internet service provisioning and tariff design. £This research

  18. JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC THEORY 29, 49-71 (1983) Competitive Nonlinear Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC THEORY 29, 49-71 (1983) Competitive Nonlinear Tariffs SHMUEL S. OREN Stanford, 1980; revised November 13. 1981 This paper generalizes the study of nonlinear tariffs, i.e.. those equilibria and the corresponding tariffs are analyzed in a Cournot framework. Various equilibria are obtained

  19. The Impact of the Russian Log Export Tariff on the Global Market for Logs and Lumber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Impact of the Russian Log Export Tariff on the Global Market for Logs and Lumber CINTRAFOR News is available on the web: http://www.cintrafor.org Russian Tariff continued on page 3 In This Issue: Director announced its plan to implement a series of log export tariffs designed to reduce the export of raw logs

  20. Fluidized bed heat exchanger with water cooled air distributor and dust hopper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jukkola, Walfred W. (Westport, CT); Leon, Albert M. (Mamaroneck, NY); Van Dyk, Jr., Garritt C. (Bethel, CT); McCoy, Daniel E. (Williamsport, PA); Fisher, Barry L. (Montgomery, PA); Saiers, Timothy L. (Williamsport, PA); Karstetter, Marlin E. (Loganton, PA)

    1981-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluidized bed heat exchanger is provided in which air is passed through a bed of particulate material containing fuel. A steam-water natural circulation system is provided for heat exchange and the housing of the heat exchanger has a water-wall type construction. Vertical in-bed heat exchange tubes are provided and the air distributor is water-cooled. A water-cooled dust hopper is provided in the housing to collect particulates from the combustion gases and separate the combustion zone from a volume within said housing in which convection heat exchange tubes are provided to extract heat from the exiting combustion gases.

  1. U.S. Virgin Islands Feed-In Tariff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In May of 2014, AB 7586 created a feed-in-tariff that would allow owners of solar photovotaic systems ranging between 10 kWh and 500 kWh to sell their energy for approximately 26 cents per kWh. Two...

  2. Optimal Smart Grid Tariffs Longbo Huang, Jean Walrand, Kannan Ramchandran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Longbo

    a static system and develops a real-time pricing al- gorithm. Works [4], [12], [11] develop two timescale, we develop a low-complexity scheme OpTar for designing optimal power tariffs. OpTar provides an easy way for the utility companies to adjust their power prices, and allows the users to pre

  3. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under VariousElectricity Tariffs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The on-site generation of electricity can offer buildingowners and occupiers financial benefits as well as social benefits suchas reduced grid congestion, improved energy efficiency, and reducedgreenhouse gas emissions. Combined heat and power (CHP), or cogeneration,systems make use of the waste heat from the generator for site heatingneeds. Real-time optimal dispatch of CHP systems is difficult todetermine because of complicated electricity tariffs and uncertainty inCHP equipment availability, energy prices, and system loads. Typically,CHP systems use simple heuristic control strategies. This paper describesa method of determining optimal control in real-time and applies it to alight industrial site in San Diego, California, to examine: 1) the addedbenefit of optimal over heuristic controls, 2) the price elasticity ofthe system, and 3) the site-attributable greenhouse gas emissions, allunder three different tariff structures. Results suggest that heuristiccontrols are adequate under the current tariff structure and relativelyhigh electricity prices, capturing 97 percent of the value of thedistributed generation system. Even more value could be captured bysimply not running the CHP system during times of unusually high naturalgas prices. Under hypothetical real-time pricing of electricity,heuristic controls would capture only 70 percent of the value ofdistributed generation.

  4. The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (English Version)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CAM Analysis of Policy, Tariff Design, Building Energy Use,14 3.3 Comparison of Utility Tariffs in Japan and the14 Table 4: Electricity Tariffs at Several Facilities in the

  5. Water and Waste Water Tariffs for New Residential Construction in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Diane; Lutz, James

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utility_Cities Table of the Water TAP Database Field NameWater andWaste Water Tariffs for New Residential Construction in

  6. Water and Waste Water Tariffs for New Residential Construction in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Diane; Lutz, James

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for New Residential Construction in California D.C. FisherTariffs for New Residential Construction in California 1.in new residential construction in California. These

  7. PROCEDURE FOR ADDRESSING CHEATING AND OTHER FORMS OF ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT INCORPORATING THE SCHEME AND TARIFF FOR DEALING WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE SCHEME AND TARIFF FOR DEALING WITH CASES OF PLAGIARISM AND COLLUSION A INTRODUCTION 1. The University

  8. Solar PV Deployment through Renewable Energy Tariff: An Option for Key Account Customers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Renewable energy tariffs, a new program and rate option being offered by some utilities to large customers, are quickly attracting attention in the renewable energy world as a way to do this. These tariffs allow a high energy usage customer to pay a slight premium in order to obtain all or a portion of their electricity from renewable sources.

  9. ORNL/TM-2008/083 A Tariff for Reactive Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    ORNL/TM-2008/083 A Tariff for Reactive Power 2008 Prepared by Christopher Tufon, Pacific Gas & Electric Company Alan G. Isemonger, California Independent System Operator Brendan Kirby, ORNL, Knowledge and Transportation Science Division A Tariff for Reactive Power Christopher Tufon Alan G. Isemonger Brendan Kirby

  10. Is there a route to a UK Feed in Tariff for renewable energy?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Is there a route to a UK Feed in Tariff for renewable energy? ICEPT Discussion Paper October 2010 University #12;2 Is there a route to a UK Feed in Tariff for renewable energy? Introduction This discussion paper is concerned with the potential to change the way the UK provides support for renewable energy

  11. NREL: State and Local Governments - Value-of-Solar Tariffs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid Integration NRELCost of6Data TheNewsValue-of-Solar Tariffs A

  12. The Tariff Analysis Project: A Database and Analysis Platform for

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformation 2EnergyCityGreenElectricity Tariffs | Open

  13. Avoiding and Managing Interruptions of Electric Service Under an Interruptible Contract or Tariff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, G. W.

    Many large industrial consumers of electricity purchase power through special interruptible contracts or curtailable tariffs. Historically, the number of actual interruptions has been very small -many interruptible consumers have never been required...

  14. Renewable Energy Feed-in Tariffs: Lessons Learned from the U...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    from the U.S. and Abroad Presentation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Renewable Energy Feed-in Tariffs: Lessons Learned from the U.S. and Abroad Presentation...

  15. U.S. Virgin Islands- Renewable Energy Feed-in-Tariff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    There is a 10 MW limit for aggregate production via feed-in-tariff contracts on the islands of St. Thomas, St. John, Water Island, and other offshore keys and islands and a similar 5 MW limit for...

  16. Long Island Power Authority- Solar Initiative Feed-in Tariff (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Long Island Power Authority's (LIPA) Feed-in Tariff II (FIT II) program provides fixed payments for electricity produced by approved photovoltaic systems over a fixed period of time. The...

  17. Feed-in Tariff Policy: Design, Implementation, and RPS Policy Interactions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report explores the design and implementation of feed-in tariff policies, including a policy definition, various payment structures, and payment differentiation options. The report also discusses the interaction between FIT and RPS policies.

  18. Policymaker's Guide to Feed-in Tariff Policy Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couture, T. D.; Cory, K.; Kreycik, C.; Williams, E.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feed-in tariffs (FITs) are the most widely used renewable energy policy in the world for driving accelerating renewable energy (RE) deployment, accounting for a greater share of RE development than either tax incentives or renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies. FITs have generated significant RE deployment, helping bring the countries that have implemented them successfully to the forefront of the global RE industry. In the European Union (EU), FIT policies have led to the deployment of more than 15,000 MW of solar photovoltaic (PV) power and more than 55,000 MW of wind power between 2000 and the end of 2009. In total, FITs are responsible for approximately 75% of global PV and 45% of global wind deployment. Countries such as Germany, in particular, have demonstrated that FITs can be used as a powerful policy tool to drive RE deployment and help meet combined energy security and emissions reductions objectives. This policymaker's guide provides a detailed analysis of FIT policy design and implementation and identifies a set of best practices that have been effective at quickly stimulating the deployment of large amounts of RE generation. Although the discussion is aimed primarily at decision makers who have decided that a FIT policy best suits their needs, exploration of FIT policies can also help inform a choice among alternative renewable energy policies.

  19. Innovative Feed-In Tariff Designs that Limit Policy Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreycik, C.; Couture, T. D.; Cory, K. S.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feed-in tariffs (FITs) are the most prevalent renewable energy policy used globally to date, and there are many benefits to the certainty offered in the marketplace to reduce development risks and associated financing costs and to grow the renewable energy industry. However, concerns over escalating costs in jurisdictions with FIT policies have led to increased attention on cost control in renewable energy policy design. In recent years, policy mechanisms for containing FIT costs have become more refined, allowing policymakers to exert greater control on policy outcomes and on the resulting costs to ratepayers. As policymakers and regulators in the United States begin to explore the use of FITs, careful consideration must be given to the ways in which policy design can be used to balance the policies' advantages while bounding its costs. This report explores mechanisms that policymakers have implemented to limit FIT policy costs. If designed clearly and transparently, such mechanisms can align policymaker and market expectations for project deployment. Three different policy tools are evaluated: (1) caps, (2) payment level adjustment mechanisms, and (3) auction-based designs. The report employs case studies to explore the strengths and weaknesses of these three cost containment tools. These tools are then evaluated with a set of criteria including predictability for policymakers and the marketplace and the potential for unintended consequences.

  20. Cost-Causation-Based Tariffs for Wind Ancillary Service Impacts: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.; Wan, Y.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conference paper discussing the integration cost of wind. Although specific tariffs for wind generation for ancillary services are uncommon, we anticipate that balancing authorities (control areas) and other entities will move toward such tariffs. Tariffs for regulation and imbalance services should be cost-based, recognize the relevant time scales that correspond with utility operational cycles, and properly allocate those costs to those entities that cause the balancing authority to incur the costs. In this paper, we present methods for separating wind's impact into regulation and load following (imbalance) time scales. We show that approximating these impacts with simpler methods can significantly distort cost causation and even cause confusion between the relevant time scales. We present results from NREL's wind data collection program to illustrate the dangers of linearly scaling wind resource data from small wind plants to approximate the wind resource data from large wind plants. Finally, we provide a framework for developing regulation and imbalance tariffs, we outline methods to begin examining contingency reserve requirements for wind plants, we provide guidance on the important characteristics to consider, and we provide hypothetical cases that the tariff can be tested against to determine whether the results are desired.

  1. A Plea for Simpler Electricity Tariffs Philip E. Coleman and Christopher T. Payne, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Plea for Simpler Electricity Tariffs Philip E. Coleman and Christopher T. Payne, Lawrence asserts that electric rate structures in the United States are often so confusing that even large a simplified declaration (in tariffs and/or bills) to electricity customers of what their marginal costs are

  2. Public sentiment in the United States towards the tariff, 1816-1828

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, John Francis

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    e and conten0 by: The purpose of this papex 1s Co survey public senti- ment in the United Sites on the ??riff from l816 co 1828 on a broader and wider geogxaphical basis than has been done previously, Post wox'ks on the tariff concentrate upon... the history of the passage of the tariff bills through Congress ox upon public sentiment in one state or section& Consequently, a study of the sentiment of the agricultural, the m?nufacturing, and the comercial regions of the country could lead to a better...

  3. Representing Trees with Constraints 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curry, Benjamin; Wiggins, Geraint; Hayes, Gillian

    This paper presents a method for representing trees using constraint logic programming over finite domains. We describe a class of trees that is of particular interest to us and how we can represent the set of trees belonging to that class using...

  4. Trade Restrictiveness Indices in Presence of Externalities: An Application to Non-Tariff Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Trade Restrictiveness Indices in Presence of Externalities: An Application to Non-Tariff Measures-00961727,version1-20Mar2014 #12;Trade Restrictiveness Indices in Presence of Externalities: An Application of Economics, INRA) Stéphan Marette (INRA)* This draft: July 10, 2013 Abstract: We extend the trade

  5. Trade Restrictiveness Indices in Presence of Externalities: An Application to Non-Tariff Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Trade Restrictiveness Indices in Presence of Externalities: An Application to Non-Tariff Measures-00961727,version2-4Sep2014 #12; Trade Restrictiveness Indices in Presence of Externalities: An Application the trade restrictiveness index approach to the case of market imperfections and domestic regulations

  6. MU FAPRI reports economic impact of extending ethanol tax credit, tariff Contact:Duane Dailey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    . ­ Extending the current ethanol tax credit and tariff would boost corn-based fuel production -- and corn for corn as an ethanol fuel source would expand corn acreage by 1.7 million acres, said Seth Meyer, MU for blended fuel at the pump. "At the same time, blenders can pay more to ethanol plants that in turn pay

  7. Feed-in Tariffs: Best Practices and Application in the U.S.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program Technical Assistance Project (TAP) for state and local officials TAP Webinar feed-in tariffs as a state policy to provide incentives for renewable energy development.

  8. What do kets represent?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casey Blood

    2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    It is usually assumed that a ket represents the state of an actually existing particle. But one can show there is no evidence for particles. The particle-like properties of mass, spin and charge, as well as particle-like trajectories, the photoelectric effect, and localized effects from spread-out wave functions can be explained using quantum mechanics alone. It is therefore proposed instead that kets represent particle-like solutions to a pre-representational linear partial differential equation which has Poincar\\'e and internal symmetries. This equation underlies the completely representational character, including mass, spin, charge, internal symmetries, and symmetric and antisymmetric statistics, of current quantum mechanics.

  9. Impact of Large Scale Energy Efficiency Programs On Consumer Tariffs and Utility Finances in India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhyankar, Nikit; Phadke, Amol

    2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale EE programs would modestly increase tariffs but reduce consumers' electricity bills significantly. However, the primary benefit of EE programs is a significant reduction in power shortages, which might make these programs politically acceptable even if tariffs increase. To increase political support, utilities could pursue programs that would result in minimal tariff increases. This can be achieved in four ways: (a) focus only on low-cost programs (such as replacing electric water heaters with gas water heaters); (b) sell power conserved through the EE program to the market at a price higher than the cost of peak power purchase; (c) focus on programs where a partial utility subsidy of incremental capital cost might work and (d) increase the number of participant consumers by offering a basket of EE programs to fit all consumer subcategories and tariff tiers. Large scale EE programs can result in consistently negative cash flows and significantly erode the utility's overall profitability. In case the utility is facing shortages, the cash flow is very sensitive to the marginal tariff of the unmet demand. This will have an important bearing on the choice of EE programs in Indian states where low-paying rural and agricultural consumers form the majority of the unmet demand. These findings clearly call for a flexible, sustainable solution to the cash-flow management issue. One option is to include a mechanism like FAC in the utility incentive mechanism. Another sustainable solution might be to have the net program cost and revenue loss built into utility's revenue requirement and thus into consumer tariffs up front. However, the latter approach requires institutionalization of EE as a resource. The utility incentive mechanisms would be able to address the utility disincentive of forgone long-run return but have a minor impact on consumer benefits. Fundamentally, providing incentives for EE programs to make them comparable to supply-side investments is a way of moving the electricity sector toward a model focused on providing energy services rather than providing electricity.

  10. Renewable Energy Prices in State-Level Feed-in Tariffs: Federal Law Constraints and Possible Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hempling, S.; Elefant, C.; Cory, K.; Porter, K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    State legislatures and state utility commissions trying to attract renewable energy projects are considering feed-in tariffs, which obligate retail utilities to purchase electricity from renewable producers under standard arrangements specifying prices, terms, and conditions. The use of feed-in tariffs simplifies the purchase process, provides revenue certainty to generators, and reduces the cost of financing generating projects. However, some argue that federal law--including the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) and the Federal Power Act of 1935 (FPA)--constrain state-level feed-in tariffs. This report seeks to reduce the legal uncertainties for states contemplating feed-in tariffs by explaining the constraints imposed by federal statutes. It describes the federal constraints, identifies transaction categories that are free of those constraints, and offers ways for state and federal policymakers to interpret or modify existing law to remove or reduce these constraints. This report proposes ways to revise these federal statutes. It creates a broad working definition of a state-level feed-in tariff. Given this definition, this report concludes there are paths to non-preempted, state-level feed-in tariffs under current federal law.

  11. Feed-in Tariff Policy: Design, Implementation, and RPS Policy Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cory, K.; Couture, T.; Kreycik, C.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feed-in tariff (FIT) policies are implemented in more than 40 countries around the world and are cited as the primary reason for the success of the German and Spanish renewable energy markets. As a result of that success, FIT policy proposals are starting to gain traction in several U.S. states and municipalities. Experience from Europe is also beginning to demonstrate that properly designed FITs may be more cost-effective than renewable portfolio standards (RPS), which make use of competitive solicitations. This article explores the design and operation of feed-in tariff policies, including a FIT policy definition, payment-structure options, and payment differentiation. The article also touches on the potential interactions between FIT policies and RPS policies at the state level.

  12. Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source -Sound Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source - Sound Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency Wave represents pressure Target - Radio Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency

  13. Evaluating the cost-effectiveness of DR programs/tariffs: Questions for Pacific Northwest utilities o Conceptually, do you distinguish among different types of DR resources in your resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 06/14/2007 Evaluating the cost-effectiveness of DR programs/tariffs: Questions for Pacific of analytic process does your utility use to select DR programs/pricing tariffs (e.g., screening analysis vs-effectiveness screening analysis? o What are the various benefits and costs of DR programs/tariffs that you account

  14. System design study to reduce capital and operating cost of a moving distributor, AFB advanced concept - comparison with an oil-fired boiler. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mah, C.S.; West, L.K.; Anderson, R.E.; Berkheimer, I.L.; Cahill, D.V.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Aerojet Energy Conversion Company, under contract with the United States Department of Energy, has performed a comparative economic study of the Aerojet Universal Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion (UAFBC) system and a coventional atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) system. The program title, ''System Design Study to Reduce Capital and Operating Cost and Bench Scale Testing of a Moving Distributor, AFB Concept,'' is a good description of the general objective of the program. The specific objective was to compare the UAFBC with the conventional AFBC in terms of normalized steam cost. The boilers were designed for 150,00 lb/hr of steam at 650 psig and 750/sup 0/F. The reference coal used in the analysis was Pittsburgh No. 8 coal with a sulfur content of 4.3% and a higher heating value of 12,919 Bru/lb. The analysis assumed a plant life of 20 years and a discount rate of 15%. The UAFBC systems included the usual elements of the conventional cola-fired AFBC steam plant, but the coal preparation sysbsystem for the UAFBC was considerably simpler because the system can use ''run-of-mine'' coal. The UAFBC boiler itself consisted of a staged-combustion fluidized-bed, superimposed over a static bed, the latter supported by a moving distributor. It incorporated a fines burnup combustor, an entrained reciculating gas cleanup bed, and conventional convection boiler. The key features of the UAFBC design were: High fuel flexibility; low NO/sub x/ emission; and superior turndown capability. 30 refs., 52 figs., 12 tabs.

  15. BACHELOR THESIS The High Representative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vellekoop, Michel

    BACHELOR THESIS The High Representative and the Libya Crisis An Assessment Dominique Prescher 8 and the Libya Crisis 2 Table of Content 1. Summary 4 2. Introduction 4 3. Theoretical Framework 8 3.1 Neo 34 9. Bibliography 36 #12;Bachelor Thesis The High Representative and the Libya Crisis 3 List

  16. Relevance of Generation Interconnection Procedures to Feed-in Tariffs in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fink, S.; Porter, K.; Rogers, J.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feed-in tariffs (FITs) have been used to promote renewable electricity development in over 40 countries throughout the past two decades. These policies generally provide guaranteed prices for the full system output from eligible generators for a fixed time period (typically 15-20 years). Due in part to the success of FIT policies in Europe, some jurisdictions in the United States are considering implementing similar policies, and a few have already put such policies in place. This report is intended to offer some guidance to policymakers and regulators on how generator interconnection procedures may affect the implementation of FITs and how state generator interconnection procedures can be formulated to support state renewable energy objectives. This report is based on a literature review of model interconnection procedures formulated by several organizations, as well as other documents that have reviewed, commented on, and in some cases, ranked state interconnection procedures.

  17. Market and behavioral barriers to energy efficiency: A preliminary evaluation of the case for tariff financing in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujita, K. Sydny

    2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Consumers regularly forgo purchases of high efficiency appliances that appear to be cost effective at a reasonable rate of return. While some argue that this is a true revelation of preferences for appliance features, this 'efficiency gap' can be largely explained by a combination of market and behavioral failures that reduce consumers ability to evaluate the relative value of appliances and skew preferences toward initial cost savings, undervaluing future reductions in operating costs. These failures and barriers include externalities of energy use, imperfect competition between manufacturers, asymmetric information, bounded rationality, split incentives, and transaction costs (Golove 1996). Recognizing the social benefit of energy conservation, several major methods are used by policymakers to ensure that efficient appliances are purchased: minimum efficiency standards, Energy Star labeling, and rebates and tax credits. There is no single market for energy services; there are hundreds of uses, thousands of intermediaries, and millions of users, and likewise, no single appropriate government intervention (Golove 1996). Complementary approaches must be implemented, considering policy and institutional limitations. In this paper, I first lay out the rationale for government intervention by addressing the market and behavioral failures and barriers that arise in the context of residential energy efficiency. I then consider the ways in which some of these failures and barriers are addressed through major federal programs and state and utility level programs that leverage them, as well as identifying barriers that are not addressed by currently implemented programs. Heterogeneity of consumers, lack of financing options, and split incentives of landlords and tenants contribute significantly to the under-adoption of efficient appliances. To quantify the size of the market most affected by these barriers, I estimate the number of appliances, and in particular the number of outdated appliances, in California rental housing. Appliances in rental housing are on average older than those in owner occupied housing. More importantly, a substantial proportion of very old appliances are in rental housing. Having established that a very old stock of appliances exists in California rental housing, I discuss tariff financing as a policy option to reduce the impact of the remaining market and behavioral barriers. In a tariff financing program, the utility pays the initial cost of an appliance, and is repaid through subsequent utility bills. By eliminating upfront costs, tying repayment to the gas or electric meter, requiring a detailed energy audit, and relying upon utility bill payment history rather than credit score in determining participant eligibility, tariff financing largely overcomes many barriers to energy efficiency. Using California as a case study, I evaluate the feasibility of implementing tariff financing. For water heaters in particular, this appears to be a cost-effective strategy. Tariff financing from utilities is particularly valuable because it improves the ability of low-income renters to lower their utility bills, without burdening landlords with unrecoverable capital costs. To implement tariff financing country-wide, regulations in many states defining private loan-making institutions or the allowable use of public benefit funds may need to be modified. Tariff financing is relatively new and in most locations is only available as a pilot program or has only recently exited pilot phase. This preliminary evaluation suggests that tariff financing is a valuable future addition to the toolkit of policymakers who aim to increase the diffusion of efficient appliances. While regulatory approval is necessary in states that wish to pursue tariff financing, at this point, the major barrier to further implementation appears to be the newness of the financing mechanism.

  18. Scheduling in an Energy Cost Aware Environment The energy cost aware scheduling problem (ECASP) is concerned with variable electricity tariffs, where the price of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheduling in an Energy Cost Aware Environment The energy cost aware scheduling problem (ECASP) is concerned with variable electricity tariffs, where the price of electricity changes over time depending because a schedule without considering variable energy charges might significantly increase

  19. Are state renewable feed-in tariff initiatives truly throttled by Federal statutes after the FERC California decision?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaffe, David P.

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For the last few years, several local and state governments have adopted ''feed-in tariffs'' to promote development of dispersed, small-scale renewable generation through incentive pricing. Most FITs are intended to stimulate development of small solar or renewable energy facilities. In July, FERC issued a decision restating that the Federal Power Act and PURPA 210, not state (or local) legislation, govern the price that local utilities may pay under FITs. (author)

  20. Representing Periodic Functions by Fourier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vickers, James

    Representing Periodic Functions by Fourier Series 23.2 Introduction In this Section we show how, then the Fourier series expansion takes the form: f(t) = a0 2 + n=1 (an cos nt + bn sin nt) Our main purpose here Fourier coefficients of a function of period 2 calculate Fourier coefficients of a function of general

  1. So You Have Questions About...Value of Solar Tariffs: Resources & Technical Assistance (Postcard), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYou are hereValue of Solar Tariffs Resources

  2. General Engineer / Physical Scientist (Facility Representative)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Facility Representatives (FRs) are line management's on-site technical representative with responsibility for identifying and evaluating environmental, safety and health issues and concerns,...

  3. Guidelines for Manufacturers and Distributors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium is intended to be a user's group — focused on the needs of participants making investments in street and area lighting — which provides a...

  4. Melody Meyer: Organic Foods Distributor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farmer, Ellen

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are into green building, reducing carbon footprint, trackingour carbon footprint. There aren’t many companies that areuse, offsetting our carbon footprint. The Rockland facility

  5. NORTH CAROLINA BIOFUEL DISTRIBUTORS & PRODUCERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .blueridgebiofuels.com Asheville, NC 828-253-1034 Woodrow Eaton info@blueridgebiofuels.com Bud's Oil Company Harmony, NC 704 Corporation www.newdixieoil.com Roanoke Rapids, NC Littleton, NC 252-537-4118 Scott Aman scottaman

  6. NORTH CAROLINA BIOFUEL DISTRIBUTORS & PRODUCERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .blueridgebiofuels.com Asheville, NC 828-253-1034 Woodrow Eaton info@blueridgebiofuels.com Bud's Oil Company Harmony, NC 704.monsonoil.com Cary, NC 888-486-5925 Finch Monson finch@monsonoil.com New Dixie Oil Corporation www

  7. Pennsylvania House of Representatives Republican Policy Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Don

    Pennsylvania House of Representatives Republican Policy Committee Westmoreland County Community, Chairman Turzai and Representative Stairs, for inviting me here this morning to talk to you about funding for higher education in the Commonwealth. I would be remiss if I did not note that Representative Stairs

  8. USING GALOIS LATTICES TO REPRESENT NETWORK DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Douglas R.

    USING GALOIS LATTICES TO REPRESENT NETWORK DATA Linton C. Freeman* Douglas R. White* Galois-binary adjacency matrix,where each row and each column in the matrix represents a social actor. A cell entry is 1 to represent the networks they study. Graph theoretic representations permit the visu- *University

  9. Intelligent Commercial Lighting: Demand-Responsive Conditioning and Increased User Satisfaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    requirements, one time of use (TOU) tariff for smallerthat on a representative time of use electricity tariff, the

  10. An Introduction to Venture Capital Granite representatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    May 2006 An Introduction to Venture Capital #12;2 Granite representatives Sam Kingsland ­ Managing;3 Introduction to Granite Ventures Founded in 1992 Granite has 9 investment professionals Over $1B under

  11. Facility Representative Program, Criteria & Review Approach Documents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADS) to assist Facility Representatives. Please submit your CRADS for posting by sending them to the HQ FR Program Manager. Please include the subject, date, and a contact person.

  12. General Engineer/Physical Scientist (Facility Representative)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will serve as an on-site technical representative to identify and evaluate environmental, safety, and health issues and concerns; as well as diagnose root...

  13. Representing Information Collections for Visual Cognition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koh, Eunyee

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of digital information collections is growing. Collections are typically represented with text-only, in a linear list format, which turns out to be a weak representation for cognition. We learned this from empirical research...

  14. Technical basis document for the release from contaminated facility representative accident and associated represented hazardous conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OBERG, B.D.

    2003-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This document supports the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the release from contaminated facility representative accident and associated represented hazardous conditions. The representative accidents qualitatively considered are fires, deflagrations, and load drops in contaminated areas. The risks from a separate evaluation of compressed gas hazards are also summarized.

  15. An iconic approach to representing climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    1 An iconic approach to representing climate change Saffron Jessica O'Neill A thesis submitted-experts to be meaningfully engaged with the issue of climate change. This thesis investigates the value of engaging non-experts with climate change at the individual level. Research demonstrates that individuals perceive climate change

  16. The Simplicity Device: Your Personal Mobile Representative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Simplicity Device: Your Personal Mobile Representative Giovanni Bartolomeo1, Francesca Martire1 mobile phone that stores and handles personal information about the user. The Simplicity Device can be connected (e.g. via Bluetooth) to several other devices thus allowing personalization of services

  17. Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Asa S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample UsingSimulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Usingcalibrated, nationally representative set of simulated homes

  18. Selection of bioclimatically representative biological reserve systems under climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pyke, C R; Fischer, Douglas T

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of bioclimatically representative biological reserve systemsthat are bioclimatically representative across a range ofa ?at line (i.e. a representative sample of current climate

  19. Drug representatives: Giving you lunch or stealing your soul?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higgins, Steven P

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with pharmaceutical representatives are too useful topharmaceutical sales representatives. JAMA. 1995 Apr 26;273(Drug representatives: Giving you lunch or stealing your

  20. Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples Timothy J.Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples Timothy J.Introduction Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing

  1. State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA) Project: An Analysis of Renewable Energy Feed-in Tariffs in the United States (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couture, T.; Cory, K.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report analyzes renewable energy feed-in tariff (FIT) policies and explores the different FIT policies currently implemented in the United States. It also discusses of a few proposed policies, the best practices in FIT policy design, and examines how FITs can be used to target state policy goals. The report covers current and potential future interactions between FITs and other state and federal energy policies while also providing an overview of the impacts FIT policies have in terms of renewable energy deployment, job creation, and economic development.

  2. Data structures and apparatuses for representing knowledge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hohimer, Ryan E; Thomson, Judi R; Harvey, William J; Paulson, Patrick R; Whiting, Mark A; Tratz, Stephen C; Chappell, Alan R; Butner, Robert S

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Data structures and apparatuses to represent knowledge are disclosed. The processes can comprise labeling elements in a knowledge signature according to concepts in an ontology and populating the elements with confidence values. The data structures can comprise knowledge signatures stored on computer-readable media. The knowledge signatures comprise a matrix structure having elements labeled according to concepts in an ontology, wherein the value of the element represents a confidence that the concept is present in an information space. The apparatus can comprise a knowledge representation unit having at least one ontology stored on a computer-readable medium, at least one data-receiving device, and a processor configured to generate knowledge signatures by comparing datasets obtained by the data-receiving devices to the ontologies.

  3. TECHNICAL BASIS FOR THE NUCLEAR CRITICALITY REPRESENTATIVE ACCIDENT & ASSOCIATED REPRESENTED HAZARDOUS CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GRIGSBY, J.M.

    2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical Basis Document for the Nuclear Criticality Representative Accident and Associate Represented Hazardous Conditions. Revision 2 of RPP-12371 provides accident consequence estimates for a hypothetical criticality event in an above grade facility (e.g. DBVS, CH-TRUM, and S-109 PWRS). This technical basis document was developed to support RPP-13033, ''Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA)'', and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the nuclear criticality representative accident and associated hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers, because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls.

  4. Non-representative quantum mechanical weak values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. E. Y. Svensson

    2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The operational definition of a weak value for a quantum mechanical system involves the limit of the weak measurement strength tending to zero. I study how this limit compares to the situation for the undisturbed (no weak measurement) system. Under certain conditions, which I investigate, this limit is discontinuous in the sense that it does not merge smoothly to the Hilbert space description of the undisturbed system. Hence, in these discontinuous cases, the weak value does not represent the undisturbed system. As a result, conclusions drawn from such weak values regarding the properties of the studied system cannot be upheld. Examples are given.

  5. On Positive Integers Represented as Arithmetic Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimitris Sardelis

    2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of the present article is to explore the possibilities of representing positive integers as sums of other positive integers and highlight certain fundamental connections between their multiplicative and additive properties. In particular, we shall be concerned with the representation of positive integers as arithmetic series of the simplest kind, i.e., either as sums of successive odd positive numbers, or as sums of successive even positive numbers (both treated as Problem 1), or as sums of consecutive positive integers (treated as Problem 2).

  6. TECHNICAL BASIS FOR THE NUCLEAR CRITICALITY REPRESENTATIVE ACCIDENT & ASSOCIATED REPRESENTED HAZARDOUS CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GOETZ, T.G.

    2003-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document was developed to support the documented safety analysis (DSA) and describes the process and basis for assigning risk bins for the nuclear criticality representative accident and associated hazardous conditions. Revision 1 incorporates ORP IRT comments to enhance the technical presentation and also makes editorial changes. This technical basis document was developed to support the documented safety analysis (DSA), and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the nuclear criticality representative accident and associated hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence.

  7. Representing the vacuum polarization on de Sitter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, Katie E.; Woodard, Richard P. [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Prokopec, Tomislav [Institute of Theoretical Physics (ITP) and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, Postbus 80195, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)] [Institute of Theoretical Physics (ITP) and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, Postbus 80195, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies of the vacuum polarization on de Sitter have demonstrated that there is a simple, noncovariant representation of it in which the physics is transparent. There is also a cumbersome, covariant representation in which the physics is obscure. Despite being unwieldy, the latter form has a powerful appeal for those who are concerned about de Sitter invariance. We show that nothing is lost by employing the simple, noncovariant representation because there is a closed form procedure for converting its structure functions to those of the covariant representation. We also present a vastly improved technique for reading off the noncovariant structure functions from the primitive diagrams. And we discuss the issue of representing the vacuum polarization for a general metric background.

  8. Open Access Transmission Tariff

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OATT currently in effect, including Large Generator Interconnection and Small Generator Interconnection Provisions, as well as historical OATT revision filings along with EIS and...

  9. BPA files reciprocity tariff

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperationalAugustDecade Later: AreAugust 19,1 BPA I-5 BPA4 12

  10. Technical basis for the nuclear criticality representative accident and associated represented hazardous conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARSON, D.M.

    2003-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document was developed to support the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA), and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the nuclear criticality representative accident and associated hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers, because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls. Determination of the need for safety-class SSCs was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses'', as described in this report.

  11. Greening the U.S. House of Representatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond,, Rick

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Officer, U.S. House of Representatives, June 21, 2007. Finalof the U.S. House of Representatives, and the Federal EnergyGreening the U.S. House of Representatives Rick Diamond and

  12. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4B Albuquerque, New Mexico Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4B Albuquerque, New...

  13. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5B Boulder, Colorado Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative...

  14. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative...

  15. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena, Montana Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative...

  16. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative...

  17. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative...

  18. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3B Las Vegas, Nevada Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative...

  19. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4A Baltimore, Maryland Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative...

  20. 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report...

  1. 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    7 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached...

  2. The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (English Version)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

    2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The August 2003 blackout of the northeastern U.S. and CANADA caused great economic losses and inconvenience to New York City and other affected areas. The blackout was a warning to the rest of the world that the ability of conventional power systems to meet growing electricity demand is questionable. Failure of large power systems can lead to serious emergencies. Introduction of on-site generation, renewable energy such as solar and wind power and the effective utilization of exhaust heat is needed, to meet the growing energy demands of the residential and commercial sectors. Additional benefit can be achieved by integrating these distributed technologies into distributed energy resource (DER) systems. This work demonstrates a method for choosing and designing economically optimal DER systems. An additional purpose of this research is to establish a database of energy tariffs, DER technology cost and performance characteristics, and building energy consumption for Japan. This research builds on prior DER studies at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and with their associates in the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) and operation, including the development of the microgrid concept, and the DER selection optimization program, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). DER-CAM is a tool designed to find the optimal combination of installed equipment and an idealized operating schedule to minimize a site's energy bills, given performance and cost data on available DER technologies, utility tariffs, and site electrical and thermal loads over a test period, usually an historic year. Since hourly electric and thermal energy data are rarely available, they are typically developed by building simulation for each of six end use loads used to model the building: electric-only loads, space heating, space cooling, refrigeration, water heating, and natural-gas-only loads. DER-CAM provides a global optimization, albeit idealized, that shows how the necessary useful energy loads can be provided for at minimum cost by selection and operation of on-site generation, heat recovery, cooling, and efficiency improvements. This study examines five prototype commercial buildings and uses DER-CAM to select the economically optimal DER system for each. The five building types are office, hospital, hotel, retail, and sports facility. Each building type was considered for both 5,000 and 10,000 square meter floor sizes. The energy consumption of these building types is based on building energy simulation and published literature. Based on the optimization results, energy conservation and the emissions reduction were also evaluated. Furthermore, a comparison study between Japan and the U.S. has been conducted covering the policy, technology and the utility tariffs effects on DER systems installations. This study begins with an examination of existing DER research. Building energy loads were then generated through simulation (DOE-2) and scaled to match available load data in the literature. Energy tariffs in Japan and the U.S. were then compared: electricity prices did not differ significantly, while commercial gas prices in Japan are much higher than in the U.S. For smaller DER systems, the installation costs in Japan are more than twice those in the U.S., but this difference becomes smaller with larger systems. In Japan, DER systems are eligible for a 1/3 rebate of installation costs, while subsidies in the U.S. vary significantly by region and application. For 10,000 m{sup 2} buildings, significant decreases in fuel consumption, carbon emissions, and energy costs were seen in the economically optimal results. This was most noticeable in the sports facility, followed the hospital and hotel. This research demonstrates that office buildings can benefit from CHP, in contrast to popular opinion. For hospitals and sports facilities, the use of waste heat is particularly effective for water and space heating. For the other building types, waste heat is most effectively use

  3. Representative Atmospheric Plume Development for Elevated Releases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Prichard, Andrew W.

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An atmospheric explosion of a low-yield nuclear device will produce a large number of radioactive isotopes, some of which can be measured with airborne detection systems. However, properly equipped aircraft may not arrive in the region where an explosion occurred for a number of hours after the event. Atmospheric conditions will have caused the radioactive plume to move and diffuse before the aircraft arrives. The science behind predicting atmospheric plume movement has advanced enough that the location of the maximum concentrations in the plume can be determined reasonably accurately in real time, or near real time. Given the assumption that an aircraft can follow a plume, this study addresses the amount of atmospheric dilution expected to occur in a representative plume as a function of time past the release event. The approach models atmospheric transport of hypothetical releases from a single location for every day in a year using the publically available HYSPLIT code. The effective dilution factors for the point of maximum concentration in an elevated plume based on a release of a non-decaying, non-depositing tracer can vary by orders of magnitude depending on the day of the release, even for the same number of hours after the release event. However, the median of the dilution factors based on releases for 365 consecutive days at one site follows a power law relationship in time, as shown in Figure S-1. The relationship is good enough to provide a general rule of thumb for estimating typical future dilution factors in a plume starting at the same point. However, the coefficients of the power law function may vary for different release point locations. Radioactive decay causes the effective dilution factors to decrease more quickly with the time past the release event than the dilution factors based on a non-decaying tracer. An analytical expression for the dilution factors of isotopes with different half-lives can be developed given the power law expression for the non-decaying tracer. If the power-law equation for the median dilution factor, Df, based on a non-decaying tracer has the general form Df=a?×t?^(-b) for time t after the release event, then the equation has the form Df=e^(-?t)×a×t^(-b) for a radioactive isotope, where ? is the decay constant for the isotope.

  4. WOCESSORS MOD DISTRIBUTORS OF REFIBED SOURCB MATWIAL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj:'I,\ W C -h JWJLP-~ . '-

  5. What does motor efference copy represent? evidence from speech production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niziolek, CA; Nagarajan, SS; Houde, JF

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    What does motor efference copy represent? Evidence fromAbbreviated title: What does motor efference copy represent?SJ, Wang X (2003) Sensory-Motor Interaction in the Primate

  6. Visualizing Scalar Fields Represented by Adaptive Square Triangulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [Sabella 88], ab­ sorption and reflection [Max 95] providing a means of representing the field by a colored

  7. Transforming on-grid renewable energy markets. A review of UNDP-GEF support for feed-in tariffs and related price and market-access instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glemarec, Yannick; Rickerson, Wilson; Waissbein, Oliver

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As a Global Environment Facility (GEF) founding implementing agency, UNDP has worked on over 230 GEF-supported clean energy projects in close to 100 developing countries since 1992. About 100 of these projects in 80 countries have focused on renewable energy, supported by approximately US $ 293 million in GEF funds and leveraging US $1.48 billion in associated co-financing from national governments, international organizations, the private sector and non-governmental organizations. As part of UNDP efforts to codify and share lessons learnt from these initiatives, this report addresses how scarce public resources can be used to catalyze larger private financial flows for renewable energy. It provides an overview of UNDP-GEF’s extensive work supporting development of national renewable energy policies such as feed-in tariffs. In these activities UNDP-GEF assists developing countries to assess key risks and barriers to technology diffusion and then to identify a mix of policy and financial de-risking measures to remove these barriers and drive investment. This approach is illustrated through three case studies in Uruguay, Mauritius and Kazakhstan. This report is complemented by a companion publication presenting an innovative UNDP financial modeling tool to assist policymakers in appraising different public instruments to promote clean energy.

  8. Assessment of Distributed Energy Adoption in Commercial Buildings:Part 1: An Analysis of Policy, Building Loads, Tariff Design, andTechnology Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Nishida, Masaru; Gao, Weijun; Marnay, Chris

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapidly growing electricity demand brings into question theability of traditional grids to expand correspondingly while providingreliable service. An alternative path is the wider application ofdistributed energy resource (DER) that apply combined heat and power(CHP). It can potentially shave peak loads and satiate its growing thirstfor electricity demand, improve overall energy efficiency, and lowercarbon and other pollutant emissions. This research investigates a methodof choosing economically optimal DER, expanding on prior studies at theBerkeley Lab using the DER design optimization program, the DistributedEnergy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). DER-CAM finds theoptimal combination of installed equipment from available DERtechnologies, given prevailing utility tariffs, site electrical andthermal loads, and a menu of available equipment. It provides a globaloptimization, albeit idealized, that shows how the site energy loads canbe served at minimum cost by selection and operation of on-sitegeneration, heat recovery, and cooling. Utility electricity and gastariffs are key factors determining the economic benefit of a CHPinstallation, however often be neglected. This paper describespreliminary analysis on CHP investment climate in the U.S. and Japan. DERtechnologies, energy prices, and incentive measures has beeninvestigated.

  9. acid phosphatase representing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manager Meeting Representatives Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: with security requirements associated with imaging, use only the DP form located at either of...

  10. ambassador permanent representative: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manager Meeting Representatives Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: with security requirements associated with imaging, use only the DP form located at either of...

  11. alheiras represents considerable: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manager Meeting Representatives Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: with security requirements associated with imaging, use only the DP form located at either of...

  12. alternative values representing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manager Meeting Representatives Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: with security requirements associated with imaging, use only the DP form located at either of...

  13. active demethylation represent: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manager Meeting Representatives Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: with security requirements associated with imaging, use only the DP form located at either of...

  14. Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order established procedures governing the selection, appointment and termination of Department of Energy contracting officers and contracting officer representatives. Cancels DOE O 541.1A.

  15. 4Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    "The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from October to December 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered...

  16. A Class Representative Model for Pure Parsimony Haplotyping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniele Catanzaro

    2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 10, 2008 ... A Class Representative Model for Pure Parsimony Haplotyping. Daniele Catanzaro (dacatanz ***at*** ulb.ac.be) Alessandra Godi (godi ***at*** ...

  17. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    akfairbankspre1980v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska Reference Buildings by Climate Zone...

  18. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    minneapolispre1980v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6A Minneapolis, Minnesota Reference Buildings by...

  19. Accountable Property Representatives List and Property Pass Signer...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Accountable Property RepresentativesProperty Pass Authorization 1202015 Employee Authorized Organization Phone APR Primary Property Pass Signer PETEET, LISA J. ALL ORGS (202)...

  20. By Earle B. Amey Tungsten's unique high-temperature properties are beneficial The Office of the United States Trade Representative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of tungsten ore concentrates and products with that of 1994. Demand generally increased in the cemented from products under these tariffs. during 1995. During 1995, prices for tungsten concentrates, which had built from 1985). Major Domestic production data for tungsten were developed by the liquidation of both

  1. Representing a Robotic Domain Using Temporal Description Logics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franconi, Enrico

    Representing a Robotic Domain Using Temporal Description Logics Alessandro Artale artale@irst.itc effects; effects may not directly follow the action but more complex temporal relations may hold describes a collection of properties of the world holding at a certain time. Actions are represented through

  2. Representative well models for eight geothermal-resource areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carson, C.C.; Lin, Y.T.; Livesay, B.J.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Representative well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal-resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. The models were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. The nature, construction, and validation of the models are presented.

  3. Department of Defense Representatives Visit Hanford to Benchmark Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash., December 16, 2005, Representatives of the Department of Defense's (DoD's) Voluntary Protection Program Center of Excellence (VPP CX) working to reduce injuries at selected (DoD)...

  4. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Baltimore, Maryland Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4A Baltimore, Maryland In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view...

  5. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Chicago, Illinois Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

  6. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    B Helena, Montana Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena, Montana In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

  7. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    B Boulder, Colorado Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5B Boulder, Colorado In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

  8. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1A Miami, Florida Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 1A Miami, Florida In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

  9. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    7 Duluth, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 7 Duluth, Minnesota In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

  10. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    B Phoenix, Arizona Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2B Phoenix, Arizona In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

  11. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    B Las Vegas, Nevada Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3B Las Vegas, Nevada In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

  12. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    B Los Angeles, California Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3B Los Angeles, California In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can...

  13. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    C San Francisco, California Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3C San Francisco, California In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can...

  14. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A Atlanta, Georgia Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3A Atlanta, Georgia In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

  15. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A Houston, Texas Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2A Houston, Texas In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

  16. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view...

  17. Changes to the Facility Representative Program, 10/26/1999

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Effective October 1, 1999, the Deputy Secretary tasked this office to manage the Facility Representative Program. We look forward to working with you in continuing and improving this very important...

  18. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    new2004v1.35.0.zip refbldg3ausagaatlantanew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3A Atlanta, Georgia...

  19. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    new2004v1.35.0.zip refbldg1ausaflmiaminew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 1A Miami, Florida...

  20. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    new2004v1.35.0.zip refbldg2ausatxhoustonnew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2A Houston, Texas...

  1. Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish procedures governing the selection, appointment, and termination of contracting officers and for the appointment of contracting officer representatives. Cancels DOE Order 4200.4A. Canceled by DOE O 541.1A.

  2. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    B Albuquerque, New Mexico Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4B Albuquerque, New Mexico In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can...

  3. Quantum states representing perfectly secure bits are always distillable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawel Horodecki; Remigiusz Augusiak

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    It is proven that recently introduced states with perfectly secure bits of cryptographic key (private states representing secure bit) [K. Horodecki et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 160502 (2005)] as well as its multipartite and higher dimension generalizations always represent distillable entanglement. The corresponding lower bounds on distillable entanglement are provided. We also present a simple alternative proof that for any bipartite quantum state entanglement cost is an upper bound on distillable cryptographic key in bipartite scenario.

  4. Landscape Characterization and Representativeness Analysis for Understanding Sampling Network Coverage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddalena, Damian; Hoffman, Forrest; Kumar, Jitendra; Hargrove, William

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sampling networks rarely conform to spatial and temporal ideals, often comprised of network sampling points which are unevenly distributed and located in less than ideal locations due to access constraints, budget limitations, or political conflict. Quantifying the global, regional, and temporal representativeness of these networks by quantifying the coverage of network infrastructure highlights the capabilities and limitations of the data collected, facilitates upscaling and downscaling for modeling purposes, and improves the planning efforts for future infrastructure investment under current conditions and future modeled scenarios. The work presented here utilizes multivariate spatiotemporal clustering analysis and representativeness analysis for quantitative landscape characterization and assessment of the Fluxnet, RAINFOR, and ForestGEO networks. Results include ecoregions that highlight patterns of bioclimatic, topographic, and edaphic variables and quantitative representativeness maps of individual and combined networks.

  5. Landscape Characterization and Representativeness Analysis for Understanding Sampling Network Coverage

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Maddalena, Damian; Hoffman, Forrest; Kumar, Jitendra; Hargrove, William

    Sampling networks rarely conform to spatial and temporal ideals, often comprised of network sampling points which are unevenly distributed and located in less than ideal locations due to access constraints, budget limitations, or political conflict. Quantifying the global, regional, and temporal representativeness of these networks by quantifying the coverage of network infrastructure highlights the capabilities and limitations of the data collected, facilitates upscaling and downscaling for modeling purposes, and improves the planning efforts for future infrastructure investment under current conditions and future modeled scenarios. The work presented here utilizes multivariate spatiotemporal clustering analysis and representativeness analysis for quantitative landscape characterization and assessment of the Fluxnet, RAINFOR, and ForestGEO networks. Results include ecoregions that highlight patterns of bioclimatic, topographic, and edaphic variables and quantitative representativeness maps of individual and combined networks.

  6. 66 Academic Nurse Program representatives assist the School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grishok, Alla

    interviews, professional development, and dealing with the unknown. Anesthesia Program Representative: Laura of safe surgery and anesthesia practices. Since gradua- tion, he has been involved in global anesthesia also currently serves on the Anesthesia Committee for the Global Alliance for Surgical and Anesthesia

  7. Does convective aggregation need to be represented in cumulus parameterizations?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Does convective aggregation need to be represented in cumulus parameterizations? Isabelle Tobin,1 in phenomena such as ``hot spots'' or the Madden-Julian Oscillation. These findings support the need climate models lack any such representation. The ability of a cloud system- resolving model to reproduce

  8. Representing Topological Relationships between Complex Regions by F-Histograms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsakis, Pascal

    Representing Topological Relationships between Complex Regions by F-Histograms Lukasz Wawrzyniak between two regions in terms of the thirteen Allen relations. An index to measure the complexity Work in the modeling of topological relationships often relies on an extension into the spatial domain

  9. Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer's Representatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish procedures governing the selection, appointment, and termination of contracting officers and for the appointment of contracting officer's representatives. To ensure that only trained and qualified procurement and financial assistance professionals, within the scope of this Order, serve as contracting officers. Cancels DOE O 541.1. Canceled by DOE O 541.1B.

  10. US House of Representatives Appropriation Committee Report May 18, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US House of Representatives Appropriation Committee Report May 18, 2005 Fusion Energy Sciences The Committee recommendation for fusion energy sciences is $295,155,000, an increase of $5,605,000 over that two-thirds of the proposed increase for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER

  11. Representing Abductive Practical Reasoning as an Action-Based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkinson, Katie

    Representing Abductive Practical Reasoning as an Action-Based Alternating Transition System Floris present an approach to abductive reasoning by examin- ing it in the context of an argumentation scheme to rea- son abductively about how an agent might have acted to find itself in a particular sceanrio

  12. Representative Seroprevalences of Brucellosis in Humans and Livestock in Kyrgyzstan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Representative Seroprevalences of Brucellosis in Humans and Livestock in Kyrgyzstan Bassirou Bonfoh), 60 Togolok Moldo Street, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan 3 Veterinary Public Health Institute, Vetsuisse Faculty, Swiss Red Cross, 187/1 Sydykova Street, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan 5 Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute

  13. Lattices which can be represented as lattices of intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaggelis Felouzis

    2006-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate lattices that can be represented as sublattices of the lattice of all convex subsets of a linearly ordered set $(X, \\leq)$ and as lattices of convex subsets of $(X, \\leq)$. A representation theory for general lattices is presented and also some applications in general topology are given.

  14. REPRESENTING GEO-SCIENTIFIC DOMAIN CONCEPTS Boyan Brodaric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Brandon

    1 REPRESENTING GEO-SCIENTIFIC DOMAIN CONCEPTS Boyan Brodaric Penn State Geography and Geological Survey of Canada brodaric@NRCan.gc.ca 1. Introduction The geo-sciences, including geology, ecology, soil accumulate and change, and (3) are characterized by degrees of uncertainty and granularity. This suggests

  15. Necessary and sufficient conditions for representing general distributions by Coxians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Necessary and sufficient conditions for representing general distributions by Coxians Takayuki University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Abstract A common analytical technique involves using a Coxian distribution to model a general distribution G, where the Coxian distribution agrees with G on the first three moments

  16. Necessary and sufficient conditions for representing general distributions by Coxians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Necessary and sufficient conditions for representing general distributions by Coxians Takayuki University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Abstract A common analytical technique involves using a Coxian distribution to model a general distribution ˘ , where the Coxian distribution agrees with ˘ on the first three moments

  17. Necessary and Sucient Conditions for Representing General Distributions by Coxians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harchol-Balter, Mor

    Necessary and SuĆcient Conditions for Representing General Distributions by Coxians Takayuki involves using a Coxian dis- tribution to model a general distribution G, where the Coxian distribu- tion of the Coxian distribution. Algo- rithms for mapping an input distribution G to a Coxian distribution largely

  18. Representing Exceptional Behaviour at the earlier Phases of Software Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, University of

    Representing Exceptional Behaviour at the earlier Phases of Software Development Rogério de Lemos. Exception handling has been traditionally associated with the design phase of the software lifecycle, during not received enough attention /Avizienes 97/. Ideally, for each identified phase of the software lifecycle

  19. Melanoma Recognition Using Representative and Discriminative Kernel Classifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caputo, Barbara

    Melanoma Recognition Using Representative and Discriminative Kernel Classifiers Tatiana Tommasi1 caputo@nada.kth.se Abstract. Malignant melanoma is the most deadly form of skin lesion. Early diagnosis these algorithms against the (to our knowledge) state-of-the-art method on melanoma recognition, exploring how

  20. DATE: December 11, 2013 MEMO TO: Curricular Representative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Instruction Modes List: This report lists sections with an Instruction Mode not set to `P' in ISIS. · Meets Attendance List: This report lists sections coded in ISIS as optional. · Curricular Representative List can be run in ISIS, and displays real-time curricular data for auditing. In ISIS: Reporting Tools

  1. INTRODUCTION The mammalian hair follicle is a representative but highly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    INTRODUCTION The mammalian hair follicle is a representative but highly complex epithelial organ, hair follicle induction requires complex signaling between the two apposing tissue layers, which to the formation of the hair follicle, which contain the dermal papilla, proliferating matrix cells and slowly

  2. Are the TRACE-P measurements representative of the western Pacific during March 2001?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TRACE-P measurements representative of the western PacificTHE TRACE- P MEASUREMENTS REPRESENTATIVE? Pierce, R. B. , etTRACE-P measurements representative of the western Pacific

  3. Representative sampling using single-pulse laser ablation with inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Haichen; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U also achieved a representative value at high irradiance.Representative sampling using single-pulse laser ablationvalue close to the representative level. Segregation during

  4. Do women represent women? : gender and policy in Argentina and Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piscopo, Jennifer M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Differences in the Representative and Policymakingaction law and their own representative mandate. Interview,States House of Representatives. ? Policy Studies Journal

  5. Conservationism is not Conservatism: Do Interest Group Endorsements Help Voters Hold Representatives Accountable?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaufman, Aaron

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    information about the representative's position on theHelp Voters Hold Representatives Accountable? ” Aaronlearn the positions their representatives take on key issue.

  6. Acceptance of human papillomavirus vaccination among Californian parents of daughters: A representative statewide analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constantine, Norman A.; Jerman, Petra

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    parents of daughters: A representative statewide analysis.Parents of Daughters: A Representative Statewide AnalysisResistance, But Still Representative. Available at: http://

  7. Voter competency, information, and campaign effects in representative and direct democracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burnett, Craig Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Campaign Effects in Representative and Direct Democracyand Campaign Effects in Representative and Direct Democracyand make decisions in representative and direct democracy.

  8. China’s Military Representatives: Striving Toward Professional Contracting and Procurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puska, Susan M; McReynolds, Joe; Geary, Debra

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    di- rection. Military representative reform could raise2011 China’s Military Representatives: Striving Towardreforms is the Military Representative Office (MRO) system

  9. Demographic and Psychological Predictors of Parent–Adolescent Communication About Sex: A Representative Statewide Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerman, Petra; Constantine, Norman A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    here are not precisely representative of the full populationCommunication About Sex: A Representative Statewide Analysismore studies with representative samples are needed to

  10. A Tariff for Reactive Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kueck, John D [ORNL; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL; Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Tufon, Christopher [Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Isemonger, Alan [California Independent System Operator

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two kinds of power are required to operate an electric power system: real power, measured in watts, and reactive power, measured in volt-amperes reactive or VARs. Reactive power supply is one of a class of power system reliability services collectively known as ancillary services, and is essential for the reliable operation of the bulk power system. Reactive power flows when current leads or lags behind voltage. Typically, the current in a distribution system lags behind voltage because of inductive loads such as motors. Reactive power flow wastes energy and capacity and causes voltage droop. To correct lagging power flow, leading reactive power (current leading voltage) is supplied to bring the current into phase with voltage. When the current is in phase with voltage, there is a reduction in system losses, an increase in system capacity, and a rise in voltage. Reactive power can be supplied from either static or dynamic VAR sources. Static sources are typically transmission and distribution equipment, such as capacitors at substations, and their cost has historically been included in the revenue requirement of the transmission operator (TO), and recovered through cost-of-service rates. By contrast, dynamic sources are typically generators capable of producing variable levels of reactive power by automatically controlling the generator to regulate voltage. Transmission system devices such as synchronous condensers can also provide dynamic reactive power. A class of solid state devices (called flexible AC transmission system devices or FACTs) can provide dynamic reactive power. One specific device has the unfortunate name of static VAR compensator (SVC), where 'static' refers to the solid state nature of the device (it does not include rotating equipment) and not to the production of static reactive power. Dynamic sources at the distribution level, while more costly would be very useful in helping to regulate local voltage. Local voltage regulation would reduce system losses, increase circuit capacity, increase reliability, and improve efficiency. Reactive power is theoretically available from any inverter-based equipment such as photovoltaic (PV) systems, fuel cells, microturbines, and adjustable-speed drives. However, the installation is usually only economical if reactive power supply is considered during the design and construction phase. In this report, we find that if the inverters of PV systems or the generators of combined heat and power (CHP) systems were designed with capability to supply dynamic reactive power, they could do this quite economically. In fact, on an annualized basis, these inverters and generators may be able to supply dynamic reactive power for about $5 or $6 per kVAR. The savings from the local supply of dynamic reactive power would be in reduced losses, increased capacity, and decreased transmission congestion. The net savings are estimated to be about $7 per kVAR on an annualized basis for a hypothetical circuit. Thus the distribution company could economically purchase a dynamic reactive power service from customers for perhaps $6/kVAR. This practice would provide for better voltage regulation in the distribution system and would provide an alternate revenue source to help amortize the cost of PV and CHP installations. As distribution and transmission systems are operated under rising levels of stress, the value of local dynamic reactive supply is expected to grow. Also, large power inverters, in the range of 500 kW to 1 MW, are expected to decrease in cost as they become mass produced. This report provides one data point which shows that the local supply of dynamic reactive power is marginally profitable at present for a hypothetical circuit. We expect that the trends of growing power flow on the existing system and mass production of inverters for distributed energy devices will make the dynamic supply of reactive power from customers an integral component of economical and reliable system operation in the future.

  11. Value of Solar Tariff (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: This program is only available to customers of one of the state's investor-owned utilities (Alliant, Minnesota Power, Otter Tail Power Company, Xcel Energy). Customers of a municipal...

  12. Representing cognitive activities and errors in HRA trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gertman, D.I.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A graphic representation method is presented herein for adapting an existing technology--human reliability analysis (HRA) event trees, used to support event sequence logic structures and calculations--to include a representation of the underlying cognitive activity and corresponding errors associated with human performance. The analyst is presented with three potential means of representing human activity: the NUREG/CR-1278 HRA event tree approach; the skill-, rule- and knowledge-based paradigm; and the slips, lapses, and mistakes paradigm. The above approaches for representing human activity are integrated in order to produce an enriched HRA event tree -- the cognitive event tree system (COGENT)-- which, in turn, can be used to increase the analyst's understanding of the basic behavioral mechanisms underlying human error and the representation of that error in probabilistic risk assessment. Issues pertaining to the implementation of COGENT are also discussed.

  13. Representing cognitive activities and errors in HRA trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gertman, D.I.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A graphic representation method is presented herein for adapting an existing technology--human reliability analysis (HRA) event trees, used to support event sequence logic structures and calculations--to include a representation of the underlying cognitive activity and corresponding errors associated with human performance. The analyst is presented with three potential means of representing human activity: the NUREG/CR-1278 HRA event tree approach; the skill-, rule- and knowledge-based paradigm; and the slips, lapses, and mistakes paradigm. The above approaches for representing human activity are integrated in order to produce an enriched HRA event tree -- the cognitive event tree system (COGENT)-- which, in turn, can be used to increase the analyst`s understanding of the basic behavioral mechanisms underlying human error and the representation of that error in probabilistic risk assessment. Issues pertaining to the implementation of COGENT are also discussed.

  14. Representing the Semantics of Geographic Information in Ontologies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ou, Yang

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    the semantics. This paper describes how to utilise ontologies to capture the semantics of geographic information and further presents a way to represent and store spatial data in a knowledge base within an ontology. By representing geographic information...Interoperability is a key concern in the field of Geographic Information Sciences for the sharing of geographic information and the integration of geospatial processes. Web service technology is a mainstream approach to distribute GIS functionality in the Web environment and provide syntactic interoperability for different processes, and ontologies have been considered as a significant technique to achieve interoperability on the semantic level. This paper describes how the mainstream Web technologies can be applied for interoperability of geospatial processes and implements the methodology with a use case of specific processes....

  15. Processes, data structures, and apparatuses for representing knowledge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hohimer, Ryan E. (West Richland, WA); Thomson, Judi R. (Guelph, CA); Harvey, William J. (Richland, WA); Paulson, Patrick R. (Pasco, WA); Whiting, Mark A. (Richland, WA); Tratz, Stephen C. (Richland, WA); Chappell, Alan R. (Seattle, WA); Butner, R. Scott (Richland, WA)

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Processes, data structures, and apparatuses to represent knowledge are disclosed. The processes can comprise labeling elements in a knowledge signature according to concepts in an ontology and populating the elements with confidence values. The data structures can comprise knowledge signatures stored on computer-readable media. The knowledge signatures comprise a matrix structure having elements labeled according to concepts in an ontology, wherein the value of the element represents a confidence that the concept is present in an information space. The apparatus can comprise a knowledge representation unit having at least one ontology stored on a computer-readable medium, at least one data-receiving device, and a processor configured to generate knowledge signatures by comparing datasets obtained by the data-receiving devices to the ontologies.

  16. Defining And Characterizing Sample Representativeness For DWPF Melter Feed Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shine, E. P.; Poirier, M. R.

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Representative sampling is important throughout the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) process, and the demonstrated success of the DWPF process to achieve glass product quality over the past two decades is a direct result of the quality of information obtained from the process. The objective of this report was to present sampling methods that the Savannah River Site (SRS) used to qualify waste being dispositioned at the DWPF. The goal was to emphasize the methodology, not a list of outcomes from those studies. This methodology includes proven methods for taking representative samples, the use of controlled analytical methods, and data interpretation and reporting that considers the uncertainty of all error sources. Numerous sampling studies were conducted during the development of the DWPF process and still continue to be performed in order to evaluate options for process improvement. Study designs were based on use of statistical tools applicable to the determination of uncertainties associated with the data needs. Successful designs are apt to be repeated, so this report chose only to include prototypic case studies that typify the characteristics of frequently used designs. Case studies have been presented for studying in-tank homogeneity, evaluating the suitability of sampler systems, determining factors that affect mixing and sampling, comparing the final waste glass product chemical composition and durability to that of the glass pour stream sample and other samples from process vessels, and assessing the uniformity of the chemical composition in the waste glass product. Many of these studies efficiently addressed more than one of these areas of concern associated with demonstrating sample representativeness and provide examples of statistical tools in use for DWPF. The time when many of these designs were implemented was in an age when the sampling ideas of Pierre Gy were not as widespread as they are today. Nonetheless, the engineers and statisticians used carefully thought out designs that systematically and economically provided plans for data collection from the DWPF process. Key shared features of the sampling designs used at DWPF and the Gy sampling methodology were the specification of a standard for sample representativeness, an investigation that produced data from the process to study the sampling function, and a decision framework used to assess whether the specification was met based on the data. Without going into detail with regard to the seven errors identified by Pierre Gy, as excellent summaries are readily available such as Pitard [1989] and Smith [2001], SRS engineers understood, for example, that samplers can be biased (Gy?s extraction error), and developed plans to mitigate those biases. Experiments that compared installed samplers with more representative samples obtained directly from the tank may not have resulted in systematically partitioning sampling errors into the now well-known error categories of Gy, but did provide overall information on the suitability of sampling systems. Most of the designs in this report are related to the DWPF vessels, not the large SRS Tank Farm tanks. Samples from the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), which contains the feed to the DWPF melter, are characterized using standardized analytical methods with known uncertainty. The analytical error is combined with the established error from sampling and processing in DWPF to determine the melter feed composition. This composition is used with the known uncertainty of the models in the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) to ensure that the wasteform that is produced is comfortably within the acceptable processing and product performance region. Having the advantage of many years of processing that meets the waste glass product acceptance criteria, the DWPF process has provided a considerable amount of data about itself in addition to the data from many special studies. Demonstrating representative sampling directly from the large Tank Farm tanks is a difficult, if not unsolvable enterprise due to li

  17. Facility Representative of the Year Award | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in RepresentativeDepartment of Energy Score Maturity Value TargetFacility

  18. The Korarchaeota: Archaeal orphans representing an ancestral lineage of life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elkins, James G.; Kunin, Victor; Anderson, Iain; Barry, Kerrie; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Hedlund, Brian; Hugenholtz, Phil; Kyrpides, Nikos; Graham, David; Keller, Martin; Wanner, Gerhard; Richardson, Paul; Stetter, Karl O.

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on conserved cellular properties, all life on Earth can be grouped into different phyla which belong to the primary domains Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. However, tracing back their evolutionary relationships has been impeded by horizontal gene transfer and gene loss. Within the Archaea, the kingdoms Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota exhibit a profound divergence. In order to elucidate the evolution of these two major kingdoms, representatives of more deeply diverged lineages would be required. Based on their environmental small subunit ribosomal (ss RNA) sequences, the Korarchaeota had been originally suggested to have an ancestral relationship to all known Archaea although this assessment has been refuted. Here we describe the cultivation and initial characterization of the first member of the Korarchaeota, highly unusual, ultrathin filamentous cells about 0.16 {micro}m in diameter. A complete genome sequence obtained from enrichment cultures revealed an unprecedented combination of signature genes which were thought to be characteristic of either the Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, or Eukarya. Cell division appears to be mediated through a FtsZ-dependent mechanism which is highly conserved throughout the Bacteria and Euryarchaeota. An rpb8 subunit of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase was identified which is absent from other Archaea and has been described as a eukaryotic signature gene. In addition, the representative organism possesses a ribosome structure typical for members of the Crenarchaeota. Based on its gene complement, this lineage likely diverged near the separation of the two major kingdoms of Archaea. Further investigations of these unique organisms may shed additional light onto the evolution of extant life.

  19. Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, Asa S.; Lekov, Alex; Lutz, James; Rosenquist, Gregory; Gu, Lixing

    2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a new simulation tool under development at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This tool uses EnergyPlus to simulate each single-family home in the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), and generates a calibrated, nationally representative set of simulated homes whose energy use is statistically indistinguishable from the energy use of the single-family homes in the RECS sample. This research builds upon earlier work by Ritchard et al. for the Gas Research Institute and Huang et al. for LBNL. A representative national sample allows us to evaluate the variance in energy use between individual homes, regions, or other subsamples; using this tool, we can also evaluate how that variance affects the impacts of potential policies. The RECS contains information regarding the construction and location of each sampled home, as well as its appliances and other energy-using equipment. We combined this data with the home simulation prototypes developed by Huang et al. to simulate homes that match the RECS sample wherever possible. Where data was not available, we used distributions, calibrated using the RECS energy use data. Each home was assigned a best-fit location for the purposes of weather and some construction characteristics. RECS provides some detail on the type and age of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment in each home; we developed EnergyPlus models capable of reproducing the variety of technologies and efficiencies represented in the national sample. This includes electric, gas, and oil furnaces, central and window air conditioners, central heat pumps, and baseboard heaters. We also developed a model of duct system performance, based on in-home measurements, and integrated this with fan performance to capture the energy use of single- and variable-speed furnace fans, as well as the interaction of duct and fan performance with the efficiency of heating and cooling equipment. Comparison with RECS revealed that EnergyPlus did not capture the heating-side behavior of heat pumps particularly accurately, and that our simple oil furnace and boiler models needed significant recalibration to fit with RECS. Simulating the full RECS sample on a single computer would take many hours, so we used the 'cloud computing' services provided by Amazon.com to simulate dozens of homes at once. This enabled us to simulate the full RECS sample, including multiple versions of each home to evaluate the impact of marginal changes, in less than 3 hours. Once the tool was calibrated, we were able to address several policy questions. We made a simple measurement of the heat replacement effect and showed that the net effect of heat replacement on primary energy use is likely to be less than 5%, relative to appliance-only measures of energy savings. Fuel switching could be significant, however. We also evaluated the national and regional impacts of a variety of 'overnight' changes in building characteristics or occupant behavior, including lighting, home insulation and sealing, HVAC system efficiency, and thermostat settings. For example, our model shows that the combination of increased home insulation and better sealed building shells could reduce residential natural gas use by 34.5% and electricity use by 6.5%, and a 1 degree rise in summer thermostat settings could save 2.1% of home electricity use. These results vary by region, and we present results for each U.S. Census division. We conclude by offering proposals for future work to improve the tool. Some proposed future work includes: comparing the simulated energy use data with the monthly RECS bill data; better capturing the variation in behavior between households, especially as it relates to occupancy and schedules; improving the characterization of recent construction and its regional variation; and extending the general framework of this simulation tool to capture multifamily housing units, such as apartment buildings.

  20. Do Emergency Department Patients Receive a Pathological Diagnosis? A Nationally-Representative Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen, Leana S.; Espinola, Janice A.; Kosowsky, Joshua M.; Camargo Jr, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diagnosis? A Nationally-Representative Sample Leana S. Wen,of a nationally-representative database of ED visits, manysubset of a nationally-representative database of ED visits

  1. Representing the influence of subgrid topography on hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, L.R.; Ghan, S.J.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimates of the impact of global climate change on land surface hydrology require climate information on scales far smaller than those explicitly resolved by global climate models of today and the foreseeable future. To bridge the gap between what is required and what is resolved, we propose a subgrid-scale parameterization of the influence of topography on clouds, precipitation, and land surface hydrology. The parameterization represents subgrid variations in surface elevation in terms of discrete elevation classes. Separate cloud and surface processes are calculated for each elevation class. The simulated surface temperature, precipitation, snowpack, and soil moisture for each elevation class can then be distributed according to the spatial distribution of surface elevation within each grid cell. The scheme is being applied to the Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s climate version of the Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model. Validation is being addressed by driving the model with observed lateral boundary conditions for the Pacific Northwest and comparing with surface observations. Preliminary results from the simulation will be presented.

  2. Fluctuations, Correlation and Representative Elementary Volume (REV) in Granular Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Evesque

    2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In general, the mechanics of granular matter is described using continuum mechanics approach; this requires to introduce the concepts of stress and strain, which are averaged quantities, so that this needs also to introduce the notion of representative elementary volume (REV) above which averaged quantities have some physical meaning. As local quantities fluctuate spatially in granular matter; a local measure of stress and strain shall exhibit fluctuations too, whose typical amplitude depends on the sampling size L. This paper discusses this problem and the causes for large scale correlation. The mean stress s applied to a plane surface of size L*L is calculated and its fluctuation amplitude Ds is found when local forces are not correlated; it is found that Ds/s scales as 1/L . It is shown also that large scale fluctuations of stress can always be interpreted as an inhomogeneous stress field and that static equilibrium modifies the mean stress applied to a rod (in 2d), even if it does not perturb the contact force distribution. This last result is compared to experiment, which indicates that the number N of contacts per rod (in 2d) is 2

  3. A representative sample of Be stars III: H band spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. A. Steele; J. S. Clark

    2001-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present H band (1.53 - 1.69 micron) spectra of 57 isolated Be stars of spectral types O9-B9 and luminosity classes III,IV & V. The HI Brackett (n-4) series is seen in emission from Br 11-18, and FeII emission is also apparent for a subset of those stars with HI emission. No emission from species with a higher excitation temperature, such as He II or CIII is seen, and no forbidden line emission is present. A subset of 12 stars show no evidence for emission from any species; these stars appear indistinguishable from normal B stars of a comparable spectral type. In general the line ratios constructed from the transitions in the range Br 11-18 do not fit case B recombination theory particularly well. Strong correlations between the line ratios with Br-gamma and spectral type are found. These results most likely represent systematic variations in the temperature and ionization of the circumstellar disc with spectral type. Weak correlations between the line widths and projected rotational velocity of the stars are observed; however no systematic trend for increasing line width through the Brackett series is observed.

  4. Examination of representative drum from 618-9 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, D.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Bunnell, L.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work described in this report was conducted in pursuance of Task E of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Solid Waste Technology Support Program for Westinghouse Hanford Company. Task E calls for a determination of the corrosion rate of low-carbon steels under typical Hanford Site conditions. To meet this objective, Pacific Northwest Laboratory examined one intact drum that was judged to be representative of the largely intact drums excavated at the 618-9 Burial Ground located west of the 300 Area at the Hanford Site. Six samples were examined to characterize the drum, its composition, and its corrosion and corrosion products. The drum, which was found empty, was constructed of low-carbon steel. Its surface appeared relatively sound. The drum metal varied in thickness, but the minimum thickness in the samples was near 0.020 in. The corrosion corresponds to approximately 25 to 35 mils of metal loss, roughly a 1 mil/yr corrosion rate. Corrosion products were goethite and maghymite, expected products of iron buried in soil. Apparently, the drum leaked some time ago, but the cause of the leakage is unknown because records of the drums and their burial are limited. The drum was empty when found, and it is possible that it could have failed by pitting rather than by general corrosion. A pitting rate of about 3.5 mils/yr would have caused loss of drum integrity in the time since burial.

  5. 1 Ma 15200 Lesson 18 Section 1.7 I Representing an Inequality ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    charlotb

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Ma 15200 Lesson 18 Section 1.7. I. Representing an Inequality. There are 3 ways to represent an inequality. (1) Using the inequality symbol (sometime.

  6. 1 Ma 15200 Lesson 18 Section 1.7 I Representing an Inequality ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    charlotb

    2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Ma 15200 Lesson 18 Section 1.7. I. Representing an Inequality. There are 3 ways to represent an inequality. (1) Using the inequality symbol (sometime.

  7. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. Subsequent chapters of this report provide: an overview of NGTDM; a description of the interface between the NEMS and NGTDM; an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM; the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module; the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module; the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module; the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module; and a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs.

  8. Representing Cloud Processing of Aerosol in Numerical Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mechem, D.B.; Kogan, Y.L.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The satellite imagery in Figure 1 provides dramatic examples of how aerosol influences the cloud field. Aerosol from ship exhaust can serve as nucleation centers in otherwise cloud-free regions, forming ship tracks (top image), or can enhance the reflectance/albedo in already cloudy regions. This image is a demonstration of the first indirect effect, in which changes in aerosol modulate cloud droplet radius and concentration, which influences albedo. It is thought that, through the effects it has on precipitation (drizzle), aerosol can also affect the structure and persistence of planetary boundary layer (PBL) clouds. Regions of cellular convection, or open pockets of cloudiness (bottom image) are thought to be remnants of strongly drizzling PBL clouds. Pockets of Open Cloudiness (POCs) (Stevens et al. 2005) or Albrecht's ''rifts'' are low cloud fraction regions characterized by anomalously low aerosol concentrations, implying they result from precipitation. These features may in fact be a demonstration of the second indirect effect. To accurately represent these clouds in numerical models, we have to treat the coupled cloud-aerosol system. We present the following series of mesoscale and large eddy simulation (LES) experiments to evaluate the important aspects of treating the coupled cloud-aerosol problem. 1. Drizzling and nondrizzling simulations demonstrate the effect of drizzle on a mesoscale forecast off the California coast. 2. LES experiments with explicit (bin) microphysics gauge the relative importance of the shape of the aerosol spectrum on the 3D dynamics and cloud structure. 3. Idealized mesoscale model simulations evaluate the relative roles of various processes, sources, and sinks.

  9. Model documentation: Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The methodology employed allows the analysis of impacts of regional capacity constraints in the interstate natural gas pipeline network and the identification of pipeline capacity expansion requirements. There is an explicit representation of core and noncore markets for natural gas transmission and distribution services, and the key components of pipeline tariffs are represented in a pricing algorithm. Natural gas pricing and flow patterns are derived by obtaining a market equilibrium across the three main elements of the natural gas market: the supply element, the demand element, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. The NGTDM consists of four modules: the Annual Flow Module, the Capacity F-expansion Module, the Pipeline Tariff Module, and the Distributor Tariff Module. A model abstract is provided in Appendix A.

  10. Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.; Nakagawa, S.; Kwon, T.-H.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing laboratory samples is important so that the properties of these materials may be measured, while controlling the composition and other variables. Natural samples are rare, and have often experienced pressure and temperature changes that may affect the property to be measured [Waite et al., 2008]. Forming methane hydrate samples in the laboratory has been done a number of ways, each having advantages and disadvantages. The ice-to-hydrate method [Stern et al., 1996], contacts melting ice with methane at the appropriate pressure to form hydrate. The hydrate can then be crushed and mixed with mineral grains under controlled conditions, and then compacted to create laboratory samples of methane hydrate in a mineral medium. The hydrate in these samples will be part of the load-bearing frame of the medium. In the excess gas method [Handa and Stupin, 1992], water is distributed throughout a mineral medium (e.g. packed moist sand, drained sand, moistened silica gel, other porous media) and the mixture is brought to hydrate-stable conditions (chilled and pressurized with gas), allowing hydrate to form. This method typically produces grain-cementing hydrate from pendular water in sand [Waite et al., 2004]. In the dissolved gas method [Tohidi et al., 2002], water with sufficient dissolved guest molecules is brought to hydrate-stable conditions where hydrate forms. In the laboratory, this is can be done by pre-dissolving the gas of interest in water and then introducing it to the sample under the appropriate conditions. With this method, it is easier to form hydrate from more soluble gases such as carbon dioxide. It is thought that this method more closely simulates the way most natural gas hydrate has formed. Laboratory implementation, however, is difficult, and sample formation is prohibitively time consuming [Minagawa et al., 2005; Spangenberg and Kulenkampff, 2005]. In another version of this technique, a specified quantity of gas is placed in a sample, then the sample is flooded with water and cooled [Priest et al., 2009]. We have performed a number of tests in which hydrate was formed and the uniformity of the hydrate formation was examined. These tests have primarily used a variety of modifications of the excess gas method to make the hydrate, although we have also used a version of the excess water technique. Early on, we found difficulties in creating uniform samples with a particular sand/ initial water saturation combination (F-110 Sand, {approx} 35% initial water saturation). In many of our tests we selected this combination intentionally to determine whether we could use a method to make the samples uniform. The following methods were examined: Excess gas, Freeze/thaw/form, Freeze/pressurize/thaw, Excess gas followed by water saturation, Excess water, Sand and kaolinite, Use of a nucleation enhancer (SnoMax), and Use of salt in the water. Below, each method, the underlying hypothesis, and our results are briefly presented, followed by a brief conclusion. Many of the hypotheses investigated are not our own, but were presented to us. Much of the data presented is from x-ray CT scanning our samples. The x-ray CT scanner provides a three-dimensional density map of our samples. From this map and the physics that is occurring in our samples, we are able to gain an understanding of the spatial nature of the processes that occur, and attribute them to the locations where they occur.

  11. Inline evenflow material distributor for pneumatic material feed systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thiry, Michael J. (Oakdale, CA)

    2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for reducing clogs in a pneumatic material feed line, such as employed in abrasive waterjet machining systems, by providing an evenflow feed of material therethrough. The apparatus preferably includes a hollow housing defining a housing volume and having an inlet capable of connecting to an upstream portion of the pneumatic material feed line, an outlet capable of connecting to a downstream portion of the pneumatic material feed line, and an air vent located between the inlet and outlet for venting excess air pressure out from the housing volume. A diverter, i.e. an impingement object, is located at the inlet and in a path of incoming material from the upstream portion of the pneumatic material feed line, to break up clumps of ambient moisture-ridden material impinging on the diverter. And one or more filter screens is also preferably located in the housing volume to further break up clumps and provide filtering.

  12. HEATING, AIR-CONDITIONING AND REFRIGERATION DISTRIBUTORS INTERNATIONAL...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    OE Framework Document and Stakeholder Meeting regarding the Enforcement of the updated Energy Conservation Standards for Air Conditioners, Furnaces and Heat Pumps. DOE EX Parte...

  13. HEATING, AIR-CONDITIONING AND REFRIGERATION DISTRIBUTORS INTERNATIONAL

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAMGeneralGuiding Documents and Links GuidingTank(HARDI) |

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Distributors Inc. to Convert

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative Fuels Clean CitiesStationTrucks Golden Eagle

  15. Changes in Inflammatory Biomarkers Across Weight Classes in a Representative US Population: A Link Between Obesity and Inflammation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Xuan-Mai T.; Lane, John; Smith, Brian R.; Nguyen, Ninh T.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Weight Classes in a Representative US Population: A Linkexamines a nationally representative complex, multistageeach weight class for a representative US population. The

  16. Structures of Domains I and IV from YbbR are representative of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Domains I and IV from YbbR are representative of a widely distributed protein family. Structures of Domains I and IV from YbbR are representative of a widely distributed protein...

  17. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Government Reform Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform March 20, 2003 Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on...

  18. Technical basis for the aboveground structure failure and associated represented hazardous conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GOETZ, T.G.

    2003-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the aboveground structure failure representative accident and associated represented hazardous conditions. This document was developed to support the documented safety analysis.

  19. China’s Military Representatives: Striving Toward Professional Contracting and Procurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puska, Susan M; McReynolds, Joe; Geary, Debra

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    effect of specialization could be to develop military representatives who are experts in specific areas of the weapons and

  20. The Allied Health Faculty Organization invited Representative Ed Bryant (7th Congressional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    The Allied Health Faculty Organization invited Representative Ed Bryant (7th Congressional District) to visit the University and discuss such topics as health and education. Representative Bryant is a member Commerce Committee Prescription Drug Task Force. Prior to his service in the House, Representative Bryant

  1. Why Think Causally? Published under the title: "Why Represent Causal Relations?"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strevens, Michael

    Why Think Causally? Published under the title: "Why Represent Causal Relations?" Michael Strevens University Press, New York, 2007. A Why do we represent the world around us using causal generalizations to be an ex- cellent vehicle for representing all-important relations of manipulability. The third, based

  2. Facility Representatives

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd ofEvaluations in Covered Facilities | Department of Energy

  3. Facility Representatives

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd ofEvaluations in Covered Facilities | Department of Energy063-2011

  4. What every designated representative should know about Title IV and Title V enforcement provisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bischoff, C.A. [Gallagher and Kennedy, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Dayal, P. [Tucson Electric Power Co., Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Title IV of the Clean Air Act not only created a regulatory program unlike any other under the Clean Air Act, but also established a unique position--the designated representative--as an integral part of the program. The designated representative is required to meet certain basic obligations under Title IV, and a panoply of enforcement mechanisms are available to EPA in the event of noncompliance with these obligations. Also, because a designated representative may take on responsibilities under the permit provisions of Title V of the Clean Air Act, the designated representative can also be subject to an enforcement action for failure to comply with certain Title V permit requirements. This paper considers the basic definition of the designated representative under EPA`s Title IV and Title V regulations, identifies the responsibilities assigned to the designated representative, and then analyzes the enforcement mechanisms that may be applied to the designated representative if a regulatory responsibility has not been satisfied.

  5. COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS REPRESENTATIVE]; Under SDG&E's tariff Schedule CCA-INFO, a local government considering under tariff Schedule CCA-INFO, section SPECIAL CONDITIONS, subsection 7, Confidential Information

  6. 2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period April through June 20 1 1. Data for these indicators were gathered...

  7. 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from April to June  2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  8. 1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  9. 2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators QuarterlyReport covering the period from April to June 2008. Data for these indicators aregathered by Field elements...

  10. 2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from April to June  2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  11. 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period July  through September 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered...

  12. 1Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January  to March 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  13. 3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from July to September  2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  14. 3Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Facility Representative Program Indicators (Pis) Quarterly Report attached, covering the period from July to September 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements...

  15. 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period of July through September 2010. Data for these...

  16. 4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators QuarterlyReport covering the period from October to December 2007. Data for these indicators aregathered by Field...

  17. 2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from April to June  2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  18. 4Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (Pis) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  19. 1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January through March 2012. Data for these indicators were...

  20. 3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from July to September  2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  1. 3Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from July to September 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  2. 4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  3. 4Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from October to December 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  4. 2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by field elements...

  5. 3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  6. 4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October through December 2011. Data for these indicators were...

  7. 4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  8. 4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period October through December 2010. Data for these...

  9. 4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December  2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  10. 3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from July to September   2008. Data for these indicators aregathered by Field...

  11. 1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from January to March 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  12. 2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  13. 4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December  2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  14. 1Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  15. 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period January through March 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered...

  16. 4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from October to December   2008. Data for these indicators are  gathered by Field...

  17. 2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  18. 2Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the highlight of, and announces the availablity on-line of, the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per...

  19. 2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April through June 2012. Data for these indicators were...

  20. 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  1. 1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from January to March  2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  2. 1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from January to March2010. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  3. Do women represent women? : gender and policy in Argentina and Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piscopo, Jennifer M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fiscal Federalism in Argentina: Policies, Politics, andRepresent Women? Gender and Policy in Argentina and Mexico AWomen? Gender and Policy in Argentina and Mexico. by

  4. United States House of Representatives Committee on Oversight and Government Reform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    United States House of Representatives Committee on Oversight and Government Reform Testimony, and the rest of the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, I am very pleased to have the opportunity responsible way. #12;Daniel M. Kammen ­ House of Representatives Committee on Oversight and Government Reform

  5. Detecting and Representing Relevant Web Deltas in Whoweda Sourav S Bhowmick1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhowmick, Sourav S.

    Detecting and Representing Relevant Web Deltas in Whoweda Sourav S Bhowmick1 Sanjay Madria2 Wee given the old and new versions of a set of interlinked Web documents, retrieved in response to a user's query. In particular, we show how to detect and represent web deltas, i.e., changes in the Web documents

  6. Representing Energy Price Variability in Long-and Medium-term Hydropower Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    1 Representing Energy Price Variability in Long- and Medium- term Hydropower Optimization Marcelo A Resources Planning and Management, 2012, in press ABSTRACT Representing peak and off-peak energy prices and examines the reliability of an existing approximate method to incorporate hourly energy price information

  7. INTRODUCTION Yard wastes currently represent about 15% of the total municipal solid waste collected in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    INTRODUCTION Yard wastes currently represent about 15% of the total municipal solid waste collected: Collect representative and typical yard trash samples throughout Florida; Characterize the wastes these wastes. WORK ACCOMPLISHED Visited two compost and mulch processing facilities in Gainesville on 10

  8. Technical basis for the aboveground structure failure accident & associated represented hazardous conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GOETZ, T.G.

    2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the above-ground structure failure representative accident and associated represented hazardous conditions. This document was developed to support the documented safety analysis.

  9. Genome analysis of Elusimicrobium minutum, the first cultivated representative of the Elusimicrobia phylum (formerly Termite Group 1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herlemann, D. P. R.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the first cultivated representative of the ElusimicrobiaT , the first cultured representative of the TG1 phylum. Wefirst pure-culture representative of the TG1 phylum, from

  10. A representative particle approach to coagulation and fragmentation of dust aggregates and fluid droplets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Zsom; C. P. Dullemond

    2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Context: There is increasing need for good algorithms for modeling the aggregation and fragmentation of solid particles (dust grains, dust aggregates, boulders) in various astrophysical settings, including protoplanetary disks, planetary- and sub-stellar atmospheres and dense molecular cloud cores. Here we describe a new algorithm that combines advantages of various standard methods into one. Aims: The aim is to develop a method that 1) can solve for aggregation and fragmentation, 2) can easily include the effect and evolution of grain properties such as compactness, composition, etc., and 3) can be built as a coagulation/fragmentation module into a hydrodynamics simulations. Methods: We develop a Monte-Carlo method in which we follow the 'life' of a limited number of representative particles. Each of these particles is associated with a certain fraction of the total dust mass and thereby represents a large number of true particles which all are assumed to have the same properties as their representative particle. Under the assumption that the total number of true particles vastly exceeds the number of representative particles, the chance of a representative particle colliding with another representative particle is negligibly small, and we therefore ignore this possibility. This now makes it possible to employ a statistical approach to the evolution of the representative particles. Results: The method reproduces the known analytic solutions of simplified coagulation kernels, and compares well to numerical results for Brownian motion using other methods. For reasonably well-behaved kernels it produces good results even for moderate number of swarms.

  11. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future is a virtue ­ your insight, clarity of thought, #12;Note: This syllabus may represent

  12. Lessons Learned in Optimizing Workers' and Worker Representatives' Input to Work Planning and Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Tom McQuiston, Dr. P.H., United Steelworkers - Tony Mazzocchi Center for Health, Safety and Environmental Education. Lessons Learned in Optimizing Workers’ and Worker Representatives’ Input in Work Planning and Control.

  13. 2Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from April 2000 to June 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field...

  14. Family ties: representing the relationships between parents and children in contemporary Irish political poetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Lori L

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    . Boland and Heaney use the idealized model of the traditional Irish family to represent the Irish nation, describing through personal experience a national significance. This is in contrast to Paul Muldoon, who was born the generation after Boland...

  15. Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of Representatives...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of...

  16. U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in innovation and clean energy to put people back to work, grow the economy, and win the future. He will be joined by U.S. Representatives John Larson and Joe Courtney for...

  17. Cultural values represented by Hispanic and US superheroes: a text analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez Castillo, Claudia del Carmen

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CULTURAL VALUES REPRESENTED BY HISPANIC AND US SUPERHEROES: A TEXT ANALYSIS A Thesis by CLAUDIA DEL CARMEN SANCHEZ CASTILLO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A%M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1999 Major Subject: Curriculum and Instruction CULTURAL VALUES REPRESENTED BY HISPANIC AND US SUPERHEROES: A TEXT ANALYSIS A Thesis by CLAUDIA DEL CAKvKN SANCHEZ CASTILLO Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

  18. Evaluation of evolving residential electricity tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Judy

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    its residential customers to Smart Meters and laying theencountered with its Smart Meter roll out, and evaluates the3 of 7 The introduction of Smart Meters One of the necessary

  19. Evaluation of evolving residential electricity tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Judy

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the groundwork for time of use pricing, due to start intiered system to time of use (TOU) pricing as mandated by

  20. Evaluation of evolving residential electricity tariffs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Judy; DeForest, Nicholas; Kiliccote, Sila; Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Donadee, Jon

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Residential customers in California's Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) territory have seen several electricity rate structure changes in the past decade. This poster: examines the history of the residential pricing structure and key milestones; summarizes and analyzes the usage between 2006 and 2009 for different baseline/climate areas; discusses the residential electricity Smart Meter roll out; and compares sample bills for customers in two climates under the current pricing structure and also the future time of use (TOU) structure.

  1. Evaluation of evolving residential electricity tariffs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Judy; DeForest, Nicholas; Kiliccote, Sila; Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Donadee, Jon

    2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Residential customers in California's Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) territory have seen several electricity rate structure changes in the past decade. A relatively simple two-tiered pricing system (charges by usage under/over baseline for the home's climate zone) was replaced in the summer of 2001 by a more complicated five-tiered system (usage below baseline and up to 30percent, 100percent, 200percent, and 300percent+ over baseline). In 2009, PG&E began the process of upgrading its residential customers to Smart Meters and laying the groundwork for time of use pricing, due to start in 2011. This paper examines the history of the tiered pricing system, discusses the problems the utility encountered with its Smart Meter roll out, and evaluates the proposed dynamic pricing incentive structures. Scenario analyses of example PG&E customer bills will also be presented. What would these residential customers pay if they were still operating under a tiered structure, and/or if they participated in peak hour reductions?

  2. Marin Clean Energy- Feed-In Tariff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    [http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/pub/01-02/bill/asm/ab_0101-0150/ab_117_bill_20... Assembly Bill 117], passed in 2002, allows communities in California to aggregate their load and to procure electricity...

  3. River Falls Municipal Utilities- Distributed Solar Tariff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    River Falls Municipal Utilities (RFMU), a member of WPPI Energy, offers a special energy purchase rate to its customers that generate electricity using solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. The special...

  4. Evaluation of evolving residential electricity tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Judy

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bill 6 , and average cost of electricity. Table 3 shows the$) Average ($/kWh) Tier 5 Table 3. Cost of electricity based

  5. Technical basis for the tank bump representative accident and associated hazardous conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WILLIAMS, J.C.

    2003-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document was developed to support the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the tank bump representative accident and associated hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and/or technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous conditions based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers, because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls. Determination of the need for safety-class SSCs was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports'', as described in this report.

  6. Model documentation: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System; Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is a component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. This report documents the archived version of NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts used in support of the Annual Energy Outlook 1994, DOE/EIA-0383(94). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. It is intended to fulfill the legal obligation of the EIA to provide adequate documentation in support of its models (Public Law 94-385, Section 57.b.2). This report represents Volume 1 of a two-volume set. (Volume 2 will report on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues.) Subsequent chapters of this report provide: (1) an overview of the NGTDM (Chapter 2); (2) a description of the interface between the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and the NGTDM (Chapter 3); (3) an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM (Chapter 4); (4) the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module (Chapter 5); (5) the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module (Chapter 6); (6) the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module (Chapter 7); (7) the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module (Chapter 8); and (8) a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs (Chapter 9).

  7. Instructions to the Applicant 1. The Facility Representative shall complete a "Special Event Application &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Application & Permit". A site and floor plan must be submitted to the Office of the State Fire Marshal with the Fire and Life Safety requirements of Title 19, Title 24, and the conditions noted on this permit. Non. The Facility Representative shall transmit the "Special Event Application & Permit" to the Office of the State

  8. Representing hierarchical POMDPs as DBNs, with applications to mobile robot navigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Kevin Patrick

    Representing hierarchical POMDPs as DBNs, with applications to mobile robot navigation Kevin P and learning is faster than in SCFGs. In particular, inference in an HHMM can be done in O(T) time [MP01) takes O(T 3 ) time [JM00]. This also means learning, which uses inference as a subroutine, is faster. Y

  9. Synthesizing Representative I/O Workloads Using Iterative Distillation Zachary Kurmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurmas, Zachary

    Synthesizing Representative I/O Workloads Using Iterative Distillation Zachary Kurmas College proper- ties are "key" for a given workload and storage system. We have developed a tool, the Distiller, that automati- cally identifies the key properties ("attribute-values") of the workload. The Distiller then uses

  10. Laser Safety Web Resources The web links below represent varied resources for laser safety information and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Paul L.

    Laser Safety Web Resources The web links below represent varied resources for laser safety information and equipment. The inclusion or exclusion of any given resource is not meant to reflect endorsement by Georgia Tech. Please contact the Laser Safety Officer if you know of any helpful resources

  11. Law School Admissions Panel Law School representatives will discuss the law school admissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinkmann, Peter

    Law School Admissions Panel Law School representatives will discuss the law school admissions process and talk about their respective schools in a panel discussion format. Join us and learn how in Law School Admissions Panel epresentatives will discuss the law school admissions process and talk

  12. Representing OGC Geospatial Web Services in OWL-S Web Service Ontologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Kristin

    Representing OGC Geospatial Web Services in OWL-S Web Service Ontologies Kristin Stock,1,2 Anne Robertson3 and Mark Small3 1 Centre for Geospatial Science, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD geospatial web services, most of which conform to specifications of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC

  13. CO2 efflux from Amazonian headwater streams represents a significant fate for deep soil respiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    CO2 efflux from Amazonian headwater streams represents a significant fate for deep soil respiration amounts of CO2 to the atmosphere, while the magnitude of CO2 degassing from small streams remains a major was as terrestrially-respired CO2 dissolved within soils, over 90% of which evaded to the atmosphere within headwater

  14. Nuclear talks in Austria International representatives will meet in Vienna on Saturday to discuss a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear talks in Austria International representatives will meet in Vienna on Saturday to discuss a controversial nuclear fusion plan. The technical meeting of experts is intended to pave the way of nuclear fusion say it provides an attractive long-term energy option, because the basic materials needed

  15. DO GLOBAL WARMING AND CLIMATE CHANGE REPRESENT A SERIOUS THREAT TO OUR WELFARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DO GLOBAL WARMING AND CLIMATE CHANGE REPRESENT A SERIOUS THREAT TO OUR WELFARE AND ENVIRONMENT? By Michael E. Mann I. Introduction The subjects of "global warming" and "climate change" have become parts of both the popular lexicon and the public discourse. Discussions of global warming often evoke passionate

  16. Mechanism-based Representative Volume Elements (RVEs) for Predicting Property Degradations in Multiphase Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Wei; Sun, Xin; Li, Dongsheng; Ryu, Seun; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative understanding of the evolving thermal-mechanical properties of a multi-phase material hinges upon the availability of quantitative statistically representative microstructure descriptions. Questions then arise as to whether a two-dimensional (2D) or a three-dimensional (3D) representative volume element (RVE) should be considered as the statistically representative microstructure. Although 3D models are more representative than 2D models in general, they are usually computationally expensive and difficult to be reconstructed. In this paper, we evaluate the accuracy of a 2D RVE in predicting the property degradations induced by different degradation mechanisms with the multiphase solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode material as an example. Both 2D and 3D microstructure RVEs of the anodes are adopted to quantify the effects of two different degradation mechanisms: humidity-induced electrochemical degradation and phosphorus poisoning induced structural degradation. The predictions of the 2D model are then compared with the available experimental measurements and the results from the 3D model. It is found that the 2D model, limited by its inability of reproducing the realistic electrical percolation, is unable to accurately predict the degradation of thermo-electrical properties. On the other hand, for the phosphorus poisoning induced structural degradation, both 2D and 3D microstructures yield similar results, indicating that the 2D model is capable of providing computationally efficient yet accurate results for studying the structural degradation within the anodes.

  17. Representing and Utilizing Changing Historical Places as an Ontology Time Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyvönen, Eero

    Chapter 1 Representing and Utilizing Changing Historical Places as an Ontology Time Series Eero Hyv.g. Check Republic or Slo- vakia) or overlapping historic names of different times (e.g. Roman Empire interfaces. The system has been applied in the semantic cultural heritage portal CULTURESAMPO for semantic

  18. MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY Come join us and representatives from the following Universities and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY · DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY Come join us and representatives from School of Professional PSY - PsyD University of Michigan ­ MSW & MPH Western Michigan University - MA MSU the following Universities and Professional Schools to learn about their graduate programs, admission

  19. INTRODUCTIONINTRODUCTION Residential landscapes represent a large percentage of urban land cover (Martin et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    INTRODUCTIONINTRODUCTION Residential landscapes represent a large percentage of urban land cover to residential landscapes, we propose a conceptual model that integrates socioeconomic factors that influence, and socioeconomic factors: Exploring the relationships in a residential landscape. Susannah B. Lerman1 and Paige S

  20. Clemson's Logo System Any mark that is intended to represent Clemson University is the prop-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    15 3 Clemson's Logo System Any mark that is intended to represent Clemson University is the prop guidelines will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Logos at this level must contain a wordmark or Tiger five marks preferably use level one logos (masterbrand symbols), brand fonts and Clemson Orange

  1. Patterns for Representing FMEA in Formal Specification of Control Systems Ilya Lopatkin, Alexei Iliasov,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southampton, University of

    Patterns for Representing FMEA in Formal Specification of Control Systems Ilya Lopatkin, Alexei, Finland {Yuliya.Prokhorova, Elena.Troubitsyna}@abo.fi Abstract -- Failure Modes and Effects analysis (FMEA) is a widely used technique for inductive safety analysis. FMEA provides engineers with valuable information

  2. Using Stochastically Generated Subcolumns to Represent Cloud Structure in a Large-Scale Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert, Pincus

    condensate amount and cloud fraction, has about the same effect on radiative fluxes as does the ad hoc tuning for representing cloud structure in instantaneous calculations and long-term integrations. Shortwave radiation accounting for this effect in the operational radiation scheme. Long simulations with the new model

  3. A case-control study of Burkitt lymphoma in East Africa: are local health facilities an appropriate source of representative controls?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    appropriate source of representative controls? Baik et al.an appropriate source of representative controls? Sonya Baikattending four representative local health facilities in the

  4. The relationship of multiple aspects of stigma and personal contact with someone hospitalized for mental illness, in a nationally representative sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd formerly Ritsher, Jennifer E; Katz, Emerald P; Link, Bruce G; Phelan, Jo C

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ill: results of representative surveys in the Federala model using data from a representative population survey.illness, in a nationally representative sample Jennifer E.

  5. The relationship of multiple aspects of stigma and personal contact with someone hospitalized for mental illness, in a nationally representative sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Jennifer E.; Katz, Emerald P.; Link, Bruce G.; Phelan, Jo C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ill: results of representative surveys in the Federala model using data from a representative population survey.illness, in a nationally representative sample Jennifer E.

  6. The older the better: are elderly study participants more non-representative? A cross-sectional analysis of clinical trial and observational study samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golomb, B. A; Chan, V. T; Evans, M. A; Koperski, S.; White, H. L; Criqui, M. H

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    participants more non-representative? A cross-sectionalparticipants more non-representative? A cross-sectionalusing a national representative longitudinal survey. J

  7. Equity and the Sun Quality Health Private Provider Social Franchise: comparative analysis of patient survey data and a nationally representative TB prevalence survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montagu, Dominic; Sudhinaraset, May; Lwin, Thandar; Onozaki, Ikushi; Win, Zaw; Aung, Tin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    data and a nationally representative TB prevalence survey.data and a nationally representative TB prevalence surveys first nationally representative TB prevalence study

  8. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ

  9. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may to its cultural relevance and effectiveness 50% Week 9 #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past

  10. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may) with your progress report (PDF). (1-3 pages) #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering

  11. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may-class participation (required) #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course

  12. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may Participation 10% Major Figure 15% Group Web 25% Final Paper 40% #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past

  13. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may is a part of your class grade and that it includes many components. #12;Note: This syllabus may represent

  14. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may will design and build a #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course

  15. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may and prototype files can be in the format most convenient for you. #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past

  16. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may, #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may

  17. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ. Course

  18. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may argumentation around the concept of crowdsourcing/crowd work. #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past

  19. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may your professional identity using multiple avenues (i.e., #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past

  20. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may discussions): 20% #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course

  1. Vacation Donation Contribution Refer to the Administrative Policy: Vacation Donation Program for Civil Service and Union-Represented Staff at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    for Civil Service and Union-Represented Staff at http://www.policy.umn.edu/Policies/hr/Leaves/VACATIONDONATION.html and corresponding Procedure: Requesting/Donating Paid Leave for Civil Service/Union-Represented Staff at http

  2. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may Course Schedule: MW, 1:30-3:20pm; or TTh, 10:30am-12:20pm *DISCLAIMER: This syllabus represents computational thinking, including: #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course

  3. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ. Course;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ

  4. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differHutchinson Style: #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings

  5. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may Tuesday Introduction to course Introduction to user assistance (UA) #12;Note: This syllabus may represent: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ. Thursday

  6. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ. Course to Seidman, pp.7­14, Weiss, Chap.1 -- #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course

  7. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may Week 3 A A. Lecture: Constructive criticism & evaluation rubric #12;Note: This syllabus may represent sources #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings

  8. Putative Zinc Finger Protein Binding Sites Are Over-Represented in the Boundaries of Methylation-Resistant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putative Zinc Finger Protein Binding Sites Are Over- Represented in the Boundaries of Methylation that there are several over-represented putative Transcription Factor Binding Sites (TFBSs) in methylation-resistant CpG islands, and a specific group of zinc finger protein binding sites are over-represented in boundary

  9. Representing Uncertainty Do not expect to arrive at certainty in every subject which you pursue. There are a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitelson, Branden

    Chapter 2 Representing Uncertainty Do not expect to arrive at certainty in every subject which you best light and reasoning will reach no farther. --Isaac Watts How should uncertainty be represented in this chapter, I discuss some other difficulties that probability has in representing uncertainty

  10. Instructions concerning the strdent's representative The faculty of law at Philadelphia University gives a high degree of interest to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instructions concerning the strdent's representative-learning process being run perfectly,it was decided that a student should be chosen to represent all students in a class to words the teacher of the course . 2- The aim of choosing a representative . This procedure aims

  11. Notes on representing grain size distributions obtained by electron backscatter diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toth, Laszlo S., E-mail: laszlo.metz@univ-lorraine.fr [Laboratoire d'Etude des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux (LEM3), UMR 7239, CNRS/Université de Lorraine, F-57045 Metz (France); Laboratory of Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for low-mAss Structures (DAMAS), Université de Lorraine (France); Biswas, Somjeet, E-mail: somjeetbiswas@gmail.com [Laboratory of Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for low-mAss Structures (DAMAS), Université de Lorraine (France); Gu, Chengfan, E-mail: chengfan.gu@unsw.edu.au [School of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Beausir, Benoit, E-mail: benoit.beausir@univ-lorraine.fr [Laboratoire d'Etude des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux (LEM3), UMR 7239, CNRS/Université de Lorraine, F-57045 Metz (France); Laboratory of Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for low-mAss Structures (DAMAS), Université de Lorraine (France)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Grain size distributions measured by electron backscatter diffraction are commonly represented by histograms using either number or area fraction definitions. It is shown here that they should be presented in forms of density distribution functions for direct quantitative comparisons between different measurements. Here we make an interpretation of the frequently seen parabolic tales of the area distributions of bimodal grain structures and a transformation formula between the two distributions are given in this paper. - Highlights: • Grain size distributions are represented by density functions. • The parabolic tales corresponds to equal number of grains in a bin of the histogram. • A simple transformation formula is given to number and area weighed distributions. • The particularities of uniform and lognormal distributions are examined.

  12. QBism and the Greeks: why a quantum state does not represent an element of physical reality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher A. Fuchs; Ruediger Schack

    2015-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In QBism (or Quantum Bayesianism) a quantum state does not represent an element of physical reality but an agent's personal probability assignments, reflecting his subjective degrees of belief about the future content of his experience. In this paper, we contrast QBism with hidden-variable accounts of quantum mechanics and show the sense in which QBism explains quantum correlations. QBism's agent-centered worldview can be seen as a development of ideas expressed in Schr\\"odinger's essay "Nature and the Greeks".

  13. REPRESENTING AEROSOL DYNAMICS AND PROPERTIES IN CHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODELS BY THE METHOD OF MOMENTS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SCHWARTZ,S.E.; MCGRAW,R.; BENKOVITZ,C.M.; WRIGHT,D.L.

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric aerosols, suspensions of solid or liquid particles, are an important multi-phase system. Aerosols scatter and absorb shortwave (solar) radiation, affecting climate (Charlson et al., 1992; Schwartz, 1996) and visibility; nucleate cloud droplet formation, modifying the reflectivity of clouds (Twomey et al., 1984; Schwartz and Slingo, 1996) as well as contributing to composition of cloudwater and to wet deposition (Seinfeld and Pandis, 1998); and affect human health through inhalation (NRC, 1998). Existing and prospective air quality regulations impose standards on concentrations of atmospheric aerosols to protect human health and welfare (EPA, 1998). Chemical transport and transformation models representing the loading and geographical distribution of aerosols and precursor gases are needed to permit development of effective and efficient strategies for meeting air quality standards, and for examining aerosol effects on climate retrospectively and prospectively for different emissions scenarios. Important aerosol properties and processes depend on their size distribution: light scattering, cloud nucleating properties, dry deposition, and penetration into airways of lungs. The evolution of the mass loading itself depends on particle size because of the size dependence of growth and removal processes. For these reasons it is increasingly recognized that chemical transport and transformation models must represent not just the mass loading of atmospheric particulate matter but also the aerosol microphysical properties and the evolution of these properties if aerosols are to be accurately represented in these models. If the size distribution of the aerosol is known, a given property can be evaluated as the integral of the appropriate kernel function over the size distribution. This has motivated the approach of determining aerosol size distribution, and of explicitly representing this distribution and its evolution in chemical transport models.

  14. Uniprocessor Performance Analysis of a Representative Workload of Sandia National Laboratories' Scientific Applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Laverty

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UNIPROCESSOR PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF A REPRESENTATIVE WORKLOAD OF SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES' SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS Master of Science in Electrical Engineering New Mexico State University Las Cruces, New Mexico, 2005 Dr. Jeanine Cook, Chair Throughout the last decade computer performance analysis has become absolutely necessary to maximum performance of some workloads. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) located in Albuquerque, New Mexico is no different in that to achieve maximum performance of large scientific, parallel workloads performance analysis is needed at the uni-processor level. A representative workload has been chosen as the basis of a computer performance study to determine optimal processor characteristics in order to better specify the next generation of supercomputers. Cube3, a finite element test problem developed at SNL is a representative workload of their scientific workloads. This workload has been studied at the uni-processor level to understand characteristics in the microarchitecture that will lead to the overall performance improvement at the multi-processor level. The goal of studying vthis workload at the uni-processor level is to build a performance prediction model that will be integrated into a multi-processor performance model which is currently being developed at SNL. Through the use of performance counters on the Itanium 2 microarchitecture, performance statistics are studied to determine bottlenecks in the microarchitecture and/or changes in the application code that will maximize performance. From source code analysis a performance degrading loop kernel was identified and through the use of compiler optimizations a performance gain of around 20% was achieved.

  15. 100% MOX BWR experimental program design using multi-parameter representative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaise, P.; Fougeras, P.; Cathalau, S. [CEA, DEN, DER/SPRC, Cadarache F-13108 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new multiparameter representative approach for the design of Advanced full MOX BWR core physics experimental programs is developed. The approach is based on sensitivity analysis of integral parameters to nuclear data, and correlations among different integral parameters. The representativeness method is here used to extract a quantitative relationship between a particular integral response of an experimental mock-up and the same response in a reference project to be designed. The study is applied to the design of the 100% MOX BASALA ABWR experimental program in the EOLE facility. The adopted scheme proposes an original approach to the problem, going from the initial 'microscopic' pin-cells integral parameters to the whole 'macroscopic' assembly integral parameters. This approach enables to collect complementary information necessary to optimize the initial design and to meet target accuracy on the integral parameters to be measured. The study has demonstrated the necessity of new fuel pins fabrication, fulfilling minimal costs requirements, to meet acceptable representativeness on local power distribution. (authors)

  16. Technical basis for the transportation related handling representative accidents and associated hazards condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TOMASZEWSKI, T.A.

    2003-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document was developed to support the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA), and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the handling and movement of tank farm waste sample containers, and mixed, low-level, and hazardous operational waste containers incidental to onsite vehicle transportation representative accident and associated hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous conditions based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls. See RPP-14286, Facility Worker Technical Basis Document, for these considerations. Determination of the need for safety-class SSCs was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses, as described in this report.

  17. The Tariff Analysis Project: A database and analysis platform for electricity tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, K.; White, R.; Bolduc, C.; Fisher, D.; Rosenquist, G.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agency, 2005. Form EIA-861 Database, Annual Electric Powerthe TAP database LBNL 56680 Field util id name eia id statedatabase ID for the utility as speci?ed in form EIA-861,

  18. The Tariff Analysis Project: A database and analysis platform for electricity tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, K.; White, R.; Bolduc, C.; Fisher, D.; Rosenquist, G.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ZIP CODE table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The EIA FIPSInformation Agency, 2005. Form EIA-861 Database, AnnualI1 PK UTILITY util_id name eia_id state_id date_effective

  19. Bonneville Purchasing Instructions. Appendix 14A, Contracting Officer`s Technical Representatives` Guide for Services Contracts.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide outlines the duties of BPA personnel designated as Contracting Officers Technical Representatives (COTRs). The BPA Administrator gives contracting officers (COs) in BPA responsibility and authority for awarding and administering contracts. COs are authorized to designate other BPA employees to act as their representatives for purposes of contract administration, from the time of contract award until final receipt and acceptance of the contracted services. COTRs are the individuals primarily relied upon to perform technical contract administration functions. Similar functions for supply and construction contracts are performed by engineering representatives, construction inspectors, and inspectors. Although this Guide is written primarily with the COTR in mind, the concept and operation of teamwork is essential throughout the entire process of contract administration. The CO administers the contract during performance, but rarely has expertise in all of the relevant technical areas. Therefore, CO decisions rely on input from a team. The COTR is an indispensable member of that team. The instructions in this Guide are designed to facilitate this essential CO-COTR cooperation. COTR duties are usually additional to those required of the COTR in his or her assigned line organization. The COTR is still accountable to the line supervisor for performance of regularly-assigned duties. These duties are to be reflected appropriately in performance appraisals and job descriptions. For contract administration duties, however, the COTR reports directly to, and is accountable only to, the CO. The COTR`s supervisor must allow sufficient time to ensure that the COTR can adequately monitor the contract for technical compliance. This Guide is designed for COTRs who are performing service contract (including intergovernmental contract) administration functions as an adjunct to their normal technical duties.

  20. Thermal light cannot be represented as a statistical mixture of pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aurélia Chenu; Agata M. Bra?czyk; Gregory D. Scholes; J. E. Sipe

    2014-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We ask whether or not thermal light can be represented as a mixture of single broadband coherent pulses. We find that it cannot. Such a mixture of pulses is simply not rich enough to mimic thermal light; indeed, it cannot even reproduce the first-order correlation function. We show that it is possible to construct a modified mixture of single coherent pulses that does yield the correct first-order correlation function at equal space points. However, as we then demonstrate, such a mixture cannot reproduce the second-order correlation function.

  1. Comparison of Statistical Multifragmentation Model simulations with Canonical Thermodynamical Model results: a few representative cases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Botvina; G. Chaudhuri; S. Das Gupta; I. Mishustin

    2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) has been widely used to explain experimental data of intermediate energy heavy ion collisions. A later entrant in the field is the canonical thermodynamic model (CTM) which is also being used to fit experimental data. The basic physics of both the models is the same, namely that fragments are produced according to their statistical weights in the available phase space. However, they are based on different statistical ensembles, and the methods of calculation are different: while the SMM uses Monte-Carlo simulations, the CTM solves recursion relations. In this paper we compare the predictions of the two models for a few representative cases.

  2. Sampling device for withdrawing a representative sample from single and multi-phase flows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Apley, Walter J. (Pasco, WA); Cliff, William C. (Richland, WA); Creer, James M. (Richland, WA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid stream sampling device has been developed for the purpose of obtaining a representative sample from a single or multi-phase fluid flow. This objective is carried out by means of a probe which may be inserted into the fluid stream. Individual samples are withdrawn from the fluid flow by sampling ports with particular spacings, and the sampling parts are coupled to various analytical systems for characterization of the physical, thermal, and chemical properties of the fluid flow as a whole and also individually.

  3. On the ambiguity of field correlators represented by asymptotic perturbation expansions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irinel Caprini; Jan Fischer; Ivo Vrko?

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting from the divergence pattern of perturbation expansions in Quantum Field Theory and the (assumed) asymptotic character of the series, we address the problem of ambiguity of a function determined by the perturbation expansion. We consider functions represented by an integral of the Laplace-Borel type along a general contour in the Borel complex plane. Proving a modified form of the Watson lemma, we obtain a large class of functions having the same asymptotic perturbation expansion. Some remarks on perturbative QCD are made, using the particular case of the Adler function.

  4. Fact #734: July 2, 2012 OPEC Countries Represent Less Than Half of U.S.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in RepresentativeDepartment ofDepartment ofof Energy 1:Petroleum Imports |

  5. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Florida Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb MarbyPriceRepresented by thePrice

  6. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Florida Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb MarbyPriceRepresented by

  7. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Georgia Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb MarbyPriceRepresented byPrice

  8. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Georgia Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb MarbyPriceRepresented byPricePrice

  9. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Hawaii Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb MarbyPriceRepresented

  10. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Hawaii Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb MarbyPriceRepresentedPrice

  11. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Idaho Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb MarbyPriceRepresentedPricePrice

  12. Quasi Regular Polyhedra and Their Duals with Coxeter Symmetries Represented by Quaternions II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehmet Koca; Mudhahir Al Ajmi; Saleh Al- Shidhani

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we construct the quasi regular polyhedra and their duals which are the generalizations of the Archimedean and Catalan solids respectively. This work is an extension of two previous papers of ours which were based on the Archimedean and Catalan solids obtained as the orbits of the Coxeter groups . When these groups act on an arbitrary vector in 3D Euclidean space they generate the orbits corresponding to the quasi regular polyhedra. Special choices of the vectors lead to the platonic and Archimedean solids. In general, the faces of the quasi regular polyhedra consist of the equilateral triangles, squares, regular pentagons as well as rectangles, isogonal hexagons, isogonal octagons, and isogonal decagons depending on the choice of the Coxeter groups of interest. We follow the quaternionic representation of the group elements of the Coxeter groups which necessarily leads to the quaternionic representation of the vertices. We note the fact that the molecule can best be represented by a truncated icosahedron where the hexagonal faces are not regular, rather, they are isogonal hexagons where single bonds and double bonds of the carbon atoms are represented by the alternating edge lengths of isogonal hexagons.

  13. Comparison of surface meteorological data representativeness for the Weldon Spring transport and dispersion modeling analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazaro, M.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy is conducting the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project under the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). The major goals of the SFMP are to eliminate potential hazards to the public and the environment that associated with contamination at SFMP sites and to make surplus property available for other uses to the extent possible. This report presents the results of analysis of available meteorological data from stations near the Weldon Spring site. Data that are most representative of site conditions are needed to accurately model the transport and dispersion of air pollutants associated with remedial activities. Such modeling will assist the development of mitigative measures. 17 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Identification and use of surrogate precursors to represent delayed neutron groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loaiza, D.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Haskin, F.E. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-dependent delayed neutron activities have traditionally been represented by six delayed neutron precursor groups, whose yields and decay constants are obtained from nonlinear least-squares fits to out-of-pile measurements. The group decay constants obtained in this manner are empirical. They do not coincide with decay constants of specific delayed neutron precursors. Different values are used for each fissionable nuclide, and the values used also depend on the energy spectrum of the neutrons causing fission. Having a different value of the six-group decay constants for each fissionable nuclide complicates the analysis of the dynamic behavior of fast reactors. A fast reactor containing six principal fissioning nuclides of uranium and plutonium must, in effect, be described by 36 delayed neutron groups. The use of group decay constants that depend on the neutron energy spectrum makes it difficult to select values that describe the dynamic response of epithermal systems because virtually all delayed neutron activity measurements have been performed for fast or thermal spectra. Clearly, it would be desirable to have a single set of group decay constants that could be applied to all fissionable nuclei. A set of seven fixed decay constants is associated with a specific, dominant delayed neutron precursor. In effect, each group is represented by a single surrogate precursor. Using recently measured delayed neutron activities for {sup 235}U and {sup 237}Np, the proposed set of decay constants actually improved the fit to the data. For other fissionable nuclei, a method has been devised to obtain yields consistent with the proposed set of decay constants from the traditional six-group parameters. This transformation is accomplished without altering the inferred reactivity scale.

  15. A Subbasin-based framework to represent land surface processes in an Earth System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tesfa, Teklu K.; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Ke, Yinghai; Sun, Yu; Liu, Ying

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Realistically representing spatial heterogeneity and lateral land surface processes within and between modeling units in earth system models is important because of their implications to surface energy and water exchange. The traditional approach of using regular grids as computational units in land surface models and earth system models may lead to inadequate representation of lateral movements of water, energy and carbon fluxes, especially when the grid resolution increases. Here a new subbasin-based framework is introduced in the Community Land Model (CLM), which is the land component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Local processes are represented assuming each subbasin as a grid cell on a pseudo grid matrix with no significant modifications to the existing CLM modeling structure. Lateral routing of water within and between subbasins is simulated with the subbasin version of a recently-developed physically based routing model, Model for Scale Adaptive River Routing (MOSART). As an illustration, this new framework is implemented in the topographically diverse region of the U.S. Pacific Northwest. The modeling units (subbasins) are delineated from high-resolution Digital Elevation Model while atmospheric forcing and surface parameters are remapped from the corresponding high resolution datasets. The impacts of this representation on simulating hydrologic processes are explored by comparing it with the default (grid-based) CLM representation. In addition, the effects of DEM resolution on parameterizing topography and the subsequent effects on runoff processes are investigated. Limited model evaluation and comparison showed that small difference between the averaged forcing can lead to more significant difference in the simulated runoff and streamflow because of nonlinear horizontal processes. Topographic indices derived from high resolution DEM may not improve the overall water balance, but affect the partitioning between surface and subsurface runoff. More systematic analyses are needed to determine the relative merits of the subbasin representation compared to the commonly used grid-based representation, especially when land surface models are approaching higher resolutions.

  16. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may of the environmental, economic, and social impact of engineering work. #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past and project overview Syllabus introduction Introductions Assignment introductions: · Sustainability project

  17. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may management project OR 55% Due Week 8b #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course - Cultural adaptation WEEK 3A ­ JULY 5TH Localization Engineering and Tools #12;Note: This syllabus may

  18. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may with empirical research. #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course of this syllabus) and short "discussion idea" postings to the course blog in order to stimulate discussion about

  19. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may Role plays and simulations Short speeches and presentations #12;Note: This syllabus may represent Introduction to HCDE 461: syllabus, goals, rules, and tips to success Warm-up activities: Self

  20. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may.9 ­ 1.1 D 0.7 ­ 0.8 D- 0.0 E #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course

  1. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may for a small system and plan and perform a usability evaluation #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past in UCD Week 11 Project Presentations L11: Course Wrap-Up Finals Online Final Exam #12;Note: This syllabus

  2. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may%) 15% #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings Introduction, Overview Syllabus review Introductions User-Centered Design Requirements 2 Ways of Thinking About

  3. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may reading 5% Participation in discussion 10% ____________ 100% #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past (2) --- HW: Summary (2) due Mon. 9:00 a.m.; Prep. for mini-presentation (2) #12;Note: This syllabus

  4. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future/Wednesdays Course URL: http://faculty.washington.edu/farkas/TC407/syllabus.html Course Description will be deducted for not posting. #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering

  5. En~lironinentand Planning A 1998, volume 30, pages 1547-1561 Visualizing georeferenced data: representing reliability of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klippel, Alexander

    of oral cancer death rates among white females in the United States prompted a study of occupation: representing reliability of health statistics A M MacEachren, C A Brewer Department of Geography, Penn State in mortality rates. A coincident visually integral depiction (using color characteristics to represent both

  6. Containment and Analysis Capability Insights Gained from Drop Testing Representative Spent Nuclear Fuel Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morton, Dana Keith; Snow, Spencer David; Rahl, Tommy Ervin; Ware, Arthur Gates

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP), operating from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), developed the standardized Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) canister. This canister is designed to be loaded with DOE SNF (including other radioactive materials) and then be used during interim storage, during transportation to the nation’s repository, and for final disposal at the repository without having to be reopened. The canister has been fully designed and has completed significant testing that clearly demonstrates that it can safely achieve its intended design goals. During 1999, nine 457-mm diameter test canisters were fabricated at the INEEL to represent the standardized DOE SNF canister design. Various "worst case" internals were incorporated. Seven of the test canisters were 4.57 m long and weighed approximately 2721 kg, while two were 3.00 m long and weighed approximately 1360 kg and 1725 kg. Seven of the test canisters were dropped from 9 m onto an essentially unyielding flat surface and one of the test canisters was dropped from 1 m onto a 15-cm diameter puncture post. The final test canister was dropped from 61 cm onto a 50.8 mm thick vertically oriented steel plate, and then fell over to impact another 50.8 mm thick vertically oriented steel plate. This last test represented a canister dropping onto another larger container such as a repository disposal container or waste package. The 1999 drop testing was performed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The nine test canisters experienced varying degrees of damage to their skirts, lifting rings, and pressure boundary components (heads and main body). However, all of the canisters were shown to have maintained their pressure boundary (through pressure testing). Four heavily damaged canisters were also shown to be leaktight via helium leak testing. Pre- and post-drop finite element (FE) analyses were also performed. The results clearly indicated that accurate predictions of canister responses to the drop tests were achieved. The results achieved for the standardized canister can also be applicable to other well-constructed containers (canisters, casks, cans, vessels, etc.) subjected to similar loads. Properly designed containers can maintain a containment system after being subjected to dynamically induced high strains and FE computer analyses can accurately predict the resulting responses.

  7. Radiative ages in a representative sample of low luminosity radio galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Parma; M. Murgia; R. Morganti; A. Capetti; H. R. de Ruiter; R. Fanti

    1998-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Two frequency observations, mainly at 1.4 and 5 GHz from the VLA, have been used to study spectral variations along the lobes of some nearby low luminosity radio galaxies that constitute a representative sample selected from the B2 catalogue. The variations of the spectral index have been interpreted as being due to synchrotron and inverse Compton losses and characteristic spectral ages are deduced for the relativistic electrons. The radiative ages are in the range of several 10^7 years. These ages correlate well with the source sizes. They also appear to be consistent with dynamical ages determined from ram-pressure arguments, if we make reasonable assumptions about the ambient gas density and allow for very moderate deviations from the equipartition conditions. There appears to be a significant difference between the radiative ages of sources in our sample and those of more powerful 3CR radio sources. We briefly discuss the possibility of re-acceleration processes and indicate some objects where these may occur.

  8. A Control Chart Approach for Representing and Mining Data Streams with Shape Based Similarity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mining of data streams for online condition monitoring is a challenging task in several domains including (electric) power grid system, intelligent manufacturing, and consumer science. Considering a power grid application in which thousands of sensors, called the phasor measurement units, are deployed on the power grid network to continuously collect streams of digital data for real-time situational awareness and system management. Depending on design, each sensor could stream between ten and sixty data samples per second. The myriad of sensory data captured could convey deeper insights about sequence of events in real-time and before major damages are done. However, the timely processing and analysis of these high-velocity and high-volume data streams is a challenge. Hence, a new data processing and transformation approach, based on the concept of control charts, for representing sequence of data streams from sensors is proposed. In addition, an application of the proposed approach for enhancing data mining tasks such as clustering using real-world power grid data streams is presented. The results indicate that the proposed approach is very efficient for data streams storage and manipulation.

  9. Our goal is to develop a modeling formalism for representing state and change of state in general cyber systems, and model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Objective Our goal is to develop a modeling formalism for representing state and change of state. Approach We represent cyber systems as discrete mathematical objects interacting across hierarchically

  10. Alpha Hemolysin: Inventory and Record Keeping On February 9, 2006, our laboratory was represented before the Microbiological Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Movileanu, Liviu

    Alpha Hemolysin: Inventory and Record Keeping On February 9, 2006, our laboratory was represented at all times. An accurate and up-to-date inventory of HL will be provided to EHO at least annually

  11. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may the original total point value. Work more than 5 days late will receive zero credit. #12;Note: This syllabus

  12. Prevalence of exposure to violence and PTSD symptoms in middle income undergraduate students representing three ethnic groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGruder, Anita Kay

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PREVALENCE OF EXPOSURE TO VIOLENCE AND PTSD SYMPTOMS IN MIDDLE INCOME UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS REPRESENTING THREE ETHNIC GROUPS A Thesis by ANITA KAY MCGRUDER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1995 Major Subject: Psychology PREVALENCE OF EXPOSURE TO VIOLENCE AND PTSD SYMPTOMS IN MIDDLE INCOME UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS REPRESENTING THREE ETHNIC GROUPS A Thesis by ANITA KAY...

  13. Development of a Future Representative Concentration Pathway for Use in the IPCC 5th Assessment Earth System Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The representative concentration pathway to be delivered is a scenario of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and other radiatively important atmospheric species, along with land-use changes, derived from the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). The particular representative concentration pathway (RCP) that the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) has been responsible for is a not-to-exceed pathway that stabilizes at a radiative forcing of 4.5Wm-2 in the year 2100.

  14. A Hydro-Economic Approach to Representing Water Resources Impacts in Integrated Assessment Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirshen, Paul H.; Strzepek, Kenneth, M.

    2004-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Grant Number DE-FG02-98ER62665 Office of Energy Research of the U.S. Department of Energy Abstract Many Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) divide the world into a small number of highly aggregated regions. Non-OECD countries are aggregated geographically into continental and multiple-continental regions or economically by development level. Current research suggests that these large scale aggregations cannot accurately represent potential water resources-related climate change impacts. In addition, IAMs do not explicitly model the flow regulation impacts of reservoir and ground water systems, the economics of water supply, or the demand for water in economic activities. Using the International Model for Policy Analysis of Agricultural Commodities and Trade (IMPACT) model of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) as a case study, this research implemented a set of methodologies to provide accurate representation of water resource climate change impacts in Integrated Assessment Models. There were also detailed examinations of key issues related to aggregated modeling including: modeling water consumption versus water withdrawals; ground and surface water interactions; development of reservoir cost curves; modeling of surface areas of aggregated reservoirs for estimating evaporation losses; and evaluating the importance of spatial scale in river basin modeling. The major findings include: - Continental or national or even large scale river basin aggregation of water supplies and demands do not accurately capture the impacts of climate change in the water and agricultural sector in IAMs. - Fortunately, there now exist gridden approaches (0.5 X 0.5 degrees) to model streamflows in a global analysis. The gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with national boundaries. This combined with GIS tools, high speed computers, and the growing availability of socio-economic gridded data bases allows assignment of demands to river basins to create hydro-economic zones that respect as much as possible both political and hydrologic integrity in different models. - To minimize pre-processing of data and add increased flexibility to modeling water resources and uses, it is recommended that water withdrawal demands be modeled, not consumptive requirements even though this makes the IAM more complex. - IAMs must consider changes in water availability for irrigation under climate change; ignoring them is more inaccurate than ignoring yield changes in crops under climate change. - Determining water availability and cost in river basins must include modeling streamflows, reservoirs and their operations, and ground water and its interaction with surface water. - Scale issues are important. The results from condensing demands and supplies in a large complex river basin to one node can be misleading for all uses under low flow conditions and instream flow uses under all conditions. Monthly is generally the most accurate scale for modeling river flows and demands. Challenges remain in integrating hydrologic units with political boundaries but the gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with political boundaries. - Using minimal reservoir cost data, it is possible to use basin topography to estimate reservoir storage costs. - Reservoir evaporation must be considered when assessing the usable water in a watershed. Several methods are available to estimate the relationship between aggregated storage surface area and storage volume. - For existing or future IAMs that can not use the appropriate aggregation for water, a water preprocessor may be required due the finer scale of hydrologic impacts.

  15. Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solar radiation, electricity tariff, technology costs, andrequirements, usage patterns, tariffs, and incentives. Toassessment Electricity tariff Natural gas tariff Technology

  16. Materials Science and Engineering B 108 (2004) 241252 Cathode and interdigitated air distributor geometry optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    geometry optimization in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells M. Grujicic, C.L. Zhao, K of the optimal PEM fuel cell design. The results of the optimization analysis show that higher current densities electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells; Design; Optimization; Robustness 1. Introduction Due to their potential

  17. Retailers and Distributors CEC-400-2012-FS-005-En Updated 3/6/2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    helped the State stabilizeper-capitaelectricity consumption during a time that electricity use Efficiency Regulations Mean to Your Business What You Need to Know If you sell or offer new electricity stringent efficiency standards? With electricity and water supplies at a premium, California's Appliance

  18. The effect of distributors on two-phase and three-phase flows in vertical columns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouyang, Chie-Jan Paul

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    been investigated in a 15. 2-centimeter internal diameter vertical column. Pressure drop across the dis- tributor and average phase hold-up were measured for two- phase and three-phase flows over flow ranges of' superficial gas velocity, 0 ? 25. 9... cm. /sec. and superficial liquid velocity, 0 ? 3. 46 cm. /sec. . Gas hold-up / pressure drop ratios were plotted against superficial gas velocity and liquid flow rate. From these plots it was found that the bubble cap was better at gas...

  19. Committee on Government Reform, United States House of Representatives Testimony for the September 21, 2006 Hearing on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Committee on Government Reform, United States House of Representatives Testimony for the September Waxman, and other members of the House Committee on Government Reform, I am grateful for the opportunity on Government Reform, September 21, 2006 - 2- In July of last year the Honourable R. John Efford

  20. Curricular Representative Contact List (if more than one Curricular Rep is listed, then first one is primary)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    is primary) Subject Department FirstName LastName Phone EmailAddress SCH/COL BUS Michele Parker 5 Representative Contact List (if more than one Curricular Rep is listed, then first one is primary) Subject M E Kathie Keyes 3-3955 kekeyes@engr.wisc.edu 207 B M E Pam Peterson 3-4025 prpeters

  1. An Economic Analysis of U.S. Farm Programs Including Senate and House Farm Bills on Representative Farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knapek, George M

    2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    and Orden (2009) investigated ACRE and its World Trade 10 Organization implications. Cooper (2009) studied corn data for Barnes County, North Dakota, and Logan County, Illinois, under both a low and high price scenarios. His study found that ACRE... .......................................................................................... 10 Simulation and Representative Farms ............................................ 12 III METHODOLOGY AND MODEL ...................................................... 15 Stochastic Simulation...

  2. Power & Promise for student aid represents the George Washington University's commitment to the power of education and the promise of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    POWER & PROMISE OVERVIEW Power & Promise for student aid represents the George Washington University's commitment to the power of education and the promise of tomorrow's leaders. Launched in 2009, Power & Promise ensures that qualified students, regardless of financial resources, can take full

  3. The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory was represented by staff from its Center for Integrating Research and Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    to drop a magnet seemingly in slow motion through a copper pipe. The USA Science and Engineering Festival and Engineering Festival National High Magnetic Field Laboratory Funding Grants: G.S. Boebinger (NSF DMR-1157490The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory was represented by staff from its Center

  4. Sulfate adsorption and its relationships with properties of representative soils of the Sa~o Paulo State, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Sulfate adsorption and its relationships with properties of representative soils of the Sa~o Paulo 2002; accepted 25 April 2003 Abstract Relationships between sulfate adsorption and physical and mineralogical properties and for their capacities of sulfate adsorption. The experimental results were submitted

  5. The honey bees of Ethiopia represent a new subspecies of Apis mellifera--Apis mellifera simensis n. ssp.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The honey bees of Ethiopia represent a new subspecies of Apis mellifera--Apis mellifera simensis n bees endemic to the volcanic dome system of Ethiopia are described as a new subspecies, Apis mellifera this population. There is no indication for the presence of more than one subspecies of honey bee in Ethiopia

  6. Wave Power Resources off the Hawaiian Islands luisvega@hawaii.edu Wave Resources for Representative Sites Around the Hawaiian Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wave Power Resources off the Hawaiian Islands luisvega@hawaii.edu 1 Wave Resources for Representative Sites Around the Hawaiian Islands Table of Contents Summary p2 Background: Wave Power Conversion p3 Licensing and Permitting p3 Challenges and Barriers p4 Wave Power Resources: Previous Work p5 Wave

  7. FACULTY CHECKLIST FOR RETIREMENT Your retirement represents so many things to you and to Stanford University. We want your

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zalta, Edward N.

    personal retirement project plan. Starting the process early will ensure that your retirement savings plansFACULTY CHECKLIST FOR RETIREMENT Your retirement represents so many things to you and to Stanford University. We want your retirement experience to be a positive one, but you are an important component

  8. Confrence TALN 1999, Cargse, 12-17 juillet 1999 1 Representing speech acts as events to treat dialogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Conférence TALN 1999, Cargèse, 12-17 juillet 1999 1 Representing speech acts as events to treat the way in which formal semantics such as SDRT (Asher, 1993) treat dialogue. We point out that SDRT offers at a semantic level, treating dia- logue cannot be done in a context-free way. Specifically, we show how

  9. How might an artificial neural network represent metric space? Patricia M.Boechler and Michael R.W.Dawson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Michael

    How might an artificial neural network represent metric space? Patricia M.Boechler and Michael R.W.Dawson Department of Psychology,University of Alberta CONCLUS IONS Although this artificial neural network. + + + + + + + ABS TR ACT An artificial neural network was trained to rate the distances between pairs of cities

  10. Motor learning of novel dynamics is not represented in a single global coordinate system: evaluation of mixed coordinate representations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, David

    . A second experiment, in which we replicated the design of an influential study that had suggested encoding represent novel dynamics while making reaching movements in a robot-rendered force field. By proposing two categorically distinct hypotheses of extrinsic (i.e., Cartesian based) and intrinsic (i.e., joint based

  11. A 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Hanspeter

    by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and was published in 1970 as international standard ISOA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar code. International Standard Book Number From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The International Standard Book Number (ISBN

  12. The Last of the Wild ver. 2 The Last of the Wild represents the least influenced (most

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    The Last of the Wild ver. 2 Oceania The Last of the Wild represents the least influenced (most wild) areas of major terrestrial biomes. Most wild in each biome are defined as areas with Human Footprint. The Last of the Wild Data set. Available at http://www.sedac.ciesin.columbia.edu/wildareas 0 500 Kilometers

  13. A strategic partnership with the University of Exeter A logo representing an equal partenership or collaboration should be displayed at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    Example B A strategic partnership with the University of Exeter · A logo representing an equal partenership or collaboration should be displayed at the bottom left of the letter. The logo can be smaller or equal size to the UoB logo but MUST NOT be larger (see Example A). A brief caption should also

  14. Systems Engineering-Energy Systems Technical Electives The following courses represent some of the content currently available university-wide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Systems Engineering-Energy Systems Technical Electives The following courses represent some for the Systems Engineering - Energy Systems graduate programs (provided these courses have not already been used approval, any graduate level courses that are consistent with the System Engineering-Energy Systems degree

  15. Representing Process Variation with a Process Family Borislava I. Simidchieva, Lori A. Clarke, and Leon J. Osterweil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Representing Process Variation with a Process Family Borislava I. Simidchieva, Lori A. Clarke. The formalization of process definitions has been an invaluable aid in many domains. However, noticeable variations in processes start to emerge as precise details are added to process definitions. While each such variation

  16. Nuclear-fuel-cycle risk assessment: descriptions of representative non-reactor facilities. Sections 1-14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, K.J.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fuel Cycle Risk Assessment Program was initiated to provide risk assessment methods for assistance in the regulatory process for nuclear fuel cycle facilities other than reactors. This report, the first from the program, defines and describes fuel cycle elements that are being considered in the program. One type of facility (and in some cases two) is described that is representative of each element of the fuel cycle. The descriptions are based on real industrial-scale facilities that are current state-of-the-art, or on conceptual facilities where none now exist. Each representative fuel cycle facility is assumed to be located on the appropriate one of four hypothetical but representative sites described. The fuel cycles considered are for Light Water Reactors with once-through flow of spent fuel, and with plutonium and uranium recycle. Representative facilities for the following fuel cycle elements are described for uranium (or uranium plus plutonium where appropriate): mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, mixed-oxide fuel refabrication, fuel reprocessing, spent fuel storage, high-level waste storage, transuranic waste storage, spent fuel and high-level and transuranic waste disposal, low-level and intermediate-level waste disposal, and transportation. For each representative facility the description includes: mainline process, effluent processing and waste management, facility and hardware description, safety-related information and potential alternative concepts for that fuel cycle element. The emphasis of the descriptive material is on safety-related information. This includes: operating and maintenance requirements, input/output of major materials, identification and inventories of hazardous materials (particularly radioactive materials), unit operations involved, potential accident driving forces, containment and shielding, and degree of hands-on operation.

  17. Gender differences in health-related quality-of-life are partly explained by sociodemographic and socioeconomic variation between adult men and women in the US: evidence from four US nationally representative data sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherepanov, Dasha; Palta, Mari; Fryback, Dennis G.; Robert, Stephanie A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report of nationally representative values for the non-from four nationally representative studies indicated thatfrom four US nationally representative data sets Dasha

  18. Two Steps Forward and One Step Back: Minority Progress and the Tyranny of the Majority: A Review-Essay Based on Lani Guinier's the Tryanny of the Majority: fundemental Fairness in Representative Democracy. N.Y.: The Free Press, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, April Maria

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FUNDAMENTAL FAIRNESS IN REPRESENTATIVE DEMOCRACY 1, 19 (Fundamental Fairness in Representative Democracy, reveals aFUNDAMENTAL FAIRNESS IN REPRESENTATIVE DEMOCRACY xviii (

  19. Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ. HCDE 418: User Experience Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may the trade-offs #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course

  20. Vacation Donation Donor/Recipient Refer to the Administrative Policy: Vacation Donation Program for Civil Service and Union-Represented Staff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    Program for Civil Service and Union-Represented Staff http://www.policy.umn.edu/Policies/hr/Leaves/VACATIONDONATION.html and corresponding Procedure: Requesting/Donating Paid Leave for Civil Service/Union-Represented Staff http

  1. UAW Local 2865 Membership Election Form UAW Local 2865 is the Union representing academic student employees (ASEs) at the University of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    07/24/12 UAW Local 2865 Membership Election Form UAW Local 2865 is the Union representing academic student employees (ASEs) at the University of California (UC). As the exclusive representative, the Union representatives, and otherwise participate in the Union. Or I decline membership in UAW Local 2865. As a non

  2. BMUS PROGRAMME Each small square box represents 0.5 unit. The shaded areas are the core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    BMUS PROGRAMME Each small square box represents 0.5 unit. The shaded areas are the core component of each year. The optional component can be made up of 0.5 units or whole units of Intermediate (I unit) Core 1102 (1 unit) Core 1103 (0.5 unit) Core 1104 (0.5 unit) Core 1105 (0.5 unit) Core 1106 (0.5

  3. The impact of alternative farm policy proposals for the 1990 Farm Bill on representative beef cattle ranches in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, David Allen

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of simulating the macroeconomic impact of alternative farm policies (Knutson, et al). The resulting model, AG-GEM, emphasizes the U. S. livestock sector and provides the input data needed for the FLIPSIM model to enable firm level policy analysis. The AG... AND CONCLUSIONS Objectives . Methodology . Results . Need for Further Research Farm . . . . 55 62 68 68 71 76 77 81 VITA 94 LIST OF TABLES Table Alternatives for U. S. Cattle Production Page 3. 1 Resource Characteristics of the Representative...

  4. A global approach of the representativity concept: Application on a high-conversion light water reactor MOX lattice case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, N. D.; Blaise, P.; Santamarina, A. [CEA, DEN/DER/SPRC Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of new types of reactor and the increase in the safety specifications and requirements induce an enhancement in both nuclear data knowledge and a better understanding of the neutronic properties of the new systems. This enhancement is made possible using ad hoc critical mock-up experiments. The main difficulty is to design these experiments in order to obtain the most valuable information. Its quantification is usually made by using representativity and transposition concepts. These theories enable to extract some information about a quantity of interest (an integral parameter) on a configuration, but generally a posteriori. This paper presents a more global approach of this theory, with the idea of optimizing the representativity of a new experiment, and its transposition a priori, based on a multiparametric approach. Using a quadratic sum, we show the possibility to define a global representativity which permits to take into account several quantities of interest at the same time. The maximization of this factor gives information about all quantities of interest. An optimization method of this value in relation to technological parameters (over-clad diameter, atom concentration) is illustrated on a high-conversion light water reactor MOX lattice case. This example tackles the problematic of plutonium experiment for the plutonium aging and a solution through the optimization of both the over-clad and the plutonium content. (authors)

  5. Representative Control Gates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    & Integrated - Operationaly Certified As-Deployed Baseline Mission Analysis Risk, Cost, etc Tools & MethodsUnderstand Customer Identify Feasible Alternatives Final Design Disposal Management Decision - System Deployed Requirements Concept Definition Analysis & Evaluation Definition Flowdown Criteria & Priorities Peer Review MCR

  6. PI:____________________________ EHS Representative: ____________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian C.

    : ____________________________ Level I Checklist Environmental: Hazardous Waste: Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAA) Yes No N/A 1. Is all hazardous waste stored in the satellite accumulation area (SAA)? 2. Are the satellite accumulation areas (SAAs) clearly labeled? 3. Are the SAAs located at or near the point of hazardous waste generation

  7. Representing Small Group Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wormald, Nicholas

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the dynamics of network evolution rests in part on the representation chosen to characterize the evolutionary process. We offer a simple, three-parameter representation based on subgraphs that capture three ...

  8. Volunteer Day Countries Represented

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilyugin, Sergei S.

    , but it really isn't. These three recreation facilities are supported by a portion of the additional fees full Board. Retirement Home for Horses-- Help care for aging and abandoned horses in a fun environment

  9. Farm-level economic impacts of the House of Representatives Farm Bill Proposal, H.R. 2646, and the Senate Farm Bill Proposal, S. 1731, for representative rice farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Christy Michelle

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements lor I he degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2002 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics FARM-LEVEL ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES FARM BILL PROPOSAL, H. R... as to style and content by: t lc James Richardson (Chair of Co ii. ie David Anderson (Member) Clai Nix (M mber ~Gene Nelson (Head of Department] August 2002 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics ABSTRACT Farm-Iwvei Economic Impacts of the House...

  10. The Value of Distributed Generation under Different Tariff Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Magnus Maribu, Karl; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the RTP structure – installed capacity is correspondinglystandby charge ($/kW of installed capacity) to the New YorkFigure 5 displays the installed capacity for each scenario

  11. Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL-55551 EIA-based average revenues by sales (in c/kWh)in region R of ownership type P (from EIA data) Set of allutilities in region R (from EIA data) Set of sample

  12. Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is higher than the average cost per-kWh, the question of howcost recovery adders are neglected unless they are speci?ed as a price per kWh

  13. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL-54447. Distributed Generation Dispatch OptimizationA Business Case for On-Site Generation: The BD Biosciencesrelated work. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization

  14. Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    this analysis. For the energy consumption data, within eachenergy consumption, for January and July, for the CBECS data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4]. The billing data include energy consumption, demand and

  15. Gainesville Regional Utilities- Solar Feed-In Tariff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: This program will re-open to new applicants from January 4, 2013 until February 5, 2013. GRU will not be accepting applications for Class 3 projects in 2013.

  16. Carbon Tariffs Revisited The Harvard Project on Climate Agreements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, X. Shirley

    Agreements is to help identify and advance scientifically sound, economically rational, and politically in Argentina, Australia, China, Europe, India, Japan, and the United States, the Project conducts research Company, Duke Energy Corporation, and Shell. Citation Information Böhringer, Christoph, André Müller

  17. access transmission tariff: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plants Websites Summary: ) establishes a framework for markets based on locational marginal pricing (LMP). The NOPR envisions a critical incentives. G iven the shortcomings of...

  18. COST-CAUSALITY BASED TARIFFS FOR DISTRIBUTION NETWORKS WITH DISTRIBUTED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1.3.6 The role of natural gas and petroleum prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 1.3.1 Reciprocating engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 1.3.2 Simple cycle gas (security of supply) . . . . . . . . 14 1.4.3 Impact of DG on network losses and usage

  19. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    control strategies (load-follow, no-DG, and heat-follow),are nearly identical to the load-follow results; i.e. , theare lower than under either load-follow or no-DG, suggesting

  20. The Value of Distributed Generation under Different Tariff Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Magnus Maribu, Karl; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    State. Prepared for the New York State Energy Research andLevy, and Chris Smith (New York State Energy Research andIn 2002, the New York State Energy Research and Development

  1. Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4 Calculation of Electricity Prices 4.1 Averageaverage seasonal and annual electricity prices by region inbased annual average electricity price vs. annual energy

  2. Tariffs Can Be Structured to Encourage Photovoltaic Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Be Structured to Encourage Photovoltaic Energy Ryan Wiser,of customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems. Though theseEconomics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California,

  3. Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The EIA Commercial Building Energy Consumption Surveys (EIA 1996. Energy Information Administration, Commercial Building Energy Consump- tion Survey.EIA 1998. Energy Information Administration, Commercial Building Energy Consump- tion Survey.

  4. Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pump Energy ConservationUnitary Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps ANOPR Technical

  5. LADWP- Feed-in Tariff (FiT) Program (California)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: LADWP accepted applications for the second 20 MW allocation of the 100 MW FiT Set Pricing Program between July 8 and July 12, 2013. This program is the first component of a 150 megawatt (MW)...

  6. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimization Common DG devices are reciprocating engines, gas turbines, microturbines, and fuel cells.

  7. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Optimization of Cogeneration Dispatch in a Deregulatedheat and power (CHP), or cogeneration, systems make use ofheat and power (CHP), or cogeneration, systems make use of

  8. Feed-in Tariff Resources | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy Chinaof EnergyImpactOnSTATEMENT OF DAVIDTheJune 6, 2012.Department of EnergyA

  9. The United Illuminating Company - Small ZREC Tariff | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23,EnergyChicopeeTechnology PerformanceDepartment ofSoftReno,Savings for

  10. Connecticut Light & Power - Small ZREC Tariff | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. DepartmentEnergy This partAs theFebruary09 FY 2009 ($Connecticut

  11. Dynamic tariffs (Smart Grid Project) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict ofDongjin SemichemDukeDuracellDynamictariffs

  12. Global Feed-in Tariffs Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting Jump to:Echo,GEF Jump to: navigation, search Name:

  13. NREL: State and Local Governments - Feed-In Tariffs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid Integration NRELCost of6Data TheNews The following

  14. The Value of Distributed Generation (DG) under Different Tariff Structures

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformation 2EnergyCityGreenElectricityOpen| Open Energy

  15. 4D-Polytopes and Their Dual Polytopes of the Coxeter Group $W(A_{4})$ Represented by Quaternions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehmet Koca; Nazife Ozdes Koca; Mudhahir Al-Ajmi

    2011-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    4-dimensional $A_{4}$ polytopes and their dual polytopes have been constructed as the orbits of the Coxeter-Weyl group $W(A_{4})$ where the group elements and the vertices of the polytopes are represented by quaternions. Projection of an arbitrary $W(A_{4})$ orbit into three dimensions is made using the subgroup $W(A_{3})$. A generalization of the Catalan solids for 3D polyhedra has been developed and dual polytopes of the uniform $A_{4}$ polytopes have been constructed.

  16. On time-optimal NMR control of states of qutrits represented by quadrupole nuclei with the spin I = 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zobov, V. E., E-mail: rsa@iph.krasn.ru; Shauro, V. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, L.V. Kirensky Institute of Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Elementary logical operators (selective rotation, Fourier transform, controllable phase shift, and SUM gate) are considered for a quantum computer based on three-level systems (qutrits) represented by nuclear spins I = 1 under nuclear magnetic resonance conditions. The computer simulation of the realization of these operators by means of simple and composite selective radiofrequency (RF) pulses and optimized RF pulses is performed. The time dependence of the amplitude of last pulses is found by numerical optimization at different durations. Two variants are proposed for realization of a two-qutrit SUM gate by using one-qutrit or two-qutrit optimized RF pulses. The calculated time dependences of realization errors were used to study the time optimality of different methods for obtaining gates, proposed earlier and in this paper. The advantages and disadvantages of each of the methods are evaluated for different values of physical parameters.

  17. Use of short-term test systems for the prediction of the hazard represented by potential chemical carcinogens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, L.R.; Jones, T.D.; Easterly, C.E.; Walsh, P.J.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been hypothesized that results from short-term bioassays will ultimately provide information that will be useful for human health hazard assessment. Historically, the validity of the short-term tests has been assessed using the framework of the epidemiologic/medical screens. In this context, the results of the carcinogen (long-term) bioassay is generally used as the standard. However, this approach is widely recognized as being biased and, because it employs qualitative data, cannot be used to assist in isolating those compounds which may represent a more significant toxicologic hazard than others. In contrast, the goal of this research is to address the problem of evaluating the utility of the short-term tests for hazard assessment using an alternative method of investigation. Chemicals were selected mostly from the list of carcinogens published by the International Agency for Research on Carcinogens (IARC); a few other chemicals commonly recognized as hazardous were included. Tumorigenicity and mutagenicity data on 52 chemicals were obtained from the Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS) and were analyzed using a relative potency approach. The data were evaluated in a format which allowed for a comparison of the ranking of the mutagenic relative potencies of the compounds (as estimated using short-term data) vs. the ranking of the tumorigenic relative potencies (as estimated from the chronic bioassays). Although this was a preliminary investigation, it offers evidence that the short-term tests systems may be of utility in ranking the hazards represented by chemicals which may contribute to increased carcinogenesis in humans as a result of occupational or environmental exposures. 177 refs., 8 tabs.

  18. Vacation Donation Program: Physician's StatementConfidential Information Refer to the Administrative Policy: Vacation Donation Program for Civil Service and Union-Represented Staff at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    to the Administrative Policy: Vacation Donation Program for Civil Service and Union-Represented Staff at http://www.policy.umn.edu/Policies/hr/Leaves/VACATIONDONATION.html and corresponding Procedures: Requesting/Donating Paid Leave for Civil Service/Union-Represented Staff at http

  19. Figure 3. Socioeconomics drive biomass too. Simple regression with untrans-formed variables. Solid line represents the estimated regression line, whereas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Figure 3. Socioeconomics drive biomass too. Simple regression with untrans- formed variables. Solid line represents the estimated regression line, whereas the dashed lines represent the 95% confidence metropolitan area. I hypothesized that income is the driving factor of vegetation coverage, primarily affecting

  20. Long term out-of-pile thermocouple tests in conditions representative for nuclear gas-cooled high temperature reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurie, M. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Inst. for Energy, P.O. Box 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Fourrez, S. [THERMOCOAX SAS, BP 26, Planquivon, F-61438 Flers Cedex (France); Fuetterer, M. A.; Lapetite, J. M. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Inst. for Energy, P.O. Box 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During irradiation tests at high temperature, failure of commercial Inconel 600 sheathed thermocouples is commonly encountered. To understand and remedy this problem, out-of-pile tests were performed with thermocouples in carburizing atmospheres which can be assumed to be at least locally representative for High Temperature Reactors. The objective was to screen those thermocouples which would consecutively be used under irradiation. Two such screening tests have been performed with a set of thermocouples embedded in graphite (mainly conventional Type N thermocouples and thermocouples with innovative sheaths) in a dedicated furnace with helium flushing. Performance indicators such as thermal drift, insulation and loop resistance were monitored and compared to those from conventional Type N thermocouples. Several parameters were investigated: niobium sleeves, bending, thickness, sheath composition, temperature as well as the chemical environment. After the tests, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) examinations were performed to analyze possible local damage in wires and in the sheath. The present paper describes the two experiments, summarizes results and outlines further work, in particular to further analyze the findings and to select suitable thermocouples for qualification under irradiation. (authors)

  1. Computer as a physical system: a microscopic quantum mechanical Hamiltonian model of computers represented by Turing machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benioff, P.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microscopic quantum mechanical model of computers as represented by Turing machines is constructed. It is shown that for each number N and Turing machine Q there exists a Hamiltonian H/sub N//sup Q/ and a class of appropriate initial states such that, if PSI/sub Q//sup N/(0) is such an initial state, then PSI/sub Q//sup N/(t) = exp(-iH/sub N//sup Q/t) PSI/sub Q//sup N/(0) correctly describes at times t/sub 3/, t/sub 6/,..., t/sub 3N/ model states that correspond to the completion of the first, second,..., Nth computation step of Q. The model parameters can be adjusted so that for an arbitrary time interval ..delta.. around t/sub 3/, t/sub 6/,..., t/sub 3N/, the machine part of PSI/sub Q//sup N/(t) is stationary. 1 figure.

  2. Characterization of Representative Materials in Support of Safe, Long Term Storage of Surplus Plutonium in DOE-STD-3013 Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narlesky, Joshua E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stroud, Mary Ann [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Paul Herrick [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wayne, David M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mason, Richard E. [MET-1: ACTINIDE PROCESSING SUPPORT; Worl, Laura A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Surveillance and Monitoring Program is a joint Los Alamos National Laboratory/Savannah River Site effort funded by the Department of Energy-Environmental Management to provide the technical basis for the safe, long-term storage (up to 50 years) of over 6 metric tons of plutonium stored in over 5,000 DOE-STD-3013 containers at various facilities around the DOE complex. The majority of this material is plutonium that is surplus to the nuclear weapons program, and much of it is destined for conversion to mixed oxide fuel for use in US nuclear power plants. The form of the plutonium ranges from relatively pure metal and oxide to very impure oxide. The performance of the 3013 containers has been shown to depend on moisture content and on the levels, types and chemical forms of the impurities. The oxide materials that present the greatest challenge to the storage container are those that contain chloride salts. Other common impurities include oxides and other compounds of calcium, magnesium, iron, and nickel. Over the past 15 years the program has collected a large body of experimental data on 54 samples of plutonium, with 53 chosen to represent the broader population of materials in storage. This paper summarizes the characterization data, moisture analysis, particle size, surface area, density, wattage, actinide composition, trace element impurity analysis, and shelf life surveillance data and includes origin and process history information. Limited characterization data on fourteen nonrepresentative samples is also presented.

  3. Meeting the Radiative Forcing Targets of the Representative Concentration Pathways in a World with Agricultural Climate Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, G. Page; Mueller, C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This study assesses how climate impacts on agriculture may change the evolution of the agricultural and energy systems in meeting the end-of-century radiative forcing targets of the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). We build on the recently completed ISI-MIP exercise that has produced global gridded estimates of future crop yields for major agricultural crops using climate model projections of the RCPs from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). For this study we use the bias-corrected outputs of the HadGEM2-ES climate model as inputs to the LPJmL crop growth model, and the outputs of LPJmL to modify inputs to the GCAM integrated assessment model. Our results indicate that agricultural climate impacts generally lead to an increase in global cropland, as compared with corresponding emissions scenarios that do not consider climate impacts on agricultural productivity. This is driven mostly by negative impacts on wheat, rice, other grains, and oil crops. Still, including agricultural climate impacts does not significantly increase the costs or change the technological strategies of global, whole-system emissions mitigation. In fact, to meet the most aggressive climate change mitigation target (2.6 W/m2 in 2100), the net mitigation costs are slightly lower when agricultural climate impacts are considered. Key contributing factors to these results are (a) low levels of climate change in the low-forcing scenarios, (b) adaptation to climate impacts, simulated in GCAM through inter-regional shifting in the production of agricultural goods, and (c) positive average climate impacts on bioenergy crop yields.

  4. The New Rules for Purchasing Electric Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, K.

    others, largely because of its size and electricity consumption per customer. Industry today sees these changes manifested in a variety of ways, several of which represent alternative power costs. These include: - conventional published tariffs...

  5. Each year, the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences recognizes a select group of outstanding alumni for their accomplishments and contributions to their professions and/or communities. Our alumni represent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    represent diverse disciplines and majors, and significant accomplishments range from early-career successes

  6. Influence of gas flow rate on liquid distribution in trickle-beds using perforated plates as liquid distributors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    compared collector data with radial spreading data issued from a radial heat transfer model. Although

  7. Supply chain networks, consisting of manufacturers, distributors, retailers, and consumers, provide the critical infrastructure for the production of goods,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    developed in Part I to energy supply chains in the form of electric power generation and distri- bution not only in terms of the product flows but also in terms of pricing in order to satisfy the consumers competition as well as cooperation and yield the resulting product and ma- terial flows and prices

  8. Office of Research Facili es and Administra ve (F&A) costs represent the infrastructure and opera ons costs that support the research enterprise at the University of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manchak, John

    Office of Research Facili es and Administra ve (F&A) costs represent the infrastructure and opera ons costs that support the research enterprise at the University of Washington. Similar to the overhead costs of a business, F&A costs are real costs incurred in conduc ng and running the UW's research

  9. Travel demand can be elegantly represented using an Origin-Destination (OD) matrix. The link counts observed on the network are produced by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    Travel demand can be elegantly represented using an Origin-Destination (OD) matrix. The link counts to reconstruct the OD matrix. An offline approach to estimate a static OD matrix over the peak period for freeway optimization routine, MINOS, interfaced to estimate an OD matrix. This approach is an application

  10. This book represents a modern treatment of classical control theory and its applications. Theoretically, it is based on the state space approach, where the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gajic, Zoran

    Preface This book represents a modern treatment of classical control theory and its applications algebra. Practically, it is based on the MATLAB 1 package for computer-aided control system design, so behavior of real physical control systems, which are quite often of high dimensions. The book treats

  11. The Human Factors and Ergonomics EFA The field of Human Factors and Ergonomics (HFE) represents an increasingly important engineering specialty. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    The Human Factors and Ergonomics EFA The field of Human Factors and Ergonomics (HFE) represents cognitive characteristics and ergonomics considers physical characteristics. The HFE EFA builds allow for an emphasis in human factors (HF) or ergonomics (Ergo). Required courses: Semester Course

  12. and at Thr185 and Tyr187 for human ERK2. The CB1000 separation revealed six protein bands, representing the non-, mono-and dually

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    and at Thr185 and Tyr187 for human ERK2. The CB1000 separation revealed six protein bands, representing the non-, mono- and dually phosphorylated forms of ERK1 and ERK2. Because human ERK1 and ERK2 are distinct but similar proteins, the isoforms of both proteins are recognized by a single, pan-ERK antibody

  13. Representative Syllabus for P140 Prof. Sandra Shapshay P140 M/W 11:15pm-12:05pm Woodburn Hall 009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    Representative Syllabus for P140 Prof. Sandra Shapshay P140 M/W 11:15pm-12:05pm Woodburn Hall 009-10:30am, SY 021 Syllabus: P140 Introduction to Ethics Welcome to Introduction to Ethics. This is a lecture

  14. Corepresentation in Joint Language: The effect of representing another’s utterance on one’s own task performance, and the mediation of friendship 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackenzie, Anna

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ’s task, even when the coactor’s task is not relevant to achieving one’s own goal (Sebanz, Knoblich & Prinz, 2003). This is taken to suggest that individuals represent a coactor’s actions (Knoblich, Butterfill & Sebanz, 2011). It is proposed...

  15. I2S2 Idealised Scientific Research Activity Lifecycle Model The model represents the processes and phases of a typical physical science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rzepa, Henry S.

    I2S2 Idealised Scientific Research Activity Lifecycle Model The model represents the processes include: development of the research proposal; its peer-review; carrying out of the experiment; equipment configuration and calibration data; processing software and associated control parameters; wikis

  16. Representing a 3-D Environment with a 2-D Map Structure Edward H.L. Fong William Adams Frederick Crabbe Alan C. Schultz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crabbe, Frederick

    planning, and localization. II. THE EVIDENCE GRID A wide variety of map representation structures (such Grid The 2-D evidence grid is one of the most popular map structures for autonomous mobile robotsRepresenting a 3-D Environment with a 2˝-D Map Structure Edward H.L. Fong William Adams Frederick

  17. Tripleclouds: An Efficient Method for Representing Horizontal Cloud Inhomogeneity in 1D Radiation Schemes by Using Three Regions at Each Height

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    that a mere 4% increase in global cloud cover could counter- act the warming caused by a doubling of carbon the effect of in- homogeneity on the radiative properties of high cloud. They used cloud radar data to inferTripleclouds: An Efficient Method for Representing Horizontal Cloud Inhomogeneity in 1D Radiation

  18. Abstract,,,Abstract,,,Abstract,,,Abstract,,, This study is concerned to look into the topic of the competent authority to decide the validity of the membership of the House of Representatives in the Hashemite kingdom of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the competent authority to decide the validity of the membership of the House of Representatives, the search in the legal jurisdiction of the membership in House of Representatives need to re of Representatives is a litigant or party in this dispute. #12;

  19. ESD Toxicology Laboratory Representative References

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    organisms. Trans. Amer. Fish. Soc. 113: 74-85. Stewart, A. J. 1984. Interactions between dissolved humic

  20. Representing and Modifying Complex Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohri, Mehryar

    . Bernardini. Sharp features on multiresolution subdivision surfaces. In 9th Pacific Conference on Com- puter-form solids. In Proceedings of ACM SIGGRAPH 2001, Computer Graphics Proceedings, Annual Conference Series SIGGRAPH 2000, Computer Graphics Proceedings, Annual Conference Series, pages 113­ 120. ACM Press / ACM

  1. GRIP: Generic Representatives in PRISM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donaldson, A.F.; Miller, A.

    Donaldson,A.F. Miller,A. Parker,D. Proceedings of the fourth International Conference on the Quantitative Evaluation of Systems (QEST'07) pp 115-116 IEEE Computer Society Press

  2. PSCAD Modules Representing PV Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photovoltaic power plants (PVPs) have been growing in size, and the installation time is very short. With the cost of photovoltaic (PV) panels dropping in recent years, it can be predicted that in the next 10 years the contribution of PVPs to the total number of renewable energy power plants will grow significantly. In this project, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a dynamic modeling of the modules to be used as building blocks to develop simulation models of single PV arrays, expanded to include Maximum Power Point Tracker (MPPT), expanded to include PV inverter, or expanded to cover an entire PVP. The focus of the investigation and complexity of the simulation determines the components that must be included in the simulation. The development of the PV inverter was covered in detail, including the control diagrams. Both the current-regulated voltage source inverter and the current-regulated current source inverter were developed in PSCAD. Various operations of the PV inverters were simulated under normal and abnormal conditions. Symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults were simulated, presented, and discussed. Both the three-phase analysis and the symmetrical component analysis were included to clarify the understanding of unsymmetrical faults. The dynamic model validation was based on the testing data provided by SCE. Testing was conducted at SCE with the focus on the grid interface behavior of the PV inverter under different faults and disturbances. The dynamic model validation covers both the symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults.

  3. Yale University HIPAA Representative Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to access to my protected health information (PHI) to assist in my care. I am also aware that I may limit separate box below is also required for HIV, psychiatric and substance abuse access. ___Other - Specify limits or specific health care incident ___________________________________________________ By checking

  4. Randy Hultgren Congressman Representing Illinois'...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hultgren has committed himself to working for fiscal sanity, real healthcare reform, and pro-growth policies that will put Americans back to work. In the current 114th...

  5. Branching of the W(H4) Polytopes and Their Dual Polytopes under the Coxeter Groups W(A4) and W(H3) Represented by Quaternions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehmet Koca; Nazife Ozdes Koca; Mudhahir Al-Ajmi

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    4-dimensional H4 polytopes and their dual polytopes have been constructed as the orbits of the Coxeter-Weyl group W(H4) where the group elements and the vertices of the polytopes are represented by quaternions. Projection of an arbitrary W(H4) orbit into three dimensions is made preserving the icosahedral subgroup W(H3) and the tetrahedral subgroup W(A3), the latter follows a branching under the Coxeter group W(A4) . The dual polytopes of the semi-regular and quasi-regular H4 polytopes have been constructed.

  6. Forestry Commission Sale of Timber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    bids - All volume estimates have been derived from a full Tariff unless otherwise stated. Tariff sheets

  7. Optimal Feed-in Tariff Schedules We analyze the design of optimal feed-in tariff schedules under production-based learning.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    concentration may cause serious degradation of the earth's climate, requiring focused effort in controlling GHG, 1999), and recent improvements in solar photovoltaic (PV) cells continue to yield substantial cost

  8. Integration of spatial datasets to suppor t the review of hydrometric networks and the identification of representative catchments Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(6), 11031117 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and the identification of representative catchments 1103 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(6), 11031117 (2004) © EGU of representative catchments C.L.R. Laize Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB, UK E into account the reduction in hydrological uncertainty brought about by the data added since the last network

  9. Crack stability in a representative piping system under combined inertial and seismic/dynamic displacement-controlled stresses. Subtask 1.3 final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, P.; Olson, R.; Wilkowski, O.G.; Marschall, C.; Schmidt, R.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results from Subtask 1.3 of the International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG) program. The objective of Subtask 1.3 is to develop data to assess analysis methodologies for characterizing the fracture behavior of circumferentially cracked pipe in a representative piping system under combined inertial and displacement-controlled stresses. A unique experimental facility was designed and constructed. The piping system evaluated is an expansion loop with over 30 meters of 16-inch diameter Schedule 100 pipe. The experimental facility is equipped with special hardware to ensure system boundary conditions could be appropriately modeled. The test matrix involved one uncracked and five cracked dynamic pipe-system experiments. The uncracked experiment was conducted to evaluate piping system damping and natural frequency characteristics. The cracked-pipe experiments evaluated the fracture behavior, pipe system response, and stability characteristics of five different materials. All cracked-pipe experiments were conducted at PWR conditions. Material characterization efforts provided tensile and fracture toughness properties of the different pipe materials at various strain rates and temperatures. Results from all pipe-system experiments and material characterization efforts are presented. Results of fracture mechanics analyses, dynamic finite element stress analyses, and stability analyses are presented and compared with experimental results.

  10. Representing vapor-liquid equilibrium for an aqueous MEA-CO{sub 2} system using the electrolyte nonrandom-two-liquid model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Y.; Zhang, L.; Watanasiri, S. [Aspen Technology, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)] [Aspen Technology, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the work of Austgen et al., the electrolyte nonrandom-two-liquid (NRTL) model was applied in a thermodynamically consistent manner to represent the vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) of the aqueous monoethanolamine (MEA)-CO{sub 2} system with rigorous chemical equilibrium consideration. Special attention was given to the accurate VLE description of the system at both absorbing and stripping conditions relevant to most aqueous MEA absorption/stripping processes for CO{sub 2} removal. The influence from chemical equilibrium constants, Henry`s constant, experimental data, and data regression on the representation of the VLE of the system was discussed in detail. The equilibrium constant of the carbamate reversion reaction as well as important interaction parameters of the electrolyte NRTL model were carefully fitted to experimental data. A good agreement between the calculated values and the experimental data was achieved. Moreover, the model with newly fitted parameters was successfully applied to simulate three industrial cases for CO{sub 2} removal using a rate-based approach. The results from this work were compared with those using the model by Austgen et al.

  11. Spatially Resolved Estimation of Ozone-related Mortality in the United States under Two Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) and their Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young-Min; Zhou, Ying; Gao, Yang; Fu, Joshua S.; Johnson, Brent; Huang, Cheng; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BACKGROUND: The spatial pattern of the uncertainty in climate air pollution health impact has rarely been studied due to the lack of high-resolution model simulations, especially under the latest Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). OBJECTIVES: We estimated county-level ozone (O3) and PM2.5 related excess mortality (EM) and evaluated the associated uncertainties in the continental United States in the 2050s under RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. METHODS: Using dynamically downscaled climate model simulations, we calculated changes in O3 and PM2.5 levels at 12 km resolution between the future (2057-2059) and present (2001-2004) under two RCP scenarios. Using concentration-response relationships in the literature and projected future populations, we estimated EM attributable to the changes in O3 and PM2.5. We finally analyzed the contribution of input variables to the uncertainty in the county-level EM estimation using Monte Carlo simulation. RESULTS: O3-related premature deaths in the continental U.S. were estimated to be 1,082 deaths/year under RCP8.5 (95% confidence interval (CI): -288 to 2,453), and -5,229 deaths/year under RCP4.5 (-7,212 to -3,246). Simulated PM2.5 changes resulted in a significant decrease in EM under the two RCPs. The uncertainty of O3-related EM estimates was mainly caused by RCP scenarios, whereas that of PM2.5-related EMs was mainly from concentration-response functions. CONCLUSION: EM estimates attributable to climate change-induced air pollution change as well as the associated uncertainties vary substantially in space, and so are the most influential input variables. Spatially resolved data is crucial to develop effective mitigation and adaptation policy.

  12. Kallotenue papyrolyticum gen. nov., sp. nov., a cellulolytic and filamentous thermophile that represents a novel lineage (Kallotenuales ord. nov., Kallotenuaceae fam. nov.) within the class Chloroflexia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Jesse; Gieler, Brandon; Heisler, Devon; Palisoc, Maryknoll; Williams, Amanda; Dohnalkova, Alice; Ming, Hong; Yu, Tian T.; Dodsworth, Jeremy A.; Li, Wen J.; Hedlund, Brian P.

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Several closely-related, thermophilic, and cellulolytic bacterial strains, designated JKG1T, JKG2, JKG3, JKG4, and JKG5, were isolated from a cellulolytic enrichment (corn stover) incubated in the water column of Great Boiling Spring, NV. Strain JKG1T had cells of a diameter of 0.7 - 0.9 ?m and length of ~2.0 ?m that formed non-branched multicellular filaments reaching >300 ?m. Spores were not formed and dense liquid cultures were red. The temperature range for growth was 45-65 °C, with an optimum of 55 °C. The pH range for growth was 5.6-9.0, with an optimum of 7.5. JKG1T grew as an aerobic heterotroph, utilizing glucose, sucrose, xylose, arabinose, cellobiose, carboxymethylcellulose, filter paper, microcrystalline cellulose, xylan, starch, casamino acids, tryptone, peptone, yeast extract, acetate, citrate, lactate, pyruvate, and glycerol as sole carbon sources, and was not observed to photosynthesize. The cells stained Gram-negative. Phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA gene sequences placed the new isolates in the class Chloroflexia, but distant from other cultivated members, with the highest sequence identity of 82.5% to Roseiflexus castenholzii. The major quinone was menaquinone-9; no ubiquinones were detected. The major cellular fatty acids (>5%) were C18:0, anteiso-C17:0, iso-C18:0, and iso-C17:0. C16:0, iso-C16:0, and C17:0. The peptidoglycan amino acids were alanine, ornithine, glutamic acid, serine, and asparagine. Whole-cell sugars included mannose, rhamnose, glucose, galactose, ribose, arabinose, and xylose. Morphological, phylogenetic, and chemotaxonomic results suggest that JKG1T is representative of a new lineage within the class Chloroflexia, which we propose to designate Kallotenue papyrolyticum gen. nov., sp. nov., Kallotenuaceae fam. nov., Kallotenuales ord. nov.

  13. CT head-scan dosimetry in an anthropomorphic phantom and associated measurement of ACR accreditation-phantom imaging metrics under clinically representative scan conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunner, Claudia C.; Stern, Stanley H.; Chakrabarti, Kish [U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States)] [U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States); Minniti, Ronaldo [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)] [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Parry, Marie I. [Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20889 (United States)] [Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20889 (United States); Skopec, Marlene [National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)] [National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To measure radiation absorbed dose and its distribution in an anthropomorphic head phantom under clinically representative scan conditions in three widely used computed tomography (CT) scanners, and to relate those dose values to metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom.Methods: By inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) in the head of an anthropomorphic phantom specially developed for CT dosimetry (University of Florida, Gainesville), we measured dose with three commonly used scanners (GE Discovery CT750 HD, Siemens Definition, Philips Brilliance 64) at two different clinical sites (Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, National Institutes of Health). The scanners were set to operate with the same data-acquisition and image-reconstruction protocols as used clinically for typical head scans, respective of the practices of each facility for each scanner. We also analyzed images of the ACR CT accreditation phantom with the corresponding protocols. While the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance protocols utilized only conventional, filtered back-projection (FBP) image-reconstruction methods, the GE Discovery also employed its particular version of an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm that can be blended in desired proportions with the FBP algorithm. We did an objective image-metrics analysis evaluating the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and CNR for images reconstructed with FBP. For images reconstructed with ASIR, we only analyzed the CNR, since MTF and NPS results are expected to depend on the object for iterative reconstruction algorithms.Results: The OSLD measurements showed that the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance scanners (located at two different clinical facilities) yield average absorbed doses in tissue of 42.6 and 43.1 mGy, respectively. The GE Discovery delivers about the same amount of dose (43.7 mGy) when run under similar operating and image-reconstruction conditions, i.e., without tube current modulation and ASIR. The image-metrics analysis likewise showed that the MTF, NPS, and CNR associated with the reconstructed images are mutually comparable when the three scanners are run with similar settings, and differences can be attributed to different edge-enhancement properties of the applied reconstruction filters. Moreover, when the GE scanner was operated with the facility's scanner settings for routine head exams, which apply 50% ASIR and use only approximately half of the 100%-FBP dose, the CNR of the images showed no significant change. Even though the CNR alone is not sufficient to characterize the image quality and justify any dose reduction claims, it can be useful as a constancy test metric.Conclusions: This work presents a straightforward method to connect direct measurements of CT dose with objective image metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and CNR. It demonstrates that OSLD measurements in an anthropomorphic head phantom allow a realistic and locally precise estimation of magnitude and spatial distribution of dose in tissue delivered during a typical CT head scan. Additional objective analysis of the images of the ACR accreditation phantom can be used to relate the measured doses to high contrast resolution, noise, and CNR.

  14. The Effects of Electricity Tariff Structure on Distributed Generation Adoption in New York State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    59 Microturbinefor volumetric electricity rate variation and microturbinefor volumetric electricity rate variation and microturbine

  15. Impact of Large Scale Energy Efficiency Programs On Consumer Tariffs and Utility Finances in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhyankar, Nikit

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Council for an Energy-Efficienct Economy (ACEEE),. McNeil,Fans Conventional 10 (yrs) Efficien t 10 (yrs) Estimation to Promote Energy Efficiency: Case Study of a Prototypical

  16. Impact of Large Scale Energy Efficiency Programs On Consumer Tariffs and Utility Finances in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhyankar, Nikit

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    refrigerators, water heaters (solar, natural gas, LPG) andwith natural gas or solar heaters), space cooling (replacingof electric water heaters by solar water heaters (iv)

  17. Impact of Large Scale Energy Efficiency Programs On Consumer Tariffs and Utility Finances in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhyankar, Nikit

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Management (DSM) in the Electricity Sector: Urgent Need for1   Electricity Sector inin the Indian electricity sector has large potential for

  18. Impact of Large Scale Energy Efficiency Programs On Consumer Tariffs and Utility Finances in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhyankar, Nikit

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development Corporation Water Heater v vi Executive Summary cost programs (such as replacing electric water heaters withgas water heaters); (b) sell power conserved through the EE

  19. Scheduling on a single machine under time-of-use electricity tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, about one-third of all the end-use energy consumption is ... As a result, improving the energy efficiency of manufacturing technologies.

  20. Impact of Large Scale Energy Efficiency Programs On Consumer Tariffs and Utility Finances in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhyankar, Nikit

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by natural gas or solar water heaters (iii)Replacement ofwater heaters by solar water heaters (iv) Replacement ofAC Fans Water Heating Solar Water Heater It should be noted