National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for distributor tariffs represent

  1. Optimization of interbed distributors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litchfield, J. [Brown and Root, Inc., Alhambra, CA (United States); Pedersen, M.; Sampath, V. [ARCO Products Co., Anaheim, CA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    ARCO Products Company and Brown and Root teamed up to develop trickle bed reactor internals for improved mixing and redistribution performance. Initial application was in a five-bed hydrocracking reactor, in which several beds experienced radial temperature gradients as high as 30--70 F by end of run. Bed temperature response to changes in quench rate was also poor. The challenge was to develop interbed distributors which will provide good gas/liquid mixing as well as: provide fast and predictable quench response; minimize the radial temperature gradients in each bed; handle the various single and mixed phase flow regimes that the catalyst beds experience during an operating cycle; fit into the existing interbed space; operate within a pressure drop limit. The result of the design effort is a seven stage interbed distributor that meets all the above objectives and was recently awarded a patent. This new two-phase flow mixer/redistributor system, which is particularly effective in low liquid flow operating regimes, has been operating successfully for 33 months. Radial temperature gradients are less than 10 F, and bed temperatures respond predictably to quench changes. By reducing peak bed temperatures, operating cycle length is extended. More uniform temperatures result in improved liquid yields, less gas and better operability, which has eliminated concerns about temperature runaway.

  2. BPA files reciprocity tariff

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 12 BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Friday, March 30, 2012 CONTACT: Doug Johnson, 503-230-5840 or 503-230-5131 BPA files reciprocity tariff Portland, Ore. -...

  3. Feed-in-Tariff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: In August of 2013 the Hawaii Public Utility Commission (PUC) initiated an investigation into the Feed-In-Tariff Program in Docket No. 2013-0194. On December 5th, 2014 the Hawaii PUC issued...

  4. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Optimization Under Various Electricity Tariffs Firestone,Optimization Under Various Electricity Tariffs Table of3 2.1 Electricity Tariff

  5. HEATING, AIR-CONDITIONING AND REFRIGERATION DISTRIBUTORS INTERNATIONAL...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    HEATING, AIR-CONDITIONING AND REFRIGERATION DISTRIBUTORS INTERNATIONAL (HARDI) HEATING, AIR-CONDITIONING AND REFRIGERATION DISTRIBUTORS INTERNATIONAL (HARDI) OE Framework Document...

  6. Gas distributor for fluidized bed coal gasifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Worley, Arthur C. (Mt. Tabor, NJ); Zboray, James A. (Irvine, CA)

    1980-01-01

    A gas distributor for distributing high temperature reaction gases to a fluidized bed of coal particles in a coal gasification process. The distributor includes a pipe with a refractory reinforced lining and a plurality of openings in the lining through which gas is fed into the bed. These feed openings have an expanding tapered shape in the downstream or exhaust direction which aids in reducing the velocity of the gas jets as they enter the bed.

  7. NIPSCO- Feed-In Tariff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

     NIPSCO is offering a feed-in tariff program for customers who generate electricity from solar, wind, biomass, or new hydroelectric facilities. All NIPSCO electric customers in good standing are...

  8. cfm Distributors, Inc. 1104 Union Avenue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    wholesale distributor of Heating, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration systems, components, supplies's historic West Bottoms (Central Industrial District). Our corporate headquarters serves as the nerve center the Armourdale and Central Industrial District Kansas and Missouri Units and modify the total project cost

  9. Evaluation of evolving residential electricity tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Judy

    2011-01-01

    electricity tariffs Judy Lai – Senior Research Associate Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Rd MS90R1121 Berkeley CA 94720 USA

  10. PV SOLAR RESOURCE GUIDE FOR RURAL DISTRIBUTORS IN TN Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, John F.

    April 2013 Asa Roy PV SOLAR RESOURCE GUIDE FOR RURAL DISTRIBUTORS IN TN #12;1 Introduction experience with solar power. Research and interviews with the Tennessee's Green Power Providers Program, Green Power Providers Coordinators at several urban distributors, and solar installers in Tennessee

  11. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01

    price ($/kWh) Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization Under Various Electricity Tariffs carbon (

  12. River Falls Municipal Utilities- Distributed Solar Tariff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RFMU was originally allocated 10 kW for their tariff, but because of the program's popularity, that limit has been increased several times, and is now limited to 30 kW. As of May 2013, the progra...

  13. Characterization of Hall effect thruster propellant distributors with flame visualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Mitchell

    an ignition kernel in lean methane/air mixtures under engine conditions Phys. Fluids 24, 105108 (2012. The technique is demonstrated for three propellant distributors us- ing a propane-air mixture at reservoir

  14. The Impact of the Russian Log Export Tariff on the Global Market for Logs and Lumber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Impact of the Russian Log Export Tariff on the Global Market for Logs and Lumber CINTRAFOR News's Notes ....2 CINTRAFOR celebrates 25th aniversary Winter 2009 Russia contains the largest area of natural in Russia, estimated at 808,790,000 hectares, represents 20.5% of total global forest area and almost half

  15. The Tariff Analysis Project: A database and analysis platform forelectricity tariffs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, K.; White, R.; Bolduc, C.; Fisher, D.; Rosenquist, G.

    2006-05-12

    Much of the work done in energy research involves ananalysis of the costs and benefits of energy-saving technologies andother measures from the perspective of the consumer. The economic valuein particular depends on the price of energy (electricity, gas or otherfuel), which varies significantly both for different types of consumers,and for different regions of the country. Ideally, to provide accurateinformation about the economic value of energy savings, prices should becomputed directly from real tariffs as defined by utility companies. Alarge number of utility tariffs are now available freely over the web,but the complexity and diversity of tariff structures presents aconsiderable barrier to using them in practice. The goal of the TariffAnalysis Project (TAP) is to collect andarchive a statistically completesample of real utility tariffs, and build a set of database and web toolsthat make this information relatively easy to use in cost-benefitanalysis. This report presentsa detailed picture of the current TAPdatabase structure and web interface. While TAP has been designed tohandle tariffs for any kind of utility service, the focus here is onelectric utilities withinthe United States. Electricity tariffs can bevery complicated, so the database structures that have been built toaccommodate them are quite flexible and can be easily generalized toother commodities.

  16. Fluid-solid contact vessel having fluid distributors therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Jr., John B. (Rifle, CO)

    1980-09-09

    Rectangularly-shaped fluid distributors for large diameter, vertical vessels include reinforcers for high heat operation, vertical sides with gas distributing orifices and overhanging, sloped roofs. Devices are provided for cleaning the orifices from a buildup of solid deposits resulting from the reactions in the vessel.

  17. Feed-In Tariffs and similar programs

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2013-01-01

    Feed-in tariffs (FITs) are a policy mechanism used to encourage deployment of renewable electricity technologies. FITs are used to a limited extent around the United States as listed. A FIT program typically guarantees that customers who own a FIT-eligible renewable electricity generation facility, such as a roof-top solar photovoltaic system, will receive a set price from their utility for all of the electricity they generate and provide to the grid.

  18. Renewable and Non-Renewable Resources Tariff RNR-7 (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Renewable and Non-Renewable Resource tariff is authorized by the Georgia Public Service Commission (PSC), which requires that the investor owned utility, Georgia Power Company, purchase...

  19. Water and Waste Water Tariffs for New Residential Construction in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Diane; Lutz, James

    2006-01-01

    and Waste Water Tariffs for New Residential Construction inand Waste Water Tariffs for New Residential Construction inwaste water tariffs in California cities and counties where there is a high level of new residential construction.

  20. FEED-IN TARIFFS AND OFFSHORE WIND POWER DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    FEED-IN TARIFFS AND OFFSHORE WIND POWER DEVELOPMENT Prepared by Jon Lilley, Blaise Sheridan, Dawn.......................................................................................................................... 25 FERC Clarification as Applied to Offshore Wind........................................................................................................................ 28 #12; 3 Feed-in Tariffs and Offshore Wind Power Development Prepared Pursuant to DOE Grant Em

  1. Electricity Network Tariff Architectures: A Comparison of Four OECD Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakhrani, Vivek

    2010-07-01

    The study is motivated by the question “what is the optimal tariff design?” While we do not offer an answer to this question, we use the different designs in four select countries to illuminate the issues involved in ...

  2. Energy Prices, Tariffs, Taxes and Subsidies in Ukraine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Meredydd

    2007-04-01

    For many years, electricity, gas and district heating tariffs for residential consumers were very low in Ukraine; until recently, they were even lower than in neighbouring countries such as Russia. The increases in gas and electricity tariffs, implemented in 2006, are an important step toward sustainable pricing levels; however, electricity and natural gas (especially for households) are still priced below the long-run marginal cost. The problem seems even more serious in district heating and nuclear power. According to the Ministry of Construction, district heating tariffs, on average, cover about 80% of costs. Current electricity prices do not fully include the capital costs of power stations, which are particularly high for nuclear power. Although the tariff for nuclear electricity generation includes a small decommissioning charge, it has not been sufficient to accumulate necessary funds for nuclear plants decommissioning.

  3. PSEG Long Island- Solar Initiative Feed-in Tariff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The PSEG Long Island Feed-in Tariff II (FIT II) program provides fixed payments for electricity produced by approved photovoltaic systems over a fixed period of time. The program operates under a...

  4. Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricityprices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; VanBuskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

    2008-03-28

    This paper presents the results of a survey and analysis ofelectricity tariffs and marginal electricity prices for commercialbuildings. The tariff data come from a survey of 90 utilities and 250tariffs for non-residential customers collected in 2004 as part of theTariff Analysis Project at LBNL. The goals of this analysis are toprovide useful summary data on the marginal electricity prices commercialcustomers actually see, and insight into the factors that are mostimportant in determining prices under different circumstances. We providea new, empirically-based definition of several marginal prices: theeffective marginal price and energy-only anddemand-only prices, andderive a simple formula that expresses the dependence of the effectivemarginal price on the marginal load factor. The latter is a variable thatcan be used to characterize the load impacts of a particular end-use orefficiency measure. We calculate all these prices for eleven regionswithin the continental U.S.

  5. Impact of Energy Imbalance Tariff on Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, Y.; Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

    2007-07-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a study that uses actual wind power data and actual energy prices to analyze the impact of an energy imbalance tariff imposed by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on wind power.

  6. Renewable Energy Feed-in Tariffs: Lessons Learned from the U...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Renewable Energy Feed-in Tariffs: Lessons Learned from the U.S. and Abroad Presentation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Renewable Energy Feed-in Tariffs: Lessons...

  7. Water and Waste Water Tariffs for New Residential Construction in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Diane; Lutz, James

    2006-01-01

    Water and Waste Water Tariffs for New ResidentialApril 2006 Water and Waste Water Tariffs for New Residentialalso reduce the amount of waste water released to the sewer.

  8. Water and Waste Water Tariffs for New Residential Construction in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Diane; Lutz, James

    2006-01-01

    for New Residential Construction in California D.C. FisherTariffs for New Residential Construction in California 1.in new residential construction in California. These

  9. Water and Waste Water Tariffs for New Residential Construction in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Diane; Lutz, James

    2006-01-01

    Utility_Cities Table of the Water TAP Database Field NameWater andWaste Water Tariffs for New Residential Construction in

  10. Innovative Feed-In Tariff Designs that Limit Policy Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreycik, Claire; Couture, Toby D.; Cory, Karlynn S.

    2011-06-01

    Feed-in tariffs (FITs) are the most prevalent policy used globally to reduce development risks, cut financing costs, and grow the renewable energy industry. However, concerns over escalating costs in jurisdictions with FIT policies have led to increased attention on cost control. Using case studies and market-focused analysis, this report from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) examines strengths and weaknesses of three cost-containment tools: (1) caps, (2) payment level adjustment mechanisms, and (3) auction-based designs. The report provides useful insights on containing costs for policymakers and regulators in the United States and other areas where FIT policies are in development.

  11. Facility Representatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-04-06

    REPLACED BY DOE-STD-1063 | SUPERSEDING DOE-STD-1063-2000 (MARCH 2000) The purpose of the DOE Facility Representative Program is to ensure that competent DOE staff personnel are assigned to oversee the day-to-day contractor operations at DOE’s hazardous nuclear and non-nuclear facilities.

  12. A Tariff for Reactive Power 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    that if the inverters of PV systems or the generators of combined heat and power (CHP) systems were designed1 A Tariff for Reactive Power -100 -50 0 50 100 150 200 250 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 LINE describes a suggested tariff or payment for the local supply of reactive power from distributed energy

  13. Solar PV Deployment through Renewable Energy Tariff: An Option for Key Account Customers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Renewable energy tariffs, a new program and rate option being offered by some utilities to large customers, are quickly attracting attention in the renewable energy world as a way to do this. These tariffs allow a high energy usage customer to pay a slight premium in order to obtain all or a portion of their electricity from renewable sources.

  14. Is there a route to a UK Feed in Tariff for renewable energy?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Is there a route to a UK Feed in Tariff for renewable energy? ICEPT Discussion Paper October 2010 University #12;2 Is there a route to a UK Feed in Tariff for renewable energy? Introduction This discussion paper is concerned with the potential to change the way the UK provides support for renewable energy

  15. Test of candidate light distributors for the muon (g$-$2) laser calibration system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Anastasi; D. Babusci; F. Baffigi; G. Cantatore; D. Cauz; G. Corradi; S. Dabagov; G. Di Sciascio; R. Di Stefano; C. Ferrari; A. T. Fienberg; A. Fioretti; L. Fulgentini; C. Gabbanini; L. A. Gizzi; D. Hampai; D. W. Hertzog; M. Iacovacci; M. Karuza; J. Kaspar; P. Koester; L. Labate; S. Mastroianni; D. Moricciani; G. Pauletta; L. Santi; G. Venanzoni

    2015-04-01

    The new muon (g-2) experiment E989 at Fermilab will be equipped with a laser calibration system for all the 1296 channels of the calorimeters. An integrating sphere and an alternative system based on an engineered diffuser have been considered as possible light distributors for the experiment. We present here a detailed comparison of the two based on temporal response, spatial uniformity, transmittance and time stability.

  16. How do I add tariffs into the OpenEI database | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    database Home > Groups > Utility Rate Greetings: I am in Arizona APS territory where demand based residential tariffs are comming. I see NREL-SAM uses OpenEI as its database for...

  17. Customer Response to RTP in Competitive Markets: A Study of Niagara Mohawk's Standard Offer Tariff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Richard N.; Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Neenan, Bernie; Hopper, Nicole

    2006-01-01

    Niagara Mohawk’s Standard Offer Tariff * Richard N. BoisvertRTP the retail standard offer would create opportunities forHowever, some retailers did offer service indexed to the SC-

  18. U.S. Virgin Islands- Renewable Energy Feed-in-Tariff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    There is a 10 MW limit for aggregate production via feed-in-tariff contracts on the islands of St. Thomas, St. John, Water Island, and other offshore keys and islands and a similar 5 MW limit for...

  19. Feed-in Tariff Policy: Design, Implementation, and RPS Policy Interactions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report explores the design and implementation of feed-in tariff policies, including a policy definition, various payment structures, and payment differentiation options. The report also discusses the interaction between FIT and RPS policies.

  20. Feed-in Tariffs: Best Practices and Application in the U.S.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, presented on Oct. 28, 2009, covered renewable energy feed-in tariffs and the lessons learned from the U.S. Presenter was Karlynn Cory of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  1. Fluidized bed heat exchanger with water cooled air distributor and dust hopper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jukkola, Walfred W. (Westport, CT); Leon, Albert M. (Mamaroneck, NY); Van Dyk, Jr., Garritt C. (Bethel, CT); McCoy, Daniel E. (Williamsport, PA); Fisher, Barry L. (Montgomery, PA); Saiers, Timothy L. (Williamsport, PA); Karstetter, Marlin E. (Loganton, PA)

    1981-11-24

    A fluidized bed heat exchanger is provided in which air is passed through a bed of particulate material containing fuel. A steam-water natural circulation system is provided for heat exchange and the housing of the heat exchanger has a water-wall type construction. Vertical in-bed heat exchange tubes are provided and the air distributor is water-cooled. A water-cooled dust hopper is provided in the housing to collect particulates from the combustion gases and separate the combustion zone from a volume within said housing in which convection heat exchange tubes are provided to extract heat from the exiting combustion gases.

  2. The effect of distributors on two-phase and three-phase flows in vertical columns 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouyang, Chie-Jan Paul

    1982-01-01

    ) - U1C (1 - E'g)/6'1 where g is the void fraction. For two-phase flow, the area fractions are related by equation 4. Substituting equation 4 into equation 3, the reduced form f' or the drift flux is obtained, Vd ? U (1- 6 ) ? Ulg The drift flux... appropriate: THE EFFECT OF DISTRIBUTORS ON TWO-PHASE AND THREE-PHASE FLOWS IN VERTICAL COLUMNS A Thesis by CHIE-JAN PAUL OUYANG Approved as to sty1e and content by: Chairm of Committee Member M mber Head of Dep rtment May 1982 ABS TRACT The Effect...

  3. Innovative Feed-In Tariff Designs that Limit Policy Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreycik, C.; Couture, T. D.; Cory, K. S.

    2011-06-01

    Feed-in tariffs (FITs) are the most prevalent renewable energy policy used globally to date, and there are many benefits to the certainty offered in the marketplace to reduce development risks and associated financing costs and to grow the renewable energy industry. However, concerns over escalating costs in jurisdictions with FIT policies have led to increased attention on cost control in renewable energy policy design. In recent years, policy mechanisms for containing FIT costs have become more refined, allowing policymakers to exert greater control on policy outcomes and on the resulting costs to ratepayers. As policymakers and regulators in the United States begin to explore the use of FITs, careful consideration must be given to the ways in which policy design can be used to balance the policies' advantages while bounding its costs. This report explores mechanisms that policymakers have implemented to limit FIT policy costs. If designed clearly and transparently, such mechanisms can align policymaker and market expectations for project deployment. Three different policy tools are evaluated: (1) caps, (2) payment level adjustment mechanisms, and (3) auction-based designs. The report employs case studies to explore the strengths and weaknesses of these three cost containment tools. These tools are then evaluated with a set of criteria including predictability for policymakers and the marketplace and the potential for unintended consequences.

  4. Policymaker's Guide to Feed-in Tariff Policy Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couture, T. D.; Cory, K.; Kreycik, C.; Williams, E.

    2010-07-01

    Feed-in tariffs (FITs) are the most widely used renewable energy policy in the world for driving accelerating renewable energy (RE) deployment, accounting for a greater share of RE development than either tax incentives or renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies. FITs have generated significant RE deployment, helping bring the countries that have implemented them successfully to the forefront of the global RE industry. In the European Union (EU), FIT policies have led to the deployment of more than 15,000 MW of solar photovoltaic (PV) power and more than 55,000 MW of wind power between 2000 and the end of 2009. In total, FITs are responsible for approximately 75% of global PV and 45% of global wind deployment. Countries such as Germany, in particular, have demonstrated that FITs can be used as a powerful policy tool to drive RE deployment and help meet combined energy security and emissions reductions objectives. This policymaker's guide provides a detailed analysis of FIT policy design and implementation and identifies a set of best practices that have been effective at quickly stimulating the deployment of large amounts of RE generation. Although the discussion is aimed primarily at decision makers who have decided that a FIT policy best suits their needs, exploration of FIT policies can also help inform a choice among alternative renewable energy policies.

  5. A Plea for Simpler Electricity Tariffs Philip E. Coleman and Christopher T. Payne, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Plea for Simpler Electricity Tariffs Philip E. Coleman and Christopher T. Payne, Lawrence asserts that electric rate structures in the United States are often so confusing that even large a simplified declaration (in tariffs and/or bills) to electricity customers of what their marginal costs are

  6. Chapter 3 Representing Geography 32 Representing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    Chapter 3 Representing Geography 32 Representing Geography OVERVIEW This chapter introduces;Chapter 3 Representing Geography 33 KEY WORDS AND CONCEPTS Digital, binary, representation, Tobler`s First Law of Geography, attributes, the fundamental problem (the world is infinitely complex), discrete

  7. The Impact of the Russian Tariff on Japanese Demand for Wood Products CINTRAFOR News is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    extent, residential housing has always been one of the major drivers of wood demand in JapanThe Impact of the Russian Tariff on Japanese Demand for Wood Products CINTRAFOR News is available will consider the potential impact on Chinese demand for wood products.) Japanese Market for Wood Products Japan

  8. "IdentifyingTwoPartTariffContractswithBuyerPower: EmpiricalEstimationonFoodRetailing"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the ...nal price setting by retailers, for competition and market power analysis. The nature of contracts TSE575 "IdentifyingTwoPartTariffContractswithBuyerPower: EmpiricalEstimationonFoodRetailing price maintenance and allow retailers to have a buyer power determined by the horizontal competition

  9. Impact of Large Scale Energy Efficiency Programs On Consumer Tariffs and Utility Finances in India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhyankar, Nikit; Phadke, Amol

    2011-01-20

    Large-scale EE programs would modestly increase tariffs but reduce consumers' electricity bills significantly. However, the primary benefit of EE programs is a significant reduction in power shortages, which might make these programs politically acceptable even if tariffs increase. To increase political support, utilities could pursue programs that would result in minimal tariff increases. This can be achieved in four ways: (a) focus only on low-cost programs (such as replacing electric water heaters with gas water heaters); (b) sell power conserved through the EE program to the market at a price higher than the cost of peak power purchase; (c) focus on programs where a partial utility subsidy of incremental capital cost might work and (d) increase the number of participant consumers by offering a basket of EE programs to fit all consumer subcategories and tariff tiers. Large scale EE programs can result in consistently negative cash flows and significantly erode the utility's overall profitability. In case the utility is facing shortages, the cash flow is very sensitive to the marginal tariff of the unmet demand. This will have an important bearing on the choice of EE programs in Indian states where low-paying rural and agricultural consumers form the majority of the unmet demand. These findings clearly call for a flexible, sustainable solution to the cash-flow management issue. One option is to include a mechanism like FAC in the utility incentive mechanism. Another sustainable solution might be to have the net program cost and revenue loss built into utility's revenue requirement and thus into consumer tariffs up front. However, the latter approach requires institutionalization of EE as a resource. The utility incentive mechanisms would be able to address the utility disincentive of forgone long-run return but have a minor impact on consumer benefits. Fundamentally, providing incentives for EE programs to make them comparable to supply-side investments is a way of moving the electricity sector toward a model focused on providing energy services rather than providing electricity.

  10. Renewable Energy Prices in State-Level Feed-in Tariffs: Federal Law Constraints and Possible Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hempling, S.; Elefant, C.; Cory, K.; Porter, K.

    2010-01-01

    State legislatures and state utility commissions trying to attract renewable energy projects are considering feed-in tariffs, which obligate retail utilities to purchase electricity from renewable producers under standard arrangements specifying prices, terms, and conditions. The use of feed-in tariffs simplifies the purchase process, provides revenue certainty to generators, and reduces the cost of financing generating projects. However, some argue that federal law--including the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) and the Federal Power Act of 1935 (FPA)--constrain state-level feed-in tariffs. This report seeks to reduce the legal uncertainties for states contemplating feed-in tariffs by explaining the constraints imposed by federal statutes. It describes the federal constraints, identifies transaction categories that are free of those constraints, and offers ways for state and federal policymakers to interpret or modify existing law to remove or reduce these constraints. This report proposes ways to revise these federal statutes. It creates a broad working definition of a state-level feed-in tariff. Given this definition, this report concludes there are paths to non-preempted, state-level feed-in tariffs under current federal law.

  11. Feed-in Tariff Policy: Design, Implementation, and RPS Policy Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cory, K.; Couture, T.; Kreycik, C.

    2009-03-01

    Feed-in tariff (FIT) policies are implemented in more than 40 countries around the world and are cited as the primary reason for the success of the German and Spanish renewable energy markets. As a result of that success, FIT policy proposals are starting to gain traction in several U.S. states and municipalities. Experience from Europe is also beginning to demonstrate that properly designed FITs may be more cost-effective than renewable portfolio standards (RPS), which make use of competitive solicitations. This article explores the design and operation of feed-in tariff policies, including a FIT policy definition, payment-structure options, and payment differentiation. The article also touches on the potential interactions between FIT policies and RPS policies at the state level.

  12. Tariffs Can Be Structured to Encourage Photovoltaic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-08-31

    The solar power market is growing at a quickening pace, fueled by an array of national and local initiatives and policies aimed at improving the value proposition of customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems. Though these policies take many forms, they commonly include up-front capital cost rebates or ongoing production incentives, supplemented by net metering requirements to ensure that customer-sited PV systems offset the full retail rate of the customer-hosts. Somewhat less recognized is the role of retail rate design, beyond net metering, on the customer-economics of grid-connected PV. Over the life of a PV system, utility bill savings represent a substantial portion of the overall economic value received by the customer. At the same time, the design of retail electricity rates, particularly for commercial and industrial customers, can vary quite substantially. Understanding how specific differences in rate design affect the value of customer-sited PV is therefore essential to supporting the continued growth of this market.

  13. Representative Control Gates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    Representative Staffing & Management Reviews & Control Gates The NASA Program/Project Life Cycle Concept C Concept/Design Evaluation Criteria ° Feasibility Assessment ° Life Cycle Cost Estimates ° Trade Requirements Establish Optimum System Design Analyze Mission Requirements Establish Optimum Architecture

  14. The Relevance of Generation Interconnection Procedures to Feed-in Tariffs in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fink, Sari; Porter, Kevin; Rogers, Jennifer

    2010-10-01

    Feed-in tariffs (FITs) have been used to promote renewable electricity development in over 40 countries throughout the past two decades. These policies generally provide guaranteed prices for the full system output from eligible generators for a fixed time period (typically 15–20 years). Due in part to the success of FIT policies in Europe, some jurisdictions in the United States are considering implementing similar policies, and a few have already put such policies in place. This report is intended to offer some guidance to policymakers and regulators on how generator interconnection procedures may affect the implementation of FITs and how state generator interconnection procedures can be formulated to support state renewable energy objectives. This report is based on a literature review of model interconnection procedures formulated by several organizations, as well as other documents that have reviewed, commented on, and in some cases, ranked state interconnection procedures.

  15. Relevance of Generation Interconnection Procedures to Feed-in Tariffs in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fink, S.; Porter, K.; Rogers, J.

    2010-10-01

    Feed-in tariffs (FITs) have been used to promote renewable electricity development in over 40 countries throughout the past two decades. These policies generally provide guaranteed prices for the full system output from eligible generators for a fixed time period (typically 15-20 years). Due in part to the success of FIT policies in Europe, some jurisdictions in the United States are considering implementing similar policies, and a few have already put such policies in place. This report is intended to offer some guidance to policymakers and regulators on how generator interconnection procedures may affect the implementation of FITs and how state generator interconnection procedures can be formulated to support state renewable energy objectives. This report is based on a literature review of model interconnection procedures formulated by several organizations, as well as other documents that have reviewed, commented on, and in some cases, ranked state interconnection procedures.

  16. Market and behavioral barriers to energy efficiency: A preliminary evaluation of the case for tariff financing in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujita, K. Sydny

    2011-06-23

    Consumers regularly forgo purchases of high efficiency appliances that appear to be cost effective at a reasonable rate of return. While some argue that this is a true revelation of preferences for appliance features, this 'efficiency gap' can be largely explained by a combination of market and behavioral failures that reduce consumers ability to evaluate the relative value of appliances and skew preferences toward initial cost savings, undervaluing future reductions in operating costs. These failures and barriers include externalities of energy use, imperfect competition between manufacturers, asymmetric information, bounded rationality, split incentives, and transaction costs (Golove 1996). Recognizing the social benefit of energy conservation, several major methods are used by policymakers to ensure that efficient appliances are purchased: minimum efficiency standards, Energy Star labeling, and rebates and tax credits. There is no single market for energy services; there are hundreds of uses, thousands of intermediaries, and millions of users, and likewise, no single appropriate government intervention (Golove 1996). Complementary approaches must be implemented, considering policy and institutional limitations. In this paper, I first lay out the rationale for government intervention by addressing the market and behavioral failures and barriers that arise in the context of residential energy efficiency. I then consider the ways in which some of these failures and barriers are addressed through major federal programs and state and utility level programs that leverage them, as well as identifying barriers that are not addressed by currently implemented programs. Heterogeneity of consumers, lack of financing options, and split incentives of landlords and tenants contribute significantly to the under-adoption of efficient appliances. To quantify the size of the market most affected by these barriers, I estimate the number of appliances, and in particular the number of outdated appliances, in California rental housing. Appliances in rental housing are on average older than those in owner occupied housing. More importantly, a substantial proportion of very old appliances are in rental housing. Having established that a very old stock of appliances exists in California rental housing, I discuss tariff financing as a policy option to reduce the impact of the remaining market and behavioral barriers. In a tariff financing program, the utility pays the initial cost of an appliance, and is repaid through subsequent utility bills. By eliminating upfront costs, tying repayment to the gas or electric meter, requiring a detailed energy audit, and relying upon utility bill payment history rather than credit score in determining participant eligibility, tariff financing largely overcomes many barriers to energy efficiency. Using California as a case study, I evaluate the feasibility of implementing tariff financing. For water heaters in particular, this appears to be a cost-effective strategy. Tariff financing from utilities is particularly valuable because it improves the ability of low-income renters to lower their utility bills, without burdening landlords with unrecoverable capital costs. To implement tariff financing country-wide, regulations in many states defining private loan-making institutions or the allowable use of public benefit funds may need to be modified. Tariff financing is relatively new and in most locations is only available as a pilot program or has only recently exited pilot phase. This preliminary evaluation suggests that tariff financing is a valuable future addition to the toolkit of policymakers who aim to increase the diffusion of efficient appliances. While regulatory approval is necessary in states that wish to pursue tariff financing, at this point, the major barrier to further implementation appears to be the newness of the financing mechanism.

  17. A Policymaker’s Guide to Feed-in Tariff Policy Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couture, Toby D.; Cory, Karlynn; Kreycik, Claire; Williams, Emily

    2010-07-01

    Feed-in tariffs (FITs) are the most widely used renewable energy policy in the world for driving accelerating renewable energy (RE) deployment, accounting for a greater share of RE development than either tax incentives or renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies. FITs have generated significant RE deployment, helping bring the countries that have implemented them successfully to the forefront of the global RE industry. In the European Union (EU), FIT policies have led to the deployment of more than 15,000 MW of solar photovoltaic (PV) power and more than 55,000 MW of wind power between 2000 and the end of 2009. In total, FITs are responsible for approximately 75% of global PV and 45% of global wind deployment. Countries such as Germany, in particular, have demonstrated that FITs can be used as a powerful policy tool to drive RE deployment and help meet combined energy security and emissions reductions objectives. This policymaker’s guide provides a detailed analysis of FIT policy design and implementation and identifies a set of best practices that have been effective at quickly stimulating the deployment of large amounts of RE generation.

  18. Observed Temperature Effects on Hourly Residential Electric LoadReduction in Response to an Experimental Critical Peak PricingTariff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herter, Karen B.; McAuliffe, Patrick K.; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.

    2005-11-14

    The goal of this investigation was to characterize themanual and automated response of residential customers to high-price"critical" events dispatched under critical peak pricing tariffs testedin the 2003-2004 California Statewide Pricing Pilot. The 15-monthexperimental tariff gave customers a discounted two-price time-of-userate on 430 days in exchange for 27 critical days, during which the peakperiod price (2 p.m. to 7 p.m.) was increased to about three times thenormal time-of-use peak price. We calculated response by five-degreetemperature bins as the difference between peak usage on normal andcritical weekdays. Results indicatedthat manual response to criticalperiods reached -0.23 kW per home (-13 percent) in hot weather(95-104.9oF), -0.03 kW per home (-4 percent) in mild weather (60-94.9oF),and -0.07 kW per home (-9 percent) during cold weather (50-59.9oF).Separately, we analyzed response enhanced by programmable communicatingthermostats in high-use homes with air-conditioning. Between 90oF and94.9oF, the response of this group reached -0.56 kW per home (-25percent) for five-hour critical periods and -0.89 kW/home (-41 percent)for two-hour critical periods.

  19. Representative Albert R. Public Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    District. During the last 12 years, he served on the powerful House Energy and Commerce Committee, most of the Subcommittee on Energy and Air Quality. While on Energy and Commerce, Representative Wynn also served OF CONCENTRATION Energy Representative Wynn helped craft the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. He added

  20. Scheduling in an Energy Cost Aware Environment The energy cost aware scheduling problem (ECASP) is concerned with variable electricity tariffs, where the price of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) is concerned with variable electricity tariffs, where the price of electricity changes over time depending on the demand. It is important to large scale electricity consumers in manufacturing and service industries tasks, the resource limit constraints, and the manpower. The goal of this project is to implement

  1. The Impact of Carbon Pricing on Wholesale Electricity Prices, Carbon Pass-Through Rates and Retail Electricity Tariffs in Australia.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    1 The Impact of Carbon Pricing on Wholesale Electricity Prices, Carbon Pass-Through Rates and Retail Electricity Tariffs in Australia.1 By Phillip Wild, School of Economics, The University of Corporate Affairs at our Industry Partner, AGL Energy Ltd, for his advice and contributions throughout

  2. Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source -Sound Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency Wave represents pressure Target - Radio. The Sound Waves simulation becomes the source of an analogical mapping to Radio Waves. Concepts Radio Waves 1 - Sound Waves references water waves 2 - Water is analogy for Sound Waves 3 - Radio

  3. Representing Periodic Functions by Fourier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vickers, James

    Representing Periodic Functions by Fourier Series 23.2 Introduction In this Section we show how, then the Fourier series expansion takes the form: f(t) = a0 2 + n=1 (an cos nt + bn sin nt) Our main purpose here Fourier coefficients of a function of period 2 calculate Fourier coefficients of a function of general

  4. ORNL/TM-2008/083 A Tariff for Reactive Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    & Electric Company Alan G. Isemonger, California Independent System Operator Brendan Kirby, ORNL, Knowledge, and International Nuclear Information System (INIS) representatives from the following source. Office of Scientific Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6283 managed by UT-BATTELLE, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract

  5. State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA) Project: An Analysis of Renewable Energy Feed-in Tariffs in the United States (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couture, T.; Cory, K.

    2009-06-01

    This report analyzes renewable energy feed-in tariff (FIT) policies and explores the different FIT policies currently implemented in the United States. It also discusses of a few proposed policies, the best practices in FIT policy design, and examines how FITs can be used to target state policy goals. The report covers current and potential future interactions between FITs and other state and federal energy policies while also providing an overview of the impacts FIT policies have in terms of renewable energy deployment, job creation, and economic development.

  6. Melody Meyer: Organic Foods Distributor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farmer, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    are into green building, reducing carbon footprint, trackingour carbon footprint. There aren’t many companies that areuse, offsetting our carbon footprint. The Rockland facility

  7. Guidelines for Manufacturers and Distributors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium is intended to be a user's group — focused on the needs of participants making investments in street and area lighting — which provides a...

  8. Melody Meyer: Organic Foods Distributor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farmer, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    The wealth could provide to our rural community andcan revitalize the rural communities, and make somebodyinvigorate rural communities. Of course, now with the

  9. Melody Meyer: Organic Foods Distributor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farmer, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    out. Farmer: Yes, with GMO [genetically modified organism]said that in some instances, GMO products can be better for

  10. Value of Solar Tariff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

     Note: This program is only available to customers of one of the state's investor-owned utilities (Alliant, Minnesota Power, Otter Tail Power Company, Xcel Energy) in the Community Solar Gardens...

  11. BPA files reciprocity tariff

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomassBudgetAugust 19, 2009 In reply6 12 BONNEVILLE

  12. Qualifying entry grades/scores for the Heriot-Watt Academic Scholarship This list sets out the minimum A-Level grades / UCAS Tariff Points for award of Scholarship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Qualifying entry grades/scores for the Heriot-Watt Academic Scholarship This list sets out the minimum A-Level grades / UCAS Tariff Points for award of Scholarship: School of Engineering & Physical Sciences · Chemistry: AAA or A*AB (360 points) Contact: Jim Cameron, 0131 451 3104 · Chemical Engineering

  13. The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (Japanese translation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

    2004-10-15

    The August 2003 blackout of the northeastern U.S. and CANADA caused great economic losses and inconvenience to New York City and other affected areas. The blackout was a warning to the rest of the world that the ability of conventional power systems to meet growing electricity demand is questionable. Failure of large power systems can lead to serious emergencies. Introduction of on-site generation, renewable energy such as solar and wind power and the effective utilization of exhaust heat is needed, to meet the growing energy demands of the residential and commercial sectors. Additional benefit can be achieved by integrating these distributed technologies into distributed energy resource (DER) systems. This work demonstrates a method for choosing and designing economically optimal DER systems. An additional purpose of this research is to establish a database of energy tariffs, DER technology cost and performance characteristics, and building energy consumption for Japan. This research builds on prior DER studies at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and with their associates in the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) and operation, including the development of the microgrid concept, and the DER selection optimization program, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). DER-CAM is a tool designed to find the optimal combination of installed equipment and an idealized operating schedule to minimize a site's energy bills, given performance and cost data on available DER technologies, utility tariffs, and site electrical and thermal loads over a test period, usually an historic year. Since hourly electric and thermal energy data are rarely available, they are typically developed by building simulation for each of six end use loads used to model the building: electric-only loads, space heating, space cooling, refrigeration, water heating, and natural-gas-only loads. DER-CAM provides a global optimization, albeit idealized, that shows how the necessary useful energy loads can be provided for at minimum cost by selection and operation of on-site generation, heat recovery, cooling, and efficiency improvements. This study examines five prototype commercial buildings and uses DER-CAM to select the economically optimal DER system for each. The five building types are office, hospital, hotel, retail, and sports facility. Each building type was considered for both 5,000 and 10,000 square meter floor sizes. The energy consumption of these building types is based on building energy simulation and published literature. Based on the optimization results, energy conservation and the emissions reduction were also evaluated. Furthermore, a comparison study between Japan and the U.S. has been conducted covering the policy, technology and the utility tariffs effects on DER systems installations.

  14. The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (English Version)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

    2004-10-15

    The August 2003 blackout of the northeastern U.S. and CANADA caused great economic losses and inconvenience to New York City and other affected areas. The blackout was a warning to the rest of the world that the ability of conventional power systems to meet growing electricity demand is questionable. Failure of large power systems can lead to serious emergencies. Introduction of on-site generation, renewable energy such as solar and wind power and the effective utilization of exhaust heat is needed, to meet the growing energy demands of the residential and commercial sectors. Additional benefit can be achieved by integrating these distributed technologies into distributed energy resource (DER) systems. This work demonstrates a method for choosing and designing economically optimal DER systems. An additional purpose of this research is to establish a database of energy tariffs, DER technology cost and performance characteristics, and building energy consumption for Japan. This research builds on prior DER studies at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and with their associates in the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) and operation, including the development of the microgrid concept, and the DER selection optimization program, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). DER-CAM is a tool designed to find the optimal combination of installed equipment and an idealized operating schedule to minimize a site's energy bills, given performance and cost data on available DER technologies, utility tariffs, and site electrical and thermal loads over a test period, usually an historic year. Since hourly electric and thermal energy data are rarely available, they are typically developed by building simulation for each of six end use loads used to model the building: electric-only loads, space heating, space cooling, refrigeration, water heating, and natural-gas-only loads. DER-CAM provides a global optimization, albeit idealized, that shows how the necessary useful energy loads can be provided for at minimum cost by selection and operation of on-site generation, heat recovery, cooling, and efficiency improvements. This study examines five prototype commercial buildings and uses DER-CAM to select the economically optimal DER system for each. The five building types are office, hospital, hotel, retail, and sports facility. Each building type was considered for both 5,000 and 10,000 square meter floor sizes. The energy consumption of these building types is based on building energy simulation and published literature. Based on the optimization results, energy conservation and the emissions reduction were also evaluated. Furthermore, a comparison study between Japan and the U.S. has been conducted covering the policy, technology and the utility tariffs effects on DER systems installations. This study begins with an examination of existing DER research. Building energy loads were then generated through simulation (DOE-2) and scaled to match available load data in the literature. Energy tariffs in Japan and the U.S. were then compared: electricity prices did not differ significantly, while commercial gas prices in Japan are much higher than in the U.S. For smaller DER systems, the installation costs in Japan are more than twice those in the U.S., but this difference becomes smaller with larger systems. In Japan, DER systems are eligible for a 1/3 rebate of installation costs, while subsidies in the U.S. vary significantly by region and application. For 10,000 m{sup 2} buildings, significant decreases in fuel consumption, carbon emissions, and energy costs were seen in the economically optimal results. This was most noticeable in the sports facility, followed the hospital and hotel. This research demonstrates that office buildings can benefit from CHP, in contrast to popular opinion. For hospitals and sports facilities, the use of waste heat is particularly effective for water and space heating. For the other building types, waste heat is most effectively use

  15. Facility Representative Program, Criteria & Review Approach Documents

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This page provides Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADS) to assist Facility Representatives. Please submit your CRADS for posting by sending them to the HQ FR Program Manager. Please include the subject, date, and a contact person.

  16. REPRESENTATIVE COURSE SEQUENCE SOFTWARE ENGINEERING (SE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Haiying

    REPRESENTATIVE COURSE SEQUENCE SOFTWARE ENGINEERING (SE) Freshman Year First Semester Second Semester Second Semester CSE 3310 ­ Fundamentals of Software CSE 3302 ­ Programming Languages Engineering CSE 3320 ­ Operating Systems CSE 3315 ­ Theoretical Concepts in CSE CSE 4310 ­ Software Engineering

  17. A Capital Market Test of Representativeness 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safdar, Mohammad

    2012-07-16

    While some prior studies document that investors overreact to information in sales growth as consistent with representativeness bias, other studies find no evidence of investor overreaction to either sales or earnings growth. Other recent studies...

  18. Representing Information Collections for Visual Cognition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koh, Eunyee

    2009-05-15

    The importance of digital information collections is growing. Collections are typically represented with text-only, in a linear list format, which turns out to be a weak representation for cognition. We learned this from empirical research...

  19. An iconic approach to representing climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    1 An iconic approach to representing climate change Saffron Jessica O'Neill A thesis submitted-experts to be meaningfully engaged with the issue of climate change. This thesis investigates the value of engaging non-experts with climate change at the individual level. Research demonstrates that individuals perceive climate change

  20. Data structures and apparatuses for representing knowledge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hohimer, Ryan E; Thomson, Judi R; Harvey, William J; Paulson, Patrick R; Whiting, Mark A; Tratz, Stephen C; Chappell, Alan R; Butner, Robert S

    2014-02-18

    Data structures and apparatuses to represent knowledge are disclosed. The processes can comprise labeling elements in a knowledge signature according to concepts in an ontology and populating the elements with confidence values. The data structures can comprise knowledge signatures stored on computer-readable media. The knowledge signatures comprise a matrix structure having elements labeled according to concepts in an ontology, wherein the value of the element represents a confidence that the concept is present in an information space. The apparatus can comprise a knowledge representation unit having at least one ontology stored on a computer-readable medium, at least one data-receiving device, and a processor configured to generate knowledge signatures by comparing datasets obtained by the data-receiving devices to the ontologies.

  1. PWR representative behavior during a LOCA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, C.M.

    1981-01-01

    To date, there has been substantial analytical and experimental effort to define the margins between design basis loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) behavior and regulatory limits on maximum fuel rod cladding temperature and deformation. As a result, there is extensive documentation on the modeling of fuel rod behavior in test reactors and design basis LOCA's. However, modeling of that behavior using representative, non-conservative, operating histories is not nearly as well documented in the public literature. Therefore, the objective of this paper is (a) to present calculations of LOCA induced behavior for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) core representative fuel rods, and (b) to discuss the variability in those calculations given the variability in fuel rod condition at the initiation of the LOCA. This analysis was limited to the study of changes in fuel rod behavior due to different power operating histories. The other two important parameters which affect that behavior, initial fuel rod design and LOCA coolant conditions were held invarient for all of the representative rods analyzed.

  2. Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharpe, Saxon E

    2007-10-23

    The primary objective of Project Activity ORD-FY04-012, “Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative,” was to provide the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) with expertise on past, present, and future climate scenarios and to support the technical elements of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) climate program. The Climate Technical Support Representative was to explain, defend, and interpret the YMP climate program to the various audiences during Site Recommendation and License Application. This technical support representative was to support DOE management in the preparation and review of documents, and to participate in comment response for the Final Environmental Impact Statement, the Site Recommendation Hearings, the NRC Sufficiency Comments, and other forums as designated by DOE management. Because the activity was terminated 12 months early and experience a 27% reduction in budget, it was not possible to complete all components of the tasks as originally envisioned. Activities not completed include the qualification of climate datasets and the production of a qualified technical report. The following final report is an unqualified summary of the activities that were completed given the reduced time and funding.

  3. Transforming on-grid renewable energy markets. A review of UNDP-GEF support for feed-in tariffs and related price and market-access instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glemarec, Yannick; Rickerson, Wilson; Waissbein, Oliver

    2012-11-15

    As a Global Environment Facility (GEF) founding implementing agency, UNDP has worked on over 230 GEF-supported clean energy projects in close to 100 developing countries since 1992. About 100 of these projects in 80 countries have focused on renewable energy, supported by approximately US $ 293 million in GEF funds and leveraging US $1.48 billion in associated co-financing from national governments, international organizations, the private sector and non-governmental organizations. As part of UNDP efforts to codify and share lessons learnt from these initiatives, this report addresses how scarce public resources can be used to catalyze larger private financial flows for renewable energy. It provides an overview of UNDP-GEF’s extensive work supporting development of national renewable energy policies such as feed-in tariffs. In these activities UNDP-GEF assists developing countries to assess key risks and barriers to technology diffusion and then to identify a mix of policy and financial de-risking measures to remove these barriers and drive investment. This approach is illustrated through three case studies in Uruguay, Mauritius and Kazakhstan. This report is complemented by a companion publication presenting an innovative UNDP financial modeling tool to assist policymakers in appraising different public instruments to promote clean energy.

  4. 1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report...

  5. Representativeness-based Sampling Network Design for the State...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Representativeness-based Sampling Network Design for the State of Alaska Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Representativeness-based Sampling Network Design for the State...

  6. Representativeness based Sampling Network Design for the State...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Representativeness based Sampling Network Design for the State of Alaska Title: Representativeness-based Sampling Network Design for the State of Alaska Authors: Forrest M. Hoffman...

  7. Representativeness-Based Sampling Network Design for the State...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Representativeness-Based Sampling Network Design for the State of Alaska Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Representativeness-Based Sampling Network...

  8. Secretary Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New "Sputnik Moment" for America Secretary Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New "Sputnik Moment" for America November...

  9. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4B Albuquerque, New Mexico Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4B Albuquerque, New...

  10. DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions June 29, 2012 -...

  11. Representative Atmospheric Plume Development for Elevated Releases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Prichard, Andrew W.

    2014-03-03

    An atmospheric explosion of a low-yield nuclear device will produce a large number of radioactive isotopes, some of which can be measured with airborne detection systems. However, properly equipped aircraft may not arrive in the region where an explosion occurred for a number of hours after the event. Atmospheric conditions will have caused the radioactive plume to move and diffuse before the aircraft arrives. The science behind predicting atmospheric plume movement has advanced enough that the location of the maximum concentrations in the plume can be determined reasonably accurately in real time, or near real time. Given the assumption that an aircraft can follow a plume, this study addresses the amount of atmospheric dilution expected to occur in a representative plume as a function of time past the release event. The approach models atmospheric transport of hypothetical releases from a single location for every day in a year using the publically available HYSPLIT code. The effective dilution factors for the point of maximum concentration in an elevated plume based on a release of a non-decaying, non-depositing tracer can vary by orders of magnitude depending on the day of the release, even for the same number of hours after the release event. However, the median of the dilution factors based on releases for 365 consecutive days at one site follows a power law relationship in time, as shown in Figure S-1. The relationship is good enough to provide a general rule of thumb for estimating typical future dilution factors in a plume starting at the same point. However, the coefficients of the power law function may vary for different release point locations. Radioactive decay causes the effective dilution factors to decrease more quickly with the time past the release event than the dilution factors based on a non-decaying tracer. An analytical expression for the dilution factors of isotopes with different half-lives can be developed given the power law expression for the non-decaying tracer. If the power-law equation for the median dilution factor, Df, based on a non-decaying tracer has the general form Df=a?×t?^(-b) for time t after the release event, then the equation has the form Df=e^(-?t)×a×t^(-b) for a radioactive isotope, where ? is the decay constant for the isotope.

  12. Knowledge Media Institute Representing Scholarly Claims in Internet Digital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowledge Media Institute Representing Scholarly Claims in Internet Digital Libraries: A Knowledge in Computer Science (Eds.) Serge Abiteboul and Anne-Marie Vercoustre. Representing Scholarly Claims with tracking and interpreting scholarly documents in distributed research communities. We argue that current

  13. Tailored Marketing for Under-represented Population Segments...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tailored Marketing for Under-represented Population Segments (201) Tailored Marketing for Under-represented Population Segments (201) August 13, 2015 3:00PM to 4:3...

  14. What does motor efference copy represent? evidence from speech production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niziolek, CA; Nagarajan, SS; Houde, JF

    2013-01-01

    What does motor efference copy represent? Evidence fromAbbreviated title: What does motor efference copy represent?SJ, Wang X (2003) Sensory-Motor Interaction in the Primate

  15. FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Since September, 1993, the Office of Field Management has served as the Department’s corporate advocate for the Facility Representative Program. The Facility Representative (FR) is a critical...

  16. 1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE CONFERENCE June 21 – 25, 1999

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy will host the Facility Representative Annual Meeting on June 21-25, 1999 at the Alexis Park Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada. The meeting will give Facility Representatives and...

  17. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Climate Zone and Representative City: 2B Phoenix, Arizona Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2B Phoenix, Arizona In addition to the ZIP file for each...

  18. NIPSCO- Feed-In Tariff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: NIPSCO is no longer accepting Participation Request Forms for Phase II. Interconnection Applications are now being accepted for all technologies except Intermediate Solar.  Details regarding...

  19. EMBODIED CARBON TARIFFS Christoph Bhringer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Department of Economics, University of Oldenburg, D-26111 Oldenburg, Germany. E-mail: christoph as indirect emissions (such as emissions created by the generation of electricity for use in steel production from domestic production activities are priced unilaterally, the global environmental impact

  20. A Tariff for Reactive Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kueck, John D; Kirby, Brendan J; Li, Fangxing; Tufon, Christopher; Isemonger, Alan

    2008-07-01

    Two kinds of power are required to operate an electric power system: real power, measured in watts, and reactive power, measured in volt-amperes reactive or VARs. Reactive power supply is one of a class of power system reliability services collectively known as ancillary services, and is essential for the reliable operation of the bulk power system. Reactive power flows when current leads or lags behind voltage. Typically, the current in a distribution system lags behind voltage because of inductive loads such as motors. Reactive power flow wastes energy and capacity and causes voltage droop. To correct lagging power flow, leading reactive power (current leading voltage) is supplied to bring the current into phase with voltage. When the current is in phase with voltage, there is a reduction in system losses, an increase in system capacity, and a rise in voltage. Reactive power can be supplied from either static or dynamic VAR sources. Static sources are typically transmission and distribution equipment, such as capacitors at substations, and their cost has historically been included in the revenue requirement of the transmission operator (TO), and recovered through cost-of-service rates. By contrast, dynamic sources are typically generators capable of producing variable levels of reactive power by automatically controlling the generator to regulate voltage. Transmission system devices such as synchronous condensers can also provide dynamic reactive power. A class of solid state devices (called flexible AC transmission system devices or FACTs) can provide dynamic reactive power. One specific device has the unfortunate name of static VAR compensator (SVC), where 'static' refers to the solid state nature of the device (it does not include rotating equipment) and not to the production of static reactive power. Dynamic sources at the distribution level, while more costly would be very useful in helping to regulate local voltage. Local voltage regulation would reduce system losses, increase circuit capacity, increase reliability, and improve efficiency. Reactive power is theoretically available from any inverter-based equipment such as photovoltaic (PV) systems, fuel cells, microturbines, and adjustable-speed drives. However, the installation is usually only economical if reactive power supply is considered during the design and construction phase. In this report, we find that if the inverters of PV systems or the generators of combined heat and power (CHP) systems were designed with capability to supply dynamic reactive power, they could do this quite economically. In fact, on an annualized basis, these inverters and generators may be able to supply dynamic reactive power for about $5 or $6 per kVAR. The savings from the local supply of dynamic reactive power would be in reduced losses, increased capacity, and decreased transmission congestion. The net savings are estimated to be about $7 per kVAR on an annualized basis for a hypothetical circuit. Thus the distribution company could economically purchase a dynamic reactive power service from customers for perhaps $6/kVAR. This practice would provide for better voltage regulation in the distribution system and would provide an alternate revenue source to help amortize the cost of PV and CHP installations. As distribution and transmission systems are operated under rising levels of stress, the value of local dynamic reactive supply is expected to grow. Also, large power inverters, in the range of 500 kW to 1 MW, are expected to decrease in cost as they become mass produced. This report provides one data point which shows that the local supply of dynamic reactive power is marginally profitable at present for a hypothetical circuit. We expect that the trends of growing power flow on the existing system and mass production of inverters for distributed energy devices will make the dynamic supply of reactive power from customers an integral component of economical and reliable system operation in the future.

  1. Enforcement Policy: Regional Standards Enforcement and Distributors |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergy HeadquartersFuelB IMSof 2005 at Iowa WindEnergy1-03 - October 24,2-05

  2. WOCESSORS MOD DISTRIBUTORS OF REFIBED SOURCB MATWIAL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , cMarch 20,WJLP-~ . '-

  3. Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-04-21

    The Order established procedures governing the selection, appointment and termination of Department of Energy contracting officers and contracting officer representatives. Supersedes DOE O 541.1A.

  4. Name Representing Alam, Mansoor WSA Information Technology Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    Name Representing Alam, Mansoor WSA Information Technology Committee Baird, Dave Chair and Chief Information Officer Beveridge, Dave Faculty, Division III Cope, Miriam Academic Computing Manager, Division

  5. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    akfairbanksnew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska Reference Buildings by Climate Zone...

  6. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    atxhoustonnew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2A Houston, Texas Reference Buildings by Climate Zone...

  7. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    mdbaltimorenew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4A Baltimore, Maryland Reference Buildings by Climate...

  8. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    agaatlantanew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3A Atlanta, Georgia Reference Buildings by Climate Zone...

  9. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    usaflmiaminew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 1A Miami, Florida Reference Buildings by Climate Zone...

  10. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    samthelenanew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena, Montana Reference Buildings by Climate Zone...

  11. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    acobouldernew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5B Boulder, Colorado Reference Buildings by Climate...

  12. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    awaseattlenew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate...

  13. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    nvlasvegasnew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3B Las Vegas, Nevada Reference Buildings by Climate...

  14. Polytechnic Institute of New York University Researchers Represented...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Polytechnic Institute of New York University Researchers Represented in the E-print Network ResearcherResearch Institution Web page Aronov, Boris - Department of Computer Science...

  15. Representative well models for eight geothermal-resource areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carson, C.C.; Lin, Y.T.; Livesay, B.J.

    1983-02-01

    Representative well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal-resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. The models were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. The nature, construction, and validation of the models are presented.

  16. Changes to the Facility Representative Program, 10/26/1999

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Effective October 1, 1999, the Deputy Secretary tasked this office to manage the Facility Representative Program. We look forward to working with you in continuing and improving this very important...

  17. Department of Defense Representatives Visit Hanford to Benchmark Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash., December 16, 2005, Representatives of the Department of Defense's (DoD's) Voluntary Protection Program Center of Excellence (VPP CX) working to reduce injuries at selected (DoD)...

  18. A representative individual from Arrovian aggregation of parametric individual utilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A representative individual from Arrovian aggregation of parametric individual utilities social choice theory Assumptions Assumption on decisive coalitions Assumptions on individual utility functions Assumptions on the social welfare function Results The socially acceptable utility function

  19. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    hicago-oharenew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois Reference Buildings by Climate...

  20. REPRESENTING AEROSOLS IN GLOBAL MODELS: FROM MICROMETERS TO MEGAMETERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    mainly from gas-to- particle conversion of low-volatility gaseous species, mainly sulfuric acid to represent aerosol processes and forcing "on-line" in climate models in order to capture the feedbacks

  1. Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-04-30

    To establish procedures governing the selection, appointment, and termination of contracting officers and for the appointment of contracting officer representatives. Cancels DOE Order 4200.4A. Canceled by DOE O 541.1A.

  2. Representing and Reasoning about Changing Spatial Extensions of Geographic Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Brandon

    . Campelo and Brandon Bennett School of Computing, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK, sccec,b.bennett@leeds For a comprehensive review of issues and challenges for representing geographic processes see [10]. #12;Foundational

  3. Landscape Characterization and Representativeness Analysis for Understanding Sampling Network Coverage

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Maddalena, Damian; Hoffman, Forrest; Kumar, Jitendra; Hargrove, William

    Sampling networks rarely conform to spatial and temporal ideals, often comprised of network sampling points which are unevenly distributed and located in less than ideal locations due to access constraints, budget limitations, or political conflict. Quantifying the global, regional, and temporal representativeness of these networks by quantifying the coverage of network infrastructure highlights the capabilities and limitations of the data collected, facilitates upscaling and downscaling for modeling purposes, and improves the planning efforts for future infrastructure investment under current conditions and future modeled scenarios. The work presented here utilizes multivariate spatiotemporal clustering analysis and representativeness analysis for quantitative landscape characterization and assessment of the Fluxnet, RAINFOR, and ForestGEO networks. Results include ecoregions that highlight patterns of bioclimatic, topographic, and edaphic variables and quantitative representativeness maps of individual and combined networks.

  4. Landscape Characterization and Representativeness Analysis for Understanding Sampling Network Coverage

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Maddalena, Damian; Hoffman, Forrest; Kumar, Jitendra; Hargrove, William

    2014-08-01

    Sampling networks rarely conform to spatial and temporal ideals, often comprised of network sampling points which are unevenly distributed and located in less than ideal locations due to access constraints, budget limitations, or political conflict. Quantifying the global, regional, and temporal representativeness of these networks by quantifying the coverage of network infrastructure highlights the capabilities and limitations of the data collected, facilitates upscaling and downscaling for modeling purposes, and improves the planning efforts for future infrastructure investment under current conditions and future modeled scenarios. The work presented here utilizes multivariate spatiotemporal clustering analysis and representativeness analysis for quantitative landscape characterization and assessment of the Fluxnet, RAINFOR, and ForestGEO networks. Results include ecoregions that highlight patterns of bioclimatic, topographic, and edaphic variables and quantitative representativeness maps of individual and combined networks.

  5. UNITED STATES HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES COMMITTEE on SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNITED STATES HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES COMMITTEE on SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT 2318 Rayburn House Office Building The Next Generation of Fusion Energy Research October 29, 2009 fusion energy has been a scientific quest since the 1950s. Inertial and magnetic confinement fusion

  6. REPRESENTING GEO-SCIENTIFIC DOMAIN CONCEPTS Boyan Brodaric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Brandon

    1 REPRESENTING GEO-SCIENTIFIC DOMAIN CONCEPTS Boyan Brodaric Penn State Geography and Geological Survey of Canada brodaric@NRCan.gc.ca 1. Introduction The geo-sciences, including geology, ecology, soil accumulate and change, and (3) are characterized by degrees of uncertainty and granularity. This suggests

  7. The Computational Complexity of Nash Equilibria in Concisely Represented Games #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vadhan, Salil

    The Computational Complexity of Nash Equilibria in Concisely Represented Games # Grant R#erent representations of games a#ect the complexity of problems associated with games, such as finding a Nash. For these two models, we study the complexity of four questions: determining if a given strategy is a Nash

  8. The Computational Complexity of Nash Equilibria in Concisely Represented Games

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vadhan, Salil

    The Computational Complexity of Nash Equilibria in Concisely Represented Games Grant R. Schoenebeck representations of games affect the complexity of problems associated with games, such as finding a Nash. For these two models, we study the complexity of four questions: determining if a given strategy is a Nash

  9. Capturing Post-Silicon Variations using a Representative Critical Path

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapatnekar, Sachin

    1 Capturing Post-Silicon Variations using a Representative Critical Path Qunzeng Liu and Sachin S on measurements on a replica of the nominal critical path, whose variations are intended to reflect those of the entire circuit after manufacturing. For realistic circuits, where the number of critical paths can

  10. Representing Thermal Vibrations and Uncertainty in Molecular Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varshney, Amitabh

    in a molecule is fuzzy because of its uncertainty in protein structure determination and thermal energy because of its thermal energy. Therefore, the smooth molecular surface will also vibrate. Also in proteinRepresenting Thermal Vibrations and Uncertainty in Molecular Surfaces Chang Ha Lee and Amitabh

  11. AN ALTERNATIVE NOTATION FOR REPRESENTING DENSE LINEAR ALGEBRA ALGORITHMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van de Geijn, Robert A.

    AN ALTERNATIVE NOTATION FOR REPRESENTING DENSE LINEAR ALGEBRA ALGORITHMS PAOLO BIENTINESI AND ROBERT A. VAN DE GEIJN Abstract. We present a notation that allows a dense linear algebra algorithm subvectors and submatrices allowing the details of the algorithm to be the focus while hiding the intricate

  12. Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer's Representatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-10-27

    To establish procedures governing the selection, appointment, and termination of contracting officers and for the appointment of contracting officer's representatives. To ensure that only trained and qualified procurement and financial assistance professionals, within the scope of this Order, serve as contracting officers. Cancels DOE O 541.1. Canceled by DOE O 541.1B.

  13. Representing Temporal Knowledge for Case-Based Prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aamodt, Agnar

    well drilling. 1 Introduction Most current CBR systems represent episodes as distinct snap. Our focus is on prediction problems for avoiding faulty situations. Based on a well-established theory-intensive CBR system Creek. The paper presents the theoretical foundation of the method, the representation

  14. US House of Representatives Appropriation Committee Report May 18, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US House of Representatives Appropriation Committee Report May 18, 2005 Fusion Energy Sciences The Committee recommendation for fusion energy sciences is $295,155,000, an increase of $5,605,000 over that two-thirds of the proposed increase for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER

  15. State DOT Representative Report Questions National Concrete Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Texas April 2, 2009 Theme: Ride Quality for Bridges Please provide your state DOT's perspective regarding the following theme questions. Each NCC state DOT representative will be asked to present requirements set forth in the Caltrans Standard Specification 51-1.17 and which are tested for conformance

  16. Toward Representative Internet Measurements Aditya Akella, Srinivasan Seshan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akella, Aditya

    and understand the structure and behavior of the Internet have a long history in the network research communityToward Representative Internet Measurements Aditya Akella, Srinivasan Seshan Dept. of Computer, and failure modes still is far from complete. Characterizing the operation of the current Internet

  17. Wave Energy Resources Representative Sites Around the Hawaiian Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wave Energy Resources for Representative Sites Around the Hawaiian Islands Prepared by: Luis A Foreword This report provides wave energy resource information required to select coastal segments for specific wave-energy-conversion (WEC) technology and to initiate engineering design incorporating

  18. Does the Poynting vector always represent electromagnetic power flow?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Changbiao Wang

    2015-07-07

    Poynting vector as electromagnetic power flow has prevailed over one hundred years in the community. However in this paper, it is shown from Maxwell equations that the Poynting vector may not represent the electromagnetic power flow for a plane wave in a non-dispersive, lossless, non-conducting, anisotropic uniform medium; this important conclusion revises the conventional understanding of Poynting vector. It is also shown that this conclusion is clearly supported by Fermat's principle and special theory of relativity.

  19. Does the Poynting vector always represent electromagnetic power flow?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Changbiao

    2015-01-01

    Poynting vector as electromagnetic power flow has prevailed over one hundred years in the community. However in this paper, it is shown from Maxwell equations that the Poynting vector may not represent the electromagnetic power flow for a plane wave in a non-dispersive, lossless, non-conducting, anisotropic uniform medium; this important conclusion revises the conventional understanding of Poynting vector. It is also shown that this conclusion is clearly supported by Fermat's principle and special theory of relativity.

  20. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. Subsequent chapters of this report provide: an overview of NGTDM; a description of the interface between the NEMS and NGTDM; an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM; the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module; the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module; the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module; the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module; and a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs.

  1. Model documentation: Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-02-17

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The methodology employed allows the analysis of impacts of regional capacity constraints in the interstate natural gas pipeline network and the identification of pipeline capacity expansion requirements. There is an explicit representation of core and noncore markets for natural gas transmission and distribution services, and the key components of pipeline tariffs are represented in a pricing algorithm. Natural gas pricing and flow patterns are derived by obtaining a market equilibrium across the three main elements of the natural gas market: the supply element, the demand element, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. The NGTDM consists of four modules: the Annual Flow Module, the Capacity F-expansion Module, the Pipeline Tariff Module, and the Distributor Tariff Module. A model abstract is provided in Appendix A.

  2. Defining And Characterizing Sample Representativeness For DWPF Melter Feed Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shine, E. P.; Poirier, M. R.

    2013-10-29

    Representative sampling is important throughout the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) process, and the demonstrated success of the DWPF process to achieve glass product quality over the past two decades is a direct result of the quality of information obtained from the process. The objective of this report was to present sampling methods that the Savannah River Site (SRS) used to qualify waste being dispositioned at the DWPF. The goal was to emphasize the methodology, not a list of outcomes from those studies. This methodology includes proven methods for taking representative samples, the use of controlled analytical methods, and data interpretation and reporting that considers the uncertainty of all error sources. Numerous sampling studies were conducted during the development of the DWPF process and still continue to be performed in order to evaluate options for process improvement. Study designs were based on use of statistical tools applicable to the determination of uncertainties associated with the data needs. Successful designs are apt to be repeated, so this report chose only to include prototypic case studies that typify the characteristics of frequently used designs. Case studies have been presented for studying in-tank homogeneity, evaluating the suitability of sampler systems, determining factors that affect mixing and sampling, comparing the final waste glass product chemical composition and durability to that of the glass pour stream sample and other samples from process vessels, and assessing the uniformity of the chemical composition in the waste glass product. Many of these studies efficiently addressed more than one of these areas of concern associated with demonstrating sample representativeness and provide examples of statistical tools in use for DWPF. The time when many of these designs were implemented was in an age when the sampling ideas of Pierre Gy were not as widespread as they are today. Nonetheless, the engineers and statisticians used carefully thought out designs that systematically and economically provided plans for data collection from the DWPF process. Key shared features of the sampling designs used at DWPF and the Gy sampling methodology were the specification of a standard for sample representativeness, an investigation that produced data from the process to study the sampling function, and a decision framework used to assess whether the specification was met based on the data. Without going into detail with regard to the seven errors identified by Pierre Gy, as excellent summaries are readily available such as Pitard [1989] and Smith [2001], SRS engineers understood, for example, that samplers can be biased (Gy?s extraction error), and developed plans to mitigate those biases. Experiments that compared installed samplers with more representative samples obtained directly from the tank may not have resulted in systematically partitioning sampling errors into the now well-known error categories of Gy, but did provide overall information on the suitability of sampling systems. Most of the designs in this report are related to the DWPF vessels, not the large SRS Tank Farm tanks. Samples from the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), which contains the feed to the DWPF melter, are characterized using standardized analytical methods with known uncertainty. The analytical error is combined with the established error from sampling and processing in DWPF to determine the melter feed composition. This composition is used with the known uncertainty of the models in the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) to ensure that the wasteform that is produced is comfortably within the acceptable processing and product performance region. Having the advantage of many years of processing that meets the waste glass product acceptance criteria, the DWPF process has provided a considerable amount of data about itself in addition to the data from many special studies. Demonstrating representative sampling directly from the large Tank Farm tanks is a difficult, if not unsolvable enterprise due to li

  3. Facility Representative of the Year Award | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRD Report to Congress MoreHyd rog enOffice of NuclearRepresentative

  4. The Korarchaeota: Archaeal orphans representing an ancestral lineage of life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elkins, James G.; Kunin, Victor; Anderson, Iain; Barry, Kerrie; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Hedlund, Brian; Hugenholtz, Phil; Kyrpides, Nikos; Graham, David; Keller, Martin; Wanner, Gerhard; Richardson, Paul; Stetter, Karl O.

    2007-05-01

    Based on conserved cellular properties, all life on Earth can be grouped into different phyla which belong to the primary domains Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. However, tracing back their evolutionary relationships has been impeded by horizontal gene transfer and gene loss. Within the Archaea, the kingdoms Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota exhibit a profound divergence. In order to elucidate the evolution of these two major kingdoms, representatives of more deeply diverged lineages would be required. Based on their environmental small subunit ribosomal (ss RNA) sequences, the Korarchaeota had been originally suggested to have an ancestral relationship to all known Archaea although this assessment has been refuted. Here we describe the cultivation and initial characterization of the first member of the Korarchaeota, highly unusual, ultrathin filamentous cells about 0.16 {micro}m in diameter. A complete genome sequence obtained from enrichment cultures revealed an unprecedented combination of signature genes which were thought to be characteristic of either the Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, or Eukarya. Cell division appears to be mediated through a FtsZ-dependent mechanism which is highly conserved throughout the Bacteria and Euryarchaeota. An rpb8 subunit of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase was identified which is absent from other Archaea and has been described as a eukaryotic signature gene. In addition, the representative organism possesses a ribosome structure typical for members of the Crenarchaeota. Based on its gene complement, this lineage likely diverged near the separation of the two major kingdoms of Archaea. Further investigations of these unique organisms may shed additional light onto the evolution of extant life.

  5. 1 Ma 15200 Lesson 18 Section 1.7 I Representing an Inequality ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    charlotb

    2010-10-04

    1. Ma 15200 Lesson 18 Section 1.7. I. Representing an Inequality. There are 3 ways to represent an inequality. (1) Using the inequality symbol (sometime.

  6. 1 Ma 15200 Lesson 18 Section 1.7 I Representing an Inequality ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    charlotb

    2011-02-22

    1. Ma 15200 Lesson 18 Section 1.7. I. Representing an Inequality. There are 3 ways to represent an inequality. (1) Using the inequality symbol (sometime.

  7. Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, Asa S.; Lekov, Alex; Lutz, James; Rosenquist, Gregory; Gu, Lixing

    2011-03-04

    This report presents a new simulation tool under development at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This tool uses EnergyPlus to simulate each single-family home in the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), and generates a calibrated, nationally representative set of simulated homes whose energy use is statistically indistinguishable from the energy use of the single-family homes in the RECS sample. This research builds upon earlier work by Ritchard et al. for the Gas Research Institute and Huang et al. for LBNL. A representative national sample allows us to evaluate the variance in energy use between individual homes, regions, or other subsamples; using this tool, we can also evaluate how that variance affects the impacts of potential policies. The RECS contains information regarding the construction and location of each sampled home, as well as its appliances and other energy-using equipment. We combined this data with the home simulation prototypes developed by Huang et al. to simulate homes that match the RECS sample wherever possible. Where data was not available, we used distributions, calibrated using the RECS energy use data. Each home was assigned a best-fit location for the purposes of weather and some construction characteristics. RECS provides some detail on the type and age of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment in each home; we developed EnergyPlus models capable of reproducing the variety of technologies and efficiencies represented in the national sample. This includes electric, gas, and oil furnaces, central and window air conditioners, central heat pumps, and baseboard heaters. We also developed a model of duct system performance, based on in-home measurements, and integrated this with fan performance to capture the energy use of single- and variable-speed furnace fans, as well as the interaction of duct and fan performance with the efficiency of heating and cooling equipment. Comparison with RECS revealed that EnergyPlus did not capture the heating-side behavior of heat pumps particularly accurately, and that our simple oil furnace and boiler models needed significant recalibration to fit with RECS. Simulating the full RECS sample on a single computer would take many hours, so we used the 'cloud computing' services provided by Amazon.com to simulate dozens of homes at once. This enabled us to simulate the full RECS sample, including multiple versions of each home to evaluate the impact of marginal changes, in less than 3 hours. Once the tool was calibrated, we were able to address several policy questions. We made a simple measurement of the heat replacement effect and showed that the net effect of heat replacement on primary energy use is likely to be less than 5%, relative to appliance-only measures of energy savings. Fuel switching could be significant, however. We also evaluated the national and regional impacts of a variety of 'overnight' changes in building characteristics or occupant behavior, including lighting, home insulation and sealing, HVAC system efficiency, and thermostat settings. For example, our model shows that the combination of increased home insulation and better sealed building shells could reduce residential natural gas use by 34.5% and electricity use by 6.5%, and a 1 degree rise in summer thermostat settings could save 2.1% of home electricity use. These results vary by region, and we present results for each U.S. Census division. We conclude by offering proposals for future work to improve the tool. Some proposed future work includes: comparing the simulated energy use data with the monthly RECS bill data; better capturing the variation in behavior between households, especially as it relates to occupancy and schedules; improving the characterization of recent construction and its regional variation; and extending the general framework of this simulation tool to capture multifamily housing units, such as apartment buildings.

  8. Greening the U.S. House of Representatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond, Rick; Diamond, Rick; Payne, Christopher

    2008-03-01

    The Greening the Capitol initiative was launched in March, 2007 with the threefold goals of making the U.S. House of Representatives: 1) carbon neutral within 18 months, 2) reducing energy use by 50percent in ten years, and 3) becoming a model of sustainable operations. We report on the recommendations to meet these goals, looking at the targets of opportunity at the Capitol Power Plant, the existing buildings, and the overall operations of the complex. Our findings have shown that these goals are achievable, and that through an integrated approach the savings in carbon and energy can be met. Specific examples include the lighting retrofits in the House offices, parking areas, and the Capitol dome; the retrofits to the HVAC systems and controls, including duct sealing, improving the efficiency of the energy and water use in the food service areas; and improved operations of the steam and chilled water distribution system. A key aspect has been better tracking and feedback to the building operators of the actual energy consumption. We report on the technical opportunities presented by these historic and symbolic buildings in becoming models of sustainability.

  9. Evaluation of evolving residential electricity tariffs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Judy; DeForest, Nicholas; Kiliccote, Sila; Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Donadee, Jon

    2011-05-15

    Residential customers in California's Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) territory have seen several electricity rate structure changes in the past decade. This poster: examines the history of the residential pricing structure and key milestones; summarizes and analyzes the usage between 2006 and 2009 for different baseline/climate areas; discusses the residential electricity Smart Meter roll out; and compares sample bills for customers in two climates under the current pricing structure and also the future time of use (TOU) structure.

  10. Evaluation of evolving residential electricity tariffs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Judy; DeForest, Nicholas; Kiliccote, Sila; Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Donadee, Jon

    2011-03-22

    Residential customers in California's Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) territory have seen several electricity rate structure changes in the past decade. A relatively simple two-tiered pricing system (charges by usage under/over baseline for the home's climate zone) was replaced in the summer of 2001 by a more complicated five-tiered system (usage below baseline and up to 30percent, 100percent, 200percent, and 300percent+ over baseline). In 2009, PG&E began the process of upgrading its residential customers to Smart Meters and laying the groundwork for time of use pricing, due to start in 2011. This paper examines the history of the tiered pricing system, discusses the problems the utility encountered with its Smart Meter roll out, and evaluates the proposed dynamic pricing incentive structures. Scenario analyses of example PG&E customer bills will also be presented. What would these residential customers pay if they were still operating under a tiered structure, and/or if they participated in peak hour reductions?

  11. Marin Clean Energy- Feed-In Tariff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Assembly Bill 117, passed in 2002, allows communities in California to aggregate their load and to procure electricity from their own preferred sources. Under the authority of this law, California...

  12. Utility Tariff Question | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin FilmUnited States:UserLaborUtility

  13. Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.; Nakagawa, S.; Kwon, T.-H.

    2011-04-01

    Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing laboratory samples is important so that the properties of these materials may be measured, while controlling the composition and other variables. Natural samples are rare, and have often experienced pressure and temperature changes that may affect the property to be measured [Waite et al., 2008]. Forming methane hydrate samples in the laboratory has been done a number of ways, each having advantages and disadvantages. The ice-to-hydrate method [Stern et al., 1996], contacts melting ice with methane at the appropriate pressure to form hydrate. The hydrate can then be crushed and mixed with mineral grains under controlled conditions, and then compacted to create laboratory samples of methane hydrate in a mineral medium. The hydrate in these samples will be part of the load-bearing frame of the medium. In the excess gas method [Handa and Stupin, 1992], water is distributed throughout a mineral medium (e.g. packed moist sand, drained sand, moistened silica gel, other porous media) and the mixture is brought to hydrate-stable conditions (chilled and pressurized with gas), allowing hydrate to form. This method typically produces grain-cementing hydrate from pendular water in sand [Waite et al., 2004]. In the dissolved gas method [Tohidi et al., 2002], water with sufficient dissolved guest molecules is brought to hydrate-stable conditions where hydrate forms. In the laboratory, this is can be done by pre-dissolving the gas of interest in water and then introducing it to the sample under the appropriate conditions. With this method, it is easier to form hydrate from more soluble gases such as carbon dioxide. It is thought that this method more closely simulates the way most natural gas hydrate has formed. Laboratory implementation, however, is difficult, and sample formation is prohibitively time consuming [Minagawa et al., 2005; Spangenberg and Kulenkampff, 2005]. In another version of this technique, a specified quantity of gas is placed in a sample, then the sample is flooded with water and cooled [Priest et al., 2009]. We have performed a number of tests in which hydrate was formed and the uniformity of the hydrate formation was examined. These tests have primarily used a variety of modifications of the excess gas method to make the hydrate, although we have also used a version of the excess water technique. Early on, we found difficulties in creating uniform samples with a particular sand/ initial water saturation combination (F-110 Sand, {approx} 35% initial water saturation). In many of our tests we selected this combination intentionally to determine whether we could use a method to make the samples uniform. The following methods were examined: Excess gas, Freeze/thaw/form, Freeze/pressurize/thaw, Excess gas followed by water saturation, Excess water, Sand and kaolinite, Use of a nucleation enhancer (SnoMax), and Use of salt in the water. Below, each method, the underlying hypothesis, and our results are briefly presented, followed by a brief conclusion. Many of the hypotheses investigated are not our own, but were presented to us. Much of the data presented is from x-ray CT scanning our samples. The x-ray CT scanner provides a three-dimensional density map of our samples. From this map and the physics that is occurring in our samples, we are able to gain an understanding of the spatial nature of the processes that occur, and attribute them to the locations where they occur.

  14. National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis Measuring and Representing Accessibility in the Information Age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis Measuring and Representing Accessibility in the Information Age A Specialist Meeting of Project Varenius' Geographies of the Information Society 19 ........................................................................................................11 Visualizing and Representing Information Space Within Geographic Information Science (GIS) Michael

  15. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Government Reform Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform March 20, 2003 Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on...

  16. Representing aquifer architecture in macrodispersivity models with an analytical solution of the transition probability matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Zhiming

    Representing aquifer architecture in macrodispersivity models with an analytical solution] The multi-dimensional transition probability model represents hydrofacies architecture in modeling aquifer heterogeneity. The structure of the aquifer architecture is mathematically characterized by a canonical

  17. U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney...

  18. What every designated representative should know about Title IV and Title V enforcement provisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bischoff, C.A. [Gallagher and Kennedy, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Dayal, P. [Tucson Electric Power Co., Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Title IV of the Clean Air Act not only created a regulatory program unlike any other under the Clean Air Act, but also established a unique position--the designated representative--as an integral part of the program. The designated representative is required to meet certain basic obligations under Title IV, and a panoply of enforcement mechanisms are available to EPA in the event of noncompliance with these obligations. Also, because a designated representative may take on responsibilities under the permit provisions of Title V of the Clean Air Act, the designated representative can also be subject to an enforcement action for failure to comply with certain Title V permit requirements. This paper considers the basic definition of the designated representative under EPA`s Title IV and Title V regulations, identifies the responsibilities assigned to the designated representative, and then analyzes the enforcement mechanisms that may be applied to the designated representative if a regulatory responsibility has not been satisfied.

  19. Inline evenflow material distributor for pneumatic material feed systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thiry, Michael J. (Oakdale, CA)

    2007-02-20

    An apparatus for reducing clogs in a pneumatic material feed line, such as employed in abrasive waterjet machining systems, by providing an evenflow feed of material therethrough. The apparatus preferably includes a hollow housing defining a housing volume and having an inlet capable of connecting to an upstream portion of the pneumatic material feed line, an outlet capable of connecting to a downstream portion of the pneumatic material feed line, and an air vent located between the inlet and outlet for venting excess air pressure out from the housing volume. A diverter, i.e. an impingement object, is located at the inlet and in a path of incoming material from the upstream portion of the pneumatic material feed line, to break up clumps of ambient moisture-ridden material impinging on the diverter. And one or more filter screens is also preferably located in the housing volume to further break up clumps and provide filtering.

  20. CenterPoint Energy A/C Distributor Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note:  This incentive is only available to customers within CenterPoint Energy’s electric service territory (greater Houston area, Texas)

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Distributors Inc. to Convert

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TA I NLoansAFDCHydrogen

  2. HEATING, AIR-CONDITIONING AND REFRIGERATION DISTRIBUTORS INTERNATIONAL

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRD Report11, SolarMatFermiGuido DeHoratiis -PDF version(HARDI) |

  3. Facility Representatives

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order14, 20111,FY 2007 FeeFederalFirst2 DOEMeetingExperience |

  4. Facility Representatives

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order14, 20111,FY 2007 FeeFederalFirst2 DOEMeetingExperience

  5. 4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from October to December   2008. Data for these indicators are  gathered by Field...

  6. 1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from January to March 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  7. 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  8. 1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from January to March  2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  9. 3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from July to September   2008. Data for these indicators aregathered by Field...

  10. 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from April to June  2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  11. 2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators QuarterlyReport covering the period from April to June 2008. Data for these indicators aregathered by Field elements...

  12. 3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  13. 4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  14. 1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from January to March2010. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  15. 1Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January  to March 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  16. 2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by field elements...

  17. 4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  18. 2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  19. 3Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from July to September 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  20. 2Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the highlight of, and announces the availablity on-line of, the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per...

  1. 3Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Facility Representative Program Indicators (Pis) Quarterly Report attached, covering the period from July to September 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements...

  2. 1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January through March 2012. Data for these indicators were...

  3. 2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period April through June 20 1 1. Data for these indicators were gathered...

  4. 4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October through December 2011. Data for these indicators were...

  5. 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period of July through September 2010. Data for these...

  6. 4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period October through December 2010. Data for these...

  7. 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period January through March 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered...

  8. 4Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from October to December 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  9. 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period July  through September 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered...

  10. 2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April through June 2012. Data for these indicators were...

  11. 4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators QuarterlyReport covering the period from October to December 2007. Data for these indicators aregathered by Field...

  12. Academic Council Representatives 2009-2010 Title/Committee 2009/2010 Members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurer, Frank

    Taryn Lenders ELECTED REPRESENTATIVES Management & Professional Staff Council Kathy Drewes General) John Wright (L) Travel Committee Taryn Lenders Shawna Sadler #12;

  13. The Tariff Analysis Project: A database and analysis platform for electricity tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, K.; White, R.; Bolduc, C.; Fisher, D.; Rosenquist, G.

    2006-01-01

    Berkeley Lab 2006. Home Energy Saver. hes.lbl.gov. [3] PHP:linked to the LBNL Home Energy Saver 1 website [2]. For thisincluding the Home Energy Saver web-site [2], but are not

  14. Detecting and Representing Relevant Web Deltas in Whoweda Sourav S Bhowmick1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhowmick, Sourav S.

    Detecting and Representing Relevant Web Deltas in Whoweda Sourav S Bhowmick1 Sanjay Madria2 Wee given the old and new versions of a set of interlinked Web documents, retrieved in response to a user's query. In particular, we show how to detect and represent web deltas, i.e., changes in the Web documents

  15. Representing and Querying the Evolution of Databases and their Schemas in Fusheng Wang and Carlo Zaniolo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaniolo, Carlo

    Representing and Querying the Evolution of Databases and their Schemas in XML Fusheng Wang surprisingly effective solutions to the problem of representing and querying the evolution of databases for evolution [20, 19, 13]. Meanwhile, there is much current interest in publishing and viewing database

  16. Representative Subsets For Big Data Learning using k-NN Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Representative Subsets For Big Data Learning using k-NN Graphs Raghvendra Mall, Vilen Jumutc, Rocco a deterministic method to obtain subsets from big data which are a good representative of the inherent structure a subset for this big data network. The FURS selection technique selects nodes from different dense regions

  17. April 21, 2014 2014-15 NON-REPRESENTED STAFF SALARY PROGRAM/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    April 21, 2014 2014-15 NON-REPRESENTED STAFF SALARY PROGRAM/ CALL FOR PERFORMANCE APPRAISALS JULY 1, 2013-JUNE 30, 2014 Salary Program The 2014-15 salary program is a 3% salary program for non-represented career staff. Individual employee's increases will vary due to the Salary Program Parameters listed below

  18. A SOFTWARE SYSTEM FOR ANALYSING CERAMIC ARTEFACTS REPRESENTED BY 2D DRAWINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borissova, Daniela

    A SOFTWARE SYSTEM FOR ANALYSING CERAMIC ARTEFACTS REPRESENTED BY 2D DRAWINGS Gennady Agre1.hristov@gmail.com Abstract: The paper describes a part of an extensible system for analysing ceramic artefacts represented this function and using it for comparing artefacts are described. Key words: ceramics classification, curvature

  19. Model documentation: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System; Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-02-24

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is a component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. This report documents the archived version of NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts used in support of the Annual Energy Outlook 1994, DOE/EIA-0383(94). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. It is intended to fulfill the legal obligation of the EIA to provide adequate documentation in support of its models (Public Law 94-385, Section 57.b.2). This report represents Volume 1 of a two-volume set. (Volume 2 will report on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues.) Subsequent chapters of this report provide: (1) an overview of the NGTDM (Chapter 2); (2) a description of the interface between the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and the NGTDM (Chapter 3); (3) an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM (Chapter 4); (4) the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module (Chapter 5); (5) the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module (Chapter 6); (6) the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module (Chapter 7); (7) the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module (Chapter 8); and (8) a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs (Chapter 9).

  20. 105TH CONGRESS REPORT " !HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES2d Session 105796

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollaar, Lee A.

    69­006 105TH CONGRESS REPORT " !HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES2d Session 105­796 DIGITAL MILLENNIUM the following CONFERENCE REPORT [To accompany H.R. 2281] The committee of conference on the disagreeing votes

  1. 105TH CONGRESS REPORT " !HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES2d Session 105452

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollaar, Lee A.

    59­006 105TH CONGRESS REPORT " !HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES2d Session 105­452 COPYRIGHT TERM EXTENSION, having considered the same, report favorably thereon with an amendment and recommend that the bill do

  2. 2Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from April 2000 to June 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field...

  3. 112TH CONGRESS REPORT " !HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES1st Session 112

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efficiency and Renewable Energy ................................. 22 84 Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability ............................... 22 93 Nuclear Energy66­387 112TH CONGRESS REPORT " !HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES1st Session 112­ ENERGY AND WATER

  4. Lessons Learned in Optimizing Workers' and Worker Representatives' Input to Work Planning and Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Tom McQuiston, Dr. P.H., United Steelworkers - Tony Mazzocchi Center for Health, Safety and Environmental Education. Lessons Learned in Optimizing Workers’ and Worker Representatives’ Input in Work Planning and Control.

  5. Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of Representatives...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of...

  6. Functions Represent SiPM Response Especially Linear Behavior After Saturation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kotera, Katsushige; Takeshita, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    We developed functions to represent wide ranges of SiPM responses. The functions model reactivation of pixels of the SiPM during each incident event. Because the number of detected photons by reactivation increases rationally and linearly in our model, the linear behavior of SiPM response after saturation, for which the reason was unknown, can be represented with our functions. From 72 samples of SiPM responses, the functions were tested. They showed their high performance with one additional correction to the simple function.

  7. SiPM Response Functions Representing Wide Range Including Linear Behavior After Saturation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsushige Kotera; Weonseok Choi; Tohru Takeshita

    2015-10-13

    We developed functions to represent wide ranges of SiPM responses. The functions model reactivation of pixels of the SiPM during each incident event. Because the number of detected photons by reactivation increases rationally and linearly in our model, the linear behavior of SiPM response after saturation, for which the reason was unknown, can be represented with our functions. From 72 samples of SiPM responses, the functions were tested. They showed their high performance with one additional correction to the simple function.

  8. Farm-level economic impacts of the House of Representatives Farm Bill Proposal, H.R. 2646, and the Senate Farm Bill Proposal, S. 1731, for representative rice farms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Christy Michelle

    2002-01-01

    increased costs of production. The primary objective of this research is to assess the farm level economic implications of the House of Representatives and the Senate farm bill proposals on representative rice farms from six different rice-producing states...

  9. DO GLOBAL WARMING AND CLIMATE CHANGE REPRESENT A SERIOUS THREAT TO OUR WELFARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DO GLOBAL WARMING AND CLIMATE CHANGE REPRESENT A SERIOUS THREAT TO OUR WELFARE AND ENVIRONMENT? By Michael E. Mann I. Introduction The subjects of "global warming" and "climate change" have become parts of both the popular lexicon and the public discourse. Discussions of global warming often evoke passionate

  10. Oil Bodies and Oleosins in Physcomitrella Possess Characteristics Representative of Early Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    Oil Bodies and Oleosins in Physcomitrella Possess Characteristics Representative of Early Trends oleosin genes. Microscopy examination of Physcomitrella revealed that oil bodies (OBs) were abundant; and bacteria. Among all these lipid droplets, oil bodies (OBs) in seeds are the most prominent and have been

  11. Curriculum Vitae December 2006 (A brief description of some representative results)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Hongjun

    Curriculum Vitae December 2006 Appendix: (A brief description of some representative results) (1 with the sample 1 #12;Curriculum Vitae December 2006 bias changing, but the wavelength is constant. Figure 2 STM-dependent competition between molecule-substrate and the laterally intermolecular interactions. 2 #12;Curriculum Vitae

  12. Representing Genetic Networks as Labeled Hybrid Petri Nets for State Space Exploration and Markov Chain Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Chris J.

    Representing Genetic Networks as Labeled Hybrid Petri Nets for State Space Exploration and Markov is to develop a way to convert genetic networks into logical models. Once this is done, finding the state graph into the reachability of the states in the original network. Therefore, the second goal of this project is to develop

  13. Representing OGC Geospatial Web Services in OWL-S Web Service Ontologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Kristin

    Representing OGC Geospatial Web Services in OWL-S Web Service Ontologies Kristin Stock,1,2 Anne.m.robertson@ed.ac.uk; mark.small@ed.ac.uk} Abstract OWL-S is an ontology for describing web services in a way that includes the semantics (meaning) of the web service, including the semantics of its behaviour and the semantics

  14. Failure Analysis for Composition of Web Services Represented as Labeled Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Robyn R.

    Failure Analysis for Composition of Web Services Represented as Labeled Transition Systems Dinanath, Ames, IA 50011, USA {yogesh, sbasu, honavar, rlutz}@cs.iastate.edu Abstract. The Web service a simple e-Library Web service in the context of the MoSCoE Web service composition framework. 1

  15. Materials Cartography: Representing and Mining Materials Space Using Structural and Electronic Fingerprints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtarolo, Stefano

    computational tools to analyze, visualize, model, and design new materials. INTRODUCTION Designing materials and the Harvard Clean Energy Project10,11 that contain thousands of unique materials and their theoreticallyMaterials Cartography: Representing and Mining Materials Space Using Structural and Electronic

  16. The multiple phenylpropene synthases in both Clarkia breweri and Petunia hybrida represent two distinct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pichersky, Eran

    The multiple phenylpropene synthases in both Clarkia breweri and Petunia hybrida represent two pollinators. Clarkia breweri flowers emit a mixture of eugenol and isoeugenol, while Petunia hybrida flowers in secondary metabolism. Here we show that C. breweri flowers have two closely related proteins (96% identity

  17. Solubility and freezing effects of Fe2+ solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solubility and freezing effects of Fe2+ and Mg2+ in H2SO4 solutions representative of upper, it is unclear how these impurities could affect particle freezing. To address these questions, we have particles. Bulk freezing experiments were also carried out on H2SO4 solutions containing amounts

  18. Patterns for Representing FMEA in Formal Specification of Control Systems Ilya Lopatkin, Alexei Iliasov,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southampton, University of

    Patterns for Representing FMEA in Formal Specification of Control Systems Ilya Lopatkin, Alexei, Finland {Yuliya.Prokhorova, Elena.Troubitsyna}@abo.fi Abstract -- Failure Modes and Effects analysis (FMEA) is a widely used technique for inductive safety analysis. FMEA provides engineers with valuable information

  19. Written Testimony to the United States House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boneh, Dan

    and power-plant solar photovoltaics (PV), concentrated solar power (CSP) plants, solar heat collectors1 Written Testimony to the United States House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce, Renewable Wind, Water, and Solar (WWS) Power for all Purposes by 2050 and 80% by 2030 Synopsis · Researchers

  20. IJCB 2011 Conference Report The International Joint Conference on Biometrics represents the joining of two major

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowyer, Kevin W.

    IJCB 2011 Conference Report The International Joint Conference on Biometrics represents the joining of two major conference series in biometrics research, the Biometrics Theory, Applications and Systems (BTAS) tradition and the International Conference on Biometrics (ICB) tradition. Measured by the number

  1. Nuclear talks in Austria International representatives will meet in Vienna on Saturday to discuss a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear talks in Austria International representatives will meet in Vienna on Saturday to discuss a controversial nuclear fusion plan. The technical meeting of experts is intended to pave the way of nuclear fusion say it provides an attractive long-term energy option, because the basic materials needed

  2. Representing OGC Geospatial Web Services in OWL-S Web Service Ontologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Kristin

    Representing OGC Geospatial Web Services in OWL-S Web Service Ontologies Kristin Stock,1,2 Anne, United Kingdom {kristin.stock@nottingham.ac.uk} 2 Allworlds Geothinking, Nottingham, United Kingdom 3). This paper describes an approach to the description of OGC web services using OWL-S that takes advantage

  3. Applying engineering and fleet detail to represent passenger vehicle transport in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    efficiency Alternative fuel vehicles A well-known challenge in computable general equilibrium (CGE) modelsApplying engineering and fleet detail to represent passenger vehicle transport in a computable for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR

  4. Representing energy technologies in top-down economic models using bottom-up information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    take energy and other prices as exogenous and, therefore, may overestimate the potential penetrationRepresenting energy technologies in top-down economic models using bottom-up information J.R. Mc 02139, USA c Laboratory for Energy and the Environment, M.I.T., Cambridge, MA 02139, USA Available

  5. CP nets: representing and reasoning with preferences of multiple agents F. Rossi and K. B. Venable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Toby

    CP nets: representing and reasoning with preferences of multiple agents F. Rossi and K. B introduce £ CP nets, an extension of the CP net formal- ism to model and handle the qualitative and conditional pref- erences of multiple agents. We give a number of different semantics for reasoning with £ CP

  6. Results on CP Violation from Belle T.E. Browder representing the Belle Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Browder, Tom

    Results on CP Violation from Belle T.E. Browder representing the Belle Collaboration Department of Physics, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii Abstract. I describe the recent measurement of the CP In 1973, Kobayashi and Maskawa (KM) first proposed a model where CP violation is incorporated

  7. ACCESSING MUSIC COLLECTIONS VIA REPRESENTATIVE CLUSTER PROTOTYPES IN A HIERARCHICAL ORGANIZATION SCHEME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widmer, Gerhard

    - come increasingly important. The enormous economic suc- cess of high-capacity mobile music players in a hierarchical man- ner and to automatically find representative pieces of music for each cluster on each by the proposed structuring approach. As for evaluation, we first assess the quality of the clustering method

  8. Representing Genomic Knowledge in the UMLS Semantic Network , Carol Friedman, Ph.D.2,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Hong

    Representing Genomic Knowledge in the UMLS Semantic Network Hong Yu1 , Carol Friedman, Ph.D.2 2 Department of Computer Science, Queens College CUNY 3 Center for Genomics Research, Columbia University 4 Yeshiva University Genomics research has a significant impact on the understanding and treatment

  9. CO2 efflux from Amazonian headwater streams represents a significant fate for deep soil respiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CO2 efflux from Amazonian headwater streams represents a significant fate for deep soil respiration amounts of CO2 to the atmosphere, while the magnitude of CO2 degassing from small streams remains a major was as terrestrially-respired CO2 dissolved within soils, over 90% of which evaded to the atmosphere within headwater

  10. Mechanism-based Representative Volume Elements (RVEs) for Predicting Property Degradations in Multiphase Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Wei; Sun, Xin; Li, Dongsheng; Ryu, Seun; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2013-02-01

    Quantitative understanding of the evolving thermal-mechanical properties of a multi-phase material hinges upon the availability of quantitative statistically representative microstructure descriptions. Questions then arise as to whether a two-dimensional (2D) or a three-dimensional (3D) representative volume element (RVE) should be considered as the statistically representative microstructure. Although 3D models are more representative than 2D models in general, they are usually computationally expensive and difficult to be reconstructed. In this paper, we evaluate the accuracy of a 2D RVE in predicting the property degradations induced by different degradation mechanisms with the multiphase solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode material as an example. Both 2D and 3D microstructure RVEs of the anodes are adopted to quantify the effects of two different degradation mechanisms: humidity-induced electrochemical degradation and phosphorus poisoning induced structural degradation. The predictions of the 2D model are then compared with the available experimental measurements and the results from the 3D model. It is found that the 2D model, limited by its inability of reproducing the realistic electrical percolation, is unable to accurately predict the degradation of thermo-electrical properties. On the other hand, for the phosphorus poisoning induced structural degradation, both 2D and 3D microstructures yield similar results, indicating that the 2D model is capable of providing computationally efficient yet accurate results for studying the structural degradation within the anodes.

  11. Notes on representing grain size distributions obtained by electron backscatter diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toth, Laszlo S., E-mail: laszlo.metz@univ-lorraine.fr [Laboratoire d'Etude des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux (LEM3), UMR 7239, CNRS/Université de Lorraine, F-57045 Metz (France); Laboratory of Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for low-mAss Structures (DAMAS), Université de Lorraine (France); Biswas, Somjeet, E-mail: somjeetbiswas@gmail.com [Laboratory of Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for low-mAss Structures (DAMAS), Université de Lorraine (France); Gu, Chengfan, E-mail: chengfan.gu@unsw.edu.au [School of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Beausir, Benoit, E-mail: benoit.beausir@univ-lorraine.fr [Laboratoire d'Etude des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux (LEM3), UMR 7239, CNRS/Université de Lorraine, F-57045 Metz (France); Laboratory of Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for low-mAss Structures (DAMAS), Université de Lorraine (France)

    2013-10-15

    Grain size distributions measured by electron backscatter diffraction are commonly represented by histograms using either number or area fraction definitions. It is shown here that they should be presented in forms of density distribution functions for direct quantitative comparisons between different measurements. Here we make an interpretation of the frequently seen parabolic tales of the area distributions of bimodal grain structures and a transformation formula between the two distributions are given in this paper. - Highlights: • Grain size distributions are represented by density functions. • The parabolic tales corresponds to equal number of grains in a bin of the histogram. • A simple transformation formula is given to number and area weighed distributions. • The particularities of uniform and lognormal distributions are examined.

  12. Modeling Frameworks for Representing the Mechanical Behavior of Tissues with a Specific Look at Vasculature 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersohn, Alexander

    2013-08-27

    -suited for multiscale modeling, I came across the term representative volume element (or RVE) used commonly in biomaterials. Not finding a definition for the mesoscale well-suited for the aim of multiscale modeling, an alternative definition was provided herein... are similar, there are some clear differences. The differences outlined in this section are evidence that a new definition for the mesoscale, tailored for multiscale modeling, was needed. Some elements of the RVE, which is mostly used in biomaterials...

  13. Family ties: representing the relationships between parents and children in contemporary Irish political poetry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Lori L

    2013-02-22

    and content by: Marian Eide (Fellows Advisor) Edward A. Funkhouser (ExecutiveDirector) April 2000 Group: Humanities ABSTRACT Family Ties: Representing the Relationships Between Parents and Children in Contemporary Irish Political Poetry. (April 2000...) Lori L. Lee Department of English Texas A & M University Fellows Advisor: Dr. Marian Eide Department of English The implications of Irish historical occurrences such as the colonization of the Irish by the English, the partial independence...

  14. Three approaches for representing Lindblad dynamics by a matrix-vector notation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morag Am-Shallem; Amikam Levy; Ido Schaefer; Ronnie Kosloff

    2015-12-10

    Markovian dynamics of open quantum systems are described by the L-GKS equation, known also as the Lindblad equation. The equation is expressed by means of left and right matrix multiplications. This formulation hampers numerical implementations. Representing the dynamics by a matrix-vector notation overcomes this problem. We review three approaches to obtain such a representation. The methods are demonstrated for a driven two-level system subject to spontaneous emission.

  15. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Florida Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNewMajorInput(Million0 0 0 0Represented by the

  16. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Florida Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNewMajorInput(Million0 0 0 0Represented by thePrice

  17. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Georgia Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNewMajorInput(Million0 0 0 0Represented by

  18. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Georgia Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNewMajorInput(Million0 0 0 0Represented byPrice

  19. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Hawaii Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNewMajorInput(Million0 0 0 0Represented byPricePrice

  20. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Hawaii Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNewMajorInput(Million0 0 0 0Represented

  1. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Idaho Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNewMajorInput(Million0 0 0 0RepresentedPrice

  2. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Idaho Represented by the

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNewMajorInput(Million0 0 0 0RepresentedPricePrice

  3. An estimated 5% of new protein structures solved today represent a new Pfam family

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mistry, Jaina; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Punta, Marco

    2013-11-01

    This study uses the Pfam database to show that the sequence redundancy of protein structures deposited in the PDB is increasing. The possible reasons behind this trend are discussed. High-resolution structural knowledge is key to understanding how proteins function at the molecular level. The number of entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), the repository of all publicly available protein structures, continues to increase, with more than 8000 structures released in 2012 alone. The authors of this article have studied how structural coverage of the protein-sequence space has changed over time by monitoring the number of Pfam families that acquired their first representative structure each year from 1976 to 2012. Twenty years ago, for every 100 new PDB entries released, an estimated 20 Pfam families acquired their first structure. By 2012, this decreased to only about five families per 100 structures. The reasons behind the slower pace at which previously uncharacterized families are being structurally covered were investigated. It was found that although more than 50% of current Pfam families are still without a structural representative, this set is enriched in families that are small, functionally uncharacterized or rich in problem features such as intrinsically disordered and transmembrane regions. While these are important constraints, the reasons why it may not yet be time to give up the pursuit of a targeted but more comprehensive structural coverage of the protein-sequence space are discussed.

  4. Fuzzy-Oil-Drop Hydrophobic Force Field A Model to Represent Late-stage Folding (In Silico) of Lysozyme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skolnick, Jeff

    Fuzzy-Oil-Drop Hydrophobic Force Field ­ A Model to Represent Late-stage Folding (In Silico the external field in the form of a fuzzy-oil-drop assumed to represent the environment. The drop is expressed is the parameter to be mini- mized in the structure optimization procedure. The size of fuzzy-oil-drop is critical

  5. Spatial Data Structures Spatial data structures describe the rules that are used to represent geographic data in geographic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Kristin

    Spatial Data Structures Spatial data structures describe the rules that are used to represent are represented in a database management system (for example, as database tables). · Spatial data structures. Spatial data structures are the core of a GIS and fundamentally affect its performance and capabilities

  6. StrucSoftSysDesign.doc 13/09/2010 Page 1 Representing structure in a software system design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Hoek, André

    StrucSoftSysDesign.doc 13/09/2010 Page 1 Representing structure in a software system design Michael@acm.org Structure, clearly understood and represented, is a key tool in the design of any complex artifact. Software created and understood by the designer must be intelligibly related to parallel structures perceived

  7. En~lironinentand Planning A 1998, volume 30, pages 1547-1561 Visualizing georeferenced data: representing reliability of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klippel, Alexander

    of oral cancer death rates among white females in the United States prompted a study of occupation: representing reliability of health statistics A M MacEachren, C A Brewer Department of Geography, Penn State in mortality rates. A coincident visually integral depiction (using color characteristics to represent both

  8. A Subbasin-based framework to represent land surface processes in an Earth System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tesfa, Teklu K.; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Ke, Yinghai; Sun, Yu; Liu, Ying

    2014-05-20

    Realistically representing spatial heterogeneity and lateral land surface processes within and between modeling units in earth system models is important because of their implications to surface energy and water exchange. The traditional approach of using regular grids as computational units in land surface models and earth system models may lead to inadequate representation of lateral movements of water, energy and carbon fluxes, especially when the grid resolution increases. Here a new subbasin-based framework is introduced in the Community Land Model (CLM), which is the land component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Local processes are represented assuming each subbasin as a grid cell on a pseudo grid matrix with no significant modifications to the existing CLM modeling structure. Lateral routing of water within and between subbasins is simulated with the subbasin version of a recently-developed physically based routing model, Model for Scale Adaptive River Routing (MOSART). As an illustration, this new framework is implemented in the topographically diverse region of the U.S. Pacific Northwest. The modeling units (subbasins) are delineated from high-resolution Digital Elevation Model while atmospheric forcing and surface parameters are remapped from the corresponding high resolution datasets. The impacts of this representation on simulating hydrologic processes are explored by comparing it with the default (grid-based) CLM representation. In addition, the effects of DEM resolution on parameterizing topography and the subsequent effects on runoff processes are investigated. Limited model evaluation and comparison showed that small difference between the averaged forcing can lead to more significant difference in the simulated runoff and streamflow because of nonlinear horizontal processes. Topographic indices derived from high resolution DEM may not improve the overall water balance, but affect the partitioning between surface and subsurface runoff. More systematic analyses are needed to determine the relative merits of the subbasin representation compared to the commonly used grid-based representation, especially when land surface models are approaching higher resolutions.

  9. The Value of Distributed Generation under Different Tariff Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Magnus Maribu, Karl; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-01

    economic analysis of combined heat and power technologies inT. Bourgeois. 2002. Combined Heat and Power Market Potential

  10. Tariffs Can Be Structured to Encourage Photovoltaic Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Be Structured to Encourage Photovoltaic Energy Ryan Wiser,of customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems. Though theseEconomics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California,

  11. The Value of Distributed Generation under Different Tariff Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Magnus Maribu, Karl; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-01

    translating into lower electricity rates for all utilityin the volumetric electricity rate sensitivity. As expected,base case volumetric electricity rates. Figure 6 shows the

  12. Tariffs Can Be Structured to Encourage Photovoltaic Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    the design of retail electricity rates, particularly forcommercial and industrial electricity rates offered by theaverage cost of electricity on each rate, the customer load

  13. The Value of Distributed Generation under Different Tariff Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Magnus Maribu, Karl; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-01

    State. Prepared for the New York State Energy Research andIn 2002, the New York State Energy Research and DevelopmentLevy, and Chris Smith (New York State Energy Research and

  14. Carbon Tariffs Revisited The Harvard Project on Climate Agreements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, X. Shirley

    Agreements is to help identify and advance scientifically sound, economically rational, and politically in Argentina, Australia, China, Europe, India, Japan, and the United States, the Project conducts research Company, Duke Energy Corporation, and Shell. Citation Information Böhringer, Christoph, André Müller

  15. The Tariff Analysis Project: A Database and Analysis Platform...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a cost-benefit analysis of energy efficiency, because it enables users to determine the cost of electricity. References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  16. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01

    to solar insolation. Energy Prices Electricity prices weresolar insolation that are based on these data. Energy Loads Utility electricityenergy loads (non- cooling electric, electric, and heating), electricity prices, DG availability, and solar

  17. Strategic Rate Design: The Role of Industrial Tariffs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenblum, J. I.; House, R.

    1992-01-01

    earned," one can say that "demnnd reduced is capacity acquired." In some cases, the strategic objective may be something other than reduction in penk demand, such as promoting the economic development of a depressed region. In these cases some... are compounded by the influence of other factors that can change customer behavior irrespective of any changes in price, such as unusual weather, customer growth, or changes in area economic conditions. Probably the best way to measure the effects...

  18. The Strategic Value of Carbon Tariffs Christoph Bhringer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pollution outside of the regulated jurisdiction due to a policy's effect on the prices of pollution in international air travel.1 Bor- der carbon adjustments were also a feature of H.R. 2454, the climate legis- 1

  19. Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

    2008-01-01

    this analysis. For the energy consumption data, within eachenergy consumption, for January and July, for the CBECS data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4]. The billing data include energy consumption, demand and

  20. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01

    the Optimization of Cogeneration Dispatch in a Deregulatedheat and power (CHP), or cogeneration, systems make use ofheat and power (CHP), or cogeneration, systems make use of

  1. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Optimization Common DG devices are reciprocating engines, gas turbines, microturbines, and fuel cells.

  2. Tariffs Can Be Structured to Encourage Photovoltaic Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    potential impact on the solar market when establishing orand William Golove The solar power market is growing at a

  3. Tariffs Can Be Structured to Encourage Photovoltaic Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California,of customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems. Though these

  4. Optimal Smart Grid Tariffs Longbo Huang, Jean Walrand, Kannan Ramchandran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Longbo

    way for the utility companies to adjust their power prices, and allows the users to preTar can significantly outperform the commonly used uniform pricing schemes. The pricing design approach energy to reduce the carbon emission of power generation. In this paper, we consider the problem

  5. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Energy Prices CHP equipment availability, energy prices, and system loads.depends on current site loads, energy prices, and DG system

  6. Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

    2008-01-01

    Energy and Demand Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US DOE 1999. Marginal Energy Prices Report U.S. Departmentmarginal price Marginal energy price in cper kwh Marginal

  7. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Efficiency and Renewable Energy, former Distributed EnergyEfficiency and Renewable Energy, former Distributed EnergyEfficiency and Renewable Energy, former Distributed Energy

  8. The Value of Distributed Generation under Different Tariff Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Magnus Maribu, Karl; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Distributed Energy ProgramRenewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO by Distributed

  9. Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

    2008-01-01

    4 Calculation of Electricity Prices 4.1 Averageaverage seasonal and annual electricity prices by region inbased annual average electricity price vs. annual energy

  10. Distributional effects of trade and tariffs between and within countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobal, Martin

    2012-01-01

    126 Model Setup and Free-Tradeand the economy approaches free trade ( increases). As tradeas the economy approaches free trade. Turning back to our

  11. Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

    2008-01-01

    4.2 E?ective Marginal Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Demand Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Calculation of Electricity Prices 4.1 Average

  12. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01

    and solar insolation that are based on these data. EnergyDATA COLLECTION.9 5.1 Energy Loads ..9 5.2 Energy System Characteristic ..10 5.3 Energy Prices 10 5.4 Solar

  13. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01

    in November 2005 during a natural gas price spike. Figure 22for the year in natural gas prices and general trends in6. electricity and natural gas prices for January 2004 to

  14. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01

    data available and used to generate random solar radiationResource Data Center], The Solar Radiation Resourcedata were collected from [16]. The stochastic model of solar radiation

  15. Renewable Market Adjusting Tariff (ReMAT) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAandSummary From: v2.7 Multiple< Back< BackDepartment of< Back

  16. Global Feed-in Tariffs Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky:BoreOpenGilliamOhio:Change | OpenInformationFeed-in

  17. NREL: State and Local Governments - Feed-In Tariffs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial ToolkitSMARTS - Simple Model ofData andWorkingDIY

  18. NREL: State and Local Governments - Value-of-Solar Tariffs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial ToolkitSMARTS - Simple Model ofData101Value-of-Solar

  19. Dynamic tariffs (Smart Grid Project) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of the National ClimateDongyingOpenDukeLLCBoostingtariffs

  20. The Tariff Analysis Project: A Database and Analysis Platform for

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ AutomationTexas/Wind ResourcesProgramSulFerox process Jump

  1. The Value of Distributed Generation (DG) under Different Tariff Structures

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ AutomationTexas/Wind ResourcesProgramSulFeroxOpen EnergyUniversity|

  2. Feed-in Tariff Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order14,Energy 9, 2013Federal TaxMAY 3-4,Into HighFeds

  3. The United Illuminating Company - Small ZREC Tariff | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsState ofSavings for Specific Measures (April 2013) |The United

  4. Connecticut Light & Power - Small ZREC Tariff | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electric vehicle (PEV)Day-June 22,FresnoSky) 15 Pictured< Back

  5. Clustering method and representative feeder selection for the California solar initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broderick, Robert Joseph; Williams, Joseph R.; Munoz-Ramos, Karina

    2014-02-01

    The screening process for DG interconnection procedures needs to be improved in order to increase the PV deployment level on the distribution grid. A significant improvement in the current screening process could be achieved by finding a method to classify the feeders in a utility service territory and determine the sensitivity of particular groups of distribution feeders to the impacts of high PV deployment levels. This report describes the utility distribution feeder characteristics in California for a large dataset of 8,163 feeders and summarizes the California feeder population including the range of characteristics identified and most important to hosting capacity. The report describes the set of feeders that are identified for modeling and analysis as well as feeders identified for the control group. The report presents a method for separating a utilitys distribution feeders into unique clusters using the k-means clustering algorithm. An approach for determining the feeder variables of interest for use in a clustering algorithm is also described. The report presents an approach for choosing the feeder variables to be utilized in the clustering process and a method is identified for determining the optimal number of representative clusters.

  6. A Control Chart Approach for Representing and Mining Data Streams with Shape Based Similarity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A

    2014-01-01

    The mining of data streams for online condition monitoring is a challenging task in several domains including (electric) power grid system, intelligent manufacturing, and consumer science. Considering a power grid application in which thousands of sensors, called the phasor measurement units, are deployed on the power grid network to continuously collect streams of digital data for real-time situational awareness and system management. Depending on design, each sensor could stream between ten and sixty data samples per second. The myriad of sensory data captured could convey deeper insights about sequence of events in real-time and before major damages are done. However, the timely processing and analysis of these high-velocity and high-volume data streams is a challenge. Hence, a new data processing and transformation approach, based on the concept of control charts, for representing sequence of data streams from sensors is proposed. In addition, an application of the proposed approach for enhancing data mining tasks such as clustering using real-world power grid data streams is presented. The results indicate that the proposed approach is very efficient for data streams storage and manipulation.

  7. A transferable coarse-grained model for diphenylalanine: How to represent an environment driven conformational transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalgicdir, Cahit; Sensoy, Ozge; Sayar, Mehmet, E-mail: msayar@ku.edu.tr [College of Engineering, Koç University, 34450 Istanbul (Turkey)] [College of Engineering, Koç University, 34450 Istanbul (Turkey); Peter, Christine [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, 55128 Mainz (Germany) [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Konstanz, 78547 Konstanz (Germany)

    2013-12-21

    One of the major challenges in the development of coarse grained (CG) simulation models that aim at biomolecular structure formation processes is the correct representation of an environment-driven conformational change, for example, a folding/unfolding event upon interaction with an interface or upon aggregation. In the present study, we investigate this transferability challenge for a CG model using the example of diphenylalanine. This dipeptide displays a transition from a trans-like to a cis-like conformation upon aggregation as well as upon transfer from bulk water to the cyclohexane/water interface. Here, we show that one can construct a single CG model that can reproduce both the bulk and interface conformational behavior and the segregation between hydrophobic/hydrophilic medium. While the general strategy to obtain nonbonded interactions in the present CG model is to reproduce solvation free energies of small molecules representing the CG beads in the respective solvents, the success of the model strongly depends on nontrivial decisions one has to make to capture the delicate balance between the bonded and nonbonded interactions. In particular, we found that the peptide's conformational behavior is qualitatively affected by the cyclohexane/water interaction potential, an interaction that does not directly involve the peptide at all but merely influences the properties of the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface. Furthermore, we show that a small modification to improve the structural/conformational properties of the CG model could dramatically alter the thermodynamic properties.

  8. A quantitative analysis of the effects of tariff and non-tariff barriers on U.S. - Mexico poultry trade 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magana Lemus, David

    2005-11-01

    , for giving me the opportunity to pursue my master?s degree at this great University and for the financial support during these two years. I would like to thank Norma Pantoja, who has helped me in several ways during this time. Without their support...

  9. The urgent demand for energy, environmental sustainability and healthcare represents the world's most paramount challenge for the next 50 years.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    The urgent demand for energy, environmental sustainability and healthcare represents the world breakthroughs from the elementary step of materials deformation/manufacturing, energy/mass transfer design down to the nanoscale in energy, environment, healthcare and manufacture" Baoxing Xu Assistant

  10. Comparing Business and Household Sector Innovation in Consumer Products: Findings from a Representative Study in the United Kingdom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von Hippel, Eric A.

    In a first survey of its type, we measure development and modification of consumer products by product users in a representative sample of 1,173 UK consumers age 18 and older. We estimate this previously unmeasured type ...

  11. Development of a Future Representative Concentration Pathway for Use in the IPCC 5th Assessment Earth System Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-12-29

    The representative concentration pathway to be delivered is a scenario of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and other radiatively important atmospheric species, along with land-use changes, derived from the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). The particular representative concentration pathway (RCP) that the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) has been responsible for is a not-to-exceed pathway that stabilizes at a radiative forcing of 4.5Wm-2 in the year 2100.

  12. A Hydro-Economic Approach to Representing Water Resources Impacts in Integrated Assessment Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirshen, Paul H.; Strzepek, Kenneth, M.

    2004-01-14

    Grant Number DE-FG02-98ER62665 Office of Energy Research of the U.S. Department of Energy Abstract Many Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) divide the world into a small number of highly aggregated regions. Non-OECD countries are aggregated geographically into continental and multiple-continental regions or economically by development level. Current research suggests that these large scale aggregations cannot accurately represent potential water resources-related climate change impacts. In addition, IAMs do not explicitly model the flow regulation impacts of reservoir and ground water systems, the economics of water supply, or the demand for water in economic activities. Using the International Model for Policy Analysis of Agricultural Commodities and Trade (IMPACT) model of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) as a case study, this research implemented a set of methodologies to provide accurate representation of water resource climate change impacts in Integrated Assessment Models. There were also detailed examinations of key issues related to aggregated modeling including: modeling water consumption versus water withdrawals; ground and surface water interactions; development of reservoir cost curves; modeling of surface areas of aggregated reservoirs for estimating evaporation losses; and evaluating the importance of spatial scale in river basin modeling. The major findings include: - Continental or national or even large scale river basin aggregation of water supplies and demands do not accurately capture the impacts of climate change in the water and agricultural sector in IAMs. - Fortunately, there now exist gridden approaches (0.5 X 0.5 degrees) to model streamflows in a global analysis. The gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with national boundaries. This combined with GIS tools, high speed computers, and the growing availability of socio-economic gridded data bases allows assignment of demands to river basins to create hydro-economic zones that respect as much as possible both political and hydrologic integrity in different models. - To minimize pre-processing of data and add increased flexibility to modeling water resources and uses, it is recommended that water withdrawal demands be modeled, not consumptive requirements even though this makes the IAM more complex. - IAMs must consider changes in water availability for irrigation under climate change; ignoring them is more inaccurate than ignoring yield changes in crops under climate change. - Determining water availability and cost in river basins must include modeling streamflows, reservoirs and their operations, and ground water and its interaction with surface water. - Scale issues are important. The results from condensing demands and supplies in a large complex river basin to one node can be misleading for all uses under low flow conditions and instream flow uses under all conditions. Monthly is generally the most accurate scale for modeling river flows and demands. Challenges remain in integrating hydrologic units with political boundaries but the gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with political boundaries. - Using minimal reservoir cost data, it is possible to use basin topography to estimate reservoir storage costs. - Reservoir evaporation must be considered when assessing the usable water in a watershed. Several methods are available to estimate the relationship between aggregated storage surface area and storage volume. - For existing or future IAMs that can not use the appropriate aggregation for water, a water preprocessor may be required due the finer scale of hydrologic impacts.

  13. This document represents a Master Service Agreement ("MSA") between the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship ("CDRS") and [Partner Name

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salzman, Daniel

    This document represents a Master Service Agreement ("MSA") between the Center for Digital Research ­ not a participant in the Journal. Master Service Agreement Simple Level of Support for Journals #12;1.11 "Admin and sustain a Simple online journal. This MSA remains valid until superseded by a revised agreement mutually

  14. This document represents a Master Service Agreement ("MSA") between the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship ("CDRS") and [Journal Name

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salzman, Daniel

    This document represents a Master Service Agreement ("MSA") between the Center for Digital Research plug-in or operant extension (see Section 2.4) Master Service Agreement Barebones Level of Support and sustain a Barebones online journal. This MSA remains valid until superseded by a revised agreement

  15. This document represents a Master Service Agreement ("MSA") between the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship ("CDRS") and [JOURNAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salzman, Daniel

    This document represents a Master Service Agreement ("MSA") between the Center for Digital Research to the web development space in which OJS resides. Master Service Agreement Basic Level of Support a Basic online journal. This MSA remains valid until superseded by a revised agreement mutually endorsed

  16. This document represents a Master Service Agreement ("MSA") between the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship ("CDRS") and [JOURNAL NAME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salzman, Daniel

    This document represents a Master Service Agreement ("MSA") between the Center for Digital Research agreement mutually endorsed by the stakeholders. Incremental changes will be recorded in an Amendments section of this Agreement and are effective upon mutual endorsement by the primary stakeholders. Section 1

  17. Wave Power Resources off the Hawaiian Islands luisvega@hawaii.edu Wave Resources for Representative Sites Around the Hawaiian Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wave Power Resources off the Hawaiian Islands luisvega@hawaii.edu 1 Wave Resources for Representative Sites Around the Hawaiian Islands Table of Contents Summary p2 Background: Wave Power Conversion p3 Licensing and Permitting p3 Challenges and Barriers p4 Wave Power Resources: Previous Work p5 Wave

  18. Abstract: A 3D biomechanical finite element model of the face is presented. Muscles are represented by piece-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payan, Yohan

    /lower lip contacts are also modeled. Simulations of smiling and of an Orbicularis Oris activationAbstract: A 3D biomechanical finite element model of the face is presented. Muscles are represented the mesh or the muscle implementation totally independently of each other. Lip/teeth and upper lip

  19. Evaluation of a robust, diimide-based, porous organic polymer (POP) as a high-capacity sorbent for representative chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluation of a robust, diimide-based, porous organic polymer (POP) as a high-capacity sorbent A previously described porous organic polymer (NU-POP-1) was evaluated against four representative chemical an activated, impregnated carbon. The ability to remove the highly volatile toxic chemicals ammonia

  20. Sulfate adsorption and its relationships with properties of representative soils of the Sa~o Paulo State, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    State, Brazil M.E. Alves, A. Lavorenti* Departamento de Cie^ncias Exatas, Escola Superior de Agricultura ``Luiz de Queiroz''--ESALQ/USP, Caixa Postal 09, 13418-900, Piracicaba (SP), Brazil Received 27 August, electrochemical and mineralogical properties of representative soils of the Sa~o Paulo State, Brazil, were

  1. Abstract--Software architecture is considered as a set of architectural design decisions (ADDs). Capturing and representing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Dewayne E.

    Abstract--Software architecture is considered as a set of architectural design decisions (ADDs). Capturing and representing ADDs during the architecting process is necessary for reducing architectural architecture framework for documenting ADDs. The TVM clarifies the notion of ADDs in three different views

  2. Nuclear-fuel-cycle risk assessment: descriptions of representative non-reactor facilities. Sections 1-14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, K.J.

    1982-09-01

    The Fuel Cycle Risk Assessment Program was initiated to provide risk assessment methods for assistance in the regulatory process for nuclear fuel cycle facilities other than reactors. This report, the first from the program, defines and describes fuel cycle elements that are being considered in the program. One type of facility (and in some cases two) is described that is representative of each element of the fuel cycle. The descriptions are based on real industrial-scale facilities that are current state-of-the-art, or on conceptual facilities where none now exist. Each representative fuel cycle facility is assumed to be located on the appropriate one of four hypothetical but representative sites described. The fuel cycles considered are for Light Water Reactors with once-through flow of spent fuel, and with plutonium and uranium recycle. Representative facilities for the following fuel cycle elements are described for uranium (or uranium plus plutonium where appropriate): mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, mixed-oxide fuel refabrication, fuel reprocessing, spent fuel storage, high-level waste storage, transuranic waste storage, spent fuel and high-level and transuranic waste disposal, low-level and intermediate-level waste disposal, and transportation. For each representative facility the description includes: mainline process, effluent processing and waste management, facility and hardware description, safety-related information and potential alternative concepts for that fuel cycle element. The emphasis of the descriptive material is on safety-related information. This includes: operating and maintenance requirements, input/output of major materials, identification and inventories of hazardous materials (particularly radioactive materials), unit operations involved, potential accident driving forces, containment and shielding, and degree of hands-on operation.

  3. Design of a proteus lattice representative of a burnt and fresh fuel interface at power conditions in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hursin, M.; Perret, G. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    The research program LIFE (Large-scale Irradiated Fuel Experiment) between PSI and Swissnuclear has been started in 2006 to study the interaction between large sets of burnt and fresh fuel pins in conditions representative of power light water reactors. Reactor physics parameters such as flux ratios and reaction rate distributions ({sup 235}U and {sup 238}U fissions and {sup 238}U capture) are calculated to estimate an appropriate arrangement of burnt and fresh fuel pins within the central element of the test zone of the zero-power research reactor PROTEUS. The arrangement should minimize the number of burnt fuel pins to ease fuel handling and reduce costs, whilst guaranteeing that the neutron spectrum in both burnt and fresh fuel regions and at their interface is representative of a large uniform array of burnt and fresh pins in the same moderation conditions. First results are encouraging, showing that the burnt/fresh fuel interface is well represented with a 6 x 6 bundle of burnt pins. The second part of the project involves the use of TSUNAMI, CASMO-4E and DAKOTA to perform parametric and optimization studies on the PROTEUS lattice by varying its pitch (P) and fraction of D{sub 2}O in moderator (F{sub D2O}) to be as representative as possible of a power light water reactor core at hot full power conditions at beginning of cycle (BOC). The parameters P and F{sub D2O} that best represent a PWR at BOC are 1.36 cm and 5% respectively. (authors)

  4. Appears in Proceedings of the 17th International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI-2001). Representing Sentence Structure in Hidden Markov Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shatkay, Hagit

    are intended to represent data not directly rele- vant to the task at hand. 2 Problem Domain Our work

  5. A global approach of the representativity concept: Application on a high-conversion light water reactor MOX lattice case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, N. D.; Blaise, P.; Santamarina, A.

    2013-07-01

    The development of new types of reactor and the increase in the safety specifications and requirements induce an enhancement in both nuclear data knowledge and a better understanding of the neutronic properties of the new systems. This enhancement is made possible using ad hoc critical mock-up experiments. The main difficulty is to design these experiments in order to obtain the most valuable information. Its quantification is usually made by using representativity and transposition concepts. These theories enable to extract some information about a quantity of interest (an integral parameter) on a configuration, but generally a posteriori. This paper presents a more global approach of this theory, with the idea of optimizing the representativity of a new experiment, and its transposition a priori, based on a multiparametric approach. Using a quadratic sum, we show the possibility to define a global representativity which permits to take into account several quantities of interest at the same time. The maximization of this factor gives information about all quantities of interest. An optimization method of this value in relation to technological parameters (over-clad diameter, atom concentration) is illustrated on a high-conversion light water reactor MOX lattice case. This example tackles the problematic of plutonium experiment for the plutonium aging and a solution through the optimization of both the over-clad and the plutonium content. (authors)

  6. Capturing Natural Resource Dynamics in Top-Down Energy?Economic Equilibrium Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Da

    2015-10-20

    Top-down energy-economic modeling approaches often use deliberately simple techniques to represent heterogeneous resource inputs to production. We show that for some policies, such as feed-in tariffs (FIT) for renewable ...

  7. Materials Science and Engineering B 108 (2004) 241252 Cathode and interdigitated air distributor geometry optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    2004-01-01

    according to the type of membrane (polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, solid oxide fuel cells, molten carbonate fuel cells, etc.) they use. One of the most promising fuel cells are the so-called poly- mer geometry optimization in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells M. Grujicic, C.L. Zhao, K

  8. Tree network channels as fluid distributors constructing double-staircase polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    fluid distribution concept, which also optimizes the shape of polymer electrolyte fuel cells; accepted 9 April 2004 In this article, constructal tree-like channel networks are introduced as a fuel cell to the catalyst layer, is used to predict the polarization curve of a so-constructed polymer electrolyte fuel cell

  9. Volunteer Day Countries Represented

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sin, Peter

    China Colombia Egypt France Italy Japan Korea Kuwait Russia Saudi Arabia Spain Thailand Turkey UAE much and in how many ways this may change, depending on the price of gas! Q: Why do the American people

  10. PI:____________________________ EHS Representative: ____________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian C.

    : ____________________________ Level I Checklist Environmental: Hazardous Waste: Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAA) Yes No N/A 1. Is all hazardous waste stored in the satellite accumulation area (SAA)? 2. Are the satellite accumulation areas (SAAs) clearly labeled? 3. Are the SAAs located at or near the point of hazardous waste generation

  11. Representing Small Group Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wormald, Nicholas

    2009-03-30

    Understanding the dynamics of network evolution rests in part on the representation chosen to characterize the evolutionary process. We offer a simple, three-parameter representation based on subgraphs that capture three ...

  12. Construction Control Representative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Rocky Mountain Region Maintenance, (J5600) Engineering and Construction 5555 E....

  13. house of representatives

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 34460/%2A en NNSA8/%2A en

  14. An economic evaluation of selected tenure arrangements for a representative farm in the northern high plains of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harwell, R. Lynn

    1970-01-01

    'frixfxttee) ~ ~~yg/J Jeff:axxy 1970 ABSTRACT An Economic Evaluation of Selected Tenure Arrangements For A Representative Farm in the Northern Sigh Plains of Texas. (January 1970) Richard Lynn Sarwell; B. B. S. , The University of Texas Directed by: Dr. J. S... thar three-fourths of the annual noisture falls during the growing season [27]. LLANO M E'yg ~VI P@ I CO HARFvvv EHERSAV tiooRF HolCHINsoN Study Area vs% Figure 1. Distribution of Hardlands Soils, Texas bligh Pla111S Souro: [57 J !!ind !mi...

  15. Wiebe, E. N. (1994). Evaluation of alternative methods of representing three-dimensional 1 objects on computer displays. In, Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1994-01-01

    Wiebe, E. N. (1994). Evaluation of alternative methods of representing three-dimensional 1 objects on computer displays. In, Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 38th Annual Meeting, October 24-28, 1994. EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVE METHODS OF REPRESENTING THREE- DIMENSIONAL OBJECTS ON COMPUTER

  16. Expressions in occam have values which represent, in the usual way for programming languages, integers, oating-point numbers, Boolean (truth)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Geraint

    . Every expression in occam has a mechanically determinable type. There are no automatic translations explicit. Integers The usual type used for discrete arithmetic is INT, which is a set of integers represented in twos-complement. Numerals like 42, or 0, represent the cor- responding values of type INT

  17. Global and regional evolution of short-lived radiatively-active gases and aerosols in the Representative Concentration Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamarque, J.-F.; Kyle, G. Page; Meinshausen, Malte; Riahi, Keywan; Smith, Steven J.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Conley, Andrew; Vitt, Francis

    2011-08-05

    In this paper, we discuss the results of 2000-2100 simulations with a chemistry-climate model, focusing on the changes in atmospheric composition (troposphere and stratosphere) following the emissions associated with the Representative Concentration Pathways. We show that tropospheric ozone is projected to decrease (RCP3PD and RCP4.5) or increase (RCP8.5) between 2000 and 2100. Surface ozone in 2100 is projected to change little compared from 2000 conditions, a much-reduced impact from the projections based on the A2 scenario. Aerosols are projected to strongly decrease in the 21st century, a reflection of their projected decrease in emissions. Similarly, sulfate deposition is projected to strongly decrease. However, nitrogen deposition is projected to increase over certain regions because of the projected increase NH3 emissions.

  18. On time-optimal NMR control of states of qutrits represented by quadrupole nuclei with the spin I = 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zobov, V. E., E-mail: rsa@iph.krasn.ru; Shauro, V. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, L.V. Kirensky Institute of Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2011-08-15

    Elementary logical operators (selective rotation, Fourier transform, controllable phase shift, and SUM gate) are considered for a quantum computer based on three-level systems (qutrits) represented by nuclear spins I = 1 under nuclear magnetic resonance conditions. The computer simulation of the realization of these operators by means of simple and composite selective radiofrequency (RF) pulses and optimized RF pulses is performed. The time dependence of the amplitude of last pulses is found by numerical optimization at different durations. Two variants are proposed for realization of a two-qutrit SUM gate by using one-qutrit or two-qutrit optimized RF pulses. The calculated time dependences of realization errors were used to study the time optimality of different methods for obtaining gates, proposed earlier and in this paper. The advantages and disadvantages of each of the methods are evaluated for different values of physical parameters.

  19. Use of short-term test systems for the prediction of the hazard represented by potential chemical carcinogens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, L.R.; Jones, T.D.; Easterly, C.E.; Walsh, P.J.

    1990-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that results from short-term bioassays will ultimately provide information that will be useful for human health hazard assessment. Historically, the validity of the short-term tests has been assessed using the framework of the epidemiologic/medical screens. In this context, the results of the carcinogen (long-term) bioassay is generally used as the standard. However, this approach is widely recognized as being biased and, because it employs qualitative data, cannot be used to assist in isolating those compounds which may represent a more significant toxicologic hazard than others. In contrast, the goal of this research is to address the problem of evaluating the utility of the short-term tests for hazard assessment using an alternative method of investigation. Chemicals were selected mostly from the list of carcinogens published by the International Agency for Research on Carcinogens (IARC); a few other chemicals commonly recognized as hazardous were included. Tumorigenicity and mutagenicity data on 52 chemicals were obtained from the Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS) and were analyzed using a relative potency approach. The data were evaluated in a format which allowed for a comparison of the ranking of the mutagenic relative potencies of the compounds (as estimated using short-term data) vs. the ranking of the tumorigenic relative potencies (as estimated from the chronic bioassays). Although this was a preliminary investigation, it offers evidence that the short-term tests systems may be of utility in ranking the hazards represented by chemicals which may contribute to increased carcinogenesis in humans as a result of occupational or environmental exposures. 177 refs., 8 tabs.

  20. Characterization of Representative Materials in Support of Safe, Long Term Storage of Surplus Plutonium in DOE-STD-3013 Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narlesky, Joshua E.; Stroud, Mary Ann; Smith, Paul Herrick; Wayne, David M.; Mason, Richard E.; Worl, Laura A.

    2013-02-15

    The Surveillance and Monitoring Program is a joint Los Alamos National Laboratory/Savannah River Site effort funded by the Department of Energy-Environmental Management to provide the technical basis for the safe, long-term storage (up to 50 years) of over 6 metric tons of plutonium stored in over 5,000 DOE-STD-3013 containers at various facilities around the DOE complex. The majority of this material is plutonium that is surplus to the nuclear weapons program, and much of it is destined for conversion to mixed oxide fuel for use in US nuclear power plants. The form of the plutonium ranges from relatively pure metal and oxide to very impure oxide. The performance of the 3013 containers has been shown to depend on moisture content and on the levels, types and chemical forms of the impurities. The oxide materials that present the greatest challenge to the storage container are those that contain chloride salts. Other common impurities include oxides and other compounds of calcium, magnesium, iron, and nickel. Over the past 15 years the program has collected a large body of experimental data on 54 samples of plutonium, with 53 chosen to represent the broader population of materials in storage. This paper summarizes the characterization data, moisture analysis, particle size, surface area, density, wattage, actinide composition, trace element impurity analysis, and shelf life surveillance data and includes origin and process history information. Limited characterization data on fourteen nonrepresentative samples is also presented.

  1. Long term out-of-pile thermocouple tests in conditions representative for nuclear gas-cooled high temperature reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurie, M.; Fourrez, S.; Fuetterer, M. A.; Lapetite, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    During irradiation tests at high temperature, failure of commercial Inconel 600 sheathed thermocouples is commonly encountered. To understand and remedy this problem, out-of-pile tests were performed with thermocouples in carburizing atmospheres which can be assumed to be at least locally representative for High Temperature Reactors. The objective was to screen those thermocouples which would consecutively be used under irradiation. Two such screening tests have been performed with a set of thermocouples embedded in graphite (mainly conventional Type N thermocouples and thermocouples with innovative sheaths) in a dedicated furnace with helium flushing. Performance indicators such as thermal drift, insulation and loop resistance were monitored and compared to those from conventional Type N thermocouples. Several parameters were investigated: niobium sleeves, bending, thickness, sheath composition, temperature as well as the chemical environment. After the tests, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) examinations were performed to analyze possible local damage in wires and in the sheath. The present paper describes the two experiments, summarizes results and outlines further work, in particular to further analyze the findings and to select suitable thermocouples for qualification under irradiation. (authors)

  2. THE SPITZER EXTRAGALACTIC REPRESENTATIVE VOLUME SURVEY: THE ENVIRONMENTS OF HIGH-z SDSS QUASI-STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Falder, J. T.; Stevens, J. A.; Jarvis, Matt J.; Bonfield, D. G.; Lacy, M.; Farrah, D.; Oliver, S.; Surace, J.; Mauduit, J.-C.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Afonso, J.; Cava, A.; Seymour, N.

    2011-07-10

    This paper presents a study of the environments of SDSS quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) in the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS). We concentrate on the high-redshift QSOs as these have not been studied in large numbers with data of this depth before. We use the IRAC 3.6-4.5 {mu}m color of objects and ancillary r-band data to filter out as much foreground contamination as possible. This technique allows us to find a significant (>4{sigma}) overdensity of galaxies around QSOs in a redshift bin centered on z {approx} 2.0 and an (>2{sigma}) overdensity of galaxies around QSOs in a redshift bin centered on z {approx} 3.3. We compare our findings to the predictions of a semi-analytic galaxy formation model, based on the {Lambda}CDM MILLENNIUM simulation, and find for both redshift bins that the model predictions match well the source density we have measured from the SERVS data.

  3. Despite the growth of agriculture and the consumption of forestry resources, these activities represent a continually decreasing percentage of production in Latin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Key messages · Despite the growth of agriculture and the consumption of forestry resources, these activities represent a continually decreasing percentage of production in Latin American countries. · Forest products account for a larger proportion of Latin America's material extraction than would

  4. The Cornell Center for a Sustainable Future (CCSF) represents a bold commitment to develop and deploy knowledge to address some of society's most complex and press-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    , develop, and deliver high-impact innova- tions through sustainability science. We also convene#12;The Cornell Center for a Sustainable Future (CCSF) represents a bold commitment to develop Compliance and Sustainability; Cornell International Institute for Food, Agriculture, and Development

  5. To obtain representative temperatures, sensors were made with a length of 35 cm. The stainless steel needles have a diameter of 3 mm. Inside are five

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    To obtain representative temperatures, sensors were made with a length of 35 cm. The stainless steel needles have a diameter of 3 mm. Inside are five Platinum Pt-100 sensors, that are cascaded

  6. Meeting the Radiative Forcing Targets of the Representative Concentration Pathways in a World with Agricultural Climate Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, G. Page; Mueller, C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-02-28

    This study assesses how climate impacts on agriculture may change the evolution of the agricultural and energy systems in meeting the end-of-century radiative forcing targets of the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). We build on the recently completed ISI-MIP exercise that has produced global gridded estimates of future crop yields for major agricultural crops using climate model projections of the RCPs from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). For this study we use the bias-corrected outputs of the HadGEM2-ES climate model as inputs to the LPJmL crop growth model, and the outputs of LPJmL to modify inputs to the GCAM integrated assessment model. Our results indicate that agricultural climate impacts generally lead to an increase in global cropland, as compared with corresponding emissions scenarios that do not consider climate impacts on agricultural productivity. This is driven mostly by negative impacts on wheat, rice, other grains, and oil crops. Still, including agricultural climate impacts does not significantly increase the costs or change the technological strategies of global, whole-system emissions mitigation. In fact, to meet the most aggressive climate change mitigation target (2.6 W/m2 in 2100), the net mitigation costs are slightly lower when agricultural climate impacts are considered. Key contributing factors to these results are (a) low levels of climate change in the low-forcing scenarios, (b) adaptation to climate impacts, simulated in GCAM through inter-regional shifting in the production of agricultural goods, and (c) positive average climate impacts on bioenergy crop yields.

  7. The Impact of Emission and Climate Change on Ozone in the United States under Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yang; Fu, Joshua S.; Drake, John B.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Liu, Yang

    2013-09-27

    Dynamical downscaling was applied in this study to link the global climate-chemistry model Community Atmosphere Model (CAM-Chem) with the regional models: Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model and Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ). Two Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5) were used to evaluate the climate impact on ozone concentrations in 2050s. Ozone concentrations in the lower-mid troposphere (surface to ~300 hPa), from mid- to high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere (NH), show decreasing trends in RCP 4.5 between 2000s and 2050s, with the largest decrease of 4-10 ppbv occurring in the summer and the fall; and increasing trends (2-12 ppbv) in RCP 8.5 resulting from the increased methane emissions. In RCP 8.5, methane emissions increase by ~60% by the end of 2050s, accounting for more than 90% of ozone increases in summer and fall, and 60-80% in spring and winter. Under the RCP 4.5 scenario, in the summer when photochemical reactions are the most active, the large ozone precursor emissions reduction leads to the greatest decrease of downscaled surface ozone concentrations, ranging from 6 to 10 ppbv. However, a few major cities show ozone increases of 3 to 7 ppbv due to weakened NO titration. Under the RCP 8.5 scenario, in winter, downscaled ozone concentrations increase across nearly the entire continental US in winter, ranging from 3 to 10 ppbv due to increased methane emissions and enhanced stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE). More intense heat waves are projected to occur by the end of 2050s in RCP 8.5, leading to more than 8 ppbv of the maximum daily 8-hour daily average (MDA8) ozone during the heat wave days than other days; this indicates the dramatic impact heat waves exert on high frequency ozone events.

  8. S.2: Supplementary Material Description of Algorithms The gene regulatory network is represented as a directed graph G=(V, E) where each

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babu, M. Madan

    S.2: Supplementary Material ­ Description of Algorithms The gene regulatory network is represented for each line in the algorithm for section S.2.1 is given as a guide. S.2.1: Characterization of the vertices in the network A. Algorithm to identify duplicated genes (regulated genes) that are controlled

  9. Abstract--Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) represent an impor-tant class of networked robotic applications that must be both highly de-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aloul, Fadi

    from ground controllers. Sensing and surveillance applications require that nodes in the UAV network and placement problems for distributed failure diagnosis in such networks where multiple vehicles must agree vehicles (UAVs) represent an important class of robotic applications for distributed sensing and control

  10. Energy and water development appropriations for 1999: Part 3. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, On Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    These are the hearings before the subcommittee on energy and water development of the committed on appropriations, House of Representatives. The topics include the Bureau of Reclamation, testimony of the Secretary of the Interior, Appalachian Regional Commission, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. The discussion is related to the funding of activities in these areas.

  11. Energy and water development appropriations for 1999: Part 7. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    These are the hearings before the subcommittee on energy and water development of the committee on appropriations, House of Representatives. This is part 7 which includes the testimony of members of congress and other interested individuals and organizations. Discussion includes funding of various US DOE programs and projects relating to energy efficiency and other topics.

  12. Sensor networks represent new paradigm for reliable environment monitoring and infor-mation collection. They hold the promise of revolutionizing sensing in a wide range of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinzelman, Wendi

    environment and air medium present error prone medium with low bandwidth. Thus, the protocols for sensorAbstract Sensor networks represent new paradigm for reliable environment monitoring and infor. Furthermore, in future smart environments, it is likely that sensor networks will play a key role in sensing

  13. Representing Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium for an Aqueous MEA-CO2 System Using the Electrolyte Nonrandom-Two-Liquid Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Luzheng

    for processing to-be-liquefied natural gas, syn- thesis gas, and hydrogen stream, which require low CO2 leakage processing the natural gas and refinery gas streams. The disadvantages of aqueous MEA include the followingRepresenting Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium for an Aqueous MEA-CO2 System Using the Electrolyte Nonrandom-Two-Liquid

  14. OSU 4-H SUMMER CONFERENCE While at OSU 4-H Summer Conference, you represent not only yourself but also your county and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    OSU 4-H SUMMER CONFERENCE DRESS CODE While at OSU 4-H Summer Conference, you represent not only of Summer Conference, nice casual wear is fine. Most of the buildings don't have air conditioning, so Conference involves lots of walking. Bring shoes that are comfortable and easy to walk in (flip flops

  15. and at Thr185 and Tyr187 for human ERK2. The CB1000 separation revealed six protein bands, representing the non-, mono-and dually

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    and at Thr185 and Tyr187 for human ERK2. The CB1000 separation revealed six protein bands, representing the non-, mono- and dually phosphorylated forms of ERK1 and ERK2. Because human ERK1 and ERK2 are distinct but similar proteins, the isoforms of both proteins are recognized by a single, pan-ERK antibody

  16. ProFIS: A New Paradigm for Higher Education in Brazil1 Public universities represent nowadays a relatively small part of the Brazilian higher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomes, Francisco A. M.

    1 ProFIS: A New Paradigm for Higher Education in Brazil1 Public universities represent nowadays and in terms of enrolment. Approximately 3/4 of all undergraduate students in Brazil attend private selective universities in Brazil. ProFIS (Interdisciplinary Higher Education Program) is a two

  17. COMPl:TI:I1 OR.ZPHICS .\\ND IMAOK PlWCI':SSING 10, %9-296 (197!), Linear Transformation of Pictures Represented by Quad Trees'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steiglitz, Kenneth

    of Pictures Represented by Quad Trees' G. M. HUNTERS AND K. STEIGLITZ Departmcrtt of Electrical Engineering for a picture into a quad tree for the same picture after application of a general linear operator of the original picture, m is the number of regions, and p is a resolution parameter. 1. INTRODUCTION

  18. Office of Research Facili es and Administra ve (F&A) costs represent the infrastructure and opera ons costs that support the research enterprise at the University of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matrajt, Graciela

    Office of Research Facili es and Administra ve (F&A) costs represent the infrastructure and opera ons costs that support the research enterprise at the University of Washington. Similar to the overhead costs of a business, F&A costs are real costs incurred in conduc ng and running the UW's research

  19. ESD Toxicology Laboratory Representative References

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    .K. Konetsky. 2004. Source of toxicity in storm water: Zinc from commonly used paint. Environ. Toxicol. Chem organisms. Trans. Amer. Fish. Soc. 113: 74-85. Stewart, A. J. 1984. Interactions between dissolved humic materials and organic toxicants. In: Synthetic Fossil Fuel Technologies: Results of Health and Environmental

  20. Representing Terrain With Mathematical Operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, W. Randolph

    of the terrain's generation by digging channels in the surface. Given our current reliance on digital map data a series of parameters (including size and area of influence of the drill, as well as the density formation mimics physical phenomena associated with geological terrain formation (such as erosion, digging

  1. PSCAD Modules Representing PV Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.

    2013-08-01

    Photovoltaic power plants (PVPs) have been growing in size, and the installation time is very short. With the cost of photovoltaic (PV) panels dropping in recent years, it can be predicted that in the next 10 years the contribution of PVPs to the total number of renewable energy power plants will grow significantly. In this project, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a dynamic modeling of the modules to be used as building blocks to develop simulation models of single PV arrays, expanded to include Maximum Power Point Tracker (MPPT), expanded to include PV inverter, or expanded to cover an entire PVP. The focus of the investigation and complexity of the simulation determines the components that must be included in the simulation. The development of the PV inverter was covered in detail, including the control diagrams. Both the current-regulated voltage source inverter and the current-regulated current source inverter were developed in PSCAD. Various operations of the PV inverters were simulated under normal and abnormal conditions. Symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults were simulated, presented, and discussed. Both the three-phase analysis and the symmetrical component analysis were included to clarify the understanding of unsymmetrical faults. The dynamic model validation was based on the testing data provided by SCE. Testing was conducted at SCE with the focus on the grid interface behavior of the PV inverter under different faults and disturbances. The dynamic model validation covers both the symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults.

  2. Countries Represented TheELIWeekly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sin, Peter

    --Come and work with homeless families. We will cook dinner for them. Car Wash--Have fun in the sun while you to what they were used to. Q: Why do people in the US prefer traveling by car rather than by airplane? A

  3. Water and Waste Water Tariffs for New Residential Construction in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Diane; Lutz, James

    2006-01-01

    waste water released to the sewer. In order to calculate theCity of Loma Linda, Water/Sewer City of Los Angeles, BureauCity of Riverbank, Water and Sewer City of Riverside, Public

  4. The Effects of Electricity Tariff Structure on Distributed Generation Adoption in New York State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2005-01-01

    such as gas turbines and internal combustion engines (ICEs),such as gas turbines and internal combustion engines (ICEs),

  5. Avoiding and Managing Interruptions of Electric Service Under an Interruptible Contract or Tariff 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, G. W.

    1995-01-01

    the customer to verify, after the fact, that an actual interruption could not have been avoided. The industrial should have the right to verify that the utility made every reasonable effort to avoid the interruption. Hourly generation data, load data...

  6. Impact of Large Scale Energy Efficiency Programs On Consumer Tariffs and Utility Finances in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhyankar, Nikit

    2011-01-01

    of electric water heaters by solar water heaters (iv)lamps with T5, use of solar water heater and, efficient airby natural gas or solar water heaters (iii)Replacement of

  7. Green Communications by Demand Shaping and User-in-the-Loop Tariff-based Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikomeroglu, Halim

    @sce.carleton.ca Abstract--The new field of green communications can be divided into a) energy-efficient communications for controlling the demand side. Dealing with congestion is a consequence of the supply=demand regime and the end, technical solutions which aim at making the wireless network more efficient in terms of specific bit energy

  8. Trade Restrictiveness Indices in Presence of Externalities: An Application to Non-Tariff Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2012 Leuven 14th Annual Conference, KUL, Leuven, Belgium; the 2012 Paris Environmental and Energy Trade Analysis Conference in Shanghai, China; and the 2013 EAERE Conference in Toulouse, France. hal strong economic and political support, despite risks of inefficiency and distortions. The effects

  9. Optimal environmental border adjustments under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emissions Trading System. The EU allows for trade restrictions in the form of a (WTO compliant) "carbon, and how does it compare to the domestic carbon price? In the context of the European Union's Emissions Trading System (EU ETS), for example, what is the optimal--WTO consistent--border carbon adjustment? We

  10. Impact of Large Scale Energy Efficiency Programs On Consumer Tariffs and Utility Finances in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhyankar, Nikit

    2011-01-01

    DG DSM DTL DVB EE FY LNG LPG MERC MU NCT NDMC NDPL NG NHPCutility level. In case of LPG and natural gas water heaters,of electric water heaters by LPG heaters would require

  11. Impact of Large Scale Energy Efficiency Programs On Consumer Tariffs and Utility Finances in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhyankar, Nikit

    2011-01-01

    Efficiency (Indian) Financial Year Liquefied Natural GasRegassified Liquefied Natural Gas Reliance Natural ResourcesLiquefied Petroleum Gas Maharashtra Electricity Regulatory Commission Million Units (kWh) National Capital Territory New Delhi Municipal Council North Delhi Power Limited Natural Gas

  12. Impact of Large Scale Energy Efficiency Programs On Consumer Tariffs and Utility Finances in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhyankar, Nikit

    2011-01-01

    refrigerators, water heaters (solar, natural gas, LPG) andwith natural gas or solar heaters), space cooling (replacingof electric water heaters by solar water heaters (iv)

  13. Impact of Large Scale Energy Efficiency Programs On Consumer Tariffs and Utility Finances in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhyankar, Nikit

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms to Promote Energy Efficiency: Case Study of ato improvements in energy efficiency. Energy Policy, 19(10),Deficit through Energy Efficiency in India: An Evaluation of

  14. Impact of Large Scale Energy Efficiency Programs On Consumer Tariffs and Utility Finances in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhyankar, Nikit

    2011-01-01

    reduction in their electricity consumption and thus totalfrom their reduced electricity consumption. The participantfrom reduction in their electricity consumption. EE programs

  15. Impact of Large Scale Energy Efficiency Programs On Consumer Tariffs and Utility Finances in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhyankar, Nikit

    2011-01-01

    India. Prayas. (2005). Demand-Side Management (DSM) in theEnergy Efficiency and Demand Side Management (DSM). PlanningDemand Growth Demand Side Management Delhi Transco Limited

  16. Public sentiment in the United States towards the tariff, 1816-1828 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, John Francis

    1968-01-01

    ly a:". footed. -"-. pl esentative eorm, -ul*' ert of 'asachuse' ta ap '-e au ';"~eainat 't:le mo lon 3 ayi ~C; that in orner to aava;Dan ' a t' ' rs i't 'w'aa n'cease- y ta ". ct pramptl; . ". 'hc ;hqa ?iau is nat van ed, " a'ld:. 'ulbert, 'ter...

  17. The Spread of Feed-In Tariff Legislation in Europe: A Diffusion of Innovation Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Aaron Jacob

    2011-04-21

    all renewable electricity generators access to the utility grid and require utility companies to purchase electricity from these producers at mandated rates that are set above market value and vary based upon the method – hydro, solar, wind, etc... of global warming brought on by greenhouse gas emissions looms, many countries, particularly those in Europe, have encouraged the domestic production of renewable energies such as wind, solar, hydro, and biomass power (Hill, 2010). Most of these policies...

  18. Scheduling on a single machine under time-of-use electricity tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apr 10, 2014 ... Abstract: We consider the problem of scheduling jobs on a single machine to minimize the total electricity cost of processing these jobs under ...

  19. Impact of Large Scale Energy Efficiency Programs On Consumer Tariffs and Utility Finances in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhyankar, Nikit

    2011-01-01

    American Council for an Energy-Efficienct Economy (ACEEE),.Mechanisms to Promote Energy Efficiency: Case Study of ato improvements in energy efficiency. Energy Policy, 19(10),

  20. Comparison of Feed in Tariff, Quota and Auction Mechanisms to Support Wind Power Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Lucy; Neuhoff, Karsten

    2006-03-14

    from an alternative source, were determined by the state utility commissions. Many commissions pegged the rates to high oil prices, resulting in highly favourable guaranteed payment and stimulating renewable development (IEA 2004a).3 A further... the marginal price, and turbines at locations with higher wind speeds will capture scarcity rents of the high wind locations. If high scarcity rents are to be avoided, a distinction should be made between sites according to the available wind resource...

  1. Impact of Large Scale Energy Efficiency Programs On Consumer Tariffs and Utility Finances in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhyankar, Nikit

    2011-01-01

    Industrial Sectors in India. LBNL-57293. Lawrence BerkeleyDivision). CEA. (2008). All India Electricity Statistics:Authority (CEA) Government of India. CEA. (2009, 31 March

  2. Scheduling on a single machine under time-of-use electricity tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-02-26

    In the United States, about one-third of all the end-use energy consumption is ... As a result, improving the energy efficiency of manufacturing technologies.

  3. Customer Response to RTP in Competitive Markets: A Study of Niagara Mohawk's Standard Offer Tariff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Richard N.; Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Neenan, Bernie; Hopper, Nicole

    2006-01-01

    for large end users in retail markets with customer choicecompetitive and regulated retail markets. To address thesenewly established retail market. Option Two was comprised of

  4. Optimising Market Share and Profit Margin: SMDP-based Tariff Pricing under the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chli, Maria

    market dynamisms.1 Power TAC simulates an open and competitive electricity wholesale and retail market market, an energy retailer aims to simultaneously increase the number of contracted customers and its the competition, AstonTAC was the only retailer agent performing well across all retail market settings. I

  5. Impact of Large Scale Energy Efficiency Programs On Consumer Tariffs and Utility Finances in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhyankar, Nikit

    2011-01-01

    Power requirement (Watts) Appliance life (hours) Usage (hours/year) Retail marketPower requirement (W) Appliance life 10 (yrs) 10 (yrs) 10 (yrs) (yrs) (hours or years) Usage (hours/year) Retail market

  6. Impact of Large Scale Energy Efficiency Programs On Consumer Tariffs and Utility Finances in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhyankar, Nikit

    2011-01-01

    The Case of India: Environmental Energy Technologiesand Energy Savings Potential in Selected Industrial Sectors in India.Deficit through Energy Efficiency in India: An Evaluation of

  7. U.S. Virgin Islands Feed-In Tariff | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-Sessions | Department of Corrective ActionforDepartmentHistorical O il

  8. How do I add tariffs into the OpenEI database | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNew Jersey:Hopkinsville,Advanced ResearchHow can IHow do I add

  9. Best Practices and Design Options for Feed-in Tariffs | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC Jump to:Greece:BajoBelpower Srl Jump to:FallsInformation

  10. A Policymaker's Guide to Feed-In Tariff Policy Design | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendo NewYanbu,

  11. Global Energy Transfer - Feed-in Tariffs for Developing Countries | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEniaElectric JumpAtlas for Solar and

  12. Renewable Energy Feed-in Tariffs: Lessons Learned from the U.S. and Abroad

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b <RefurbishedDevelopment RED 2002

  13. LADWP - Feed-in Tariff (FiT) Program | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safety Standards Implementation JulyTheKEY07-97# . L I .

  14. Innovative Feed-In Tariff Designs that Limit Policy Costs | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:on Openei |sourceAndInformation ReeseInnovative

  15. Are there any other data sources for utility tariff detail that are more

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYork Jump| OpenExploration AtArchbaldArdica

  16. Community-Based Energy Development (C-BED) Tariff | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartment ofCommercial Grade DedicationaOfficetoand Financebe

  17. Increases in electric rates in rural areas. Hearing before the Committee on Agriculture, House of Representatives, Ninety-Sixth Congress, Second Session, June 4, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Seven witnesses representing rural electric utilities and cooperatives spoke at a June 4, 1980 hearing to discuss which inflationary factors are increasing rural electric rates. The Committee recognized that the problem is not unique to rural systems. In their testimony, the witnesses noted increasing urbanization of rural areas; the cost of generating plant construction, fuel, and operating expenses; general economic factors of inflation and high interest rates; and regulations as major contributing factors to utility requests for rate increases. The hearing record includes their testimony, additional material submitted for the record, and responses to questions from the subcommittee. (DCK)

  18. Alternative fuels for general aviation. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Transportation, Aviation, and Materials, U. S. House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session, August 29, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Five witnesses representing general aviation and aviation fuel industries and the Federal Aviation Administration testified on the potential for using alternative fuels in general aviation to counteract the effects of high prices and supply vulnerability on the industry. The witnesses described test results of liquid methane and alcohol fuels, noting that those fuels which most closely emulate the properties of petroleum will best serve the industry's needs. Their testimony covered environmental and economic effects as well as fuel performance. The Synthetic Fuels Corporation, DOE, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the Department of Defense, as well as the aviation industry have research programs on aviation fuels.

  19. Starting with the End in Mind: A Case Study of Under-Represented, Teacher Education, Community College Transfers in a Predominantly White Institution 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrd, David Arthur

    2012-10-19

    shock. The intent of my study is to research other variables and situations that students may experience that could lead to attrition from teacher education programs. It is through the narratives of under-represented teacher-education transfer students... decided to leave because his grades reflected a student who was succeeding rather than struggling. It then became clear to me that it may be necessary to re-define transfer shock and explore the criteria that allow students of color to succeed after...

  20. Accepted for publication International Journal of Flexible Automation and Integrated Manufacturing. A VECTOR PERTURBATION APPROACH TO THE GENERALIZED AIRCRAFT SPARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potok, Thomas E.

    Accepted for publication International Journal of Flexible Automation and Integrated Manufacturing for flexible and lean supply chain systems. A vector space model is used to represent a set of operation aircraft. This challenge requires the manufacturers and distributors of spare parts to be able to supply

  1. Clinch River: an alternate financing plan. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Energy Conservation and Power, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, first session, 20 Sep 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Representatives of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) project, the nuclear industry, taxpayers, the financial community, and legislators testified at a hearing held to review administration plans for completing the CRBR by attaching its financing to a continuing resolution and avoiding the legislative process. A Congressional Budget Office report noted that the administration's financing proposal will generate up to 37% return on investment from tax relief alone, which is more appropriate for high-risk than government-backed investment. The Congressional Research Service challenged that the plant's power production capacity was overstated and its price overvalued. Of concern to the committee was the fairness of asking taxpayers to share in the $2.5 billion needed to complete the project. Additional material submitted for the record follows the testimony of 20 witnesses.

  2. PARTICLE IMAGE VELOCIMETRY MEASUREMENTS IN A REPRESENTATIVE GAS-COOLED PRISMATIC REACTOR CORE MODEL: FLOW IN THE COOLANT CHANNELS AND INTERSTITIAL BYPASS GAPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas E. Conder; Richard Skifton; Ralph Budwig

    2012-11-01

    Core bypass flow is one of the key issues with the prismatic Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor, and it refers to the coolant that navigates through the interstitial, non-cooling passages between the graphite fuel blocks instead of traveling through the designated coolant channels. To determine the bypass flow, a double scale representative model was manufactured and installed in the Matched Index-of-Refraction flow facility; after which, stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was employed to measure the flow field within. PIV images were analyzed to produce vector maps, and flow rates were calculated by numerically integrating over the velocity field. It was found that the bypass flow varied between 6.9-15.8% for channel Reynolds numbers of 1,746 and 4,618. The results were compared to computational fluid dynamic (CFD) pre-test simulations. When compared to these pretest calculations, the CFD analysis appeared to under predict the flow through the gap.

  3. A Keck Adaptive Optics Survey of a Representative Sample of Gravitationally-Lensed Star-Forming Galaxies: High Spatial Resolution Studies of Kinematics and Metallicity Gradients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leethochawalit, Nicha; Ellis, Richard S; Stark, Daniel P; Richard, Johan; Zitrin, Adi; Auger, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We discuss spatially resolved emission line spectroscopy secured for a total sample of 15 gravitationally lensed star-forming galaxies at a mean redshift of $z\\simeq2$ based on Keck laser-assisted adaptive optics observations undertaken with the recently-improved OSIRIS integral field unit (IFU) spectrograph. By exploiting gravitationally lensed sources drawn primarily from the CASSOWARY survey, we sample these sub-L$^{\\ast}$ galaxies with source-plane resolutions of a few hundred parsecs ensuring well-sampled 2-D velocity data and resolved variations in the gas-phase metallicity. Such high spatial resolution data offers a critical check on the structural properties of larger samples derived with coarser sampling using multiple-IFU instruments. We demonstrate how serious errors of interpretation can only be revealed through better sampling. Although we include four sources from our earlier work, the present study provides a more representative sample unbiased with respect to emission line strength. Contrary t...

  4. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01

    LBNL collected water and waste water tariffs in Californiastate. Current water and waste water tariffs for these areaswas based on water and waste water tariffs in California

  5. Assessment of G3(MP2)//B3 theory including a pseudopotential for molecules containing first-, second-, and third-row representative elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocha, Carlos Murilo Romero; Morgon, Nelson Henrique; Custodio, Rogério; Pereira, Douglas Henrique; Departamento de Ciências Exatas e Biotecnológicas, Universidade Federal do Tocantins, Campus de Gurupi, 77410-530 Gurupi, Tocantins

    2013-11-14

    G3(MP2)//B3 theory was modified to incorporate compact effective potential (CEP) pseudopotentials, providing a theoretical alternative referred to as G3(MP2)//B3-CEP for calculations involving first-, second-, and third-row representative elements. The G3/05 test set was used as a standard to evaluate the accuracy of the calculated properties. G3(MP2)//B3-CEP theory was applied to the study of 247 standard enthalpies of formation, 104 ionization energies, 63 electron affinities, 10 proton affinities, and 22 atomization energies, comprising 446 experimental energies. The mean absolute deviations compared with the experimental data for all thermochemical results presented an accuracy of 1.4 kcal mol{sup ?1} for G3(MP2)//B3 and 1.6 kcal mol{sup ?1} for G3(MP2)//B3-CEP. Approximately 75% and 70% of the calculated properties are found with accuracy between ±2 kcal mol{sup ?1} for G3(MP2)//B3 and G3(MP2)//B3-CEP, respectively. Considering a confidence interval of 95%, the results may oscillate between ±4.2 kcal mol{sup ?1} and ±4.6 kcal mol{sup ?1}, respectively. The overall statistical behavior indicates that the calculations using pseudopotential present similar behavior with the all-electron theory. Of equal importance to the accuracy is the CPU time, which was reduced by between 10% and 40%.

  6. Improved recovery from Gulf of Mexico reservoirs. Volume III (of 4): Characterization and simulation of representative resources. Final report, February 14, 1995--October 13, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimbrell, W.C.; Bassiouni, Z.A.; Bourgoyne, A.T.

    1997-01-13

    Significant innovations have been made in seismic processing and reservoir simulation. In addition, significant advances have been made in deviated and horizontal drilling technologies. Effective application of these technologies along with improved integrated resource management methods offer opportunities to significantly increase Gulf of Mexico production, delay platform abandonments, and preserve access to a substantial remaining oil target for both exploratory drilling and advanced recovery processes. In an effort to illustrate the impact that these new technologies and sources of information can have upon the estimates of recoverable oil in the Gulf of Mexico, additional and detailed data was collected for two previously studied reservoirs: a South March Island reservoir operated by Taylor Energy and Gulf of Mexico reservoir operated by Mobil, whose exact location has been blind-coded at their request, and an additional third representative reservoir in the Gulf of Mexico, the KEKF-1 reservoir in West Delta Block 84 Field. The new data includes reprocessed 2-D seismic data, newly acquired 3-D data, fluid data, fluid samples, pressure data, well test data, well logs, and core data/samples. The new data was used to refine reservoir and geologic characterization of these reservoirs. Further laboratory investigation also provided additional simulation input data in the form of PVT properties, relative permeabilities, capillary pressures, and water compatibility. Geologic investigations were also conducted to refine the models of mud-rich submarine fan architectures used by seismic analysts and reservoir engineers. These results were also used, in part, to assist in the recharacterization of these reservoirs.

  7. Spatially Resolved Estimation of Ozone-related Mortality in the United States under Two Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) and their Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young-Min; Zhou, Ying; Gao, Yang; Fu, Joshua S.; Johnson, Brent; Huang, Cheng; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The spatial pattern of the uncertainty in climate air pollution health impact has rarely been studied due to the lack of high-resolution model simulations, especially under the latest Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). OBJECTIVES: We estimated county-level ozone (O3) and PM2.5 related excess mortality (EM) and evaluated the associated uncertainties in the continental United States in the 2050s under RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. METHODS: Using dynamically downscaled climate model simulations, we calculated changes in O3 and PM2.5 levels at 12 km resolution between the future (2057-2059) and present (2001-2004) under two RCP scenarios. Using concentration-response relationships in the literature and projected future populations, we estimated EM attributable to the changes in O3 and PM2.5. We finally analyzed the contribution of input variables to the uncertainty in the county-level EM estimation using Monte Carlo simulation. RESULTS: O3-related premature deaths in the continental U.S. were estimated to be 1,082 deaths/year under RCP8.5 (95% confidence interval (CI): -288 to 2,453), and -5,229 deaths/year under RCP4.5 (-7,212 to -3,246). Simulated PM2.5 changes resulted in a significant decrease in EM under the two RCPs. The uncertainty of O3-related EM estimates was mainly caused by RCP scenarios, whereas that of PM2.5-related EMs was mainly from concentration-response functions. CONCLUSION: EM estimates attributable to climate change-induced air pollution change as well as the associated uncertainties vary substantially in space, and so are the most influential input variables. Spatially resolved data is crucial to develop effective mitigation and adaptation policy.

  8. CT head-scan dosimetry in an anthropomorphic phantom and associated measurement of ACR accreditation-phantom imaging metrics under clinically representative scan conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunner, Claudia C.; Stern, Stanley H.; Chakrabarti, Kish; Minniti, Ronaldo; Parry, Marie I.; Skopec, Marlene

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To measure radiation absorbed dose and its distribution in an anthropomorphic head phantom under clinically representative scan conditions in three widely used computed tomography (CT) scanners, and to relate those dose values to metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom.Methods: By inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) in the head of an anthropomorphic phantom specially developed for CT dosimetry (University of Florida, Gainesville), we measured dose with three commonly used scanners (GE Discovery CT750 HD, Siemens Definition, Philips Brilliance 64) at two different clinical sites (Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, National Institutes of Health). The scanners were set to operate with the same data-acquisition and image-reconstruction protocols as used clinically for typical head scans, respective of the practices of each facility for each scanner. We also analyzed images of the ACR CT accreditation phantom with the corresponding protocols. While the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance protocols utilized only conventional, filtered back-projection (FBP) image-reconstruction methods, the GE Discovery also employed its particular version of an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm that can be blended in desired proportions with the FBP algorithm. We did an objective image-metrics analysis evaluating the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and CNR for images reconstructed with FBP. For images reconstructed with ASIR, we only analyzed the CNR, since MTF and NPS results are expected to depend on the object for iterative reconstruction algorithms.Results: The OSLD measurements showed that the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance scanners (located at two different clinical facilities) yield average absorbed doses in tissue of 42.6 and 43.1 mGy, respectively. The GE Discovery delivers about the same amount of dose (43.7 mGy) when run under similar operating and image-reconstruction conditions, i.e., without tube current modulation and ASIR. The image-metrics analysis likewise showed that the MTF, NPS, and CNR associated with the reconstructed images are mutually comparable when the three scanners are run with similar settings, and differences can be attributed to different edge-enhancement properties of the applied reconstruction filters. Moreover, when the GE scanner was operated with the facility's scanner settings for routine head exams, which apply 50% ASIR and use only approximately half of the 100%-FBP dose, the CNR of the images showed no significant change. Even though the CNR alone is not sufficient to characterize the image quality and justify any dose reduction claims, it can be useful as a constancy test metric.Conclusions: This work presents a straightforward method to connect direct measurements of CT dose with objective image metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and CNR. It demonstrates that OSLD measurements in an anthropomorphic head phantom allow a realistic and locally precise estimation of magnitude and spatial distribution of dose in tissue delivered during a typical CT head scan. Additional objective analysis of the images of the ACR accreditation phantom can be used to relate the measured doses to high contrast resolution, noise, and CNR.

  9. Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) Demonstration Using a Representative Savannah River Site Sludge Simulant On the Large-Size Pilot Platform at the CEA-Marcoule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girold, C.; Delaunay, M.; Dussossoy, J.L.; Lacombe, J. [CEA Marcoule, CEA/DEN/DTCD/SCDV, 30 (France); Marra, S.; Peeler, D.; Herman, C.; Smith, M.; Edwards, R.; Barnes, A.; Stone, M. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Washington Savannah River Company, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC (United States); Iverson, D. [Liquid Waste Operations, Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC), Aiken, SC (United States); Do Quang, R. [AREVA NC, Tour AREVA, 92 - Paris La Defense (France); Tchemitcheff, E. [AREVA Federal Services LLC, Richland Office, Richland, WA (United States); Veyer, C. [Consultant, 59 - Saint Waast la Vallee (France)

    2008-07-01

    The cold-crucible induction melter technology (CCIM) is considered worldwide for industrial implementation to overcome the current limits of high level waste vitrification technologies and to answer future challenges such as: new or difficult sludge compositions, need for improving waste loading, need for high temperatures, and corrosive effluents. More particularly, this technology is being considered for implementation at the US DOE Savannah River site to increase the rate of waste processing while reducing the number of HLW canisters to be produced through increased waste loading and improved waste throughput. A collaborative program involving AREVA, CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission), SRNL (Savannah River National Laboratory) and WSRC (Washington Savannah River Company) has thus been initiated in 2007 to demonstrate vitrification with waste loadings on the order of 50% (versus the current DWPF waste loading of about 35%) with a PUREX-type waste composition (high Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} composition), and to perform two pilot-scale runs on the large size platform equipped with a 650 mm diameter CCIM at the CEA Marcoule. The objectives of the demonstrations were 1) to show the feasibility of processing a representative SRS sludge surrogate using continuous slurry feeding, 2) to produce a glass that would meet the acceptance specifications with an increased waste loading when compared to what is presently achieved at the DWPF, and 3) achieve improved waste throughputs. This presentation describes the platform and the very encouraging results obtained from the demonstration performed at temperatures, specific throughputs and waste loadings that overcome current DWPF limits. Results from the initial exploratory run and second demonstration run include 1) production of a glass product that achieved the targeted glass composition that was more durable than the standard Environmental Assessment (EA) glass, 2) successful slurry feeding of the CCIM, and 3) promising waste processing rates (at 1250 deg. C and 1300 deg. C melt pool temperature) that could result in processing of the Savannah River HLW faster than could be currently achieved with the existing Joule Heated melter in DWPF. In conclusion, this joint effort conducted by CEA, AREVA, SRNL and WSRC led to very encouraging results, demonstrating waste throughputs 44 % that of the DWPF ceramic melter throughput in a 650 mm CCIM melter for the same waste type with a Sludge Batch 3 PUREX-type waste feed flux of 150 L/h/m{sup 2} demonstrated at 1250 deg. C. The very high waste loading (above 52%) allows reducing the amount of glass to be produced by about 27% to treat the same amount of waste when compared to previous DWPF operation for this specific type of feed, since 27 % less glass is needed to immobilize the same amount of waste. It was also demonstrated, for this type of feed, an unusual behavior with regard to nepheline formation, which would require further evaluation for future applications. The product from the baseline demonstration run, with a waste loading of at least 52%, displayed a very good quality. Stabilized operation close to the maximum throughput was demonstrated. Cesium volatility was apparently between 7 and 12 % (based on glass analysis); however this value is only preliminary. This demonstration also allowed the CEA to better understand the SRS slurry feed behavior and to propose adaptations to the platform for any future demonstrations using this type of feed. Finally, use of a large diameter CCIM ({approx}1 meter) may allow faster processing of the SRS HLW than can be achieved with the current DWPF melter. (authors)

  10. The Shorthorn: Casey Crane Robert Arrowood, Carrizo Oil and Gas, Inc. representative, takes local homeowners' questions about on-campus natural gas drilling in an Arlington office complex Tuesday.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    The Shorthorn: Casey Crane Robert Arrowood, Carrizo Oil and Gas, Inc. representative, takes local," Gilfour said. A spokesman with the Tar- rant County Medical Examiner's office said toxicology results that plans to drill on university property. Carrizo Oil and Gas, Inc. recently signed a one-year lease

  11. where f(x; y) represents the intensity of emitted radiation at location (x; y), ` is a given projection angle, and t is the detector location. The function P ` (t) is the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, James S.

    19 where f(x; y) represents the intensity of emitted radiation at location (x; y), ` is a given projection angle, and t is the detector location. The function P ` (t) is the projection of f(x; y) at angle of f(x; y). This is depicted in Figure 3.1. In emission tomography, however, the radiation measured

  12. AUTHORIZATION FOR RELEASE OF HEALTH INFORMATION PURSUANT TO HIPAA I, or my authorized representative, request that health information regarding my care and treatment as set forth on this form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    the right to request a list of people who may receive or use my HIV-related information without AUTHORIZATION FOR RELEASE OF HEALTH INFORMATION PURSUANT TO HIPAA I, or my authorized representative, request that health information regarding my care and treatment as set forth

  13. H. R. 1643: This Act may be cited as the Superfund Liability Clarification Act, introduced in the US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, March 22, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This bill was introduced into the US House of Representatives on March 22, 1991 to amend the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980. Key features of the bill revolve around clarification of liability of lenders and clarification of innocent landowner defense.

  14. Fig S1. Images of Two dimensional gel electrophoresis gels. The left image is for the untreated control; the right image is for Gm treated samples. Green represents protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matin, A.C.

    is for the untreated control; the right image is for Gm treated samples. Green represents protein spot intensity from. #12; Fig S2. N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) dampens the lethal effect of Gm in the stationaryA strain are reproduced from Figure 4 for ease of comparison. *** (p Gm

  15. Do U.S. tariff reductions explain rising wage inequality?: The case of U.S. tariffs on imports from countries having free trade agreements with the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitaoka, Hisaya

    2008-07-28

    at the University of Kansas, I am going to complete the Ph.D. program in May, 2008 and leave for another journey of my life. I am grateful to them for all their helps and supports. I would like to express my sincere and special thanks to Professor Joseph... made me easier to walk though the difficult time of my study in Ph.D. program, especially while I was on the job market. She is a great graduate director. vi Table of Content Abstract...

  16. Superfund: right-to-know and hazardous waste site cleanup. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Commerce, Transportation, and Tourism of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, December 20, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Representatives of local and state offices and the congressional representative of St. Paul, Minnesota testified at a field hearing on the Superfund program. The focus of the hearing was on community right-to-know aspects and the cleanup of hazardous materials that were abandoned on federal sites. At issue was environmental problems at the 38 priority sites listed for Minnesota and the lack of information on health effects after over 20 years of environmental study of toxic substances. The proposed legislation would subject federal facilities and sites to the same standards, cleanup schedules, and oversite as private sites. A new enforcement bill would encourage citizen suits to force cleanup. Military arsenals that contribute to water and soil pollution were of particular concern. Witnesses discussed the need for a national right-to-know law so that businesses would not be tempted to relocate to avoid Minnesota's environmental policy. The hearing record covers the testimony of seven witnesses.

  17. Nuclear energy cooperation with China. Hearing before the Special Subcommittee on US Trade with China of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session, May 16, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Ten representatives of the nuclear industry and experts in foreign affairs testified on issues relating to the transfer of nuclear technology to China, which needs new energy supplies for modernization. With congressional approval of a negotiated agreement, US firms are prepared to offer assistance. US firms will compete with several other countries for the China contracts. Industry spokesmen noted the market potential China represents and the fact that US cooperation in the nuclear power program will not affect proliferation since China is already a nuclear weapons country. US firms will be handicapped if there are too many legal delays or if Congress decides it does not want to pursue a relationship with China in the area of nuclear power. Additional material submitted for the record follows the testimony.

  18. Hazardous-waste cleanup and enforcement problems: Indiana. Hearing before the Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, Second Session, June 1, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Thirteen witnesses representing the private and public sectors testified at a Seymour, Indiana hearing on hazardous materials at the Seymour Recycling facility and efforts to clean up the site. The facility began operations in 1968, and was closed down in February of 1980; the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had discovered during 1978 that the company was not disposing of its chemical wastes properly. Local concerns focused on why the EPA efforts slowed noticeably in the spring of 1981 and whether the site qualifies for superfund financing. Spokesmen from EPA argued that the slowdown was due to inaction at the state level, but state representatives countered that the problem was a lack of state funds to match federal funding. Other witnesses pursued health and safety issues and the efforts Seymour citizens have made to gain relief. (DCK)

  19. Sell-in versus Sell-through Revenue Recognition: An Examination of Firm Characteristics and Financial Information Quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasmussen, Stephanie Jean Binger

    2010-10-12

    This study examines revenue recognition methods used by high technology firms for sales to distributors. Revenue is either recognized when products are delivered to distributors (sell-in) or when distributors resell products ...

  20. Market and behavioral barriers to energy efficiency: A preliminary evaluation of the case for tariff financing in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujita, K. Sydny

    2012-01-01

    California Avg # rooms in owner occupied 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/recs/) Avg # rooms in rental Average appliance prices

  1. Market and behavioral barriers to energy efficiency: A preliminary evaluation of the case for tariff financing in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujita, K. Sydny

    2012-01-01

    Utility-Maximization: a Test of Energy Price Responsiveness.period analyses Energy prices (2009$) Average electricityor cooling intensity, energy price variation, and high

  2. State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA): An Analysis of Renewable Energy Feed-in Tariffs in the United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report defines a FIT policy, explores U.S. FIT policy design, and highlights a few of the best practices in FIT policy design. It also explores how FITs can be used to target state policy goals and examines policy interactions with other renewable energy policies. An overview of FIT impacts (jobs and economic development) in Europe is included.

  3. Market and behavioral barriers to energy efficiency: A preliminary evaluation of the case for tariff financing in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujita, K. Sydny

    2012-01-01

    Brown) “Paying for Energy Efficiency Upgrades throughSupport Document: Energy Efficiency Program for ConsumerSupport Document: Energy Efficiency Program for Consumer

  4. Market and behavioral barriers to energy efficiency: A preliminary evaluation of the case for tariff financing in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujita, K. Sydny

    2012-01-01

    Residential Energy Consumption Survey 2009 Update. U.S.and the 2009 update to the Residential Energy Consumption

  5. Market and behavioral barriers to energy efficiency: A preliminary evaluation of the case for tariff financing in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujita, K. Sydny

    2012-01-01

    24   RebateEnergy Star labeling, and rebates and tax credits. There iscost aversion, larger rebates may be necessary to achieve

  6. Combined Heat and Power: Connecting the Gap Between Markets and Utility Interconnection and Tariff Practices (Part 1) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, S.; Elswick, B.; Elliott, R. N.

    2006-01-01

    -Grid No Yes Supportive 3 Incentives for renewables Minnesota Xcel Energy Yes No No position 2 Distributed generation incentives North Carolina Progress Energy– Carolina Power & Light Yes Yes No position 4 Green Power Initiative Nevada... Nevada/Sierra Pacific Power No Yes No position 3 South Carolina Progress Energy– Carolina Power & Light Yes Yes No position 4 Green Power Initiative Tennessee Tennessee Valley Authority Yes No No position 3 Green power incentives...

  7. Analysis on the impacts of electricity tariffs on the attractiveness of gas fired distributed combined heat and power systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Yichen

    2015-01-01

    In order to achieve a more sustainable energy system, regulators and the industry are trying to balance among many challenging issues such as environmental concerns, economic efficiency and security of supply. In Europe, ...

  8. Market and behavioral barriers to energy efficiency: A preliminary evaluation of the case for tariff financing in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujita, K. Sydny

    2012-01-01

    Utility-Maximization: a Test of Energy Price Responsiveness.23   Energy prices (2009limit the affect of energy prices on appliance production

  9. Market and behavioral barriers to energy efficiency: A preliminary evaluation of the case for tariff financing in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujita, K. Sydny

    2012-01-01

    two categories, natural gas storage and electric storage.electric storage, baseline natural gas storage, EnergyStar natural gas storage, natural gas tankless, and

  10. So You Have Questions About...Value of Solar Tariffs: Resources & Technical Assistance (Postcard), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 *Impact NeutronSmallGridSmartphone

  11. Understanding and representing natural language meaning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waltz, D.L.; Maran, L.R.; Dorfman, M.H.; Dinitz, R.; Farwell, D.

    1982-12-01

    During this contract period the authors have: (a) continued investigation of events and actions by means of representation schemes called 'event shape diagrams'; (b) written a parsing program which selects appropriate word and sentence meanings by a parallel process known as activation and inhibition; (c) begun investigation of the point of a story or event by modeling the motivations and emotional behaviors of story characters; (d) started work on combining and translating two machine-readable dictionaries into a lexicon and knowledge base which will form an integral part of our natural language understanding programs; (e) made substantial progress toward a general model for the representation of cognitive relations by comparing English scene and event descriptions with similar descriptions in other languages; (f) constructed a general model for the representation of tense and aspect of verbs; (g) made progress toward the design of an integrated robotics system which accepts English requests, and uses visual and tactile inputs in making decisions and learning new tasks.

  12. CONTACT INFO59 SALES REPRESENTATIVES59

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    smart phone to see video trailers about our titles. E-BOOKS Books listed with an EB ISBN are available Gate Bridge7 Business Consulting in a Multicultural America31 The Business of Culture46 Chicana/o Art

  13. Focal Species and Representative Habitats Chuck Peven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    building and placement, loss of riparian habitat, water diversion, reduced large woody debris (LWD) recruitment, and flood control efforts that include LWD removal, berm construction, and stream channelization

  14. Representing the Gaichi in Japanese Detective Fiction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cruz, Aileen Marie

    2014-01-01

    Shinchosa, 1990. Kawana, Sari. Murder Most Modern: DetectiveDetective Fiction Writer?s Murder” Conclusion Bibliography itheir illicit attachment. The murder-suicide via bomb in “A

  15. FOOD SECURITY FUEL INDEPENDENCE These projects represent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myong, Sua

    dry biomass. Increase photosynthesis Within their leaves, plants harness the energy from the sun, and the southern edge of the Gulf Coast states. Likewise, sorghum prefers warmer regions, such as Texas from a cross with Miscanthus, and have produced several more by using new crossing technologies

  16. Dark Matter Searches with Representing the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    · Supernova Remnants · Unidentified Gamma-ray Sources · Gamma-Ray Bursts · Solar Physics · Dark Matter #12;SCIPP talk Larry Wai / SLAC 4 Talk overview 1. What is GLAST? 2. How does dark matter shine in gamma rays? 3. Where should we look for dark matter with GLAST? #12;SCIPP talk Larry Wai / SLAC 5 GLAST

  17. Representing Complex Geographic Phenomena in GIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, May

    models have been designed based on either object- or field- based conceptualizations of reality and precipitation, has not yet been incorporated into GIS data models. To this end, a new conceptual framework- tial data have been growing significantly. With this growth, new challenges have arisen for data- base

  18. Representing and Querying Data Transformations Yannis Velegrakis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velegrakis, Yannis

    - known sources such as government organizations, research institutes or private companies may be well to their query. In systems where information from multiple sources is used, such knowledge may assist of Toronto, Canada jm@cs.toronto.edu Abstract Modern information systems often store data that has been

  19. Representing and modeling images with multiscale local

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simoncelli, Eero

    few years has been a very good experience. I would like to thank some friends I was fortunate to get, Barney Bramham, Tyler Neylon, Fred Lalibert´e. I would like to thank my friends and colleagues from the Laboratory for Computational Vision : Umesh Rajashekar, Alan Stocker, Zhou Wang, Cynthia Rudin, Rosa Figueras

  20. Landscape Characterization and Representativeness Analysis for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725 Resource Type: Dataset Data Type: Numeric Data Research Org: Climate Change Science Institute (CCSI), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Rdige,...

  1. A Novel Topology for Representing Protein Folds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segal, Mark R

    2009-01-01

    1993). Cooperativity in protein-folding kinetics. Proc NatlVoelz VA. (2007). The protein folding problem: when will itMS, Weikl TR. (2008). The protein folding problem. Annu Rev

  2. Advisory Board Seats New Student Representatives | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for the school's FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Robotics Team, the 4265 Secret City Wildbots. She is interested in film production and is...

  3. Representing Face Images for Emotion Classi cation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cottrell, Garrison W.

    University of California, San Diego La Jolla, CA 92034 Garrison Cottrell Department of Computer Science

  4. Representing Face Images for Emotion Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cottrell, Garrison W.

    University of California, San Diego La Jolla, CA 92034 Garrison Cottrell Department of Computer Science

  5. DOE ORP Contracting Officer Representatives - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB Packet Hanford AdvisoryEnergyManagementAnnouncementsis Part

  6. DOE RL Contracting Officer Representatives - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB Packet HanfordDOE Project Taps HPC for Next-Generationof

  7. house of representatives | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) August 20123/%2A en46Afed feedholiday |

  8. Authorizing Official Designated Representative (AODR) | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p uBUS SERVICE SUBSIDIES AT THEEnergyAO is the Senior

  9. Facility Representative Functional Area Qualification Standard

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order14, 20111,FY 2007 FeeFederalFirst2 DOEMeeting

  10. Facility Representative Qualification Equivalencies Based on Previous

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order14, 20111,FY 2007 FeeFederalFirst2 DOEMeetingExperience |

  11. Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergy HeadquartersFuelBConservation StandardsEnergy In Case You12/17/1998 | Department of

  12. Facility Representative Program Outstanding at ID

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesofExtrans -ORGANIZATIONOperations »Department ofFacility June

  13. Property Representatives Lists - HQ | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report Appendices |Project Management

  14. DOE uranium enrichment program. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Energy Conservation and Power of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, February 19, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Six witnesses representing the Congressional Budget Office, DOE, the National Taxpayers Union, the Edison Electric Institute, and the General Accounting Office testified on the implications of the uranium enrichment program to the national deficit. The program's $1.6 billion annual budget makes it DOE's largest program, but its benefits are aimed more at the nuclear utility customers at the expense of taxpayers. The administration's proposal to write off unrecovered costs will further hurt taxpayers, and is counter to its philosophy of allowing market forces to operate. The hearing addressed DOE's proposals for improving the economics of the program. Additional material for the record follows the testimony.

  15. Update of the status of Alaskan oil exports. Hearing before the Subcommittee on International Economic Policy and Trade of the Committee on Foreign Affairs, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, November 20, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    Representatives of the Alaskan oil industry, citizen groups, and government agencies involved in trade and international affairs testified at a hearing on reauthorization of the Export Administration Act, which allowed the export of crude oil from Cook Inlet. Opponents to reauthorization cited the potential for compromising national security, the president's effort to circumvent congressional intent, and the possibility that trade balance benefits would be illusory. Proponents argued that oil exports would relieve the trade deficit with Japan, but would also remove trade barriers with other Pacific and Asian countries. West Coast consumers argued that the availability of Alaskan oil lowers their energy and product costs. Statements and letters submitted for the record and seven appendices with additional statements and a letter follow the testimony of the seven witnesses.

  16. Residential Conservation Service. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Energy Conservation and Power of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session, September 26, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Reviewing DOE's record of mismanaging the mandated residential conservation program in ways that delay and hinder congressional intent were 16 witnesses from the General Accounting Office, DOE, utilities, and conservation groups. DOE's performance reflects the administration's policy of reducing government involvement. Witnesses also reviewed the program itself to see if it is cost effective, whether it is reaching the right people, whether those who have energy audits take any different actions than those who don't, and whether there would be a better response from state programs. DOE representatives defended their performance in view of budget and staff reductions and the fact that a program evaluation was underway at the time. Material submitted for the record follows their testimony.

  17. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Sunshine Act regulations. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Energy Conservation and Power of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, May 21, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear Regulatory Commissioners and staff and representatives of Resources for the Future, Center for the Study of Responsive Law, and the Union of Concerned Scientists testified at a hearing held in response to a changed Commission meeting format allowing secret gatherings that would not have a formal transcript or written record for later assessment. Critics of the NRC's new regulation were opposed to both the concept of secret meetings and the fact that the Commissioners approved the plan without public comment. NRC Chairman Palladino countered that the change conforms with congressional intent as interpreted by the Supreme Court in a 1984 decision involving the Sunshine Act. At issue was the intent of the commissioners and the importance of public participation in the decision making process. Additional material submitted for the record follows the testimony of 12 witnesses.

  18. Delays in processing and adjudicating black lung claims. Hearing before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, June 24, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Representatives of coal miners and black lung claimants testified about the failure of government agencies to process claims in a fair and timely manner at a field hearing in Charleston, West Virginia before a joint congressional delegation. At issue were bureaucratic delays of up to seven years in administering the compensation promised to affected workers. Lawyers who handle black lung cases also have trouble receiving the guaranteed reimbursement. At the time of the hearing, West Virginia alone had over 3200 cases awaiting hearings and only 200 scheduled for hearings. Officials of the Department of Labor discussed the level of funding and staffing of the review board as they relate to the size of the backlog. Administrators complained that regulatory interpretations and attitudes work against the miners' interests. Letters, statements, and additional material submitted for the record follow the testimony of 12 witnesses.

  19. Strategic Petroleum Reserve - Part 2. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Fossil and Synthetic Fuels of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, March 4, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Part 2 of the hearing record covers the testimony of representatives of the General Accounting Office, DOE, the Petroleum Industry Research Foundation, and members of Congress on the future of the strategic petroleum (SPR) and the naval petroleum reserves (NPR). At issue was the Administration's plans to discontinue filling the SPR at the half-billion barrel mark raise and sell the NPR. Among the concerns under considerations was the adequacy of the reserves, the opportunity to buy petroleum for the reserves at a time when oil prices are low, and the opportunity to raise needed cash with a sale. Debate centers on financial and national security issues. Additional material submitted for the record by the witnesses, DOE, and the Congressional Research Service follows the testimony of the five witnesses.

  20. Microsoft Word - SEC J_Appendix S- Contracting Officer's Representative_s_

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) August 2012 Guidance for High TemperatureO, Page 1R,J,

  1. Method and apparatus for producing co-current fluid contact

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trutna, W.R.

    1997-12-09

    An improved packing system and method are disclosed wherein a packing section includes a liquid distributor and a separator placed above the distributor so that gas rising through the liquid distributor contacts liquid in the distributor, forming a gas-liquid combination which rises in co-current flow to the separator. Liquid is collected in the separator, from which gas rises. 13 figs.

  2. Policy ReseaRch WoRking PaPeR 4680 Safeguards and Antidumping in Latin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Policy ReseaRch WoRking PaPeR 4680 Safeguards and Antidumping in Latin American TradePublicDisclosureAuthorizedPublicDisclosureAuthorizedPublicDisclosureAuthorized #12;Produced by the Research Support Team Abstract The Policy ResearchWorking Paper Series they represent. Policy ReseaRch WoRking PaPeR 4680 The binding of tariff rates and adoption of the General

  3. Wind energy systems information user study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the results of a series of telephone interviews with potential users of information on wind energy conversion. These interviews, part of a larger study covering nine different solar technologies, attempted to identify: the type of information each distinctive group of information users needed, and the best way of getting information to that group. Groups studied include: wind energy conversion system researchers; wind energy conversion system manufacturer representatives; wind energy conversion system distributors; wind turbine engineers; utility representatives; educators; county agents and extension service agents; and wind turbine owners.

  4. Multi-Building Microgrids for a Distributed Energy Future in Portugal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendes, Goncalo

    2013-01-01

    electricity tariff “MT – Médias utilizações em ciclo semanal normal” for the Education,electricity tariff considered in the DER-CAM runs for the Education,

  5. Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    data, for example solar radiation, electricity tariff, technology costs,solar radiation data, electricity and natural gas tariffs, and the performance and cost

  6. Social Welfare implications of demand response programs in competitiv e electricity markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Richard N.; Neenan, Bernard F.

    2003-01-01

    Customer Electricity Demand Under Fixed Tariffs vs. Marketto re-emphasize that these electricity demands are the ones2. Customer Electricity Demand Under Fixed Tariffs vs.

  7. Essays on Trade and Production Sharing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noguera, Guillermo Marcelo

    2011-01-01

    I also collect data on free trade agreements and tariffs andand negatively related to free trade agreements andto be less responsive to free trade agreements and tariffs

  8. Carbon Offsetting: An Efficient Way to Reduce Emissions or to Avoid Reducing Emissions? An Investigation and Analysis of Offsetting Design and Practice in India and China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haya, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Central Electricity Regulatory Commission tariff order for renewable energyCentral Electricity Regulatory Commission (Terms and Conditions for Tariff determination from Renewable Energy

  9. Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    electricity tariff, technology costs, and governmenttariff Natural gas tariff Technology costs and financialand estimated the technology costs in the current Chinese

  10. Distillation sequence for the purification and recovery of hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reyneke, Rian (Katy, TX); Foral, Michael (Aurora, IL); Papadopoulos, Christos G. (Naperville, IL); Logsdon, Jeffrey S. (Naperville, IL); Eng, Wayne W. Y. (League City, TX); Lee, Guang-Chung (Houston, TX); Sinclair, Ian (Warrington, GB)

    2007-12-25

    This invention is an improved distillation sequence for the separation and purification of ethylene from a cracked gas. A hydrocarbon feed enters a C2 distributor column. The top of the C2 distributor column is thermally coupled to an ethylene distributor column, and the bottoms liquid of a C2 distributor column feeds a deethanizer column. The C2 distributor column utilizes a conventional reboiler. The top of the ethylene distributor is thermally coupled with a demethanizer column, and the bottoms liquid of the ethylene distributor feeds a C2 splitter column. The ethylene distributor column utilizes a conventional reboiler. The deethanizer and C2 splitter columns are also thermally coupled and operated at a substantially lower pressure than the C2 distributor column, the ethylene distributor column, and the demethanizer column. Alternatively, a hydrocarbon feed enters a deethanizer column. The top of the deethanizer is thermally coupled to an ethylene distributor column, and the ethylene distributor column utilizes a conventional reboiler. The top of the ethylene distributor column is thermally coupled with a demethanizer column, and the bottoms liquid of the ethylene distributor column feeds a C2 splitter column. The C2 splitter column operates at a pressure substantially lower than the ethylene distributor column, the demethanizer column, and the deethanizer column.

  11. As a participant in a New Hampshire 4-H Event, you have the responsibility of representing the New Hampshire 4-H Program to the public. You are expected to conduct yourself in a manner that will bring honor to you as well as to 4-H. To do that, you will n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    As a participant in a New Hampshire 4-H Event, you have the responsibility of representing the New to you and to misconduct in which you participate. New Hampshire 4-H. You are responsible for knowing in public areas. New Hampshire 4-H Event Youth Code of Conduct Those who find themselves unable to conduct

  12. As a chaperone/participant in a New Hampshire 4-H Event, you have the responsibility of representing the New Hampshire 4-H Program to the public. You have the responsibility to be a positive role model for youth and partner with other adults to ensure you

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    As a chaperone/participant in a New Hampshire 4-H Event, you have the responsibility of representing the New Hampshire 4-H Program to the public. You have the responsibility to be a positive role the University of New Hampshire, its trustees, officers, agents, employees, and volunteers from and against all

  13. H.R. 432: A Bill to amend chapter 601 of title 49, United States Code, to improve natural gas and hazardous liquid pipeline safety, in response to the natural gas pipeline accident in Edison, New Jersey, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This document contains H.R. 432, A Bill to amend chapter 601 of title 49, United States Code, to improve natural gas and hazardous liquid pipeline safety, in response to the natural gas pipeline accident in Edison, New Jersey, and for other purposes. This Bill was introduced in the House of Representatives, 104th Congress, First Session, January 5, 1995.

  14. The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (English Version)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

    2004-01-01

    photovoltaic PURPA Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act QFs qualifying facilities SBC system benefits charge SC Shading

  15. Poverty, Islamist Extremism, and the Debacle of Doha Round Counter-Terrorism: Part One of a Trilogy -- Agricultural Tariffs and Subsidies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhala, Raj

    2012-01-01

    . & POL’Y (forthcoming 2012) (40th Anniversary Symposium in Honor of Professor Ved Nanda). # Associate Dean for International and Comparative Law, and Rice Distinguished Professor, The University of Kansas, School of Law, Green Hall, 1535 West 15th... Told, REUTERS, Dec. 1, 2009, available at http://af.reuters.com/article/commoditiesNews/idAFGEE5B00G320091201?sp=true\\ (emphasis added) (quoting International Food Policy Research Institute study). 9 See RAJ BHALA, DICTIONARY OF INTERNATIONAL TRADE...

  16. The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (English Version)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

    2004-01-01

    shows how the necessary useful energy loads can be providedtotal energy output is in the form of useful thermal energy.Where useful thermal energy results from power production,

  17. Assessment of Distributed Energy Adoption in Commercial Buildings: Part 1: An Analysis of Policy, Building Loads, Tariff Design, and Technology Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan; Nishida, Masaru; Gao, Weijun; Marnay, Chris

    2005-01-01

    Assessment of Distributed Energy Adoption in Commercialand Renewable Energy, Distributed Energy Program of the U.S.Assessment of Distributed Energy Adoption in Commercial

  18. Assessment of Distributed Energy Adoption in Commercial Buildings: Part 1: An Analysis of Policy, Building Loads, Tariff Design, and Technology Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan; Nishida, Masaru; Gao, Weijun; Marnay, Chris

    2005-01-01

    systems, estimates of energy consumption intensities of various building types are typically obtained from the Natural Gas Cogeneration

  19. The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (English Version)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

    2004-01-01

    systems, estimates of energy consumption intensities of various building types are typically obtained from the Natural Gas Cogeneration

  20. The Ninth Annual DOE Solid-State Lighting Market Development Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Nearly 200 lighting leaders from across North America gathered in Detroit from November 12–13, 2014, for the ninth annual Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Market Development Workshop, hosted by DOE. The diverse audience spanned the spectrum of SSL stakeholders, representing industry, government, efficiency organizations, utilities, municipalities, designers, specifiers, retailers, and distributors. The workshop’s purpose was to create a forum for airing issues and questions regarding today’s solid-state lighting products, and identifying strategies that will speed market adoption.

  1. Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in the Republic of Korea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    dispenser or homebar door No CCE below Tariff Residential Freezers Split Room Air Conditioners Motors

  2. FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    filings involving market pricing or rules; * modify: existing transmission or power exchange tariffs

  3. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01

    Central Electricity Regulatory Commission, CERC (2009). Terms and Conditions for Tariff determination from Renewable Energy

  4. NCBI Handout Series | Clone DB | Last Update: August 19, 2013 Contact: info@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov Repository for DNA clones with integrated information on sequences, maps and distributors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Judith G.

    terms are automatically entered in the query box (F). Clicking the "Add to history" link (G) pre- views box so custom terms such as a search history (#9) can be added. Displaying the search results A search for accessing data from CloneDB: Text searching through the Clone DB homepage www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/clone/ Bulk

  5. 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About Us ShirleyU.S. DRIVE11 CostProposed Rulemaking |5Template||UNITED10

  6. DATE: December 10, 2014 MEMO TO: Curricular Representative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emshwiller, Eve

    for Curricular Updates Monday, February 16 ­ Wednesday, February 25 Term 1162 available online in Class Search Call for Curricular Updates Tuesday, October 28 ­ Friday, January 2 Enter curricular updates in ISIS

  7. The politics of representing the past in Bolivia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Edward Fabian

    2009-01-01

    Anthropology by Edward Fabian Kennedy Committee in charge:Copyright Edward Fabian Kennedy, 2009 All rights reserved.Dissertation of Edward Fabian Kennedy is approved, and it is

  8. The politics of representing the past in Bolivia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Edward Fabian

    2009-01-01

    Identity. ” In Social Movements and Culture. Edited by HankNomads of the Present: Social Movements and Individual Needsof Collective Action: Social Movements and Challenges to ‘

  9. Greening the U.S. House of Representatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond,, Rick

    2008-01-01

    2009. 2. Reduce the carbon footprint of the House by cuttingroadmap to reducing the carbon footprint of the House, whileGoal #2: Reduce the carbon footprint of the House by cutting

  10. Fate of a representative pharmaceutical in the environment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morse, Audra; Jackson, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    ). Sources of antibiotics include the treatment of human infections, veterinary use (e.g., animal feeding operations), aquaculture, and land application of compost containing sludge from wastewater treatment plants. In human uses, which will be the primary...). Peniciloly groups were observed at concentrations greater than 25 ng/L and 10 mg/L in river water and potable water, respectively (Halling-Sorensen et al., 1998). Therefore, wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are receiving wastes that contain low...

  11. Howard University Researchers Represented in the E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ww.biology.howard.edu FacultyFacultyBiosEckberg.htm Hindman, Neil - Department of Mathematics, Howard University http:mysite.verizon.netnhindman Sitaraman, Sankar -...

  12. U.S. Representative Cleaver congratulates KCP employees for safety...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    The relocation teams have safely and securely moved a wide range of equipment including tools weighing as little as six ounces to a milling machine weighing 87,000 pounds. By the...

  13. August 20, 2014 meeting with DOE representatives regarding the...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Furnaces; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking and Public Meeting American Gas Association (AGA) for DOE Furnace Product Class AGAAPGA Questions re Pre-publication Furnace NOPR...

  14. August 20, 2014 meeting with DOE representatives regarding the...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Residential Furnaces; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking and Public Meeting American Gas Association (AGA) for DOE Furnace Product Class Memorandum Summarizing Ex Parte Communication...

  15. United States House of Representatives House Armed Services Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Fred B.

    create paths that enable attackers to compromise some system that is not seen as critical, and thus Information Technology and Cybersecurity Activities Dr. Fred B. Schneider fbs@cs.cornell.edu (607) 255 a Computer Science faculty member since 1978, actively involved in research, education, and in various

  16. Representing mechanical assemblies with features and mating conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qamar, Sayyad Zahid

    1993-01-01

    are discussed. Use of the representation system is demonstrated through drawings and data-structures of example products, both simple and reasonably complex....

  17. Extracting Emotion From Movement: Representing Interactions as Glyphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharlin, Ehud

    to interact in a way that is socially acceptable. It will be useful to have tools to understand, evaluate objects interacting, such as leaves blowing in the wind, they often translate the interaction

  18. Electron temperature anisotropy instabilities represented by superposition of streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inglebert, A.; Ghizzo, A.; Reveille, T.; Bertrand, P. [IJL UMR 7198, Universite de Lorraine, BP 70239 F-54506 Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France); Califano, F. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    The generation of magnetic field, together with the electrostatic activity met in the saturation regime of the Weibel instability (WI), is investigated by means of an analytical multi-stream model in a Hamiltonian framework. Taking advantage from the invariance of the generalized canonical momentum, the model allows to reduce the full kinetic 1D2V Vlasov equation into several 1D1V equations while keeping its kinetic character. The multi-stream model provides a more complete and accurate picture of the Weibel instability, because it is possible to separate the specific contribution of each stream during the development of the Weibel instability. An interesting result for the multi-stream mode is a lower cost in the perpendicular treatment of the p{sub y} momentum component since no differential operator associated with some approximate numerical scheme has to be carried out on this variable. Indeed, a small number of streams or particle classes are sufficient to correctly describe the magnetic field generation and the mixed electrostatic- electromagnetic nature of the instability.

  19. On Representing Coalitional Games with Externalities Tomasz Michalak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woolridge, Mike

    Sroka Institute of Informatics Uni. of Warsaw, Poland sroka@mimuw.edu.pl Andrew Dowell Dept. of Computer

  20. Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Project Technologies: Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Jason C.; Prakash Kumar, Nirupama; Bonebrake, Christopher A.

    2012-02-14

    This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of a limited number of demand response technologies and implementations deployed in the SGIG projects.

  1. Representing Fluid with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics in a Cranial Base

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salisbury, Kenneth

    . The Stanford SPRING project, for example, recognizes the need for including smoke and blood by computing these forces, and by constructing neighbor lists for the interacting particles. The latter is typically accelerated by means of spatial decomposition. The pressure force penalizes fluid compression

  2. Explicitly representing soil microbial processes in Earth system models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Jenkinson, D. S. , and J. H. Rayner (1977), The turnover ofD. S. , P. B. S. Hart, J. H. Rayner, and L. C. Parry (1987),Ecol. Appl. , 15, 71–86. Rayner, P. J. , M. Scholze, W.

  3. Representing integers as linear combinations of power products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajdu, Lajos

    2012-01-01

    Let P be a finite set of at least two prime numbers, and A the set of positive integers that are products of powers of primes from P. Let F(k) denote the smallest positive integer which cannot be presented as sum of less than k terms of A. In a recent paper Nathanson asked to determine the properties of the function F(k), in particular to estimate its growth rate. In this paper we derive several results on F(k) and on the related function which denotes the smallest positive integer which cannot be presented as sum of less than k terms from the union of A and -A.

  4. Greening the U.S. House of Representatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond,, Rick

    2008-01-01

    and maintenance o Retrofit motors with premium efficient motors o Evaluate retrofit potential of variable-speed drives on pump

  5. On the Adequacy of Program Dependence Graphs for Representing Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reps, Thomas W.

    introduced by Kuck as an intermediate program representation well suited for performing optimizations are strongly equivalent. 1. Introduction Program dependence graphs were introduced by Kuck as an intermediate

  6. Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Asa S.

    2011-01-01

    Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus Asa S. Hopkins, Alex Lekov,Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus 1. Executive Summary……B: Details of Running EnergyPlus Simulations on Amazon

  7. Introduction Chaperonins represent a ubiquitous and essential family of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archibald, John

    ). Group II chaperonins possess eight different subunits per ring with the exception of some archaeal cpn60, chaperonins of bacterial origin are classified as Group I (Horwich and Willison, 1993). Their distant relatives, termed Group II chaperonins, are found in the cytosols of eukaryotes and archaea

  8. Representing Uncertainty in Decision Support Harvey J. Greenberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Harvey J.

    overlapping factors. · Source of uncertainty. Is it a future event, such as product demand? Is it ignorance defines a proven reserve? · Time scale. Is the decision a strategic one, to cover a planning horizon? Is it a major setback, such as the loss of a company? Is it catastrophic, such as the loss of a city? · Decision

  9. W&M Student Elected to Represent American Physical Society's...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the APS and the scientific community at large and to enhance the ability of APS to meet the needs of graduate students. It also offers support services and encourages...

  10. Greening the U.S. House of Representatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond,, Rick

    2008-01-01

    practices for operations and maintenance o Monitor energypractices for operations and maintenance o Retrofit motorsoperations of the House office buildings, including maintenance,

  11. Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Asa S.

    2011-01-01

    effects between efficiency measures, and the savings for theappliance efficiency measures result in less overall savingsmeasure. (Energy savings from national appliance efficiency

  12. BUNCH THEORY Bunches can be used to represent collections.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hehner, Eric C.R.

    .7 #12;STRING THEORY nil the empty string 2 4; 2; 4; 6 ±(4; 2; 4; 6) = 4 4 ; 2 ; 4 ; 6 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 (3 = nil , 3 , 3;3 , 3;3;3 , ... 2.8 #12;LIST THEORY [0; 1; 2] [0; 1; 2]: [nat; 1; (0,..10)]: [3*nat = 4 B 1 1 L@nil = L L@n = L n L@(S; T) = L@S@T B@(2; 1; 0) = B 2 1 0 = 6 nili | L = i (S;T) i | L = S

  13. The politics of representing the past in Bolivia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Edward Fabian

    2009-01-01

    govern the country. But we have the majority! We have Evo.need to support MAS…support Evo. We need the country to knowwiphalas. We need to show Evo that he has campesino support.

  14. Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    personnel security, cyber security, and the protection of Department assets, such as computers, firearms, and nuclear materials. STATEMENT OF HERBERT RICHARDSON PRINCIPAL DEPUTY...

  15. Representing Language: Essays in Honor of Judith Aissen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutiérrez-Bravo, Rodrigo; Mikkelsen, Line; Potsdam, Eric

    2011-01-01

    waschen musste]. that he the car wash had.to ‘Tim regrettednot? *I asked Harvey to wash the car, but I expected him toto: I asked Harvey to wash the car, but I expected him not

  16. PolisGnosis Project: Representing and Analysing City Indicators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yu

    cities, assuming they adhere to the standard. The goal of this research is to develop theories, embodiedGnosis Analysis Engine Indicator Theme Knowledge Indicator Theme Knowledge Semantic Web #12;The blue boxes focus data formats into a standard representation that can be published on the Semantic Web. The green boxes

  17. ROWLBAC -Representing Role Based Access Control in OWL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Jianwei

    two parallel themes in access control re- search in recent years. On the one hand there are efforts show two dif- ferent ways to support the NIST Standard RBAC model in OWL and then discuss how the OWL in infrastructures such as Grid computing, web services and pervasive computing. These systems must exchange

  18. Representing the Semantics of Geographic Information in Ontologies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ou, Yang

    2007-08-15

    Currently, one of the key issues facing applications and integration of Geographic Information Systems is the lack of interoperability among various systems due to the diversity of data representations. The semantics of ...

  19. A comparison of methods for representing sparsely sampled random quantities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero, Vicente Jose; Swiler, Laura Painton; Urbina, Angel; Mullins, Joshua

    2013-09-01

    This report discusses the treatment of uncertainties stemming from relatively few samples of random quantities. The importance of this topic extends beyond experimental data uncertainty to situations involving uncertainty in model calibration, validation, and prediction. With very sparse data samples it is not practical to have a goal of accurately estimating the underlying probability density function (PDF). Rather, a pragmatic goal is that the uncertainty representation should be conservative so as to bound a specified percentile range of the actual PDF, say the range between 0.025 and .975 percentiles, with reasonable reliability. A second, opposing objective is that the representation not be overly conservative; that it minimally over-estimate the desired percentile range of the actual PDF. The presence of the two opposing objectives makes the sparse-data uncertainty representation problem interesting and difficult. In this report, five uncertainty representation techniques are characterized for their performance on twenty-one test problems (over thousands of trials for each problem) according to these two opposing objectives and other performance measures. Two of the methods, statistical Tolerance Intervals and a kernel density approach specifically developed for handling sparse data, exhibit significantly better overall performance than the others.

  20. Bachelor Thesis Determination of the Representative Elementary Volume for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    -investigations of Silicon Solar Cells Introduction The metallization interface of textured silicon solar cells are extremely-tomograms of the metallization interface of a solar cell and determine different properties from the reconstructed volumes of the metallization interface of a textured silicon solar cell. #12;