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1

Integrating synthetic flood data for selection of regional frequency distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Regional frequency distributions are estimated using respective regional average coefficients of variance, skewness and kurtosis. The regional average coefficients may be significantly biased for a region with inadequate hydrometric data. The objective of this study is to select suitable regional frequency distributions in previously identified five hydrologic homogeneous regions of Nepalese territory with larger focus on data-scarce regions. Incorporation of synthetic flood data has been proposed in two hydrologic regions which have insufficient hydrometric data. A SimHyd rainfall runoff model was employed for the generation of synthetic flood data to augment hydrometric data inadequacy. Selection of best-fit regional frequency distribution was identified using L-moment ratio diagrams and goodness-of-fit measure. The selected distributions were tested by comparing observation and regional distribution factors at eight observation hydrometric sites. Incorporation of synthetic flood data enabled to reduce regional distribution factor error to 6% from that of 10%.

Binaya Kumar Mishra; Kaoru Takara

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Segmentation and morphometric analysis of subcortical regions in autistic MR brain images using fuzzy Gaussian distribution model-based distance regularised multi-phase level set  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, subcortical regions of autism spectrum disorder are analysed using fuzzy Gaussian distribution model-based distance regularised multi-phase level set method in autistic MR brain images. The fuzzy Gaussian distribution model is used as the intensity discriminator. The segmented images are validated with the ground truth using geometrical measure area. The results show that the fuzzy Gaussian distribution model-based multi-phase level set method is able to extract the subcortical tissue boundaries. The subcortical regions segmented using this method gives high correlation with ground truth. The corpus callosum area gives very high (R = 0.94) correlation. The brain stem and cerebellum present high correlations of 0.89 and 0.84, respectively. Also, it is found the segmented autistic subcortical regions have reduced area and are statistically significant (p brain area.

A.R. Jac Fredo; G. Kavitha; S. Ramakrishnan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Modeling soil salinity distribution along topographic gradients in tidal salt marshes in Atlantic and Gulf coastal regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil salinity plays a very important role in determining the distribution of vegetation, plant productivity, and biogeochemical processes in coastal marsh ecosystems. Salinity gradients and salinity–vegetation associations in salt marshes have often been observed but rarely explained. A quantitative and systematic study on the soil salinity distribution in salt marshes is not only important to the understanding of coastal marsh ecosystems but also to the development of a potentially useful ecological and environmental indicator. In this research, we developed a salt marsh soil salinity model based on an existing salt and water balance model with modifications to several key features to examine the impacts of tidal forcing, climate, soil, vegetation, and topography on soil salinity distributions of the Atlantic and Gulf coastal marshes. This model was calibrated and validated using field observations from the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) of northwestern Florida, USA. The results showed that the model had good agreement (r2 = 0.84, n = 15, P salinity maximum in a coastal salt marsh. Simulations indicate that tidal irregularity primarily controls the width of the salinity maximum band. Evapotranspiration, temperature, hydraulic conductivity, and incoming tidal salinity significantly affect the salinity maximum band, which may lead to the formation of salt barrens/flats when reaching a threshold level.

Hongqing Wang; Y. Ping Hsieh; Mark A. Harwell; Wenrui Huang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

THE COLD SHOULDER: EMISSION MEASURE DISTRIBUTIONS OF ACTIVE REGION CORES  

SciTech Connect

The coronal heating mechanism for active region core loops is difficult to determine because these loops are often not resolved and cannot be studied individually. Rather, we concentrate on the 'inter-moss' areas between loop footpoints. We use observations from the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer and the X-Ray Telescope to calculate the emission measure distributions of eight inter-moss areas in five different active regions. The combined data sets provide both high- and low-temperature constraints and ensure complete coverage in the temperature range appropriate for active regions. For AR 11113, the emission can be modeled with heating events that occur on timescales less than the cooling time. The loops in the core regions appear to be close to equilibrium and are consistent with steady heating. The other regions studied, however, appear to be dominated by nanoflare heating. Our results are consistent with the idea that active region age is an important parameter in determining whether steady or nanoflare heating is primarily responsible for the core emission, that is, older regions are more likely to be dominated by steady heating, while younger regions show more evidence of nanoflares.

Schmelz, J. T.; Pathak, S., E-mail: jschmelz@memphis.edu [Physics Department, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

5

Three-dimensional modeling of ionized gas. II. Spectral energy distributions of massive and very massive stars in stationary and time-dependent modeling of the ionization of metals in HII regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HII regions play a crucial role in the measurement of the chemical composition of the interstellar medium and provide fundamental data about element abundances that constrain models of galactic chemical evolution. Discrepancies that still exist between observed emission line strengths and those predicted by nebular models can be partly attributed to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the sources of ionizing radiation used in the models as well as simplifying assumptions made in nebular modeling. The influence of stellar metallicity on nebular line strength ratios, via its effect on the SEDs, is of similar importance as variations in the nebular metallicity. We have computed a grid of model atmosphere SEDs for massive and very massive O-type stars covering a range of metallicities from significantly subsolar (0.1 Zsun) to supersolar (2 Zsun). The SEDs have been computed using a state-of-the-art model atmosphere code that takes into account the attenuation of the ionizing flux by the spectral lines of ...

Weber, J A; Hoffmann, T L

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Marine Biodiversity in the Regional Estimates and Distribution Patterns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marine Biodiversity in the Caribbean Regional Estimates and Distribution Patterns Patricia www.ploscollections.org/coml/marine_biodiversity Elva Escobar-Briones Juan José Cruz-Motta Ernesto Aniuska Kazandjian Manuel Ortiz PLoS ONE Collection: Marine Biodiversity and Biogeography Regional

Bermingham, Eldredge

7

Modeling the distribution of the West Nile and Rift Valley Fever vector Culex pipiens in arid and semi-arid regions of the Middle East and North Africa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Middle East North Africa (MENA) region is under continuous threat of the re-emergence of West Nile virus (WNV) and Rift Valley Fever virus (RVF), two pathogens transmitted...Culex pipiens. Predicting areas at...

Amy K Conley; Douglas O Fuller; Nabil Haddad; Ali N Hassan…

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Distribution of oceanic 137Cs from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant simulated numerically by a regional ocean model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radioactive materials were released to the environment from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant as a result of the reactor accident after the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami of 11 March 2011. The measured 137Cs concentration in a seawater sample near the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant site reached 68 kBq L?1 (6.8 × 104 Bq L?1) on 6 April. The two major likely pathways from the accident site to the ocean existed: direct release of high radioactive liquid wastes to the ocean and the deposition of airborne radioactivity to the ocean surface. By analysis of the 131I/137Cs activity ratio, we determined that direct release from the site contributed more to the measured 137Cs concentration than atmospheric deposition did. We then used a regional ocean model to simulate the 137Cs concentrations resulting from the direct release to the ocean off Fukushima and found that from March 26 to the end of May the total amount of 137Cs directly released was 3.5 ± 0.7 PBq ((3.5 ± 0.7) × 1015 Bq). The simulated temporal change in 137Cs concentrations near the Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Plant site agreed well with observations. Our simulation results showed that (1) the released 137Cs advected southward along the coast during the simulation period; (2) the eastward-flowing Kuroshio and its extension transported 137C during May 2011; and (3) 137Cs concentrations decreased to less than 10 Bq L?1 by the end of May 2011 in the whole simulation domain as a result of oceanic advection and diffusion. We compared the total amount and concentration of 137Cs released from the Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors to the ocean with the 137Cs released to the ocean by global fallout. Even though the measured 137Cs concentration from the Fukushima accident was the highest recorded, the total released amount of 137Cs was not very large. Therefore, the effect of 137Cs released from the Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors on concentration in the whole North Pacific was smaller than that of past release events such as global fallout, and the amount of 137Cs expected to reach other oceanic basins is negligible comparing with the past radioactive input.

Daisuke Tsumune; Takaki Tsubono; Michio Aoyama; Katsumi Hirose

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China - a Regional  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China - a Regional Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China - a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions Title Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China - a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions Publication Type Conference Proceedings Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-81770 Year of Publication 2012 Authors Feng, Wei, Nan Zhou, Chris Marnay, Michael Stadler, and Judy Lai Conference Name 2012 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, August 12-17, 2012 Date Published 08/2012 Conference Location Pacific Grove, California ISBN Number 0-918249-XX-X Notes LBNL - XXXXX Refereed Designation Refereed Attachment Size PDF 5 MB Google Scholar BibTex RIS RTF XML Alternate URL: http://eetd.lbl.gov/node/52998

10

DATABASE Open Access Regional distribution of mercury in sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DATABASE Open Access Regional distribution of mercury in sediments of the main rivers of French led to locally high concentrations in soils and sediments. The present study maps the levels of Hg concentrations in river sediments from five main rivers of French Guiana (Approuague River, Comté River, Mana

Boyer, Edmond

11

Models on Distributed Memory Architectures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5/2004 Y.He 1 5/2004 Y.He 1 MPH: a Library for Coupling Multi-Component Models on Distributed Memory Architectures and its Applications Yun (Helen) He and Chris Ding CRD Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 10/15/2004 Y.He 2 10/15/2004 Y.He 3 Motivation n Application problems grow in scale & complexity n Effective organization of simulation software system that is maintainable, reusable, sharable, and efficient è a major issue n Community Climate System Model (CCSM) development n Software lasts much longer than a computer! 10/15/2004 Y.He 4

12

Regions in Energy Market Models  

SciTech Connect

This report explores the different options for spatial resolution of an energy market model--and the advantages and disadvantages of models with fine spatial resolution. It examines different options for capturing spatial variations, considers the tradeoffs between them, and presents a few examples from one particular model that has been run at different levels of spatial resolution.

Short, W.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Distributed Energy Resources Market Diffusion Model  

SciTech Connect

Distributed generation (DG) technologies, such as gas-fired reciprocating engines and microturbines, have been found to be economically beneficial in meeting commercial-sector electrical, heating, and cooling loads. Even though the electric-only efficiency of DG is lower than that offered by traditional central stations, combined heat and power (CHP) applications using recovered heat can make the overall system energy efficiency of distributed energy resources (DER) greater. From a policy perspective, however, it would be useful to have good estimates of penetration rates of DER under various economic and regulatory scenarios. In order to examine the extent to which DER systems may be adopted at a national level, we model the diffusion of DER in the US commercial building sector under different technical research and technology outreach scenarios. In this context, technology market diffusion is assumed to depend on the system's economic attractiveness and the developer's knowledge about the technology. The latter can be spread both by word-of-mouth and by public outreach programs. To account for regional differences in energy markets and climates, as well as the economic potential for different building types, optimal DER systems are found for several building types and regions. Technology diffusion is then predicted via two scenarios: a baseline scenario and a program scenario, in which more research improves DER performance and stronger technology outreach programs increase DER knowledge. The results depict a large and diverse market where both optimal installed capacity and profitability vary significantly across regions and building types. According to the technology diffusion model, the West region will take the lead in DER installations mainly due to high electricity prices, followed by a later adoption in the Northeast and Midwest regions. Since the DER market is in an early stage, both technology research and outreach programs have the potential to increase DER adoption, and thus, shift building energy consumption to a more efficient alternative.

Maribu, Karl Magnus; Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui,Afzal S.

2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

14

New model for nucleon generalized parton distributions  

SciTech Connect

We describe a new type of models for nucleon generalized parton distributions (GPDs) H and E. They are heavily based on the fact nucleon GPDs require to use two forms of double distribution (DD) representations. The outcome of the new treatment is that the usual DD+D-term construction should be amended by an extra term, {xi} E{sub +}{sup 1} (x,{xi}) which has the DD structure {alpha}/{beta} e({beta},{alpha}, with e({beta},{alpha}) being the DD that generates GPD E(x,{xi}). We found that this function, unlike the D-term, has support in the whole -1 <= x <= 1 region. Furthermore, it does not vanish at the border points |x|={xi}.

Radyushkin, Anatoly V. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Regional Climate Modeling: Progress, Challenges, and Prospects  

SciTech Connect

Regional climate modeling with regional climate models (RCMs) has matured over the past decade and allows for meaningful utilization in a broad spectrum of applications. In this paper, latest progresses in regional climate modeling studies are reviewed, including RCM development, applications of RCMs to dynamical downscaling for climate change assessment, seasonal climate predictions and climate process studies, and the study of regional climate predictability. Challenges and potential directions of future research in this important area are discussed, with the focus on those to which less attention has been given previously, such as the importance of ensemble simulations, further development and improvement of regional climate modeling approach, modeling extreme climate events and sub-daily variation of clouds and precipitation, model evaluation and diagnostics, applications of RCMs to climate process studies and seasonal predictions, and development of regional earth system models. It is believed that with both the demonstrated credibility of RCMs’ capability in reproducing not only monthly to seasonal mean climate and interannual variability but also the extreme climate events when driven by good quality reanalysis and the continuous improvements in the skill of global general circulation models (GCMs) in simulating large-scale atmospheric circulation, regional climate modeling will remain an important dynamical downscaling tool for providing the needed information for assessing climate change impacts and seasonal climate predictions, and a powerful tool for improving our understanding of regional climate processes. An internationally coordinated effort can be developed with different focuses by different groups to advance regional climate modeling studies. It is also recognized that since the final quality of the results from nested RCMs depends in part on the realism of the large-scale forcing provided by GCMs, the reduction of errors and improvement in physics parameterizations in both GCMs and RCMs remain a priority for climate modeling community.

Wang, Yuqing; Leung, Lai R.; McGregor, John L.; Lee, Dong-Kyou; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Ding, Yihui; Kimura, Fujio

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Photovoltaic subsystem marketing and distribution model: programming manual. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Complete documentation of the marketing and distribution (M and D) computer model is provided. The purpose is to estimate the costs of selling and transporting photovoltaic solar energy products from the manufacturer to the final customer. The model adjusts for the inflation and regional differences in marketing and distribution costs. The model consists of three major components: the marketing submodel, the distribution submodel, and the financial submodel. The computer program is explained including the input requirements, output reports, subprograms and operating environment. The program specifications discuss maintaining the validity of the data and potential improvements. An example for a photovoltaic concentrator collector demonstrates the application of the model.

Not Available

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Regional Dynamics Model (REDYN) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regional Dynamics Model (REDYN) Regional Dynamics Model (REDYN) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: REDYN Agency/Company /Organization: Regional Dynamics Inc. Sector: Energy Phase: Determine Baseline, "Evaluate Options and Determine Feasibility" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property., Develop Goals Topics: Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Co-benefits assessment, - Macroeconomic Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.regionaldynamics.com/

18

Pseudoabsence Generation Strategies for Species Distribution Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pseudoabsence Generation Strategies for Species Distribution Models Brice B. Hanberry1 *, Hong S: Pseudoabsence generation strategy completely affected the area predicted as present for species distribution) Pseudoabsence Generation Strategies for Species Distribution Models. PLoS ONE 7(8): e44486. doi:10.1371/ journal

He, Hong S.

19

NETL: Predictive Modeling and Evaluation - CMU Regional Modeling Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Source-Receptor Modeling Study Regional Source-Receptor Modeling Study The Pittsburgh Air Quality Study (PAQS) [PDF-744KB] is comprised of three inter-related components: 1) ambient PM measurements, 2) source characterization, and 3) deterministic and statistical air quality modeling. This effort will permit clarification of the contribution of coal-fired power plants to fine ambient PM2.5 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 µm). The resources from the Department of Energy (DOE) will be leveraged with resources from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other organizations. Clarkson University (Hopke group) will apply advanced receptor models to identify the nature, location and contribution of the sources of particulate matter observed by the measurements made as part of the PAQS. Several forms of factor analysis including Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) and UNMIX will be applied in order to identify the composition and contributions of the sources. Potential Source Contribution Function analysis as well as Residence Time Weighted Concentration analysis will be applied to the determination of the locations of the likely major contributing sources. The aforementioned factor analysis methods will also be applied to the spatially distributed data both on a single species and multiple species basis and to compare these results with those obtained utilizing the back-trajectory-based methods. The availability of highly time resolved data should permit greater source resolution and will be examined to determine how much increased source specificity can be obtained from the increased time resolution in the data. Assistance will be provided with the multivariate calibration that will permit the use of single-particle mass spectrometry data to estimate ambient concentrations of particulate species. These analyses should provide a better understanding of the source/receptor relationships that lead to the observed particle concentrations in the Pittsburgh area.

20

Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI) Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI) Model Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI) Model Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: REMI Agency/Company /Organization: Regional Economic Models Inc. Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Phase: Determine Baseline, Develop Goals Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.remi.com/ Cost: Paid References: http://www.remi.com/index.php?page=overview&hl=en_US Related Tools Job and Economic Development Impact Models (JEDI) The Integrated Environmental Strategies Handbook: A Resource Guide for Air Quality Planning

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distribution model regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Characteristics of the size distribution of recent and historical landslides in a populated hilly region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Despite the availability of studies on the frequency density of landslide areas in mountainous regions, frequency–area distributions of historical landslide inventories in populated hilly regions are absent. This study revealed that the frequency–area distribution derived from a detailed landslide inventory of the Flemish Ardennes (Belgium) is significantly different from distributions usually obtained in mountainous areas where landslides are triggered by large-scale natural causal factors such as rainfall, earthquakes or rapid snowmelt. Instead, the landslide inventory consists of the superposition of two populations, i.e. (i) small ( 1–2 · 10? 2 km2), deep-seated landslides that are older than 100 yr. Both subpopulations are best represented by a negative power–law relation with exponents of ? 0.58 and ? 2.31 respectively. This study focused on the negative power–law relation obtained for recent, small landslides, and contributes to the understanding of frequency distributions of landslide areas by presenting a conceptual model explaining this negative power–law relation for small landslides in populated hilly regions. According to the model hilly regions can be relatively stable under the present-day environmental conditions, and landslides are mainly triggered by human activities that have only a local impact on slope stability. Therefore, landslides caused by anthropogenic triggers are limited in size, and the number of landslides decreases with landslide area. The frequency density of landslide areas for old landslides is similar to those obtained for historical inventories compiled in mountainous areas, as apart from the negative power–law relation with exponent ? 2.31 for large landslides, a positive power–law relation followed by a rollover is observed for smaller landslides. However, when analysing the old landslides together with the more recent ones, the present-day higher temporal frequency of small landslides compared to large landslides, obscures the positive power–law relation and rollover.

M. Van Den Eeckhaut; J. Poesen; G. Govers; G. Verstraeten; A. Demoulin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Regional Distribution of the Locomotor Pattern-Generating Network in the Neonatal Rat Spinal Cord  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional Distribution of the Locomotor Pattern-Generating Network in the Neonatal Rat Spinal Cord K/NMA, and was evidence of a distributed organization of unit generators inmonitored via hindlimb flexor (peroneal, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0W3, Canada Cowley, K. C. and B. J. Schmidt. Regional distribution of the rhythmic

Manitoba, University of

23

DISTRIBUTION OF SIPHONOPHORES IN THE REGIONS ADJACENT TO THE SUEZ AND PANAMA CANALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DISTRIBUTION OF SIPHONOPHORES IN THE REGIONS ADJACENT TO THE SUEZ AND PANAMA CANALS ANGELES ALVARIN in the Caribbean and the Pacific regions adjacent to the Panama Canal. Published information on the distribution were observed in the Caribbean and Pacific regions adjacent to the Panama Canal. Most of the species

24

Gas Distribution Modeling using Sparse Gaussian Process Mixture Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Distribution Modeling using Sparse Gaussian Process Mixture Models Cyrill Stachniss1 Christian-- In this paper, we consider the problem of learning a two dimensional spatial model of a gas distribution with a mobile robot. Building maps that can be used to accurately predict the gas concentration at query

Stachniss, Cyrill

25

Survey of Emissions Models for Distributed Combined Heat and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Survey of Emissions Models for Distributed Combined Heat and Power Systems, 2007 Survey of Emissions Models for Distributed Combined Heat and Power Systems, 2007 The models...

26

Modeling distributed generation in the buildings sectors  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Modeling distributed generation Modeling distributed generation in the buildings sectors August 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Modeling distributed generation in the buildings sectors i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. July 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Modeling distributed generation in the buildings sectors 1

27

A Conceptual Model of the Surface Salinity Distribution in the Oceanic Hadley Cell  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A conceptual model of the salinity distribution in the oceanic Hadley cell is presented. The model pertains to the region of tropical easterly surface winds, where the surface salinity increases poleward from a local salinity minimum near the ...

Johan Nilsson; Heiner Körnich

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Regional distributions of nitrogen-fixing bacteria in the Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: We evaluated the regional distributions of six nitrogen (N2)-fixing bacteria in the North Pacific Ocean using quantitative polymerase chain reaction

29

A correlated K-distribution model of the heating rates for H[sub 2]O and a molecular mixture in the 0-2500 cm[sup [minus]1] wavelength region in the atmosphere between 0 and 60 km  

SciTech Connect

For this report a prototype infrared radiative transfer model using a correlated k-distribution technique to calculate the transmission between atmospheric levels has been used to calculate the radiative fluxes and heating rates for H[sub 2]O and a mixture of the major molecular absorbers in the atmosphere between 0 and 60 km. The mixture consists of H[sub 2]O, CO[sub 2], O[sub 3], CH[sub 4], and N[sub 2]O. The wave number range considered is 0-2500 cm[sup [minus]1]. The use of the k-distribution method allows 25 cm[sup [minus]1] wave number bins to produce fluxes and heating rates which are within ten percent of the results of detailed line by line calculations.

Grossman, A S; Grant, K E

1992-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

30

Auroral electron distributions within and close to the Saturn kilometric radiation source region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Auroral electron distributions within and close to the Saturn kilometric radiation source region P al. (2011), Auroral electron distributions within and close to the Saturn kilometric radiation source the electron cyclotron frequency, consistent with in situ observations of the SKR source region [Lamy et al

Gurnett, Donald A.

31

Distributed Wind Diffusion Model Overview (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Distributed wind market demand is driven by current and future wind price and performance, along with several non-price market factors like financing terms, retail electricity rates and rate structures, future wind incentives, and others. We developed a new distributed wind technology diffusion model for the contiguous United States that combines hourly wind speed data at 200m resolution with high resolution electricity load data for various consumer segments (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial), electricity rates and rate structures for utility service territories, incentive data, and high resolution tree cover. The model first calculates the economics of distributed wind at high spatial resolution for each market segment, and then uses a Bass diffusion framework to estimate the evolution of market demand over time. The model provides a fundamental new tool for characterizing how distributed wind market potential could be impacted by a range of future conditions, such as electricity price escalations, improvements in wind generator performance and installed cost, and new financing structures. This paper describes model methodology and presents sample results for distributed wind market potential in the contiguous U.S. through 2050.

Preus, R.; Drury, E.; Sigrin, B.; Gleason, M.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Projected impacts of climate change on species distribution in the Acadian Forest region of eastern Nova Scotia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.e., hydrological cycle and earth- sun geometry. Growing degree days and mean air temperature are basedProjected impacts of climate change on species distribution in the Acadian Forest region of eastern on processing remote sensing data, mean air temperatures serves as one of several inputs to model calculation

33

Adjoint modeling for atmospheric pollution process sensitivity at regional scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adjoint modeling for atmospheric pollution process sensitivity at regional scale Laurent Menut; 0345 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Pollution--urban and regional (0305); 3210 Mathematical: atmospheric pollution, tropospheric ozone, urban pollution peaks, adjoint modeling, sensitivity Citation

Menut, Laurent

34

The MAGS Regional Climate Modeling System: CRCM-MAGS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Mackenzie GEWEX Study (MAGS) regional climate modeling system (denoted CRCM-MAGS) is a developmental version of the Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM) tailored for use over North America. It is compose...

Murray MacKay; Paul Bartlett; Ed Chan…

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Synthesised Constraint Models for Distributed Energy Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for optimisation have been widely ignored ­ a gap we aim to close. As a by-product, we give a formulation of warmSynthesised Constraint Models for Distributed Energy Management Alexander Schiendorfer, Jan frequently encountered in energy management systems such as the coordination of power generators in a virtual

Reif, Wolfgang

36

California Wintertime Precipitation in Regional and Global Climate Models  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, wintertime precipitation from a variety of observational datasets, regional climate models (RCMs), and general circulation models (GCMs) is averaged over the state of California (CA) and compared. Several averaging methodologies are considered and all are found to give similar values when model grid spacing is less than 3{sup o}. This suggests that CA is a reasonable size for regional intercomparisons using modern GCMs. Results show that reanalysis-forced RCMs tend to significantly overpredict CA precipitation. This appears to be due mainly to overprediction of extreme events; RCM precipitation frequency is generally underpredicted. Overprediction is also reflected in wintertime precipitation variability, which tends to be too high for RCMs on both daily and interannual scales. Wintertime precipitation in most (but not all) GCMs is underestimated. This is in contrast to previous studies based on global blended gauge/satellite observations which are shown here to underestimate precipitation relative to higher-resolution gauge-only datasets. Several GCMs provide reasonable daily precipitation distributions, a trait which doesn't seem tied to model resolution. GCM daily and interannual variability is generally underpredicted.

Caldwell, P M

2009-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

37

Diamond Lattice Model of Semicrystalline Polyethylene in the Amorphous Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diamond Lattice Model of Semicrystalline Polyethylene in the Amorphous Region Zhong­Hui Duan Abstract The statistics of polyethylene chains in the amorphous region between two crystallites have been as models of the chain molecules in the amorphous region of semicrystalline polyethylene, both

Aluffi, Paolo

38

Latitude Distribution of Interplanetary Magnetic Field Lines Rooted in Active Regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electrons, accelerated in solar active regions to ? 10 keV, escape along open magnetic field lines and generate plasma radiation (Type III bursts ... Here we describe the latitude distribution of the field lines ...

G. A. Dulk; J. L. Steinberg; S. Hoang…

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Shared memory optimizations for distributed memory programming models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the world of parallel programming, there are two major classes of programming models: shared memory and distributed memory. Shared memory models share all memory by default, and are most effective on multi-processor systems. Distributed memory models ...

Andrew Friedley / Andrew Lumsdaine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Phonon distribution in a model polariton system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider a simple model polariton problem and show that the phonons in this system will never exhibit sub-Poissonian statistics. We furthermore observe that the probability distribution of the phonons will be classical at all temperatures, although the polariton complex as a whole can have a nonclassical behavior below a threshold temperature whose value will depend on the photon-phonon coupling strength.

Sharmishtha Ghoshal and Ashok Chatterjee

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distribution model regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Husimi distribution function and one-dimensional Ising model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Husimi distribution function for the one-dimensional Ising model is obtained. One-point and joint distribution functions are calculated and their thermal behaviour are discussed.

F. Kheirandish

2005-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

42

Electrical Model Development and Validation for Distributed Resources  

SciTech Connect

This project focuses on the development of electrical models for small (1-MW) distributed resources at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility.

Simoes, M. G.; Palle, B.; Chakraborty, S.; Uriarte, C.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. Subsequent chapters of this report provide: an overview of NGTDM; a description of the interface between the NEMS and NGTDM; an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM; the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module; the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module; the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module; the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module; and a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

A Service Oriented Architecture for Exploring High Performance Distributed Power Models  

SciTech Connect

Power grids are increasingly incorporating high quality, high throughput sensor devices inside power distribution networks. These devices are driving an unprecedented increase in the volume and rate of available information. The real-time requirements for handling this data are beyond the capacity of conventional power models running in central utilities. Hence, we are exploring distributed power models deployed at the regional scale. The connection of these models for a larger geographic region is supported by a distributed system architecture. This architecture is built in a service oriented style, whereby distributed power models running on high performance clusters are exposed as services. Each service is semantically annotated and therefore can be discovered through a service catalog and composed into workflows. The overall architecture has been implemented as an integrated workflow environment useful for power researchers to explore newly developed distributed power models.

Liu, Yan; Chase, Jared M.; Gorton, Ian

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

45

NREL: Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) Model - Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) Model Energy Analysis ReEDS Regional Energy Deployment System Model Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) Model Energy Analysis ReEDS Regional Energy Deployment System Model Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Publications The following are publications - including technical reports, journal articles, conference papers, and posters - focusing on the Wind Deployment System (WinDS) and Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) models. Technical Reports Eurek, K.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Mowers, M. (2013). Sensitivity of Utility-Scale Solar Deployment Projections in the SunShot Vision Study to Market and Performance Assumptions. 55 pp.; NREL Report No. TP-6A20-55836. Martinez, A.; Eurek, K.; Mai, T.; Perry, A. (2013). Integrated Canada-U.S. Power Sector Modeling with the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS).

46

A multi-agent model of several economic regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents Lagom regiO: a multi-agent model of several growing economic areas in interaction. The model is part of the Lagom model family: economic multi-agent models developed to make steps toward understanding equilibrium selection and identifying ... Keywords: Economic regions, Emissions, Growing economy, Multi-agent model

Sarah Wolf; Steffen FüRst; Antoine Mandel; Wiebke Lass; Daniel Lincke; Federico Pablo-Martí; Carlo Jaeger

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Model-predicted distribution of wind-induced internal wave energy in the world's oceans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model-predicted distribution of wind-induced internal wave energy in the world's oceans Naoki 9 July 2008; published 30 September 2008. [1] The distribution of wind-induced internal wave energy-scaled kinetic energy are all consistent with the available observations in the regions of significant wind

Miami, University of

48

The WAMME regional model intercomparison study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

has produced a multi-model climatology of land surface ?uxesThe Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) combined

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

A Model of U.S. Commercial Distributed Generation Adoption  

SciTech Connect

Small-scale (100 kW-5 MW) on-site distributed generation (DG) economically driven by combined heat and power (CHP) applications and, in some cases, reliability concerns will likely emerge as a common feature of commercial building energy systems over the next two decades. Forecasts of DG adoption published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) are made using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), which has a forecasting module that predicts the penetration of several possible commercial building DG technologies over the period 2005-2025. NEMS is also used for estimating the future benefits of Department of Energy research and development used in support of budget requests and management decisionmaking. The NEMS approach to modeling DG has some limitations, including constraints on the amount of DG allowed for retrofits to existing buildings and a small number of possible sizes for each DG technology. An alternative approach called Commercial Sector Model (ComSeM) is developed to improve the way in which DG adoption is modeled. The approach incorporates load shapes for specific end uses in specific building types in specific regions, e.g., cooling in hospitals in Atlanta or space heating in Chicago offices. The Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) uses these load profiles together with input cost and performance DG technology assumptions to model the potential DG adoption for four selected cities and two sizes of five building types in selected forecast years to 2022. The Distributed Energy Resources Market Diffusion Model (DER-MaDiM) is then used to then tailor the DER-CAM results to adoption projections for the entire U.S. commercial sector for all forecast years from 2007-2025. This process is conducted such that the structure of results are consistent with the structure of NEMS, and can be re-injected into NEMS that can then be used to integrate adoption results into a full forecast.

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Ryan Firestone; Zhou, Nan; Maribu,Karl; Marnay, Chris

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

50

Event:Third Workshop on Enhancing the Regional Distribution of CDM Projects  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enhancing the Regional Distribution of CDM Projects Enhancing the Regional Distribution of CDM Projects in Asia and the Pacific Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Third Workshop on Enhancing the Regional Distribution of CDM Projects in Asia and the Pacific: on 2012/07/18 "This workshop is being organized by the Asian Development Bank (ADB), the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) and the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Secretariat, in collaboration with the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) Risoe Centre. The aim of the workshop is to provide a platform for participants to share best practices and key lessons, enhance their knowledge on the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) and discuss technical, financial, and policy issues specific to their projects." Event Details

51

Assessment of length distributions between non-coding and coding sequences amongst two model organisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The availability of genomic DNA and cDNA sequence data has escalated the data mining and genomics era. We aim to investigate the length distributions of the non-coding and coding regions of protein genes of two model organisms, Arabidopsis thaliana and Drosophila melanogaster. A non-linear functional relationship model was applied and strong correlation was found between the Coding Sequence (CDS) and non-coding sequence regions, conditional on the 5' UTR data. Significant differences were found between the protein functional classes and each gene region. Examination of the non-coding and coding regions of these organisms has revealed possible correlations.

Rachel Caldwell; Yan-Xia Lin; Ren Zhang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. From 1982 through 1993, the Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS) was used by the EIA for its analyses, and the Gas Analysis Modeling System (GAMS) was used within IFFS to represent natural gas markets. Prior to 1982, the Midterm Energy Forecasting System (MEFS), also referred to as the Project Independence Evaluation System (PIES), was employed. NEMS was developed to enhance and update EIA`s modeling capability by internally incorporating models of energy markets that had previously been analyzed off-line. In addition, greater structural detail in NEMS permits the analysis of a broader range of energy issues. The time horizon of NEMS is the midterm period (i.e., through 2015). In order to represent the regional differences in energy markets, the component models of NEMS function at regional levels appropriate for the markets represented, with subsequent aggregation/disaggregation to the Census Division level for reporting purposes.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

The WAMME regional model intercomparison study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Á D. P. Rowell Met Of?ce Hadley Centre, Exeter, UK E. K.parametrizations in the Hadley Centre climate model: HadAM3.2008). The UK Met Of?ce Hadley Centre RCM is known as Had-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Application of TOPNET in the distributed model intercomparison project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Application of TOPNET in the distributed model intercomparison project Christina Bandaragodaa of the Distributed Model Intercomparison Project (DMIP). The model implementation is based on a topographically network is mapped from the US National Elevation Dataset Digital Elevation Model (DEM) using procedures

Tarboton, David

55

A Framework for Modeling Uncertainty in Regional Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, we present a new modeling framework and a large ensemble of climate projections to investigate the uncertainty in regional climate change over the US associated with four dimensions of uncertainty. The sources ...

Monier, Erwan

56

2012 SG Peer Review - Recovery Act: Enhanced Demand and Distribution Management Regional Demonstration - Craig Miller, NRECA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enhanced Distribution and Demand Management Enhanced Distribution and Demand Management Regional Demonstration Craig Miller Cooperative Research Network National Rural Electric Cooperative Association 8 June 2012 December 2008 Project Title Objective Life-cycle Funding ($K) $68 million with match Hardware: $43 million Research: $11.6 Co-op Labor: $13.4 Technical Scope * 23 Co-ops, Distributed Nationally * 275,000 components deployed * Meters & DR * Distribution Automation * Infrastructure * In home displays and web portals * Demand response over AMI * Prepaid metering * Interactive thermal storage * Electrical storage (20x10kWh, 1MWh 0.5MWh) * Renewable energy * Smart feeder switching * Conservation voltage reduction * Advanced metering infrastructure * Meter data management * Communications infrastructure * SCADA To advance the deployment of the smart grid

57

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Yellowstone Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laney, 2005) Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Yellowstone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Localized Strain as a Discriminator of Hidden Geothermal Systems, Vasco and Foxall, 2005. Recent work has focused on (1) collaborating with Alessandro Ferretti to use Permanent Scatterer (PS) InSAR data to infer strain at depth, (2) working with Lane Johnson to develop a dynamic faulting model, and (3) acquiring InSAR data for the region surrounding the Dixie Valley fault zone in collaboration with Dr. William Foxall of LLNL. The InSAR data

58

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Developed natural state mass and energy transport fluid flow models of generic Basin and Range systems based on Dixie Valley data that help to understand the nature of large scale constraints on the location and characteristics of the geothermal systems References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of

59

Evaluating the Vertical Distribution of Ozone and Its Relationship to Pollution Events in Air Quality Models Using Satellite Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most regional scale models that are used for air quality forecasts and ozone source attribution do not adequately capture the distribution of ozone in the mid- and upper troposphere, but it is unclear how this...

Jessica L. Neu; Gregory Osterman…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Synthesis of Seafood Catch, Distribution, and Consumption Patterns in the Gulf of Mexico Region  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this task was to gather and assemble information that will provide a synthesis of seafood catch, distribution and consumption patterns for the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) region. This task was part of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored project entitled ''Environmental and Economic Assessment of Discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region Oil and Gas Operations.'' Personal interviews were conducted with a total of 905 recreational fishermen and 218 commercial fishermen (inclusive of shrimpers, crabbers, oystermen and finfishermen) in Louisiana and Texas using survey questionnaires developed for the study. Results of these interviews detail the species and quantities caught, location of catch, mode of fishing, distribution of catch, family consumption patterns and demographics of the fishermen.

Steimle and Associates, Inc.

1999-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distribution model regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Learning to model sequences generated by switching distributions Yoav Freund  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Learning to model sequences generated by switching distributions Yoav Freund AT&T Bell Labs 600 distributions learning problem. A sequence S = oe 1 oe 2 : : : oe n , over a finite alphabet \\Sigma is generated run is generated by independent random draws from a distribution ~ p i over \\Sigma, where ~p i

Freund, Yoav

62

Cost Modeling and Design Techniques for Integrated Package Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Modeling and Design Techniques for Integrated Package Distribution Systems Karen R. Smilowitz and Carlos F. Daganzo December 23, 2005 Abstract Complex package distribution systems are designed using-scale integrated distribution networks. While the network design problem is quite complex, we demonstrate

Smilowitz, Karen

63

Distribution of glycosaminoglycans in specific regions of the reproductive tract of mares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Chair Committee) David W. Forrest (Member) Thomas H. Welsh, Jr (Member) Ro ert C. Bur rdt (Member Gerald R. Bratton (Head of Department) May 1990 ABSTRACT Distribution of Glycosaminoglycans in Specific Regions of the Reproductive Tract... of glycosaminoglycans in luminal fluids is affected by the oestrous cycle and location within the reproductive tract. All mares were considered to be reproduc- tively sound, based on physical examination (Greenhoff 5 Kenney, 1975), evaluation of endometrial biopsies...

Varner, Dickson Drew

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

64

Analytically solvable geometric network growth model with arbitrary degree distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct a class of network growth models capable of producing arbitrary degree distributions. The conditions necessary for generating the desired degree distribution can be derived analytically. In this model, a network is generated as a result of local interactions among agents residing on a metric space. Specifically, we study the case of random-walking agents who form bonds when they meet at designated locations we refer to as "rendezvous points." The spatial distribution of the rendezvous points determines key characteristics of the network such as the degree distribution. For any arbitrary (monotonic) degree distribution, we are able to analytically solve for the required rendezvous point distribution. Certain features of the model including high clustering coefficients suggest that it may be a suitable candidate for modeling biological and urban networks.

Dianati, Navid

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

NON-LINEAR MODELING OF THE RHIC INTERACTION REGIONS.  

SciTech Connect

For RHIC's collision lattices the dominant sources of transverse non-linearities are located in the interaction regions. The field quality is available for most of the magnets in the interaction regions from the magnetic measurements, or from extrapolations of these measurements. We discuss the implementation of these measurements in the MADX models of the Blue and the Yellow rings and their impact on beam stability.

TOMAS,R.FISCHER,W.JAIN,A.LUO,Y.PILAT,F.

2004-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

66

Modeling of Field Distribution and Energy Storage in Diphasic Dielectrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling of Field Distribution and Energy Storage in Diphasic Dielectrics S. K. Patil, M. Y, USA Modeling of electrostatic field distribution and energy storage in diphasic dielectrics containing to the increased energy storage density. For composites with lower volume fractions of high-permittivity inclusions

Koledintseva, Marina Y.

67

New approach for modelling distributed MEMS transmission lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New approach for modelling distributed MEMS transmission lines K. Topalli, M. Unlu, S. Demir, O for the distributed MEMS transmission line (DMTL) structures. In this new model, the MEMS bridges that are used as the loading elements of the DMTL structures are represented as low-impedance transmission lines, rather than

Akin, Tayfun

68

Orchestration in Orc: A Deterministic Distributed Programming Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Orchestration in Orc: A Deterministic Distributed Programming Model William R. Cook and Jayadev}@cs.utexas.edu Abstract. Orc is a new model of distributed programming which pro- vides a strong theoretical foundation for internet computing based on compositions of web-services. Orc combines some of the power and flex- ibility

Misra, Jayadev

69

Regional climate model data used within the SWURVE project 2: addressing uncertainty in regional climate model data Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11(1), 10851096, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional climate model data used within the SWURVE project 2: addressing uncertainty in regional within the SWURVE project 2: addressing uncertainty in regional climate model data for five European case regions (CSRs) of the EC-funded project SWURVE, estimates of uncertainty in climate model data need

Boyer, Edmond

70

Relativistic Diffusion Model and Analysis of Large Transverse Momentum Distributions  

SciTech Connect

In order to describe large transverse momentum (pT) distributions observed in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions, a stochastic model in the three dimensional rapidity space is introduced. The fundamental solution of the radial symmetric diffusion equation is Gaussian-like in radial rapidity. We can also derive a pT or radial rapidity distribution function, where a distribution of emission center is taken into account. The solution is applied to the analysis of observed large p T distributions of charged particles. It is shown that our model approaches to a power function of p T in the high transverse momentum limit.

Suzuki, Naomichi [Department of Comprehensive Management, Matsumoto University, Matsumoto 390-1295 (Japan); Biyajima, Minoru [Department of Physics, Shinshu University, Matsumoto, 390-8621 (Japan)

2006-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

71

Relativistic diffusion model and analysis of large transverse momentum distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to describe large transverse momentum ($p_T$) distributions observed in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions, a stochastic model in the three dimensional rapidity space is introduced. The fundamental solution of the radial symmetric diffusion equation is Gaussian-like in radial rapidity. We can also derive a $p_T$ or radial rapidity distribution function, where a distribution of emission center is taken into account. It is applied to the analysis of observed large $p_T$ distributions of charged particles. It is shown that our model approaches to a power function of $p_T$ in the high transverse momentum limit.

Naomichi Suzuki; Minoru Biyajima

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Conduction Models Of The Temperature Distribution In The East Rift Zone Of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conduction Models Of The Temperature Distribution In The East Rift Zone Of Conduction Models Of The Temperature Distribution In The East Rift Zone Of Kilauea Volcano Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Conduction Models Of The Temperature Distribution In The East Rift Zone Of Kilauea Volcano Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Temperature variations in the 1966-meter Hawaii Geothermal Project well HGP-A are simulated by model studies using a finite element code for conductive heat flow. Three models were generated: a constant temperature source from a vertical dike; a constant heat-generating magma chamber; and a transient heat source from a tapered vertical dike. Fair correlation is obtained between the HGP-A well temperature and the tapered dike 125 years after it is injected with an initial (transient) 1200°C

73

A SPATIAL WEB GRAPH MODEL WITH LOCAL INFLUENCE REGIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A SPATIAL WEB GRAPH MODEL WITH LOCAL INFLUENCE REGIONS W. AIELLO, A. BONATO, C. COOPER, J. JANSSEN- served in real-world networks such as the web graph. On the other hand, experimental and heuristic network can be recognized as densely linked subgraphs, or that web pages with many common neigh- bours

Pralat, Pawel

74

THE DEVELOPMENT MODEL ELECTRONIC COMMERCE OF REGIONAL AGRICULTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE DEVELOPMENT MODEL ELECTRONIC COMMERCE OF REGIONAL AGRICULTURE Jun Kang* , Lecai Cai, Hongchan, Fax: +86-813-5505966, Email: kj_sky@126.com Abstract: With the developing of the agricultural information, it is inevitable trend of the development of agricultural electronic commercial affairs

Boyer, Edmond

75

Action Models: A Reliability Modeling Formalism for Fault-Tolerant Distributed Computing Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Action Models: A Reliability Modeling Formalism for Fault-Tolerant Distributed Computing Systems. Introduction Model-based evaluation of the reliability of distributed systems has traditionally required expert- proach to analyze the reliability of fault-tolerant distributed systems. More in particular, we want

Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

76

Modeling of air currents in the Gulf Region  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability modeled the wind flow in the Gulf Region in order to make projections of the Kuwait oil fires pollution dispersion. Extensive meteorological models incorporating explicit terrain influences to the flow fields were routinely employed through a six month international assessment support effort organized by the World Meteorological Organization and US scientific research agencies. Results show generally close agreement with visible imagery of the smoke plumes as detected by meteorological satellites. However, there are some examples of significant disagreement or failure of the meteorological models. These failures are most likely directly linked to missing or unavailable weather observations.

Sullivan, T.J.; Ellis, J.S.; Foster, C.S.; Foster, K.T.; Baskett, R.L.; Nasstrom, J.S.; Schalk, W.W.

1992-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

77

1D ISING MODELS, COMPOUND GEOMETRIC DISTRIBUTIONS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1­D ISING MODELS, COMPOUND GEOMETRIC DISTRIBUTIONS AND SELFDECOMPOSABILITY # Zbigniew J. Jurek that the inverse of the partition function in 1­ D Ising model, as a function of the external field, is a product the Lâ??evy­ Khintchine formula for infinite divisible variables. Key words and phrases: 1­D Ising model

Jurek, Zbigniew J.

78

1-D ISING MODELS, COMPOUND GEOMETRIC DISTRIBUTIONS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1-D ISING MODELS, COMPOUND GEOMETRIC DISTRIBUTIONS AND SELFDECOMPOSABILITY Zbigniew J. Jurek that the inverse of the partition function in 1- D Ising model, as a function of the external field, is a product the L´evy- Khintchine formula for infinite divisible variables. Key words and phrases: 1-D Ising model

Jurek, Zbigniew J.

79

Explaining species distribution patterns through hierarchical modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and its lower right at 34?20.5’ S, 19?16.5’ E, with total area of 4,456 km2. It comprises a rectangular area including the Kogelberg Biosphere Reserve and beyond, extending 41m east and 107m north from Cape Hangklip. The region is shown in Figure 1.... The survey paper of Guisan and Zimmerman (2000) provides discussion and extensive referencing. Let log ( p(k)i 1 ? p(k)i ) = wi??k + ?k + ?i, (5) where wi is a vector of grid cell level characteristics, and the ?k’s are species level coefficients associated...

Gelfand, Alan E.; Silander, John A., Jr.; Wu, Shanshan; Latimer, Andrew; Lewis, Paul O.; Rebelo, Anthony G.; Holder, Mark T.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Cost Modeling and Design Techniques for Integrated Package Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Modeling and Design Techniques for Integrated Package Distribution Systems Karen R. Smilowitz idealizations of network geometries, operating costs, demand and customer distributions, and routing patterns that approximate the total cost of operation. The design problem is then reduced to a series of optimization

Daganzo, Carlos F.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distribution model regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Quality Modeling of Water Distribution Systems using Sensitivity Equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quality Modeling of Water Distribution Systems using Sensitivity Equations P. Fabrie1 ; G. Gancel2 and the associated sensitivity equa- tions are solved for Water Distribution Systems (WDS). A new solution algorithm presented in this study permits global sensitivity analysis of the system to be performed and its efficiency

Boyer, Edmond

82

Collaborative Creativity: A Complex Systems Model with Distributed Affect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collaborative Creativity: A Complex Systems Model with Distributed Affect Cecilia R. Aragon E16 2RD UK alisonwilliams62@googlemail.com ABSTRACT The study of creativity has received significant attention over the past century, with a recent increase in interest in collaborative, distributed creativity

Anderson, Richard

83

SeedChaser: Vertical soil tillage distribution model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Knowledge of the vertical distribution of surface residues, chemicals, or seeds following tillage operations is of great importance to a wide variety of soil research areas. This paper describes a 1D empirical vertical soil tillage distribution model ... Keywords: Conservation tillage, Leslie matrix, Seed movement, Seedbank, Soil movement

K. Spokas; F. Forcella; D. Archer; D. Reicosky

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Measurement and Modeling of Spatial NH3 Storage Distributions...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

in a Commercial Small Port Cu Zeolite Urea SCR Catalyst Measurement and Modeling of Spatial NH3 Storage Distributions in a Commercial Small Port Cu Zeolite Urea SCR Catalyst...

85

Stochastic model of heterogeneity in earthquake slip spatial distributions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Seismology Stochastic model of heterogeneity in earthquake slip spatial distributions Daniel Lavallee 1 Pengcheng Liu 1 Ralph J. Archuleta 1 2 1 Institute for Crustal Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, California......

Daniel Lavallée; Pengcheng Liu; Ralph J. Archuleta

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Universal software packages to model the distributed-parameter systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Consideration was given to the universal software packages for modeling objects and distributed-parameter systems obeying the partial differential equations. The packages may serve as important tools for industrial automation because the majority of ... Keywords: 07.05.Tp

E. E. Dudnikov

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models; Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the project was to conduct model simulations for past and future climate change with respect to the proposed Yucca Mtn. repository. The authors report on three main topics, one of which is boundary conditions for paleo-hindcast studies. These conditions are necessary for the conduction of three to four model simulations. The boundary conditions have been prepared for future runs. The second topic is (a) comparing the atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) with observations and other GCMs; and (b) development of a better precipitation data base for the Yucca Mtn. region for comparisons with models. These tasks have been completed. The third topic is preliminary assessments of future climate change. Energy balance model (EBM) simulations suggest that the greenhouse effect will likely dominate climate change at Yucca Mtn. for the next 10,000 years. The EBM study should improve rational choice of GCM CO{sub 2} scenarios for future climate change.

Crowley, T.J.; Smith, N.R. [Applied Research Corp., College Station, TX (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Regional-Scale Climate Change: Observations and Model Simulations  

SciTech Connect

This collaborative proposal addressed key issues in understanding the Earthâ??s climate system, as highlighted by the U.S. Climate Science Program. The research focused on documenting past climatic changes and on assessing future climatic changes based on suites of global and regional climate models. Geographically, our emphasis was on the mountainous regions of the world, with a particular focus on the Neotropics of Central America and the Hawaiian Islands. Mountain regions are zones where large variations in ecosystems occur due to the strong climate zonation forced by the topography. These areas are particularly susceptible to changes in critical ecological thresholds, and we conducted studies of changes in phonological indicators based on various climatic thresholds.

Raymond S. Bradley; Henry F. Diaz

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

89

Dispersive processes in models of regional radionuclide migration. Technical memorandum  

SciTech Connect

Three broad areas of concern in the development of aquifer scale transport models will be local scale diffusion and dispersion processes, regional scale dispersion processes, and numerical problems associated with the advection-dispersion equation. Local scale dispersion processes are fairly well understood and accessible to observation. These processes will generally be dominated in large scale systems by regional processes, or macro-dispersion. Macro-dispersion is primarily the result of large scale heterogeneities in aquifer properties. In addition, the effects of many modeling approximations are often included in the process. Because difficulties arise in parameterization of this large scale phenomenon, parameterization should be based on field measurements made at the same scale as the transport process of interest or else partially circumvented through the application of a probabilistic advection model. Other problems associated with numerical transport models include difficulties with conservation of mass, stability, numerical dissipation, overshoot, flexibility, and efficiency. We recommend the random-walk model formulation for Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's purposes as the most flexible, accurate and relatively efficient modeling approach that overcomes these difficulties.

Evenson, D.E.; Dettinger, M.D.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

A Simulation Model for Evaluating Distributed Systems Dependability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present a new simulation model designed to evaluate the dependability in distributed systems. This model extends the MONARC simulation model with new capabilities for capturing reliability, safety, availability, security, and maintainability requirements. The model has been implemented as an extension of the multithreaded, process oriented simulator MONARC, which allows the realistic simulation of a wide-range of distributed system technologies, with respect to their specific components and characteristics. The extended simulation model includes the necessary components to inject various failure events, and provides the mechanisms to evaluate different strategies for replication, redundancy procedures, and security enforcement mechanisms, as well. The results obtained in simulation experiments presented in this paper probe that the use of discrete-event simulators, such as MONARC, in the design and development of distributed systems is appealing due to their efficiency and scalability.

Dobre, Ciprian; Cristea, Valentin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Estimating Predictive Variance for Statistical Gas Distribution Modelling  

SciTech Connect

Recent publications in statistical gas distribution modelling have proposed algorithms that model mean and variance of a distribution. This paper argues that estimating the predictive concentration variance entails not only a gradual improvement but is rather a significant step to advance the field. This is, first, since the models much better fit the particular structure of gas distributions, which exhibit strong fluctuations with considerable spatial variations as a result of the intermittent character of gas dispersal. Second, because estimating the predictive variance allows to evaluate the model quality in terms of the data likelihood. This offers a solution to the problem of ground truth evaluation, which has always been a critical issue for gas distribution modelling. It also enables solid comparisons of different modelling approaches, and provides the means to learn meta parameters of the model, to determine when the model should be updated or re-initialised, or to suggest new measurement locations based on the current model. We also point out directions of related ongoing or potential future research work.

Lilienthal, Achim J.; Asadi, Sahar; Reggente, Matteo [AASS Research Center, Oerebro University (Sweden)

2009-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

92

Model Parameterization, Prior Distributions, and the General Time-Reversible Model in Bayesian Phylogenetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bayesian phylogenetic methods require the selection of prior probability distributions for all parameters of the model of evolution. These distributions allow one to incorporate prior information into a Bayesian analysis, ...

Zwickl, Derrick J.; Holder, Mark T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Essential Terrestrial Variable data workflows for distributed water resources modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses a prototype infrastructure, HydroTerre, that provides researchers, educators and resource managers with seamless access to geospatial/geotemporal data for supporting physics-based numerical models. The prototype defines the supporting ... Keywords: Data workflow, Distributed hydrologic model, Essential Terrestrial Variables, Geographic information systems, HydroTerre, PIHM, Web services

Lorne Leonard; Christopher J. Duffy

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Runtime Performance Modeling and Measurement of Adaptive Distributed Object Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Distributed applications that can adapt at runtime to changing quality of service (QoS) require a model of the expected QoS and of the possible application adaptations. QoS models in turn require runtime measurements, both in-band and out-of-band, from ...

John A. Zinky; Joseph P. Loyall; Richard Shapiro

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

LHC $Z^`$ discovery potential for models with continuously distributed mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) discovery potential for $Z^`$ models with continuously distributed mass for $\\sqrt{s} = 7, 10$ and 14 TeV centre-of-mass energies. One of possible LHC signatures for such models is the existence of broad resonance in Drell-Yan reaction $pp \\to Z^` + ... \\to l^+l^- + ...$.

N. V. Krasnikov

2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

96

KAPPA DISTRIBUTION MODEL FOR HARD X-RAY CORONAL SOURCES OF SOLAR FLARES  

SciTech Connect

Solar flares produce hard X-ray emission, the photon spectrum of which is often represented by a combination of thermal and power-law distributions. However, the estimates of the number and total energy of non-thermal electrons are sensitive to the determination of the power-law cutoff energy. Here, we revisit an 'above-the-loop' coronal source observed by RHESSI on 2007 December 31 and show that a kappa distribution model can also be used to fit its spectrum. Because the kappa distribution has a Maxwellian-like core in addition to a high-energy power-law tail, the emission measure and temperature of the instantaneous electrons can be derived without assuming the cutoff energy. Moreover, the non-thermal fractions of electron number/energy densities can be uniquely estimated because they are functions of only the power-law index. With the kappa distribution model, we estimated that the total electron density of the coronal source region was {approx}2.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}. We also estimated without assuming the source volume that a moderate fraction ({approx}20%) of electrons in the source region was non-thermal and carried {approx}52% of the total electron energy. The temperature was 28 MK, and the power-law index {delta} of the electron density distribution was -4.3. These results are compared to the conventional power-law models with and without a thermal core component.

Oka, M.; Ishikawa, S.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Krucker, S.; Lin, R. P. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California Berkeley (United States)] [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California Berkeley (United States)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

97

Regional Analysis of Building Distributed Energy Costs and CO2 Abatement: A U.S. - China Comparison  

SciTech Connect

The following paper conducts a regional analysis of the U.S. and Chinese buildings? potential for adopting Distributed Energy Resources (DER). The expected economics of DER in 2020-2025 is modeled for a commercial and a multi-family residential building in different climate zones. The optimal building energy economic performance is calculated using the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER CAM) which minimizes building energy costs for a typical reference year of operation. Several DER such as combined heat and power (CHP) units, photovoltaics, and battery storage are considered. The results indicate DER have economic and environmental competitiveness potential, especially for commercial buildings in hot and cold climates of both countries. In the U.S., the average expected energy cost savings in commercial buildings from DER CAM?s suggested investments is 17percent, while in Chinese buildings is 12percent. The electricity tariffs structure and prices along with the cost of natural gas, represent important factors in determining adoption of DER, more so than climate. High energy pricing spark spreads lead to increased economic attractiveness of DER. The average emissions reduction in commercial buildings is 19percent in the U.S. as a result of significant investments in PV, whereas in China, it is 20percent and driven by investments in CHP. Keywords: Building Modeling and Simulation, Distributed Energy Resources (DER), Energy Efficiency, Combined Heat and Power (CHP), CO2 emissions 1. Introduction The transition from a centralized and fossil-based energy paradigm towards the decentralization of energy supply and distribution has been a major subject of research over the past two decades. Various concerns have brought the traditional model into question; namely its environmental footprint, its structural inflexibility and inefficiency, and more recently, its inability to maintain acceptable reliability of supply. Under such a troubled setting, distributed energy resources (DER) comprising of small, modular, electrical renewable or fossil-based electricity generation units placed at or near the point of energy consumption, has gained much attention as a viable alternative or addition to the current energy system. In 2010, China consumed about 30percent of its primary energy in the buildings sector, leading the country to pay great attention to DER development and its applications in buildings. During the 11th Five Year Plan (FYP), China has implemented 371 renewable energy building demonstration projects, and 210 photovoltaics (PV) building integration projects. At the end of the 12th FYP, China is targeting renewable energy to provide 10percent of total building energy, and to save 30 metric tons of CO2 equivalents (mtce) of energy with building integrated renewables. China is also planning to implement one thousand natural gas-based distributed cogeneration demonstration projects with energy utilization rates over 70percent in the 12th FYP. All these policy targets require significant DER systems development for building applications. China?s fast urbanization makes building energy efficiency a crucial economic issue; however, only limited studies have been done that examine how to design and select suitable building energy technologies in its different regions. In the U.S., buildings consumed 40percent of the total primary energy in 2010 [1] and it is estimated that about 14 billion m2 of floor space of the existing building stock will be remodeled over the next 30 years. Most building?s renovation work has been on building envelope, lighting and HVAC systems. Although interest has emerged, less attention is being paid to DER for buildings. This context has created opportunities for research, development and progressive deployment of DER, due to its potential to combine the production of power and heat (CHP) near the point of consumption and delivering multiple benefits to customers, such as cost

Mendes, Goncalo; Feng, Wei; Stadler, Michael; Steinbach, Jan; Lai, Judy; Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Ding, Yan; Zhao, Jing; Tian, Zhe; Zhu, Neng

2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

98

An optimisation model for optimal and sustainable distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In many companies, a large share of costs in value chains is due to the distribution logistics. The problem is known as the vehicle routing problem (VRP) and many different algorithms are used for approximate solutions. The main point of the problem is to carry out deliveries from the central storage facility to all customers incurring minimal costs. This paper aims to present development and implementation of such a model and its application for a special distribution and customer network. Although the conceptual idea of the model is primarily based on the economical cost optimisation and consequentially on as much profit as possible, the model can simply be upgraded with ecological or environmentally friendly aspects. So the aim of the model is an optimisation tool upgraded by sustainable development of logistics and distribution.

Rok Strašek

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Modeling distributions of stem characteristics of genetically improved loblolly pine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

presented in this study. N de 'n th Parame s Once the parameter estimates for each plot had been computed for the chosen distribution, multiple regression techniques were utilized to relate the parameter estimates to stand characteristics. Regression... best characterized the data. Models were subsequently developed to predict the diameter, height, and volume distributions using the moment-based beta probability density function. The probability density function parameters were predicted from stand...

Janssen, Jill Elizabeth

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

A Conceptual Model of the Surface Salinity Distribution in the Oceanic Hadley Cell JOHAN NILSSON AND HEINER KRNICH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Conceptual Model of the Surface Salinity Distribution in the Oceanic Hadley Cell JOHAN NILSSON in the oceanic Hadley cell is presented. The model pertains to the region of tropical easterly surface winds of the near-surface air is constant, the salinity variation in the oceanic Hadley cell varies essentially

Nilsson, Johan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distribution model regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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101

A U.S. and China Regional Analysis of Distributed Energy Resources in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

attractive. In general, solar thermal energy is attractiveof Distributed Solar Thermal Energy in Chinese Buildingsutilizing distributed solar thermal energy in residential

Feng, Wei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Distributed parameter hydrologic modeling usinsg object-oriented simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DISTRIBUTED PARAMETER HYDROLOGIC MODELING USING OBJECT-ORIENTED SIMULATION A Thesis by KENNETH RAY KLANIKA Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfilhnent of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style...). The Geographic Object-Oriented Simulation Environment [GOOSE] is linked with GRASS, and is used to create the basic patch network from GRASS ASCII vector and attribute files. The model, written in Common Lisp Object System [CLOS] language, was designed around...

Klanika, Kenneth Ray

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

103

LIMITED POWER BURSTS IN DISTRIBUTED MODELS OF NUCLEAR REACTORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIMITED POWER BURSTS IN DISTRIBUTED MODELS OF NUCLEAR REACTORS M. V. Bazhenov and E. F. Sabaev UDC employed for analyzing reactor dynamics. Equations of this type are used for analyzing the stability of the reactor power, etc. Among these problems the question of the boundedness of reactor power bursts

Bazhenov, Maxim

104

High Resolution PV Power Modeling for Distribution Circuit Analysis  

SciTech Connect

NREL has contracted with Clean Power Research to provide 1-minute simulation datasets of PV systems located at three high penetration distribution feeders in the service territory of Southern California Edison (SCE): Porterville, Palmdale, and Fontana, California. The resulting PV simulations will be used to separately model the electrical circuits to determine the impacts of PV on circuit operations.

Norris, B. L.; Dise, J. H.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

A nanoflare model for active region radiance: application of artificial neural networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context. Nanoflares are small impulsive bursts of energy that blend with and possibly make up much of the solar background emission. Determining their frequency and energy input is central to understanding the heating of the solar corona. One method is to extrapolate the energy frequency distribution of larger individually observed flares to lower energies. Only if the power law exponent is greater than 2, is it considered possible that nanoflares contribute significantly to the energy input. Aims. Time sequences of ultraviolet line radiances observed in the corona of an active region are modelled with the aim of determining the power law exponent of the nanoflare energy distribution. Methods. A simple nanoflare model based on three key parameters (the flare rate, the flare duration time, and the power law exponent of the flare energy frequency distribution) is used to simulate emission line radiances from the ions Fe XIX, Ca XIII, and Si iii, observed by SUMER in the corona of an active region as it rotates around the east limb of the Sun. Light curve pattern recognition by an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) scheme is used to determine the values. Results. The power law exponents, alpha 2.8, 2.8, and 2.6 for Fe XIX, Ca XIII, and Si iii respectively. Conclusions. The light curve simulations imply a power law exponent greater than the critical value of 2 for all ion species. This implies that if the energy of flare-like events is extrapolated to low energies, nanoflares could provide a significant contribution to the heating of active region coronae.

M. Bazarghan; H. Safari; D. E. Innes; E. Karami; S. K. Solanki

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

106

Improvement of snowpack simulations in a regional climate model  

SciTech Connect

To improve simulations of regional-scale snow processes and related cold-season hydroclimate, the Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3), developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), was coupled with the Pennsylvania State University/NCAR fifth-generation Mesoscale Model (MM5). CLM3 physically describes the mass and heat transfer within the snowpack using five snow layers that include liquid water and solid ice. The coupled MM5–CLM3 model performance was evaluated for the snowmelt season in the Columbia River Basin in the Pacific Northwestern United States using gridded temperature and precipitation observations, along with station observations. The results from MM5–CLM3 show a significant improvement in the SWE simulation, which has been underestimated in the original version of MM5 coupled with the Noah land-surface model. One important cause for the underestimated SWE in Noah is its unrealistic land-surface structure configuration where vegetation, snow and the topsoil layer are blended when snow is present. This study demonstrates the importance of the sheltering effects of the forest canopy on snow surface energy budgets, which is included in CLM3. Such effects are further seen in the simulations of surface air temperature and precipitation in regional weather and climate models such as MM5. In addition, the snow-season surface albedo overestimated by MM5–Noah is now more accurately predicted by MM5–CLM3 using a more realistic albedo algorithm that intensifies the solar radiation absorption on the land surface, reducing the strong near-surface cold bias in MM5–Noah. The cold bias is further alleviated due to a slower snowmelt rate in MM5–CLM3 during the early snowmelt stage, which is closer to observations than the comparable components of MM5–Noah. In addition, the over-predicted precipitation in the Pacific Northwest as shown in MM5–Noah is significantly decreased in MM5 CLM3 due to the lower evaporation resulting from the longer snow duration.

Jin, J.; Miller, N.L.

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

107

Application of Scale-Selective Data Assimilation to Regional Climate Modeling and Prediction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method referred to as scale-selective data assimilation (SSDA) is designed to inject the large-scale components of the atmospheric circulation from a global model into a regional model to improve regional climate simulations and predictions. ...

Shiqiu Peng; Lian Xie; Bin Liu; Fredrick Semazzi

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Inclusive distributions for hadronic collisions in the valon-recombination model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inclusive distributions of soft production of mesons in hadronic collisions are calculated in the valon-recombination model. The new determination of the valon distributions from hard scattering data makes possible a tightly interrelated treatment of pion and kaon production in the fragmentation regions of proton, pion, and kaon. Only one free parameter is used in the determination of the valon distribution in the kaon. No other adjustable parameter is needed to fit the x distributions of the data on inclusive cross sections, except for the normalizations since the data are at fixed pT. The success of the model in reproducing seven inclusive distributions suggests that there are two important mechanisms at work in soft production. One is that the structure of the hadron that fragments is highly relevant. The other is that the produced particles are formed by the recombination of quarks and antiquarks. These two aspects about hadrons in soft processes can be well described in the framework of the valon-recombination model.

Rudolph C. Hwa and C. B. Yang

2002-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

109

Optimisation of a Crossdocking Distribution Centre Simulation Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports on continuing research into the modelling of an order picking process within a Crossdocking distribution centre using Simulation Optimisation. The aim of this project is to optimise a discrete event simulation model and to understand factors that affect finding its optimal performance. Our initial investigation revealed that the precision of the selected simulation output performance measure and the number of replications required for the evaluation of the optimisation objective function through simulation influences the ability of the optimisation technique. We experimented with Common Random Numbers, in order to improve the precision of our simulation output performance measure, and intended to use the number of replications utilised for this purpose as the initial number of replications for the optimisation of our Crossdocking distribution centre simulation model. Our results demonstrate that we can improve the precision of our selected simulation output performance measure value using C...

Adewunmi, Adrian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Conceptual model for regional radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site. Final draft, technical memorandum  

SciTech Connect

This technical memorandum was prepared to: (1) describe a typical basalt radionuclide repository site, (2) describe geologic and hydrologic processes associated with regional radionuclide transport in basalts, (3) define the parameters required to model regional radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site, and (4) develop a ''conceptual model'' of radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site. In a general hydrological sense, basalts may be described as layered sequences of aquifers and aquitards. The Columbia River Basalt, centered near the semi-arid Pasco Basin, is considered by many to be typical basalt repository host rock. Detailed description of the flow system including flow velocities with high-low hydraulic conductivity sequences are not possible with existing data. However, according to theory, waste-transport routes are ultimately towards the Columbia River and the lengths of flow paths from the repository to the biosphere may be relatively short. There are many physical, chemical, thermal, and nuclear processes with associated parameters that together determine the possible pattern of radionuclide migration in basalts and surrounding formations. Brief process descriptions and associated parameter lists are provided. Emphasis has been placed on the use of the distribution coefficient in simulating ion exchange. The use of the distribution coefficient approach is limited because it takes into account only relatively fast mass transfer processes. In general, knowledge of hydrogeochemical processes is primitive.

Walton, W.C.; Voorhees, M.L.; Prickett, T.A.

1980-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

111

Probability distributions for regional climate change from uncertain global mean warming and uncertain scaling relationship Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11(3), 10971114, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Probability distributions for regional climate change from uncertain global mean warming of probability distributions for regional climate change from uncertain global mean warming and an uncertain/precipitation per degree global mean warming. Each scaling variable is assumed to be normally distributed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

112

A tightly coupled GIS and distributed hydrologic modeling framework  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Distributed, physics-based hydrologic models require spatially explicit specification of parameters related to climate, geology, land-cover, soil, and topography. Extracting these parameters from national geodatabases requires intensive data processing. Furthermore, mapping these parameters to model mesh elements necessitates development of data access tools that can handle both spatial and temporal datasets. This paper presents an open-source, platform independent, tightly coupled GIS and distributed hydrologic modeling framework, \\{PIHMgis\\} (www.pihm.psu.edu), to improve model-data integration. Tight coupling is achieved through the development of an integrated user interface with an underlying shared geodata model, which improves data flow between the \\{PIHMgis\\} data processing components. The capability and effectiveness of the \\{PIHMgis\\} framework in providing functionalities for watershed delineation, domain decomposition, parameter assignment, simulation, visualization and analyses, is demonstrated through prototyping of a model simulation. The framework and the approach are applicable for watersheds of varied sizes, and offer a template for future GIS-Model integration efforts.

Gopal Bhatt; Mukesh Kumar; Christopher J. Duffy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

A U.S. and China Regional Analysis of Distributed Energy Resources in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar energy into other useable forms. PV technology converts solar resourcesresource distribution and other factors (e.g. energy transportation cost). Solarsolar resources and thus these areas are candidates for distributed solar energy

Feng, Wei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Spatial distribution of geotechnical properties in surficial marine sediments-Northwestern slope region, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

set out to identify the depositional environment of that region, and reflect on surface sedimentation patterns, regional and local. In order to achieve these goals, this study employed select geotechnical tests, shear strength measurements, lithologic...

Meyer, Matthew Kael

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

115

Modeling regional seismic waves. Final report, 24 Mar 89-31 Jul 91  

SciTech Connect

This study can be divided into three main topics: modeling regional broad-band seismograms from the Imperial Valley to Pasadena, Determining surface wave magnitudes for NTS events using regional data, and waveform modeling to determine depth of earthquakes in Tibet leading to new origin times and a better estimation of P(sub n) and S(sub n) velocities. In section 1, broad-band wave propagation along a corridor from Imperial Valley to Pasadena, California is addressed. The path consists of 50 km of slow basin structure with a shallow moho followed by 250 km of relatively normal Southern California structure approaching Pasadena. In section 2, surface wave magnitudes for 112 Nevada Test Site (NTS) explosions from a data set of regional long-period seismograms from North American stations are calculated. In order to utilize the newer regional stations (Delta < 25 deg), a new method for determining M(sub s) has been developed which employs synthetic seismograms to establish a relationship between the amplitude of the regional Airy phase, or Rayleigh pulse, of the data and an associated surface wave magnitude, based on conventional M(sub s) determinations, calculated from a synthetic seismogram propagated to 40 deg. In section 3, a note on the relocation of the Tibetan earthquake is presented. Present ISC locations for earthquakes beneath Tibet indicates a random distribution of events down to a depth of about 50 km. A detained investigation of the Tibetan earthquakes, with magnitudes greater than 5.5 from 1964 to 1986, yields a distinctly different picture.

Helmberger, D.V.; Harkrider, D.G.

1991-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

116

Lessons learned in modeling Underfloor Air Distribution system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Underfloor Air Distribution (UFAD) Design Guide. Atlanta:for design cooling loads in underfloor air distribution (

Lee, Kwang Ho; Schiavon, Stefano; Webster, Tom; Bauman, Fred; Feng, Jingjuan; Hoyt, Tyler

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Abstract--This paper presents the impact of different types of load models in distribution network with distributed wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a major enabler of the smart grid for the integration of small and medium sized renewable energy basedAbstract--This paper presents the impact of different types of load models in distribution network with distributed wind generation. The analysis is carried out for a test distribution system representative

Pota, Himanshu Roy

118

Numerical Modeling of the Distributed Electrochemistry and Performance of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect

A cell-level distributed electrochemistry (DEC) modeling tool has been developed to enable prediction of solid oxide fuel cell performance by considering the coupled and spatially varying multi-physics that occur within the tri-layer. The approach calculates the distributed electrochemistry within the electrodes, which includes the charge transfer and electric potential fields, ion transport throughout the tri-layer, and gas distributions within the composite and porous electrodes. The thickness of the electrochemically active regions within the electrodes is calculated along with the distributions of charge transfer. The DEC modeling tool can examine the overall SOFC performance based on electrode microstructural parameters, such as particle size, pore size, porosity factor, electrolyte and electrode phase volume fractions, and triple-phase-boundary length. Recent developments in electrode fabrication methods have lead to increased interest in using graded and nano-structured electrodes to improve the electrochemical performance of SOFCs. This paper demonstrates how the DEC modeling tool can be used to help design novel electrode microstructures by optimizing a graded anode for high electrochemical performance.

Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Ryan, Emily M.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Post-Systolic Thickening in Ischaemic Myocardium: A Simple Mathematical Model for Simulating Regional Deformation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a one-dimensional mathematical model to explain changes in regional radial myocardial deformation during ischaemia. The model makes use of cellular contraction properties of normal and ischaemic myocytes extracted from an animal model of induced ...

Piet Claus; Bart Bijnens; Frank Weidemann; Christoph Dommke; Virginie Bito; Frank Heinzel; Karin Sipido; Ivan De Scheerder; Frank E. Rademakers; George R. Sutherland

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distribution model regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin...

122

A Brief History of Generative Models for Power Law and Lognormal Distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Brief History of Generative Models for Power Law and Lognormal Distributions Michael Mitzenmacher generative models that lead to these distributions. One #12;nding is that lognormal and power law of an underlying generative model which suggested that #12;le sizes were better modeled by a lognormal distribution

Mitzenmacher, Michael

123

Application of the distributed activation energy model to blends devolatilisation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, an investigation was carried out into the thermal behaviour of coal, petcoke and their blend as a generic feedstock in combustion and IGCC plants for energy production. The samples were pyrolysed in a TG analyzer in nitrogen atmosphere (constant flow of 0.0335 m/s) at several heating rates with temperatures ranging from 300 to 1223 K. The distributed activation energy model was applied to study the effects of heating rates on the reactions of single solids. The results obtained were used in the calculation of curves mass loss vs. temperature at more realistic heating rates. The algorithm used to obtain the distribution of reactivities for single solids was successfully implemented to allow the prediction of blends performance.

M.V. Navarro; A. Aranda; T. Garcia; R. Murillo; A.M. Mastral

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Modeling-Computer_Simulations_At_Northern_Basin_%26_Range_Region_(Biasi,_Et_Al.,_2009)&oldid=40142

125

Computational Model of the Mark-IV Electrorefiner: Two-Dimensional Potential and Current Distributions  

SciTech Connect

A computational model of the Mark-IV electrorefiner is currently being developed as a joint project between Idaho National Laboratory, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Seoul National University, and the University of Idaho. As part of this model, the two-dimensional potential and current distributions within the molten salt electrolyte are calculated for U3+ , Zr4+ , and Pu3+ along with the total distributions, using the partial differential equation solver of the commercial Matlab software. The electrical conductivity of the electrolyte solution is shown to depend primarily on the composition of the electrolyte and to average 205 mho/m with a standard deviation of 2.5 × 10-5% throughout the electrorefining process. These distributions show that the highest potential gradients (thus, the highest current) exist directly between the two anodes and cathode. The total, uranium, and plutonium potential gradients are shown to increase throughout the process, with a slight decrease in that of zirconium. The distributions also show small potential gradients and very little current flow in the region far from the operating electrodes.

Supathorn Phongikaroon; Steven Herrmann; Michael F. Simpson

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

An explicit boussinesq solution for a polynomial distribution of pressure over a triangular region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents explicit formulae for the deflection of the surface of an elastic half-space due to a continuous pressure represented by a cubic polynomial distributed over a triangular area.

Otto J. Svec; G. M. L. Gladwell

1971-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Distributed Bayesian Algorithms for Fault-Tolerant Event Region Detection in Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a distributed solution for a canonical task in wireless sensor networks---the binary detection of interesting environmental events. We explicitly take into account the possibility of sensor measurement faults and develop a distributed Bayesian algorithm for detecting and correcting such faults. Theoretical analysis and simulation results show that 85-95 percent of faults can be corrected using this algorithm, even when as many as 10 percent of the nodes are faulty.

Bhaskar Krishnamachari; Sitharama Iyengar

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Crustal structure of the south-central Andes Cordillera and backarc region from regional waveform modelling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......phase PmpSmp with long period energy but smaller amplitudes at regional...reported by the local networks in Argentina (INPRES) and Chile (SSN...histogram shows the seismic energy (in 106 J) released in the...coverage due to the Chile and Argentina seismic networks, so it is......

P. Alvarado; S. Beck; G. Zandt

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biasi, Et Al., Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Modeling-Computer_Simulations_At_Nw_Basin_%26_Range_Region_(Biasi,_Et_Al.,_2009)&oldid=401461" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded

130

Feasible Distributed CSP Models for Scheduling Problems Miguel A. Salido, Adriana Giret  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feasible Distributed CSP Models for Scheduling Problems Miguel A. Salido, Adriana Giret Universidad satisfaction problem (DisCSP) is a CSP in which variables and constraints are distributed among multiple are distributed by using our model. Key words: distributed CSP, constraint satisfaction, holonic system, multi

Salido, Miguel Angel

131

The Differential cross section distribution of Drell-Yan dielectron pairs in the z boson mass region  

SciTech Connect

We report on a measurement of the rapidity distribution, d{sigma}/dy, for Z=Drell-Yan {yields} ee events produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data sample consists of 2.13 fb{sup -1} corresponding to about 160,000 Z/Drell-Yan {yields} ee candidates in the Z boson mass region collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The d{sigma}/dy distribution, which is measured over the full kinematic range for e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs in the invariant mass range 66 < M{sub ee} < 116 GeV/c{sup 2}, is compared with theory predictions. There is good agreement between the data and predictions of Quantum Chromodynamics in Next to Leading Order with the CTEQ6.1M Parton Distribution Functions.

Han, Jiyeon; /Rochester U.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Joint physical and numerical modeling of water distribution networks.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the experimental and modeling effort undertaken to understand solute mixing in a water distribution network conducted during the last year of a 3-year project. The experimental effort involves measurement of extent of mixing within different configurations of pipe networks, measurement of dynamic mixing in a single mixing tank, and measurement of dynamic solute mixing in a combined network-tank configuration. High resolution analysis of turbulence mixing is carried out via high speed photography as well as 3D finite-volume based Large Eddy Simulation turbulence models. Macroscopic mixing rules based on flow momentum balance are also explored, and in some cases, implemented in EPANET. A new version EPANET code was developed to yield better mixing predictions. The impact of a storage tank on pipe mixing in a combined pipe-tank network during diurnal fill-and-drain cycles is assessed. Preliminary comparison between dynamic pilot data and EPANET-BAM is also reported.

Zimmerman, Adam; O'Hern, Timothy John; Orear, Leslie Jr.; Kajder, Karen C.; Webb, Stephen Walter; Cappelle, Malynda A.; Khalsa, Siri Sahib; Wright, Jerome L.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Chwirka, J. Benjamin; Hartenberger, Joel David; McKenna, Sean Andrew; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; McGrath, Lucas K.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Experimental verification of a model describing the intensity distribution from a single mode optical fiber  

SciTech Connect

The intensity distribution of a transmission from a single mode optical fiber is often approximated using a Gaussian-shaped curve. While this approximation is useful for some applications such as fiber alignment, it does not accurately describe transmission behavior off the axis of propagation. In this paper, another model is presented, which describes the intensity distribution of the transmission from a single mode optical fiber. A simple experimental setup is used to verify the model's accuracy, and agreement between model and experiment is established both on and off the axis of propagation. Displacement sensor designs based on the extrinsic optical lever architecture are presented. The behavior of the transmission off the axis of propagation dictates the performance of sensor architectures where large lateral offsets (25-1500 {micro}m) exist between transmitting and receiving fibers. The practical implications of modeling accuracy over this lateral offset region are discussed as they relate to the development of high-performance intensity modulated optical displacement sensors. In particular, the sensitivity, linearity, resolution, and displacement range of a sensor are functions of the relative positioning of the sensor's transmitting and receiving fibers. Sensor architectures with high combinations of sensitivity and displacement range are discussed. It is concluded that the utility of the accurate model is in its predicative capability and that this research could lead to an improved methodology for high-performance sensor design.

Moro, Erik A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Puckett, Anthony D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Todd, Michael D [UCSD

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

134

The Plausibility of Semantic Properties Generated by a Distributional Model: Evidence from a Visual World Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Plausibility of Semantic Properties Generated by a Distributional Model: Evidence from a Visual the plausibility of the properties generated by a distributional model using data from a visual world experiment, recently, a distributional model has been proposed that is able to generate properties associated

Koehn, Philipp

135

Regulation and Measuring Cost-Efficiency with Panel Data Models: Application to Electricity Distribution Utilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper examines the performance of panel data models in measuring cost-efficiency of electricity distribution utilities. Different cost frontier models are applied to a sample...

Mehdi Farsi; Massimo Filippini

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Distributed generation capabilities of the national energy modeling system  

SciTech Connect

This report describes Berkeley Lab's exploration of how the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) models distributed generation (DG) and presents possible approaches for improving how DG is modeled. The on-site electric generation capability has been available since the AEO2000 version of NEMS. Berkeley Lab has previously completed research on distributed energy resources (DER) adoption at individual sites and has developed a DER Customer Adoption Model called DER-CAM. Given interest in this area, Berkeley Lab set out to understand how NEMS models small-scale on-site generation to assess how adequately DG is treated in NEMS, and to propose improvements or alternatives. The goal is to determine how well NEMS models the factors influencing DG adoption and to consider alternatives to the current approach. Most small-scale DG adoption takes place in the residential and commercial modules of NEMS. Investment in DG ultimately offsets purchases of electricity, which also eliminates the losses associated with transmission and distribution (T&D). If the DG technology that is chosen is photovoltaics (PV), NEMS assumes renewable energy consumption replaces the energy input to electric generators. If the DG technology is fuel consuming, consumption of fuel in the electric utility sector is replaced by residential or commercial fuel consumption. The waste heat generated from thermal technologies can be used to offset the water heating and space heating energy uses, but there is no thermally activated cooling capability. This study consists of a review of model documentation and a paper by EIA staff, a series of sensitivity runs performed by Berkeley Lab that exercise selected DG parameters in the AEO2002 version of NEMS, and a scoping effort of possible enhancements and alternatives to NEMS current DG capabilities. In general, the treatment of DG in NEMS is rudimentary. The penetration of DG is determined by an economic cash-flow analysis that determines adoption based on the n umber of years to a positive cash flow. Some important technologies, e.g. thermally activated cooling, are absent, and ceilings on DG adoption are determined by some what arbitrary caps on the number of buildings that can adopt DG. These caps are particularly severe for existing buildings, where the maximum penetration for any one technology is 0.25 percent. On the other hand, competition among technologies is not fully considered, and this may result in double-counting for certain applications. A series of sensitivity runs show greater penetration with net metering enhancements and aggressive tax credits and a more limited response to lowered DG technology costs. Discussion of alternatives to the current code is presented in Section 4. Alternatives or improvements to how DG is modeled in NEMS cover three basic areas: expanding on the existing total market for DG both by changing existing parameters in NEMS and by adding new capabilities, such as for missing technologies; enhancing the cash flow analysis but incorporating aspects of DG economics that are not currently represented, e.g. complex tariffs; and using an external geographic information system (GIS) driven analysis that can better and more intuitively identify niche markets.

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Simulation of a Polar Low Case in the North Atlantic with different regional numerical models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Matthias Zahn, Hans von Storch University of Hamburg/ GKSS, Matthias.Zahn@gkss.de ABSTRACT In this paper (REgional MOdel) and CLM (CLimate Model) simulations performed at the GKSS with spectral nudging (Feser et

Zahn, Matthias

138

Regional Frequency Analysis at Ungauged Sites with the Generalized Additive Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The log-linear regression model is one of the most commonly used models to estimate flood quantiles at ungauged sites within the regional frequency analysis (RFA) framework. However, hydrological processes are naturally complex in several aspects ...

F. Chebana; C. Charron; T. B. M. J. Ouarda; B. Martel

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

A Diagnostic Analysis of a Long-Term Regional Air Pollutant Transport Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Predicted concentrations from the Regional Air Pollutant Transport (RAPT) model are compared with the corresponding observed values of sulfate, and the results used to define strengths and weaknesses in the model formulation.

Daniel J. McNaughton; Carl M. Berkowitz; Robert C. Williams

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

GIS-based energy-economic model of low temperature geothermal resources: A case study in the Italian Marche region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a computational procedure designed to derive a regional model of the low temperature geothermal potential and its economic exploitability. The model was applied to the Italian Marche region and developed with the support of a Geographic Information System (GIS), which highlights the spatial dependencies in the distribution of geothermic resources. The Low Temperature Geothermal Energy has already gained attention as a renewable energy resource for domestic heating and represents a growing opportunity for investment. Although it is common practice to conduct an accurate evaluation of the geothermal potential and its exploitability on a site during the construction of a single installation, there is not an established practice or guidelines for estimating this resource over large territories. This information could support an institution’s ability to conduct regional energy planning and guide private entrepreneurship to meet new economic opportunities. To address these issues, the main contribution of this work is a model that reduces the distance between the physical knowledge of the territory/environment and economic analysis. The model is based on a useful assessment of low temperature geothermal potential obtained from physical parameters on a regional scale, from which a set of economic indicators are calculated to evaluate the actual economic accessibility to the geothermal energy resource.

Alberto Gemelli; Adriano Mancini; Sauro Longhi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distribution model regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

An autonomy-oriented computing mechanism for modeling the formation of energy distribution networks: crude oil distribution in U.S. and Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An efficient, economical, as well as reliable energy distribution system plays important roles in distributing energy resources from energy suppliers to energy consumers in different regions. In this paper, we present a decentralized self-organized mechanism ...

Benyun Shi; Jiming Liu

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

The Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) 4-dimensional variational data assimilation systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) 4-dimensional variational data assimilation systems Part during ocean data assimilation was explored when the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) 4-dimensional. This is the third part of a three part series describing the ROMS 4D- Var systems. Ã? 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

Costa, Daniel P.

143

The Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) 4-dimensional variational data assimilation systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) 4-dimensional variational data assimilation systems Part Article history: Available online xxxx a b s t r a c t The Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) 4 of the various components of ROMS 4D-Var. In par- ticular, we present a comparison of three approaches to 4D

Costa, Daniel P.

144

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References J. W. Pritchett (2004) Finding Hidden Geothermal Resources In The Basin And Range Using Electrical Survey Techniques- A Computational Feasibility Study Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Modeling-Computer_Simulations_At_Northern_Basin_%26_Range_Region_(Pritchett,_2004)&oldid=401423"

145

A multistage model for distribution expansion planning with distributed generation in a deregulated electricity market  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Distribution systems management is becoming an increasingly complicated issue due to the introduction of new technologies, new energy trading strategies and a new deregulated environment. In the new deregulated energy market and considering the incentives ... Keywords: GAMS-MATLAB interface, distributed generation (DG), distribution company (DISCO), investment payback time, microturbine, social welfare

S. Porkar; A. Abbaspour-Tehrani-Fard; P. Poure; S. Saadate

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Creol: a type-safe object-oriented model for distributed concurrent systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Object-oriented distributed computing is becoming increasingly important for critical infrastructure in society. In standard object-oriented models, objects synchronize on method calls. These models may be criticized in the distributed setting for their ... Keywords: distributed object-oriented systems, type and effect system, type soundness

Einar Broch Johnsen; Olaf Owe; Ingrid Chieh Yu

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Data-based Construction of Convex Region Surrogate (CRS) Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University Arul Sundaramoorthy, Jose M. Pinto Praxair Inc., Business and Supply Chain Optimization R Model of an Industrial Process. Real process data drawn from a Praxair plant Set 1 0.900 0.062 0

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

148

Regional CO2 and latent heat surface fluxes in the Southern Great Plains: Measurements, modeling, and scaling  

SciTech Connect

Characterizing net ecosystem exchanges (NEE) of CO{sub 2} and sensible and latent heat fluxes in heterogeneous landscapes is difficult, yet critical given expected changes in climate and land use. We report here a measurement and modeling study designed to improve our understanding of surface to atmosphere gas exchanges under very heterogeneous land cover in the mostly agricultural U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP). We combined three years of site-level, eddy covariance measurements in several of the dominant land cover types with regional-scale climate data from the distributed Mesonet stations and Next Generation Weather Radar precipitation measurements to calibrate a land surface model of trace gas and energy exchanges (isotope-enabled land surface model (ISOLSM)). Yearly variations in vegetation cover distributions were estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer normalized difference vegetation index and compared to regional and subregional vegetation cover type estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture census. We first applied ISOLSM at a 250 m spatial scale to account for vegetation cover type and leaf area variations that occur on hundred meter scales. Because of computational constraints, we developed a subsampling scheme within 10 km 'macrocells' to perform these high-resolution simulations. We estimate that the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility SGP region net CO{sub 2} exchange with the local atmosphere was -240, -340, and -270 gC m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} (positive toward the atmosphere) in 2003, 2004, and 2005, respectively, with large seasonal variations. We also performed simulations using two scaling approaches at resolutions of 10, 30, 60, and 90 km. The scaling approach applied in current land surface models led to regional NEE biases of up to 50 and 20% in weekly and annual estimates, respectively. An important factor in causing these biases was the complex leaf area index (LAI) distribution within cover types. Biases in predicted weekly average regional latent heat fluxes were smaller than for NEE, but larger than for either ecosystem respiration or assimilation alone. However, spatial and diurnal variations of hundreds of W m{sup -2} in latent heat fluxes were common. We conclude that, in this heterogeneous system, characterizing vegetation cover type and LAI at the scale of spatial variation are necessary for accurate estimates of bottom-up, regional NEE and surface energy fluxes.

Riley, W. J.; Biraud, S.C.; Torn, M.S.; Fischer, M.L.; Billesbach, D.P.; Berry, J.A.

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Modeling-Computer Simulations At General Us Region (Goff & Decker, 1983) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Us Region (Goff & Decker, 1983) Us Region (Goff & Decker, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At General Us Region (Goff & Decker, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location General Us Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Review and identification of 24 potential sites for EGS development across the U.S., as well as modeling of the representative geologic systems in which promising EGS sites occur. References Fraser Goff, Edward R. Decker (1983) Candidate Sites For Future Hot Dry Rock Development In The United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Modeling-Computer_Simulations_At_General_Us_Region_(Goff_%26_Decker,_1983)&oldid=38761

150

Abstract 3714: Trametinib (Mekinist TM) has limited brain distribution in the mouse model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Trametinib (Mekinist TM) has limited brain distribution in the mouse model Shruthi...molecularly-targeted agents into the brain. The discovery of focal BRAF mutations...vemurafenib and dabrafenib) have limited brain distribution due to active efflux at the...

Shruthi Vaidhyanathan; Rajendar K. Mittapalli; Daniel J. Ma; Mark A. Schroeder; Jann N. Sarkaria; William F. Elmquist

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

The size distribution, scaling properties and spatial organization of urban clusters: a global and regional perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human development has far-reaching impacts on the surface of the globe. The transformation of natural land cover occurs in different forms and urban growth is one of the most eminent transformative processes. We analyze global land cover data and extract cities as defined by maximally connected urban clusters. The analysis of the city size distribution for all cities on the globe confirms Zipf's law. Moreover, by investigating the percolation properties of the clustering of urban areas we assess the closeness to criticality for various countries. At the critical thresholds, the urban land cover of the countries undergoes a transition from separated clusters to a gigantic component on the country scale. We study the Zipf-exponents as a function of the closeness to percolation and find a systematic decrease with increasing scale, which could be the reason for deviating exponents reported in literature. Moreover, we investigate the average size of the clusters as a function of the proximity to percolation and fi...

Fluschnik, Till; Ros, Anselmo García Cantú; Zhou, Bin; Reusser, Dominik E; Kropp, Jürgen P; Rybski, Diego

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Modeling-Computer Simulations At U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At U.S. West Region Modeling-Computer Simulations At U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. West Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Characterization and Conceptual Modeling of Magmatically-Heated and Deep-Circulation, High-Temperature Hydrothermal Systems in the Basin and Range and Cordilleran United States, Moore, Nash, Nemcok, Lutz, Norton, Kaspereit, Berard, van de Putte, Johnson and Deymonaz. Utilizing a wealth of formerly proprietary subsurface samples and datasets for exemplary high-temperature western U.S. geothermal systems, develop and publish detailed and refined new conceptual and numerical hydrothermal-history models of fundamental scientific import but, more importantly, of use to

153

On the Predictive Uncertainty of a Distributed Hydrologic Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use models to simulate the real world mainly for prediction purposes. However, since any model is a simplification of reality, there remains a great deal of uncertainty even after the calibration of model parameters. The model’s identifiability...

Cho, Huidae

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Modeling the reactive inorganic solute distributions in the groundwater flow systems of the Hanford Site using inverse analytical modeling techniques.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Inverse analytical techniques were used to model solute distributions and determine transport parameters for two flow systems in the Yakima Basalt subgroup at the Hanford… (more)

Adamski, Mark Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Is the Weibull distribution really suited for wind statistics modeling and wind power evaluation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind speed statistics is generally modeled using the Weibull distribution. This distribution is convenient since it fully characterizes analytically with only two parameters (the shape and scale parameters) the shape of distribution and the different moments of the wind speed (mean, standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis). This distribution is broadly used in the wind energy sector to produce maps of wind energy potential. However, the Weibull distribution is based on empirical rather than physical justification and might display strong limitations for its applications. The philosophy of this article is based on the modeling of the wind components instead of the wind speed itself. This provides more physical insights on the validity domain of the Weibull distribution as a possible relevant model for wind statistics and the quantification of the error made by using such a distribution. We thereby propose alternative expressions of more suited wind speed distribution.

Drobinski, Philippe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Memory consistency models for high performance distributed computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a mathematical framework for specifying the consistency guarantees of high performance distributed shared memory multiprocessors. This framework is based on computations, which specify the operations ...

Luchangco, Victor

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Nicaragua-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nicaragua-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Nicaragua-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Jump to: navigation, search Name Nicaragua-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Agency/Company /Organization World Watch Institute Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Background analysis, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.worldwatch.org/node Country Nicaragua Central America References Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model[1] Overview "This project will design a unified low-carbon development strategy for Central America through the use of renewable energy and energy efficiency maps, followed by technical, economic, and social feasibility studies for

158

Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Jump to: navigation, search Name Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Agency/Company /Organization World Watch Institute Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Background analysis, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.worldwatch.org/node Country Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America References Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model[1] Overview "This project will design a unified low-carbon development strategy for

159

Honduras-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Honduras-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Honduras-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Jump to: navigation, search Name Honduras-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Agency/Company /Organization World Watch Institute Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Background analysis, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.worldwatch.org/node Country Honduras Central America References Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model[1] Overview "This project will design a unified low-carbon development strategy for Central America through the use of renewable energy and energy efficiency maps, followed by technical, economic, and social feasibility studies for

160

Belize-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Belize-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Belize-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Jump to: navigation, search Name Belize-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Agency/Company /Organization World Watch Institute Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Background analysis, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.worldwatch.org/node Country Belize Central America References Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model[1] Overview "This project will design a unified low-carbon development strategy for Central America through the use of renewable energy and energy efficiency maps, followed by technical, economic, and social feasibility studies for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distribution model regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Assembling Crustal Geophysical Data for Geothermal Exploration in the Great Basin, Louie and Coolbaugh. We have compiled velocity information from sources in the literature, results of previous seismic experiments and earthquake-monitoring projects, and data donated from mining, geothermal, and petroleum companies. We also collected (May 2002 and August 2004) two

162

Costa Rica-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Costa Rica-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Costa Rica-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Jump to: navigation, search Name Costa-Rica-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Agency/Company /Organization World Watch Institute Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Background analysis, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.worldwatch.org/node Country Costa Rica Central America References Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model[1] Overview "This project will design a unified low-carbon development strategy for Central America through the use of renewable energy and energy efficiency maps, followed by technical, economic, and social feasibility studies for

163

Integrated modelling and assessment of regional groundwater resources in Germany and Benin, West Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Integrated modelling and assessment of regional groundwater resources in Germany and Benin, West.J.S. SONNEVELD [1] Institute of Hydraulic Engineering, Universitaet Stuttgart, Germany (Roland Conservation University of Bonn, Germany [3] Institute of Landscape Planning and Ecology, University

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

164

High-Speed Extraction Model of Interest Region in the Parcel Image of Large Size  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper deals with a model for the high-speed extraction of ROI (Region Of Interest) during the process of logistics transported on conveyor belt. The objective of this paper is to extract various ROIs from...

Moon-sung Park; Il-sook Kim; Eun-kyung Cho…

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Guatemala-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guatemala-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Guatemala-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Jump to: navigation, search Name Guatemala-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model Agency/Company /Organization World Watch Institute Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Background analysis, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.worldwatch.org/node Country Guatemala Central America References Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional Model[1] Overview "This project will design a unified low-carbon development strategy for Central America through the use of renewable energy and energy efficiency maps, followed by technical, economic, and social feasibility studies for

166

Modeling Silicon Photonics in Distributed Computing Systems: From the Device to the Rack  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SiP interconnects are envisioned for large scale distributed computing platforms. In such applications, optical systems involving millions of devices have to be modeled. We review key...

Rumley, Sébastien; Nikolova, Dessislava; Hendry, Robert; Wen, Ke; Bergman, Keren

167

A distributed parameter model for the torsional vibration analysis of turbine-generator shafts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A distributed parameter model is presented for the calculation of torsional vibrations of large turbine-generator shafts, on the basis of electrical analogy...

A. Deri; L. Kiss; G. Toth

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Design and Modeling of Centralized Distribution Network for the DC House Project.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis focuses on the design, modeling, simulation, and performance evaluation of Centralized Distribution Network for the DC House Project. Power System Computer Aided… (more)

Bassi, Harpreet S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Automated Distributed Implementation of Component-based Models with Priorities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

School of Computer Science University of Waterloo 200 University Avenue West Waterloo, Canada, N2L3G1.4 [Computer-Communication Networks]: Distributed Systems[Distributed applications] ; D.1.3 [Programming the European Community's Seventh Framework Pro- gramme [FP7/2007-2013] under grant agreement no 248776 (PRO3D

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

170

Modeling transparency and collaborativeness in distributed work groups  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Transparency and collaborativeness are two essential features required for dependability. These two issues in social groups are not well studied. The present paper studies these two aspects in distributed work group environment such as Self Help Groups ... Keywords: SHG, collaboration, distributed work groups, self help group, transparency

A. B. Sagar

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Critical region for an Ising model coupled to causal dynamical triangulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A lower and an upper bound are established upon a critical curve for the (annealed) Ising model coupled to two-dimensional causal dynamical triangulations. Using the Fortuin-Kasteleyn (FK) representation of quantum Ising models via path integrals, we determine a region in the quadrant of parameters $\\beta, \\mu>0$ where the critical curve can be located. Moreover, this approach serves to outline a region where the infinite-volume Gibbs measure exist and is unique and a region where the finite-volume Gibbs measure has no weak limit. We also provide lower and upper bounds for the infinite-volume free energy.

José Cerda Hernández

2014-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

172

A Computational Market Model for Distributed Configuration Design Michael P. Wellman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of distributed configuration design problems. Given a design problem, the model defines a computational economy viewpoint for analyzing distributed design problems. #12;This page intentionally blank #12. Computational support for distributed design collaboration presents a variety of new challenges (Cutkosky et al

Wellman, Michael P.

173

Extreme Work Teams: Using SWAT Teams As a Model for Coordinating Distributed Robots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extreme Work Teams: Using SWAT Teams As a Model for Coordinating Distributed Robots Hank Jones phinds@leland.stanford.edu ABSTRACT We present a field study of police SWAT teams for the purpose observations. Keywords Distributed work, distributed teams, leadership, extreme work teams, field robotics

174

Distribution Load Modelling for Demand Side Management and End-Use Efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problem of electric load modelling for low aggregation levels is addressed in the paper, being the object to obtain good “response” behaviour models of any group of loads in an electric energy distribution...

C. Álvarez; A. Gabaldón

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Modeling the Effect of Hurricanes on Power Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are many calamitous events such as earthquakes, hurricanes, tsunamis etc. that occur suddenly and cause great loss of life, damage, or hardship. Hurricanes cause significant damage to power distribution systems, resulting in prolonged customer...

Chanda, Suraj

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

176

Modeled climate change effects on distributions of Canadian butterfly species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Climate change effects on biodiversity are being documented now frequently in the form of changes in phenology and distributional shifts. However, the form that these effects will take over a longer timespan is ...

Peterson, A. Townsend; Martí nez-Meyer, Enrique; Gonzá lez-Salazar, Constantino; Hall, Peter W.

2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

177

A Complex Model for Distributing Competences That Requires Further Safeguards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The distribution of competences between State and Autonomous Communities in Spain has recently undergone a number of major changes resulting from the reform of the Statutes of Autonomy. The present article seeks ...

Paloma Biglino Campos

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Distribution and kinematics of the HCN(3-2) emission down to the innermost region in the envelope of the O-rich star W Hya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report high angular resolution observations of the HCN (3-2) line emission in the circumstellar envelope of the O-rich star W Hya with the Submillimeter Array. The proximity of this star allows us to image its molecular envelope with a spatial resolution of just ~40 AU, corresponding to about 10 times the stellar diameter. We resolve the HCN (3-2) emission and find that it is centrally peaked and has a roughly spherically symmetrical distribution. This shows that HCN is formed in the innermost region of the envelope (within ~10 stellar radii), which is consistent with predictions from pulsation-driven shock chemistry models, and rules out the scenario in which HCN forms through photochemical reactions in the outer envelope. Our model suggests that the envelope decreases steeply in temperature and increases smoothly in velocity with radius, inconsistent with the standard model for mass-loss driven by radiative pressure on dust grains. We detect a velocity gradient of ~5 km/s in the NW--SE direction over the central 40 AU. This velocity gradient is reminescent of that seen in OH maser lines, and could be caused by the rotation of the envelope or by a weak bipolar outflow.

Muller Sebastien; Dinh-V-Trung; He Jin-Hua; Lim Jeremy

2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

179

11.482J / 1.285J / ESD.193J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analyses and Modeling, Fall 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reviews regional economic theories and models and provides students with experience in using alternative economic impact assessment models on microcomputers. Problem sets are oriented around infrastructure, housing, energy, ...

Polenske, Karen R.

180

Fully Distributed Trust Model based on Trust Graph for Mobile Ad hoc Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully Distributed Trust Model based on Trust Graph for Mobile Ad hoc Networks Mawloud Omar, Yacine University of Technology, France. bouabdal@hds.utc.fr Abstract A mobile ad hoc network (MANET) is a wireless that defines who trusts who and how. Our work aims to provide a fully distributed trust model for mobile ad hoc

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distribution model regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Analytical model for ion angular distribution functions at rf biased surfaces with collisionless plasma sheaths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analytical model for ion angular distribution functions at rf biased surfaces with collisionless plasma sheaths Laxminarayan L. Rajaa) Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics The article presents an analytical model for evaluation of ion angular distribution functions IADFs at a radio

Raja, Laxminarayan L.

182

Characterizing uncertainty in species distribution models derived from interpolated weather station data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metrics of uncertainty in interpolated weather station data have varying contributions to over- and underCharacterizing uncertainty in species distribution models derived from interpolated weather station distribution models derived from interpolated weather station data. Ecosphere 4(5):61. http://dx.doi.org/10

Kueppers, Lara M.

183

Hybrid thermal model for swimming pools based on artificial neural networks for southeast region of Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nowadays, the usage of systems based on solar energy have been largely stimulated. The correct designing and efficiency of these systems are highly dependent of the seasonal climatic characteristics of the regions where they will be installed. In this ... Keywords: Artificial neural networks, Hybrid models, Renewable energy, Solar energy systems, Thermal model of pool

Enock T. Santos; Luis E. ZáRate; Elizabeth M. D. Pereira

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

A Multi-Model Assessment of Regional Climate Disparities Caused by Solar Geoengineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 A Multi-Model Assessment of Regional Climate Disparities Caused by Solar Geoengineering Brunswick, NJ. 5 Canadian Centre for Climate Modeling and Analysis, Environment Canada, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. 6 School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

Robock, Alan

185

The NOAA National Operational Model Archive and Distribution System -NOMADS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for access to real-time and retrospective high volume numerical weather prediction and climate models been on weather and reanalysis. Plans to support climate models and associated observational data a unified climate and weather model archive providing format independent access to retrospective models

186

Abundance determinations in HII regions: model fitting versus Te-method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The discrepancy between the oxygen abundances in high-metallicity HII regions determined through the Te-method (and/or through the corresponding "strong lines - oxygen abundance" calibration) and that determined through the model fitting (and/or through the corresponding "strong lines - oxygen abundance" calibration) is discussed. It is suggested to use the interstellar oxygen abundance in the solar vicinity, derived with very high precision from the high-resolution observations of the weak interstellar absorption lines towards the stars, as a "Rosetta stone" to verify the validity of the oxygen abundances derived in HII regions with the Te-method at high abundances. The agreement between the value of the oxygen abundance at the solar galactocentric distance traced by the abundances derived in HII regions through the Te-method and that derived from the interstellar absorption lines towards the stars is strong evidence in favor of that i) the two-zone model for Te seems to be a realistic interpretation of the temperature structure within HII regions, and ii) the classic Te-method provides accurate oxygen abundances in HII regions. It has been concluded that the "strong lines - oxygen abundance" calibrations must be based on the HII regions with the oxygen abundances derived with the Te-method but not on the existing grids of the models for HII regions.

L. S. Pilyugin

2002-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

187

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blackwell, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Developed natural state mass and energy transport fluid flow models of generic Basin and Range systems based on Dixie Valley data that help to

188

Downscaling Global Land Cover Projections from an Integrated Assessment Model for Use in Regional Analyses: Results and Evaluation for the US from 2005 to 2095  

SciTech Connect

Projections of land cover change generated from Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) and other economic-based models can be applied for analyses of environmental impacts at subregional and landscape scales. For those IAM and economic models that project land use at the sub-continental or regional scale, these projections must be downscaled and spatially distributed prior to use in climate or ecosystem models. Downscaling efforts to date have been conducted at the national extent with relatively high spatial resolution (30m) and at the global extent with relatively coarse spatial resolution (0.5 degree).

West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick LB; Huang, Maoyi; Wolf, Julie; Thomson, Allison M.

2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

189

Regional flood hydrology in a semi-arid catchment using a GLS regression model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary The regional flood frequency hydrology of the 86,000 km2 and semi-arid Ebro catchment is investigated using an extended generalised least square model that includes separate descriptions for sampling errors and model errors. The Ebro catchment is characterised by large hydro-climatic heterogeneities among sub-regions. However, differences in flood processes among sites are better explained by a set of new catchment descriptors introduced into hydrological regression models, such as new characteristics derived from the slope of flow duration curves, the ratio of mean annual precipitation to extreme precipitations and the aridity index. These additions enabled a more direct link to be established between the general flow regime and the extreme flood characteristics through-out the entire catchment. The new regression models developed in this study were compared to a set of existing models recommended for flood frequency estimation in Spain. It was found that the generalised least squares model developed in this study improves the existing ordinary least squares models both at regional and trans-regional scales. An adequate description of flood processes is obtained and, as a direct consequence, more reliable flood predictions in ungauged catchments are achieved.

Luis Mediero; Thomas R. Kjeldsen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Long-Term Succession of Structure and Diversity of a Biofilm Formed in a Model Drinking Water Distribution System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

formation in a model drinking water distribution system. J.and activity in drinking water distribution networks underbacterial species from drinking water biofilms and proof of

Martiny, A. C; Jorgensen, T. M; Albrechtsen, H.-J.; Arvin, E.; Molin, S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

An explicit method for decoupled distributed solvers in an equation-based modelling language  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Modelica language offers an intuitive way to create object-oriented models. This makes it natural also to use an object-oriented solver, where each sub-model solves its own equations. Doing so is possible only if sub-models can be made independent ... Keywords: Modelica, distributed solvers, model generation, transmission line element method

Robert Braun, Petter Krus

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Distributed State Space Generation of Discrete-State Stochastic Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the numerical approach, since the size of the state space can easily be orders of magnitude larger than the main charts [17], and ad hoc textual languages [14], the correct logical behavior can, in principle--it makes sense to distribute the state-space principally when one has to in order to avoid paging overhead

Ciardo, Gianfranco

193

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blackwell,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northern Basin & Northern Basin & Range Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Developed natural state mass and energy transport fluid flow models of generic Basin and Range systems based on Dixie Valley data that help to understand the nature of large scale constraints on the location and characteristics of the geothermal systems References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Modeling-Computer_Simulations_At_Northern_Basin_%26_Range_Region_(Blackwell,_Et_Al.,_2003)&oldid=401422

194

Distribution:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

JAN26 19% JAN26 19% Distribution: OR00 Attn: h.H.M.Roth DFMusser ITMM MMMann INS JCRyan FIw(2) Hsixele SRGustavson, Document rocm Formal file i+a@mmm bav@ ~@esiaw*cp Suppl. file 'Br & Div rf's s/health (lic.only) UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION SPECIAL NUCLEAB MATERIAL LICENSE pursuant to the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Chapter 1, P&t 70, "Special Nuclear Material Reg)llatiqm," a license is hereby issued a$hortztng the licensee to rekeive and possess the special nuclear material designated below; to use such special nuclear mat&ial for the purpose(s) and at the place(s) designated below; and to transfer such material to per&s authorized to receive it in accordance with the regula,tions in said Part.

195

Estimating sandstone permeability using network models with pore size distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in appearance to empirical data. A network model is developed to simulate the pore geometry of a clean, well-sorted sandstone. Pores were modeled as straight capillaries connected in various lattice configurations. Complex lattice configurations produce more... properties and can be closely monitored, allowing for study of their effects on flow in the network lattice. Various parameter variation techniques are introduced in the literature. These techniques induce flow property changes in the model allowing rock...

Mathews, Alan Ronald

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Economic and Distributed Model Predictive Control of Nonlinear Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R. Amrit. Optimizing process economic performance us- ing2 Economic Model Predictive Control of Nonlinear Processof MPC and economic optimization of processes (e.g. , [2,

Heidarinejad, Mohsen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Modeling the Dispersal of an Active Region: Quantifying Energy Input into the Corona  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, a new technique for modeling nonlinear force-free fields directly from line-of-sight magnetogram observations is presented. The technique uses sequences of magnetograms directly as lower boundary conditions to drive the evolution of coronal magnetic fields between successive force-free equilibria over long periods of time. It is illustrated by applying it to SOHO: MDI observations of a decaying active region, NOAA AR 8005. The active region is modeled during a four-day period around its central meridian passage. Over this time, the dispersal of the active region is dominated by random motions due to small-scale convective cells. Through studying the buildup of magnetic energy in the model, it is found that such small-scale motions may inject anywhere from (2.5-3) ? 1025 erg s–1 of free magnetic energy into the coronal field. Most of this energy is stored within the center of the active region in the low corona, below 30 Mm. After four days, the buildup of free energy is 10% that of the corresponding potential field. This energy buildup is sufficient to explain the radiative losses at coronal temperatures within the active region. Small-scale convective motions therefore play an integral part in the energy balance of the corona. This new technique has wide ranging applications with the new high-resolution, high-cadence observations from the SDO:HMI and SDO:AIA instruments.

Duncan H. Mackay; L. M. Green; Aad van Ballegooijen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Design of a next-generation regional weather research and forecast model.  

SciTech Connect

The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model is a new model development effort undertaken jointly by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and a number of collaborating institutions and university scientists. The model is intended for use by operational NWP and university research communities, providing a common framework for idealized dynamical studies, fill physics numerical weather prediction, air-quality simulation, and regional climate. It will eventually supersede large, well-established but aging regional models now maintained by the participating institutions. The WRF effort includes re-engineering the underlying software architecture to produce a modular, flexible code designed from the outset to provide portable performance across diverse computing architectures. This paper outlines key elements of the WRF software design.

Michalakes, J.

1999-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

199

A distributed converging overland flow model: 1. Mathematical solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MODEL The kinematic wave equations of continuity and momentum for a converging section are [Singh, 1974] 889 890 SHERMAN AND SINGH: FLOW MODELING, 1 X Fig. 1. Geometry of converging overland flow model. Oh O(uh) uh Ot q- Ox - q(x, t) q- L -- x (3...)' Q = uh = a(x,t)h n (4) where L is the length of the converging section (Figure 1). For a specified rainfall duration T, q(x, t) = 0 when t > T. We assume that n > 1. Eliminating u in (3) and (4), .we get Oh q_ na(x t)h \\"- Oh Ot ' Ox a(x, t...

Sherman, Bernard; Singh, Vijay P.

200

Modeling of the electron distribution based on bremsstrahlung emission during lower hybrid current drive on PLT  

SciTech Connect

Lower hybrid current drive requires the generation of a high energy electron tail anisotropic in velocity. Measurements of bremsstrahlung emission produced by this tail are compared with the calculated emission from reasonable model distributions. The physical basis and the sensitivity of this modeling process are described and the plasma properties of current driven discharges which can be derived from the model are discussed.

Stevens, J.E.; von Goeler, S.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.; Chu, T.K.; Efthimion, P.; Fisch, N.; Hooke, W.; Hosea, J.; Jobes, F.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distribution model regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Modeling the Complex Dynamics of Distributed Communities of the Web with Pretopology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling the Complex Dynamics of Distributed Communities of the Web with Pretopology Vincent analysis of web communities. This approach is based upon the pretopological concepts of pseudoclosure through the actual limits of graph theory modeling. The problem of modeling and understanding web

202

misunderstanding the factors shaping species distributions. By building `over fit' models, with excessive flexibility, we  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1267 misunderstanding the factors shaping species distributions. By building `over fit' models, with excessive flexibility, we risk inadvertently ascribing pattern to noise or building opaque models. As such for particular study objectives is challenging. By building `under fit' models, having insufficient flexibility

Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

203

Distributed sediment yield modelling: Importance of initial sediment Gianbattista Bussi a,*, Flix Francs a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed sediment yield modelling: Importance of initial sediment conditions Gianbattista Bussi April 2014 Available online Keywords: Sediment modelling Soil erosion River network deposits Initial conditions Sediment hysteresis loop a b s t r a c t The importance of initial sediment conditions on model

Julien, Pierre Y.

204

OPTIMISATION OF A CROSSDOCKING DISTRIBUTION CENTRE SIMULATION MODEL Adrian Adewunmi, Uwe Aickelin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OPTIMISATION OF A CROSSDOCKING DISTRIBUTION CENTRE SIMULATION MODEL Adrian Adewunmi, Uwe Aickelin using Simulation Optimisation. The aim of this project is to optimise a discrete event simulation model simulation model. Our results demonstrate that we can improve the precision of our selected simulation output

Aickelin, Uwe

205

Lessons learned in modeling Underfloor Air Distribution system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UFAD variable speed fan coil units are not straightforwarda variable speed fan coil unit model object was developed inand a constant volume fan coil unit, used only for heating.

Lee, Kwang Ho; Schiavon, Stefano; Webster, Tom; Bauman, Fred; Feng, Jingjuan; Hoyt, Tyler

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Distributed GIS for Monitoring and Modeling Urban Air Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The progress of technology has made the measurement of air quality and the simulation of complex air pollution models both feasible and cost-effective. However, there is a long way to go in terms of facilitating widespread ...

Yeang, Chen-Hsiang, 1969-

207

The model of stress distribution in polymer electrolyte membrane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analytical model of mechanical stress in a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) of a hydrogen/air fuel cell with porous Water Transfer Plates (WTP) is developed in this work. The model considers a mechanical stress in the membrane is a result of the cell load cycling under constant oxygen utilization. The load cycling causes the cycling of the inlet gas flow rate, which results in the membrane hydration/dehydration close to the gas inlet. Hydration/dehydration of the membrane leads to membrane swelling/shrinking, which causes mechanical stress in the constrained membrane. Mechanical stress results in through-plane crack formation. Thereby, the mechanical stress in the membrane causes mechanical failure of the membrane, limiting fuel cell lifetime. The model predicts the stress in the membrane as a function of the cell geometry, membrane material properties and operation conditions. The model was applied for stress calculation in GORE-SELECT.

Atrazhev, Vadim V; Dmitriev, Dmitry V; Erikhman, Nikolay S; Sultanov, Vadim I; Patterson, Timothy; Burlatsky, Sergei F

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

The model of stress distribution in polymer electrolyte membrane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analytical model of mechanical stress in a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) of a hydrogen/air fuel cell with porous Water Transfer Plates (WTP) is developed in this work. The model considers a mechanical stress in the membrane is a result of the cell load cycling under constant oxygen utilization. The load cycling causes the cycling of the inlet gas flow rate, which results in the membrane hydration/dehydration close to the gas inlet. Hydration/dehydration of the membrane leads to membrane swelling/shrinking, which causes mechanical stress in the constrained membrane. Mechanical stress results in through-plane crack formation. Thereby, the mechanical stress in the membrane causes mechanical failure of the membrane, limiting fuel cell lifetime. The model predicts the stress in the membrane as a function of the cell geometry, membrane material properties and operation conditions. The model was applied for stress calculation in GORE-SELECT.

Vadim V. Atrazhev; Tatiana Yu. Astakhova; Dmitry V. Dmitriev; Nikolay S. Erikhman; Vadim I. Sultanov; Timothy Patterson; Sergei F. Burlatsky

2014-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

209

Hybrid thermal model for swimming pools based on artificial neural networks for southeast region of Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nowadays, the usage of systems based on solar energy have been largely stimulated. The correct designing and efficiency of these systems are highly dependent of the seasonal climatic characteristics of the regions where they will be installed. In this work, we propose a hybrid structure to simulate the thermodynamic behavior of pools, which uses neural computational models to incorporate the climatic information of the regions being analyzed. The neural models have as input variables data of geographic position such as: elevation, latitude and longitude, what permits to delineate the climatic profile of the region being considered. The human activity is another factor that directly influences the thermodynamic behavior of pools and, therefore, is also considered. In this work, changes of volume are estimated in order to track losses due to the human activity.

Enock T. Santos; Luis E. Zárate; Elizabeth M.D. Pereira

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Evaluation Model for Safety Capacity of Chemical Industrial Park Based on Acceptable Regional Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The paper defines the Safety Capacity of Chemical Industrial Park (SCCIP) from the perspective of acceptable regional risk. For the purpose to explore the evaluation model for the SCCIP, a method based on quantitative risk assessment was adopted for evaluating transport risk and to confirm reasonable safety transport capacity for chemical industrial park, and then by combining with the safety storage capacity,a SCCIP evaluation model was put forward. The SCCIP was decided by the smaller one between the largest safety storage capacity and the maximum safety transport capacity, or else, the regional risk of the park will exceed the acceptable level. The developed method was applied to a chemical industrial park in Guangdong province to obtain the maximum safety transport capacity and the SCCIP. The results can be realized the regional risk control to the Park effectively.

Guohua Chen; Shukun Wang; Xiaoqun Tan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Modeling and Generating Daily Changes in Market Variables Using A Multivariate Mixture of Normal Distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling and Generating Daily Changes in Market Variables Using A Multivariate Mixture of Normal Distributions Jin Wang Department of Mathematics and Computer Science Valdosta State University Valdosta, GA 31698-0040 January 28, 2000 Abstract The mixture of normal distributions provides a useful extension

Wang, Jin

212

A Design Model for Open Distributed Processing Systems Marten van Sinderen1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Design Model for Open Distributed Processing Systems Marten van Sinderen1 , Luís Ferreira Pires1 these standards and consequently may decrease their price. The design and implementation of a distributed system, pires, vissers, katoen}@cs.utwente.nl Abstract This paper proposes design concepts that allow

van Sinderen, Marten

213

A Design Model for Open Distributed Processing Systems Marten van Sinderen1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Design Model for Open Distributed Processing Systems Marten van Sinderen1 , Luís Ferreira Pires1 and consequently may decrease their price. The design and implementation of a distributed system is a complex, pires, vissers, katoen}@cs.utwente.nl Abstract This paper proposes design concepts that allow

Pires, Luís Ferreira

214

An Electricity Trade Model for Multiple Power Distribution Networks in Smart Energy Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Electricity Trade Model for Multiple Power Distribution Networks in Smart Energy Systems-interactive [1]-[3]. In order to switch from a centralized power distribution network (in which electrical energy Tiansong Cui, Yanzhi Wang, Shahin Nazarian, and Massoud Pedram Department of Electrical Engineering

Pedram, Massoud

215

Diagnostics for near-surface wind response to the Gulf Stream in a regional atmospheric model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mechanisms acting on near-surface winds over the Gulf Stream are diagnosed using 5-year outputs of a regional atmospheric model. The diagnostics for the surface-layer momentum vector, its curl, and its convergence are developed with a clear ...

Kohei Takatama; Shoshiro Minobe; Masaru Inatsu; R. Justin Small

216

A MODIFIED GAMBLER'S RUIN MODEL POLYETHYLENE CHAINS IN THE AMORPHOUS REGION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A MODIFIED GAMBLER'S RUIN MODEL OF POLYETHYLENE CHAINS IN THE AMORPHOUS REGION Zhong­Hui Duan and Louis N. Howard Department of Mathematics The Florida State University ABSTRACT. Polyethylene chainsM 3 +O(M 2 ). INTRODUCTION Semicrystalline polyethylene formed from melt generally consists

Aluffi, Paolo

217

Regional Characterization of Freshwater Use in LCA: Modeling Direct Impacts on Human Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Regional Characterization of Freshwater Use in LCA: Modeling Direct Impacts on Human Health ... Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a methodology that quantifies potential environmental impacts for comparative purposes in a decision-making context. ... While potential environmental impacts from pollutant emissions into water are characterized in LCA, impacts from water unavailability are not yet fully quantified. ...

Anne-Marie Boulay; Cécile Bulle; Jean-Baptiste Bayart; Louise Deschênes; Manuele Margni

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

218

Optimized regional and interannual variability of lightning in a global chemical transport model constrained  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to remove their diurnal sampling bias, we construct a monthly time series of lightning flash rates for 1998, D20307, doi:10.1029/2012JD017934. 1. Introduction [2] The extreme heat in a lightning flash channelOptimized regional and interannual variability of lightning in a global chemical transport model

Jacob, Daniel J.

219

Overview of Avista GHG Modeling NPCC Greenhouse Gas and the Regional Power System Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6/5/2013 1 Overview of Avista GHG Modeling NPCC Greenhouse Gas and the Regional Power System Pricing $70 $80 Weighted Average Expected Case 2020 Hi h GHG P i i C $20 $30 $40 $50 $60 dollarspermetricton 2020 High GHG Pricing Case 2020 Low GHG Pricing Case 2025 High GHG Pricing Case 2025 Low GHG

220

Resampling of regional climate model output for the simulation of extreme river flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the simulation of extreme river flows. This is important to assess the impact of climate change on river flooding biases in the RCM data, the simulated extreme flood quantiles correspond quite well with those obtainedResampling of regional climate model output for the simulation of extreme river flows Robert

Haak, Hein

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distribution model regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

High-Speed extraction model of interest region in the parcel image of large size  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper deals with a model for the high-speed extraction of ROI (Region Of Interest) during the process of logistics transported on conveyor belt. The objective of this paper is to extract various ROIs from large size image of logistics more than ...

Moon-sung Park; Il-sook Kim; Eun-kyung Cho; Young-hee Kwon; Jong-heung Park

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Influence of spatial resolution on regional climate model derived wind climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of northern Europe is more profound in the wind extremes than in the central tendency. The domain are of similar magnitude to the climate change signal in extreme wind events derived in prior research and mayInfluence of spatial resolution on regional climate model derived wind climates S. C. Pryor,1 G

Pryor, Sara C.

223

A new model of cloud drop distribution that simulates the observed drop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A new model of cloud drop distribution that simulates the observed drop A new model of cloud drop distribution that simulates the observed drop clustering: effect of clustering on extinction coefficient estimates Knyazikhin, Yuri Boston University Marshak, Alexander NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Larsen, Michael Michigan Technological University Wiscombe, Warren BNL/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Category: Modeling Cloud droplet size distribution is one of the most fundamental subjects in cloud physics. Understanding of spatial distribution and small-scale fluctuations of cloud droplets is essential for both cloud physics and atmospheric radiation. For cloud physics, it relates to the coalescence growth of raindrops while for radiation, it has a strong impact on a cloud's radiative properties. We have developed new size dependent models

224

Using Solar Business Models to Expand the Distributed Wind Market (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation to attendees at Wind Powering America's All-States Summit in Chicago describes business models that were responsible for rapid growth in the solar industry and that may be applicable to the distributed wind industry as well.

Savage, S.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Prioritization of areas in China for the conservation of endangered birds using modelled geographical distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We developed distributional models for 90 threatened bird species in China, and used heuristic complementarity algorithms to prioritize areas for conservation. The pixel-based area selection prioritized 20 areas for ...

Chen, Guojun; Peterson, A. Townsend

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Distributed Central Pattern Generator Model for Robotics Application Based on Phase Sensitivity Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method is presented to predict phase relationships between coupled phase oscillators. As an illustration of how the method can be applied, a distributed Central Pattern Generator (CPG) model based on amplitude ...

Jonas Buchli; Auke Jan Ijspeert

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Quantification of model mismatch errors of the dynamic energy distribution in a stirred-tank reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QUANTIFICATION OF MODEL MISMATCH ERRORS OF THE DYNAMIC ENERGY DISTRIBUTION IN A STIRRED- TANK REACTOR A Thesis by MARK RAYMOND KIMMICH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 198i Major Subject: Chemical Engineering QUANTIFICATION OF MODEL MISMATCH ERRORS OF THE DYNAMIC ENERGY DISTRIBUTION IN A STIRRED-TANK REACTOR A Thesis by MARK RAYMOND KIMMICH Approved as to style and content by...

Kimmich, Mark Raymond

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Toward a high performance distributed memory climate model  

SciTech Connect

As part of a long range plan to develop a comprehensive climate systems modeling capability, the authors have taken the Atmospheric General Circulation Model originally developed by Arakawa and collaborators at UCLA and have recast it in a portable, parallel form. The code uses an explicit time-advance procedure on a staggered three-dimensional Eulerian mesh. The authors have implemented a two-dimensional latitude/longitude domain decomposition message passing strategy. Both dynamic memory management and interprocessor communication are handled with macro constructs that are preprocessed prior to compilation. The code can be moved about a variety of platforms, including massively parallel processors, workstation clusters, and vector processors, with a mere change of three parameters. Performance on the various platforms as well as issues associated with coupling different models for major components of the climate system are discussed.

Wehner, M.F.; Ambrosiano, J.J.; Brown, J.C.; Dannevik, W.P.; Eltgroth, P.G.; Mirin, A.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Farrara, J.D.; Ma, C.C.; Mechoso, C.R.; Spahr, J.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (US). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences

1993-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

Translation techniques for distributed-shared memory programming models  

SciTech Connect

The high performance computing community has experienced an explosive improvement in distributed-shared memory hardware. Driven by increasing real-world problem complexity, this explosion has ushered in vast numbers of new systems. Each new system presents new challenges to programmers and application developers. Part of the challenge is adapting to new architectures with new performance characteristics. Different vendors release systems with widely varying architectures that perform differently in different situations. Furthermore, since vendors need only provide a single performance number (total MFLOPS, typically for a single benchmark), they only have strong incentive initially to optimize the API of their choice. Consequently, only a fraction of the available APIs are well optimized on most systems. This causes issues porting and writing maintainable software, let alone issues for programmers burdened with mastering each new API as it is released. Also, programmers wishing to use a certain machine must choose their API based on the underlying hardware instead of the application. This thesis argues that a flexible, extensible translator for distributed-shared memory APIs can help address some of these issues. For example, a translator might take as input code in one API and output an equivalent program in another. Such a translator could provide instant porting for applications to new systems that do not support the application's library or language natively. While open-source APIs are abundant, they do not perform optimally everywhere. A translator would also allow performance testing using a single base code translated to a number of different APIs. Most significantly, this type of translator frees programmers to select the most appropriate API for a given application based on the application (and developer) itself instead of the underlying hardware.

Fuller, Douglas James

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Wetland model in an earth systems modeling framework for regional environmental policy analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to investigate incorporating a wetland component into a land energy and water fluxes model, the Community Land Model (CLM). CLM is the land fluxes component of the Integrated Global Systems ...

Awadalla, Sirein Salah

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Using Simulation Models for District Chilled Water Distribution Systems Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the design. The focus of this paper is to demonstrate how the using of the computerized simulation model can give the engineer the ability to explore many more alternative design scenarios and to identify more cost-effective and robust designs. The University...

Chen, Q.; Xu, C.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

NREL: Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) Model - Unique Value of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unique Value of ReEDS Unique Value of ReEDS Spatial Resolution and Variability Consideration The Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model has singular capabilities that differentiate it from other models and that make it uniquely suitable for certain types of analyses. While ReEDS can model all types of power generators and fuels-coal, gas, nuclear, renewables-it was designed primarily to address considerations for integrating renewable electric technologies into the power grid. In particular, it was designed to address the variable resource issues associated with solar and wind power as well as the remote nature of many of the best wind resources and their need for transmission. These capabilities require the two primary structural elements of ReEDS-a multiplicity of regions and a

233

Conceptual model for regional radionuclide transport from a salt dome repository: a technical memorandum  

SciTech Connect

Disposal of high-level radioactive wastes is a major environmental problem influencing further development of nuclear energy in this country. Salt domes in the Gulf Coast Basin are being investigated as repository sites. A major concern is geologic and hydrologic stability of candidate domes and potential transport of radionuclides by groundwater to the biosphere prior to their degradation to harmless levels of activity. This report conceptualizes a regional geohydrologic model for transport of radionuclides from a salt dome repository. The model considers transport pathways and the physical and chemical changes that would occur through time prior to the radionuclides reaching the biosphere. Necessary, but unknown inputs to the regional model involve entry and movement of fluids through the repository dome and across the dome-country rock interface and the effect on the dome and surrounding strata of heat generated by the radioactive wastes.

Kier, R.S.; Showalter, P.A.; Dettinger, M.D.

1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

234

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Walker-Lane Modeling-Computer Simulations At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Assembling Crustal Geophysical Data for Geothermal Exploration in the Great Basin, Louie and Coolbaugh. We have compiled velocity information from sources in the literature, results of previous seismic experiments and earthquake-monitoring projects, and data donated from mining, geothermal, and petroleum companies. We also collected (May 2002 and August 2004) two new crustal refraction profiles across western Nevada and the northern and central Sierra. These sections had not been well characterized previously.

235

An Energy-Aware Simulation Model and Transaction Protocol for Dynamic Workload Distribution in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Energy-Aware Simulation Model and Transaction Protocol for Dynamic Workload Distribution California {tari, prong, pedram}@usc.edu Abstract This paper introduces a network simulation model

Pedram, Massoud

236

Evaluation of models for numerical simulation of the non-neutral region of sheath plasma  

SciTech Connect

Four different electron models are used to simulate the nonequilibrium plasma flow around a representative cylindrical Faraday probe geometry. Each model is implemented in a two-dimensional axisymmetric hybrid electron fluid and particle in cell method. The geometric shadowing model is derived from kinetic theory on the basis that physical obstruction of part of the velocity distribution leads to many of the expected sheath features. The Boltzmann electron fluid model relates the electron density to the plasma potential through the Boltzmann relation. The non-neutral detailed electron fluid model is derived from the electron conservation equations under the assumption of neutrality, and then modified to include non-neutral effects through the electrostatic Poisson equation. The Poisson-consistent detailed electron fluid model is also derived from the conservation equations and the electrostatic Poisson equation, but uses an alternative method that is inherently non-neutral from the outset. Simulations using the geometric shadowing and non-neutral detailed models do not yield satisfactory sheath structures, indicating that these models are not appropriate for sheath simulations. Simulations using the Boltzmann and Poisson-consistent models produce sheath structures that are in excellent agreement with the planar Bohm sheath solution near the centerline of the probe. The computational time requirement for the Poisson-consistent model is much higher than for the Boltzmann model and becomes prohibitive for larger domains.

Boerner, Jeremiah J.; Boyd, Iain D. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, FXB Building, 1320 Beal Avenue, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

2-level environmental-stress-screening (ESS) model: A mixed-distribution approach  

SciTech Connect

Environmental stress screening (ESS) is used to reduce, if not eliminate, the occurrence of some types of failures from the field by fixing them before the product is deployed. This paper models a 2-level ESS program where screening is performed at the part & unit levels. The parts are screened for a specified duration before being assembled into a unit. Defects induced during the assembly process are screened at the unit level. These parts & connections are assumed to come from either a good or a substandard population, and their times-to-failure distributions are modeled by mixed distributions. The optimal screening durations are obtained by minimizing the life-cycle cost. The model is simple to use and its viability is illustrated using mixed exponential distributions. The implementation of screens at various levels depends on costs and failure distribution characteristics. 13 refs.

Reddy, R.K.; Dietrich, D.L.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Theoretical modeling for neutron elastic scattering angular distribution in the fast energy range  

SciTech Connect

One of the major issues of neutron scattering modeling in the fast energy range is the contribution of compound elastic and inelastic scattering to the total scattering process. The compound component may become large at very low energies where the angular distribution becomes 90-degree symmetric in the center-of-mass system. Together with the shape elastic component, the elastic scattering gives slightly forward-peaked angular distributions in the fast energy range. This anisotropic angular distribution gives high sensitivities to many important nuclear reactor characteristics, such as criticality and neutron shielding. In this talk we describe how the anisotropic angular distributions are calculated within the statistical model framework, including the case where strongly coupled channels exist, by combining the coupled-channels theory with the Hauser-Feshbach model. This unique capability extension will have significant advantages in understanding the neutron scattering process for deformed nuclei, like uranium or plutonium, on which advanced nuclear energy applications center.

Kawano, Toshihiko [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

239

Time series models with an EGB2 conditional distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Theory and Methods. John Wiley & Sons Ltd. McDonald,. J.B. and White, S. B. (1993) A comparison of some robust, adaptive, and partially adaptive estimators of regression models. Econo- metric Reviews 12, 103-124 McDonald J. B. and Xu, Y. J. (1995) A... generalization of the beta distrib- ution with applications. Journal of Econometrics 66, 133-152. McNeil, A.J., Frey, R. and Embrechts, P. (2005) Quantitative Risk Manage- ment. Princeton: Princeton University Press. Prentice, R. L. (1975) Discrimination among...

Caivano, Michele; Harvey, Andrew

2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

240

Regional Analysis of Building Distributed Energy Costs and CO2 Abatement: A U.S. - China Comparison  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in CHP. Keywords: Building Modeling and Simulation,modeling requires the following inputs: the building’s end-

Mendes, Goncalo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distribution model regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Models of the Solar Chromosphere and Transition Region from SUMER and HRTS Observations: Formation of the Extreme-Ultraviolet Spectrum of Hydrogen, Carbon, and Oxygen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present the results of optically thick non-LTE radiative transfer calculations of lines and continua of H, C I-IV, and O I-VI and other elements using a new one-dimensional, time-independent model corresponding to the average quiet-Sun chromosphere and transition region. The model is based principally on the Curdt et al. SUMER atlas of the extreme ultraviolet spectrum. Our model of the chromosphere is a semiempirical one, with the temperature distribution adjusted to obtain optimum agreement between calculated and observed continuum intensities, line intensities, and line profiles. Our model of the transition region is determined theoretically from a balance between (a) radiative losses and (b) the downward energy flow from the corona due to thermal conduction and particle diffusion, and using boundary conditions at the base of the transition region established at the top of the chromosphere from the semiempirical model. The quiet-Sun model presented here should be considered as a replacement of the earlier model C of Vernazza et al., since our new model is based on an energy-balance transition region, a better underlying photospheric model, a more extensive set of chromospheric observations, and improved calculations. The photospheric structure of the model given here is the same as in Table 3 of Fontenla, Avrett, Thuiller, & Harder. We show comparisons between calculated and observed continua, and between the calculated and observed profiles of all significant lines of H, C I-IV, and O I-VI in the wavelength range 67-173 nm. While some of the calculated lines are not in emission as observed, we find reasonable general agreement, given the uncertainties in atomic rates and cross sections, and we document the sources of the rates and cross sections used in the calculation. We anticipate that future improvements in the atomic data will give improved agreement with the observations.

Eugene H. Avrett; Rudolf Loeser

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Wind modelling based on wind input data conditions using Weibull distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Weibull distribution can be used to model the wind speed distribution at a particular site and hence, it can help in wind resource assessment (WRA) of a site. By calculating the shape (k) and scale (c) parameters for Weibull distribution, the wind speed frequency curve for a site can be made. Once this wind speed distribution for site is determined, it can be convolved with the power curve for a wind turbine and the annual energy output from the site can be determined. This paper presents how the Weibull distribution is used to determine the wind speed distribution for Vadravadra site in Gau Island of Fiji and how closely the annual energy output from the modelled wind speed distribution matches with the annual energy output using the actual wind speed distribution. It also presents how k is related to the turbulence intensity for a site; how the c is related to the annual mean wind speed and how a formula for estimating c is derived at a new height.

R.D. Prasad; R.C. Bansal; M. Sauturaga

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Model for energy efficiency in radio over fiber distributed indoor antenna Wi-Fi network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model for energy efficiency in radio over fiber distributed indoor antenna Wi-Fi network Yves Josse communications in indoor environments. In this paper, the power consumption and energy efficiency of a DAS using for different transmission configurations, yielding a distance- dependent energy efficiency model. In a second

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

244

A Simple Physical Model for the Gas Distribution in Galaxy Clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dominant baryonic component of galaxy clusters is hot gas whose distribution is commonly probed through X-ray emission arising from thermal bremsstrahlung. The density profile thus obtained has been traditionally modeled with a beta-profile, a simple function with only three parameters. However, this model is known to be insufficient for characterizing the range of cluster gas distributions, and attempts to rectify this shortcoming typically introduce additional parameters to increase the fitting flexibility. We use cosmological and physical considerations to obtain a family of profiles for the gas with fewer parameters than the beta-model but which better accounts for observed gas profiles over wide radial intervals.

Patej, Anna

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Log-normal distribution based EMOS models for probabilistic wind speed forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ensembles of forecasts are obtained from multiple runs of numerical weather forecasting models with different initial conditions and typically employed to account for forecast uncertainties. However, biases and dispersion errors often occur in forecast ensembles, they are usually under-dispersive and uncalibrated and require statistical post-processing. We present an Ensemble Model Output Statistics (EMOS) method for calibration of wind speed forecasts based on the log-normal (LN) distribution, and we also show a regime-switching extension of the model which combines the previously studied truncated normal (TN) distribution with the LN. Both presented models are applied to wind speed forecasts of the eight-member University of Washington mesoscale ensemble, of the fifty-member ECMWF ensemble and of the eleven-member ALADIN-HUNEPS ensemble of the Hungarian Meteorological Service, and their predictive performances are compared to those of the TN and general extreme value (GEV) distribution based EMOS methods an...

Baran, Sándor

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Assessing the Capability of a Regional-Scale Weather Model to Simulate Extreme Precipitation Patterns and Flooding in Central Texas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A regional-scale weather model is used to determine the potential for flood forecasting based on model-predicted rainfall. Extreme precipitation and flooding events are a significant concern in central Texas, due to both the high occurrence and ...

Marla R. Knebl Lowrey; Zong-Liang Yang

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Gaseous Chemistry and Aerosol Mechanism Developments for Version 3.5.1 of the Online Regional Model, WRF-Chem  

SciTech Connect

We have made a number of developments in the regional coupled model WRF-Chem, with the aim of making the model more suitable for prediction of atmospheric composition and of interactions between air quality and weather. We have worked on the European domain, with a particular focus on making the model suitable for the study of night time chemistry and oxidation by the nitrate radical in the UK atmosphere. A reduced form of the Common Reactive Intermediates gas-phase chemical mechanism (CRIv2-R5) has been implemented to enable more explicit simulation of VOC degradation. N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry has been added to the existing sectional MOSAIC aerosol module, and coupled to both the CRIv2-R5 and existing CBM-Z gas phase scheme. Modifications have also been made to the sea-spray aerosol emission representation, allowing the inclusion of primary organic material in sea-spray aerosol. Driven by appropriate emissions, wind fields and chemical boundary conditions, implementation of the different developments is illustrated in order to demonstrate the impact that these changes have in the North-West European domain. These developments are now part of the freely available WRF-Chem distribution.

Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Lowe, Douglas; Utembe, Steve; Allan, James D.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Fast, Jerome D.; Hodnebrog, Oivind; Denier van der Gon, Hugo; McFiggans, Gordon

2014-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

248

Hierarchical Modeling of Variability in Regional Climate Models Using Markov Random Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ensembles, are used to explore the uncertainties associated with projections of climate change (ANOVA), climate model ensembles, un- certainty quantification. 1 Geophysical Statistics Project the Earth's climate and producing projections of climate change. They encapsulate an entire field

Kaufman, Cari

249

A model for the formation of the active region corona driven by magnetic flux emergence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first model that couples the formation of the corona of a solar active region to a model of the emergence of a sunspot pair. This allows us to study when, where, and why active region loops form, and how they evolve. We use a 3D radiation MHD simulation of the emergence of an active region through the upper convection zone and the photosphere as a lower boundary for a 3D MHD coronal model. The latter accounts for the braiding of the magnetic fieldlines, which induces currents in the corona heating up the plasma. We synthesize the coronal emission for a direct comparison to observations. Starting with a basically field-free atmosphere we follow the filling of the corona with magnetic field and plasma. Numerous individually identifiable hot coronal loops form, and reach temperatures well above 1 MK with densities comparable to observations. The footpoints of these loops are found where small patches of magnetic flux concentrations move into the sunspots. The loop formation is triggered by an incr...

Chen, F; Bingert, S; Cheung, M C M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Assessing the Capability of a Regional-Scale Weather Model to Simulate Extreme Precipitation Patterns and Flooding in Central Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessing the Capability of a Regional-Scale Weather Model to Simulate Extreme Precipitation Patterns and Flooding in Central Texas MARLA R. KNEBL LOWREY AND ZONG-LIANG YANG Department of Geological 3 March 2008) ABSTRACT A regional-scale weather model is used to determine the potential for flood

Yang, Zong-Liang

251

AN APPLICATION OF URBANSIM TO THE AUSTIN, TEXAS REGION: INTEGRATED-MODEL FORECASTS FOR THE YEAR 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AN APPLICATION OF URBANSIM TO THE AUSTIN, TEXAS REGION: INTEGRATED-MODEL FORECASTS FOR THE YEAR, as well as energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. This work describes the modeling of year-2030 policies significantly impact the region's future land use patterns, traffic conditions, greenhouse gas

Kockelman, Kara M.

252

Regional and Global Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Products > Regional/Global Products > Regional/Global Regional and Global Data Biogeochemical Dynamics Data Regional and global biogeochemical dynamics data can be used to improve our understanding of the structure and function of various ecosystems; to enable prediction across spatial and temporal scales; and to parameterize and validate terrestrial ecosystem models. The ORNL DAAC compiles, archives, and distributes more than 150 products from the following projects: Climate Collections Hydroclimatology Collections ISLSCP II Project Net Primary Productivity (NPP) River Discharge (RIVDIS) Russian Land Cover (RLC) Soil Collections Vegetation Collections Vegetation-Ecosystem Modeling (VEMAP) Climate Collections Climate collections include measured and modeled values for variables such as temperature, precipitation, humidity, radiation, wind velocity, and

253

Ripe for investment : refocusing the food desert debate on smaller stores, wholesale markets and regional distribution systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis argues that food distribution systems must be strengthened in order to address the challenge of urban food access. The argument rests on a historical analysis of the supermarket industry and a comparative study ...

Tamis, Laurie P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Multi-Site Capacity, Production and Distribution Planning with Reactor Modifications: MILP Model, Bi-level Decomposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-site production facilities to meet the demands of multiple geographically distributed markets. Potential capacityMulti-Site Capacity, Production and Distribution Planning with Reactor Modifications: MILP Model mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) model for the simultaneous capacity, production and distribution

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

255

Evaluating Domestic Hot Water Distribution System Options With Validated Analysis Models  

SciTech Connect

A developing body of work is forming that collects data on domestic hot water consumption, water use behaviors, and energy efficiency of various distribution systems. A full distribution system developed in TRNSYS has been validated using field monitoring data and then exercised in a number of climates to understand climate impact on performance. This study builds upon previous analysis modelling work to evaluate differing distribution systems and the sensitivities of water heating energy and water use efficiency to variations of climate, load, distribution type, insulation and compact plumbing practices. Overall 124 different TRNSYS models were simulated. Of the configurations evaluated, distribution losses account for 13-29% of the total water heating energy use and water use efficiency ranges from 11-22%. The base case, an uninsulated trunk and branch system sees the most improvement in energy consumption by insulating and locating the water heater central to all fixtures. Demand recirculation systems are not projected to provide significant energy savings and in some cases increase energy consumption. Water use is most efficient with demand recirculation systems, followed by the insulated trunk and branch system with a central water heater. Compact plumbing practices and insulation have the most impact on energy consumption (2-6% for insulation and 3-4% per 10 gallons of enclosed volume reduced). The results of this work are useful in informing future development of water heating best practices guides as well as more accurate (and simulation time efficient) distribution models for annual whole house simulation programs.

Weitzel, E.; Hoeschele, M.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Evolution of soot size distribution in premixed ethylene/air and ethylene/benzene/air flames: Experimental and modeling study  

SciTech Connect

The effect of benzene concentration in the initial fuel on the evolution of soot size distribution in ethylene/air and ethylene/benzene/air flat flames was characterized by experimental measurements and model predictions of size and number concentration within the flames. Experimentally, a scanning mobility particle sizer was used to allow spatially resolved and online measurements of particle concentration and sizes in the nanometer-size range. The model couples a detailed kinetic scheme with a discrete-sectional approach to follow the transition from gas-phase to nascent particles and their coagulation to larger soot particles. The evolution of soot size distribution (experimental and modeled) in pure ethylene and ethylene flames doped with benzene showed a typical nucleation-sized (since particles do not actually nucleate in the classical sense particle inception is often used in place of nucleation) mode close to the burner surface, and a bimodal behavior at greater height above burner (HAB). However, major features were distinguished between the data sets. The growth of nucleation and agglomeration-sized particles was faster for ethylene/benzene/air flames, evidenced by the earlier presence of bimodality in these flames. The most significant changes in size distribution were attributed to an increase in benzene concentration in the initial fuel. However, these changes were more evident for high temperature flames. In agreement with the experimental data, the model also predicted the decrease of nucleation-sized particles in the postflame region for ethylene flames doped with benzene. This behavior was associated with the decrease of soot precursors after the main oxidation zone of the flames. (author)

Echavarria, Carlos A.; Sarofim, Adel F.; Lighty, JoAnn S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); D'Anna, Andrea [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Universita ''Federico II'' di Napoli, Naples (Italy)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Latitude Based Model for Tilt Angle Optimization for Solar Collectors in the Mediterranean Region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper inspects the different parameters that intervene in the determination of the optimal tilt angle for maximum solar energy collection. It proposes a method for calculating the optimal tilt angle based upon the values of the daily global solar radiation on a horizontal surface. A computer program using the mathematical model to calculate the solar radiation incident on an inclined surface as a function of the tilt angle is implemented. Four years data of daily global solar radiation on a horizontal surface in 35 sites in different countries of the Mediterranean region is used. The program assumes a due south orientation of the collectors and it determines the optimal tilt angle for maximum solar radiation collection for sites in the Mediterranean region. A regression analysis using the results of the computer simulation is conducted to develop a latitude based tilt angle optimization mathematical model for maximum solar radiation collection for the sites. We tested both a linear and a quadratic model (of the form ax2+bx) for representing the relationship between the annual optimal tilt angle and the site's latitude. The quadratic model is better; it provides very high prediction accuracy. 99.87% of the variation in the annual optimal tilt angle is explained by the variability in site's latitude with an average residual angle of only 0.96° for all 35 sites studied. It also gives an average percentage decrease in the annual solar radiation of only 0.016% when compared with actual optimal tilt angles.

Hassane Darhmaoui; Driss Lahjouji

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

A two-dimensional regional basin model of Williston basin hydrocarbon systems  

SciTech Connect

Institut Francais du Petrole`s two-dimensional model, TEMISPACK, is used to discuss the functioning of petroleum systems in the Williston basin along a 330-km-long section, focusing on four regional source intervals: Ordovician Yeoman formation, Lower Devonian Winnipegosis Formation, Upper Devonian-Lower Mississippian Bakken Formation, and Mississippian Lodgepole formation. Thermal history calibration against present temperature and source rock maturity profiles suggests that the Williston basin can be divided into a region of constant heat flow of about 55 mW/m{sup 2} away from the Nesson anticline, and a region of higher heat flow and enhanced thermal maturity in the vicinity of the Nesson anticline. Original kinetic parameters used in the calibration were derived for each of the four source rocks from Rock-Eval yield curves. Bakken overpressures are entirely due to oil generation, not compaction disequilibrium. Very low Bakken vertical permeabilities range from 0.01 to 0.001 and are matched against observed overpressures, whereas Bakken porosities based on the model and confirmed by measurements are inferred to be also unusually low, around 3%.

Burrus, J.; Wolf, S.; Doligez, B. [Institut Francais due Petrole, Rueil-Malmaison (France)] [and others

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Modeling of dimmable High Power LED illumination distribution using ANFIS on the isolated area  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High power light emitting diodes (HP-LEDs) are more suitable for energy saving applications and have becoming replacing traditional fluorescent and incandescent bulbs for its energy efficient. Therefore, HP-LED lighting has been regarded in the next-generation lighting. In this study, illumination distribution of white color HP-LED is modeled by adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) approach on the isolated area while LED head is fixed. Subtractive clustering with hybrid learning approach is used to train the realized ANFIS architectures. End of the numerous experiment we finally concluded that, ANFIS could be used to modeling the illumination distribution applications perfectly.

?smail Kiyak; Vedat Topuz; Bülent Oral

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

A MILP model for optimising multi-service portfolios of distributed energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Energy storage has the potential to provide multiple services to several sectors in electricity industry and thus support activities related to generation, network and system operation. Hence aggregating the value delivered by storage to these sectors is paramount for promoting its efficient deployment in the near future, which will provide the level of flexibility needed to deal with the envisaged high renewables share and the increase in peak demand driven by transport and heating electrification. In this context, we develop a Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP) model to schedule operation of distributed storage by coordinating provision of a range of system services which are rewarded at different market prices. The model maximises distributed storage’s net profit while providing distribution network congestion management, energy price arbitrage and various reserve and frequency regulation services through both active and reactive power control. We demonstrate benefits associated with the coordination of these services and its impacts on commercial strategies to determine optimal multi-service portfolios in the long term. We also demonstrate the value of reactive power control to support not only distribution network congestion management, but also efficient trading of energy and balancing services which are usually treated through active power-only control. In addition, we use the model to price the service of distribution network congestion management and propose an efficient investment policy to upgrade distribution network capacity in the presence of distributed storage. Finally, several case studies under current market conditions in Great Britain (GB) demonstrate that distributed storage revenues associated with frequency control services are significantly more profitable.

Rodrigo Moreno; Roberto Moreira; Goran Strbac

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distribution model regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Hardware model of a shipboard zonal electrical distribution system (ZEDS) : alternating current/direct current (AC/DC)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A hardware model of a shipboard electrical distribution system based on aspects of the DDG 51 Flight IIA, Arleigh Burke class, 60Hz Alternating Current (AC) and the future direct current (DC), zonal electrical distribution ...

Tidd, Chad N. (Chad Norman)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

The characterization of ice hydrometeor gamma size distributions as volumes in N0-?–? phase space: Implications for microphysical process modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gamma distributions represent particle size distributions (SDs) in mesoscale and cloud resolving models that predict one, two or three moments of hydrometeor species. They are characterized by intercept (N0), slope (?) and shape (?) parameters ...

Greg M. McFarquhar; Tsung-Lin Hsieh; Matt Freer; Jeana Mascio; Brian F. Jewett

263

Does the Danube exist? Versions of reality given by various regional climate models and climatological datasets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an intercomparison and verification analysis of several regional climate models (RCMs) nested into the same run of the same Atmospheric Global Circulation Model (AGCM) regarding their representation of the statistical properties of the hydrological balance of the Danube river basin for 1961-1990. We also consider the datasets produced by the driving AGCM, from the ECMWF and NCEP-NCAR reanalyses. The hydrological balance is computed by integrating the precipitation and evaporation fields over the area of interest. Large discrepancies exist among RCMs for the monthly climatology as well as for the mean and variability of the annual balances, and only few datasets are consistent with the observed discharge values of the Danube at its Delta, even if the driving AGCM provides itself an excellent estimate. Since the considered approach relies on the mass conservation principle and bypasses the details of the air-land interface modeling, we propose that the atmospheric components of RCMs still face diffic...

Lucarini, V; Kriegerova, I; Speranza, A; Danihlik, Robert; Kriegerova, Ida; Lucarini, Valerio; Speranza, Antonio

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Impact of Agricultural Practice on Regional Climate in a CoupledLand Surface Mesoscale Model  

SciTech Connect

The land surface has been shown to form strong feedbacks with climate due to linkages between atmospheric conditions and terrestrial ecosystem exchanges of energy, momentum, water, and trace gases. Although often ignored in modeling studies, land management itself may form significant feedbacks. Because crops are harvested earlier under drier conditions, regional air temperature, precipitation, and soil moisture, for example, affect harvest timing, particularly of rain-fed crops. This removal of vegetation alters the land surface characteristics and may, in turn, affect regional climate. We applied a coupled climate(MM5) and land-surface (LSM1) model to examine the effects of early and late winter wheat harvest on regional climate in the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility in the Southern Great Plains, where winter wheat accounts for 20 percent of the land area. Within the winter wheat region, simulated 2 m air temperature was 1.3 C warmer in the Early Harvest scenario at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Soils in the harvested area were drier and warmer in the top 10 cm and wetter in the 10-20 cm layer. Midday soils were 2.5 C warmer in the harvested area at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Harvest also dramatically altered latent and sensible heat fluxes. Although differences between scenarios diminished once both scenarios were harvested, the short-term impacts of land management on climate were comparable to those from land cover change demonstrated in other studies.

Cooley, H.S.; Riley, W.J.; Torn, M.S.; He, Y.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

An anticipatory integrated assessment of regional acidification: The RAINS-Asia model  

SciTech Connect

Across large parts of Asia, air pollution problems are becoming more and more evident. Rainfall in some areas, including China, Japan, and Thailand, has been measured to be 10 times more acidic than unpolluted rain. Increasing evidence of acidification damage to ecosystems such as surface waters, soils, and economically important crops, is beginning to appear. In addition, urban air quality in many areas of the region continues to decrease. Current economic forecasts predict continued rapid economic growth in the region, which will bring with it increasing emissions of air pollutants, especially sulfur. The total primary energy demand in Asia currently doubles every twelve years (as compared to a world average of every 28 years). Coal is expected to continue to be the dominant energy source, with coal demand projected to increase by 65 percent per year, a rate that outpaces regional economic growth. If current trends in economic development and energy use in Asia continue, emissions of sulfur dioxide, one of the key components in acid rain, will more than triple within the next 30 years. Many ecosystems will be unable to continue to absorb these increased levels of pollution without harmful effects, thus creating a potential danger for irreversible environmental damage in many areas. In view of the potential environmental consequences of projected growth in Asian energy consumption, emissions, and air pollution, the World Bank, together with the Asian Development Bank, have funded a project to develop and implement an integrated assessment model for the acid deposition phenomenon in Asia. The Regional Air Pollution INformation and Simulation model for Asia (RAINS-Asia) is a software tool to help decision makers assess and project future trends in emissions, transport, and deposition of air pollutants, and their potential environmental effects.

Amann, M. [International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg (Austria); Carmichael, G.R. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Foell, W. [Resource Management Associates, Madison, WI (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Spatial Variation of Soil Type and Soil Moisture in the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

Soil characteristics (texture and moisture) are typically assumed to be initially constant when performing simulations with the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). Soil texture is spatially homogeneous and time-independent, while soil moisture is often spatially homogeneous initially, but time-dependent. This report discusses the conversion of a global data set of Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) soil types to RAMS soil texture and the subsequent modifications required in RAMS to ingest this information. Spatial variations in initial soil moisture obtained from the National Center for Environmental Predictions (NCEP) large-scale models are also introduced. Comparisons involving simulations over the southeastern United States for two different time periods, one during warmer, more humid summer conditions, and one during cooler, dryer winter conditions, reveals differences in surface conditions related to increases or decreases in near-surface atmospheric moisture con tent as a result of different soil properties. Three separate simulation types were considered. The base case assumed spatially homogeneous soil texture and initial soil moisture. The second case assumed variable soil texture and constant initial soil moisture, while the third case allowed for both variable soil texture and initial soil moisture. The simulation domain was further divided into four geographically distinct regions. It is concluded there is a more dramatic impact on thermodynamic variables (surface temperature and dewpoint) than on surface winds, and a more pronounced variability in results during the summer period. While no obvious trends in surface winds or dewpoint temperature were found relative to observations covering all regions and times, improvement in surface temperatures in most regions and time periods was generally seen with the incorporation of variable soil texture and initial soil moisture.

Buckley, R.

2001-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

267

Modeling of polarization curves not exhibiting a Tafel region using Excel spreadsheets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper describes the modeling of polarization curves not exhibiting a Tafel region using Excel spreadsheets. Carbon steel in aerated NaCl unbuffered solutions was studied applying a linear potential sweep technique. Current–potential curves were obtained from linear potential sweep at a rate of 10 mV s?1 in un-buffered 0.1, 0.4 and 0.9 M NaCl solutions, at a constant temperature of 25 °C and potential sweeps that were conducted in a potential range ?1.0 to 0.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl.

Marco Alfaro

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Modeling the Distribution of Sulfur Compounds in a Large Two Stroke Diesel Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modeling the Distribution of Sulfur Compounds in a Large Two Stroke Diesel Engine ... The model is formulated in MATLAB and applies the open source software CANTERA(10, 11) that is efficiently used to integrate chemical reaction rates, computing general chemical equilibrium and thermodynamic gas properties. ... The trapped cylinder gas at the time where compression starts is a mixture of fresh air and residual gas products from the previous engine cycle. ...

Rasmus Cordtz; Jesper Schramm; Anders Andreasen; Svend S. Eskildsen; Stefan Mayer

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Incorporating remotely-sensed snow albedo into a spatially-distributed snowmelt model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Division of Engineering, University of California, Merced, California, USA Jeff Dozier Donald Bren School of Environmental Science and Management, University of California, Santa Barbara, California, USA Received 12 estimates in a distributed snowmelt model that explicitly includes net solar radiation resulted in a much

Dozier, Jeff

270

Modelling the future distribution of the amphibian chytrid fungus: the influence of climate and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FORUM Modelling the future distribution of the amphibian chytrid fungus: the influence of climate of amphibians are believed to be caused by the chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Hence, determining its present and future environmental suitability should help to inform management and surveillance

Rohr, Jason

271

An analytical model of the equilibrium distribution of suspended sediment in an estuary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mixed) salinity gradients. Simple scal- ing relationships control the longitudinal distribution of SSC] is the position of the maximum salinity gradient, and xL [m] scales the salinity gradient. The x-axis points and depend upon model parameters such as the applied salinity field, depth, width, freshwater discharge

Talke, Stefan

272

Statistical Model Checking for Distributed Probabilistic-Control Hybrid Automata with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statistical Model Checking for Distributed Probabilistic-Control Hybrid Automata with Smart Grid Introduction The ultimate promise of the Smart Grid is that of a more stable, energy-efficient, adaptable, secure, resilient power grid, while delivering cheaper electricity. Cur- rently, energy consumption

Platzer, André

273

Effects of the Training Dataset Characteristics on the Performance of Nine Species Distribution Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of the Training Dataset Characteristics on the Performance of Nine Species Distribution species need to be fitted to a training dataset before practical use. The training dataset of this paper is to study the effect of the training dataset characteristics on model performance and to compare

Kratochvíl, Lukas

274

Uncertainty Analysis of the Adequacy Assessment Model of a Distributed Generation System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of evidence theory, the hybrid propagation approach is introduced. A demonstration is given on a DG system enables end-users to install renewable generators (e.g. solar generators and wind turbines) on1 Uncertainty Analysis of the Adequacy Assessment Model of a Distributed Generation System Yanfu Li

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

275

Bell States and Negative Sentences in the Distributed Model of Meaning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, but not in the same order. Alice puts the meaning into words according to the rules of the syntax. Bob recognizes KS Bob shared syntax shared meaning time // John does not like Mary Fig. 1. Alice informs BobQPL 2009 Bell States and Negative Sentences in the Distributed Model of Meaning Anne Preller 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

276

Bell States and Negative Sentences in the Distributed Model of Meaning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, but not in the same order. Alice puts the meaning into words according to the rules of the syntax. Bob recognizes time // John does not like Mary Fig. 1. Alice informs Bob reconstructs the meaning of the wordsQPL 2009 Bell States and Negative Sentences in the Distributed Model of Meaning Anne Preller 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

277

Development of pipe deterioration models for water distribution systems using EPR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of pipe deterioration models for water distribution systems using EPR L. Berardi, O diameter D, Dclass Equivalent diameter of the pipe class DSS Decision support system EPR Evolutionary polynomial regression ES Matrix of exponents of EPR input variables f, g Functions selected by user

Fernandez, Thomas

278

Other-Cell-Interference Factor Distribution Model in Downlink WCDMA Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Interference performance is among the most important issues especially in WCDMA cellular networks planning coverage and capacity. F-factor has been introduced in previous works to model the interference in WCDMA downlink ... Keywords: F-factor, WCDMA, design methodology, distribution function, f-parameter, interference, interfering tiers, log-normal correlated shadow, uniform and non-uniform traffic-load cells

Anis Masmoudi; Sami Tabbane

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Evaluation of distributed hydrologic impacts of temperature-index and energy-based snow models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intercepts snow- fall, alters the snow/atmosphere energy exchange and reduces wind speed. Dense canopies tendEvaluation of distributed hydrologic impacts of temperature-index and energy-based snow models c l e i n f o Article history: Received 28 September 2012 Received in revised form 8 March 2013

Dozier, Jeff

280

Regional groundwater flow model for C, K. L. and P reactor areas, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC  

SciTech Connect

A regional groundwater flow model encompassing approximately 100 mi2 surrounding the C, K, L, and P reactor areas has been developed. The reactor flow model is designed to meet the planning objectives outlined in the General Groundwater Strategy for Reactor Area Projects by providing a common framework for analyzing groundwater flow, contaminant migration and remedial alternatives within the Reactor Projects team of the Environmental Restoration Department. The model provides a quantitative understanding of groundwater flow on a regional scale within the near surface aquifers and deeper semi-confined to confined aquifers. The model incorporates historical and current field characterization data up through Spring 1999. Model preprocessing is automated so that future updates and modifications can be performed quickly and efficiently. The CKLP regional reactor model can be used to guide characterization, perform scoping analyses of contaminant transport, and serve as a common base for subsequent finer-scale transport and remedial/feasibility models for each reactor area.

Flach, G.P.

2000-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distribution model regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The sine-Gordon model and the small. kappa. sup + region of light- cone perturbation theory  

SciTech Connect

The non-perturbative ultraviolet divergence of the sine-Gordon model is used to study the k{sup +} = 0 region of light-cone perturbation theory. The light-cone vacuum is shown to be unstable at the non- perturbative {beta}{sup 2} = 8{pi} critical point by a light-cone version of Coleman's variational method. Vacuum bubbles, which are k{sup +} = 0 diagram in light-cone field theory and are individually finite and non-vanishing for all {beta}, conspire to generate ultraviolet divergences of the light-cone energy density. The k{sup +} = 0 region of momentum also contributed to connected Green's functions: the connected two point function will not diverge, as it should, at the critical point unless diagrams which contribute only at k {sup +} = 0 are properly included. This analysis shows in a simple way how the k {sup +} = 0 region cannot be ignored even for connected diagrams. This phenomenon is expected to occur in higher dimensional gauge theories starting at two loop order in light-cone perturbation theory.

Griffin, P.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

An application of a puff dispersion model on power plant emissions in Yatagan region, Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present paper describes the application of the CALMET meteorological model and CALPUFF plume dispersion model to the Yatagan district to study the impact of Yatagan Power Plant emissions on the SO2 levels on December 2000 in the region. Results indicate that SO2 concentrations over the city depend strongly on advected emissions from the power plant and on the local variation of the wind field and limited vertical mixing conditions. It is found that South Westerly and light winds and the night time surface inversion layers lead to accumulation of pollutants coming from the power plant over the Yatagan district. The results are compared with the observations obtained from Local Environmental Authorities of Mugla. The simulation results indicate that the maximum ground level concentrations were found northeast from the source, which agrees with the measurements, but differ in terms of magnitudes.

Ulas Im; Orhan Yenigun

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Generalized CP symmetries and special regions of parameter space in the two-Higgs-doublet model  

SciTech Connect

We consider the impact of imposing generalized CP symmetries on the Higgs sector of the two-Higgs-doublet model, and identify three classes of symmetries. Two of these classes constrain the scalar potential parameters to an exceptional region of parameter space, which respects either a Z{sub 2} discrete flavor symmetry or a U(1) symmetry. We exhibit a basis-invariant quantity that distinguishes between these two possible symmetries. We also show that the consequences of imposing these two classes of CP symmetry can be achieved by combining Higgs family symmetries, and that this is not possible for the usual CP symmetry. We comment on the vacuum structure and on renormalization in the presence of these symmetries. Finally, we demonstrate that the standard CP symmetry can be used to build all the models we identify, including those based on Higgs family symmetries.

Ferreira, P. M. [Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Rua Conselheiro Emidio Navarro, 1900 Lisboa (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Teorica e Computacional, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Haber, Howard E. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064 (United States); Silva, Joao P. [Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Rua Conselheiro Emidio Navarro, 1900 Lisboa (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Teorica de Particulas, Instituto Superior Tecnico, P-1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Using Local and Regional Air Quality Modeling and Source Apportionment Tools to Evaluate Vehicles and Biogenic Emission Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and inventories of CO, NO_(x) and VOCs from on-road vehicles estimated by vehicle emission factor models and biogenic emissions of isoprene estimated by a popular biogenic emission model are evaluated using local and regional scale air quality modeling and source...

Kota, Sri H

2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

285

Evaluation of a Conjunctive Surface–Subsurface Process Model (CSSP) over the Contiguous United States at Regional–Local Scales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study presents a comprehensive evaluation on a Conjunctive Surface–Subsurface Process Model (CSSP) in predicting soil temperature–moisture distributions, terrestrial hydrology variations, and land–atmosphere exchanges against various in situ ...

Xing Yuan; Xin-Zhong Liang

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

A service-oriented modeling and simulation framework for rapid development of distributed applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper presents a service-oriented distributed modeling and simulation framework that supports the development and evaluation of large scale distributed systems such as network-centric and system-of-systems applications. The distinct features of the framework include a modeling and specification language, dynamic model checking for completeness and consistency, automated code generation from the specification, simulation of different architectures with a template-based platform builder, service-oriented multi-agent simulation for easy re-configuration and re-composition, formal policy specification and enforcement for dynamic verification, and dynamic analyses for evaluation and monitoring. The framework and most of the tools reported in this paper have been implemented and applied in several industrial projects. This paper presents the design principles, user interfaces, its runtime infrastructure, and the experiment results on its performance.

W.T. Tsai; Chun Fan; Yinong Chen; Ray Paul

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

A Distributed Electrochemistry Modeling Tool for Simulating SOFC Performance and Degradation  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a distributed electrochemistry (DEC) model capable of investigating the electrochemistry and local conditions with the SOFC MEA based on the local microstructure and multi-physics. The DEC model can calculate the global current-voltage (I-V) performance of the cell as determined by the spatially varying local conditions through the thickness of the electrodes and electrolyte. The simulation tool is able to investigate the electrochemical performance based on characteristics of the electrode microstructure, such as particle size, pore size, electrolyte and electrode phase volume fractions, and triple-phase-boundary length. It can also investigate performance as affected by fuel and oxidant gas flow distributions and other environmental/experimental conditions such as temperature and fuel gas composition. The long-term objective for the DEC modeling tool is to investigate factors that cause electrode degradation and the decay of SOFC performance which decrease longevity.

Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Ryan, Emily M.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

288

Estimates of Twenty-First-Century Flood Risk in the Pacific Northwest Based on Regional Climate Model Simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results from a regional climate model simulation show substantial increases in future flood risk (2040–69) in many Pacific Northwest river basins in the early fall. Two primary causes are identified: 1) more extreme and earlier storms and 2) ...

Eric P. Salathé Jr.; Alan F. Hamlet; Clifford F. Mass; Se-Yeun Lee; Matt Stumbaugh; Richard Steed

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Hydrological Processes in Regional Climate Model Simulations of the Central United States Flood of June–July 1993  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thirteen regional climate model (RCM) simulations of June–July 1993 were compared with each other and observations. Water vapor conservation and precipitation characteristics in each RCM were examined for a 10° × 10° subregion of the upper ...

Christopher J. Anderson; Raymond W. Arritt; Zaitao Pan; Eugene S. Takle; William J. Gutowski Jr.; Francis O. Otieno; Renato da Silva; Daniel Caya; Jens H. Christensen; Daniel Lüthi; Miguel A. Gaertner; Clemente Gallardo; Filippo Giorgi; René Laprise; Song-You Hong; Colin Jones; H-M. H. Juang; J. J. Katzfey; John L. McGregor; William M. Lapenta; Jay W. Larson; John A. Taylor; Glen E. Liston; Roger A. Pielke Sr.; John O. Roads

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

A quantum cascade laser in a transverse magnetic field. A model of the open triple-barrier active region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A theory of spectral parameters and active dynamic conductivity of the quantum cascade laser is proposed in the model of a triple-barrier active region of an individual cascade in a transverse magnetic field. In ...

N. V. Tkach; I. V. Boyko; Ju. A. Seti; G. G. Zegrya

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

On an improved sub-regional water resources management representation for integration into earth system models  

SciTech Connect

Human influence on the hydrologic cycle includes regulation and storage, consumptive use and overall redistribution of water resources in space and time. Representing these processes is essential for applications of earth system models in hydrologic and climate predictions, as well as impact studies at regional to global scales. Emerging large-scale research reservoir models use generic operating rules that are flexible for coupling with earth system models. Those generic operating rules have been successful in reproducing the overall regulated flow at large basin scales. This study investigates the uncertainties of the reservoir models from different implementations of the generic operating rules using the complex multi-objective Columbia River Regulation System in northwestern United States as an example to understand their effects on not only regulated flow but also reservoir storage and fraction of the demand that is met. Numerical experiments are designed to test new generic operating rules that combine storage and releases targets for multi-purpose reservoirs and to compare the use of reservoir usage priorities, withdrawals vs. consumptive demand, as well as natural vs. regulated mean flow for calibrating operating rules. Overall the best performing implementation is the use of the combined priorities (flood control storage targets and irrigation release targets) operating rules calibrated with mean annual natural flow and mean monthly withdrawals. The challenge of not accounting for groundwater withdrawals, or on the contrary, assuming that all remaining demand is met through groundwater extractions, is discussed.

Voisin, Nathalie; Li, Hongyi; Ward, Duane L.; Huang, Maoyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

292

Hierarchy-oriented modeling of enterprise architecture using reference-model of open distributed processing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modeling Enterprise Architecture (EA) requires the representation of multiple views for an enterprise. This could be done by a team of stakeholders that essentially have different backgrounds. One way to do this is to structure the model into hierarchical ... Keywords: Alloy, Enterprise architecture, Enterprise modeling, RM-ODP, SEAM, Systems theory

Lam-Son Lê; Alain Wegmann

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

LIMIT GIBBS DISTRIBUTIONS FOR THE ISING MODEL ON HIERARCHICAL LATTICES P. Bleher and E. Zalys UDC 519o21  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIMIT GIBBS DISTRIBUTIONS FOR THE ISING MODEL ON HIERARCHICAL LATTICES P. Bleher and E. Zalys UDC- cation of the widely known Ising model on the integral lattice Zd. One should note that the Ising model with this many authors have introduced various modifications of the Ising model, mean field model, spherical

Bleher, Pavel

294

Towards a syntactic signature for domain models: proposed descriptive metrics for visualizing the entity fan-out frequency distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main objective of this paper is to find a minimal set of measures that allow the immediate, intuitive characterisation and visualization of the syntactic structure of models covering a particular application domain. The measures are validated ... Keywords: case measures, enterprise models, entity fan-out distribution, metrics, model analysis, model complexity, modelling

Jean-Paul van Belle

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

A nonlinear binary programming model for electric distribution systems reliability optimization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a new nonlinear binary programming model aiming to minimize the SAIDI and SAIFI reliability indices of a distribution feeder. Graph theory and a contingency simulation-based technique are used in the explicit formulation of the objective functions to accurately model the protection system response to faults and system reconfiguration practices. To ensure the solution’s feasibility both technical and economic constraints are considered. An alternative economic constraint is proposed, taking into account the current locations of the protective devices and sectionalizing switches, which directly affect the utility costs for reliability improvement. To solve the proposed model, an optimization technique based on the branch-and-bound algorithm is used in this paper. Hence, this technique enables deterministic optimization of distribution feeder reliability by identifying types and locations of protection devices and sectionalizing switches, so that SAIDI and SAIFI reliability indices are minimized. Test cases are presented to illustrate the reliability optimization of a test feeder considering the use of different protection schemes and cost constraints. A value-based reliability optimization formulation is derived from the proposed model and its application to the test feeder is also illustrated. Additionally, the solutions obtained from the proposed model are compared with the solutions obtained from two other state-of-the-art models found in the literature. A comparative study is also carried out to evaluate the efficiency of the genetic algorithm in solving the proposed models.

G.D. Ferreira; A.S. Bretas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Atmospheric Rivers Induced Heavy Precipitation and Flooding in the Western U.S. Simulated by the WRF Regional Climate Model  

SciTech Connect

Twenty years of regional climate simulated by the Weather Research and Forecasting model for North America has been analyzed to study the influence of the atmospheric rivers and the role of the land surface on heavy precipitation and flooding in the western U.S. Compared to observations, the simulation realistically captured the 95th percentile extreme precipitation, mean precipitation intensity, as well as the mean precipitation and temperature anomalies of all the atmospheric river events between 1980-1999. Contrasting the 1986 President Day and 1997 New Year Day atmospheric river events, differences in atmospheric stability are found to have an influence on the spatial distribution of precipitation in the Coastal Range of northern California. Although both cases yield similar amounts of heavy precipitation, the 1997 case was found to produce more runoff compared to the 1986 case. Antecedent soil moisture, the ratio of snowfall to total precipitation (which depends on temperature), and existing snowpack all seem to play a role, leading to a higher runoff to precipitation ratio simulated for the 1997 case. This study underscores the importance of characterizing or simulating atmospheric rivers and the land surface conditions for predicting floods, and for assessing the potential impacts of climate change on heavy precipitation and flooding in the western U.S.

Leung, Lai R.; Qian, Yun

2009-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

297

Evaluation of a spatially-distributed Thornthwaite water-balance model  

SciTech Connect

A small watershed of low relief in coastal New Hampshire was divided into hydrologic sub-areas in a geographic information system on the basis of soils, sub-basins and remotely-sensed landcover. Three variables were spatially modeled for input to 49 individual water-balances: available water content of the root zone, water input and potential evapotranspiration (PET). The individual balances were weight-summed to generate the aggregate watershed-balance, which saw 9% (48--50 mm) less annual actual-evapotranspiration (AET) compared to a lumped approach. Analysis of streamflow coefficients suggests that the spatially-distributed approach is more representative of the basin dynamics. Variation of PET by landcover accounted for the majority of the 9% AET reduction. Variation of soils played a near-negligible role. As a consequence of the above points, estimates of landcover proportions and annual PET by landcover are sufficient to correct a lumped water-balance in the Northeast. If remote sensing is used to estimate the landcover area, a sensor with a high spatial resolution is required. Finally, while the lower Thornthwaite model has conceptual limitations for distributed application, the upper Thornthwaite model is highly adaptable to distributed problems and may prove useful in many earth-system models.

Lough, J.A. (Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States). Complex Systems Research Center)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

A distributed model for capacitance requirements for self-excited induction generators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main objective of this paper is to construct a distributed environment through which the capacitance requirements of self-excited induction generators can be monitored and controlled. A single-server/multiclient architecture has been proposed which enables that the self-excited induction generators can access the remote server at any time, with their respective data and can able to get the minimum capacitance requirements. An Remote Method Invocation (RMI)-based distributed model has been developed in such a way that for every specific period of time, the remote server obtains the system data simultaneously from the neighbouring self-excited induction generators which are the clients registered with it and the server send back the capacitance requirements as response to the respective clients. The server creates a new thread of control for every client request and hence complete distributed environment has been exploited.

K. Nithiyananthan; V. Ramachandran

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

THE PHYSICAL CONDITIONS IN STARBURSTS DERIVED FROM BAYESIAN FITTING OF MID-INFRARED SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION MODELS: 30 DORADUS AS A TEMPLATE  

SciTech Connect

To understand and interpret the observed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of starbursts, theoretical or semi-empirical SED models are necessary. Yet, while they are well founded in theory, independent verification and calibration of these models, including the exploration of possible degeneracies between their parameters, are rarely made. As a consequence, a robust fitting method that leads to unique and reproducible results has been lacking. Here we introduce a novel approach based on Bayesian analysis to fit the Spitzer-Infrared Spectrometer spectra of starbursts using the SED models proposed by Groves et al.. We demonstrate its capabilities and verify the agreement between the derived best-fit parameters and actual physical conditions by modeling the nearby, well-studied, giant H II region 30 Doradus in the LMC. The derived physical parameters, such as cluster mass, cluster age, interstellar medium pressure, and covering fraction of photodissociation regions, are representative of the 30 Doradus region. The inclusion of the emission lines in the modeling is crucial to break degeneracies. We investigate the limitations and uncertainties by modeling subregions, which are dominated by single components, within 30 Doradus. A remarkable result for 30 Doradus in particular is a considerable contribution to its mid-infrared spectrum from hot ({approx}300 K) dust. The demonstrated success of our approach will allow us to derive the physical conditions in more distant, spatially unresolved starbursts.

MartInez-Galarza, J. R.; Groves, B.; Brandl, B. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 CA Leiden (Netherlands); De Messieres, G. E.; Indebetouw, R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 3818, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Dopita, M. A. [Mount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatories, Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia)

2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

300

Theoretical modeling of propagation of magneto-acoustic waves in magnetic regions below sunspots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use 2D numerical simulations and eikonal approximation, to study properties of MHD waves traveling below the solar surface through the magnetic structure of sunspots. We consider a series of magnetostatic models of sunspots of different magnetic field strengths, from 10 Mm below the photosphere to the low chromosphere. The purpose of these studies is to quantify the effect of the magnetic field on local helioseismology measurements by modeling waves excited by sub-photospheric sources. Time-distance propagation diagrams and wave travel times are calculated for models of various field strength and compared to the non-magnetic case. The results clearly indicate that the observed time-distance helioseismology signals in sunspot regions correspond to fast MHD waves. The slow MHD waves form a distinctly different pattern in the time-distance diagram, which has not been detected in observations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the solution in the short-wavelength (eikonal) approximation, providing its validation. The frequency dependence of the travel times is in a good qualitative agreement with observations.

E. Khomenko; A. Kosovichev; M. Collados; K. Parchevsky; V. Olshevsky

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distribution model regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Theoretical Modeling of Propagation of Magnetoacoustic Waves in Magnetic Regions Below Sunspots  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We use two-dimensional numerical simulations and eikonal approximation to study properties of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves traveling below the solar surface through the magnetic structure of sunspots. We consider a series of magnetostatic models of sunspots of different magnetic field strengths, from 10 Mm below the photosphere to the low chromosphere. The purpose of these studies is to quantify the effect of the magnetic field on local helioseismology measurements by modeling waves excited by subphotospheric sources. Time-distance propagation diagrams and wave travel times are calculated for models of various field strengths and compared to the nonmagnetic case. The results clearly indicate that the observed time-distance helioseismology signals in sunspot regions correspond to fast MHD waves. The slow MHD waves form a distinctly different pattern in the time-distance diagram, which has not been detected in observations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the solution in the short-wavelength (eikonal) approximation, providing its validation. The frequency dependence of the travel times is in good qualitative agreement with observations.

E. Khomenko; A. Kosovichev; M. Collados; K. Parchevsky; V. Olshevsky

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Two-stage fuzzy-stochastic robust programming: a hybrid model for regional air quality management  

SciTech Connect

In this study, a hybrid two-stage fuzzy-stochastic robust programming (TFSRP) model is developed and applied to the planning of an air-quality management system. As an extension of existing fuzzy-robust programming and two stage stochastic programming methods, the TFSRP can explicitly address complexities and uncertainties of the study system without unrealistic simplifications. Uncertain parameters can be expressed as probability density and/or fuzzy membership functions, such that robustness of the optimization efforts can be enhanced. Moreover, economic penalties as corrective measures against any infeasibilities arising from the uncertainties are taken into account. This method can, thus, provide a linkage to predefined policies determined by authorities that have to be respected when a modeling effort is undertaken. In its solution algorithm, the fuzzy decision space can be delimited through specification of the uncertainties using dimensional enlargement of the original fuzzy constraints. The developed model is applied to a case study of regional air quality management at two coal-fired power plants considered as major sulfur dioxide emission sources. The results indicate that reasonable solutions have been obtained. The solutions can be used for further generating pollution-mitigation alternatives with minimized system costs and for providing a more solid support for sound environmental decisions. 61 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

Yongping Li; Guo H. Huang; Amornvadee Veawab; Xianghui Nie; Lei Liu [University of Regina, Regina, SK (Canada). Environmental Systems Engineering Program

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Update and assessment of geothermal economic models, geothermal fluid flow and heat distribution models, and geothermal data bases  

SciTech Connect

Numerical simulation models and data bases that were developed for DOE as part of a number of geothermal programs have been assessed with respect to their overall stage of development and usefulness. This report combines three separate studies that focus attention upon: (1) economic models related to geothermal energy; (2) physical geothermal system models pertaining to thermal energy and the fluid medium; and (3) geothermal energy data bases. Computerized numerical models pertaining to the economics of extracting and utilizing geothermal energy have been summarized and catalogued with respect to their availability, utility and function. The 19 models that are discussed in detail were developed for use by geothermal operators, public utilities, and lending institutions who require a means to estimate the value of a given resource, total project costs, and the sensitivity of these values to specific variables. A number of the models are capable of economically assessing engineering aspects of geothermal projects. Computerized simulations of heat distribution and fluid flow have been assessed and are presented for ten models. Five of the models are identified as wellbore simulators and five are described as reservoir simulators. Each model is described in terms of its operational characteristics, input, output, and other pertinent attributes. Geothermal energy data bases are reviewed with respect to their current usefulness and availability. Summaries of eight data bases are provided in catalogue format, and an overall comparison of the elements of each data base is included.

Kenkeremath, D. (ed.)

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Spatial distribution of shear wave anisotropy in the crust of the southern Hyogo region by borehole observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......estimate a depth-dependent anisotropic model for each subset. The...or the upper limit of the anisotropic zone for the two clusters...mostly Jurassic sandstone or shale, but some areas have quite...8 Conclusions We obtain anisotropic structure, not only in terms......

Takashi Mizuno; Kiyoshi Yomogida; Hisao Ito; Yasuto Kuwahara

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Theoretical modeling of propagation of magneto-acoustic waves in magnetic regions below sunspots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use 2D numerical simulations and eikonal approximation to study properties of magneto-acoustic gravity waves traveling below the solar surface through the magnetic structure of sunspots. We consider a series of magnetostatic models of sunspots of different magnetic field strengths, from the deep interior to the chromosphere. The purpose of these studies is to quantify the effect of the magnetic field on local helioseismology measurements. Waves are excited by a sub-photospheric source located in the region beta slightly larger than 1. Time-distance diagrams and travel times are calculated for various frequency intervals and compared to the non-magnetic case. The results confirm that the observed time-distance helioseismology signals in sunspot regions correspond to fast MHD waves. The slow MHD waves form a distinctly different pattern in the time-distance diagram, which has not been detected in observations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the solution in the short-wavelength (eikonal) app...

Khomenko, E; Collados, M; Parchevsky, K; Olshevsky, V

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Energy and angular distributions of detached electrons in a solvable model of ion-atom collisions  

SciTech Connect

Electron energy and angular distributions are computed for a model of atom{endash}negative-ion collisions. In this model, electron-atom interactions are represented by zero-range potentials in an approximation where two identical atoms move along straight-line classical trajectories in head-on collisions. Analytic expressions for the ionization amplitudes are interpreted in terms of Sturmian eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. At high velocity, the computed distributions exhibit direct excitation and continuum capture cusps in addition to the binary encounter ridge. At low velocities, a single feature corresponding to an electron distribution centered midway between the target and projectile emerges. For initial conditions corresponding to gerade symmetry a single broad peak appears, while for ungerade symmetry there is a node at the midpoint so that the peak splits into two parts. It is confirmed that the advanced adiabatic approximation gives an accurate description of the ungerade distribution at low and intermediate velocities. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

Macek, J.H.; Ovchinnikov, S.Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1501 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1501 (United States); [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Solovev, E.A. [Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Research Center for Energy and Informatics, P.O. Box 428, 91000 Skopje, (Macedonia)] [Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Research Center for Energy and Informatics, P.O. Box 428, 91000 Skopje, (Macedonia)

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Energy and angular distributions of detached electrons in a solvable model of ion-atom collisions  

SciTech Connect

Electron energy and angular distributions are computed for a model of atom[endash]negative-ion collisions. In this model, electron-atom interactions are represented by zero-range potentials in an approximation where two identical atoms move along straight-line classical trajectories in head-on collisions. Analytic expressions for the ionization amplitudes are interpreted in terms of Sturmian eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. At high velocity, the computed distributions exhibit direct excitation and continuum capture cusps in addition to the binary encounter ridge. At low velocities, a single feature corresponding to an electron distribution centered midway between the target and projectile emerges. For initial conditions corresponding to gerade symmetry a single broad peak appears, while for ungerade symmetry there is a node at the midpoint so that the peak splits into two parts. It is confirmed that the advanced adiabatic approximation gives an accurate description of the ungerade distribution at low and intermediate velocities. [copyright] [ital 1999] [ital The American Physical Society

Macek, J.H.; Ovchinnikov, S.Y. (Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1501 (United States) Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)); Solovev, E.A. (Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Research Center for Energy and Informatics, P.O. Box 428, 91000 Skopje, (Macedonia))

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan, Vol. 82, No. 6, pp. 1599--1628, 2004 1599 Regional Climate Modeling: Progress, Challenges, and Prospects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and development of regional earth system models. It is believed that with the demonstrated credibility of RCMs

Wang, Yuqing

309

Polarimetric modeling of corotating interaction regions (CIRs) threading massive-star winds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Massive star winds are complex radiation-hydrodynamic (sometimes magnetohydrodynamic) outflows that are propelled by their enormously strong luminosities. The winds are often found to be structured and variable, but can also display periodic or quasi-periodic behavior in a variety of wind diagnostics. The regular variations observed in putatively single stars, especially in UV wind lines, have often been attributed to corotating interaction regions (CIRs) like those seen in the solar wind. We present light curves for variable polarization from winds with CIR structures. We develop a model for a time-independent CIR based on a kinematical description. Assuming optically thin electron scattering, we explore the range of polarimetric light curves that result as the curvature, latitude, and number of CIRs are varied. We find that a diverse array of variable polarizations result from an exploration of cases. The net polarization from an unresolved source is weighted more toward the inner radii of the wind. Given t...

Ignace, R; Proulx-Giraldeau, F

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

A phenomenological model of dynamical arrest of electron transfer in solvents in the glass-transition region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A phenomenological model of dynamical arrest of electron transfer in solvents in the glass 2004; published online 17 February 2005 A phenomenological model of electron transfer reactions-acceptor energy gaps dashed line in Fig. 1 differs from the equilibrium distribution. The present phenomenological

Matyushov, Dmitry

311

Distributed three-dimensional finite-difference modeling of wave propagation in acoustic media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Finite-difference modeling of wave propagation in heterogeneous media is a useful technique in a number of disciplines including earthquake and oil exploration seismology laboratory ultrasonics ocean acoustics radar imaging nondestructive evaluation and others. However the size of the models that can be treated by finite-difference methods in three spatial dimensions has limited their application to supercomputers. We describe a finite-difference domain-decomposition method for the three-dimensional acoustic wave equation which is well suited to distributed parallelization. We have implemented this algorithm using the PVM message-passing library and show here benchmarks on two different distributed memory architectures the IBM SP2 and a network of low-cost PCs running the Linux operating system. We present performance measurements of this algorithm on both the low-bandwidth PC network (10-Mbits/s Ethernet) and the high-bandwidth SP2 cluster (40-Mbits/s switch). These results demonstrate the feasibility of doing distributed finite-difference acoustic modeling on networks of workstations but point to the substantial efficiencies that can be expected as higher bandwidth networks become available. © 1997 American Institute of Physics.

Alberto Villarreal

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

A Model for Collaboration Networks Giving Rise to a Power Law Distribution with an Exponential Cutoff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently several authors have proposed stochastic evolutionary models for the growth of complex networks that give rise to power-law distributions. These models are based on the notion of preferential attachment leading to the ``rich get richer'' phenomenon. Despite the generality of the proposed stochastic models, there are still some unexplained phenomena, which may arise due to the limited size of networks such as protein, e-mail, actor and collaboration networks. Such networks may in fact exhibit an exponential cutoff in the power-law scaling, although this cutoff may only be observable in the tail of the distribution for extremely large networks. We propose a modification of the basic stochastic evolutionary model, so that after a node is chosen preferentially, say according to the number of its inlinks, there is a small probability that this node will become inactive. We show that as a result of this modification, by viewing the stochastic process in terms of an urn transfer model, we obtain a power-law...

Fenner, T; Loizou, G; Fenner, Trevor; Levene, Mark; Loizou, George

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Tests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-Scale Data Assimilation. Part II: Imperfect Model Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

degraded). As in Part I, where the perfect model assumption was utilized, most analysis error reduction of significant model errors due to physical parameterizations by assimilating synthetic sounding and surfaceTests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-Scale Data Assimilation. Part II

Meng, Zhiyong

314

Contention Modeling for Multithreaded Distributed Shared Memory Machines: The Cray XMT  

SciTech Connect

Distributed Shared Memory (DSM) machines are a wide class of multi-processor computing systems where a large virtually-shared address space is mapped on a network of physically distributed memories. High memory latency and network contention are two of the main factors that limit performance scaling of such architectures. Modern high-performance computing DSM systems have evolved toward exploitation of massive hardware multi-threading and fine-grained memory hashing to tolerate irregular latencies, avoid network hot-spots and enable high scaling. In order to model the performance of such large-scale machines, parallel simulation has been proved to be a promising approach to achieve good accuracy in reasonable times. One of the most critical factors in solving the simulation speed-accuracy trade-off is network modeling. The Cray XMT is a massively multi-threaded supercomputing architecture that belongs to the DSM class, since it implements a globally-shared address space abstraction on top of a physically distributed memory substrate. In this paper, we discuss the development of a contention-aware network model intended to be integrated in a full-system XMT simulator. We start by measuring the effects of network contention in a 128-processor XMT machine and then investigate the trade-off that exists between simulation accuracy and speed, by comparing three network models which operate at different levels of accuracy. The comparison and model validation is performed by executing a string-matching algorithm on the full-system simulator and on the XMT, using three datasets that generate noticeably different contention patterns.

Secchi, Simone; Tumeo, Antonino; Villa, Oreste

2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

315

Physical Constraints on, and a Model for, the Active Regions in Seyfert Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss several physical constraints on the nature of the Active Regions (AR) in Seyfert 1 Galaxies, and show that a plausible model consistent with these constraints is one in which the ARs are magnetically confined and ``fed''. The unique X-ray index of these sources points to a large compactness parameter ($l\\gg 1$). This, together with the conditions required to account for the observed optical depth being close to unity, suggests that the magnetic energy density in the AR should be comparable to the equipartition value in the accretion disk, and that it should be released in a flare-like event above the surface of the cold accretion disk. We consider the various issues pertaining to magnetic flares and attempt to construct a coherent picture, including a reason for the optical depth in the AR being $\\sim 1$, and an understanding of the characteristics of the X-ray reflection component and the power density spectra associated with this high-energy emission.

Sergei Nayakshin; Fulvio Melia

1997-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

316

Radiation-MHD models of elephant trunks and globules in H II regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the formation and evolution of pillars of dense gas, known as elephant trunks, at the boundaries of H II regions, formed by shadowing of ionising radiation by dense clumps. The effects of magnetic fields on this process are investigated using 3D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics simulations. For a simulation in which an initially uniform magnetic field of strength |B|=50 uG is oriented perpendicular to the radiation propagation direction, the field is swept into alignment with the pillar during its dynamical evolution, in agreement with observations of the "Pillars of Creation" in M16, and of some cometary globules. This effect is significantly enhanced when the simulation is re-run with a weaker field of 18 uG. A stronger field with |B|=160 uG is sufficient to prevent this evolution completely, also significantly affecting the photoionisation process. Using a larger simulation domain it is seen that the pillar formation models studied in Mackey & Lim (2010) ultimately evolve to cometary structures ...

Mackey, Jonathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Environment and the Lifetime of Tropical Deep Convection in a Cloud-Permitting Regional Model Simulation  

SciTech Connect

By applying a cloud tracking algorithm to tropical convective systems simulated by a regional high resolution model, the study documents environmental conditions before and after convective systems are initiated over ocean and land by following them during their lifetime. The comparative roles of various environmental fields in affecting the lifetime of convection are also quantified. The statistics of lifetime, maximum area, propagation speed and direction of the simulated deep convection agrees well with geostationary satellite observations. Over ocean, convective systems enhance surface fluxes through the associated wind gusts as well as cooling and drying of the boundary layer. A significant relationship is found between the mean surface fluxes during their lifetime and the longevity of the systems which in turn is related to the initial intensity of the moist updraft and to a lesser extent upper level shear. Over land, on the other hand, convective activity suppresses surface fluxes through cloud cover and the lifetime of convection is related to the upper level shear during their lifetime and strength of the heat fluxes several hours before the initiation of convection. For systems of equal lifetime, those over land are significantly more intense than those over ocean especially during early stages of their lifetime.

Hagos, Samson M.; Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Paradigm shift in urban energy systems through distributed generation: Methods and models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The path towards energy sustainability is commonly referred to the incremental adoption of available technologies, practices and policies that may help to decrease the environmental impact of energy sector, while providing an adequate standard of energy services. The evaluation of trade-offs among technologies, practices and policies for the mitigation of environmental problems related to energy resources depletion requires a deep knowledge of the local and global effects of the proposed solutions. While attempting to calculate such effects for a large complex system like a city, an advanced multidisciplinary approach is needed to overcome difficulties in modeling correctly real phenomena while maintaining computational transparency, reliability, interoperability and efficiency across different levels of analysis. Further, a methodology that rationally integrates different computational models and techniques is necessary to enable collaborative research in the field of optimization of energy efficiency strategies and integration of renewable energy systems in urban areas. For these reasons, a selection of currently available models for distributed generation planning and design is presented and analyzed in the perspective of gathering their capabilities in an optimization framework to support a paradigm shift in urban energy systems. This framework embodies the main concepts of a local energy management system and adopts a multicriteria perspective to determine optimal solutions for providing energy services through distributed generation.

Massimiliano Manfren; Paola Caputo; Gaia Costa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Modelling and interpreting the dependence of clustering on the spectral energy distributions of galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We extend our previous physically-based halo occupation distribution models to include the dependence of clustering on the spectral energy distributions of galaxies. The high resolution Millennium Simulation is used to specify the positions and the velocities of the model galaxies. The stellar mass of a galaxy is assumed to depend only on M_{infall}, the halo mass when the galaxy was last the central dominant object of its halo. Star formation histories are parametrized using two additional quantities that are measured from the simulation for each galaxy: its formation time (t_{form}), and the time when it first becomes a satellite (t_{infall}). Central galaxies begin forming stars at time t_{form} with an exponential time scale tau_c. If the galaxy becomes a satellite, its star formation declines thereafter with a new time scale tau_s. We compute 4000 \\AA break strengths for our model galaxies using stellar population synthesis models. By fitting these models to the observed abundances and projected correlations of galaxies as a function of break strength in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we constrain tau_c and tau_s as functions of galaxy stellar mass. We find that central galaxies with large stellar masses have ceased forming stars. At low stellar masses, central galaxies display a wide range of different star formation histories, with a significant fraction experiencing recent starbursts. Satellite galaxies of all masses have declining star formation rates, with similar e-folding times, tau_s ~ 2.5Gyr. One consequence of this long e-folding time is that the colour-density relation is predicted to flatten at redshifts > 1.5, because star formation in the majority of satellites has not yet declined by a significant factor. This is consistent with recent observational results from the DEEP and VVDS surveys.

Lan Wang; Cheng Li; Guinevere Kauffmann; Gabriella De Lucia

2007-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

320

Extension of thermonuclear functions through the pathway model including Maxwell-Boltzmann and Tsallis distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Maxwell-Boltzmannian approach to nuclear reaction rate theory is extended to cover Tsallis statistics (Tsallis, 1988) and more general cases of distribution functions. An analytical study of respective thermonuclear functions is being conducted with the help of statistical techniques. The pathway model, recently introduced by Mathai (2005), is utilized for thermonuclear functions and closed-form representations are obtained in terms of H-functions and G-functions. Maxwell-Boltzmannian thermonuclear functions become particular cases of the extended thermonuclear functions. A brief review on the development of the theory of analytic representations of nuclear reaction rates is given.

H. J. Haubold; D. Kumar

2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distribution model regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The Impact of Land Surface Processes on Simulations of the U.S. Hydrological Cycle: A Case Study of the 1993 Flood Using the SSiB Land Surface Model in the NCEP Eta Regional Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a methodology for coupling the Simplified Simple Biosphere Model (SSiB) to the regional Eta Model of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), and presents the application of the coupled system in regional ...

Y. Xue; F. J. Zeng; K. E. Mitchell; Z. Janjic; E. Rogers

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Using Advanced Technology-Rich Models for Regional And Global Economic Analysis of GHG Mitigation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article presents the case for a detailed regional analysis of the economic impacts of GHG control, via a set of inter-connected...

Richard Loulou; Amit Kanudia

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

E-Print Network 3.0 - active region model Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collection: Physics 72 The main rationale In the 21st Summary: development in the ASEAN region. Chapter 3: The Space Activities of ASEAN Countries investigates the...

324

Spatial Ecology of the Giant Kangaroo Rat (Dipodomys ingens): A Test of Species Distribution Models as Ecological Revealers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biology. Trends in Ecology & Evolution 23:141-148. Kremen,simple habitat models. Ecology Letters 8:993-1009. Krebs, C.2008. Ecology: the experimental analysis of distribution and

Bean, William Timothy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Modeling the dynamic response of pressures in a distributed helium refrigeration system  

SciTech Connect

A mathematical model is created of the dynamic response of pressures caused by flow inputs to an existing distributed helium refrigeration system. The dynamic system studied consists of the suction and discharge pressure headers and compressor portions of the refrigeration system used to cool the superconducting magnets of the Tevatron accelerator at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The modeling method involves identifying the system from data recorded during a series of controlled tests, with effort made to detect locational differences in pressure response around the four mile accelerator circumference. A review of the fluid mechanics associated with the system indicates linear time invariant models are suitable for the identification, particularly since the governing equations of one dimensional fluid flow are approximated by linear differential equations. An outline of the experimental design and the data acquisition system are given, followed by a detailed description of the modeling, which utilized the Matlab programming language and associated System Identification Toolbox. Two representations of the system are presented. One, a black box model, provides a multi-input, multi-output description assembled from the results of single input step function testing. This description indicates definite variation in pressure response with distance from the flow input location, and also suggests subtle differences in response with the input location itself. A second system representation is proposed which details the relation between continuous flow changes and pressure response, and provides explanation of a previously unappreciated pressure feedback internal to the system.

Brubaker, J.C.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Model calculation of anisotropic charge and magnetic moment distribution on a Ni(001) surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Anisotropies in the electronic charge and moment distribution on a (001) surface of Ni are influenced by the kinetic and Coulomb energies as well as by exchange and correlations. By using a simple model Hamiltonian the various contributions are analyzed. In particular we consider the effects of nonlocal exchange and correlation energies on the anisotropies. When we simulate a local exchange and correlation approximation, we find a decrease in the surface anisotropies (e.g., a moment in the 3z2-r2 orbital). The accompanying relative energy changes are very small, i.e., of the order of 10-4. The same holds true for anisotropies in the exchange splittings. A comparison is attempted between the results of the present model and recent ab initio calculations for the Ni surface in which the local-spin-density approximation is applied.

A. M. Oles and P. Fulde

1984-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

ONE-DIMENSIONAL MODELING FOR TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENT UPFLOW IN THE DIMMING REGION OBSERVED BY HINODE/EUV IMAGING SPECTROMETER  

SciTech Connect

We previously found a temperature-dependent upflow in the dimming region following a coronal mass ejection observed by the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). In this paper, we reanalyzed the observations along with previous work on this event and provided boundary conditions for modeling. We found that the intensity in the dimming region dramatically drops within 30 minutes from the flare onset, and the dimming region reaches the equilibrium stage after {approx}1 hr. The temperature-dependent upflows were observed during the equilibrium stage by EIS. The cross-sectional area of the flux tube in the dimming region does not appear to expand significantly. From the observational constraints, we reconstructed the temperature-dependent upflow by using a new method that considers the mass and momentum conservation law and demonstrated the height variation of plasma conditions in the dimming region. We found that a super-radial expansion of the cross-sectional area is required to satisfy the mass conservation and momentum equations. There is a steep temperature and velocity gradient of around 7 Mm from the solar surface. This result may suggest that the strong heating occurred above 7 Mm from the solar surface in the dimming region. We also showed that the ionization equilibrium assumption in the dimming region is violated, especially in the higher temperature range.

Imada, S.; Shimizu, T. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Hara, H.; Watanabe, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Murakami, I. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Harra, L. K. [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Zweibel, E. G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 N Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

328

Superscaling and Charge-Changing Neutrino Scattering from Nuclei in the $\\boldsymbol ?$-Region beyond the Relativistic Fermi Gas Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The superscaling analysis using the scaling function obtained within the coherent density fluctuation model is extended to calculate charge-changing neutrino and antineutrino scattering on $^{12}$C at energies from 1 to 2 GeV not only in the quasielastic but also in the delta excitation region. The results are compared with those obtained using the scaling functions from the relativistic Fermi gas model and from the superscaling analysis of inclusive scattering of electrons from nuclei.

M. V. Ivanov; M. B. Barbaro; J. A. Caballero; A. N. Antonov; E. Moya de Guerra; M. K. Gaidarov

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

329

Sub-national TIMES model for analyzing regional future use of Biomass and Biofuels in France and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Sub-national TIMES model for analyzing regional future use of Biomass and Biofuels in France Introduction Renewable energy sources such as biomass and biofuels are increasingly being seen as important of biofuels on the final consumption of energy in transport should be 10%. The long-term target is to reduce

Boyer, Edmond

330

A Comparative Study of Precipitation and Evaporation between CMIP3 and CMIP5 Climate Model Ensembles in Semiarid Regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The twentieth-century climatology and twenty-first-century trend in precipitation P, evaporation E, and P ? E for selected semiarid U.S. Southwest and Mediterranean regions are compared between ensembles from phases 3 and 5 of the Coupled Model ...

Noel C. Baker; Huei-Ping Huang

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Aeroelastic Modeling of Offshore Turbines and Support Structures in Hurricane-Prone Regions (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

US offshore wind turbines (OWTs) will likely have to contend with hurricanes and the associated loading conditions. Current industry standards do not account for these design load cases (DLCs), thus a new approach is required to guarantee that the OWTs achieve an appropriate level of reliability. In this study, a sequentially coupled aero-hydro-servo-elastic modeling technique was used to address two design approaches: 1.) The ABS (American Bureau of Shipping) approach; and 2.) The Hazard Curve or API (American Petroleum Institute) approach. The former employs IEC partial load factors (PSFs) and 100-yr return-period (RP) metocean events. The latter allows setting PSFs and RP to a prescribed level of system reliability. The 500-yr RP robustness check (appearing in [2] and [3] upcoming editions) is a good indicator of the target reliability for L2 structures. CAE tools such as NREL's FAST and Bentley's' SACS (offshore analysis and design software) can be efficiently coupled to simulate system loads under hurricane DLCs. For this task, we augmented the latest FAST version (v. 8) to include tower aerodynamic drag that cannot be ignored in hurricane DLCs. In this project, a 6 MW turbine was simulated on a typical 4-legged jacket for a mid-Atlantic site. FAST-calculated tower base loads were fed to SACS at the interface level (transition piece); SACS added hydrodynamic and wind loads on the exposed substructure, and calculated mudline overturning moments, and member and joint utilization. Results show that CAE tools can be effectively used to compare design approaches for the design of OWTs in hurricane regions and to achieve a well-balanced design, where reliability levels and costs are optimized.

Damiani, R.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Determination of High-Frequency Current Distribution Using EMTP-Based Transmission Line Models with Resulting Radiated Electromagnetic Fields  

SciTech Connect

Application of BPL technologies to existing overhead high-voltage power lines would benefit greatly from improved simulation tools capable of predicting performance - such as the electromagnetic fields radiated from such lines. Existing EMTP-based frequency-dependent line models are attractive since their parameters are derived from physical design dimensions which are easily obtained. However, to calculate the radiated electromagnetic fields, detailed current distributions need to be determined. This paper presents a method of using EMTP line models to determine the current distribution on the lines, as well as a technique for using these current distributions to determine the radiated electromagnetic fields.

Mork, B; Nelson, R; Kirkendall, B; Stenvig, N

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

333

Anatomy of the AGN in NGC 5548: I. A global model for the broadband spectral energy distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An extensive multi-satellite campaign on NGC 5548 has revealed this archetypal Seyfert-1 galaxy to be in an exceptional state of persistent heavy absorption. Our observations taken in 2013-2014 with XMM-Newton, Swift, NuSTAR, INTEGRAL, Chandra, HST and two ground-based observatories have together enabled us to establish that this unexpected phenomenon is caused by an outflowing stream of weakly ionised gas (called the obscurer), extending from the vicinity of the accretion disk to the broad-line region. In this work we present the details of our campaign and the data obtained by all the observatories. We determine the spectral energy distribution of NGC 5548 from near-infrared to hard X-rays by establishing the contribution of various emission and absorption processes taking place along our line of sight towards the central engine. We thus uncover the intrinsic emission and produce a broadband continuum model for both obscured (average summer 2013 data) and unobscured ($<$ 2011) epochs of NGC 5548. Our res...

Mehdipour, M; Kriss, G A; Cappi, M; Petrucci, P -O; Steenbrugge, K C; Arav, N; Behar, E; Bianchi, S; Boissay, R; Branduardi-Raymont, G; Costantini, E; Ebrero, J; Di Gesu, L; Harrison, F A; Kaspi, S; De Marco, B; Matt, G; Paltani, S; Peterson, B M; Ponti, G; Nuñez, F Pozo; De Rosa, A; Ursini, F; de Vries, C P; Walton, D J; Whewell, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Surface Temperature Probability Distributions in the NARCCAP Hindcast Experiment: Evaluation Methodology, Metrics and Results  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methodology is developed and applied to evaluate the characteristics of daily surface temperature distributions in a six-member regional climate model (RCM) hindcast experiment conducted as part of the North American Regional Climate Change ...

Paul C. Loikith; Duane E. Waliser; Huikyo Lee; Jinwon Kim; J. David Neelin; Benjamin R. Lintner; Seth McGinnis; Chris A. Mattmann; Linda O. Mearns

335

Regional groundwater modeling of the saturated zone in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Iterative Performance Assessment, Phase 2  

SciTech Connect

Results of groundwater modeling of the saturated zone in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain are presented. Both a regional (200 {times} 200 km) and subregional (50 {times} 50 km) model were used in the analyses. Simulations were conducted to determine the impact of various disruptive that might take place over the life span of a proposed Yucca Mountain geologic conditions repository on the groundwater flow field, as well as changes in the water-table elevations. These conditions included increases in precipitation and groundwater recharge within the regional model, changes in permeability of existing hydrogeologic barriers, a:nd the vertical intrusion of volcanic dikes at various orientations through the saturated zone. Based on the regional analysis, the rise in the water-table under Yucca Mountain due to various postulated conditions ranged from only a few meters to 275 meters. Results of the subregional model analysis, which was used to simulate intrusive dikes approximately 4 kilometers in length in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, showed water-table rises ranging from a few meters to as much as 103 meters. Dikes oriented approximately north-south beneath Yucca Mountain produced the highest water-table rises. The conclusions drawn from this analysis are likely to change as more site-specific data become available and as the assumptions in the model are improved.

Ahola, M.; Sagar, B. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Modelling China’s potential maize production at regional scale under climate change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the continuing warming due to greenhouse gases concentration, it is important to examine the potential impacts on regional crop production spatially and temporally. We assessed China’s potential maize pro...

Wei Xiong; Robin Matthews; Ian Holman; Erda Lin; Yinglong Xu

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

New Theoretical Model of the Complex Edge Region of Fusion Plasmas...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

a high pedestal is required for copious fusion energy production in ITER or a fusion power plant, and (2) the large free energy in the pedestal region can drive instabilities...

338

Modeling regional transportation demand in China and the impacts of a national carbon constraint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate and energy policy in China will have important and uneven impacts on the country’s regionally heterogeneous transport system. In order to simulate these impacts, transport sector detail is added to a multi-sector, ...

Kishimoto, Paul

2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

339

Modeling regional seismic waves from underground nuclear explosion. Report for 17 March 1987-30 March 88  

SciTech Connect

Two main topics are presented: the effects of ocean continent transition zones on L - g waves; and modeling regional Love waves with 2-D velocity structures. Hybrid regional and teleseismic SH mode sum seismograms are produced after propagation through a regional transition zone or other heterogeneity that exists as part of a longer, mostly plane-layered, path. In particular the effects of ocean continent transition regions of geometry for propagation along a partially oceanic path is at most a factor of four. Extending the oceanic path length changes this factor to at most 6. This is inadequate to explain the observed attenuation of Lg. Thus, additional effects, must be considered to provide a complete explanation of the attenuation of Lg. Long period seismograms recorded at Pasadena of earthquakes occurring along a profile to Imperial Valley are studied in terms of source phenomena versus path effects. Some of the events have known source parameters, determined by teleseismic or near-field studies, and are used as master events in a forward modeling exercise to derive the Green's functions that describe the propagation effects along the profile. Both timing and waveforms of records are matched by synthetics calculated from 2-dimensional velocity models. The best 2-dimensional section begins at Imperial Valley with a thin crust containing the basin structure and thickens towards Pasadena.

Clayton, R.W.; Harkrider, D.G.; Helmberger, D.V.

1988-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

340

Multi-scale Ensemble Modeling of Modular Proteins with Intrinsically Disordered Linker Regions: Application to p53  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In eukaryotic proteins, intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) are ubiquitous and often exist in linker regions that flank the functional domains of modular proteins, regulating their functions. For detailed structural ensemble modeling of IDRs, we propose a multiscale method for \\{IDRs\\} that possess significant long-range order in modular proteins and apply it to the eukaryotic transcription factor p53 as an example. First, we performed all-atom (AA) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the explicitly solvated p53 linker region, without experimental restraint terms, finding fractional long-range contacts within the linker. Second, we fed this AA MD ensemble into a coarse-grained (CG) model, finding an optimal set of contact potentials. The optimized CG MD simulations reproduced the contact probability map from the AA MD simulations. Finally, we performed the CG MD simulation of the tetrameric p53 fragments including the core domains, the linker, and the tetramerization domain. Using the obtained ensemble, we theoretically calculated the small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) profile of this fragment. The obtained SAXS profile agrees well with the experiment. We also found that the long-range contacts in the p53 linker region are required to reproduce the experimental SAXS profile. The developed framework in which we calculate the long-range contact probability map from the AA MD simulation and incorporate it to the CG model can be applied to broad range of IDRs.

Tsuyoshi Terakawa; Junichi Higo; Shoji Takada

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Distribution of petroleum reservoirs relative to allocycles and autocycles, upper portion of the Cherokee Group (Middle Pennsylvanian, Desmoinesian), Mid-Continent Region, U. S. A  

SciTech Connect

Sequences of mud rocks, lenticular sandstones, coals, and thin carbonates form autocycles and allocycles in the upper portion of the Cherokee Group. Autocycles delineated in eastern Kansas and northern Oklahoma are relatively local in extent, while allocycles are traceable over the entire region. All autocycles delineated in this study are embedded within the regressive portions of allocycles. Petroleum-bearing sandstones consist of shoestring-shaped and thin sheetlike units in thicker sedimentary lobes. These lobes were deposited as deltaic complexes, which included fluvial and distributary channel sands, interdistributary muds, crevasse splay sands and muds, flood-basin muds, delta-front sands, and predeltaic muds. Delta lobes prograded across the margins of the Middle Pennsylvanian epeiric sea during times of eustatic stillstand or regression. When lobes were abandoned, waves and currents winnowed their upper portions, leaving thin sheetlike lenses of sand. These reworked sands along with marine muds above regressive deltaic sequences form the transgressive parts of autocyclothems. The transgressive parts of allocyclothems, generally consisting of marine shale, resulted from sea level rises that rapidly shifted shorelines far northeastward, moving siliciclastic sources away from the study area. The positions of reservoir-containing deltaic complexes were determined by strandline positions at various sea levels. Extent of eustatic sea level changes appears to have been the major mechanism that controlled the distribution of petroleum reservoir and source units. In addition, sea level changes probably were a significant factor in the nature of diagenetic alterations that affected reservoir properties.

Brenner, R.L.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Can minimum-bias distributions on transverse energy test hadron production models?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A recent study reports measurements of transverse-energy $E_t$ distributions at mid-rapidity for several high-energy nuclear collision systems. The $E_t$ data are analyzed in the context of constituent-quark (CQ) participants estimated with a Glauber-model simulation. The study concludes that systematic variations of hadron and $E_t$ yields previously interpreted in terms of a two-component soft+hard model (TCM) of hadron production including a dijet (hard) contribution are actually the result of CQ participant trends with only soft production. It is claimed that deviations from linear scaling with the number of nucleon participants of hadron yields vs A-A centrality do not actually arise from dijet production as previously assumed. In the present study we examine the new $E_t$ data in the context of the TCM and compare those results with previous differential spectrum and minimum-bias correlation analysis. We present substantial evidence supporting a significant dijet contribution to all high-energy nuclear collisions consistent with the TCM and conclude that the $E_t$ data, given their systematic uncertainties, fail to support claimed CQ model interpretations.

Thomas A. Trainor

2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

343

Coupling Multi-Component Models with MPH on Distributed MemoryComputer Architectures  

SciTech Connect

A growing trend in developing large and complex applications on today's Teraflop scale computers is to integrate stand-alone and/or semi-independent program components into a comprehensive simulation package. One example is the Community Climate System Model which consists of atmosphere, ocean, land-surface and sea-ice components. Each component is semi-independent and has been developed at a different institution. We study how this multi-component, multi-executable application can run effectively on distributed memory architectures. For the first time, we clearly identify five effective execution modes and develop the MPH library to support application development utilizing these modes. MPH performs component-name registration, resource allocation and initial component handshaking in a flexible way.

He, Yun; Ding, Chris

2005-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

344

Development of a regional groundwater flow model for the area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a study conducted to develop a regional groundwater flow model for the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer in the area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The model was developed to support Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10-04 groundwater flow and transport studies. The products of this study are this report and a set of computational tools designed to numerically model the regional groundwater flow in the Eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. The objective of developing the current model was to create a tool for defining the regional groundwater flow at the INEL. The model was developed to (a) support future transport modeling for WAG 10-04 by providing the regional groundwater flow information needed for the WAG 10-04 risk assessment, (b) define the regional groundwater flow setting for modeling groundwater contaminant transport at the scale of the individual WAGs, (c) provide a tool for improving the understanding of the groundwater flow system below the INEL, and (d) consolidate the existing regional groundwater modeling information into one usable model. The current model is appropriate for defining the regional flow setting for flow submodels as well as hypothesis testing to better understand the regional groundwater flow in the area of the INEL. The scale of the submodels must be chosen based on accuracy required for the study.

McCarthy, J.M.; Arnett, R.C.; Neupauer, R.M. [and others

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Modeling The GRB Host Galaxy Mass Distribution: Are GRBs Unbiased Tracers of Star Formation?  

SciTech Connect

We model the mass distribution of long gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies given recent results suggesting that GRBs occur in low metallicity environments. By utilizing measurements of the redshift evolution of the mass-metallicity (M-Z) relationship for galaxies, along with a sharp host metallicity cut-off suggested by Modjaz and collaborators, we estimate an upper limit on the stellar mass of a galaxy that can efficiently produce a GRB as a function of redshift. By employing consistent abundance indicators, we find that sub-solar metallicity cut-offs effectively limit GRBs to low stellar mass spirals and dwarf galaxies at low redshift. At higher redshifts, as the average metallicity of galaxies in the Universe falls, the mass range of galaxies capable of hosting a GRB broadens, with an upper bound approaching the mass of even the largest spiral galaxies. We compare these predicted limits to the growing number of published GRB host masses and find that extremely low metallicity cut-offs of 0.1 to 0.5 Z{sub {circle_dot}} are effectively ruled out by a large number of intermediate mass galaxies at low redshift. A mass function that includes a smooth decrease in the efficiency of producing GRBs in galaxies of metallicity above 12+log(O/H){sub KK04} = 8.7 can, however, accommodate a majority of the measured host galaxy masses. We find that at z {approx} 1, the peak in the observed GRB host mass distribution is inconsistent with the expected peak in the mass of galaxies harboring most of the star formation. This suggests that GRBs are metallicity biased tracers of star formation at low and intermediate redshifts, although our model predicts that this bias should disappear at higher redshifts due to the evolving metallicity content of the universe.

Kocevski, Daniel; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; West, Andrew A.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /MIT, MKI; Modjaz, Maryam; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept.

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

346

Hydrologic Extremes in a changing climate: how much information can regional climate models provide?  

SciTech Connect

We proposed to identify a set of about 10 urban areas across the western U.S., and hourly precipitation data within each of these areas, which were extracted from the NCDC TD 3240. We also proposed to analyze the annual maximum series of precipitation extremes simulated for NARCCAP (using Reanalysis boundary forcing) for the grid cells close to station data, and to compare the distributions of annual maximum precipitation for accumulation intervals ranging from one to 28 hours. Recognizing that there may inevitably be differences between the station data and RCM grid cell values, we proposed to examine the scale dependence in the distributions of extremes.

Lettenmaier, Dennis P.

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

347

A Parameterization of Heterogeneous Land Surfaces for Atmospheric Numerical Models and Its Impact on Regional Meteorology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural land surfaces are usually heterogeneous over the resolvable scales considered in atmospheric numerical models. Therefore, model surface parameterizations that assume surface homogeneity may fail to represent the surface forcing ...

R. Avissar; R. A. Pielke

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

A hierarchical compromise model for the joint optimization of recovery operations and distribution of emergency goods in Humanitarian Logistics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The distribution of emergency goods to a population affected by a disaster is one of the most fundamental operations in Humanitarian Logistics. In the case of a particularly disruptive event, parts of the distribution infrastructure (e.g., bridges, roads) can be damaged. This damage would make it impossible and/or unsafe for the vehicles to reach all the centers of demand (e.g., towns and villages). In this paper, we propose and solve the problem of planning for recovery of damaged elements of the distribution network, so that the consequent distribution planning would benefit the most. We apply the model, called RecHADS, to a case study based on the 2010 Haiti earthquake. We also show empirically the importance of coordinating recovery and distribution operations optimization.

F. Liberatore; M.T. Ortuño; G. Tirado; B. Vitoriano; M.P. Scaparra

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Region-based quantitative and hierarchical attribute reduction in the two-category decision theoretic rough set model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Quantitative attribute reduction exhibits applicability but complexity when compared to qualitative reduction. According to the two-category decision theoretic rough set model, this paper mainly investigates quantitative reducts and their hierarchies (with qualitative reducts) from a regional perspective. (1) An improved type of classification regions is proposed, and its preservation reduct (CRP-Reduct) is studied. (2) Reduction targets and preservation properties of set regions are analyzed, and the set-region preservation reduct (SRP-Reduct) is studied. (3) Separability of set regions and rule consistency is verified, and the quantitative and qualitative double-preservation reduct (DP-Reduct) is established. (4) Hierarchies of CRP-Reduct, SRP-Reduct, and DP-Reduct are explored with two qualitative reducts: the Pawlak-Reduct and knowledge-preservation reduct (KP-Reduct). (5) Finally, verification experiments are provided. CRP-Reduct, SRP-Reduct, and DP-Reduct expand layer by layer Pawlak-Reduct and exhibit quantitative applicability, and the experimental results indicate their effectiveness and hierarchies regarding Pawlak-Reduct and KP-Reduct.

Xianyong Zhang; Duoqian Miao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Transport pathways and signatures of mixing in the extratropical tropopause region derived from Lagrangian model simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,2 I. Pollack,2,3 A. Weinheimer,2 J. Wei,4,5 E. L. Atlas,6 and K. P. Bowman7 Received 6 August 2010 (STE) in the extratropical tropopause region plays an important role in trace gas composition, will be analyzed using tracers of air mass origin in Lagrangian simulations. [3] In situ measurements of trace

Pan, Laura

351

4.6 INVESTIGATION OF MIDDLE EASTERN CLIMATE USING A REGIONAL CLIMATE MODEL Jason Evans*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Caspian Seas in the north, the Mediterranean in the West and the Red Sea and Persian Gulf in the south the Persian Gulf). South of these ranges is a large semi-arid to arid region with relatively little relief

Evans, Jason

352

Results of the Regional Earthquake Likelihood Models (RELM) test of earthquake forecasts in California  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...given in Table 1, as well as background earthquakes...in the test region as well as forecasts that excluded...about 50 km south of the Mexico–United States border...this is the Cerra Prieto geothermal area...earthquake in northern Mexico. This earthquake occurred...

Ya-Ting Lee; Donald L. Turcotte; James R. Holliday; Michael K. Sachs; John B. Rundle; Chien-Chih Chen; Kristy F. Tiampo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

A Habitat-based Wind-Wildlife Collision Model with Application to the Upper Great Plains Region  

SciTech Connect

Most previous studies on collision impacts at wind facilities have taken place at the site-specific level and have only examined small-scale influences on mortality. In this study, we examine landscape-level influences using a hierarchical spatial model combined with existing datasets and life history knowledge for: Horned Lark, Red-eyed Vireo, Mallard, American Avocet, Golden Eagle, Whooping Crane, red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat. These species were modeled in the central United States within Bird Conservation Regions 11, 17, 18, and 19. For the bird species, we modeled bird abundance from existing datasets as a function of habitat variables known to be preferred by each species to develop a relative abundance prediction for each species. For bats, there are no existing abundance datasets so we identified preferred habitat in the landscape for each species and assumed that greater amounts of preferred habitat would equate to greater abundance of bats. The abundance predictions for bird and bats were modeled with additional exposure factors known to influence collisions such as visibility, wind, temperature, precipitation, topography, and behavior to form a final mapped output of predicted collision risk within the study region. We reviewed published mortality studies from wind farms in our study region and collected data on reported mortality of our focal species to compare to our modeled predictions. We performed a sensitivity analysis evaluating model performance of 6 different scenarios where habitat and exposure factors were weighted differently. We compared the model performance in each scenario by evaluating observed data vs. our model predictions using spearmans rank correlations. Horned Lark collision risk was predicted to be highest in the northwestern and west-central portions of the study region with lower risk predicted elsewhere. Red-eyed Vireo collision risk was predicted to be the highest in the eastern portions of the study region and in the forested areas of the western portion; the lowest risk was predicted in the treeless portions of the northwest portion of the study area. Mallard collision risk was predicted to be highest in the eastern central portion of the prairie potholes and in Iowa which has a high density of pothole wetlands; lower risk was predicted in the more arid portions of the study area. Predicted collision risk for American Avocet was similar to Mallard and was highest in the prairie pothole region and lower elsewhere. Golden Eagle collision risk was predicted to be highest in the mountainous areas of the western portion of the study area and lowest in the eastern portion of the prairie potholes. Whooping Crane predicted collision risk was highest within the migration corridor that the birds follow through in the central portion of the study region; predicted collision risk was much lower elsewhere. Red bat collision risk was highly driven by large tracts of forest and river corridors which made up most of the areas of higher collision risk. Silver-haired bat and hoary bat predicted collision risk were nearly identical and driven largely by forest and river corridors as well as locations with warmer temperatures, and lower average wind speeds. Horned Lark collisions were mostly influenced by abundance and predictions showed a moderate correlation between observed and predicted mortality (r = 0.55). Red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat predictions were much higher and shown a strong correlations with observed mortality with correlations of 0.85, 0.90, and 0.91 respectively. Red bat collisions were influenced primarily by habitat, while hoary bat and silver-haired bat collisions were influenced mainly by exposure variables. Stronger correlations between observed and predicted collision for bats than for Horned Larks can likely be attributed to stronger habitat associations and greater influences of weather on behavior for bats. Although the collision predictions cannot be compared among species, our model outputs provide a convenient and easy landscape-level tool to quick

Forcey, Greg, M.

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

354

Transforming the representation of the boundary layer and low clouds for high-resolution regional climate modeling: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds in subtropical oceanic regions (e.g., Southeast Pacific) cover thousands of square kilometers and play a key role in regulating global climate (e.g., Klein and Hartmann, 1993). Numerical modeling is an essential tool to study these clouds in regional and global systems, but the current generation of climate and weather models has difficulties in representing them in a realistic way (e.g., Siebesma et al., 2004; Stevens et al., 2007; Teixeira et al., 2011). While numerical models resolve the large-scale flow, subgrid-scale parameterizations are needed to estimate small-scale properties (e.g. boundary layer turbulence and convection, clouds, radiation), which have significant influence on the resolved scale due to the complex nonlinear nature of the atmosphere. To represent the contribution of these fine-scale processes to the resolved scale, climate models use various parameterizations, which are the main pieces in the model that contribute to the low clouds dynamics and therefore are the major sources of errors or approximations in their representation. In this project, we aim to 1) improve our understanding of the physical processes in thermal circulation and cloud formation, 2) examine the performance and sensitivity of various parameterizations in the regional weather model (Weather Research and Forecasting model; WRF), and 3) develop, implement, and evaluate the advanced boundary layer parameterization in the regional model to better represent stratocumulus, shallow cumulus, and their transition. Thus, this project includes three major corresponding studies. We find that the mean diurnal cycle is sensitive to model domain in ways that reveal the existence of different contributions originating from the Southeast Pacific land-masses. The experiments suggest that diurnal variations in circulations and thermal structures over this region are influenced by convection over the Peruvian sector of the Andes cordillera, while the mostly dry mountain-breeze circulations force an additional component that results in semi-diurnal variations near the coast. A series of numerical tests, however, reveal sensitivity of the simulations to the choice of vertical grid, limiting the possibility of solid quantitative statements on the amplitudes and phases of the diurnal and semidiurnal components across the domain. According to our experiments, the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN) boundary layer scheme and the WSM6 microphysics scheme is the combination of schemes that performs best. For that combination, mean cloud cover, liquid water path, and cloud depth are fairly wellsimulated, while mean cloud top height remains too low in comparison to observations. Both microphysics and boundary layer schemes contribute to the spread in liquid water path and cloud depth, although the microphysics contribution is slightly more prominent. Boundary layer schemes are the primary contributors to cloud top height, degree of adiabaticity, and cloud cover. Cloud top height is closely related to surface fluxes and boundary layer structure. Thus, our study infers that an appropriate tuning of cloud top height would likely improve the low-cloud representation in the model. Finally, we show that entrainment governs the degree of adiabaticity, while boundary layer decoupling is a control on cloud cover. In the intercomparison study using WRF single-column model experiments, most parameterizations show a poor agreement of the vertical boundary layer structure when compared with large-eddy simulation models. We also implement a new Total-Energy/Mass- Flux boundary layer scheme into the WRF model and evaluate its ability to simulate both stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds. Result comparisons against large-eddy simulation show that this advanced parameterization based on the new Eddy-Diffusivity/Mass-Flux approach provides a better performance than other boundary layer parameterizations.

Huang, Hsin-Yuan; Hall, Alex

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

355

Regional climate model data used within the SWURVE project 1:projected changes in seasonal patterns and estimation of PET Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11(3), 10691083, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional climate model data used within the SWURVE project 1:projected changes in seasonal patterns) project, assessing the risk posed by future climatic change to various hydrological and hydraulic systems/1069/2007 © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Regional climate model data used

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

356

Minimizing Energy Consumption in a Water Distribution System: A Systems Modeling Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a water distribution system from groundwater supply, the bulk of energy consumption is expended at pump stations. These pumps pressurize the water and transport it from the aquifer to the distribution system and to elevated storage tanks. Each...

Johnston, John

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

357

Modeling the resuspension of radionuclides in Ukranian regions impacted by Chernobyl fallout  

SciTech Connect

Following the 1986 Chernobyl event, large amounts of radioactive materials were deposited in nearby areas. Concentrations of various radionuclides were measured in air and surface soil. To study the resuspension of radioactive particulate, three different exposure situations were developed on the basis of the collected data under the auspices of the international BIOMOVS II (BIOspheric MOdel Validation Study) project. Modelers were asked to predict seasonal air concentrations and resuspension factors at several locations at different distances from Chernobyl for six successive years following the accident. Measurements of radionuclide deposition on topsoil were provided for each site along with information on soil, vegetation, land use, surface roughness, meteorology, and climate. In this paper, the three exposure situations are described, along with the initial data set provided to the modelers; two modeling approaches used to make the endpoint predictions are also presented. After the model predictions were submitted, the measured air concentrations and resuspension factors were released to the modelers. Generally, the predictions were well within an order of magnitude of the measured values. Time-dependent trends in predictions and measurements were in good agreement with one of the models, which (a) explicitly accounted for loss processes in soil and (b) used calibration to improve its predictive capabilities. Reasons for variations between predictions and measurements, suggestions for the improvement of models, and conclusions from the model validation study are presented. 12 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

Nair, S.K.; Thiessen, K.M.; Hoffman, F.O. [SENES Oak Ridge Inc., TN (United States)] [and others

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

The complementary relationship in estimation of regional evapotranspiration: An enhanced Advection-Aridity model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collins, Colorado Abstract. Long-term monthly evapotranspiration estimates from Brutsaert and Stricker and Stricker's [1979] Advection- Aridity (AA) model, exhibit two very different approaches to parameterizing

Ramírez, Jorge A.

359

Hadron Production Model Developments and Benchmarking in the 0.7 - 12 GeV Energy Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Driven by the needs of the intensity frontier projects with their Megawatt beams, e.g., ESS, FAIR and Project X, and their experiments, the event generators of the MARS15 code have been recently improved. After thorough analysis and benchmarking against data, including the newest ones by the HARP collaboration, both the exclusive and inclusive particle production models were further developed in the crucial for the above projects - but difficult from a theoretical standpoint - projectile energy region of 0.7 to 12 GeV. At these energies, modelling of prompt particle production in nucleon-nucleon and pion-nucleon inelastic reactions is now based on a combination of phase-space and isobar models. Other reactions are still modeled in the framework of the Quark-Gluon String Model. Pion, kaon and strange particle production and propagation in nuclear media are improved. For the alternative inclusive mode, experimental data on large-angle (> 20 degrees) pion production in hadron-nucleus interactions are parameterized in a broad energy range using a two-source model. It is mixed-and-matched with the native MARS model that successfully describes low-angle pion production data. Predictions of both new models are - in most cases - in a good agreement with experimental data obtained at CERN, JINR, LANL, BNL and KEK.

N. V. Mokhov; K. K. Gudima; S. I. Striganov

2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

360

Dipole strength distributions in the stable Ba isotopes {sup 134-138}Ba: A study in the mass region of a nuclear shape transition  

SciTech Connect

The low-lying dipole strength distributions in the odd-mass isotopes {sup 135,137}Ba were studied in nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments (NRF) performed at the Stuttgart Dynamitron facility using bremsstrahlung beams with end point energies of 4.1, 3.1, and 2.5 MeV. Numerous excited states, most of them unknown so far, were observed in the excitation energy range up to 4 MeV. Detailed spectroscopic information has been obtained on excitation energies, decay widths, decay branching ratios, and transition probabilities. The results for {sup 137}Ba are compared with calculations in the framework of the Quasiparticle-Phonon Model. The new data for {sup 135,137}Ba complete the systematics of low-lying dipole excitations as observed for the even Ba isotopes {sup 134,136,138}Ba in previous NRF experiments in Stuttgart. The complete systematics within the Ba isotopic chain, exhibiting a nuclear shape transition, is discussed with respect to E1 two-phonon excitations, M1 scissors mode excitations, and in regard to the new critical point symmetries.

Scheck, M.; Garrel, H. von; Belic, D.; Kneissl, U.; Kohstall, C.; Nord, A.; Pitz, H.H.; Stedile, F. [Institut fuer Strahlenphysik, Universitaet Stuttgart, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Tsoneva, N. [Institut fuer Theor. Physik, Universitaet Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Brentano, P. von; Fransen, C.; Gade, A.; Jolie, J.; Linnemann, A.; Pietralla, N.; Werner, V. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, D-50937 Cologne (Germany); Stoyanov, C. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria)

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distribution model regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII): A Two-Continent Effort for the Evaluation of Regional Air Quality Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the endorsement and support from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, European Commission, and Environment Canada, a project entitled Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) was.....

S. T. Rao; Rohit Mathur; Christian Hogrefe…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

A survey on control schemes for distributed solar collector fields. Part I: Modeling and basic control approaches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article presents a survey of the different automatic control techniques that have been applied to control the outlet temperature of solar plants with distributed collectors during the last 25 years. Different aspects of the control problem involved in this kind of plants are treated, from modeling and simulation approaches to the different basic control schemes developed and successfully applied in real solar plants. A classification of the modeling and control approaches is used to explain the main features of each strategy.

E.F. Camacho; F.R. Rubio; M. Berenguel; L. Valenzuela

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Observed Scaling in Clouds and Precipitation and Scale Incognizance in Regional to Global Atmospheric Models  

SciTech Connect

We use observations of robust scaling behavior in clouds and precipitation to derive constraints on how partitioning of precipitation should change with model resolution. Our analysis indicates that 90-99% of stratiform precipitation should occur in clouds that are resolvable by contemporary climate models (e.g., with 200 km or finer grid spacing). Furthermore, this resolved fraction of stratiform precipitation should increase sharply with resolution, such that effectively all stratiform precipitation should be resolvable above scales of ~50 km. We show that the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model also exhibit the robust cloud and precipitation scaling behavior that is present in observations, yet the resolved fraction of stratiform precipitation actually decreases with increasing model resolution. A suite of experiments with multiple dynamical cores provides strong evidence that this `scale-incognizant' behavior originates in one of the CAM4 parameterizations. An additional set of sensitivity experiments rules out both convection parameterizations, and by a process of elimination these results implicate the stratiform cloud and precipitation parameterization. Tests with the CAM5 physics package show improvements in the resolution-dependence of resolved cloud fraction and resolved stratiform precipitation fraction.

O'Brien, Travis A.; Li, Fuyu; Collins, William D.; Rauscher, Sara; Ringler, Todd; Taylor, Mark; Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Generalisation of Levine's prediction for the distribution of freezing temperatures of droplets: A general singular model for ice nucleation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Models without an explicit time dependence, called singular models, are widely used for fitting the distribution of temperatures at which water droplets freeze. In 1950 Levine developed the original singular model. His key assumption was that each droplet contained many nucleation sites, and that freezing occurred due to the nucleation site with the highest freezing temperature. The fact that freezing occurs due to the maximum value out of large number of nucleation temperatures, means that we can apply the results of what is called extreme-value statistics. This is the statistics of the extreme, i.e., maximum or minimum, value of a large number of random variables. Here we use the results of extreme-value statistics to show that we can generalise Levine's model to produce the most general singular model possible. We show that when a singular model is a good approximation, the distribution of freezing temperatures should always be given by what is called the generalised extreme-value distribution. In addition...

Sear, Richard P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

The relationship of the Yucca Mountain repository block to the regional ground-water system: A geochemical model  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada, is being studied by the Department of Energy and the State of Nevada as the site of a high-level nuclear waste repository. Geochemical and isotopic modeling were used in this study to define the relationship of the volcanic tuff aquifers and aquitards to the underlying regional carbonate ground-water system. The chemical evolution of a ground water as it passes through a hypothetical tuffaceous aquifer was developed using computer models PHREEQE, WATEQDR and BALANCE. The tuffaceous system was divided into five parts, with specific mineralogies, reaction steps and temperatures. The initial solution was an analysis of a soil water from Rainier Mesa. The ending solution in each part became the initial solution in the next part. Minerals consisted of zeolites, smectites, authigenic feldspars and quartz polymorphs from described diagentic mineral zones. Reaction steps were ion exchange with zeolites. The solution from the final zone, Part V, was chosen as most representative, in terms of pH, element molalities and mineral solubilities, of tuffaceous water. This hypothetical volcanic water from Part V was mixed with water from the regional carbonate aquifer, and the results compared to analyses of Yucca Mountain wells. Mixing and modeling attempts were conducted on wells in which studies indicated upward flow.

Matuska, N.A.; Hess, J.W. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Water Resources Center

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Borders as membranes :metaphors and models for improved policy in border regions.  

SciTech Connect

Political borders are controversial and contested spaces. In an attempt to better understand movement along and through political borders, this project applied the metaphor of a membrane to look at how people, ideas, and things ''move'' through a border. More specifically, the research team employed this metaphor in a system dynamics framework to construct a computer model to assess legal and illegal migration on the US-Mexico border. Employing a metaphor can be helpful, as it was in this project, to gain different perspectives on a complex system. In addition to the metaphor, the multidisciplinary team utilized an array of methods to gather data including traditional literature searches, an experts workshop, a focus group, interviews, and culling expertise from the individuals on the research team. Results from the qualitative efforts revealed strong social as well as economic drivers that motivate individuals to cross the border legally. Based on the information gathered, the team concluded that legal migration dynamics were of a scope we did not want to consider hence, available demographic models sufficiently capture migration at the local level. Results from both the quantitative and qualitative data searches were used to modify a 1977 border model to demonstrate the dynamic nature of illegal migration. Model runs reveal that current US-policies based on neo-classic economic theory have proven ineffective in curbing illegal migration, and that proposed enforcement policies are also likely to be ineffective. We suggest, based on model results, that improvement in economic conditions within Mexico may have the biggest impact on illegal migration to the U.S. The modeling also supports the views expressed in the current literature suggesting that demographic and economic changes within Mexico are likely to slow illegal migration by 2060 with no special interventions made by either government.

Malczynski, Leonard A.; Passell, Howard David; Forster, Craig B. (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT); Cockerill, Kristan (Cockerill Consulting, Boone, NC)

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Global distribution and climate forcing of marine organic aerosol: 1. Model improvements and evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Marine organic aerosol emissions have been implemented and evaluated within the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's 7-mode Modal Aerosol Module (MAM-7). Emissions of marine primary organic aerosols (POA), phytoplanktonproduced isoprene- and monoterpenes-derived secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and methane sulfonate (MS{sup -}) are shown to affect surface concentrations of organic aerosols in remote marine regions. Global emissions of submicron marine POA is estimated to be 7.9 and 9.4 Tg yr{sup -1}, for the Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) emission parameterizations, respectively. Marine sources of SOA and particulate MS{sup -} (containing both sulfur and carbon atoms) contribute an additional 0.2 and 5.1 Tg yr{sup -1}, respectively. Widespread areas over productive waters of the Northern Atlantic, Northern Pacific, and the Southern Ocean show marine-source submicron organic aerosol surface concentrations of 100 ngm{sup -3}, with values up to 400 ngm{sup -3} over biologically productive areas. Comparison of long-term surface observations of water insoluble organic matter (WIOM) with POA concentrations from the two emission parameterizations shows that despite revealed discrepancies (often more than a factor of 2), both Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) formulations are able to capture the magnitude of marine organic aerosol concentrations, with the Gantt et al. (2011) parameterization attaining better seasonality. Model simulations show that the mixing state of the marine POA can impact the surface number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The largest increases (up to 20 %) in CCN (at a supersaturation (S) of 0.2 %) number concentration are obtained over biologically productive ocean waters when marine organic aerosol is assumed to be externally mixed with sea-salt. Assuming marine organics are internally-mixed with sea-salt provides diverse results with increases and decreases in the concentration of CCN over different parts of the ocean. The sign of the CCN change due to the addition of marine organics to seasalt aerosol is determined by the relative significance of the increase in mean modal diameter due to addition of mass, and the decrease in particle hygroscopicity due to compositional changes in marine aerosol. Based on emerging evidence for increased CCN concentration over biologically active surface ocean areas/periods, our study suggests that treatment of sea spray in global climate models (GCMs) as an internal mixture of marine organic aerosols and sea-salt will likely lead to an underestimation in CCN number concentration.

Meskhidze, N.; Xu, J.; Gantt, Brett; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

368

Model calculations of radiative capture of nucleons in MeV region  

SciTech Connect

We address calculations of the neutron and the proton radiative capture at incident energies up to 20 MeV on medium and heavy nuclei. The main formalism used is the pre-equilibrium (exciton) model of {gamma} emission. A link to the Consistent Direct-Semidirect model is noticed as well. The resulting pre-equilibrium (plus equilibrium) calculations of the radiative capture excitation functions are compared to experimental data and also some cross section trends important for possible production of therapeutic radioisotopes are extracted.

Betak, E. [Institute of Physics, Slovak Acad. Sciences, 84511 Bratislava (Slovakia); Faculty of Philosophy and Sciences, Silesian Univ., 74601 Opava (Czech Republic)

2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

369

Quantification and characterization of regional seismic signals from cast blasting in mines: a linear elastic model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......detonalions that sometimes accompany standard blasting operations. The models...past signal character. We also plan to study the effects of imperfect...pulse with, xf.A thorough review by Michael Hedlin is also appreciated...explosions from simultaneous mining blasts, Bull. seism. Soc......

Sridhar Anandakrishnan; Steven R. Taylor; Brian W. Stump

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Modeling the Dynamics of Desakota Regions: Global - Local Nexus in the Taipei Metropolitan Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

develops a GIS-based CA framework based on the desakota model to not only simulate the unique urbanization processes in Asia but also integrate the influence of globalization into Asian urban dynamics. Three approaches are developed in the CA simulation: 1...

Wu, Bing-Sheng

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

371

Regions of nonexistence of invariant tori for spin-orbit models Alessandra Cellettia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

character of the motion. © 2007 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.2811880 Nearly integrable of the evolved satellites of the solar system are seen to move in a synchronous resonance; the only exception computational effort. II. THE SPIN-ORBIT MODEL Let S be a triaxial satellite orbiting around a central planet

MacKay, Robert S.

372

Modeling Word Burstiness Using the Dirichlet Distribution Rasmus E. Madsen rem@imm.dtu.dk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

search for a model that fits documents well within an exponential family of models, while Jansche (2003

373

Coupling Multi-Component Models with MPH on Distributed Memory Computer Architectures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Among these, NASA’s Earth System Models Framework (ESMF) [to facilitate coupling earth system model components and to

He, Yun; Ding, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Survivability models for the assessment of smart grid distribution automation network designs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Smart grids are fostering a paradigm shift in the realm of power distribution systems. Whereas traditionally different components of the power distribution system have been provided and analyzed by different teams through different lenses, smart grids ... Keywords: fault tolerance, smart grid, survivability, transient analysis

Alberto Avritzer; Sindhu Suresh; Daniel Sadoc Menasché; Rosa Maria Meri Leão; Edmundo de Souza e Silva; Morganna Carmem Diniz; Kishor Trivedi; Lucia Happe; Anne Koziolek

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

From Balanced Initial Occupant Distribution to Balanced Exit Usage in a Simulation Model of Pedestrian Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is tested in this contribution if and to which extend a method of a pedestrian simulation tool that attempts to make pedestrians walk into the direction of estimated earliest arrival can help to automatically distribute pedestrians - who are initially distributed arbitrarily in the scenario - equally on the various exits of the scenario.

Kretz, Tobias

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Model-Based Development of Distributed Embedded Systems by the Example of the Scicos/SynDEx Framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The embedded systems engineering industry faces increasing demands for more functionality, rapidly evolving components, and shrinking schedules. Abilities to quickly adapt to changes, develop products with safe design, minimize project costs, and deliver timely are needed. Model-based development (MBD) follows a separation of concerns by abstracting systems with an appropriate intensity. MBD promises higher comprehension by modeling on several abstraction-levels, formal verification, and automated code generation. This thesis demonstrates MBD with the Scicos/SynDEx framework on a distributed embedded system. Scicos is a modeling and simulation environment for hybrid systems. SynDEx is a rapid prototyping integrated development environment for distributed systems. Performed examples implement well-known control algorithms on a target system containing several networked microcontrollers, sensors, and actuators. The addressed research question tackles the feasibility of MBD for medium-sized embedded systems. In ...

Fischer, Bernhard

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

The artificial neural network model to estimate the photovoltaic modul efficiency for all regions of the Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Artificial neural network (ANN) is a useful tool that using estimates behavior of the most of engineering applications. In the present study, ANN model has been used to estimate the temperature, efficiency and power of the Photovoltaic module according to outlet air temperature and solar radiation. An experimental system consisted photovoltaic module, heating and cooling sub systems, proportional integral derivative (PID) control unit was designed and built. Tests were realized at the outdoors for the constant ambient air temperatures of photovoltaic module. To preserve ambient air temperature at the determined constant values as 10, 20, 30 and 40 °C, cooling and heating subsystems which connected PID control unit were used in the test apparatus. Ambient air temperature, solar radiation, back surface of the photovoltaic module temperature was measured in the experiments. Obtained data were used to estimate the photovoltaic module temperature, efficiency and power with using ANN approach for all 7 region of the Turkey. The study dealing with this paper not only will beneficial for the limited region but also in all region of Turkey which will be thought established of photovoltaic panels by the manufacturer, researchers and etc.

?lhan Ceylan; Engin Gedik; Okan Erkaymaz; Ali Etem Gürel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The sine-Gordon model and the small {kappa}{sup +} region of light- cone perturbation theory  

SciTech Connect

The non-perturbative ultraviolet divergence of the sine-Gordon model is used to study the k{sup +} = 0 region of light-cone perturbation theory. The light-cone vacuum is shown to be unstable at the non- perturbative {beta}{sup 2} = 8{pi} critical point by a light-cone version of Coleman`s variational method. Vacuum bubbles, which are k{sup +} = 0 diagram in light-cone field theory and are individually finite and non-vanishing for all {beta}, conspire to generate ultraviolet divergences of the light-cone energy density. The k{sup +} = 0 region of momentum also contributed to connected Green`s functions: the connected two point function will not diverge, as it should, at the critical point unless diagrams which contribute only at k {sup +} = 0 are properly included. This analysis shows in a simple way how the k {sup +} = 0 region cannot be ignored even for connected diagrams. This phenomenon is expected to occur in higher dimensional gauge theories starting at two loop order in light-cone perturbation theory.

Griffin, P.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Discrete Pearson distributions  

SciTech Connect

These distributions are generated by a first order recursive scheme which equates the ratio of successive probabilities to the ratio of two corresponding quadratics. The use of a linearized form of this model will produce equations in the unknowns matched by an appropriate set of moments (assumed to exist). Given the moments we may find valid solutions. These are two cases; (1) distributions defined on the non-negative integers (finite or infinite) and (2) distributions defined on negative integers as well. For (1), given the first four moments, it is possible to set this up as equations of finite or infinite degree in the probability of a zero occurrence, the sth component being a product of s ratios of linear forms in this probability in general. For (2) the equation for the zero probability is purely linear but may involve slowly converging series; here a particular case is the discrete normal. Regions of validity are being studied. 11 refs.

Bowman, K.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Shenton, L.R. [Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States); Kastenbaum, M.A. [Kastenbaum (M.A.), Basye, VA (United States)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Investigation of Aerosol Indirect Effects using a Cumulus Microphysics Parameterization in a Regional Climate Model  

SciTech Connect

A new Zhang and McFarlane (ZM) cumulus scheme includes a two-moment cloud microphysics parameterization for convective clouds. This allows aerosol effects to be investigated more comprehensively by linking aerosols with microphysical processes in both stratiform clouds that are explicitly resolved and convective clouds that are parameterized in climate models. This new scheme is implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, which is coupled with the physics and aerosol packages from the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5). A test case of July 2008 during the East Asian summer monsoon is selected to evaluate the performance of the new ZM scheme and to investigate aerosol effects on monsoon precipitation. The precipitation and radiative fluxes simulated by the new ZM scheme show a better agreement with observations compared to simulations with the original ZM scheme that does not include convective cloud microphysics and aerosol convective cloud interactions. Detailed analysis suggests that an increase in detrained cloud water and ice mass by the new ZM scheme is responsible for this improvement. To investigate precipitation response to increased anthropogenic aerosols, a sensitivity experiment is performed that mimics a clean environment by reducing the primary aerosols and anthropogenic emissions to 30% of that used in the control simulation of a polluted environment. The simulated surface precipitation is reduced by 9.8% from clean to polluted environment and the reduction is less significant when microphysics processes are excluded from the cumulus clouds. Ensemble experiments with ten members under each condition (i.e., clean and polluted) indicate similar response of the monsoon precipitation to increasing aerosols.

Lim, Kyo-Sun; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ma, Po-Lun; Singh, Balwinder; Zhao, Chun; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Guang; Song, Xiaoliang

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distribution model regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Network Reconfiguration at the Distribution System with Distributed Generators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article proposes a novel model for distribution network reconfiguration to meet current distribution system operating demands. In the model the connection of distributed generators to distribution system is ...

Gao Xiaozhi; Li Linchuan; Xue Hailong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

A solar active region loop compared with a 2D MHD model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyzed a coronal loop observed with the Normal Incidence Spectrometer (NIS), which is part of the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The measured Doppler shifts and proper motions along the selected loop strongly indicate unidirectional flows. Analysing the Emission Measure Curves of the observed spectral lines, we estimated that the temperature along the loop was about 380000 K. We adapted a solution of the ideal MHD steady equations to our set of measurements. The derived energy balance along the loop, as well as the advantages/disadvantages of this MHD model for understanding the characteristics of solar coronal loops are discussed.

Gontikakis, C; Dara, H C; Tsinganos, K

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

A solar active region loop compared with a 2D MHD model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyzed a coronal loop observed with the Normal Incidence Spectrometer (NIS), which is part of the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The measured Doppler shifts and proper motions along the selected loop strongly indicate unidirectional flows. Analysing the Emission Measure Curves of the observed spectral lines, we estimated that the temperature along the loop was about 380000 K. We adapted a solution of the ideal MHD steady equations to our set of measurements. The derived energy balance along the loop, as well as the advantages/disadvantages of this MHD model for understanding the characteristics of solar coronal loops are discussed.

C. Gontikakis; G. J. D. Petrie; H. C. Dara; K. Tsinganos

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

384

Spatial distribution of canopy and subcanopy species along a sloping topography in a cool-temperate conifer-hardwood forest in the snowy region of Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The spatial distributions of canopy and subcanopy species (?50?cm stem length) were investigated within a plot extending from the top of a ridge to the valley bottom in a cool-temperate old-growth mixed forest...

Kimiko Hirayama; Michinori Sakimoto

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Distribution Patterns of Metals Contamination in Sediments Based on Type Regional Development on the Intertidal Coastal Zones of the Persian Gulf, Iran  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study was performed to determine the variation of metals concentrations (Pb, Cd, Zn, and Cu) in surface sediments based on type region development from ten sites on the intertidal coastal zone of the Persian

Ali Kazemi; Alireza Riyahi Bakhtiari…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

An integrated assessment modeling framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change: the MIT IGSM-CAM (version 1.0)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a computationally efficient framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change. In this framework, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model ...

Monier, Erwan

387

Distributed quantitative precipitation forecasts combining information from radar and numerical weather prediction model outputs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applications of distributed Quantitative Precipitation Forecasts (QPF) range from flood forecasting to transportation. Obtaining QPF is acknowledged to be one of the most challenging areas in hydrology and meteorology. ...

Ganguly, Auroop Ratan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Model-free, regularized, fast, and robust analytical orientation distribution function estimation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High Angular Resolution Imaging (HARDI) can better explore the complex micro-structure of white matter compared to Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI). Orientation Distribution Function (ODF) in HARDI is used to describe the probability of the fiber direction. ...

Jian Cheng; Aurobrata Ghosh; Rachid Deriche; Tianzi Jiang

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Tritium transport in the NuMI decay pipe region - modeling and comparison with experimental data  

SciTech Connect

The NuMI (Neutrinos at Main Injector) beam facility at Fermilab is designed to produce an intense beam of muon neutrinos to be sent to the MINOS underground experiment in Soudan, Minnesota. Neutrinos are created by the decay of heavier particles. In the case of NuMI, the decaying particles are created by interaction of high-energy protons in a target, creating mostly positive pions. These particles can also interact with their environment, resulting in production of a variety of short-lived radionuclides and tritium. In the NuMI beam, neutrinos are produced by 120 GeV protons from the Fermilab Main Injector accelerator which are injected into the NuMI beam line using single turn extraction. The beam line has been designed for 400 kW beam power, roughly a factor of 2 above the initial (2005-06) running conditions. Extracted protons are bent downwards at a 57mr angle towards the Soudan Laboratory. The meson production target is a 94 cm segmented graphite rod, cooled by water in stainless tubes on the top and bottom of the target. The target is followed by two magnetic horns which are pulsed to 200 kA in synchronization with the passage of the beam, producing focusing of the secondary hadron beam and its daughter neutrinos. Downstream of the second horn the meson beam is transported for 675 m in an evacuated 2 m diameter beam (''decay'') pipe. Subsequently, the residual mesons and protons are absorbed in a water cooled aluminum/steel absorber immediately downstream of the decay pipe. Some 200 m of rock further downstream ranges out all of the residual muons. During beam operations, after installation of the chiller condensate system in December 2005, the concentration of tritiated water in the MINOS sump flow of 177 gpm was around 12 pCi/ml, for a total of 0.010 pCi/day. A simple model of tritium transport and deposition via humidity has been constructed to aid in understanding how tritium reaches the sump water. The model deals with tritium transported as HTO, water in which one hydrogen atom has been replaced with tritium. Based on concepts supported by the modeling, a dehumidification system was installed during May 2006 that reduced the tritium level in the sump by a factor of two. This note is primarily concerned with tritium that was produced in the NuMI target pile, carried by air flow into the target hall and down the decay pipe passageway (where most of it was deposited). The air is exhausted through the existing air vent shaft EAV2 (Figure 1).

Hylen, J.; Plunkett, R.; /Fermilab

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Two-dimensional model of the air flow and temperature distribution in a cavity-type heat receiver of a solar stirling engine  

SciTech Connect

A theoretical study on the air flow and temperature in the heat receiver, affected by free convection, of a Stirling Engine for a Dish/Stirling Engine Power System is presented. The standard {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model for the fluid flow has been used and the boundary conditions employed were obtained using a second level mathematical model of the Stirling Engine working cycle. Physical models for the distribution of the solar insolation from the Concentrator on the bottom and side walls of the cavity-type heat receiver have been taken into account. The numerical results show that most of the heat losses in the receiver are due to re-radiation from the cavity and conduction through the walls of the cavity. It is in the region of the boundary of the input window of the heat receiver where there is a sensible reduction in the temperature in the shell of the heat exchangers and this is due to the free convection of the air. Further, the numerical results show that convective heat losses increase with decreasing tilt angle.

Makhkamov, K.K.; Ingham, D.B.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Model for Sustainable Urban Design With Expanded Sections on Distributed Energy Resources, February 2004  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Document describing a model design for urban development and redevelopment that will reduce urban energy consumption

392

Comparison of MAGIC and Diatom paleolimnological model hindcasts of lakewater acidification in the Adirondack region of New York  

SciTech Connect

Thirty-three lakes that had been statistically selected as part of the US Environmental Protection Agency's Eastern Lake Survey and Direct Delayed Response Project (DDRP) were used to compare the MAGIC (watershed) and Diatom (paleolimnological) models. The study lakes represented a well-defined group of Adirondack lakes, each larger than 4 ha in area and having acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) <400 {mu}eq L{sup {minus}1}. The study first compared current and pre-industrial (before 1850) pH and ANC estimates from Diatom and MAGIC as they were calibrated in the preceding Paleocological Investigation of Recent Lake Acidification (PIRLA) and DDRP studies, respectively. Initially, the comparison of hindcasts of pre-industrial chemistry was confounded by seasonal and methodological differences in lake chemistry data used in calibration of the model. Although certain differences proved to be of little significance for comparison, MAGIC did predict significantly higher pre-industrial ANC and pH values than did Diatom, using calibrations in the preceding studies. Both models suggest acidification of low ANC Adirondack region lakes since preindustrial times, but differ primarily in that MAGIC inferred greater acidification and that acidification has occurred in all lakes in the comparison, whereas Diatom inferred that acidification has been restricted to low ANC lakes (

Sullivan, T.J.; Bernert, J.A.; Eliers, J.M. (E and S Environmental Chemistry, Corvallis, OR (USA)); Jenne, E.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Cosby, B.J. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (USA). School of Forestry and Environmental Studies); Charles, D.F.; Selle, A.R. (Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR (USA). Environmental Research Lab.)

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Wind and Load Forecast Error Model for Multiple Geographically Distributed Forecasts  

SciTech Connect

The impact of wind and load forecast errors on power grid operations is frequently evaluated by conducting multi-variant studies, where these errors are simulated repeatedly as random processes based on their known statistical characteristics. To generate these errors correctly, we need to reflect their distributions (which do not necessarily follow a known distribution law), standard deviations, auto- and cross-correlations. For instance, load and wind forecast errors can be closely correlated in different zones of the system. This paper introduces a new methodology for generating multiple cross-correlated random processes to simulate forecast error curves based on a transition probability matrix computed from an empirical error distribution function. The matrix will be used to generate new error time series with statistical features similar to observed errors. We present the derivation of the method and present some experimental results by generating new error forecasts together with their statistics.

Makarov, Yuri V.; Reyes Spindola, Jorge F.; Samaan, Nader A.; Diao, Ruisheng; Hafen, Ryan P.

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

394

Economic regulation of electricity distribution utilities under high penetration of distributed energy resources : applying an incentive compatible menu of contracts, reference network model and uncertainty mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ongoing changes in the use and management of electricity distribution systems - including the proliferation of distributed energy resources, smart grid technologies (i.e., advanced power electronics and information and ...

Jenkins, Jesse D. (Jesse David)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Validation of a Fast-Fluid-Dynamics Model for Predicting Distribution of Particles with Low Stokes Number  

SciTech Connect

To design a healthy indoor environment, it is important to study airborne particle distribution indoors. As an intermediate model between multizone models and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), a fast fluid dynamics (FFD) model can be used to provide temporal and spatial information of particle dispersion in real time. This study evaluated the accuracy of the FFD for predicting transportation of particles with low Stokes number in a duct and in a room with mixed convection. The evaluation was to compare the numerical results calculated by the FFD with the corresponding experimental data and the results obtained by the CFD. The comparison showed that the FFD could capture major pattern of particle dispersion, which is missed in models with well-mixed assumptions. Although the FFD was less accurate than the CFD partially due to its simplification in numeric schemes, it was 53 times faster than the CFD.

Zuo, Wangda; Chen, Qingyan

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Comment on “Modeling and prediction of natural gas fracking pad landscapes in the Marcellus Shale region, USA” by Qingming Meng  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In modeling and prediction of natural gas fracking pad landscapes in the Marcellus Shale region, USA, the author asserts that landscape and environmental characteristics are the driving factors behind the siting of natural gas pads in the southwestern area of the Marcellus Shale, Pennsylvania, USA. In the article, the author largely dismisses the importance of geology for site prediction. Although the study is useful for understanding landscape characteristics in a small area of the Marcellus Shale, his premise that “the key variables for natural gas fracking can be landscape and environmental variables rather than geological variables” is flawed and thus could lead to erroneous assumptions when creating land use plans. A more reasonable assumption is that the surface siting of natural gas wells is secondary to geologic considerations, as the current topography bears little influence on the geology.

Wendy A. Klein; Alex K. Manda

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Identification of Bacteria in Biofilm and Bulk Water Samples from a Nonchlorinated Model Drinking Water Distribution System: Detection of a Large Nitrite-Oxidizing Population Associated with Nitrospira spp.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

formation in a model drinking water distribution system. J.and activity in drinking water distribution networks underbacterial species from drinking water biofilms and proof of

Martiny, A. C; Albrechtsen, H.-J.; Arvin, E.; Molin, S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Hydraulic model analysis of water distribution system, Rockwell International, Rocky Flats, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Rockwell International requested an analysis of the existing plant site water supply distribution system at Rocky Flats, Colorado, to determine its adequacy. On September 26--29, 1988, Hughes Associates, Inc., Fire Protection Engineers, accompanied by Rocky Flats Fire Department engineers and suppression personnel, conducted water flow tests at the Rocky Flats plant site. Thirty-seven flows from various points throughout the plant site were taken on the existing domestic supply/fire main installation to assure comprehensive and thorough representation of the Rocky Flats water distribution system capability. The analysis was completed in four phases which are described, together with a summary of general conclusions and recommendations.

Perstein, J.; Castellano, J.A. [Hughes Associates, Inc., Wheaton, MD (United States)

1989-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

399

Power corrections in the decay rate and distributions in B{r_arrow}X{sub s}scr(l){sup +}scr(l){sup {minus}} in the standard model  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the leading power corrections to the decay rates and distributions in the decay B{r_arrow}X{sub s}scr(l){sup +}scr(l){sup {minus}} in the standard model (SM) using heavy quark expansion (HQE) in (1/m{sub b}) and a phenomenological model implementing the Fermi motion effects of the b quark bound in the B hadron. In the HQE method, we find that including the leading power corrections the decay width {Gamma}(B{r_arrow}X{sub s}scr(l){sup +}scr(l){sup {minus}}) decreases by about 4{percent} and the branching ratio B(B{r_arrow}X{sub s}scr(l){sup +}scr(l){sup {minus}}) by about 1.5{percent} from their (respective) parton model values. The dilepton invariant mass spectrum is found to be stable against power corrections over a good part of this spectrum. However, near the high-mass end point this distribution becomes negative with the current value of the nonperturbative parameter {lambda}{sub 2} (the {lambda}{sub 1}-dependent corrections are found to be innocuous), implying the breakdown of the HQE method in this region. Our results are at variance with the existing ones in the literature in both the decay rate and the invariant dilepton mass distribution calculated in the HQE approach. As an alternative, we implement the nonperturbative effects in the decay B{r_arrow}X{sub s}scr(l){sup +}scr(l){sup {minus}} using a phenomenologically motivated Gaussian Fermi motion model. We find small corrections to the branching ratio, but the nonperturbative effects are perceptible in both the dilepton mass distribution and the forward-backward asymmetry in the high dilepton mass region. (Abstract Truncated)

Ali, A.; Hiller, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchroton DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany)] [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchroton DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Handoko, L.T.; Morozumi, T. [Department of Physics, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi Hiroshima - 739 (Japan)] [Department of Physics, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi Hiroshima - 739 (Japan)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Precipitation Forecasting with Gamma Distribution Models for Gridded Precipitation Events in Eastern Oklahoma and Northwest Arkansas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An elegant and easy to implement probabilistic quantitative precipitation forecasting model that can be used to estimate the probability of exceedance (POE) is presented. The model was built using precipitation data collected across eastern ...

Steven A. Amburn; Andrew S.I.D. Lang; Michael A. Buonaiuto

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distribution model regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

In-situ prediction on sensor networks using distributed multiple linear regression models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within sensor networks for environmental monitoring, a class of problems exists that requires in-situ control and modeling. In this thesis, we provide a solution to these problems, enabling model-driven computation where ...

Basha, Elizabeth (Elizabeth Ann)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Distributed three-dimensional finite-difference modeling of wave propagation in acoustic media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, including earthquake and oil exploration seismology, laboratory ultrasonics, ocean acoustics, radar imaging, let us consider the requirements for a typical application in oil exploration geophysics: Perform, and show here benchmarks on two different distributed memory architectures, the IBM SP2 and a network

Scales, John

403

Homogenization of a Catalyst Layer Model for Periodically Distributed Pore Geometries in PEM Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Distributed Pore Geometries in PEM Fuel Cells Markus Schmuck 1 Peter Berg 2 Correspondence...particular, polymer electrolyte fuel cells might become future power sources...research, see [3]. The CL in PEM fuel cells is comprised of a complex multiphase......

Markus Schmuck; Peter Berg

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Modeling of dimmable High Power LED illumination distribution using ANFIS on the isolated area  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High power light emitting diodes (HP-LEDs) are more suitable for energy saving applications and have becoming replacing traditional fluorescent and incandescent bulbs for its energy efficient. Therefore, HP-LED lighting has been regarded in the next-generation ... Keywords: ANFIS, High Power LED, Illumination distribution

?smail Kiyak; Vedat Topuz; Bülent Oral

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

MODELING STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS THROUGH DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF 3D-MHD TURBULENCE  

SciTech Connect

Statistical properties of the Sun's photospheric turbulent magnetic field, especially those of the active regions (ARs), have been studied using the line-of-sight data from magnetograms taken by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and several other instruments. This includes structure functions and their exponents, flatness curves, and correlation functions. In these works, the dependence of structure function exponents ({zeta}{sub p}) of the order of the structure functions (p) was modeled using a non-intermittent K41 model. It is now well known that the ARs are highly turbulent and are associated with strong intermittent events. In this paper, we compare some of the observations from Abramenko et al. with the log-Poisson model used for modeling intermittent MHD turbulent flows. Next, we analyze the structure function data obtained from the direct numerical simulations (DNS) of homogeneous, incompressible 3D-MHD turbulence in three cases: sustained by forcing, freely decaying, and a flow initially driven and later allowed to decay (case 3). The respective DNS replicate the properties seen in the plots of {zeta}{sub p} against p of ARs. We also reproduce the trends and changes observed in intermittency in flatness and correlation functions of ARs. It is suggested from this analysis that an AR in the onset phase of a flare can be treated as a forced 3D-MHD turbulent system in its simplest form and that the flaring stage is representative of decaying 3D-MHD turbulence. It is also inferred that significant changes in intermittency from the initial onset phase of a flare to its final peak flaring phase are related to the time taken by the system to reach the initial onset phase.

Malapaka, Shiva Kumar; Mueller, Wolf-Christian [Max-Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate System Model  

SciTech Connect

Primary activities are reported in these areas: climate system component studies via one-way coupling experiments; development of the Regional Arctic Climate System Model (RACM); and physical feedback studies focusing on changes in Arctic sea ice using the fully coupled model.

Lettenmaier, Dennis P

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

407

Hypocenter relocation using a fast grid search method and a 3-D seismic velocity model for the Sumatra region  

SciTech Connect

Determination of earthquake hypocenter in Indonesia conducted by the Meteorological, Climatological, and Geophysical Agency (MCGA) has still used a 1-D seismic velocity model. In this research, we have applied a Fast Grid Search (FGM) method and a 3-D velocity model resulting from tomographic imaging to relocate earthquakes in the Sumatran region. The data were taken from the MCGA data catalog from 2009 to 2011 comprising of subduction zone and on land fault earthquakes with magnitude greater than 4 Mw. Our preliminary results show some significant changes in the depths of the relocated earthquakes which are in general deeper than the depths of hypocenters from the MCGA data catalog. The residual times resulting from the relocation process are smaller than those prior to the relocation. Encouraged by these results, we will continue to conduct hypocenter relocation for all events from the MCGA data catalog periodically in order to produce a new data catalog with good quality. We hope that the new data catalog will be useful for further studies.

Nugroho, Hendro [Study Program of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Earth Sciences and Technology, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jl. Ganesha No. 10, Bandung 40132, Indonesia and Meteorological, Climatological, and Geophysical Agency, Jl. Angkasa 1 No. 2, Kemayoran, Jakar (Indonesia)] [Study Program of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Earth Sciences and Technology, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jl. Ganesha No. 10, Bandung 40132, Indonesia and Meteorological, Climatological, and Geophysical Agency, Jl. Angkasa 1 No. 2, Kemayoran, Jakar (Indonesia); Widiyantoro, Sri [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jl. Ganesha No. 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)] [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jl. Ganesha No. 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Nugraha, Andri Dian [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technologyc Bandung, Jl. Ganesha No. 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)] [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technologyc Bandung, Jl. Ganesha No. 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

408

Deformed shell model results for neutrinoless double beta decay of nuclei in A=60-90 region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear transition matrix elements (NTME) for the neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{70}$Zn, $^{80}$Se and $^{82}$Se nuclei are calculated within the framework of the deformed shell model based on Hartree-Fock states. For $^{70}$Zn, jj44b interaction in $^{2}p_{3/2}$, $^{1}f_{5/2}$, $^{2}p_{1/2}$ and $^{1}g_{9/2}$ space with $^{56}$Ni as the core is employed. However, for $^{80}$Se and $^{82}$Se nuclei, a modified Kuo interaction with the above core and model space are employed. Most of our calculations in this region were performed with this effective interaction. However, jj44b interaction has been found to be better for $^{70}$Zn. After ensuring that DSM gives good description of the spectroscopic properties of low-lying levels in these three nuclei considered, the NTME are calculated. The deduced half-lives with these NTME, assuming neutrino mass is 1 eV, are $9.6 \\times 10^{25}$yr, $1.9 \\times 10^{27}$yr and $1.95 \\times 10^{24}$yr for $^{70}$Zn, $^{80}$Se and $^{82}$Se, respectively.

Sahu, R

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Modeling the Influence of GDL and flow-field plate parameters on the reaction distribution in the PEMFC cathode catalyst layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, a two-dimensional cross-the-channel model was applied to investigate the influence of gas diffusion layer (GDL) property and flow-field geometry on the local reaction rate in the PEMFC cathode catalyst layer. The model predictions show that the rate of consumption of oxygen or current density under the land area may differ considerably from that under the channel. Simulation results indicate that for a fixed channel width, increasing the channel-to-land width ratio results in improved water transport and positively impacts the overall reaction rates at high overpotential. However, too high ratio may retard electron transport and thus lead to worse cathode performance. Numerical simulation results revealed that GDL electrical conductivity and thickness have a strong influence on how the chemical species and electrons are transported to the active catalyst sites. Depending on the electrical conductivity of GDL, the region of higher reaction rate may occur either under the land or under the channel. Consideration of orthotropic electrical conductivity of GDL affects the simulation results significantly highlighting the need to improve our understanding of GDL transport coefficients. Simulation of GDL compression effects showed that the total current density is not affected significantly but current density distribution is. The extent of reactant bypass through the GDL from one channel to the other depends on the GDL permeability and results in a significant enhancement in reaction rates.

Wei Sun; Brant A. Peppley; Kunal Karan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Distribution of hazardous air pollutant trace elements, total sulfur, and ash in coals from five Tertiary basins in the Rocky Mountain Region  

SciTech Connect

Arithmetic mean values of the contents of hazardous air pollutant (HAP) trace elements named in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, manganese, mercury, nickel, selenium, and uranium), ash, and total sulfur were statistically compared on a whole-coal basis for Paleocene coals from five Tertiary basins in the Rocky Mountain Region. The study of proximate and elemental analyses indicate a relationship between trace element contents and paleogeography.

Ellis, M.S.; Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

Analytic model of the energy distribution function for highly energetic electrons in magnetron plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes a situation which is common for magnetized technical plasmas such as dc magnetron and HiPIMS systems. It presents an analytic calculation of the distribution function of hot electrons which enter a plasma as a monoenergetic beam and which slow down by Coulomb collisions with a Maxwellian distribution of bulk electrons, and by inelastic collisions with neutrals. The results are verified for parameters appropriate to HiPIMS discharges, by means of numerical calculations. This work is expected to be applicable to HiPIMS and other magnetron discharges, as well as dc discharges where secondary electrons enter the plasma after being accelerated in the Cathode Fall and encounter a nearly uniform bulk where they slow down.

Gallian, Sara; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Hitchon, William N G

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Comparison of Idealized and Real-World City Station Citing Models for Hydrogen Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

focus is on modeling of hydrogen production and distributionconvenience of hydrogen production, delivery and refuelinga hydrogen depot (i.e. hydrogen production facility or city-

Yang, Christopher; Nicholas, Michael A; Ogden, Joan M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Estimating Probability Distributions from Complex Models with Bifurcations: The Case of Ocean Circulation Collapse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studying the uncertainty in computationally expensive models has required the development of specialized methods, including alternative sampling techniques and response surface approaches. However, existing techniques for ...

Webster, Mort David.

414

Application of Distribution Transformer Thermal Life Models to Electrified Vehicle Charging Loads Using Monte-Carlo Method: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Application of Distribution Application of Distribution Transformer Thermal Life Models to Electrified Vehicle Charging Loads Using Monte-Carlo Method Preprint Michael Kuss, Tony Markel, and William Kramer Presented at the 25th World Battery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposium & Exhibition Shenzhen, China November 5 - 9, 2010 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5400-48827 January 2011 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes.

415

Physiological observations validate finite element models for estimating subject-specific electric field distributions induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation of the human motor cortex  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Recent evidence indicates subject-specific gyral folding patterns and white matter anisotropy uniquely shape electric fields generated by TMS. Current methods for predicting the brain regions influenced by TMS involve projecting the TMS coil position or center of gravity onto realistic head models derived from structural and functional imaging data. Similarly, spherical models have been used to estimate electric field distributions generated by TMS pulses delivered from a particular coil location and position. In the present paper we inspect differences between electric field computations estimated using the finite element method (FEM) and projection-based approaches described above. We then more specifically examined an approach for estimating cortical excitation volumes based on individualistic FEM simulations of electric fields. We evaluated this approach by performing neurophysiological recordings during MR-navigated motormapping experiments. We recorded motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in response to single pulse TMS using two different coil orientations (45° and 90° to midline) at 25 different locations (5 × 5 grid, 1 cm spacing) centered on the hotspot of the right first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle in left motor cortex. We observed that motor excitability maps varied within and between subjects as a function of TMS coil position and orientation. For each coil position and orientation tested, simulations of the TMS-induced electric field were computed using individualistic FEM models and compared to MEP amplitudes obtained during our motormapping experiments. We found FEM simulations of electric field strength, which take into account subject-specific gyral geometry and tissue conductivity anisotropy, significantly correlated with physiologically observed MEP amplitudes (rmax = 0.91, p = 1.8 × 10-5 rmean = 0.81, p = 0.01). These observations validate the implementation of individualistic FEM models to account for variations in gyral folding patterns and tissue conductivity anisotropy, which should help improve the targeting accuracy of TMS in the mapping or modulation of human brain circuits.

Alexander Opitz; Wynn Legon; Abby Rowlands; Warren K. Bickel; Walter Paulus; William J. Tyler

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Experimental determination of the radial dose distribution in high gradient regions around {sup 192}Ir wires: Comparison of electron paramagnetic resonance imaging, films, and Monte Carlo simulations  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The experimental determination of doses at proximal distances from radioactive sources is difficult because of the steepness of the dose gradient. The goal of this study was to determine the relative radial dose distribution for a low dose rate {sup 192}Ir wire source using electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) and to compare the results to those obtained using Gafchromic EBT film dosimetry and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: Lithium formate and ammonium formate were chosen as the EPR dosimetric materials and were used to form cylindrical phantoms. The dose distribution of the stable radiation-induced free radicals in the lithium formate and ammonium formate phantoms was assessed by EPRI. EBT films were also inserted inside in ammonium formate phantoms for comparison. MC simulation was performed using the MCNP4C2 software code. Results: The radical signal in irradiated ammonium formate is contained in a single narrow EPR line, with an EPR peak-to-peak linewidth narrower than that of lithium formate ({approx}0.64 and 1.4 mT, respectively). The spatial resolution of EPR images was enhanced by a factor of 2.3 using ammonium formate compared to lithium formate because its linewidth is about 0.75 mT narrower than that of lithium formate. The EPRI results were consistent to within 1% with those of Gafchromic EBT films and MC simulations at distances from 1.0 to 2.9 mm. The radial dose values obtained by EPRI were about 4% lower at distances from 2.9 to 4.0 mm than those determined by MC simulation and EBT film dosimetry. Conclusions: Ammonium formate is a suitable material under certain conditions for use in brachytherapy dosimetry using EPRI. In this study, the authors demonstrated that the EPRI technique allows the estimation of the relative radial dose distribution at short distances for a {sup 192}Ir wire source.

Kolbun, N.; Leveque, Ph.; Abboud, F.; Bol, A.; Vynckier, S.; Gallez, B. [Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Unit, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Universite catholique de Louvain, Avenue Mounier 73.40, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium); Molecular Imaging and Experimental Radiotherapy Unit, Institute of Experimental and Clinical Research, Universite catholique de Louvain, Avenue Hippocrate 55, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium); Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Unit, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Universite catholique de Louvain, Avenue Mounier 73.40, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

A fully traits-based approach to modeling global vegetation distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...biosphere–climate interactions. Despite their importance, DGVMs are among the most uncertain components of earth system models when predicting climate change (2). DGVMs have been built around the concept of Plant Functional Types (PFTs...

Peter M. van Bodegom; Jacob C. Douma; Lieneke M. Verheijen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Evaluating and developing parameter optimization and uncertainty analysis methods for a computationally intensive distributed hydrological model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study focuses on developing and evaluating efficient and effective parameter calibration and uncertainty methods for hydrologic modeling. Five single objective optimization algorithms and six multi-objective optimization algorithms were tested...

Zhang, Xuesong

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Distributed Energy: Modeling Penetration in Industrial Sector Over the Long-Term  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the generation of steam. Within the framework of a US energy system model (MARKAL using the assumptions underlying AEO 2005), where all sources of energy supply and demand are depicted, the potential penetration of DE options is evaluated. The industrial... and the generation of steam. Within the framework of a US energy system model (MARKAL using the assumptions underlying AEO 2005), where all sources of energy supply and demand are depicted, the potential penetration of DE options is evaluated. The industrial...

Greening, L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Numerical Simulation of Inter-basin Groundwater Flow into Northern Yucca Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Using the Death Valley Regional Flow System Model  

SciTech Connect

Models of groundwater flow for the Yucca Flat area of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) are under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for corrective action investigations of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit (CAU). One important aspect of these models is the quantity of inter-basin groundwater flow from regional systems to the north. This component of flow, together with its uncertainty, must be properly accounted for in the CAU flow models to provide a defensible regional framework for calculations of radionuclide transport that will support determinations of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine contaminant boundary. Because characterizing flow boundary conditions in northern Yucca Flat requires evaluation to a higher level of detail than the scale of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU model can efficiently provide, a study more focused on this aspect of the model was required.

Pohlmann Karl,Ye Ming

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distribution model regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Sensitivity of the Simulated Distributions of Water Masses, CFCs, and Bomb 14C to Parameterizations of Mesoscale Tracer Transports in a Model of the North Pacific  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A basinwide ocean general circulation model of the North Pacific Ocean is used to study the sensitivity of the simulated distributions of water masses, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), and bomb carbon-14 isotope (14C) to parameterizations of mesoscale ...

Yongfu Xu; Shigeaki Aoki; Koh Harada

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Effect of Char Combustion Product Distribution Coefficient on the CFD Modeling of Biomass Gasification in a Circulating Fluidized Bed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The predicted temperature profile can be used to select the refractory linings or bricks of the gasifier, and the predicted gas composition distribution may help to determine the size and shape of the gasifier. ... The enthalpy source from thermal radiation is computed by the P-1 model:(20, 26)(13)(14)where a, ?s, C, and n are the absorption coefficient, the scattering coefficient, the linear-anisotropic phase function coefficient, and the refractive index of the medium, respectively. ... A 3D unsteady-state CFD model is built in ANSYS Fluent 14.0, and the simulation results will be compared and validated with experimental data by García-Ibañez, et al.(18) Figure 1 shows the schematic diagram of the gasifier for the current studies, which sizes are the same as those of the gasifier used in the experiment. ...

Hui Liu; Ali Elkamel; Ali Lohi; Mazda Biglari

2014-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

423

Modelling electron distributions within ESA's Gaia satellite CCD pixels to mitigate radiation damage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Gaia satellite is a high-precision astrometry, photometry and spectroscopic ESA cornerstone mission, currently scheduled for launch in 2012. Its primary science drivers are the composition, formation and evolution of the Galaxy. Gaia will achieve its unprecedented positional accuracy requirements with detailed calibration and correction for radiation damage. At L2, protons cause displacement damage in the silicon of CCDs. The resulting traps capture and emit electrons from passing charge packets in the CCD pixel, distorting the image PSF and biasing its centroid. Microscopic models of Gaia's CCDs are being developed to simulate this effect. The key to calculating the probability of an electron being captured by a trap is the 3D electron density within each CCD pixel. However, this has not been physically modelled for the Gaia CCD pixels. In Seabroke, Holland & Cropper (2008), the first paper of this series, we motivated the need for such specialised 3D device modelling and outlined how its future resu...

Seabroke, G M; Burt, D; Robbins, M S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Parametric probability distributions in reliability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parametric probability distributions in reliability F.P.A. Coolen Department of Mathematical parametric probability distributions which are frequently used in reliability. We present some main as models for specific reliability scenarios. Keywords: Binomial distribution, Exponential distribution

Coolen, Frank

425

Eliciting fuzzy distributions from experts for ranking conceptual risk model components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An expert elicitation methodology was developed to integrate scientific knowledge from many studies at different spatial and temporal scales. The methodology utilised a structured one-to-one interview to elicit scale-dependent conceptual models and expert-weightings ... Keywords: Elicitation, Expert opinion, Fuzzy number, Phosphorus, Uncertainty, Water framework directive

T. Page; A. L. Heathwaite; L. J. Thompson; L. Pope; R. Willows

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Modeling Diameter Distributions of Poly (N-isopropylacrylamide-co-methacrylic Acid) Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quang Cao, Peng Tian, Qinglin Wu School of Renewable Natural Resources, Louisiana State University Ag of 0.05 and 0.10 showed trends similar to those displayed in the observed data. VVC 2008 Wiley- tributions of gas-evaporated nanoparticles.21,22 Most of these models are based on coagulation theory

Cao, Quang V.

427

A warranty forecasting model based on piecewise statistical distributions and stochastic simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry and has a specific application to automotive electronics. The warranty prediction model is based is demonstrated using a case study of automotive electronics warranty returns. The approach developed b CALCE Electronic Products and Systems Center, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University

Sandborn, Peter

428

Parallel Bayesian MCMC Imputation for Multiple Distributed Lag Models: A Case Study in Environmental  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and therefore provide a more realistic measure of the health effects of air pollution than single lag models data are frequently used to study the short-term effects of particulate matter air pollution allow to estimate the cumulative effect of air pollution exposure over few days in the past

Jones, Galin

429

Distributed Model-Invariant Detection of Unknown Inputs in Networked Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, including dynam- ically networked ones such as the smart grid and building thermal dynamics, fault detection, as in environmental monitoring [1], building energy management [2, 3], wireless communica- tions [4] and power grids algorithms undoubtedly benefit from the knowledge of accurate models [6, 1, 3]. Howe

Johansson, Karl Henrik

430

Fuel Cell Power Model Version 2: Startup Guide, System Designs, and Case Studies. Modeling Electricity, Heat, and Hydrogen Generation from Fuel Cell-Based Distributed Energy Systems  

SciTech Connect

This guide helps users get started with the U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model Version 2, which is a Microsoft Excel workbook that analyzes the technical and economic aspects of high-temperature fuel cell-based distributed energy systems with the aim of providing consistent, transparent, comparable results. This type of energy system would provide onsite-generated heat and electricity to large end users such as hospitals and office complexes. The hydrogen produced could be used for fueling vehicles or stored for later conversion to electricity.

Steward, D.; Penev, M.; Saur, G.; Becker, W.; Zuboy, J.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

A spatially-distributed computational model to quantify behaviour of contrast agents in MR perfusion imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Contrast agent enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion imaging provides an early, non-invasive indication of defects in the coronary circulation. However, the large variation of contrast agent properties, physiological state and imaging protocols means that optimisation of image acquisition is difficult to achieve. This situation motivates the development of a computational framework that, in turn, enables the efficient mapping of this parameter space to provide valuable information for optimisation of perfusion imaging in the clinical context. For this purpose a single-compartment porous medium model of capillary blood flow is developed which is coupled with a scalar transport model, to characterise the behaviour of both blood-pool and freely-diffusive contrast agents characterised by their ability to diffuse through the capillary wall into the extra-cellular space. A parameter space study is performed on the nondimensionalised equations using a 2D model for both healthy and diseased myocardium, examining the sensitivity of system behaviour to Peclet number, Damköhler number (Da), diffusivity ratio and fluid porosity. Assuming a linear MR signal response model, sample concentration time series data are calculated, and the sensitivity of clinically-relevant properties of these signals to the model parameters is quantified. Both upslope and peak values display significant non-monotonic behaviour with regard to the Damköhler number, with these properties showing a high degree of sensitivity in the parameter range relevant to contrast agents currently in use. However, the results suggest that signal upslope is the more robust and discerning metric for perfusion quantification, in particular for correlating with perfusion defect size. Finally, the results were examined in the context of nonlinear signal response, flow quantification via Fermi deconvolution and perfusion reserve index, which demonstrated that there is no single best set of contrast agent parameters, instead the contrast agents should be tailored to the specific imaging protocol and post-processing method to be used.

A.N. Cookson; J. Lee; C. Michler; R. Chabiniok; E. Hyde; D. Nordsletten; N.P. Smith

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Modeling the effects of cymene on the distribution of germination and growth of Beauveria bassiana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Essential oils have antifungal and antipathogenic effects and therefore are targets in plant pathology research for their potential uses as natural substitutes for inorganic plant pesticides. Beauveria bassiana, an entomopathogenic fungus, can endophytically colonize a vast number of plant species and trigger induced systemic resistance against plant pathogens. Spore germination is the most vulnerable in the fungal life cycle and is therefore a good candidate for monitoring the effect of essential oils on the growth of B. bassiana. Percentage germination of fungal spores and length of germination tubes were recorded from experiments. A mathematical model that was able to capture the effects of cymene, an essential oil produced by Monarda, on the germination and growth was developed. This is the first report of a model for the impact of essential oils on B. bassiana spore germination.

Luong Nguyen; Dubravka Bodiroga; Reka Kelemen; Jaewook Joo; Kimberly D. Gwinn

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

433

CFD modelling of thermal distribution in industrial server centres for configuration optimisation and energy efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of servers for computational and communication control tasks is becoming more and more frequent in industries and institutions. Ever increasing computational power and data storage combined with reduction in chipsets size resulted in the increased heat density and need for proper configurations of the server racks to enhance cooling and energy efficiency. While different methods can be used to model and design new server centres and optimise their configuration, there is no clear guideline in the literature on the best way to design them and how to increase energy efficiency of existing server centres. This paper presents a simplified yet reliable computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model used to qualitatively evaluate different cooling solutions of a data centre and proposes guidelines to improve its energy efficiency. The influence of different parameters and configurations on the cooling load of the server room is then analysed.

Pierre-Luc Paradis; Drishtysingh Ramdenee; Adrian Ilinca; Hussein Ibrahim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Constructing probability distributions of uncertain variables in models of the performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: The 1990 performance simulations  

SciTech Connect

A five-step procedure was used in the 1990 performance simulations to construct probability distributions of the uncertain variables appearing in the mathematical models used to simulate the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's (WIPP's) performance. This procedure provides a consistent approach to the construction of probability distributions in cases where empirical data concerning a variable are sparse or absent and minimizes the amount of spurious information that is often introduced into a distribution by assumptions of nonspecialist. The procedure gives first priority to the professional judgment of subject-matter experts and emphasizes the use of site-specific empirical data for the construction of the probability distributions when such data are available. In the absence of sufficient empirical data, the procedure employs the Maximum Entropy Formalism and the subject-matter experts' subjective estimates of the parameters of the distribution to construct a distribution that can be used in a performance simulation. 23 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Tierney, M.S.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

ZHANG, XUEJIN. Adapting the Weather Research and Forecasting Model for the Simulation of Regional Climate in East Africa. (Under the direction of Dr. Lian Xie).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and society for regional climate information. The current Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) RCM inherits several advantages of the original WRF model. For example, (1) it can be used for multiple scale infrastructure to distinguish the scientific problems from engineering problems. In order to adapt WRF for long

Liu, Paul

436

Distributed Algorithms Distributed Transactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Algorithms© Gero Mühl 8 Concurrency Control serial RC (ReCoverable) ACA (Avoiding Cascading Aborts) ST (StricDistributed Algorithms Distributed Transactions PD Dr.-Ing. Gero Mühl Kommunikations- und Betriebssysteme Fakultät für Elektrotechnik u. Informatik Technische Universität Berlin #12;Distributed Algorithms

Wichmann, Felix

437

DualTrust: A Distributed Trust Model for Swarm-Based Autonomic Computing Systems  

SciTech Connect

For autonomic computing systems that utilize mobile agents and ant colony algorithms for their sensor layer, trust management is important for the acceptance of the mobile agent sensors and to protect the system from malicious behavior by insiders and entities that have penetrated network defenses. This paper examines the trust relationships, evidence, and decisions in a representative system and finds that by monitoring the trustworthiness of the autonomic managers rather than the swarming sensors, the trust management problem becomes much more scalable and still serves to protect the swarm. We then propose the DualTrust conceptual trust model. By addressing the autonomic manager’s bi-directional primary relationships in the ACS architecture, DualTrust is able to monitor the trustworthiness of the autonomic managers, protect the sensor swarm in a scalable manner, and provide global trust awareness for the orchestrating autonomic manager.

Maiden, Wendy M.; Dionysiou, Ioanna; Frincke, Deborah A.; Fink, Glenn A.; Bakken, David E.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Potential climate change impact on wind energy resources in northern Europe: analyses using a regional climate model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy density in each grid cell was computed using Eq. 10 and ... 11 is employed. To further explore the impact of potential changes in the speed distribution on the wind energy sector we also computed the f...

S. C. Pryor; R. J. Barthelmie; E. Kjellström

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Sheet beam model for intense space-charge: with application to Debye screening and the distribution of particle oscillation frequencies in a thermal equilibrium beam  

SciTech Connect

A one-dimensional Vlasov-Poisson model for sheet beams is reviewed and extended to provide a simple framework for analysis of space-charge effects. Centroid and rms envelope equations including image charge effects are derived and reasonable parameter equivalences with commonly employed 2D transverse models of unbunched beams are established. This sheet beam model is then applied to analyze several problems of fundamental interest. A sheet beam thermal equilibrium distribution in a continuous focusing channel is constructed and shown to have analogous properties to two- d three-dimensional thermal equilibrium models in terms of the equilibrium structure and Deybe screening properties. The simpler formulation for sheet beams is exploited to explicitly calculate the distribution of particle oscillation frequencies within a thermal equilibrium beam. It is shown that as space-charge intensity increases, the frequency distribution becomes broad, suggesting that beams with strong space-charge can have improved stability.

Lund, Steven M.; Friedman, Alex; Bazouin, Guillaume

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

440

Modeling, control, and power management of a power electrical system including two distributed generators based on fuel cell and supercapacitor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper focuses on Distributed Generator (DG) integration in Power Electrical System (PES) for dispersed nodes. The main objective of the DG use can be classified into two aspects: a load following service and ancillary service systems. In this study the DG system contains a Fuel cell and a Supercapacitor storage device. A gas turbine system is modeled in order to estimate the PES frequency behavior under a variable power demand. The main goal of this work is to develop a DG control strategy with the aim to smooth the frequency and the voltage peak variations. To assess the different management stages the power flow exchanged between DGs and PES is depicted and discussed for different power demand variations. The results found with the DGs integration strategy confirm the frequency and voltage regulations and also prove the well power flow management.

L. Krichen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distribution model regions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Development of an Energy System Model in Jiangsu Region with MARKAL: An Analysis of the Supply Side  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Research, conducted in collaboration with Department of Mechanical Engineer of Southeast University of Nanjing situated in the Jangsu Region, has been developed over a period of three years in the ambit of Sc...

Vincenzo Naso; Flavio Rottenberg

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Regional environmental change: special issue on “Modelling future changes in Cropland Soil Carbon in European Russia and the Ukraine”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many studies have examined the potential for climate mitigation in agriculture in Europe and globally, as well as in other regions of the world such as North America, but soil carbon sequestration potential for t...

Pete Smith

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Transverse-momentum distribution and nuclear modification factor for neutral pions in the forward-rapidity region in proton-lead collisions at sNN=5.02 TeV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The transverse momentum (pT) distribution for inclusive neutral pions in the very forward rapidity region has been measured, with the Large Hadron Collider forward detector (LHCf), in proton-lead collisions at nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energies of sNN=5.02TeV at the LHC. The pT spectra obtained in the rapidity range ?11.0

O. Adriani et al. (LHCf Collaboration)

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

444

Constraining the properties of AGN host galaxies with Spectral Energy Distribution modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[abridged] We use the latest release of CIGALE, a galaxy SED fitting model relying on energy balance, to study the influence of an AGN in estimating both the SFR and stellar mass in galaxies, as well as the contribution of the AGN to the power output of the host. Using the galaxy formation SAM GALFORM, we create mock galaxy SEDs using realistic star formation histories (SFH) and add an AGN of Type 1, Type 2, or intermediate type whose contribution to the bolometric luminosity can be variable. We perform an SED fitting of these catalogues with CIGALE assuming three different SFHs: a single- and double-exponentially-decreasing, and a delayed SFH. Constraining thecontribution of an AGN to the LIR (fracAGN) is very challenging for fracAGN<20%, with uncertainties of ~5-30% for higher fractions depending on the AGN type, while FIR and sub-mm are essential. The AGN power has an impact on the estimation of $M_*$ in Type 1 and intermediate type AGNs but has no effect for galaxies hosting Type 2 AGNs. We find that i...

Ciesla, L; Georgakakis, A; Bernhard, E; Mitchell, P D; Buat, V; Elbaz, D; Floc'h, E Le; Lacey, C G; Magdis, G E; Xilouris, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Gap-Size Distribution Functions of a Random Sequential Adsorption Model of Segments on the Line  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We performed extensive simulations accompanied by a detailed study of a two-segment size random sequential model on the line. We followed the kinetics towards the jamming state, but we paid particular attention to the characterization of the jamming state structure. In particular, we studied the effect of the size ratio on the mean-gap size, the gap-size dispersion, gap-size skewness, and gap-size kurtosis at the jamming state. We also analyzed the above quantities for the four possible segment-to-segment gap types. We ranged the values of the size ratio from one to twenty. In the limit of a size ratio of one, one recovers the classical car-parking problem. We observed that at low size ratios the jamming state is constituted by short streaks of small and large segments, while at high values of the size ratio the jamming state structure is formed by long streaks of small segments separated by a single large segment. This view of the jamming state structure as a function of the size ratio is supported by the various measured quantities. The present work can help provide insight, for example, on how to minimize the interparticle distance or minimize fluctuations around the mean particle-to-particle distance.

N. A. M. Araujo; A. Cadilhe

2004-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

446

COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: TOWARDS ADVANCED UNDERSTANDING AND PREDICTIVE CAPABILITY OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE ARCTIC USING A HIGH-RESOLUTION REGIONAL ARCTIC CLIMATE SYSTEM MODEL  

SciTech Connect

The motivation for this project was to advance the science of climate change and prediction in the Arctic region. Its primary goals were to (i) develop a state-of-the-art Regional Arctic Climate system Model (RACM) including high-resolution atmosphere, land, ocean, sea ice and land hydrology components and (ii) to perform extended numerical experiments using high performance computers to minimize uncertainties and fundamentally improve current predictions of climate change in the northern polar regions. These goals were realized first through evaluation studies of climate system components via one-way coupling experiments. Simulations were then used to examine the effects of advancements in climate component systems on their representation of main physics, time-mean fields and to understand variability signals at scales over many years. As such this research directly addressed some of the major science objectives of the BER Climate Change Research Division (CCRD) regarding the advancement of long-term climate prediction.

Gutowski, William J.

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

447

Regional refining models for alternative fuels using shale and coal synthetic crudes: identification and evaluation of optimized alternative fuels. Annual report, March 20, 1979-March 19, 1980  

SciTech Connect

The initial phase has been completed in the project to evaluate alternative fuels for highway transportation from synthetic crudes. Three refinery models were developed for Rocky Mountain, Mid-Continent and Great Lakes regions to make future product volumes and qualities forecast for 1995. Projected quantities of shale oil and coal oil syncrudes were introduced into the raw materials slate. Product slate was then varied from conventional products to evaluate maximum diesel fuel and broadcut fuel in all regions. Gasoline supplement options were evaluated in one region for 10% each of methanol, ethanol, MTBE or synthetic naphtha in the blends along with syncrude components. Compositions and qualities of the fuels were determined for the variation in constraints and conditions established for the study. Effects on raw materials, energy consumption and investment costs were reported. Results provide the basis to formulate fuels for laboratory and engine evaluation in future phases of the project.

Sefer, N.R.; Russell, J.A.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

A Mathematical Study to Select Fractionation Regimen Based on Physical Dose Distribution and the Linear-Quadratic Model  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Hypofractionated irradiation is often used in precise radiotherapy instead of conventional multifractionated irradiation. We propose a novel mathematical method for selecting a hypofractionated or multifractionated irradiation regimen based on physical dose distribution adding to biologic consideration. Methods and Materials: The linear-quadratic model was used for the radiation effects on tumor and normal tissues, especially organs at risk (OARs). On the basis of the assumption that the OAR receives a fraction of the dose intended for the tumor, the minimization problem for the damage effect on the OAR was treated under the constraint that the radiation effect on the tumor is fixed. Results: For an N-time fractionated irradiation regimen, the constraint of tumor lethality was described by an N-dimensional hypersphere. The total dose of the fractionated irradiations was considered for minimizing the damage effect on the OAR under the hypersphere condition. It was found that the advantage of hypofractionated or multifractionated irradiation therapies depends on the magnitude of the ratio of {alpha}/{beta} parameters for the OAR and tumor in the linear-quadratic model and the ratio of the dose for the OAR and tumor. Conclusions: Our mathematical method shows that multifractionated irradiation with a constant dose is better if the ratio of {alpha}/{beta} for the OAR and tumor is less than the ratio of the dose for the OAR and tumor, whereas hypofractionated irradiation is better otherwise.

Mizuta, Masahiro [Laboratory of Advanced Data Science, Information Initiative Center, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)] [Laboratory of Advanced Data Science, Information Initiative Center, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Takao, Seishin [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)] [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Date, Hiroyuki, E-mail: date@hs.hokudai.ac.jp [Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)] [Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Kishimoto, Naoki [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)] [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Sutherland, Kenneth L.; Onimaru, Rikiya; Shirato, Hiroki [Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)] [Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

The influence of hospital ward design on resilience to heat waves: an exploration using distributed lag models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Distributed lag models (DLMs) to predict future internal temperatures have been developed using the hourly weather data and the internal temperatures recorded in eleven spaces on two UK National Health Service (NHS) hospital sites. The ward spaces were in five buildings of very different type and age. In all the DLMs, the best prediction of internal temperature was obtained using three exogenous drivers, previous internal temperature, external temperature and solar radiation. \\{DLMs\\} were sensitive to the buildings’ differences in orientation, thermal mass and shading and were validated by comparing the predictions with the internal temperatures recorded in the summer of 2012. The results were encouraging, with both modelled and recorded data showing good correlation. To understand the resilience of the spaces to heat waves, the \\{DLMs\\} were fed with weather data recorded during the hot summer of 2006. The Nightingale wards and traditional masonry wards showed remarkable resilience to the hot weather. In contrast, light-weight modular buildings were predicted to overheat dangerously. By recording internal temperatures for a short period, \\{DLMs\\} might be created that can forecast future temperatures in many other types of naturally ventilated or mixed-mode buildings as a means of assessing overheating risk.

C.R. Iddon; T.C. Mills; R. Giridharan; K.J. Lomas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Evaluation of the accuracy of the EPA model for BOD5 prediction in various climatic regions of Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model demonstrated removal rates for BOD?, TSS, fecal coliform, ammonium, and phosphorus of 80.0%, 70.9%, 87.1%, 34.7%, and 22.7%, respectively. These data provided the basis for evaluating the EPA model. A sensitivity analysis of the EPA model...

Koutny, Jessica Leigh

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

3-D modelling and analysis of Dst C-responses in the North Pacific Ocean region, revisited  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......order to derive eq. (37) we used the elementary equality cos d = cos cos 0+ sin sin...distribution of the lithosphere: The transverse resistance, R, is taken to be 3 108omega m2 beneath...Schmucker U. , 1985. Magnetic and electric fields due to electromagnetic induction......

Alexei Kuvshinov; Hisashi Utada; Dmitry Avdeev; Takao Koyama

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Evaluating officially reported polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions in the Athabasca oil sands region with a multimedia fate model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...14 9 3-5-13 Wind speed [m/s...region ÷ average wind speed Particle...particle deposition velocity to snow [m...Assumed/Default Mass fraction of OC...0.1 Assumed Mass transfer coeff...particle deposition velocity to soil [m...forest 0.5 Google maps Fraction of forest...

Abha Parajulee; Frank Wania

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

A hierarchical compromise model for the joint optimization of recovery operations and distribution of emergency goods in Humanitarian Logistics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The distribution of emergency goods to a population affected by a disaster is one of the most fundamental operations in Humanitarian Logistics. In the case of a particularly disruptive event, parts of the distribution infrastructure (e.g., bridges, roads) ... Keywords: Distribution planning, Humanitarian logistics, Multi-criteria optimization, Recovery

F. Liberatore; M. T. Ortuño; G. Tirado; B. Vitoriano; M. P. Scaparra

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Energy performance of underfloor air distribution systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Underfloor Air Distribution (UFAD) Design Guide.  Atlanta: distribution, UFAD, EnergyPlus, EnergyPlus/UFAD, energy  modeling, design design calculations must account for the distribution of 

Bauman, Fred; Webster, Tom; Linden, Paul; Buhl, Fred

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Variable Density Flow Modeling for Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Along Arches Province of Midwestern United States  

SciTech Connect

The Arches Province in the Midwestern U.S. has been identified as a major area for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage applications because of the intersection of Mt. Simon sandstone reservoir thickness and permeability. To better understand large-scale CO{sub 2} storage infrastructure requirements in the Arches Province, variable density scoping level modeling was completed. Three main tasks were completed for the variable density modeling: Single-phase, variable density groundwater flow modeling; Scoping level multi-phase simulations; and Preliminary basin-scale multi-phase simulations. The variable density modeling task was successful in evaluating appropriate input data for the Arches Province numerical simulations. Data from the geocellular model developed earlier in the project were translated into preliminary numerical models. These models were calibrated to observed conditions in the Mt. Simon, suggesting a suitable geologic depiction of the system. The initial models were used to assess boundary conditions, calibrate to reservoir conditions, examine grid dimensions, evaluate upscaling items, and develop regional storage field scenarios. The task also provided practical information on items related to CO{sub 2} storage applications in the Arches Province such as pressure buildup estimates, well spacing limitations, and injection field arrangements. The Arches Simulation project is a three-year effort and part of the United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE)/National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) program on innovative and advanced technologies and protocols for monitoring/verification/accounting (MVA), simulation, and risk assessment of CO{sub 2} sequestration in geologic formations. The overall objective of the project is to develop a simulation framework for regional geologic CO{sub 2} storage infrastructure along the Arches Province of the Midwestern U.S.

Joel Sminchak

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

456

Regional-scale chemical transport modeling in support of the analysis of observations obtained during the TRACE-P experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during the TRACE-P experiment G. R. Carmichael,1 Y. Tang,1 G. Kurata,3 I. Uno,2 D. Streets,4 J.-H. Woo,1 H. Huang,1 J. Yienger,1 B. Lefer,5 R. Shetter,5 D. Blake,6 E. Atlas,5 A. Fried,5 E. Apel,5 F. Eisele the TRACE-P experiment is used to evaluate how well the CFORS/STEM-2K1 regional-scale chemical transport

Clarke, Antony

457

Assessing the CAM5 Physics Suite in the WRF-Chem Model: Implementation, Resolution Sensitivity, and a First Evaluation for a Regional Case Study  

SciTech Connect

A suite of physical parameterizations (deep and shallow convection, turbulent boundary layer, aerosols, cloud microphysics, and cloud fraction) from the global climate model Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5) has been implemented in the regional model Weather Research and Forecasting with chemistry (WRF-Chem). A downscaling modeling framework with consistent physics has also been established in which both global and regional simulations use the same emissions and surface fluxes. The WRF-Chem model with the CAM5 physics suite is run at multiple horizontal resolutions over a domain encompassing the northern Pacific Ocean, northeast Asia, and northwest North America for April 2008 when the ARCTAS, ARCPAC, and ISDAC field campaigns took place. These simulations are evaluated against field campaign measurements, satellite retrievals, and ground-based observations, and are compared with simulations that use a set of common WRF-Chem Parameterizations. This manuscript describes the implementation of the CAM5 physics suite in WRF-Chem provides an overview of the modeling framework and an initial evaluation of the simulated meteorology, clouds, and aerosols, and quantifies the resolution dependence of the cloud and aerosol parameterizations. We demonstrate that some of the CAM5 biases, such as high estimates of cloud susceptibility to aerosols and the underestimation of aerosol concentrations in the Arctic, can be reduced simply by increasing horizontal resolution. We also show that the CAM5 physics suite performs similarly to a set of parameterizations commonly used in WRF-Chem, but produces higher ice and liquid water condensate amounts and near-surface black carbon concentration. Further evaluations that use other mesoscale model parameterizations and perform other case studies are needed to infer whether one parameterization consistently produces results more consistent with observations.

Ma, Po-Lun; Rasch, Philip J.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.; Gustafson, William I.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Singh, Balwinder

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

458

Ecosystem feedbacks to climate change in California: Development, testing, and analysis using a coupled regional atmosphere and land-surface model (WRF3-CLM3.5)  

SciTech Connect

A regional atmosphere model [Weather Research and Forecasting model version 3 (WRF3)] and a land surface model [Community Land Model, version 3.5 (CLM3.5)] were coupled to study the interactions between the atmosphere and possible future California land-cover changes. The impact was evaluated on California's climate of changes in natural vegetation under climate change and of intentional afforestation. The ability of WRF3 to simulate California's climate was assessed by comparing simulations by WRF3-CLM3.5 and WRF3-Noah to observations from 1982 to 1991. Using WRF3-CLM3.5, the authors performed six 13-yr experiments using historical and future large-scale climate boundary conditions from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model version 2.1 (GFDL CM2.1). The land-cover scenarios included historical and future natural vegetation from the Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System-Century 1 (MC1) dynamic vegetation model, in addition to a future 8-million-ha California afforestation scenario. Natural vegetation changes alone caused summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature changes of -0.7 to +1 C in regions without persistent snow cover, depending on the location and the type of vegetation change. Vegetation temperature changes were much larger than the 2-m air temperature changes because of the finescale spatial heterogeneity of the imposed vegetation change. Up to 30% of the magnitude of the summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature increase and 70% of the magnitude of the 1600 local time (LT) vegetation temperature increase projected under future climate change were attributable to the climate-driven shift in land cover. The authors projected that afforestation could cause local 0.2-1.2 C reductions in summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature and 2.0-3.7 C reductions in 1600 LT vegetation temperature for snow-free regions, primarily because of increased evapotranspiration. Because some of these temperature changes are of comparable magnitude to those projected under climate change this century, projections of climate and vegetation change in this region need to consider these climate-vegetation interactions.

Subin, Z.M.; Riley, W.J.; Kueppers, L.M.; Jin, J.; Christianson, D.S.; Torn, M.S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

TOWARDS A POWER EFFICIENT PROGRAMMING MODEL FOR AD HOC In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a distributed operating system for ad hoc net-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 TOWARDS A POWER EFFICIENT PROGRAMMING MODEL FOR AD HOC NETWORKS Abstract In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a distributed operating system for ad hoc net- works. The goal of our system is to extend total system lifetime for ad hoc networking applications through power

Sirer, Emin Gun

460

Automatic Thread Distribution For Nested Parallelism In OpenMP OpenMP is becoming the standard programming model for sharedmemory parallel architectures. One of its most inter-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automatic Thread Distribution For Nested Parallelism In OpenMP Abstract OpenMP is becoming in the language is the support for nested parallelism. Previous research and parallelization experiences have shown the benefits of using nested parallelism as an alternative to combining several programming models

Corbalan, Julita

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461

Preliminary geohydrologic conceptual model of the Los Medanos region near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for the purpose of performance assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a geohydrologic conceptual model of the northern Delaware Basin to be used in modeling three-dimensional, regional ground-water flow for assessing the performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the Los Medanos region near Carlsbad, New Mexico. Geochemical and hydrological evidence indicates that flow is transient in the Rustler Formation and the Capitan aquifer in response to changing geologic, hydrologic, and climatic conditions. Before the Pleistocene, ground-water flow in the Rustler Formation was generally eastward, but uneven tilting of the Delaware Basin lowered the regional base level and formed fractures in the evaporitic sequence of rocks approximately parallel to the basin axis. Dissolution along the fractures, coupled with erosion, formed Nash Draw. Also, the drop in base level resulted in an increase in the carrying power of the Pecos River, which began incising the Capitan/aquifer near Carlsbad, New Mexico. Erosion and downcutting released hydraulic pressure that caused a reversal in Rustler ground-water flow direction near the WIPP. Flow in the Rustler west of the WIPP is toward Nash Draw and eventually toward Malaga Bend; flow south of the WIPP is toward Malaga Bend. 126 refs., 70 figs., 18 tabs.

Brinster, K.F. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

The Diurnal Cycle of Precipitation in Regional Spectral Model Simulations over West Africa: Sensitivities to Resolution and Cumulus Schemes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As a basic form of climate patterns, the diurnal cycle of precipitation (DCP) can provide a key test bed for model reliability and development. In this study, DCP over West Africa was simulated by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (...

Xiaogang He; Hyungjun Kim; Pierre-Emmanuel Kirstetter; Kei Yoshimura; Eun-Chul Chang; Craig R. Ferguson; Jessica M. Erlingis; Yang Hong; Taikan Oki

463

Representing the Effects of Long-Range Transport and Lateral Boundary Conditions in Regional Air Pollution Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Both observational and modeling studies have demonstrated that pollutants near the Earth’s surface can be convectively lofted to higher altitudes where strong winds can efficiently transport them from one contine...

Rohit Mathur; Shawn Roselle; Jeffrey Young…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Potential applications of three-dimensional geoscientific mapping and modeling systems to regional hydrogeological assessments at Yucca mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three-dimensional Geoscientific Information Systems (GSIS) are being evaluated for supporting 3-D ground-water modeling activities required to evaluate the paleo-, present, and future hydrology at Yucca Mountain,...

A. Keith Turner; Kenneth E. Kolm

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Assessment of the ocean circulation in the Azores region as predicted by a numerical model assimilating altimeter data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) on the new perspectives in data assimilation). In the SIMAN project (SIMulation de l'Atlantique Nord Stream area (Blayo et al., 1996). It has been shown that the model is able to reproduce

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

466

Multi-region capacity planning model with contracts of varying duration under uncertainty : a satellite capacity acquisition case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper highlights the issues associated with and presents a modeling framework for long-term capacity planning problems constrained in a similar fashion to satellite capacity acquisition. Although ambiguities exist, ...

Lydiard, John M., IV

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Diabatic wind speed profiles in coastal regions: Comparison of an internal boundary layer (IBL) model with observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A model is presented to transform wind speed observations at a single height over sea ... of 100 m). Only moderate and strong winds from the sea are considered, which are particularly important for wind energy ap...

A. C. M. Beljaars; A. A. M. Holtslag; W. C. Turkenburg

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Impact of natural and anthropogenic aerosols on stratocumulus and precipitation in the Southeast Pacific: A regional modeling study using WRF-Chem  

SciTech Connect

Cloud-system resolving simulations with the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-Chem) model are used to quantify the impacts of regional anthropogenic and oceanic emissions on changes in aerosol properties, cloud macro- and microphysics, and cloud radiative forcing over the Southeast Pacific (SEP) during the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) (15 Oct–Nov 16, 2008). The effects of oceanic aerosols on cloud properties, precipitation, and the shortwave forcing counteract those of anthropogenic aerosols. Despite the relatively small changes in Na concentrations (2-12%) from regional oceanic emissions, their net effect (direct and indirect) on the surface shortwave forcing is opposite and comparable or even larger in magnitude compared to those of regional anthropogenic emissions over the SEP. Two distinct regions are identified in the VOCALS-REx domain. The near-coast polluted region is characterized with strong droplet activation suppression of small particles by sea-salt particles, the more important role of the first than the second indirect effect, low surface precipitation rate, and low aerosol-cloud interaction strength associated with anthropogenic emissions. The relatively clean remote region is characterized with large contributions of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN, number concentration denoted by NCCN) and droplet number concentrations (Nd) from non-local sources (lateral boundaries), a significant amount of surface precipitation, and high aerosol-cloud interactions under a scenario of five-fold increase in anthropogenic emissions. In the clean region, cloud properties have high sensitivity (e.g., 13% increase in cloud-top height and a 9% surface albedo increase) to the moderate increase in CCN concentration (?Nccn = 13 cm-3; 25%) produced by a five-fold increase in regional anthropogenic emissions. The increased anthropogenic aerosols reduce the precipitation amount over the relatively clean remote ocean. The reduction of precipitation (as a cloud water sink) more than doubles the wet scavenging timescale, resulting in an increased aerosol lifetime in the marine boundary layer. Therefore, the aerosol impacts on precipitation are amplified by the positive feedback of precipitation on aerosol. The positive feedback ultimately alters the cloud micro- and macro-properties, leading to strong aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions. The higher sensitivity of clouds to anthropogenic aerosols over this region is also related to a 16% entrainment rate increase due to anthropogenic aerosols. The simulated aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions are stronger at night over the clean marine region, while during the day, solar heating results in more frequent decoupling, thinner clouds, reduced precipitation, and reduced sensitivity to anthropogenic emissions. The simulated high sensitivity to the increased anthropogenic emissions over the clean region suggests that the perturbation of the clean marine environment with anthropogenic aerosols may have a larger effect on climate than that of already polluted marine environments.

Yang, Qing; Gustafson, William I.; Fast, Jerome D.; Wang, Hailong; Easter, Richard C.; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Berg, Larry K.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Morrison, H.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

469

Detection and Attribution of Regional Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

We developed a high resolution global coupled modeling capability to perform breakthrough studies of the regional climate change. The atmospheric component in our simulation uses a 1{sup o} latitude x 1.25{sup o} longitude grid which is the finest resolution ever used for the NCAR coupled climate model CCSM3. Substantial testing and slight retuning was required to get an acceptable control simulation. The major accomplishment is the validation of this new high resolution configuration of CCSM3. There are major improvements in our simulation of the surface wind stress and sea ice thickness distribution in the Arctic. Surface wind stress and ocean circulation in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current are also improved. Our results demonstrate that the FV version of the CCSM coupled model is a state of the art climate model whose simulation capabilities are in the class of those used for IPCC assessments. We have also provided 1000 years of model data to Scripps Institution of Oceanography to estimate the natural variability of stream flow in California. In the future, our global model simulations will provide boundary data to high-resolution mesoscale model that will be used at LLNL. The mesoscale model would dynamically downscale the GCM climate to regional scale on climate time scales.

Bala, G; Mirin, A

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

470

Energy-economic theory and mathematical models for combining the systems of man and nature, case study: The urban region of Miami, Florida  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a study of the urban region of Miami, Fla. with consideration of energy flow and the relationship between energy theory and economics. Much of this work is based on the theories and work of Dr Howard T. Odum at the University of Florida. A theory of energy quality is presented which is an attempt to relate energies of different concentrations in their ability to do work. This theory allows comparison of the systems of man and nature. Another theory is proposed which seeks to describe the ability of a region to compete based on its flows of natural and fossil fuel energies. Economic, natural system, and energy data were compiled for the Miami urban region from 1950–1972. Cross-correlation of this data showed significant levels of correlation between the rate of change of fossil fuel use and the rates of change of population, budget, sales tax, income, building structure, and number of telephones. Calculation of several urban indicators for 1972 showed a fossil fuel energy density of 300 kcal/m2/day in the urbanized area, a per capita energy consumption of 53.8 × 106 kcal/capita/year, a ratio of natural to fossil fuel energies of 0.25, a developed area of 260 miles2 (673.4 km2), and a rate of development of 6.5 miles2 (16.8 km2) per year. An overall model of Miami is presented with flows and storages quantified for 1972. Based on this model a simpler model was simulated on an analog computer. This model consisted of a system of first-order in time, non-linear differential equations which included fossil fuel energy flows, main economic flows, external price functions, building structure, natural energies, and population. This model was simulated for several linearly increasing future price functions and several sets of future energy functions. Natural energies within the region were calculated by determining the land areas associated with various ecosystem types. Estimating the productivities of these systems on a per area basis allowed calculation of total energy flows. The energies associated with winds, tides, waves, and fresh/salt water concentration gradients were also determined. It was found that the ratio of natural to fossil fuel energy changed from 1.77 in 1950 to 0.25 in 1972.

James Zucchetto

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Recoverable distributed shared memory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed Shared Memory (DSM) is a model for interprocess communication, implemented on top of message passing systems. In this model, processes running on separate hosts can access a shared, coherent memory address space, provided...

Kanthadai, Sundarrajan S

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

472

Efficient distributed quantum computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide algorithms for efficiently moving and addressing quantum memory in parallel. These imply that the standard circuit model can be simulated with a low overhead by a more realistic model of a distributed quantum ...

Beals, Robert

473

Regional Purchasing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Purchasing Regional Purchasing Regional Purchasing Pursuant to Appendix M of Prime Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396 between DOE/NNSA and Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS), LANS is committed to building a strong supplier base with Northern New Mexico businesses and the local Native American pueblos in the purchases of goods and services. Contact Small Business Office (505) 667-4419 Email We seek out and utilize known Northern New Mexico business as suppliers The Northern New Mexico counties included are Los Alamos Santa Fe Rio Arriba Taos Mora San Miguel Sandoval The eight regional pueblos included are Nambe Ohkay Owingeh (formerly known as San Juan) Picuris Pojoaque San Ildefonso Santa Clara Taos Tesuque When the Laboratory cannot identify regional firms, it will expand its

474

Future of Grid-Tied PV Business Models: What Will Happen When PV Penetration on the Distribution Grid is Significant? Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Eventually, distributed PV will become a more significant part of the generation mix. When this happens, it is expected that utilities will have to take on a more active role in the placement, operation and control of these systems. There are operational complexities and concerns of revenue erosion that will drive utilities into greater involvement of distributed PV and will create new business models. This report summarizes work done by Navigant Consulting Inc. for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory as part of the Department of Energy's work on Renewable System Integration. The objective of the work was to better understand the structure of these future business models and the research, development and demonstration (RD&D) required to support their deployment. This report describes potential future PV business models in terms of combinations of utility ownership and control of the PV assets, and the various relationships between end-users and third-party owners.

Graham, S.; Katofsky, R.; Frantzis, L.; Sawyer, H.; Margolis, R.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z