National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for distribution model regions

  1. Statistical Models for Solar Flare Interval Distribution in Individual Active Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuki Kubo

    2008-02-01

    This article discusses statistical models for solar flare interval distribution in individual active regions. We analyzed solar flare data in 55 active regions that are listed in the GOES soft X-ray flare catalog. We discuss some problems with a conventional procedure to derive probability density functions from any data set and propose a new procedure, which uses the maximum likelihood method and Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) to objectively compare some competing probability density functions. We found that lognormal and inverse Gaussian models are more likely models than the exponential model for solar flare interval distribution in individual active regions. The results suggest that solar flares do not occur randomly in time; rather, solar flare intervals appear to be regulated by solar flare mechanisms. We briefly mention a probabilistic solar flare forecasting method as an application of a solar flare interval distribution analysis.

  2. Polar-region distributions of Poynting flux: Global models compared with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotko, William

    of electric potential, field-aligned current and Poynting flux derived from the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry globalPolar-region distributions of Poynting flux: Global models compared with observations P. D submitted to J. Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 15 June 2007 #12;with updated simulation results

  3. Polar-region distributions of Poynting flux: Global models compared with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotko, William

    of electric potential, field-aligned current and Poynting flux derived from the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry globalPolar-region distributions of Poynting flux: Global models compared with observations P. D from the Preprint submitted to J. Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 11 July 2008 #12;DMSP F13

  4. Multitarget region tracking based on short-sight modeling of background and color distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mille, Julien

    as well as non-parametric modeling of color statistics, we develop an energy-minimization based approach of color statistics and shapes of objects over time and space [1][2]. Most often, the energy is derived for tracking in real scenes with cluttered backgrounds, where statistical color data is highly scattered

  5. Integrated simulation of snow and glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed hydrological modeling framework at Hunza River Basin of Pakistan Karakoram region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    in the surface energy balance of Haut Glacier d’Arolla,2008), Distributed energy balance modeling of South CascadeA distributed energy balance model for complex topography

  6. Integrated simulation of snow and glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed hydrological modeling framework at Hunza River Basin of Pakistan Karakoram region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    variations in the surface energy balance of Haut Glacier d’Clark (2008), Distributed energy balance modeling of South2005), A distributed energy balance model for complex

  7. Modeling regional power transfers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kavicky, J.A.; Veselka, T.D.

    1994-03-01

    The Spot Market Network (SMN) model was used to estimate spot market transactions and prices between various North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions for summer on-peak situations. A preliminary analysis of new or proposed additions to the transmission network was performed. The effects of alternative exempt wholesale generator (EWG) options on spot market transactions and the transmission system are also studied. This paper presents the SMN regional modelling approach and summarizes simulation results. Although the paper focuses on a regional network representation, a discussion of how the SMN model was used to represent a detailed utility-level network is also presented.

  8. book review: Species distribution models for species distribution modellers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dormann, Carsten F

    2012-01-01

    Mapping  species  distributions:  spa? tial inference and news and update  book review  Species distribution models for species distribution modellers  Ecological niches and 

  9. Integrated simulation of snow and glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed hydrological modeling framework at Hunza River Basin of Pakistan Karakoram region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    variations in the surface energy balance of Haut Glacier d’2005), A distributed energy balance model for complexat Fraser using a energy balance based snowmelt model (WEB-

  10. Integrated simulation of snow and glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed hydrological modeling framework at Hunza River Basin of Pakistan Karakoram region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    basin, Nepal Himalaya, in Snow and Glacier Hydrology, vol.274, 198–210. INTEGRATED SNOW AND GLACIERMELT MODEL Journalon water availability in snow-dominated regions, Nature,

  11. Integrated simulation of snow and glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed hydrological modeling framework at Hunza River Basin of Pakistan Karakoram region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    model of land surface water and energy ?uxes for GSMs, J.glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributedglacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed

  12. Modeling Microbial Consortiums as Distributed Metabolic Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Modeling Microbial Consortiums as Distributed Metabolic Networks JOSEPH J. VALLINO Ecosystems living systems in combination with abiotic reactions process and cycle mass and energy on local, regional by microbial processes, and it appears to closely follow thermodynamic constraints in that electron acceptor (O

  13. Extrapolating Oceanic Age Distributions: Lessons from the Pacific Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extrapolating Oceanic Age Distributions: Lessons from the Pacific Region David B. Rowley Department plate reconstructions. An area equal in size to the Pacific Basin oceanic lithosphere must-mail: rowley@geosci.uchicago.edu) A B S T R A C T Extrapolation of the age distribution of oceanic lithosphere

  14. Low Cost Region Detection from Distributed Sensor Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yan

    regions from the dis- tributed sensors. The solution is based on Spatial Grid partition and the task of applications that rely on coin- to palm-size computerized sentries. These miniature sensors can identify to create regions from distributed sensors. The solution is based on a Spatial Grid (SG) partition coupled

  15. A U.S. and China Regional Analysis of Distributed Energy Resources in Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Characterizations.China regional analysis of distributed energy resource incarbon dioxide distributed energy resources Distributed

  16. Statistical Models for Globular Cluster Luminosity Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunter, David

    Statistical Models for Globular Cluster Luminosity Distribution Max Buot Donald Richards Xavier statistical models which have been proposed for luminosity distributions for the globular clusters galaxies were well fit by Gaussian distributions, subsequent investigations suggested

  17. Regional weather modeling on parallel computers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baillie, C.; Michalakes, J.; Skalin, R.; Mathematics and Computer Science; NOAA Forecast Systems Lab.; Norwegian Meteorological Inst.

    1997-01-01

    This special issue on 'regional weather models' complements the October 1995 special issue on 'climate and weather modeling', which focused on global models. In this introduction we review the similarities and differences between regional and global atmospheric models. Next, the structure of regional models is described and we consider how the basic algorithms applied in these models influence the parallelization strategy. Finally, we give a brief overview of the eight articles in this issue and discuss some remaining challenges in the area of adapting regional weather models to parallel computers.

  18. A regional scale modeling analysis of aerosol and trace gas distributions over the eastern Pacific during the INTEX-B field campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    Attribution 3.0 License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Aused in current atmospheric chemistry models in general andalso influence atmospheric chemistry by pro- viding surface

  19. Integrated simulation of snow and glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed hydrological modeling framework at Hunza River Basin of Pakistan Karakoram region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    will affect the Asian water towers, Science, 328(5984),hydrologic modelling, J. Water Resour. Plann. Manag. , 119(impact of climate change on the water resource of Hindukush-

  20. Models on Distributed Memory Architectures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMission MissionModeling distributed generation in804 Y.He 1

  1. New model for nucleon generalized parton distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radyushkin, Anatoly V.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new type of models for nucleon generalized parton distributions (GPDs) H and E. They are heavily based on the fact nucleon GPDs require to use two forms of double distribution (DD) representations. The outcome of the new treatment is that the usual DD+D-term construction should be amended by an extra term, {xi} E{sub +}{sup 1} (x,{xi}) which has the DD structure {alpha}/{beta} e({beta},{alpha}, with e({beta},{alpha}) being the DD that generates GPD E(x,{xi}). We found that this function, unlike the D-term, has support in the whole -1 <= x <= 1 region. Furthermore, it does not vanish at the border points |x|={xi}.

  2. Regions in Energy Market Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, W.

    2007-02-01

    This report explores the different options for spatial resolution of an energy market model--and the advantages and disadvantages of models with fine spatial resolution. It examines different options for capturing spatial variations, considers the tradeoffs between them, and presents a few examples from one particular model that has been run at different levels of spatial resolution.

  3. Regions in Energy Market Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    This report explores the different options for spatial resolution of an energy market model and the advantages and disadvantages of models with fine spatial resolution. It examines different options for capturing spatial variations, considers the tradeoffs between them, and presents a few examples from one particular model that has been run at different levels of spatial resolution.

  4. Regional Climate Modeling: Progress, Challenges, and Prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yuqing; Leung, Lai R.; McGregor, John L.; Lee, Dong-Kyou; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Ding, Yihui; Kimura, Fujio

    2004-12-01

    Regional climate modeling with regional climate models (RCMs) has matured over the past decade and allows for meaningful utilization in a broad spectrum of applications. In this paper, latest progresses in regional climate modeling studies are reviewed, including RCM development, applications of RCMs to dynamical downscaling for climate change assessment, seasonal climate predictions and climate process studies, and the study of regional climate predictability. Challenges and potential directions of future research in this important area are discussed, with the focus on those to which less attention has been given previously, such as the importance of ensemble simulations, further development and improvement of regional climate modeling approach, modeling extreme climate events and sub-daily variation of clouds and precipitation, model evaluation and diagnostics, applications of RCMs to climate process studies and seasonal predictions, and development of regional earth system models. It is believed that with both the demonstrated credibility of RCMs’ capability in reproducing not only monthly to seasonal mean climate and interannual variability but also the extreme climate events when driven by good quality reanalysis and the continuous improvements in the skill of global general circulation models (GCMs) in simulating large-scale atmospheric circulation, regional climate modeling will remain an important dynamical downscaling tool for providing the needed information for assessing climate change impacts and seasonal climate predictions, and a powerful tool for improving our understanding of regional climate processes. An internationally coordinated effort can be developed with different focuses by different groups to advance regional climate modeling studies. It is also recognized that since the final quality of the results from nested RCMs depends in part on the realism of the large-scale forcing provided by GCMs, the reduction of errors and improvement in physics parameterizations in both GCMs and RCMs remain a priority for climate modeling community.

  5. DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC CURRENTS IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Török, T.; Titov, V. S.; Miki?, Z.; Leake, J. E.; Archontis, V.; Linton, M. G.; Dalmasse, K.; Aulanier, G.; Kliem, B.

    2014-02-10

    There has been a long-standing debate on the question of whether or not electric currents in solar active regions are neutralized. That is, whether or not the main (or direct) coronal currents connecting the active region polarities are surrounded by shielding (or return) currents of equal total value and opposite direction. Both theory and observations are not yet fully conclusive regarding this question, and numerical simulations have, surprisingly, barely been used to address it. Here we quantify the evolution of electric currents during the formation of a bipolar active region by considering a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the emergence of a sub-photospheric, current-neutralized magnetic flux rope into the solar atmosphere. We find that a strong deviation from current neutralization develops simultaneously with the onset of significant flux emergence into the corona, accompanied by the development of substantial magnetic shear along the active region's polarity inversion line. After the region has formed and flux emergence has ceased, the strong magnetic fields in the region's center are connected solely by direct currents, and the total direct current is several times larger than the total return current. These results suggest that active regions, the main sources of coronal mass ejections and flares, are born with substantial net currents, in agreement with recent observations. Furthermore, they support eruption models that employ pre-eruption magnetic fields containing such currents.

  6. Active region emission measure distributions and implications for nanoflare heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cargill, P. J., E-mail: p.cargill@imperial.ac.uk [Space and Atmospheric Physics, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BW, UKAND (United Kingdom); School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Scotland KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-20

    The temperature dependence of the emission measure (EM) in the core of active regions coronal loops is an important diagnostic of heating processes. Observations indicate that EM(T) ? T{sup a} below approximately 4 MK, with 2 < a < 5. Zero-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of nanoflare trains are used to demonstrate the dependence of a on the time between individual nanoflares (T{sub N} ) and the distribution of nanoflare energies. If T{sub N} is greater than a few thousand seconds, a < 3. For smaller values, trains of equally spaced nanoflares cannot account for the observed range of a if the distribution of nanoflare energies is either constant, randomly distributed, or a power law. Power law distributions where there is a delay between consecutive nanoflares proportional to the energy of the second nanoflare do lead to the observed range of a. However, T{sub N} must then be of the order of hundreds to no more than a few thousand seconds. If a nanoflare leads to the relaxation of a stressed coronal field to a near-potential state, the time taken to build up the required magnetic energy is thus too long to account for the EM measurements. Instead, it is suggested that a nanoflare involves the relaxation from one stressed coronal state to another, dissipating only a small fraction of the available magnetic energy. A consequence is that nanoflare energies may be smaller than previously envisioned.

  7. Approximations to the Distributed Activation Energy Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Approximations to the Distributed Activation Energy Model for Pyrolysis C.P. Please, 1 M.J. Mc, then resubmitted after minor revisions in September 2002. Abstract The Distributed Activation Energy Model (DAEM effective method for estimating kinetic parameters and the distribution of activation energies. Comparison

  8. Modeling hydrogen fuel distribution infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulido, Jon R. (Jon Ramon), 1974-

    2004-01-01

    This thesis' fundamental research question is to evaluate the structure of the hydrogen production, distribution, and dispensing infrastructure under various scenarios and to discover if any trends become apparent after ...

  9. A distributed accelerated gradient algorithm for distributed model predictive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Como, Giacomo

    is applied to the power reference tracking problem of a hydro power valley (HPV) system. The applied, Distributed model predictive control 1. Introduction Hydro power plants generate electricity from potential river or a water body system to generate the power at different stages. Currently, hydro power is one

  10. Model documentation: Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-02-17

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The methodology employed allows the analysis of impacts of regional capacity constraints in the interstate natural gas pipeline network and the identification of pipeline capacity expansion requirements. There is an explicit representation of core and noncore markets for natural gas transmission and distribution services, and the key components of pipeline tariffs are represented in a pricing algorithm. Natural gas pricing and flow patterns are derived by obtaining a market equilibrium across the three main elements of the natural gas market: the supply element, the demand element, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. The NGTDM consists of four modules: the Annual Flow Module, the Capacity F-expansion Module, the Pipeline Tariff Module, and the Distributor Tariff Module. A model abstract is provided in Appendix A.

  11. Gas Distribution Modeling using Sparse Gaussian Process Mixture Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teschner, Matthias

    Gas Distribution Modeling using Sparse Gaussian Process Mixture Models Cyrill Stachniss1 Christian-- In this paper, we consider the problem of learning a two dimensional spatial model of a gas distribution with a mobile robot. Building maps that can be used to accurately predict the gas concentration at query

  12. Survey of Emissions Models for Distributed Combined Heat and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Survey of Emissions Models for Distributed Combined Heat and Power Systems, 2007 Survey of Emissions Models for Distributed Combined Heat and Power Systems, 2007 The models...

  13. Convex Models of Distribution System Reconfiguration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Joshua A.

    We derive new mixed-integer quadratic, quadratically constrained, and second-order cone programming models of distribution system reconfiguration, which are to date the first formulations of the ac problem that have convex, ...

  14. Applying waste logistics modeling to regional planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holter, G.M.; Khawaja, A.; Shaver, S.R.; Peterson, K.L.

    1995-05-01

    Waste logistics modeling is a powerful analytical technique that can be used for effective planning of future solid waste storage, treatment, and disposal activities. Proper waste management is essential for preventing unacceptable environmental degradation from ongoing operations, and is also a critical part of any environmental remediation activity. Logistics modeling allows for analysis of alternate scenarios for future waste flowrates and routings, facility schedules, and processing or handling capacities. Such analyses provide an increased understanding of the critical needs for waste storage, treatment, transport, and disposal while there is still adequate lead time to plan accordingly. They also provide a basis for determining the sensitivity of these critical needs to the various system parameters. This paper discusses the application of waste logistics modeling concepts to regional planning. In addition to ongoing efforts to aid in planning for a large industrial complex, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is currently involved in implementing waste logistics modeling as part of the planning process for material recovery and recycling within a multi-city region in the western US.

  15. Modeling of Customer Adoption of Distributed Energy Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling of Customer Adoption of Distributed Energy Resources CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Reliability Technology Solutions Modeling of Customer Adoption of Distributed Energy Resources Prepared the consequences. #12;#12;Modeling of Customer Adoption of Distributed Energy Resources iii Table of Contents

  16. Distributed Wind Diffusion Model Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preus, R.; Drury, E.; Sigrin, B.; Gleason, M.

    2014-07-01

    Distributed wind market demand is driven by current and future wind price and performance, along with several non-price market factors like financing terms, retail electricity rates and rate structures, future wind incentives, and others. We developed a new distributed wind technology diffusion model for the contiguous United States that combines hourly wind speed data at 200m resolution with high resolution electricity load data for various consumer segments (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial), electricity rates and rate structures for utility service territories, incentive data, and high resolution tree cover. The model first calculates the economics of distributed wind at high spatial resolution for each market segment, and then uses a Bass diffusion framework to estimate the evolution of market demand over time. The model provides a fundamental new tool for characterizing how distributed wind market potential could be impacted by a range of future conditions, such as electricity price escalations, improvements in wind generator performance and installed cost, and new financing structures. This paper describes model methodology and presents sample results for distributed wind market potential in the contiguous U.S. through 2050.

  17. Projected impacts of climate change on species distribution in the Acadian Forest region of eastern Nova Scotia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .e., hydrological cycle and earth- sun geometry. Growing degree days and mean air temperature are basedProjected impacts of climate change on species distribution in the Acadian Forest region of eastern on processing remote sensing data, mean air temperatures serves as one of several inputs to model calculation

  18. Hot Water Distribution System Model Enhancements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoeschele, M.; Weitzel, E.

    2012-11-01

    This project involves enhancement of the HWSIM distribution system model to more accurately model pipe heat transfer. Recent laboratory testing efforts have indicated that the modeling of radiant heat transfer effects is needed to accurately characterize piping heat loss. An analytical methodology for integrating radiant heat transfer was implemented with HWSIM. Laboratory test data collected in another project was then used to validate the model for a variety of uninsulated and insulated pipe cases (copper, PEX, and CPVC). Results appear favorable, with typical deviations from lab results less than 8%.

  19. Modeling optical and UV polarization of AGNs III. From uniform-density to clumpy regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marin, F; Gaskell, C M

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that part of, if not all, scattering regions of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are clumpy. Hence. in this paper, we run radiative transfer models in the optical/UV for a variety of AGN reprocessing regions with different distributions of clumpy scattering media. We use the latest version of the Monte Carlo code STOKES presented in the first two papers of this series to model AGN reprocessing regions of increasing morphological complexity. We replace previously uniform-density media with up to thousands of constant-density clumps. We couple a continuum source to fragmented equatorial scattering regions, polar outflows, and toroidal, obscuring dust regions and investigate a wide range of geometries. We also consider different levels of fragmentation in each scattering region to evaluate importance of fragmentation for the net polarization of the AGN. We find that, in comparison with uniform-density models, equatorial distributions of gas and dust clouds result in grayer spectr...

  20. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer...

  1. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer...

  2. California Wintertime Precipitation in Regional and Global Climate Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, P M

    2009-04-27

    In this paper, wintertime precipitation from a variety of observational datasets, regional climate models (RCMs), and general circulation models (GCMs) is averaged over the state of California (CA) and compared. Several averaging methodologies are considered and all are found to give similar values when model grid spacing is less than 3{sup o}. This suggests that CA is a reasonable size for regional intercomparisons using modern GCMs. Results show that reanalysis-forced RCMs tend to significantly overpredict CA precipitation. This appears to be due mainly to overprediction of extreme events; RCM precipitation frequency is generally underpredicted. Overprediction is also reflected in wintertime precipitation variability, which tends to be too high for RCMs on both daily and interannual scales. Wintertime precipitation in most (but not all) GCMs is underestimated. This is in contrast to previous studies based on global blended gauge/satellite observations which are shown here to underestimate precipitation relative to higher-resolution gauge-only datasets. Several GCMs provide reasonable daily precipitation distributions, a trait which doesn't seem tied to model resolution. GCM daily and interannual variability is generally underpredicted.

  3. Distributed Energy Resources Market Diffusion Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maribu, Karl Magnus; Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal S.

    2006-01-01

    Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Distributed Energy ProgramDistributed Energy Resources Characterizations. National Renewable Energy

  4. An advanced power distribution automation model system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niwa, Shigeharu; Kanoi, Minoru; Nishijima, Kazuo; Hayami, Mitsuo

    1995-12-31

    An advanced power distribution automation (APDA) model system has been developed on the present basis of the automated distribution systems in Japan, which have been used for remote switching operations and for urgent supply restorations during faults. The increased use of electronic apparatuses sensitive to supply interruption requires very high supply reliability, and the final developed system is expected to be useful for this purpose. The developed model system adopts pole circuit breakers and remote termination units connected through 64kbps optical fibers to the computer of the automated system in the control center. Immediate switching operations for supply restorations during faults are possible through the restoration procedures, prepared beforehand, by the computer and by fast telecommunications using optical fibers. So, protection by the feeder circuit breaker in the substation can be avoided, which would otherwise cause the blackout of the whole distribution line. The test results show the effectiveness of model the system: successful fault locations and reconfiguration for supply restoration including separation of the fault sections (without blackout for the ground faults and with a short period (within 1 s) of blackout for the short-circuit faults).

  5. Distribution of glycosaminoglycans in specific regions of the reproductive tract of mares 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varner, Dickson Drew

    1990-01-01

    (Chair Committee) David W. Forrest (Member) Thomas H. Welsh, Jr (Member) Ro ert C. Bur rdt (Member Gerald R. Bratton (Head of Department) May 1990 ABSTRACT Distribution of Glycosaminoglycans in Specific Regions of the Reproductive Tract... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Nay 1990 Najor Subject: Veterinary Anatomy DISTRIBUTION OF GLYCOSAMINOGLYCANS IN SPECIFIC REGIONS OF THE REPRODUCTIVE TRACT OF MARES A Thesis by DICKSON DREW YARNER Approved as to style and content by: L r Johnson...

  6. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. Subsequent chapters of this report provide: an overview of NGTDM; a description of the interface between the NEMS and NGTDM; an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM; the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module; the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module; the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module; the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module; and a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs.

  7. Diamond Lattice Model of Semicrystalline Polyethylene in the Amorphous Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond Lattice Model of Semicrystalline Polyethylene in the Amorphous Region Zhong­Hui Duan Abstract The statistics of polyethylene chains in the amorphous region between two crystallites have been as models of the chain molecules in the amorphous region of semicrystalline polyethylene, both

  8. Distributed Energy Resources Market Diffusion Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maribu, Karl Magnus; Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal S.

    2006-01-01

    International Journal of Distributed Energy Resources, 1 (Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resources Characterizations.Firestone, R. (2004) Distributed Energy Resources Customer

  9. A Framework for Modeling Uncertainty in Regional Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    climate models). The modeling framework revolves around the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MITA Framework for Modeling Uncertainty in Regional Climate Change Erwan Monier, Xiang Gao, Jeffery processes of policy development and implementation, climate change research needs to focus on improving

  10. Regional Short-Term Energy Model (RSTEM) Overview

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The Regional Short-Term Energy Model (RSTEM) utilizes estimated econometric relationships for demand, inventories and prices to forecast energy market outcomes across key sectors and selected regions throughout the United States.

  11. The Central Region in M100: Observations and Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. H. Knapen; J. E. Beckman; C. H. Heller; I. Shlosman; R. S. de Jong

    1995-06-19

    We present new high-resolution observations of the center of the late-type spiral M100 (NGC 4321) supplemented by 3D numerical modeling of stellar and gas dynamics, including star formation (SF). NIR imaging has revealed a stellar bar, previously inferred from optical and 21 cm observations, and an ovally-shaped ring-like structure in the plane of the disk. The K isophotes become progressively elongated and skewed to the position angle of the bar (outside and inside the `ring') forming an inner bar-like region. The galaxy exhibits a circumnuclear starburst in the inner part of the K `ring'. Two maxima of the K emission have been observed to lie symmetrically with respect to the nucleus and equidistant from it slightly leading the stellar bar. We interpret the twists in the K isophotes as being indicative of the presence of a double inner Lindblad resonance (ILR) and test this hypothesis by modeling the gas flow in a self-consistent gas + stars disk embedded in a halo, with an overall NGC4321-like mass distribution. We have reproduced the basic morphology of the region (the bar, the large scale trailing shocks, two symmetric K peaks corresponding to gas compression maxima which lie at the caustic formed by the interaction of a pair of trailing and leading shocks in the vicinity of the inner ILR, both peaks being sites of SF, and two additional zones of SF corresponding to the gas compression maxima, referred usually as `twin peaks').

  12. Coupling of a regional atmospheric model (RegCM3) and a regional oceanic model (FVCOM) over the maritime continent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Jun

    Climatological high resolution coupled climate model simulations for the maritime continent have been carried out using the regional climate model (RegCM) version 3 and the finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) ...

  13. Model-predicted distribution of wind-induced internal wave energy in the world's oceans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Model-predicted distribution of wind-induced internal wave energy in the world's oceans Naoki 9 July 2008; published 30 September 2008. [1] The distribution of wind-induced internal wave energy-scaled kinetic energy are all consistent with the available observations in the regions of significant wind

  14. Modeling Distributed Electricity Generation in the NEMS Buildings Models

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the modeling methodology, projected market penetration, and impact of distributed generation with respect to offsetting future electricity needs and carbon dioxide emissions in the residential and commercial buildings sector in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) reference case.

  15. A Model of U.S. Commercial Distributed Generation Adoption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Ryan Firestone; Zhou, Nan; Maribu,Karl; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-10

    Small-scale (100 kW-5 MW) on-site distributed generation (DG) economically driven by combined heat and power (CHP) applications and, in some cases, reliability concerns will likely emerge as a common feature of commercial building energy systems over the next two decades. Forecasts of DG adoption published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) are made using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), which has a forecasting module that predicts the penetration of several possible commercial building DG technologies over the period 2005-2025. NEMS is also used for estimating the future benefits of Department of Energy research and development used in support of budget requests and management decisionmaking. The NEMS approach to modeling DG has some limitations, including constraints on the amount of DG allowed for retrofits to existing buildings and a small number of possible sizes for each DG technology. An alternative approach called Commercial Sector Model (ComSeM) is developed to improve the way in which DG adoption is modeled. The approach incorporates load shapes for specific end uses in specific building types in specific regions, e.g., cooling in hospitals in Atlanta or space heating in Chicago offices. The Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) uses these load profiles together with input cost and performance DG technology assumptions to model the potential DG adoption for four selected cities and two sizes of five building types in selected forecast years to 2022. The Distributed Energy Resources Market Diffusion Model (DER-MaDiM) is then used to then tailor the DER-CAM results to adoption projections for the entire U.S. commercial sector for all forecast years from 2007-2025. This process is conducted such that the structure of results are consistent with the structure of NEMS, and can be re-injected into NEMS that can then be used to integrate adoption results into a full forecast.

  16. Modeling The GRB Host Galaxy Mass Distribution: Are GRBs Unbiased...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Modeling The GRB Host Galaxy Mass Distribution: Are GRBs Unbiased Tracers of Star Formation? Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modeling The GRB Host Galaxy Mass...

  17. Inverse modeling of NOx emissions at regional scale over northern France: Preliminary investigation of the second-order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallet, Vivien

    Inverse modeling of NOx emissions at regional scale over northern France: Preliminary investigation time distribution of NOx emissions is robust. Citation: Que´lo, D., V. Mallet, and B. Sportisse (2005), Inverse modeling of NOx emissions at regional scale over northern France: Preliminary investigation

  18. Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-02-01

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. From 1982 through 1993, the Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS) was used by the EIA for its analyses, and the Gas Analysis Modeling System (GAMS) was used within IFFS to represent natural gas markets. Prior to 1982, the Midterm Energy Forecasting System (MEFS), also referred to as the Project Independence Evaluation System (PIES), was employed. NEMS was developed to enhance and update EIA`s modeling capability by internally incorporating models of energy markets that had previously been analyzed off-line. In addition, greater structural detail in NEMS permits the analysis of a broader range of energy issues. The time horizon of NEMS is the midterm period (i.e., through 2015). In order to represent the regional differences in energy markets, the component models of NEMS function at regional levels appropriate for the markets represented, with subsequent aggregation/disaggregation to the Census Division level for reporting purposes.

  19. Accounting for species taxonomy improves distribution models Aidin Niamir a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    models, multispecies models, species distribution models Abstract: The use of species atlas data of species distribution models. Using atlas data, two taxonomically enhanced datasets were created for 356. Enhancement of atlas data by excluding irrelevant absences based on species taxonomy significantly improved

  20. Rainwater harvesting in Dry Chaco: Regional distribution and local water balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    Rainwater harvesting in Dry Chaco: Regional distribution and local water balance Patricio N Infiltration Drylands a b s t r a c t Rainwater harvesting (RWH) has been essential for the establishment. The daily dy- namic of water stock of the RWH impoundment showed that water harvest events were

  1. HII Region Metallicity Distribution in the Milky Way Disk Dana Balser (NRAO)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Dana S.

    Radiation #12;Water Masers in AGN H2O Masers in Nuclear Accretion Disks Discovered by the GBT Monitored & Tsvetanov Cat's Eye (NGC 6543) #12;Galaxy Formation and Evolution Martin Pugh Andromeda (M31) #12;Radial HII Region Catalog Distribution #12;Questions #12;Extra Slides #12;GBT/140 Foot Cross Calibration

  2. F region above kauai: Measurement, model, modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.Y.; Sjolander, G.W.; Oran, E.S.; Young, T.R.; Bernhardt, P.A.; Da Rosa, A.V.

    1980-08-01

    A detailed description and analysis is presented of the Lagopedo II results. The rocket was launched on September 11, 1977. Prior to an explosive chemical release a rocket-borne ion mass spectrometer and dual-frequency beacon measured the ion composition and electron content of the undisturbed F region above Kauai, Hawaii. These results are compared to a detailed calculation of ionospheric ion denities. Considerable H/sub 2/O outgassing produced measurable 18/sup +/(H/sub 2/O/sup +/) and 19/sup +/(H/sub 3/O/sup +/) currents which together with O/sup +/ current were used to determine the H/sup 3/O/sup +//H/sub 2/O/sup +/ dissociative recombination rate ratio. The explosive event at 283 km swept clean a l-km-radius region. The boundary of the ionic void was characterized by a steep gradient in the ion density. Results for the first 60 s after the event are presented which show changes in ambient ion species 14/sup +/, 16/sup +/, 30/sup +/, new reactant species 15/sup +/, 17/sup +/, 18/sup +/, 19/sup +/, 27/sup +/, and 46/sup +/, and evidence of ionic depletion by sweeping.

  3. MODELLING DISTRIBUTED KNOWLEDGE PROCESSES IN NEXT GENERATION MULTIDISCIPLINARY ALLIANCES *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowker, Geoffrey C.

    MODELLING DISTRIBUTED KNOWLEDGE PROCESSES IN NEXT GENERATION MULTIDISCIPLINARY ALLIANCES * Alaina G and industrial dollars are invested in establishing academic-industry alliances and building infrastructures and technology in distributed, multidisciplinary scientific teams in the National Computational Science Alliance

  4. Improved Indoor Tracking Based on Generalized t-Distribution Noise Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuo, Liu; Le, Yin; Khuen, Ho Weng; Voon, Ling Keck

    2015-01-01

    t distribution noise model. Industrial & EngineeringGeneralized t -Distribution Noise Model Liu Shuo Yin Le Hogeneralized t-distribution noise model based on influence

  5. Distributed energy resources in practice: A case study analysis and validation of LBNL's customer adoption model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Owen; Creighton, Charles; Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Pharmingen Distributed Energy Resources in Practice Tablemany regions. Distributed Energy Resources in Practice 10.of µGrid Distributed Energy Resource Potential Using DER-CAM

  6. Distributed energy resources in practice: A case study analysis and validation of LBNL's customer adoption model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Owen; Creighton, Charles; Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael

    2003-01-01

    BD Biosciences Pharmingen Distributed Energy Resources inin many regions. Distributed Energy Resources in PracticeAssessment of µGrid Distributed Energy Resource Potential

  7. Regional Dynamics Model (REDYN) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergyRedfield1989) Jump to:|OpenRegenesisDynamics Model

  8. Analysis Model for Domestic Hot Water Distribution Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, J.; Krarti, M.; Fang, X.

    2011-11-01

    A thermal model was developed to estimate the energy losses from prototypical domestic hot water (DHW) distribution systems for homes. The developed model, using the TRNSYS simulation software, allows researchers and designers to better evaluate the performance of hot water distribution systems in homes. Modeling results were compared with past experimental study results and showed good agreement.

  9. High order hybrid discontinuous Galerkin regional ocean modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ueckermann, Mattheus Percy

    2014-01-01

    Accurate modeling of physical and biogeochemical dynamics in coastal ocean regions is required for multiple scientific and societal applications, covering a wide range of time and space scales. However, in light of the ...

  10. A Framework for Modeling Uncertainty in Regional Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monier, Erwan

    In this study, we present a new modeling framework and a large ensemble of climate projections to investigate the uncertainty in regional climate change over the US associated with four dimensions of uncertainty. The sources ...

  11. Model of the radial distribution of gas in the blast furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikus, M.; Saxen, H. [Aabo Akademi Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes an on-line model for estimating the radial gas distribution in blast furnaces. The model is based on molar and energy flow balances for the blast furnace throat region, and utilizes the top gas temperature and gas temperature measurements from a fixed above-burden probe. The distribution of the gas flux is estimated by a Kalman filter. The method is illustrated to capture short-term dynamics and to detect sudden major changes in the gas distribution in Finnish blast furnace.

  12. Synthesised Constraint Models for Distributed Energy Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Wolfgang

    generators in a virtual power plant (unit commitment). Standard solutions require fixed parametrised. The concepts are detailed with the load- distribution problem faced in virtual power plants and evaluated.g., distributing the load in a virtual power plant (VPP) or scheduling energy-consuming domestic processes

  13. Asymptotic Approximations to the Distributed Activation Energy Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuinness, Mark

    Asymptotic Approximations to the Distributed Activation Energy Model M.J.McGuinness1 , E. Donskoi2 by a continuum distribution in activation energy of individual re- actions. An individual reaction is characterised by a pre-exponential coefficient and an activation energy. The distribution, usually Gaussian

  14. Equilibrium Distribution of Mutators in the Single Fitness Peak Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tannenbaum, Emmanuel; Deeds, Eric J.; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2003-09-26

    This Letter develops an analytically tractable model for determining the equilibrium distribution of mismatch repair deficient strains in unicellular populations. The approach is based on the single fitness peak model, ...

  15. A Spatial Analysis of Multivariate Output from Regional Climate Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sain, Steve

    , Columbus, OH 43210, ncressie@stat.osu.edu. 1 #12;1 Introduction Many processes in the Earth system cannot, etc. Climate models attempt to represent this system, as well as to incorporate anthropogenic forcingsA Spatial Analysis of Multivariate Output from Regional Climate Models Stephan R. Sain,1 Reinhard

  16. Orchestration in Orc: A Deterministic Distributed Programming Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misra, Jayadev

    Orchestration in Orc: A Deterministic Distributed Programming Model William R. Cook and Jayadev}@cs.utexas.edu Abstract. Orc is a new model of distributed programming which pro- vides a strong theoretical foundation for internet computing based on compositions of web-services. Orc combines some of the power and flex- ibility

  17. Distributed parameter model simulation tool for PEM fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batlle, Carles

    for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) has been developed, based on a distributed parameter model and durability of PEMFC. Keywords: PEMFC, distributed parameter modeling, dynamic simulation 1. Introduction The proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) technology has been incorporated to a wide range of portable

  18. Modeling of Field Distribution and Energy Storage in Diphasic Dielectrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koledintseva, Marina Y.

    Modeling of Field Distribution and Energy Storage in Diphasic Dielectrics S. K. Patil, M. Y, USA Modeling of electrostatic field distribution and energy storage in diphasic dielectrics containing to the increased energy storage density. For composites with lower volume fractions of high-permittivity inclusions

  19. SPATIAL MODELS FOR LOCALIZATION OF IMAGE TAMPERING USING DISTRIBUTED SOURCE CODES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girod, Bernd

    SPATIAL MODELS FOR LOCALIZATION OF IMAGE TAMPERING USING DISTRIBUTED SOURCE CODES Yao-Chung Lin to distinguish the legitimate diversity of encoded images from tampering but also lo- calize the tampered regions extend the localization decoder with 1D and 2D spatial mod- els to exploit the contiguity of the tampered

  20. FAST ABSTRACT: Vulnerability Discovery Modeling using Weibull Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malaiya, Yashwant K.

    models for the related processes. A few vulnerability discovery models (VDMs) have been proposed recently that attempt to model the vulnerability discovery process during the lifecycle of a given software productFAST ABSTRACT: Vulnerability Discovery Modeling using Weibull Distribution HyunChul Joh, Jinyoo Kim

  1. Modeling Neural Population Spiking Activity with Gibbs Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Frank

    the neural code and building practical decoding algorithms. No parametric models currently exist for modeling-parametric methods impractical. To address these prob- lems we propose an energy-based model in which the joint a multivariate probability distribution over spike times. Modeling P(s, r) is made challenging by the high

  2. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Regional Residential Heating Oil Price Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The regional residential heating oil price module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide residential retail price forecasts for the 4 census regions: Northeast, South, Midwest, and West.

  3. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Regional Residential Propane Price Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The regional residential propane price module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide residential retail price forecasts for the 4 Census regions: Northeast, South, Midwest, and West.

  4. Modeling probability distributions with predictive state representations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiewiora, Eric Walter

    2008-01-01

    Discovery is the process of choosing the core tests, whose success probabilities will become the state of the learned model.

  5. Dynamic Modeling and Resilience for Power Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji, Chuanyi

    --Resilience of power distribution is pertinent to the energy grid under severe weather. This work develops an ana is to improve resilience of the power grid to external disruptions from severe weather. Severe weather events-scale external disruptions from severe weather [3]. Resilience here corresponds to the ability of the grid

  6. Explaining species distribution patterns through hierarchical modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfand, Alan E.; Silander, John A., Jr.; Wu, Shanshan; Latimer, Andrew; Lewis, Paul O.; Rebelo, Anthony G.; Holder, Mark T.

    2006-01-01

    ; 000 cells total for the region). We report on results for 40 species of a owering plant family Proteaceae (of about 330 in the CFR) for a de ned subregion. Using a Bayesian framework, we develop a two stage, spatially explicit, hierar- chical logistic...

  7. Double-distribution-function discrete Boltzmann model for combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuandong Lin; Aiguo Xu; Guangcai Zhang; Yingjun Li

    2015-11-11

    A 2-dimensional discrete Boltzmann model for combustion is presented. Mathematically, the model is composed of two coupled discrete Boltzmann equations for two species and a phenomenological equation for chemical reaction process. Physically, the model is equivalent to a reactive Navier-Stokes model supplemented by a coarse-grained model for the thermodynamic nonequilibrium behaviours. This model adopts 16 discrete velocities. It works for both subsonic and supersonic combustion phenomena with flexible specific heat ratio. To discuss the physical accuracy of the coarse-grained model for nonequilibrium behaviours, three other discrete velocity models are used for comparisons. Numerical results are compared with analytical solutions based on both the first-order and second-order truncations of the distribution function. It is confirmed that the physical accuracy increases with the increasing moment relations needed by nonequlibrium manifestations. Furthermore, compared with the single distribution function model, this model can simulate more details of combustion.

  8. Recovery Act-SmartGrid regional demonstration transmission and distribution (T&D) Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hedges, Edward T.

    2015-01-31

    This document represents the Final Technical Report for the Kansas City Power & Light Company (KCP&L) Green Impact Zone SmartGrid Demonstration Project (SGDP). The KCP&L project is partially funded by Department of Energy (DOE) Regional Smart Grid Demonstration Project cooperative agreement DE-OE0000221 in the Transmission and Distribution Infrastructure application area. This Final Technical Report summarizes the KCP&L SGDP as of April 30, 2015 and includes summaries of the project design, implementation, operations, and analysis performed as of that date.

  9. Modeling Learningless Vulnerability Discovery using a Folded Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malaiya, Yashwant K.

    model is logistic, and thus the increase and decrease in the discovery process is assumedModeling Learningless Vulnerability Discovery using a Folded Distribution Awad A. Younis1 , Hyun, CO 80523, USA Abstract ­ A vulnerability discovery model describes the vulnerability discovery rate

  10. Open economy models of distribution and growth Robert A. Blecker*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlini, David

    Chapter 9 Open economy models of distribution and growth Robert A. Blecker* To appear in: Eckhard-Keynesian macro models for closed economies, the present chapter focuses on extensions of these models the post-Keynesian framework to a global economy that has become much more integrated in the past few

  11. Adjoint modeling for atmospheric pollution process sensitivity at regional scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    , a strong pollution event was documented over Paris as part of the Etude et Simulation de la Qualite´ de l'airAdjoint modeling for atmospheric pollution process sensitivity at regional scale Laurent Menut 1998 the pollution event changes from a well-marked ozone plume issued from Paris to a more general

  12. Reference wind farm selection for regional wind power prediction models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Reference wind farm selection for regional wind power prediction models Nils Siebert George.siebert@ensmp.fr, georges.kariniotakis@ensmp.fr Abstract Short-term wind power forecasting is recognized today as a major requirement for a secure and economic integration of wind generation in power systems. This paper deals

  13. Spatial Models for Groundwater Behavioral Analysis in Regions of Maharashtra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Spatial Models for Groundwater Behavioral Analysis in Regions of Maharashtra M.Tech Dissertation In this project we have performed spatial analysis of groundwater data in Thane and Latur districts of Maharashtra Groundwater Survey and Development Agency, Maharashtra), shape files for watershed boundaries and drainage

  14. A regional modeling study of the entraining Mediterranean outflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozgökmen, Tamay M.

    A regional modeling study of the entraining Mediterranean outflow X. Xu,1,2 E. P. Chassignet,3 J. F­dependent entrainment parameterization of Xu et al. (2006). Given realistic topography and sufficient resolution of the outflow plume, and most importantly, the localized, strong entrainment that has been observed to occur

  15. Non resonant transmission modelling with Statistical modal Energy distribution Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    be used as an alternative to Statistical Energy Analysis for describing subsystems with low modal overlap1 Non resonant transmission modelling with Statistical modal Energy distribution Analysis L. Maxit Capelle, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex, France Statistical modal Energy distribution Analysis (SmEdA) can

  16. Distributed Prognostics Based on Structural Model Decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daigle, Matthew

    efficiency. Using a centrifugal pump as a case study, we perform a number of simulation-based experiments or probability Q volumetric flow T temperature r friction coefficient w wear parameter M model/submodel v

  17. Modeling and Verification of a Distributed Transmission Protocol Lubomir Ivanov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Lubomir

    -parallel poset verification is a powerful methodology for proving the design correctness of complex systemsModeling and Verification of a Distributed Transmission Protocol Lubomir Ivanov Department verification methodologies has evolved in two directions: powerful, general techniques capable of accurately

  18. A mixture model of global Internet capacity distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyunjin; Thorson, Stuart

    2015-05-13

    This article develops a preferential attachment-based mixture model of global Internet bandwidth and investigates it in the context of observed bandwidth distributions between 2002 and 2011. Our longitudinal analysis shows, among other things...

  19. Discovering Statistical Models of Availability in Large Distributed Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kondo, Derrick

    1 Discovering Statistical Models of Availability in Large Distributed Systems: An Empirical Study. Invariably, these systems are composed of heterogeneous hosts whose individual availability often exhibit describe an effective method for discovering subsets of hosts whose availability have similar statistical

  20. Can remote sensing of land cover improve species distribution modelling?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley, Bethany

    of continuous values, and are more often used for predict- ing species distributions (Guisan & Zim- mermann regions. The structural complexity of vegetation and the relative proportion of cover in the understorey scattering data, both of which provide a much greater range of continuous data values than vegetation

  1. MULTIVARIATE INPUT MODELING WITH JOHNSON DISTRIBUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Psihogios Joseph R. Davis Ergonomics Laboratory Department of Industrial Engineering North Carolina State­ cations of the technique in ergonomics and production scheduling are discussed. The proposed method­modeling technique. In this paper two applications are discussed in some detail. Ergonomics Application. We construct

  2. Rat Trachea Dose Distribution Model Using MCNPTM 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almanza, Christian

    2010-01-15

    , ?, by ionizing radiation within a specific volume, V, of mass m (2), i.e., dm d D ? = . This quantity has units of gray, Gy, where 1 Gy = 1 J/kg. Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP TM ) code is based on the Monte Carlo method and is frequently used to model....0035 73562 g tally for photons electrons cell 201 cell 201 28 1.83858E-11 0...

  3. Regional-Scale Climate Change: Observations and Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond S. Bradley; Henry F. Diaz

    2010-12-14

    This collaborative proposal addressed key issues in understanding the Earthâ??s climate system, as highlighted by the U.S. Climate Science Program. The research focused on documenting past climatic changes and on assessing future climatic changes based on suites of global and regional climate models. Geographically, our emphasis was on the mountainous regions of the world, with a particular focus on the Neotropics of Central America and the Hawaiian Islands. Mountain regions are zones where large variations in ecosystems occur due to the strong climate zonation forced by the topography. These areas are particularly susceptible to changes in critical ecological thresholds, and we conducted studies of changes in phonological indicators based on various climatic thresholds.

  4. Modeling distributed generation in the buildings sectors

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See(STEO), 19992, 19999,33.0Modeling

  5. KAPPA DISTRIBUTION MODEL FOR HARD X-RAY CORONAL SOURCES OF SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oka, M.; Ishikawa, S.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Krucker, S.; Lin, R. P. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California Berkeley (United States)] [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California Berkeley (United States)

    2013-02-10

    Solar flares produce hard X-ray emission, the photon spectrum of which is often represented by a combination of thermal and power-law distributions. However, the estimates of the number and total energy of non-thermal electrons are sensitive to the determination of the power-law cutoff energy. Here, we revisit an 'above-the-loop' coronal source observed by RHESSI on 2007 December 31 and show that a kappa distribution model can also be used to fit its spectrum. Because the kappa distribution has a Maxwellian-like core in addition to a high-energy power-law tail, the emission measure and temperature of the instantaneous electrons can be derived without assuming the cutoff energy. Moreover, the non-thermal fractions of electron number/energy densities can be uniquely estimated because they are functions of only the power-law index. With the kappa distribution model, we estimated that the total electron density of the coronal source region was {approx}2.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}. We also estimated without assuming the source volume that a moderate fraction ({approx}20%) of electrons in the source region was non-thermal and carried {approx}52% of the total electron energy. The temperature was 28 MK, and the power-law index {delta} of the electron density distribution was -4.3. These results are compared to the conventional power-law models with and without a thermal core component.

  6. Modelling LARES temperature distribution and thermal drag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phuc H. Nguyen; Richard Matzner

    2015-07-25

    The LARES satellite, a laser-ranged space experiment to contribute to geophysics observation, and to measure the general relativistic Lense-Thirring effect, has been observed to undergo an anomalous along-track orbital acceleration of -0.4 pm/s$^2$ (pm := picometer). This "drag" is not surprising; along track drag has previously been observed with the related LAGEOS satellites (-3.4 pm/s$^2$). It is hypothesized that the drag is principally due to anisotropic thermal radiation from the satellite's exterior. We report the results of numerical computations of the along-track orbital decay of the LARES satellite during the first 126 days after launch. The results depend to a significant degree on the visual and IR absorbance $\\alpha$ and emissivity $\\epsilon$ of the fused silica Cube Corner Reflectors. We present results for two values of $\\alpha_{IR}$ = $\\epsilon_{IR}$: 0.82, a standard number for "clean" fused silica; and 0.60, a possible value for silica with slight surface contamination subjected to the space environment. The heating and the resultant along-track acceleration depend on the plane of the orbit, the sun position, and in particular on the occurrence of eclipses, all of which are functions of time. Thus we compute the drag for specific days. We compare our model to observational data, available for a 120-day period starting with the 7th day after launch, which shows the average acceleration of -0.4 pm/s$^2$. With our model the average along-track drag over this 120-day period for CCR $\\alpha_{IR}$ = $\\epsilon_{IR}$ = 0.82 was computed to be -0.59 pm/s$^2$. For CCR $\\alpha_{IR}$ = $\\epsilon_{IR}$ = 0.60 we compute -0.36 pm/s$^2$. Thus, our model demonstrates that most of the anomalous along-track acceleration can be explained by thermal thrust, but there could be smaller contributions from unmodelled effects.

  7. Modelling LARES temperature distribution and thermal drag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phuc H. Nguyen; Richard Matzner

    2015-10-13

    The LARES satellite, a laser-ranged space experiment to contribute to geophysics observation, and to measure the general relativistic Lense-Thirring effect, has been observed to undergo an anomalous along-track orbital acceleration of -0.4 pm/s$^2$ (pm := picometer). This "drag" is not surprising; along track drag has previously been observed with the related LAGEOS satellites (-3.4 pm/s$^2$). It is hypothesized that the drag is principally due to anisotropic thermal radiation from the satellite's exterior. We report the results of numerical computations of the along-track orbital decay of the LARES satellite during the first 126 days after launch. The results depend to a significant degree on the visual and IR absorbance $\\alpha$ and emissivity $\\epsilon$ of the fused silica Cube Corner Reflectors. We present results for two values of $\\alpha_{IR}$ = $\\epsilon_{IR}$: 0.82, a standard number for "clean" fused silica; and 0.60, a possible value for silica with slight surface contamination subjected to the space environment. The heating and the resultant along-track acceleration depend on the plane of the orbit, the sun position, and in particular on the occurrence of eclipses, all of which are functions of time. Thus we compute the drag for specific days. We compare our model to observational data, available for a 120-day period starting with the 7th day after launch, which shows the average acceleration of -0.4 pm/s$^2$. With our model the average along-track drag over this 120-day period for CCR $\\alpha_{IR}$ = $\\epsilon_{IR}$ = 0.82 was computed to be -0.59 pm/s$^2$. For CCR $\\alpha_{IR}$ = $\\epsilon_{IR}$ = 0.60 we compute -0.36 pm/s$^2$. Thus, our model demonstrates that most of the anomalous along-track acceleration can be explained by thermal thrust, but there could be smaller contributions from unmodelled effects.

  8. Regional Analysis of Building Distributed Energy Costs and CO2 Abatement: A U.S. - China Comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendes, Goncalo; Feng, Wei; Stadler, Michael; Steinbach, Jan; Lai, Judy; Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Ding, Yan; Zhao, Jing; Tian, Zhe; Zhu, Neng

    2014-04-09

    The following paper conducts a regional analysis of the U.S. and Chinese buildings? potential for adopting Distributed Energy Resources (DER). The expected economics of DER in 2020-2025 is modeled for a commercial and a multi-family residential building in different climate zones. The optimal building energy economic performance is calculated using the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER CAM) which minimizes building energy costs for a typical reference year of operation. Several DER such as combined heat and power (CHP) units, photovoltaics, and battery storage are considered. The results indicate DER have economic and environmental competitiveness potential, especially for commercial buildings in hot and cold climates of both countries. In the U.S., the average expected energy cost savings in commercial buildings from DER CAM?s suggested investments is 17percent, while in Chinese buildings is 12percent. The electricity tariffs structure and prices along with the cost of natural gas, represent important factors in determining adoption of DER, more so than climate. High energy pricing spark spreads lead to increased economic attractiveness of DER. The average emissions reduction in commercial buildings is 19percent in the U.S. as a result of significant investments in PV, whereas in China, it is 20percent and driven by investments in CHP. Keywords: Building Modeling and Simulation, Distributed Energy Resources (DER), Energy Efficiency, Combined Heat and Power (CHP), CO2 emissions 1. Introduction The transition from a centralized and fossil-based energy paradigm towards the decentralization of energy supply and distribution has been a major subject of research over the past two decades. Various concerns have brought the traditional model into question; namely its environmental footprint, its structural inflexibility and inefficiency, and more recently, its inability to maintain acceptable reliability of supply. Under such a troubled setting, distributed energy resources (DER) comprising of small, modular, electrical renewable or fossil-based electricity generation units placed at or near the point of energy consumption, has gained much attention as a viable alternative or addition to the current energy system. In 2010, China consumed about 30percent of its primary energy in the buildings sector, leading the country to pay great attention to DER development and its applications in buildings. During the 11th Five Year Plan (FYP), China has implemented 371 renewable energy building demonstration projects, and 210 photovoltaics (PV) building integration projects. At the end of the 12th FYP, China is targeting renewable energy to provide 10percent of total building energy, and to save 30 metric tons of CO2 equivalents (mtce) of energy with building integrated renewables. China is also planning to implement one thousand natural gas-based distributed cogeneration demonstration projects with energy utilization rates over 70percent in the 12th FYP. All these policy targets require significant DER systems development for building applications. China?s fast urbanization makes building energy efficiency a crucial economic issue; however, only limited studies have been done that examine how to design and select suitable building energy technologies in its different regions. In the U.S., buildings consumed 40percent of the total primary energy in 2010 [1] and it is estimated that about 14 billion m2 of floor space of the existing building stock will be remodeled over the next 30 years. Most building?s renovation work has been on building envelope, lighting and HVAC systems. Although interest has emerged, less attention is being paid to DER for buildings. This context has created opportunities for research, development and progressive deployment of DER, due to its potential to combine the production of power and heat (CHP) near the point of consumption and delivering multiple benefits to customers, such as cost

  9. Regional Modeling of Dust Mass Balance and Radiative Forcing over East Asia using WRF-Chem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Siyu; Zhao, Chun; Qian, Yun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, J.; Huang, Zhongwei; Bi, Jianrong; Zhang, Wu; Shi, Jinsen; Yang, Lei; Li, Deshuai; Li, Jinxin

    2014-12-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to investigate the seasonal and annual variations of mineral dust over East Asia during 2007-2011, with a focus on the dust mass balance and radiative forcing. A variety of measurements from in-stu and satellite observations have been used to evaluate simulation results. Generally, WRF-Chem reproduces not only the column variability but also the vertical profile and size distribution of mineral dust over and near the dust source regions of East Asia. We investigate the dust lifecycle and the factors that control the seasonal and spatial variations of dust mass balance and radiative forcing over the seven sub-regions of East Asia, i.e. source regions, the Tibetan Plateau, Northern China, Southern China, the ocean outflow region, and Korea-Japan regions. Results show that, over the source regions, transport and dry deposition are the two dominant sinks. Transport contributes to ~30% of the dust sink over the source regions. Dust results in a surface cooling of up to -14 and -10 W m-2, atmospheric warming of up to 20 and 15 W m-2, and TOA cooling of -5 and -8 W m-2 over the two major dust source regions of East Asia, respectively. Over the Tibetan Plateau, transport is the dominant source with a peak in summer. Over identified outflow regions, maximum dust mass loading in spring is contributed by the transport. Dry and wet depositions are the comparably dominant sinks, but wet deposition is larger than dry deposition over the Korea-Japan region, particularly in spring (70% versus 30%). The WRF-Chem simulations can generally capture the measured features of dust aerosols and its radaitve properties and dust mass balance over East Asia, which provides confidence for use in further investigation of dust impact on climate over East Asia.

  10. Study of Cherenkov Light Lateral Distribution Function around the Knee Region in Extensive Air Showers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Al-Rubaiee; U. Hashim; Marwah M.; Y. Al-Douri

    2015-05-06

    The Cherenkov light lateral distribution function (LDF) was simulated with the CORSIKA code, in the energy range (10^13-10^16) eV. This simulation was performed for conditions and configurations of the Tunka EAS Cherenkov array for two primary particles (p and Fe). Basing on the simulated results, many approximated functions are structured for two primary particles and different zenith angles. This allowed us to reconstruct the EAS events, which is, to determine the type and energy of the primary particles that produced showers from signal amplitudes of Cherenkov radiation which measured with Tunka Cherenkov array experiment. Comparison of the calculated LDF of Cherenkov radiation with that measured at the Tunka EAS array shows the ability for identifying of the primary particle that initiated the EAS cascades determining of its primary energy around the knee region of the cosmic ray spectrum.

  11. Study of Cherenkov Light Lateral Distribution Function around the Knee Region in Extensive Air Showers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Rubaiee, A A; M., Marwah; Al-Douri, Y

    2015-01-01

    The Cherenkov light lateral distribution function (LDF) was simulated with the CORSIKA code, in the energy range (10^13-10^16) eV. This simulation was performed for conditions and configurations of the Tunka EAS Cherenkov array for two primary particles (p and Fe). Basing on the simulated results, many approximated functions are structured for two primary particles and different zenith angles. This allowed us to reconstruct the EAS events, which is, to determine the type and energy of the primary particles that produced showers from signal amplitudes of Cherenkov radiation which measured with Tunka Cherenkov array experiment. Comparison of the calculated LDF of Cherenkov radiation with that measured at the Tunka EAS array shows the ability for identifying of the primary particle that initiated the EAS cascades determining of its primary energy around the knee region of the cosmic ray spectrum.

  12. Self-affirmation model for football goal distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bittner, Elmar; Janke, Wolfhard; Weigel, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Analyzing football score data with statistical techniques, we investigate how the highly co-operative nature of the game is reflected in averaged properties such as the distributions of scored goals for the home and away teams. It turns out that in particular the tails of the distributions are not well described by independent Bernoulli trials, but rather well modeled by negative binomial or generalized extreme value distributions. To understand this behavior from first principles, we suggest to modify the Bernoulli random process to include a simple component of self-affirmation which seems to describe the data surprisingly well and allows to interpret the observed deviation from Gaussian statistics. The phenomenological distributions used before can be understood as special cases within this framework. We analyzed historical football score data from many leagues in Europe as well as from international tournaments and found the proposed models to be applicable rather universally. In particular, here we compa...

  13. Developing a Regional Integrated Assessment Model (RIAM) Framework PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Benjamin L. Preston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    responses of human systems. This project seeks to apply a regional IAM framework to the Gulf Coast region issues, and energy supply issues are all occurring simultaneous- ly, but for which integrated modeling regionalized to develop a new regional IAM capability (Regional Global Change Assessment Model *RCGAM+). RCGAM

  14. Gluon saturation and pseudo-rapidity distributions of charged hadrons at RHIC energy regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin-Bin Wei; Sheng-Qin Feng

    2014-11-20

    We modified the gluon saturation model by rescaling the momentum fraction according to saturation momentum and introduced the Cooper-Frye hydrodynamic evolution to systematically study the pseudo-rapidity distributions of final charged hadrons at different energies and different centralities for Au-Au collisions in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The features of both gluon saturation and hydrodynamic evolution at different energies and different centralities for Au-Au collisions are investigated in this paper.

  15. Modeling of Thermal Storage Systems in MILP Distributed Energy Resource Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steen, David

    2014-01-01

    in latent heat energy storage systems: A review," Renewableof thermal energy storage systems," International Journal ofModeling of Thermal Storage Systems in MILP Distributed

  16. Modeling and forecasting the distribution of Vibrio vulnificus in Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, John M.; Rhodes, M.; Brown, C. W.; Hood, Raleigh R.; Leight, A.; Long, Wen; Wood, R.

    2014-11-01

    The aim is to construct statistical models to predict the presence, abundance and potential virulence of Vibrio vulnificus in surface waters. A variety of statistical techniques were used in concert to identify water quality parameters associated with V. vulnificus presence, abundance and virulence markers in the interest of developing strong predictive models for use in regional oceanographic modeling systems. A suite of models are provided to represent the best model fit and alternatives using environmental variables that allow them to be put to immediate use in current ecological forecasting efforts. Conclusions: Environmental parameters such as temperature, salinity and turbidity are capable of accurately predicting abundance and distribution of V. vulnificus in Chesapeake Bay. Forcing these empirical models with output from ocean modeling systems allows for spatially explicit forecasts for up to 48 h in the future. This study uses one of the largest data sets compiled to model Vibrio in an estuary, enhances our understanding of environmental correlates with abundance, distribution and presence of potentially virulent strains and offers a method to forecast these pathogens that may be replicated in other regions.

  17. Continuous VRML output fromContinuous VRML output from regional circulation models: aregional circulation models: a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Continuous VRML output fromContinuous VRML output from regional circulation models: aregional and volume to viewview ·· Generate Virtual Reality Modeling LanguageGenerate Virtual Reality ModelingDesktop or laptop PC with web browser ­­ High speed/large RAM not essentialHigh speed/large RAM not essential

  18. Model documentation Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-26

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) of the National Energy Modeling System is developed and maintained by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. This report documents the archived version of the NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1996, (DOE/EIA-0383(96)). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic approach, and provides detail on the methodology employed. Previously this report represented Volume I of a two-volume set. Volume II reported on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues.

  19. Double-distribution-function discrete Boltzmann model for combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuandong Lin; Aiguo Xu; Guangcai Zhang; Yingjun Li

    2015-06-21

    A 2-dimensional discrete Boltzmann model for combustion is presented. Mathematically, the model is composed of two coupled discrete Boltzmann equations for two species and a phenomenological evolution equation for chemical reaction process. Physically, the model is equivalent to a Navier-Stokes model supplemented by a coarse-grained model for the thermodynamic nonequilibrium behaviours. This model adopts $16$ discrete velocities. It works for both subsonic and supersonic combustion phenomena with flexible specific heat ratio. To discuss the physical accuracy of the coarse-grained model for nonequilibrium behaviours, three other discrete velocity models are used for comparisons. Numerical results are compared with analytical solutions based on both the first-order and second-order truncations of the distribution function. It is confirmed that the physical accuracy increases with the increasing moment relations needed by nonequlibrium manifestations. Furthermore, a criterion of transition from incomplete to complete combustion is obtained. Compared with the single distribution function model, this model can simulate incomplete combustion, decomposition and combination reactions.

  20. A distributed converging overland flow model: 2. Effect of infiltration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, Bernard; Singh, Vijay P.

    1976-01-01

    RESOURCES RESEARCH OCTOBER 1976 A Distributed Converging Overland Flow Model 2. Effect of Infiltration BERNARD SHERMAN AND VIJAY P. SINGH New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, New Mexico 87801 The overland flow on an infiltrating...; Woolhiser, 1969; Kibler and Woolhiser, 1970; Singh, 1974; Lane, 1975; Philip, 1957; Hanks and Bowers, 1962; Whisler and Klute, 1965; Rubin, 1966]. A combined study of these phases is required for modeling overland flow. With a few exceptions, notably...

  1. A distributed converging overland flow model: 1. Mathematical solutions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, Bernard; Singh, Vijay P.

    1976-01-01

    wave theory has been utilized increasingly in numerous in- vestigations of watershed runoff modeling [Brakensiek, 1967; Woolhiser, 1969; Woolhiser et al., 1970; Eagleson, 1972; Singh, 1974, 1975a, b, c, d]. In these investigations the formulation... entail varying degrees of geometric abstrac- tions and are either lumped or at most quasi-distributed, de- pending upon the characterization of the parameter a. The converging overland flow model [Woolhiser, 1969; Singh, 1974, Copyright ? 1976...

  2. Model documentation: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System; Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-02-24

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is a component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. This report documents the archived version of NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts used in support of the Annual Energy Outlook 1994, DOE/EIA-0383(94). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. It is intended to fulfill the legal obligation of the EIA to provide adequate documentation in support of its models (Public Law 94-385, Section 57.b.2). This report represents Volume 1 of a two-volume set. (Volume 2 will report on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues.) Subsequent chapters of this report provide: (1) an overview of the NGTDM (Chapter 2); (2) a description of the interface between the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and the NGTDM (Chapter 3); (3) an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM (Chapter 4); (4) the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module (Chapter 5); (5) the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module (Chapter 6); (6) the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module (Chapter 7); (7) the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module (Chapter 8); and (8) a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs (Chapter 9).

  3. Static and Impulsive Models of Solar Active Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Patsourakos; J. A. Klimchuk

    2008-08-20

    The physical modeling of active regions (ARs) and of the global coronal is receiving increasing interest lately. Recent attempts to model ARs using static equilibrium models were quite successful in reproducing AR images of hot soft X-ray (SXR) loops. They however failed to predict the bright EUV warm loops permeating ARs: the synthetic images were dominated by intense footpoint emission. We demonstrate that this failure is due to the very weak dependence of loop temperature on loop length which cannot simultaneously account for both hot and warm loops in the same AR. We then consider time-dependent AR models based on nanoflare heating. We demonstrate that such models can simultaneously reproduce EUV and SXR loops in ARs. Moreover, they predict radial intensity variations consistent with the localized core and extended emissions in SXR and EUV AR observations respectively. We finally show how the AR morphology can be used as a gauge of the properties (duration, energy, spatial dependence, repetition time) of the impulsive heating.

  4. LIMITED POWER BURSTS IN DISTRIBUTED MODELS OF NUCLEAR REACTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazhenov, Maxim

    LIMITED POWER BURSTS IN DISTRIBUTED MODELS OF NUCLEAR REACTORS M. V. Bazhenov and E. F. Sabaev UDC employed for analyzing reactor dynamics. Equations of this type are used for analyzing the stability of the reactor power, etc. Among these problems the question of the boundedness of reactor power bursts

  5. High Resolution PV Power Modeling for Distribution Circuit Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, B. L.; Dise, J. H.

    2013-09-01

    NREL has contracted with Clean Power Research to provide 1-minute simulation datasets of PV systems located at three high penetration distribution feeders in the service territory of Southern California Edison (SCE): Porterville, Palmdale, and Fontana, California. The resulting PV simulations will be used to separately model the electrical circuits to determine the impacts of PV on circuit operations.

  6. Thermal physiology and species distribution models reveal climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combes, Stacey A.

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Thermal physiology and species distribution models reveal climate vulnerability warming than tropical species based on their larger thermal safety margins, the distance between ambient temperatures and species' thermal optima. We sought to test the prediction that high latitude amphibians

  7. FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Modeling of Distributed Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Modeling of Distributed Energy Resources in the Smart Grid OBJECTIVE can be used in the studies for the design, operation and control of the future smart grid. Our project National Laboratory (509) 375-2235 shuai.lu@pnnl.gov ABOUT FPGI The Future Power Grid Initiative (FPGI

  8. Order Reduction of a Distributed Parameter PEM Fuel Cell Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batlle, Carles

    reduction of the PEMFC 5 Conclusions and outlook 2 / 17 iberconappice2014 #12;Introduction Distributed and durability of the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC). Large number of differential algebraic dimension DAE system obtained from a first principles, PDE model of the PEMFC. Both the original full order

  9. Optimal Model of Distributed Energy System by Using GAMS and Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yongwen; Gao, Weijun; Ruan, Yingjun; Xuan, Ji; Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris

    2005-01-01

    Optimal Model of Distributed Energy System by Using GAMS andEnergy Reliability, Distributed Energy Program of the U.S.Optimal Model of Distributed Energy System by Using GAMS and

  10. Modelling Neutral Particle Analyzer Measurements of High Energy Fusion Alpha-Particle Distributions in JET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modelling Neutral Particle Analyzer Measurements of High Energy Fusion Alpha-Particle Distributions in JET

  11. A nanoflare model for active region radiance: application of artificial neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bazarghan; H. Safari; D. E. Innes; E. Karami; S. K. Solanki

    2008-12-20

    Context. Nanoflares are small impulsive bursts of energy that blend with and possibly make up much of the solar background emission. Determining their frequency and energy input is central to understanding the heating of the solar corona. One method is to extrapolate the energy frequency distribution of larger individually observed flares to lower energies. Only if the power law exponent is greater than 2, is it considered possible that nanoflares contribute significantly to the energy input. Aims. Time sequences of ultraviolet line radiances observed in the corona of an active region are modelled with the aim of determining the power law exponent of the nanoflare energy distribution. Methods. A simple nanoflare model based on three key parameters (the flare rate, the flare duration time, and the power law exponent of the flare energy frequency distribution) is used to simulate emission line radiances from the ions Fe XIX, Ca XIII, and Si iii, observed by SUMER in the corona of an active region as it rotates around the east limb of the Sun. Light curve pattern recognition by an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) scheme is used to determine the values. Results. The power law exponents, alpha 2.8, 2.8, and 2.6 for Fe XIX, Ca XIII, and Si iii respectively. Conclusions. The light curve simulations imply a power law exponent greater than the critical value of 2 for all ion species. This implies that if the energy of flare-like events is extrapolated to low energies, nanoflares could provide a significant contribution to the heating of active region coronae.

  12. Regionalization of subsurface stormflow parameters of hydrologic models: Derivation from regional analysis of streamflow recession curves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Sheng; Li, Hongyi; Huang, Maoyi; Ali, Melkamu; Leng, Guoyong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Wang, Shaowen; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-07-21

    Subsurface stormflow is an important component of the rainfall–runoff response, especially in steep terrain. Its contribution to total runoff is, however, poorly represented in the current generation of land surface models. The lack of physical basis of these common parameterizations precludes a priori estimation of the stormflow (i.e. without calibration), which is a major drawback for prediction in ungauged basins, or for use in global land surface models. This paper is aimed at deriving regionalized parameterizations of the storage–discharge relationship relating to subsurface stormflow from a top–down empirical data analysis of streamflow recession curves extracted from 50 eastern United States catchments. Detailed regression analyses were performed between parameters of the empirical storage–discharge relationships and the controlling climate, soil and topographic characteristics. The regression analyses performed on empirical recession curves at catchment scale indicated that the coefficient of the power-law form storage–discharge relationship is closely related to the catchment hydrologic characteristics, which is consistent with the hydraulic theory derived mainly at the hillslope scale. As for the exponent, besides the role of field scale soil hydraulic properties as suggested by hydraulic theory, it is found to be more strongly affected by climate (aridity) at the catchment scale. At a fundamental level these results point to the need for more detailed exploration of the co-dependence of soil, vegetation and topography with climate.

  13. Improvement of snowpack simulations in a regional climate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, J.; Miller, N.L.

    2011-01-10

    To improve simulations of regional-scale snow processes and related cold-season hydroclimate, the Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3), developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), was coupled with the Pennsylvania State University/NCAR fifth-generation Mesoscale Model (MM5). CLM3 physically describes the mass and heat transfer within the snowpack using five snow layers that include liquid water and solid ice. The coupled MM5–CLM3 model performance was evaluated for the snowmelt season in the Columbia River Basin in the Pacific Northwestern United States using gridded temperature and precipitation observations, along with station observations. The results from MM5–CLM3 show a significant improvement in the SWE simulation, which has been underestimated in the original version of MM5 coupled with the Noah land-surface model. One important cause for the underestimated SWE in Noah is its unrealistic land-surface structure configuration where vegetation, snow and the topsoil layer are blended when snow is present. This study demonstrates the importance of the sheltering effects of the forest canopy on snow surface energy budgets, which is included in CLM3. Such effects are further seen in the simulations of surface air temperature and precipitation in regional weather and climate models such as MM5. In addition, the snow-season surface albedo overestimated by MM5–Noah is now more accurately predicted by MM5–CLM3 using a more realistic albedo algorithm that intensifies the solar radiation absorption on the land surface, reducing the strong near-surface cold bias in MM5–Noah. The cold bias is further alleviated due to a slower snowmelt rate in MM5–CLM3 during the early snowmelt stage, which is closer to observations than the comparable components of MM5–Noah. In addition, the over-predicted precipitation in the Pacific Northwest as shown in MM5–Noah is significantly decreased in MM5 CLM3 due to the lower evaporation resulting from the longer snow duration.

  14. A multiscale MDCT image-based breathing lung model with time-varying regional ventilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Youbing, E-mail: youbing-yin@uiowa.edu [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States) [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); IIHR-Hydroscience and Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Department of Radiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Choi, Jiwoong, E-mail: jiwoong-choi@uiowa.edu [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States) [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); IIHR-Hydroscience and Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Hoffman, Eric A., E-mail: eric-hoffman@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Tawhai, Merryn H., E-mail: m.tawhai@auckland.ac.nz [Auckland Bioengineering Institute, The University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand); Lin, Ching-Long, E-mail: ching-long-lin@uiowa.edu [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States) [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); IIHR-Hydroscience and Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A novel algorithm is presented that links local structural variables (regional ventilation and deforming central airways) to global function (total lung volume) in the lung over three imaged lung volumes, to derive a breathing lung model for computational fluid dynamics simulation. The algorithm constitutes the core of an integrative, image-based computational framework for subject-specific simulation of the breathing lung. For the first time, the algorithm is applied to three multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) volumetric lung images of the same individual. A key technique in linking global and local variables over multiple images is an in-house mass-preserving image registration method. Throughout breathing cycles, cubic interpolation is employed to ensure C{sub 1} continuity in constructing time-varying regional ventilation at the whole lung level, flow rate fractions exiting the terminal airways, and airway deformation. The imaged exit airway flow rate fractions are derived from regional ventilation with the aid of a three-dimensional (3D) and one-dimensional (1D) coupled airway tree that connects the airways to the alveolar tissue. An in-house parallel large-eddy simulation (LES) technique is adopted to capture turbulent-transitional-laminar flows in both normal and deep breathing conditions. The results obtained by the proposed algorithm when using three lung volume images are compared with those using only one or two volume images. The three-volume-based lung model produces physiologically-consistent time-varying pressure and ventilation distribution. The one-volume-based lung model under-predicts pressure drop and yields un-physiological lobar ventilation. The two-volume-based model can account for airway deformation and non-uniform regional ventilation to some extent, but does not capture the non-linear features of the lung.

  15. Modeling the Interplay Between Individual Behavior and Network Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yang; Dong, Yuxiao; Mei, Qiaozhu; Johnson, Reid A; Chawla, Nitesh V

    2015-01-01

    It is well-known that many networks follow a power-law degree distribution; however, the factors that influence the formation of their distributions are still unclear. How can one model the connection between individual actions and network distributions? How can one explain the formation of group phenomena and their evolutionary patterns? In this paper, we propose a unified framework, M3D, to model human dynamics in social networks from three perspectives: macro, meso, and micro. At the micro-level, we seek to capture the way in which an individual user decides whether to perform an action. At the meso-level, we study how group behavior develops and evolves over time, based on individual actions. At the macro-level, we try to understand how network distributions such as power-law (or heavy-tailed phenomena) can be explained by group behavior. We provide theoretical analysis for the proposed framework, and discuss the connection of our framework with existing work. The framework offers a new, flexible way to e...

  16. Multiobjective calibration and sensitivity of a distributed land surface water and energy balance model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houser, Paul R; Gupta, Hoshin V; Shuttleworth, W. James; Famiglietti, James S

    2001-01-01

    distributed land surface water and energy balance model Pauldistributed land surface water and energy balance model (because models of water and energy balance, Ph.D.

  17. Multi-State Load Models for Distribution System Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Kevin P.; Fuller, Jason C.; Chassin, David P.

    2011-11-01

    Recent work in the field of distribution system analysis has shown that the traditional method of peak load analysis is not adequate for the analysis of emerging distribution system technologies. Voltage optimization, demand response, electric vehicle charging, and energy storage are examples of technologies with characteristics having daily, seasonal, and/or annual variations. In addition to the seasonal variations, emerging technologies such as demand response and plug in electric vehicle charging have the potential to send control signals to the end use loads which will affect how they consume energy. In order to support time-series analysis over different time frames and to incorporate potential control signal inputs it is necessary to develop detailed end use load models which accurately represent the load under various conditions, and not just during the peak load period. This paper will build on previous work on detail end use load modeling in order to outline the method of general multi-state load models for distribution system analysis.

  18. Modeling of customer adoption of distributed energy resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01

    Customer Adoption of Distributed Energy Resources Ozbek, A.Customer Adoption of Distributed Energy Resources Figure 39.Customer Adoption of Distributed Energy Resources REFERENCES

  19. A U.S. and China Regional Analysis of Distributed Energy Resources in Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    www.epa.gov/cleanenergy/energy-resources/egrid. [24] Wang,Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Characterizations.CO: National Renewable Energy Resource Laboratory Report TP-

  20. Horizontal Class Fragmentation For Advanced Object Models in a Distributed Object Based System \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezeife, Christie

    Horizontal Class Fragmentation For Advanced Object Models in a Distributed Object Based System application performance on a Distributed Object Based System (DOBS) requires class fragmentation and vertical fragmentation of relations exist, but fragmentation techniques for class objects in a distributed

  1. Congreso Iberoamericano de Hidrgeno y Pilas de Combustible 2014 Distributed parameter PEMFC model order reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batlle, Carles

    Congreso Iberoamericano de Hidrógeno y Pilas de Combustible 2014 1/4 Distributed parameter PEMFC PEMFC model, which incorporates the effects of distributed parameters that are relevant for its proper partial differential equations (PDE) model. Keywords: PEMFC, distributed parameter modeling, model

  2. Future regional climate change in the ten hydrologic regions of California: A climate modeling investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloan, Lisa C

    2005-01-01

    4) Central Coast; (5) Tulare Lake; (6) San Joaquin; (7) San4) Central Coast, (5) Tulare Lake, (6) San Joaquin River, (the smallest increase is in the Tulare Lake region. Median

  3. Detailed End Use Load Modeling for Distribution System Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Kevin P.; Fuller, Jason C.

    2010-04-09

    The field of distribution system analysis has made significant advances in the past ten years. It is now standard practice when performing a power flow simulation to use an algorithm that is capable of unbalanced per-phase analysis. Recent work has also focused on examining the need for time-series simulations instead of examining a single time period, i.e., peak loading. One area that still requires a significant amount of work is the proper modeling of end use loads. Currently it is common practice to use a simple load model consisting of a combination of constant power, constant impedance, and constant current elements. While this simple form of end use load modeling is sufficient for a single point in time, the exact model values are difficult to determine and it is inadequate for some time-series simulations. This paper will examine how to improve simple time invariant load models as well as develop multi-state time variant models.

  4. Feasible Distributed CSP Models for Scheduling Problems Miguel A. Salido, Adriana Giret

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salido, Miguel Angel

    Feasible Distributed CSP Models for Scheduling Problems Miguel A. Salido, Adriana Giret Universidad satisfaction problem (DisCSP) is a CSP in which variables and constraints are distributed among multiple are distributed by using our model. Key words: distributed CSP, constraint satisfaction, holonic system, multi

  5. Modeled climate change effects on distributions of Canadian butterfly species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend; Martí nez-Meyer, Enrique; Gonzá lez-Salazar, Constantino; Hall, Peter W.

    2004-07-30

    for approaches Can. J. Zool. 82: 851–858 (2004) doi: 10.1139/Z04-064 © 2004 NRC Canada 851 Received 22 July 2003. Accepted 21 May 2004. Published on the NRC Research Press Web site at http://cjz.nrc.ca on 30 July 2004. A.T. Peterson. 1 Natural History Museum...-Cordero, V., Soberon, J., Bartley, J., Buddemeier, R.H., and Navarro-Siguenza, A.G. 2001. Effects of global climate change on geographic distributions of Mexican Cracidae. Ecol. Model. 144: 21–30. Peterson, A.T., Ball, L.G., and Cohoon, K.C. 2002a. Predicting...

  6. Modeling Experts and Novices in Citizen Science Data for Species Distribution Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Experts and Novices in Citizen Science Data for Species Distribution Modeling Jun Yu, Weng-habitat relationships, is a research area that can benefit greatly from citizen science. The eBird project [18] is one of the largest citizen science programs in existence. By allowing birders to upload ob- servations of bird

  7. Joint physical and numerical modeling of water distribution networks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, Adam; O'Hern, Timothy John; Orear, Leslie Jr.; Kajder, Karen C.; Webb, Stephen Walter; Cappelle, Malynda A.; Khalsa, Siri Sahib; Wright, Jerome L.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Chwirka, J. Benjamin; Hartenberger, Joel David; McKenna, Sean Andrew; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; McGrath, Lucas K.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes the experimental and modeling effort undertaken to understand solute mixing in a water distribution network conducted during the last year of a 3-year project. The experimental effort involves measurement of extent of mixing within different configurations of pipe networks, measurement of dynamic mixing in a single mixing tank, and measurement of dynamic solute mixing in a combined network-tank configuration. High resolution analysis of turbulence mixing is carried out via high speed photography as well as 3D finite-volume based Large Eddy Simulation turbulence models. Macroscopic mixing rules based on flow momentum balance are also explored, and in some cases, implemented in EPANET. A new version EPANET code was developed to yield better mixing predictions. The impact of a storage tank on pipe mixing in a combined pipe-tank network during diurnal fill-and-drain cycles is assessed. Preliminary comparison between dynamic pilot data and EPANET-BAM is also reported.

  8. A surface structural approach to ion adsorption: The charge distribution (CD) model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiemstra, T.; Van Riemsdijk, W.H.

    1996-05-10

    Cation and anion adsorption at the solid/solution interface of metal hydroxides plays an important role in several fields of chemistry, including colloid and interface chemistry, soil chemistry and geochemistry, aquatic chemistry, environmental chemistry, catalysis, and chemical engineering. An ion adsorption model for metal hydroxides has been developed which deals with the observation that in the case of inner sphere complex formation only part of the surface complex is incorporated into the surface by a ligand exchange reaction while the other part is located in the Stern layer. The charge distribution (CD) concept of Pauling, used previously in the multi site complexation (MUSIC) model approach, is extended to account for adsorbed surface complexes. In the new model, surface complexes are not treated as point charges, but are considered as having a spatial distribution of charge in the interfacial region. The new CD model can describe within a single conceptual framework all important experimental adsorption phenomena, taking into account the chemical composition of the crystal surface. The CD model has been applied to one of the most difficult and challenging ion adsorption phenomena, i.e., PO{sub 4} adsorption on goethite, and successfully describes simultaneously the basic charging behavior of goethite, the concentration, pH, and salt dependency of adsorption, the shifts in the zeta potentials and isoelectric point (IEP), and the OH/P exchange ratio. This is all achieved within the constraint that the experimental surface speciation found from in situ IR spectroscopy is also described satisfactorily.

  9. Experimental verification of a model describing the intensity distribution from a single mode optical fiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moro, Erik A; Puckett, Anthony D; Todd, Michael D

    2011-01-24

    The intensity distribution of a transmission from a single mode optical fiber is often approximated using a Gaussian-shaped curve. While this approximation is useful for some applications such as fiber alignment, it does not accurately describe transmission behavior off the axis of propagation. In this paper, another model is presented, which describes the intensity distribution of the transmission from a single mode optical fiber. A simple experimental setup is used to verify the model's accuracy, and agreement between model and experiment is established both on and off the axis of propagation. Displacement sensor designs based on the extrinsic optical lever architecture are presented. The behavior of the transmission off the axis of propagation dictates the performance of sensor architectures where large lateral offsets (25-1500 {micro}m) exist between transmitting and receiving fibers. The practical implications of modeling accuracy over this lateral offset region are discussed as they relate to the development of high-performance intensity modulated optical displacement sensors. In particular, the sensitivity, linearity, resolution, and displacement range of a sensor are functions of the relative positioning of the sensor's transmitting and receiving fibers. Sensor architectures with high combinations of sensitivity and displacement range are discussed. It is concluded that the utility of the accurate model is in its predicative capability and that this research could lead to an improved methodology for high-performance sensor design.

  10. Modeling the Impacts of Solar Distributed Generation on U.S. Water Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amanda, Smith; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Jaron, Peck

    2015-01-01

    Distributed electric power generation technologies typically use little or no water per unit of electrical energy produced; in particular, renewable energy sources such as solar PV systems do not require cooling systems and present an opportunity to reduce water usage for power generation. Within the US, the fuel mix used for power generation varies regionally, and certain areas use more water for power generation than others. The need to reduce water usage for power generation is even more urgent in view of climate change uncertainties. In this paper, we present an example case within the state of Tennessee, one of the top four states in water consumption for power generation and one of the states with little or no potential for developing centralized renewable energy generations. The potential for developing PV generation within Knox County, Tennessee, is studied, along with the potential for reducing water withdrawal and consumption within the Tennessee Valley stream region. Electric power generation plants in the region are quantified for their electricity production and expected water withdrawal and consumption over one year, where electrical generation data is provided over one year and water usage is modeled based on the cooling system(s) in use. Potential solar PV electrical production is modeled based on LiDAR data and weather data for the same year. Our proposed methodology can be summarized as follows: First, the potential solar generation is compared against the local grid demand. Next, electrical generation reductions are specified that would result in a given reduction in water withdrawal and a given reduction in water consumption, and compared with the current water withdrawal and consumption rates for the existing fuel mix. The increase in solar PV development that would produce an equivalent amount of power, is determined. In this way, we consider how targeted local actions may affect the larger stream region through thoughtful energy development. This model can be applied to other regions, other types of distributed generation, and used as a framework for modeling alternative growth scenarios in power production capacity in addition to modeling adjustments to existing capacity.

  11. A regional numerical ocean model of the circulation in the Bay of Biscay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drijfhout, Sybren

    A regional numerical ocean model of the circulation in the Bay of Biscay Y. Friocourt,1,2,3 B Peninsula and in the Bay of Biscay is investigated by means of a regional ocean model. In particular numerical ocean model of the circulation in the Bay of Biscay, J. Geophys. Res., 112, C09008, doi:10

  12. Complete Angular Distributions of the Deuteron Photo-Disintegration Reaction in the Few GeV Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federico Ronchetti

    2013-01-24

    The study of two body deuteron photo-disintegration is ideal for investigating the transition region from meson exchange to the Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD) regime because of its simplicity and amenability to calculation. In the past years, the theoretical efforts have been focused in two different directions: extending at higher energies the models based on meson exchange, and improving the models inspired by QCD principles to extrapolate their predictions at lower energies, in order to find out the approach that best describes the experimental data and in which energy region the transition between the two descriptions takes place.

  13. Modeling of customer adoption of distributed energy resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01

    of Dispersed Energy Resources Deployment. Berkeley, LawrenceAdoption of Distributed Energy Resources Ozbek, A. 2001.Adoption of Distributed Energy Resources Figure 39. Figure

  14. Modeled regional climate change and California endemic oak ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kueppers, Lara M.

    pressure from cutting for fuel, grazing, conversion of woodlands to vineyards and orchards, water resource development, competition with inva- sive grasses, and urban expansion (1). Here, we report how the regional

  15. Predicting the Power Output of Distributed Renewable Energy Resources within a Broad Geographical Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chalkiadakis, Georgios

    generators into the Smart Grid has emerged as a ma- jor challenge [16, 18]. The creation of Virtual Power Resources (DERs) to create the impression of a sin- gle "conventional" power plant, has been suggestedPredicting the Power Output of Distributed Renewable Energy Resources within a Broad Geographical

  16. Systematic comparison of trip distribution laws and models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenormand, Maxime; Ramasco, José J

    2015-01-01

    Trip distribution laws are basic for the travel demand characterization needed in transport and urban planning. Several approaches have been considered in the last years. One of them is the so-called gravity law, in which the number of trips is assumed to be related to the population at origin and destination and to decrease with the distance. The mathematical expression of this law resembles Newton's law of gravity, which explains its name. Another popular approach is inspired by the theory of intervening opportunities and it has been concreted into the so-called radiation models. Individuals are supposed to travel until they find a job opportunity, so the population and jobs spatial distributions naturally lead to a trip flow network. In this paper, we perform a thorough comparison between the gravity and the radiation approaches in their ability at estimating commuting flows. We test the gravity and the radiation laws against empirical trip data at different scales and coming from different countries. Diff...

  17. Usefulness of the reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo model in regional flood frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribatet, Mathieu

    Usefulness of the reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo model in regional flood frequency; revised 3 May 2007; accepted 17 May 2007; published 3 August 2007. [1] Regional flood frequency analysis and the index flood approach. Results show that the proposed estimator is absolutely suited to regional

  18. Evaluation of Reconstructed Images of Regional Lung Changes Using a Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    Evaluation of Reconstructed Images of Regional Lung Changes Using a Model Robert P, Patterson1 A and Patterson 2004, Yang and Patterson 2010). In order to answer questions about regional lung changes, two regions were created in the posterior portion of the right lung where the resistivity can be independently

  19. MODELING THE ATOMIC-TO-MOLECULAR TRANSITION AND CHEMICAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF TURBULENT STAR-FORMING CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Offner, Stella S. R. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Bisbas, Thomas G.; Viti, Serena [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6B (United Kingdom); Bell, Tom A., E-mail: stella.offner@yale.edu [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), Carretera de Ajalvir, km 4, E-28850 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-06-10

    We use 3D-PDR, a three-dimensional astrochemistry code for modeling photodissociation regions (PDRs), to post-process hydrodynamic simulations of turbulent, star-forming clouds. We focus on the transition from atomic to molecular gas, with specific attention to the formation and distribution of H, C{sup +}, C, H{sub 2}, and CO. First, we demonstrate that the details of the cloud chemistry and our conclusions are insensitive to the simulation spatial resolution, to the resolution at the cloud edge, and to the ray angular resolution. We then investigate the effect of geometry and simulation parameters on chemical abundances and find weak dependence on cloud morphology as dictated by gravity and turbulent Mach number. For a uniform external radiation field, we find similar distributions to those derived using a one-dimensional PDR code. However, we demonstrate that a three-dimensional treatment is necessary for a spatially varying external field, and we caution against using one-dimensional treatments for non-symmetric problems. We compare our results with the work of Glover et al., who self-consistently followed the time evolution of molecule formation in hydrodynamic simulations using a reduced chemical network. In general, we find good agreement with this in situ approach for C and CO abundances. However, the temperature and H{sub 2} abundances are discrepant in the boundary regions (A{sub v} {<=} 5), which is due to the different number of rays used by the two approaches.

  20. MODELLING GROUNDWATER FLOW ON THE REGIONAL SCALE IN THE UPPER DANUBE CATCHMENT (GERMANY)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    MODELLING GROUNDWATER FLOW ON THE REGIONAL SCALE IN THE UPPER DANUBE CATCHMENT (GERMANY) Roland.barthel@iws.uni-stuttgart.de Abstract. A groundwater flow model for the Upper Danube catchment (A=77,000km2 at gauge Passau, Germany coupled models. Modelling of groundwater flow, using coupled deterministic and hydrological approaches

  1. Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models; Third year report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowley, T.J.; North, G.R.; Smith, N.R.

    1994-05-01

    This report was prepared by the Applied Research Corporation (ARC), College Station, Texas, under subcontract to Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate studies task. The task supports site characterization work required for the selection of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository and is part of the Performance Assessment Scientific Support (PASS) Program at PNL. The work is under the overall direction of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), US Department of Energy Headquarters, Washington, DC. The scope of the report is to present the results of the third year`s work on the atmospheric modeling part of the global climate studies task. The development testing of computer models and initial results are discussed. The appendices contain several studies that provide supporting information and guidance to the modeling work and further details on computer model development. Complete documentation of the models, including user information, will be prepared under separate reports and manuals.

  2. BioEarth: Envisioning and developing a new regional earth system model to inform natural and agricultural resource management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    a new regional earth system model to inform natural andsystems, coupled earth system models (EaSMs) are essential.coupled regional earth system models (EaSMs). Decision

  3. Regional CO2 and latent heat surface fluxes in the Southern Great Plains: Measurements, modeling, and scaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, W. J.; Biraud, S.C.; Torn, M.S.; Fischer, M.L.; Billesbach, D.P.; Berry, J.A.

    2009-08-15

    Characterizing net ecosystem exchanges (NEE) of CO{sub 2} and sensible and latent heat fluxes in heterogeneous landscapes is difficult, yet critical given expected changes in climate and land use. We report here a measurement and modeling study designed to improve our understanding of surface to atmosphere gas exchanges under very heterogeneous land cover in the mostly agricultural U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP). We combined three years of site-level, eddy covariance measurements in several of the dominant land cover types with regional-scale climate data from the distributed Mesonet stations and Next Generation Weather Radar precipitation measurements to calibrate a land surface model of trace gas and energy exchanges (isotope-enabled land surface model (ISOLSM)). Yearly variations in vegetation cover distributions were estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer normalized difference vegetation index and compared to regional and subregional vegetation cover type estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture census. We first applied ISOLSM at a 250 m spatial scale to account for vegetation cover type and leaf area variations that occur on hundred meter scales. Because of computational constraints, we developed a subsampling scheme within 10 km 'macrocells' to perform these high-resolution simulations. We estimate that the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility SGP region net CO{sub 2} exchange with the local atmosphere was -240, -340, and -270 gC m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} (positive toward the atmosphere) in 2003, 2004, and 2005, respectively, with large seasonal variations. We also performed simulations using two scaling approaches at resolutions of 10, 30, 60, and 90 km. The scaling approach applied in current land surface models led to regional NEE biases of up to 50 and 20% in weekly and annual estimates, respectively. An important factor in causing these biases was the complex leaf area index (LAI) distribution within cover types. Biases in predicted weekly average regional latent heat fluxes were smaller than for NEE, but larger than for either ecosystem respiration or assimilation alone. However, spatial and diurnal variations of hundreds of W m{sup -2} in latent heat fluxes were common. We conclude that, in this heterogeneous system, characterizing vegetation cover type and LAI at the scale of spatial variation are necessary for accurate estimates of bottom-up, regional NEE and surface energy fluxes.

  4. WAITING TIME DISTRIBUTION OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS MODELED WITH A NON-STATIONARY POISSON PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, C.; Su, W.; Fang, C.; Zhong, S. J.; Wang, L.

    2014-09-10

    We present a study of the waiting time distributions (WTDs) of solar energetic particle (SEP) events observed with the spacecraft WIND and GOES. The WTDs of both solar electron events (SEEs) and solar proton events (SPEs) display a power-law tail of ??t {sup –?}. The SEEs display a broken power-law WTD. The power-law index is ?{sub 1} = 0.99 for the short waiting times (<70 hr) and ?{sub 2} = 1.92 for large waiting times (>100 hr). The break of the WTD of SEEs is probably due to the modulation of the corotating interaction regions. The power-law index, ? ? 1.82, is derived for the WTD of the SPEs which is consistent with the WTD of type II radio bursts, indicating a close relationship between the shock wave and the production of energetic protons. The WTDs of SEP events can be modeled with a non-stationary Poisson process, which was proposed to understand the waiting time statistics of solar flares. We generalize the method and find that, if the SEP event rate ? = 1/?t varies as the time distribution of event rate f(?) = A?{sup –?}exp (– ??), the time-dependent Poisson distribution can produce a power-law tail WTD of ??t {sup ?} {sup –3}, where 0 ? ? < 2.

  5. PROCEEDINGS OF THE WORKSHOP ON NATIONAL/REGIONAL ENERGY-ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING CONCEPTS, MAY 30 - JUNE 1, 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritschard, R.L.

    2010-01-01

    comprehensive list of model and data base assumptions and toe.g. , scenario, data base, model linkages, etc. , andfor regional models (largely due to data base constraints).

  6. Annual Report On Regional Aquifer Modeling And Data Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Zhiming

    .................................................................................. 13 3.1 Estimates based on 2-D flow, measured hydraulic gradients and field-based hydraulic........................................................................... 19 4.2 Model Calibrations, Using New Water Level Data from R-wells

  7. Modeling Long-Range Transportation and Land Use Scenarios for the Sacramento Region, Using Citizen-Generated Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Robert A.; Gao, Shengyi; Clay, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Barra. Comparison from the Sacramento Model Testbed. Transp.Management Policies in the Sacramento Region: Year Two.Land Use Scenarios for the Sacramento Region, Using Citizen-

  8. Modelling ground lichen distribution as a proxy for the ecosystem service of reindeer meat provision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .000 1.000 49.116 1.08e-11 *** s(slope) 8.571 8.822 3.022 0.00189 ** --- Signif. codes: 0 `***' 0Modelling ground lichen distribution as a proxy for the ecosystem service of reindeer meat of the classes the distribution of ground lichens were modeled using Generalized Additive Models (GAM

  9. Statistical Model Checking for Distributed Probabilistic-Control Hybrid Automata with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Platzer, André

    Statistical Model Checking for Distributed Probabilistic-Control Hybrid Automata with Smart Grid accurately model real-world power consumption). We propose Distributed Probabilistic-Control Hybrid Automata and apply existing statistical model- checking techniques. We provide an implementation of a framework

  10. Using Citizen Science Data to Model the Distributions of Common Songbirds of Turkey Under Different Global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Using Citizen Science Data to Model the Distributions of Common Songbirds of Turkey Under Different an ornithological citizen science initiative (www.kusbank.org) with maximum entropy modeling and eight bioclimatic (2013) Using Citizen Science Data to Model the Distributions of Common Songbirds of Turkey Under

  11. Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources using Model Predictive Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Shuai; Samaan, Nader A.; Butler-Purry, Karen

    2012-07-22

    In an isolated power system (rural microgrid), Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) such as renewable energy resources (wind, solar), energy storage and demand response can be used to complement fossil fueled generators. The uncertainty and variability due to high penetration of wind makes reliable system operations and controls challenging. In this paper, an optimal control strategy is proposed to coordinate energy storage and diesel generators to maximize wind penetration while maintaining system economics and normal operation. The problem is formulated as a multi-objective optimization problem with the goals of minimizing fuel costs and changes in power output of diesel generators, minimizing costs associated with low battery life of energy storage and maintaining system frequency at the nominal operating value. Two control modes are considered for controlling the energy storage to compensate either net load variability or wind variability. Model predictive control (MPC) is used to solve the aforementioned problem and the performance is compared to an open-loop look-ahead dispatch problem. Simulation studies using high and low wind profiles, as well as, different MPC prediction horizons demonstrate the efficacy of the closed-loop MPC in compensating for uncertainties in wind and demand.

  12. Regional Analysis of Building Distributed Energy Costs and CO2 Abatement: A U.S. - China Comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendes, Goncalo

    2014-01-01

    Gas- Fired Distributed Energy Resource Characterizations,R. Fan, Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimizationand power; DER – Distributed energy resources; DER-CAM –

  13. Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    426–435. LBNL. (2012). Distributed Energy Resources CustomerATIONAL L ABORATORY Building Distributed Energy Performanceemployer. Building Distributed Energy Performance

  14. ESTIMATION OF FLOW DISTRIBUTION FOR HYDROLOGICAL MODELLING Petter Pilesj

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrie, Lars

    distribution over a continuous surface. The significance of the proposed algorithm is that the topographic form the flow distribution values proportionally to the slope gradient, or raised slope gradient, in each if for all ß > 0 (1) where i,j = flow directions (1...8), fi = flow proportion (0...1) in direction i, tan ßi

  15. CAMELEON-RT: a Software Architecture Reference Model for Distributed, Migratable, and Plastic User

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAMELEON-RT: a Software Architecture Reference Model for Distributed, Migratable, and Plastic User the problem space of distributed, migratable and plastic user interfaces, and presents CAMELEON-RT1 for distributed, migratable, and plastic user inter- faces. We have developed an early implementation of a run

  16. Impact Ionization Model Using Average Energy and Average Square Energy of Distribution Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham, Scott

    Impact Ionization Model Using Average Energy and Average Square Energy of Distribution Function Ken relaxation length, v sat ø h''i (¸ 0:05¯m), the energy distribution function is not well described calculation of impact ionization coefficient requires the use of a high energy distribution function because

  17. Modeling Needs Related to the Regional Observing System in the Gulf of Maine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Needs Related to the Regional Observing System in the Gulf of Maine RARGOM Report 05-1 Theme Session 6-7 July, 2005 Cliff House Ogunquit, Maine Convened by Regional Association for Research on the Gulf of Maine Gulf of Maine Census of Marine Life Gulf of Maine Ocean Observing System Coastal

  18. Go to the Right of the Pillar: Modeling Unoccupied Regions for Robot Directives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skubic, Marjorie

    Go to the Right of the Pillar: Modeling Unoccupied Regions for Robot Directives Marjorie Skubic and Sam Blisard Dept. of Computer Engineering and Computer Science University of Missouri of regions that do not contain objects but may be referenced by objects in the environment, to compute target

  19. Coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator to Regional Climate Model Version 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

    A description of the coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) to Regional Climate Model version 3 (RegCM3) is presented. IBIS introduces several key advantages to RegCM3, most notably vegetation dynamics, the ...

  20. Modeling Regional Air Quality Using the Near-Explicit Master Chemical Mechanism 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jingyi

    2014-08-01

    structure, allowing an explicit calculation of SOA formation from individual model species. Earlier attempts in this area were aimed at developing mechanisms for regional SOA using a small number of representative species (Griffin et al., 2002b; Griffin...

  1. A solvable model of fracture with power-law distribution of fragment sizes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ken Yamamoto; Yoshihiro Yamazaki

    2011-06-08

    The present paper describes a stochastic model of fracture, whose fragment size distribution can be calculated analytically as a power-law-like distribution. The model is basically cascade fracture, but incorporates the effect that each fragment in each stage of cascade ceases fracture with a certain probability. When the probability is constant, the exponent of the power-law cumulative distribution lies between -1 and 0, depending not only on the probability but the distribution of fracture points. Whereas, when the probability depends on the size of a fragment, the exponent is less than -1, irrespective of the distribution of fracture points.

  2. Mesoscale environmental models accompanying convection in the Texas HIPLEX region / by Mark Edward Humbert 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Mark Edward

    1980-01-01

    MESOSCALE ENVIRONMENTAL MODELS ACCOMPANYING CONVECTION IN THE TEXAS HIPLEX REGION A Thesis by MARK EDWARD HUMBERT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1980 Major Subject: Meteorology MESOSCALE ENVIRONMENTAL MODELS ACCOMPANYING CONVECTION IN THE TEXAS HIPLEX REGION A Thesis by MARK EDWARD HUMBERT Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Co ttee) (Head of Department) (Member...

  3. Modeling of Thermal Storage Systems in MILP Distributed Energy Resource Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steen, David

    2014-01-01

    Advanced integration of distributed energy resources," inE. Pouresmaeil, "Distributed energy resources and benefitsinteractions of multiple distributed energy resources in

  4. Microgrid modeling using the stochastic Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model DER-CAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    using the stochastic Distributed Energy Resources CustomerEnergy Reliability, Distributed Energy Program of the U.S.Lab • Motivation • The Distributed Energy Resources Customer

  5. Time series models with an EGB2 conditional distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, Andrew; Caivano, Michele

    2013-07-17

    function; see Kleiber4 and Kotz (2003, ch6). The GB2 distribution contains many important distributions as special cases, including the Burr (#24; = 1) and log-logistic (#24; = 1; & = 1). GB2 distributions are fat tailed for ?nite #24; and & with upper... and lower tail indices of #17; = and #17; = #24;#23; respectively. The absolute value5 of a tf variate is GB2(f 1=2'; 2; 1=2; f=2) with tail index is #17; = #17; = f: 4Note that Kleiber and Kotz (2003) have #11; and #23; in reverse order, ie they write...

  6. Modeling and responding to pandemic influenza : importance of population distributional attributes and non-pharmaceutical interventions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nigmatulina, Karima Robert

    2009-01-01

    After reviewing prevalent approaches to the modeling pandemic influenza transmission, we present a simple distributional model that captures the most significant population attributes that alter the dynamics of the outbreak. ...

  7. Resource Planning Model: An Integrated Resource Planning and Dispatch Tool for Regional Electric Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this report, we introduce a new transparent regional capacity expansion model with high spatio-temporal resolution and detailed representation of dispatch. The development of this model, referred to as the Resource Planning Model (RPM), is motivated by the lack of a tool in the public domain that can be used to characterize optimal regional deployment of resources with detailed dispatch modeling. In particular, RPM is designed to evaluate scenarios of renewable technology deployment to meet renewable portfolio standard (RPS) and emission-reduction goals, and to project possible deployment levels for various projections of future technology and fuel prices.

  8. Resource Planning Model: An Integrated Resource Planning and Dispatch Tool for Regional Electric Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.; Drury, E.; Eurek, K.; Bodington, N.; Lopez, A.; Perry, A.

    2013-01-01

    This report introduces a new capacity expansion model, the Resource Planning Model (RPM), with high spatial and temporal resolution that can be used for mid- and long-term scenario planning of regional power systems. Although RPM can be adapted to any geographic region, the report describes an initial version of the model adapted for the power system in Colorado. It presents examples of scenario results from the first version of the model, including an example of a 30%-by-2020 renewable electricity penetration scenario.

  9. The origin of the ionization of the diffuse interstellar medium in spiral galaxies. II. Modelling the distribution of ionizing radiation in NGC 157

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Zurita; J. E. Beckman; M. Rozas; S. Ryder

    2002-03-15

    In this paper we make a quantitative study of the hypothesis that the diffuse H-alpha emitted from the discs of spiral galaxies owes its origin to the ionizing photons escaping from HII regions. We use the H-alpha measurements of the complete set of HII regions in the spiral NGC 157, for which an HI density map was available, to derive a family of models which predict the ionizing photon distribution in the disc of this galaxy. The predicted diffuse H-alpha surface brightness distributions from our models were compared with the observed distributions showing that, in general terms, the hypothesis of density bounding for the HII regions allows us to predict well the spatial distribution of the diffuse ionized gas. In the model yielding the best fit to the data, the regions of lower luminosity lose a constant fraction of their ionizing flux to their surroundings, while for HII region luminosities above a specific transition value the ionizing escape fraction is a rising function of the Ha luminosity.

  10. Modeling the Effect of Hurricanes on Power Distribution Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chanda, Suraj

    2012-10-19

    outages and excessive delays in the reconstruction efforts. Accordingly, predicting the effects of power outages on the performance of power distribution systems is of major importance to government agencies, utilities, and customers. Unfortunately...

  11. V CONGRESO NACIONAL DE PILAS DE COMBUSTIBLE DISTRIBUTED PARAMETER MODEL SIMULATION TOOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batlle, Carles

    cells (PEMFC) has been developed, based on a distributed parameter model. The tool is designed others that have significant effects on the performance and durability of PEMFC. Palabras clave: PEMFC, modelado de parámetros distribuidos, simulación dinámica Keywords: PEMFC, distributed parameter modeling

  12. Magnetic Energy Storage and Current Density Distributions for Different Force-Free Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regnier, S

    2011-01-01

    [..] The change in the magnetic configuration due to the increase/decrease of electric current for different force-free models (potential, linear and nonlinear force-free fields) has never been studied in detail before. Here we focus especially on the evolution of the free magnetic energy, the location of the excess of energy, and the distribution of electric currents in the corona. For this purpose, we use an idealised active region characterised by four main polarities and a satellite polarity allowing us to specify a complex topology and sheared arcades to the coronal magnetic field but no twisted flux bundles. We investigate the changes in the geometry and connectivity of field lines, the magnetic energy and current density content as well as the evolution of null points. Increasing the photospheric current density in the magnetic configuration does not dramatically change the energy-storage processes within the active region even if the magnetic topology is slightly modified. We conclude that for reasona...

  13. 11.482J / 1.285J / ESD.193J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polenske, Karen R.

    Reviews regional economic theories and models and provides students with experience in using alternative economic impact assessment models on microcomputers. Problem sets are oriented around infrastructure, housing, energy, ...

  14. 11.482J / 1.285J / ESD.193J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling, Fall 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polenske, Karen R.

    Reviews regional economic theories and models and provides students with experience in using alternative economic impact assessment models on microcomputers. Problem sets are oriented around infrastructure, housing, energy, ...

  15. 11.482J / 1.285J / ESD.193J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling, Fall 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polenske, Karen

    Reviews regional economic theories and models and provides students with experience in using alternative economic impact assessment models on microcomputers. Problem sets are oriented around infrastructure, housing, energy, ...

  16. A unified model for the spatial and mass distribution of subhaloes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jiaxin; Frenk, Carlos S; Jing, Yipeng

    2015-01-01

    N-body simulations suggest that the substructures that survive inside dark matter haloes follow universal distributions in mass and radial number density. We demonstrate that a simple analytical model can explain these subhalo distributions as resulting from tidal stripping which increasingly reduces the mass of subhaloes with decreasing halo-centric distance. As a starting point, the spatial distribution of subhaloes of any given infall mass is shown to be largely indistinguishable from the overall mass distribution of the host halo. Using a physically motivated statistical description of the amount of mass stripped off individual subhaloes, the model fully describes the joint distribution of subhaloes in final mass, infall mass and radius. As a result, it can be used to predict several derived distributions involving combinations of these quantities including, but not limited to, the universal subhalo mass function, the subhalo spatial distribution, the lensing profile, the dark matter annihilation radiatio...

  17. Downscaling Global Land Cover Projections from an Integrated Assessment Model for Use in Regional Analyses: Results and Evaluation for the US from 2005 to 2095

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick LB; Huang, Maoyi; Wolf, Julie; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-06-05

    Projections of land cover change generated from Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) and other economic-based models can be applied for analyses of environmental impacts at subregional and landscape scales. For those IAM and economic models that project land use at the sub-continental or regional scale, these projections must be downscaled and spatially distributed prior to use in climate or ecosystem models. Downscaling efforts to date have been conducted at the national extent with relatively high spatial resolution (30m) and at the global extent with relatively coarse spatial resolution (0.5 degree).

  18. Temporal Models for Groundwater Level Prediction in Regions of Maharashtra Dissertation Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Temporal Models for Groundwater Level Prediction in Regions of Maharashtra Dissertation Report In this project work we perform analysis of groundwater level data in three districts of Maha- rashtra - Thane of these districts and developed seasonal models to represent the groundwater be- havior. Three different type

  19. Coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator to Regional Climate Model version 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

    2006-01-01

    Presented in this thesis is a description of the coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) to Regional Climate Model version 3 (RegCM3), and an assessment of the coupled model (RegCM3-IBIS). RegCM3 is a 3-dimensional, ...

  20. An improved model of the lightning electromagnetic field interaction with the D-region ionosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    14 March 2012. [1] We present an improved time-domain model of the lightning electromagnetic pulse. Introduction [2] Lightning discharges produce both an electromagnetic pulse (EMP), due to the rapid lightningAn improved model of the lightning electromagnetic field interaction with the D-region ionosphere R

  1. Abundance determinations in HII regions: model fitting versus Te-method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Pilyugin

    2002-11-14

    The discrepancy between the oxygen abundances in high-metallicity HII regions determined through the Te-method (and/or through the corresponding "strong lines - oxygen abundance" calibration) and that determined through the model fitting (and/or through the corresponding "strong lines - oxygen abundance" calibration) is discussed. It is suggested to use the interstellar oxygen abundance in the solar vicinity, derived with very high precision from the high-resolution observations of the weak interstellar absorption lines towards the stars, as a "Rosetta stone" to verify the validity of the oxygen abundances derived in HII regions with the Te-method at high abundances. The agreement between the value of the oxygen abundance at the solar galactocentric distance traced by the abundances derived in HII regions through the Te-method and that derived from the interstellar absorption lines towards the stars is strong evidence in favor of that i) the two-zone model for Te seems to be a realistic interpretation of the temperature structure within HII regions, and ii) the classic Te-method provides accurate oxygen abundances in HII regions. It has been concluded that the "strong lines - oxygen abundance" calibrations must be based on the HII regions with the oxygen abundances derived with the Te-method but not on the existing grids of the models for HII regions.

  2. Utilizing spatial technologies to understand and model wildlife species distributions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daugherty, Brad Ellis

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to utilize Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Remote Sensing, and the Global Positioning System (GPS) to develop and test an environmental model. The model was designed to predict, based ...

  3. A regional economic impact model for identifying the relationship between transportation investments and economic development 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freyre, German Eleodoro

    1989-01-01

    Impacts 21 3. 5 Past Applications of the REIMHS Model 22 I V PROPOSED METHODOLOGY 24 4. 1 Project Classification Criteria 4. 2 Allocation of Project Costs 4. 3 Computation and Distribution of the Efficiency Savings 24 26 31 TABLE OF CONTENTS... OF CONTENTS Chapter Page I INTRODUCIION 1. 1 General Background 1. 2 Objectives of the Research 1. 3 Summary of Research Plan 1. 4 Thesis Organization II LITERATURE REVIEW I I I OVERVIEW OF THE REIMHS MODEL 14 3. 1 Distribution of the Monetary...

  4. Modeling of Thermal Storage Systems in MILP Distributed Energy Resource Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steen, David

    2014-01-01

    and a Ph.D. in Energy and Resources, all from the Universityof distributed energy resources," in Power and EnergyPouresmaeil, "Distributed energy resources and benefits to

  5. Investigation of the Summer Climate of the Contiguous United States and Mexico Using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castro, Christopher L.

    to observations. The Great Plains low-level jet (LLJ) is also well represented in both RAMS and NARR, but the Baja Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). Part I: Model Climatology (1950­2002) CHRISTOPHER L. CASTRO* Department downscaled using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) to generate a regional climate model (RCM

  6. Evaluating Domestic Hot Water Distribution System Options with Validated Analysis Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weitzel, E.; Hoeschele, E.

    2014-09-01

    A developing body of work is forming that collects data on domestic hot water consumption, water use behaviors, and energy efficiency of various distribution systems. Transient System Simulation Tool (TRNSYS) is a full distribution system developed that has been validated using field monitoring data and then exercised in a number of climates to understand climate impact on performance. In this study, the Building America team built upon previous analysis modeling work to evaluate differing distribution systems and the sensitivities of water heating energy and water use efficiency to variations of climate, load, distribution type, insulation and compact plumbing practices. Overall, 124 different TRNSYS models were simulated. The results of this work are useful in informing future development of water heating best practices guides as well as more accurate (and simulation time efficient) distribution models for annual whole house simulation programs.

  7. Modeling the reactive inorganic solute distributions in the groundwater flow systems of the Hanford Site using inverse analytical modeling techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adamski, Mark Robert

    1993-01-01

    Inverse analytical techniques were used to model solute distributions and determine transport parameters for two flow systems in the Yakima Basalt subgroup at the Hanford Site in Washington state. Previous studies of these flow systems used...

  8. An Approach to Spatially Distributed Modeling of Net Primary Production (NPP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    -de- rived inputs, for example, the planned Earth Observation System (EOS)-MODIS Land Science Team model" in some sense) of simpler, globally applied models. In this article, we 1) pro-system processes and fluxesAn Approach to Spatially Distributed Modeling of Net Primary Production (NPP) at the Landscape

  9. Distributed sediment yield modelling: Importance of initial sediment Gianbattista Bussi a,*, Flix Francs a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    Distributed sediment yield modelling: Importance of initial sediment conditions Gianbattista Bussi April 2014 Available online Keywords: Sediment modelling Soil erosion River network deposits Initial conditions Sediment hysteresis loop a b s t r a c t The importance of initial sediment conditions on model

  10. Mining for Statistical Models of Availability in Large-Scale Distributed Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kondo, Derrick

    Mining for Statistical Models of Availability in Large-Scale Distributed Systems: An Empirical and Telecommunication Systems (MASCOTS 2009) B. Javadi (INRIA) Statistical Models of Availability MASCOTS 2009 1 / 34) Statistical Models of Availability MASCOTS 2009 2 / 34 #12;Introduction and Motivation P2P, Grid, Cloud

  11. Modeling and evaluating the performance of Brillouin distributed optical fiber sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalang, Robert C.

    Modeling and evaluating the performance of Brillouin distributed optical fiber sensors Marcelo A analysis of the key factors impacting on the performance of Brillouin distributed optical fiber sensors-of-merit offers to the research community and to potential users the possibility to evaluate with an objective

  12. DistributionFree Multivariate Process Control Based On LogLinear Modeling School of Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Peihua

    Distribution­Free Multivariate Process Control Based On Log­Linear Modeling Peihua Qiu School the process measurement is multivariate. In the literature, most existing multivariate SPC procedures assume that the in­control distribution of the multivariate process measurement is known and it is a Gaussian

  13. Brief summary of LADHS: Los Alamos distributed hydrologic modeling system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, R. E. (Regan E.); Winter, C. L. (C. Larrabee); Springer, E. P.; Costigan, K. R. (Keeley R.); Tseng, P. H. (Peng-Hsiang)

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the current state of the fourth Thrust Area of the NSF Science and Technology Center for the Sustainability of Semi-Arid Hydrology and Riparian Areas (SAHRA). Sustainability of semi-arid regions has become a serious political and scientific concern. Increasing population has added stress to the water supply and other natural resources, notably, underground aquifers. Recent controversies in the Rio Grande Basin involving the competing interests of endangered species and humans for water have highlighted the delicate balance of biologically diverse southwestern riparian areas. Potentially, the warming climate may intensify summer storms and affect the amount and timing of snow melt, the largest renewable source of water in the southwest. It is, therefore, of great political, social and scientific interest to determine ways in which human activities can coexist with healthy riparian areas and a plentiful, clean water supply over the long run. An understanding of how all of these processes interrelate would allow regional decision-makers to consider a wide range of options and thereby develop useful plans for meeting societal needs. To make the best use of limited fresh water resources, decision makers must be able to make predictions about the entire hydrologic cycle, which is a complex combination of physical, chemical, and biological processes. Only then could they explore the potential effects of increased water use and of changes in the regional climate. The important processes in the hydrologic cycle include rainfall, snowmelt, storms, runoff, and flow in ephemeral streams, rivers, and underground aquifers. Riparian communities and evaporation play key roles in reducing the available water.

  14. Conduction Models Of The Temperature Distribution In The East...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Volcano Abstract Temperature variations in the 1966-meter Hawaii Geothermal Project well HGP-A are simulated by model studies using a finite element code for conductive heat flow....

  15. Distributed GIS for Monitoring and Modeling Urban Air Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeang, Chen-Hsiang, 1969-

    The progress of technology has made the measurement of air quality and the simulation of complex air pollution models both feasible and cost-effective. However, there is a long way to go in terms of facilitating widespread ...

  16. Application of the Gebhart-Block Model for Predicting Vertical Temperature Distribution in a Large Space Building with Natural Ventilation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, C.; Song, Y.; Luo, X.

    2006-01-01

    Based on the Block model for predicting vertical temperature distribution in a large space, this paper describes an improved Gebhart-Block model for predicting vertical temperature distribution of a large space with natural ventilation...

  17. Static and Dynamic Modeling of a Solar Active Region. I: Soft X-Ray Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harry P. Warren; Amy R. Winebarger

    2006-09-01

    Recent simulations of solar active regions have shown that it is possible to reproduce both the total intensity and the general morphology of the high temperature emission observed at soft X-ray wavelengths using static heating models. There is ample observational evidence, however, that the solar corona is highly variable, indicating a significant role for dynamical processes in coronal heating. Because they are computationally demanding, full hydrodynamic simulations of solar active regions have not been considered previously. In this paper we make first application of an impulsive heating model to the simulation of an entire active region, AR8156 observed on 1998 February 16. We model this region by coupling potential field extrapolations to full solutions of the time-dependent hydrodynamic loop equations. To make the problem more tractable we begin with a static heating model that reproduces the emission observed in 4 different \\textit{Yohkoh} Soft X-Ray Telescope (SXT) filters and consider dynamical heating scenarios that yield time-averaged SXT intensities that are consistent with the static case. We find that it is possible to reproduce the total observed soft X-ray emission in all of the SXT filters with a dynamical heating model, indicating that nanoflare heating is consistent with the observational properties of the high temperature solar corona.

  18. A predictive model for particle size distribution and yield for Bayer precipitation and classification 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kapraun, Christopher Michael

    1996-01-01

    This project implements a dynamic alumina hydrate continuous precipitation and classification model in an alumina refining operation to allow the forecasting of a number of relevant process parameters, such as the particle size distribution...

  19. A Computational Market Model for Distributed Configuration Design Michael P. Wellman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wellman, Michael P.

    economies" constitutes the market solution to the original problem. After defining the configuration design. Consider a hyper-simplified scenario in aircraft design. (We choose this not as a serious exemplar ¡ ¢ £ £ ¤ ¢ ¥ ¦ § ¨ © ¨ A Computational Market Model for Distributed Configuration

  20. Distributed Energy: Modeling Penetration in Industrial Sector Over the Long-Term 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greening, L.

    2006-01-01

    : Modeling Penetration in Industrial Sector over the Long-Term Lorna Greening, Private Consultant, Los Alamos, NM Distributed energy (DE) sources provide a number of benefits when utilized. For industrial facilities in the past, turbines have provided...

  1. Using Solar Business Models to Expand the Distributed Wind Market (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savage, S.

    2013-05-01

    This presentation to attendees at Wind Powering America's All-States Summit in Chicago describes business models that were responsible for rapid growth in the solar industry and that may be applicable to the distributed wind industry as well.

  2. BioEarth: Envisioning and developing a new regional earth system model to inform natural and agricultural resource management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    systems, coupled earth system models (EaSMs) are essential.a new regional earth system model to inform natural andthe Community Earth System Model (CESM; www2.cesm.ucar.edu)

  3. Incorporating Stakeholder Decision Support Needs into an Integrated Regional Earth System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, Jennie S.; Moss, Richard H.; Runci, Paul J.; Anderson, K. L.; Malone, Elizabeth L.

    2012-03-21

    A new modeling effort exploring the opportunities, constraints, and interactions between mitigation and adaptation at regional scale is utilizing stakeholder engagement in an innovative approach to guide model development and demonstration, including uncertainty characterization, to effectively inform regional decision making. This project, the integrated Regional Earth System Model (iRESM), employs structured stakeholder interactions and literature reviews to identify the most relevant adaptation and mitigation alternatives and decision criteria for each regional application of the framework. The information is used to identify important model capabilities and to provide a focus for numerical experiments. This paper presents the stakeholder research results from the first iRESM pilot region. The pilot region includes the Great Lakes Basin in the Midwest portion of the United States as well as other contiguous states. This geographic area (14 states in total) permits cohesive modeling of hydrologic systems while also providing gradients in climate, demography, land cover/land use, and energy supply and demand. The results from the stakeholder research indicate that iRESM should prioritize addressing adaptation alternatives in the water resources, urban infrastructure, and agriculture sectors, such as water conservation, expanded water quality monitoring, altered reservoir releases, lowered water intakes, urban infrastructure upgrades, increased electric power reserves in urban areas, and land use management/crop selection changes. Regarding mitigation alternatives, the stakeholder research shows a need for iRESM to focus on policies affecting the penetration of renewable energy technologies, and the costs and effectiveness of energy efficiency, bioenergy production, wind energy, and carbon capture and sequestration.

  4. Impact of transport model errors on the global and regional methane emissions estimated by inverse modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Locatelli, R.

    A modelling experiment has been conceived to assess the impact of transport model errors on methane emissions estimated in an atmospheric inversion system. Synthetic methane observations, obtained from 10 different model ...

  5. Atmospheric Test Models and Numerical Experiments for the Simulation of the Global Distributions of Weather Data Transponders III. Horizontal Distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molenkamp, C.R.; Grossman, A.

    1999-12-20

    A network of small balloon-borne transponders which gather very high resolution wind and temperature data for use by modern numerical weather predication models has been proposed to improve the reliability of long-range weather forecasts. The global distribution of an array of such transponders is simulated using LLNL's atmospheric parcel transport model (GRANTOUR) with winds supplied by two different general circulation models. An initial study used winds from CCM3 with a horizontal resolution of about 3 degrees in latitude and longitude, and a second study used winds from NOGAPS with a 0.75 degree horizontal resolution. Results from both simulations show that reasonable global coverage can be attained by releasing balloons from an appropriate set of launch sites.

  6. Design of a next-generation regional weather research and forecast model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalakes, J.

    1999-01-13

    The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model is a new model development effort undertaken jointly by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and a number of collaborating institutions and university scientists. The model is intended for use by operational NWP and university research communities, providing a common framework for idealized dynamical studies, fill physics numerical weather prediction, air-quality simulation, and regional climate. It will eventually supersede large, well-established but aging regional models now maintained by the participating institutions. The WRF effort includes re-engineering the underlying software architecture to produce a modular, flexible code designed from the outset to provide portable performance across diverse computing architectures. This paper outlines key elements of the WRF software design.

  7. Inclusive hadron distributions in p+p collisions from saturation models of HERA DIS data.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tribedy, P.; Venugopalan, R.

    2010-12-06

    Dipole models based on various saturation scenarios provide reasonable fits to small-x DIS inclusive, diffractive and exclusive data from HERA. Proton un-integrated gluon distributions extracted from such fits are employed in a k{sub {perpendicular}}-factorization framework to calculate inclusive gluon distributions at various energies. The n-particle multiplicity distribution predicted in the Glasma flux tube approach shows good agreement with data over a wide range of energies. Hadron inclusive transverse momentum distributions expressed in terms of the saturation scale demonstrate universal behavior over a wider kinematic range systematically with increasing center of mass energies.

  8. Universal Protein Distributions in a Model of Cell Growth and Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naama Brenner; C. M. Newman; Dino Osmanovic; Yitzhak Rabin; Hanna Salman; D. L. Stein

    2015-04-08

    Protein distributions measured under a broad set of conditions in bacteria and yeast exhibit a universal skewed shape, with variances depending quadratically on means. For bacteria these properties are reproduced by protein accumulation and division dynamics across generations. We present a stochastic growth-and-division model with feedback which captures these observed properties. The limiting copy number distribution is calculated exactly, and a single parameter is found to determine the distribution shape and the variance-to-mean relation. Estimating this parameter from bacterial temporal data reproduces the measured universal distribution shape with high accuracy, and leads to predictions for future experiments.

  9. A combined model for the pseudorapidity distributions in p-p collisions at center-of-mass energies from 23.6 to 7000 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhi-Jin Jiang; Yan Huang; Jie Wang

    2015-10-22

    In p-p collisions, the produced charge particles consist of two leading particles and those frozen out from the hot and dense matter created in collisions. The two leading particles are respectively in the projectile and target fragmentation region, which, in this paper, are conventionally supposed to have Gaussian rapidity distributions. The hot and dense matter is assumed to expand according to the unified hydrodynamics, a hydro model which unifies the features of Landau and Hwa-Bjorken model, and freeze out into charged particles from a space-like hypersurface with a fixed proper time of Tau_FO. The rapidity distribution of this part of charged particles can be derived out analytically. The combined contribution from both leading particles and unified hydrodynamics is then compared against the experimental data performed in a wide now available center-of-mass energy region from 23.6 to 7000 GeV. The model predictions are in well consistent with experimental measurements.

  10. On the Predictive Uncertainty of a Distributed Hydrologic Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Huidae

    2009-05-15

    of the San Jacinto River watershed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 2 Barton Creek and Onion Creek watersheds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 3 Streamflow versus runoff for selected models out of the 54 cali- brated models...?99 SOL AWC Available water capacity of the soil layer (mm H2O/mm soil) 0.0?1.0 ESCO Soil evaporation compensation factor 0.01?1.0 GWQMN Threshold depth of water in the shallow aquifer re- quired for return flow to occur (mm H2O) 0?5000 GW REVAP...

  11. Using Simulation Models for District Chilled Water Distribution Systems Design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Q.; Xu, C.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.

    2004-01-01

    the design. The focus of this paper is to demonstrate how the using of the computerized simulation model can give the engineer the ability to explore many more alternative design scenarios and to identify more cost-effective and robust designs. The University...

  12. Implementation of an Urban Parameterization Scheme into the Regional Climate Model COSMO-CLM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    July 2012, in final form 23 April 2013) ABSTRACT As the nonhydrostatic regional model of the Consortium of urbanization on the environment, the authors extend its surface-layer parameterization by the Town Energy on spatial scales below ;3 km. 1. Introduction Since the level of world urbanization crossed the 50% mark

  13. A MODIFIED GAMBLER'S RUIN MODEL POLYETHYLENE CHAINS IN THE AMORPHOUS REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A MODIFIED GAMBLER'S RUIN MODEL OF POLYETHYLENE CHAINS IN THE AMORPHOUS REGION Zhong­Hui Duan and Louis N. Howard Department of Mathematics The Florida State University ABSTRACT. Polyethylene chainsM 3 +O(M 2 ). INTRODUCTION Semicrystalline polyethylene formed from melt generally consists

  14. Detecting changes in seasonal precipitation extremes using regional climate model projections: Implications for managing fluvial flood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowler, Hayley

    further demonstrates that existing precautionary allowances for climate change used for flood managementClick Here for Full Article Detecting changes in seasonal precipitation extremes using regional climate model projections: Implications for managing fluvial flood risk H. J. Fowler1 and R. L. Wilby2

  15. Bayesian Monte Carlo analysis applied to regional-scale inverse emission modeling for reactive trace gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    the a priori uncertainties in anthropogenic NOx and volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions: (1) The a posteriori probability density function (pdf) for NOx emissions is not modified in its averageBayesian Monte Carlo analysis applied to regional-scale inverse emission modeling for reactive

  16. Static and flowing regions in granular collapses down channels: Insights from a sedimenting shallow water model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huppert, Herbert

    Static and flowing regions in granular collapses down channels: Insights from a sedimenting shallow extend the model of Larrieu 2006 to include an estimation for the interface between the static, 043301 2007 . An empirical sedimentation term Ls and the instantaneous removal of a static deposit wedge

  17. Spatial variability of regional model simulated JuneSeptember mean precipitation over West Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    made with the CCSR/GISS RM3, driven by synchronous data from NCEP reanalysis. A five-member ensemble for a single season was generated by staggering the initial conditions of each member by 36 hr within] Regional climate model (RCM) simulations are driven by synchronous lateral boundary conditions (LBC

  18. A Prototype Integrated Transportation Land-use Model for the Lausanne Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bierlaire, Michel

    of Architecture, Civil and Environmental Engineering Ecole Polytechnique F´ed´erale de Lausanne transp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3.2 Demographic Transition Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3.3 Development Project-Morges Region in 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 6 UrbanSim Submodels Estimated for the Lausanne-Morges Re

  19. Predicting hurricane regional landfall rates: comparing local and basin-wide track model approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, T; Hall, Tim; Jewson, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    We compare two methods for making predictions of the climatological distribution of the number of hurricanes making landfall along short sections of the North American coastline. The first method uses local data, and the second method uses a basin-wide track model. Using cross-validation we show that the basin-wide track model gives better predictions for almost all parts of the coastline. This is the first time such a comparison has been made, and is the first rigourous justification for the use of basin-wide track models for predicting hurricane landfall rates and hurricane risk.

  20. Wetland model in an earth systems modeling framework for regional environmental policy analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awadalla, Sirein Salah

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate incorporating a wetland component into a land energy and water fluxes model, the Community Land Model (CLM). CLM is the land fluxes component of the Integrated Global Systems ...

  1. Regional Analysis of Building Distributed Energy Costs and CO2 Abatement: A U.S. - China Comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendes, Goncalo

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO 2 Emissions, ACEEEDistributed   Energy  Costs  and  CO 2  Abatement:     A  of Building Distributed Energy Costs and CO 2 Abatement: A

  2. REGIONAL SEISMIC AMPLITUDE MODELING AND TOMOGRAPHY FOR EARTHQUAKE-EXPLOSION DISCRIMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, W R; Pasyanos, M E; Matzel, E; Gok, R; Sweeney, J; Ford, S R; Rodgers, A J

    2008-07-08

    We continue exploring methodologies to improve earthquake-explosion discrimination using regional amplitude ratios such as P/S in a variety of frequency bands. Empirically we demonstrate that such ratios separate explosions from earthquakes using closely located pairs of earthquakes and explosions recorded on common, publicly available stations at test sites around the world (e.g. Nevada, Novaya Zemlya, Semipalatinsk, Lop Nor, India, Pakistan, and North Korea). We are also examining if there is any relationship between the observed P/S and the point source variability revealed by longer period full waveform modeling (e. g. Ford et al 2008). For example, regional waveform modeling shows strong tectonic release from the May 1998 India test, in contrast with very little tectonic release in the October 2006 North Korea test, but the P/S discrimination behavior appears similar in both events using the limited regional data available. While regional amplitude ratios such as P/S can separate events in close proximity, it is also empirically well known that path effects can greatly distort observed amplitudes and make earthquakes appear very explosion-like. Previously we have shown that the MDAC (Magnitude Distance Amplitude Correction, Walter and Taylor, 2001) technique can account for simple 1-D attenuation and geometrical spreading corrections, as well as magnitude and site effects. However in some regions 1-D path corrections are a poor approximation and we need to develop 2-D path corrections. Here we demonstrate a new 2-D attenuation tomography technique using the MDAC earthquake source model applied to a set of events and stations in both the Middle East and the Yellow Sea Korean Peninsula regions. We believe this new 2-D MDAC tomography has the potential to greatly improve earthquake-explosion discrimination, particularly in tectonically complex regions such as the Middle East. Monitoring the world for potential nuclear explosions requires characterizing seismic events and discriminating between natural and man-made seismic events, such as earthquakes and mining activities, and nuclear weapons testing. We continue developing, testing, and refining size-, distance-, and location-based regional seismic amplitude corrections to facilitate the comparison of all events that are recorded at a particular seismic station. These corrections, calibrated for each station, reduce amplitude measurement scatter and improve discrimination performance. We test the methods on well-known (ground truth) datasets in the U.S. and then apply them to the uncalibrated stations in Eurasia, Africa, and other regions of interest to improve underground nuclear test monitoring capability.

  3. Sub-grid parameterization of snow distribution for an energy and mass balance snow cover model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sub-grid parameterization of snow distribution for an energy and mass balance snow cover model-element scale variability in snow accumulation and ablation is increasingly recognized as important spatial variability in snow accumulation and melt. Model state variables are snow-covered area average

  4. Testing a blowing snow model against distributed snow measurements at Upper Sheep Creek,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    Testing a blowing snow model against distributed snow measurements at Upper Sheep Creek, Idaho S. Seyfried5 Abstract. In this paper a physically based snow transport model (SnowTran-3D) was used to simulate snow drifting over a 30 m grid and was compared to detailed snow water equivalence (SWE) surveys

  5. Modeling and Generating Daily Changes in Market Variables Using A Multivariate Mixture of Normal Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jin

    Modeling and Generating Daily Changes in Market Variables Using A Multivariate Mixture of Normal of the normal distribution for modeling of daily changes in market variables with fatter-than-normal tails is to transform (linearly) a multivariate normalwith an input covariance matrix into the desired multivariate

  6. Physically-Based Distributed Models for Multi-Layer Ceramic Capacitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Physically-Based Distributed Models for Multi-Layer Ceramic Capacitors C. R. Sullivan Yuqin Sun-Layer Ceramic Capacitors Charles R. Sullivan and Yuqin Sun charles.r.sullivan@dartmouth.edu http-603-646-3856 Abstract Measurements show that lumped RLC models for multilayer ceramic capacitors are inadequate. A new

  7. Log-normal distribution based EMOS models for probabilistic wind speed forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baran, Sándor

    2014-01-01

    Ensembles of forecasts are obtained from multiple runs of numerical weather forecasting models with different initial conditions and typically employed to account for forecast uncertainties. However, biases and dispersion errors often occur in forecast ensembles, they are usually under-dispersive and uncalibrated and require statistical post-processing. We present an Ensemble Model Output Statistics (EMOS) method for calibration of wind speed forecasts based on the log-normal (LN) distribution, and we also show a regime-switching extension of the model which combines the previously studied truncated normal (TN) distribution with the LN. Both presented models are applied to wind speed forecasts of the eight-member University of Washington mesoscale ensemble, of the fifty-member ECMWF ensemble and of the eleven-member ALADIN-HUNEPS ensemble of the Hungarian Meteorological Service, and their predictive performances are compared to those of the TN and general extreme value (GEV) distribution based EMOS methods an...

  8. A review on regional convection-permitting climate modeling: Demonstrations, prospects, and challenges

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Prein, Andreas; Langhans, Wolfgang; Fosser, Giorgia; Ferrone, Andrew; Ban, Nikolina; Goergen, Klaus; Keller, Michael; Tolle, Merja; Gutjahr, Oliver; Feser, Frauke; et al

    2015-05-27

    Regional climate modeling using convection permitting models (CPMs) emerges as a promising framework to provide more reliable climate information on regional to local scales compared to traditionally used large-scale models (LSMs). CPMs do not use convection parameterization schemes, known as a major source of errors and uncertainties, and have more accurate surface and orography elds. The drawback of CPMs is their high demand on computational resources. For this reason, the CPM climate simulations only appeared a decade ago. In this study we aim to provide a common basis for CPM climate simulations by giving a holistic review of the topic.more »The most important components in CPM, such as physical parameterizations and dynamical formulations are discussed, and an outlook on required future developments and computer architectures that would support the application of CPMs is given. Most importantly, this review presents the consolidated outcome of studies that addressed the added value of CPM climate simulations compared to LSMs. Most improvements are found for processes related to deep convection (e.g., precipitation during summer), for mountainous regions, and for the soil-vegetation-atmosphere interactions. The climate change signals of CPM simulations reveal increases in short and extreme rainfall events and an increased ratio of liquid precipitation at the surface (a decrease of hail) potentially leading to more frequent ash oods. Concluding, CPMs are a very promising tool for future climate research. However, coordinated modeling programs are crucially needed to assess their full potential and support their development.« less

  9. Particle dynamics in a non-flaring solar active region model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Threlfall, J; Neukirch, T; Parnell, C E

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate and characterise particle behaviour in a (observationally-driven) 3D MHD model of the solar atmosphere above a slowly evolving, non-flaring active region. We use a relativistic guiding-centre particle code to investigate particle acceleration in a single snapshot of the 3D MHD simulation. Despite the lack of flare-like behaviour in the active region, direct acceleration of electrons and protons to non-thermal energies ($\\lesssim420$MeV) was found, yielding spectra with high-energy tails which conform to a power law. Examples of particle dynamics, including particle trapping caused by local electric rather than magnetic field effects, are observed and discussed, together with implications for future experiments which simulate non-flaring active region heating and reconnection.

  10. A Moment Matching Based Fitting Algorithm for High Sigma Distribution Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnan, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    on Mathematical Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Piecewise Distributionthe Segment1 Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  11. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Macro Bridge Procedure to Update Regional Macroeconomic Forecasts with National Macroeconomic Forecasts

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    The Regional Short-Term Energy Model (RSTEM) uses macroeconomic variables such as income, employment, industrial production and consumer prices at both the national and regional1 levels as explanatory variables in the generation of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO). This documentation explains how national macroeconomic forecasts are used to update regional macroeconomic forecasts through the RSTEM Macro Bridge procedure.

  12. A study on the background and clustering seismicity in the Taiwan region by using point process models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yuh-Ing

    A study on the background and clustering seismicity in the Taiwan region by using point process), A study on the background and clustering seismicity in the Taiwan region by using point process models, J the shallow seismicity occurring in the Taiwan region during the 20th century using a stochastic declustering

  13. Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport models: One-dimensional soil thaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Jeffrey M.

    Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport Freezing and thawing a b s t r a c t Numerous cold regions water flow and energy transport models have of powerful simulators of cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport have emerged in recent years

  14. Polar-region distributions of Poynting flux: Global models compared with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotko, William

    Hall, Hanover, NH 03755-8001 USA M. J. Wiltberger High Altitude Observatory, National Center- mosphere is the primary sink for electromagnetic power generated by the solar wind-80% of the load on the solar wind dynamo, with the bulk of the remaining power flowing into the ring current

  15. Polar-region distributions of Poynting flux: Global models compared with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotko, William

    Hall, Hanover, NH 03755-8001 USA M. J. Wiltberger High Altitude Observatory, National Center-latitude ionosphere and ther- mosphere is the primary sink for electromagnetic power generated by the solar wind, 94.30.Kq, 94.20.wc, 94.20.dk 1 Introduction By most estimates, energy deposition in the high

  16. MCM Layout with Distributed-RLC Model D. Zhou and F. Tsui

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cong, Jason "Jingsheng"

    =l:ijiii:ii::::i It lOOOj!m (a) A single transmission line. (volt) 6.0 4.0 distrobuted-RC model 2.0 0.0 2e-11 4e-11 6eMCM Layout with Distributed-RLC Model D. Zhou and F. Tsui EE Department UNC at Charlotte Charlotte Garcia Ave. Mountain View, CA 94043 Abstract ,/ This paper models high-speed VLSI interconnects by using

  17. Classification of Distributed Data Using Topic Modeling and Maximum Variation Sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patton, Robert M; Beaver, Justin M; Potok, Thomas E

    2011-01-01

    From a management perspective, understanding the information that exists on a network and how it is distributed provides a critical advantage. This work explores the use of topic modeling as an approach to automatically determine the classes of information that exist on an organization's network, and then use the resultant topics as centroid vectors for the classification of individual documents in order to understand the distribution of information topics across the enterprise network. The approach is tested using the 20 Newsgroups dataset.

  18. A hybrid model for particle transport and electron energy distributions in positive column electrical discharges using equivalent species transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushner, Mark

    A hybrid model for particle transport and electron energy distributions in positive column the fluid portion of the model. Transport coefficients, source functions, and energy distributions for all field has motivated a num- ber of investigations into its effect on the `electron energy distribution

  19. Comparative study of Regional Urban Growth (RUG) model projections for new EU members in central Europe and the Baltic States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langner, Pawel

    2009-11-26

    Urban modelling and land-cover changes are well discussed in literature and are in a focal point of many researches. Regional urban growth (RUG) model for central Europe and the Baltic States projects land-cover changes ...

  20. Global warming and climate change - predictive models for temperate and tropical regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malini, B.H.

    1997-12-31

    Based on the assumption of 4{degree}C increase of global temperature by the turn of 21st century due to the accumulation of greenhouse gases an attempt is made to study the possible variations in different climatic regimes. The predictive climatic water balance model for Hokkaido island of Japan (a temperate zone) indicates the possible occurrence of water deficit for two to three months, which is a unknown phenomenon in this region at present. Similarly, India which represents tropical region also will experience much drier climates with increased water deficit conditions. As a consequence, the thermal region of Hokkaido which at present is mostly Tundra and Micro thermal will change into a Meso thermal category. Similarly, the moisture regime which at present supports per humid (A2, A3 and A4) and Humid (B4) climates can support A1, B4, B3, B2 and B1 climates indicating a shift towards drier side of the climatic spectrum. Further, the predictive modes of both the regions have indicated increased evapotranspiration rates. Although there is not much of change in the overall thermal characteristics of the Indian region the moisture regime indicates a clear shift towards the aridity in the country.

  1. Gaseous Chemistry and Aerosol Mechanism Developments for Version 3.5.1 of the Online Regional Model, WRF-Chem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Lowe, Douglas; Utembe, Steve; Allan, James D.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Fast, Jerome D.; Hodnebrog, Oivind; Denier van der Gon, Hugo; McFiggans, Gordon

    2014-11-08

    We have made a number of developments in the regional coupled model WRF-Chem, with the aim of making the model more suitable for prediction of atmospheric composition and of interactions between air quality and weather. We have worked on the European domain, with a particular focus on making the model suitable for the study of night time chemistry and oxidation by the nitrate radical in the UK atmosphere. A reduced form of the Common Reactive Intermediates gas-phase chemical mechanism (CRIv2-R5) has been implemented to enable more explicit simulation of VOC degradation. N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry has been added to the existing sectional MOSAIC aerosol module, and coupled to both the CRIv2-R5 and existing CBM-Z gas phase scheme. Modifications have also been made to the sea-spray aerosol emission representation, allowing the inclusion of primary organic material in sea-spray aerosol. Driven by appropriate emissions, wind fields and chemical boundary conditions, implementation of the different developments is illustrated in order to demonstrate the impact that these changes have in the North-West European domain. These developments are now part of the freely available WRF-Chem distribution.

  2. Evaluating Domestic Hot Water Distribution System Options With Validated Analysis Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weitzel, E.; Hoeschele, M.

    2014-09-01

    A developing body of work is forming that collects data on domestic hot water consumption, water use behaviors, and energy efficiency of various distribution systems. A full distribution system developed in TRNSYS has been validated using field monitoring data and then exercised in a number of climates to understand climate impact on performance. This study builds upon previous analysis modelling work to evaluate differing distribution systems and the sensitivities of water heating energy and water use efficiency to variations of climate, load, distribution type, insulation and compact plumbing practices. Overall 124 different TRNSYS models were simulated. Of the configurations evaluated, distribution losses account for 13-29% of the total water heating energy use and water use efficiency ranges from 11-22%. The base case, an uninsulated trunk and branch system sees the most improvement in energy consumption by insulating and locating the water heater central to all fixtures. Demand recirculation systems are not projected to provide significant energy savings and in some cases increase energy consumption. Water use is most efficient with demand recirculation systems, followed by the insulated trunk and branch system with a central water heater. Compact plumbing practices and insulation have the most impact on energy consumption (2-6% for insulation and 3-4% per 10 gallons of enclosed volume reduced). The results of this work are useful in informing future development of water heating best practices guides as well as more accurate (and simulation time efficient) distribution models for annual whole house simulation programs.

  3. Modeling of Thermal Storage Systems in MILP Distributed Energy Resource Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steen, David

    2014-01-01

    2010, Special Issue on Microgrids and Energy Management,and Operation of Microgrids in Commercial Buildings," IEEEin buildings and microgrids. Index Terms—distributed energy

  4. Evolution of soot size distribution in premixed ethylene/air and ethylene/benzene/air flames: Experimental and modeling study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Echavarria, Carlos A.; Sarofim, Adel F.; Lighty, JoAnn S.; D'Anna, Andrea

    2011-01-15

    The effect of benzene concentration in the initial fuel on the evolution of soot size distribution in ethylene/air and ethylene/benzene/air flat flames was characterized by experimental measurements and model predictions of size and number concentration within the flames. Experimentally, a scanning mobility particle sizer was used to allow spatially resolved and online measurements of particle concentration and sizes in the nanometer-size range. The model couples a detailed kinetic scheme with a discrete-sectional approach to follow the transition from gas-phase to nascent particles and their coagulation to larger soot particles. The evolution of soot size distribution (experimental and modeled) in pure ethylene and ethylene flames doped with benzene showed a typical nucleation-sized (since particles do not actually nucleate in the classical sense particle inception is often used in place of nucleation) mode close to the burner surface, and a bimodal behavior at greater height above burner (HAB). However, major features were distinguished between the data sets. The growth of nucleation and agglomeration-sized particles was faster for ethylene/benzene/air flames, evidenced by the earlier presence of bimodality in these flames. The most significant changes in size distribution were attributed to an increase in benzene concentration in the initial fuel. However, these changes were more evident for high temperature flames. In agreement with the experimental data, the model also predicted the decrease of nucleation-sized particles in the postflame region for ethylene flames doped with benzene. This behavior was associated with the decrease of soot precursors after the main oxidation zone of the flames. (author)

  5. Phase transition free regions in the Ising model via the Kac-Ward operator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcin Lis

    2015-05-17

    We investigate the spectral radius and operator norm of the Kac-Ward transition matrix for the Ising model on a general planar graph. We then use the obtained results to identify regions in the complex plane where the free energy density limits are analytic functions of the inverse temperature. The bound turns out to be optimal in the case of isoradial graphs, i.e. it yields criticality of the self-dual Z-invariant coupling constants.

  6. Ripe for investment : refocusing the food desert debate on smaller stores, wholesale markets and regional distribution systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamis, Laurie P

    2009-01-01

    This thesis argues that food distribution systems must be strengthened in order to address the challenge of urban food access. The argument rests on a historical analysis of the supermarket industry and a comparative study ...

  7. Statistical Distribution of the Vacuum Energy Density in Racetrack Kähler Uplift Models in String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoske Sumitomo; S. -H. Henry Tye; Sam S. C. Wong

    2013-05-03

    We study a racetrack model in the presence of the leading alpha'-correction in flux compactification in Type IIB string theory, for the purpose of getting conceivable de-Sitter vacua in the large compactified volume approximation. Unlike the K\\"ahler Uplift model studied previously, the alpha'-correction is more controllable for the meta-stable de-Sitter vacua in the racetrack case since the constraint on the compactified volume size is very much relaxed. We find that the vacuum energy density \\Lambda for de-Sitter vacua approaches zero exponentially as the volume grows. We also analyze properties of the probability distribution of \\Lambda in this class of models. As in other cases studied earlier, the probability distribution again peaks sharply at \\Lambda=0. We also study the Racetrack K\\"ahler Uplift model in the Swiss-Cheese type model.

  8. Hardware model of a shipboard zonal electrical distribution system (ZEDS) : alternating current/direct current (AC/DC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tidd, Chad N. (Chad Norman)

    2010-01-01

    A hardware model of a shipboard electrical distribution system based on aspects of the DDG 51 Flight IIA, Arleigh Burke class, 60Hz Alternating Current (AC) and the future direct current (DC), zonal electrical distribution ...

  9. North American Carbon Program (NACP) Regional Interim Synthesis: Terrestrial Biospheric Model Intercomparision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huntzinger, Deborah [University of Michigan; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Michalak, Anna [University of Michigan; West, Tristram O. [Joint Global Change Research Institute, PNNL; Jacobson, Andrew [NOAA ESRL and CIRES; Baker, Ian [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Chen, Jing M. [University of Toronto; Davis, Kenneth [Pennsylvania State University; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Jain, Atul [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Liu, Shuguang [United States Geological Survey, Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (USGS EROS); Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Neilson, Ronald [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Poulter, Ben [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Tian, Hanqin [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Tomelleri, Enrico [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Viovy, Nicolas [National Center for Scientific Research, Gif-sur-Yvette, France; Xiao, Jingfeng [Purdue University; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Understanding of carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere can be improved through direct observations and experiments, as well as through modeling activities. Terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) have become an integral tool for extrapolating local observations and understanding to much larger terrestrial regions. Although models vary in their specific goals and approaches, their central role within carbon cycle science is to provide a better understanding of the mechanisms currently controlling carbon exchange. Recently, the North American Carbon Program (NACP) organized several interim-synthesis activities to evaluate and inter-compare models and observations at local to continental scales for the years 2000-2005. Here, we compare the results from the TBMs collected as part of the regional and continental interim-synthesis (RCIS) activities. The primary objective of this work is to synthesize and compare the 19 participating TBMs to assess current understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle in North America. Thus, the RCIS focuses on model simulations available from analyses that have been completed by ongoing NACP projects and other recently published studies. The TBM flux estimates are compared and evaluated over different spatial (1{sup o} x 1{sup o} and spatially aggregated to different regions) and temporal (monthly and annually) scales. The range in model estimates of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) for North America is much narrower than estimates of productivity or respiration, with estimates of NEP varying between -0.7 and 2.2 PgC yr{sup -1}, while gross primary productivity and heterotrophic respiration vary between 12.2 and 32.9 PgC yr{sup -1} and 5.6 and 13.2 PgC yr{sup -1}, respectively. The range in estimates from the models appears to be driven by a combination of factors, including the representation of photosynthesis, the source and of environmental driver data and the temporal variability of those data, as well as whether nutrient limitation is considered in soil carbon decomposition. The disagreement in current estimates of carbon flux across North America, including whether North America is a net biospheric carbon source or sink, highlights the need for further analysis through the use of model runs following a common simulation protocol, in order to isolate the influences of model formulation, structure, and assumptions on flux estimates.

  10. Hollow cathode theory and experiment. II. A two-dimensional theoretical model of the emitter region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Polk, James E.

    2005-12-01

    Despite their long history and wide range of applicability that includes electric propulsion, detailed understanding of the driving physics inside orificed hollow cathodes remains elusive. The theoretical complexity associated with the multicomponent fluid inside the cathode, and the difficulty of accessing empirically this region, have limited our ability to design cathodes that perform better and last longer. A two-dimensional axisymmetric theoretical model of the multispecies fluid inside an orificed hollow cathode is presented. The level of detail attained by the model is allowed by its extended system of governing equations not solved for in the past within the hollow cathode. Such detail is motivated in part by the need to quantify the effect(s) of the plasma on the emitter life, and by the need to build the foundation for future modeling that will assess erosion of the keeper plate. Results from numerical simulations of a 1.2-cm-diam cathode operating at a discharge current of 25 A and a gas flow rate of 5 SCCM show that approximately 10 A of electron current, and 3.45 A of ion current return back to the emitter surface. The total emitted electron current is 33.8 A and the peak emitter temperature is found to be 1440 K. Comparisons with the measurements suggest that anomalous heating of the plasma is possible near the orifice region. The model predicts heavy species temperatures as high as 2034 K and peak voltage drops near the emitting surface not exceeding 8 V.

  11. Improvement of capabilities of the Distributed Electrochemistry Modeling Tool for investigating SOFC long term performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez Galdamez, Rinaldo A.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.

    2012-04-30

    This report provides an overview of the work performed for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) modeling during the 2012 Winter/Spring Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). A brief introduction on the concept, operation basics and applications of fuel cells is given for the general audience. Further details are given regarding the modifications and improvements of the Distributed Electrochemistry (DEC) Modeling tool developed by PNNL engineers to model SOFC long term performance. Within this analysis, a literature review on anode degradation mechanisms is explained and future plans of implementing these into the DEC modeling tool are also proposed.

  12. Solar surface emerging flux regions: a comparative study of radiative MHD modeling and Hinode SOT observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. C. M. Cheung; M. Schuessler; T. D. Tarbell; A. M. Title

    2008-10-31

    We present results from numerical modeling of emerging flux regions on the solar surface. The modeling was carried out by means of 3D radiative MHD simulations of the rise of buoyant magnetic flux tubes through the convection zone and into the photosphere. Due to the strong stratification of the convection zone, the rise results in a lateral expansion of the tube into a magnetic sheet, which acts as a reservoir for small-scale flux emergence events at the scale of granulation. The interaction of the convective downflows and the rising magnetic flux undulates it to form serpentine field lines emerging into the photosphere. Observational characteristics including the pattern of emerging flux regions, the cancellation of surface flux and associated high speed downflows, the convective collapse of photospheric flux tubes, the appearance of anomalous darkenings, the formation of bright points and the possible existence of transient kilogauss horizontal fields are discussed in the context of new observations from the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope. Implications for the local helioseismology of emerging flux regions are also discussed.

  13. Data Driven Approach for High Resolution Population Distribution and Dynamics Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhaduri, Budhendra L; Bright, Eddie A; Rose, Amy N; Liu, Cheng; Urban, Marie L; Stewart, Robert N

    2014-01-01

    High resolution population distribution data are vital for successfully addressing critical issues ranging from energy and socio-environmental research to public health to human security. Commonly available population data from Census is constrained both in space and time and does not capture population dynamics as functions of space and time. This imposes a significant limitation on the fidelity of event-based simulation models with sensitive space-time resolution. This paper describes ongoing development of high-resolution population distribution and dynamics models, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, through spatial data integration and modeling with behavioral or activity-based mobility datasets for representing temporal dynamics of population. The model is resolved at 1 km resolution globally and describes the U.S. population for nighttime and daytime at 90m. Integration of such population data provides the opportunity to develop simulations and applications in critical infrastructure management from local to global scales.

  14. Conceptual Model Summary Report Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Along Arches Province of Midwestern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-06-30

    A conceptual model was developed for the Arches Province that integrates geologic and hydrologic information on the Eau Claire and Mt. Simon formations into a geocellular model. The conceptual model describes the geologic setting, stratigraphy, geologic structures, hydrologic features, and distribution of key hydraulic parameters. The conceptual model is focused on the Mt. Simon sandstone and Eau Claire formations. The geocellular model depicts the parameters and conditions in a numerical array that may be imported into the numerical simulations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage. Geophysical well logs, rock samples, drilling logs, geotechnical test results, and reservoir tests were evaluated for a 500,000 km{sup 2} study area centered on the Arches Province. The geologic and hydraulic data were integrated into a three-dimensional (3D) grid of porosity and permeability, which are key parameters regarding fluid flow and pressure buildup due to CO{sub 2} injection. Permeability data were corrected in locations where reservoir tests have been performed in Mt. Simon injection wells. The final geocellular model covers an area of 600 km by 600 km centered on the Arches Province. The geocellular model includes a total of 24,500,000 cells representing estimated porosity and permeability distribution. CO{sub 2} injection scenarios were developed for on-site and regional injection fields at rates of 70 to 140 million metric tons per year.

  15. Modeling of Thermal Storage Systems in MILP Distributed Energy Resource Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steen, David

    2014-01-01

    with electric and thermal storage technologies," presentedModeling of Thermal Storage Systems in MILP Distributedof California. Modeling of thermal storage systems in MILP

  16. Integrated Model for Production-Distribution Coordination in an Industrial Gases Supply-chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    and their demand/consumption profiles Max/Min inventory at production sites and customer locations Max and Respective Production limits Daily Electricity Prices (off-peak and peak) Customers and their demand/consumptionIntegrated Model for Production-Distribution Coordination in an Industrial Gases Supply-chain Pablo

  17. Modeling and Simulation of the EV Charging in a Residential Distribution Power Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Faruque, Mohammad Abdullah

    by changing the transformers and adding more power plants to provide more energy to the residential grid [5Modeling and Simulation of the EV Charging in a Residential Distribution Power Grid Fereidoun of California, Irvine Irvine, California, USA {fahourai, ibhuang, mohammad.alfaruque} @ uci.edu Abstract

  18. Distributed Brain Modelling by means of Hierarchical Collaborative CoEvolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trahanias, Panos

    Distributed Brain Modelling by means of Hierarchical Collaborative CoEvolution Michail Maniadakis-based agent structures are employed to represent distinct brain areas. We in- troduce a Hierarchical Collaborative CoEvolutionary (HCCE) approach to design autonomous, yet cooper- ating agents. Thus, partial brain

  19. Modeling NoC Traffic Locality and Energy Consumption with Rent's Communication Probability Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephanie

    Circuits]: Design aids--simulation; C.4 [Performance of Systems]: Modeling techiniques General Terms Design Distribution George B. P. Bezerra Dept. of Computer Science University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131 gbezerra@cs.unm.edu Stephanie Forrest Dept. of Computer Science University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM

  20. Evaluation of distributed hydrologic impacts of temperature-index and energy-based snow models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    Evaluation of distributed hydrologic impacts of temperature-index and energy-based snow models Accepted 13 March 2013 Available online 26 March 2013 Keywords: Snow Energy-balance Temperature that both the Isnobal energy-balance and calibrated temperature-index methods adequately reproduce snow

  1. SUBGRID PARAMETERIZATION OF SNOW DISTRIBUTION FOR AN ENERGY AND MASS BALANCE SNOW COVER MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    SUBGRID PARAMETERIZATION OF SNOW DISTRIBUTION FOR AN ENERGY AND MASS BALANCE SNOW COVER MODEL., Plaza 4, Suite 105, Boise, Idaho 83712-7716 Paper presented at the International Conference on SNOW in Hydrological Processes, 13(12-13): 1921-1933, special issue from International Conference on Snow Hydrology

  2. Aalborg Universitet Models for HLI analysis of power system with offshore wind farms and distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    Aalborg Universitet Models for HLI analysis of power system with offshore wind farms for Offshore Wind farms Publication date: 2008 Document Version Publisher final version (usually the publisher with offshore wind farms and distributed generation. In Proc. of 7th International Workshop on Large- Scale

  3. Distributed Modeling of Extreme Floods on Large Watersheds John F. England, Jr.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    1 Distributed Modeling of Extreme Floods on Large Watersheds John F. England, Jr.1 , Pierre Y. Julien2 , Mark L. Velleux2 , and James A. Smith3 1 Hydraulic Engineer, Bureau of Reclamation, Flood Estimates of extreme floods and probabilities are needed for hydrologic engineering and dam safety risk

  4. Design Models for Components in Distributed Object Software X. Xie and S. M. Shatz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shatz, Sol M.

    approach for component-based software engineering. This paper discusses an approach for blending Petri netDesign Models for Components in Distributed Object Software 1 X. Xie and S. M. Shatz University of Illinois at Chicago Abstract Component-based software development has many potential advantages, including

  5. Modelling the distribution, sustainability and diapause emergence timing of the copepod Calanus finmarchicus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    Modelling the distribution, sustainability and diapause emergence timing of the copepod Calanus of population sustainability. We are able to simulate reasonably well the temporal and spatial patterns, however, are dependent upon ships of opportunity, which rarely venture into the mid- and northern Labrador

  6. 1 | P a g e Implementing an Integrated Distributed Model in Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ollivier-Gooch, Carl

    1 | P a g e Implementing an Integrated Distributed Model in Finance There are significant changes taking place, effective today, across the University's Finance function. These changes reflect some key opportunities for our finance professionals through mentoring, talent development, career laddering, mobility

  7. Estimation of Distributed Parameters in Permittivity Models of Composite Dielectric Materials Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such as ceramic matrix composites (CMC's) are currently being studied for their use in a wide rangeEstimation of Distributed Parameters in Permittivity Models of Composite Dielectric Materials Using the feasibility of quantifying properties of a composite dielectric ma- terial through the reflectance, where

  8. Incorporating remotely-sensed snow albedo into a spatially-distributed snowmelt model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    estimates in a distributed snowmelt model that explicitly includes net solar radiation resulted in a much significant in areas and at times where incident solar radiation was relatively high and temperatures low Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) with an RMSE of 1.8% [Painter et al., 2003]. To date

  9. Lumped and Distributed Parameter SPICE Models of TE Devices Considering Temperature Dependent Material Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Mitrani; J. Salazar; A. Turo; M. J. García; J. A. Chávez

    2008-01-07

    Based on simplified one-dimensional steady-state analysis of thermoelectric phenomena and on analogies between thermal and electrical domains, we propose both lumped and distributed parameter electrical models for thermoelectric devices. For lumped parameter models, constant values for material properties are extracted from polynomial fit curves evaluated at different module temperatures (hot side, cold side, average, and mean module temperature). For the case of distributed parameter models, material properties are calculated according to the mean temperature at each segment of a sectioned device. A couple of important advantages of the presented models are that temperature dependence of material properties is considered and that they can be easily simulated using an electronic simulation tool such as SPICE. Comparisons are made between SPICE simulations for a single-pellet module using the proposed models and with numerical simulations carried out with Mathematica software. Results illustrate accuracy of the distributed parameter models and show how inappropriate is to assume, in some cases, constant material parameters for an entire thermoelectric element.

  10. Impact of Agricultural Practice on Regional Climate in a CoupledLand Surface Mesoscale Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooley, H.S.; Riley, W.J.; Torn, M.S.; He, Y.

    2004-07-01

    The land surface has been shown to form strong feedbacks with climate due to linkages between atmospheric conditions and terrestrial ecosystem exchanges of energy, momentum, water, and trace gases. Although often ignored in modeling studies, land management itself may form significant feedbacks. Because crops are harvested earlier under drier conditions, regional air temperature, precipitation, and soil moisture, for example, affect harvest timing, particularly of rain-fed crops. This removal of vegetation alters the land surface characteristics and may, in turn, affect regional climate. We applied a coupled climate(MM5) and land-surface (LSM1) model to examine the effects of early and late winter wheat harvest on regional climate in the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility in the Southern Great Plains, where winter wheat accounts for 20 percent of the land area. Within the winter wheat region, simulated 2 m air temperature was 1.3 C warmer in the Early Harvest scenario at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Soils in the harvested area were drier and warmer in the top 10 cm and wetter in the 10-20 cm layer. Midday soils were 2.5 C warmer in the harvested area at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Harvest also dramatically altered latent and sensible heat fluxes. Although differences between scenarios diminished once both scenarios were harvested, the short-term impacts of land management on climate were comparable to those from land cover change demonstrated in other studies.

  11. NREL: Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) Model - Model Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial Toolkit TheCompetitiveMattPhotoQualitative Model

  12. Distributed energy resources customer adoption modeling with combined heat and power applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2003-01-01

    of Microgrid Distributed Energy Resource Potential Usingon Integration of Distributed Energy Resources: The CERTSof Customer Adoption of Distributed Energy Resources. ”

  13. Validation of a Hot Water Distribution Model Using Laboratory and Field Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backman, C.; Hoeschele, M.

    2013-07-01

    Characterizing the performance of hot water distribution systems is a critical step in developing best practice guidelines for the design and installation of high performance hot water systems. Developing and validating simulation models is critical to this effort, as well as collecting accurate input data to drive the models. In this project, the Building America research team ARBI validated the newly developed TRNSYS Type 604 pipe model against both detailed laboratory and field distribution system performance data. Validation efforts indicate that the model performs very well in handling different pipe materials, insulation cases, and varying hot water load conditions. Limitations of the model include the complexity of setting up the input file and long simulation run times. This project also looked at recent field hot water studies to better understand use patterns and potential behavioral changes as homeowners convert from conventional storage water heaters to gas tankless units. The team concluded that the current Energy Factor test procedure overestimates typical use and underestimates the number of hot water draws, which has implications for both equipment and distribution system performance. Gas tankless water heaters were found to impact how people use hot water, but the data does not necessarily suggest an increase in usage. Further study in hot water usage and patterns is needed to better define these characteristics in different climates and home vintages.

  14. Validation of a Hot Water Distribution Model Using Laboratory and Field Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backman, C.; Hoeschele, M.

    2013-07-01

    Characterizing the performance of hot water distribution systems is a critical step in developing best practice guidelines for the design and installation of high performance hot water systems. Developing and validating simulation models is critical to this effort, as well as collecting accurate input data to drive the models. In this project, the ARBI team validated the newly developed TRNSYS Type 604 pipe model against both detailed laboratory and field distribution system performance data. Validation efforts indicate that the model performs very well in handling different pipe materials, insulation cases, and varying hot water load conditions. Limitations of the model include the complexity of setting up the input file and long simulation run times. In addition to completing validation activities, this project looked at recent field hot water studies to better understand use patterns and potential behavioral changes as homeowners convert from conventional storage water heaters to gas tankless units. Based on these datasets, we conclude that the current Energy Factor test procedure overestimates typical use and underestimates the number of hot water draws. This has implications for both equipment and distribution system performance. Gas tankless water heaters were found to impact how people use hot water, but the data does not necessarily suggest an increase in usage. Further study in hot water usage and patterns is needed to better define these characteristics in different climates and home vintages.

  15. Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Department of Energy Commercial Reference Building Models ofthe National Building Stock. Golden, Colorado: Nationaland Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, of the

  16. A Distributed Electrochemistry Modeling Tool for Simulating SOFC Performance and Degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Ryan, Emily M.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-10-13

    This report presents a distributed electrochemistry (DEC) model capable of investigating the electrochemistry and local conditions with the SOFC MEA based on the local microstructure and multi-physics. The DEC model can calculate the global current-voltage (I-V) performance of the cell as determined by the spatially varying local conditions through the thickness of the electrodes and electrolyte. The simulation tool is able to investigate the electrochemical performance based on characteristics of the electrode microstructure, such as particle size, pore size, electrolyte and electrode phase volume fractions, and triple-phase-boundary length. It can also investigate performance as affected by fuel and oxidant gas flow distributions and other environmental/experimental conditions such as temperature and fuel gas composition. The long-term objective for the DEC modeling tool is to investigate factors that cause electrode degradation and the decay of SOFC performance which decrease longevity.

  17. Phase Space Distribution for Two-Gap Solution in Unitary Matrix Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parikshit Dutta; Suvankar Dutta

    2015-10-12

    We analyze the dynamics of weakly coupled finite temperature $U(N)$ gauge theories on $S^3$ by studying a class of effective unitary matrix model. Solving Dyson-Schwinger equation at large $N$, we find that different phases of gauge theories are characterized by gaps in eigenvalue distribution over a unit circle. In particular, we obtain no-gap, one-gap and two-gap solutions at large $N$ for a class of matrix model we are considering. The same effective matrix model can equivalently be written as a sum over representations (or Young diagrams) of unitary group. We show that at large $N$, Young diagrams corresponding to different phases can be classified in terms of discontinuities in number of boxes in two consecutive rows. More precisely, the representation, where there is no discontinuity, corresponds to no-gap and one-gap solution, where as, a diagram with one discontinuity corresponds to two-gap phase, mentioned above. This observation allows us to write a one to one relation between eigenvalue distribution function and Young tableaux distribution function for each saddle point, in particular for two-gap solution. We find that all the saddle points can be described in terms of free fermions with a phase space distribution for no-gap, one-gap and two-gap phases.

  18. Model Based Commissioning Tool for Air-Conditioning Distribution Systems-APCBC 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoshida, H.; Noda, T.

    2014-01-01

    , Beijing, China ESL-IC-14-09-06 Proceedings of the 14th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Beijing, China, September 14-17, 2014 1. Issues 2. Simulation Model of Distribution System 3. Example of VWV System 4. Example of VAV System... 5. Conclusions 2 ESL-IC-14-09-06 Proceedings of the 14th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Beijing, China, September 14-17, 2014 ? Energy consumption of air and water distribution in air- conditioning systems reaches up to 12...

  19. Improvements to Regional Explosion Identification using Attenuation Models of the Lithosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasyanos, M E; Walter, W R

    2009-03-30

    Regional P/S amplitudes have been recognized as an effective discriminant between earthquakes and explosions. While closely spaced earthquake and explosions generally discriminate easily, the application of this technique to broad regions has been hampered by large variations in the amplitude of regional phases due to the attenuation structure of the crust and upper mantle. Making use of a recent P-wave and S-wave attenuation model of the lithosphere, we have found that correcting the events using our amplitude methodology significantly reduces the scattering in the earthquake population. We demonstrate an application of this technique to station NIL (Nilore, Pakistan) using broad area earthquakes and the 1998 Indian nuclear explosion recorded at the station using the Pn/Lg discriminant in the 1-2 Hz passband. We find that the explosion, which is lost in the scatter of the earthquakes in the uncorrected discriminant, clearly separates by correcting for the attenuation structure. We see a similar reduction in scatter and separation for the Pn/Sn and Pg/Lg discriminants in the same passband.

  20. Regional scale cropland carbon budgets: evaluating a geospatial agricultural modeling system using inventory data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; Sahajpal, Ritvik; West, Tristram O.; Thomson, Allison M.; Xu, Min; Zhao, Kaiguang; LeDuc, Stephen D.; Williams, Jimmy R.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate quantification and clear understanding of regional scale cropland carbon (C) cycling is critical for designing effective policies and management practices that can contribute toward stabilizing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. However, extrapolating site-scale observations to regional scales represents a major challenge confronting the agricultural modeling community. This study introduces a novel geospatial agricultural modeling system (GAMS) exploring the integration of the mechanistic Environmental Policy Integrated Climate model, spatially-resolved data, surveyed management data, and supercomputing functions for cropland C budgets estimates. This modeling system creates spatially-explicit modeling units at a spatial resolution consistent with remotely-sensed crop identification and assigns cropping systems to each of them by geo-referencing surveyed crop management information at the county or state level. A parallel computing algorithm was also developed to facilitate the computationally intensive model runs and output post-processing and visualization. We evaluated GAMS against National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) reported crop yields and inventory estimated county-scale cropland C budgets averaged over 2000–2008. We observed good overall agreement, with spatial correlation of 0.89, 0.90, 0.41, and 0.87, for crop yields, Net Primary Production (NPP), Soil Organic C (SOC) change, and Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE), respectively. However, we also detected notable differences in the magnitude of NPP and NEE, as well as in the spatial pattern of SOC change. By performing crop-specific annual comparisons, we discuss possible explanations for the discrepancies between GAMS and the inventory method, such as data requirements, representation of agroecosystem processes, completeness and accuracy of crop management data, and accuracy of crop area representation. Based on these analyses, we further discuss strategies to improve GAMS by updating input data and by designing more efficient parallel computing capability to quantitatively assess errors associated with the simulation of C budget components. The modularized design of the GAMS makes it flexible to be updated and adapted for different agricultural models so long as they require similar input data, and to be linked with socio-economic models to understand the effectiveness and implications of diverse C management practices and policies.

  1. A shape of charged particle lateral distribution in individual EAS events with energy above 10^19 eV arriving from different celestial regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Sabourov; M. I. Pravdin; S. P. Knurenko

    2007-11-15

    A shape of lateral distribution for charged particles in events with energy above 10^19eV is considered. Two methods were used for individual LDF parametrization. In the first approach, the index of power was determined for generalized Greisen-Linsley approximation. In second, mean square radius of the shower was determined for approximation proposed by Lagutin et al. Comparison of resulted parameters is presented for individual events arrived from different celestial regions -- Galactic planes and the region with increased flux of particles with E(0)>=10^19eV (according to Yakutsk array): 1.7h-3.7h right ascension; 45-60 degrees declination.

  2. Ecological Modelling 190 (2006) 171189 Local spatial modeling of white-tailed deer distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    spatial modeling techniques. We used one local modeling approach, geographically weighted regression (GWR rights reserved. Keywords: Geographically weighted regression; Ordinary linear-squares regression; White regression (White et al., 2004), logistic multiple regression (Pearce, 1987; Augustin et al., 1996

  3. A One-Dimensional (1-D) Three-Region Model for a Bubbling Fluidized-Bed Adsorber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Andrew; Miller, David C.

    2012-01-01

    A general one-dimensional (1-D), three-region model for a bubbling fluidized-bed adsorber with internal heat exchangers has been developed. The model can predict the hydrodynamics of the bed and provides axial profiles for all temperatures, concentrations, and velocities. The model is computationally fast and flexible and allows for any system of adsorption and desorption reactions to be modeled, making the model applicable to any adsorption process. The model has been implemented in both gPROMS and Aspen Custom Modeler, and the behavior of the model has been verified.

  4. MODELING SUPER-FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVES OBSERVED BY SDO IN ACTIVE REGION FUNNELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ofman, L.; Liu, W.; Title, A.; Aschwanden, M.

    2011-10-20

    Recently, quasi-periodic, rapidly propagating waves have been observed in extreme ultraviolet by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument in about 10 flare/coronal mass ejection (CME) events thus far. A typical example is the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/CME event that exhibited arc-shaped wave trains propagating in an active region (AR) magnetic funnel with {approx}5% intensity variations at speeds in the range of 1000-2000 km s{sup -1}. The fast temporal cadence and high sensitivity of AIA enabled the detection of these waves. We identify them as fast magnetosonic waves driven quasi-periodically at the base of the flaring region and develop a three-dimensional MHD model of the event. For the initial state we utilize the dipole magnetic field to model the AR and include gravitationally stratified density at coronal temperature. At the coronal base of the AR, we excite the fast magnetosonic wave by periodic velocity pulsations in the photospheric plane confined to a funnel of magnetic field lines. The excited fast magnetosonic waves have similar amplitude, wavelength, and propagation speeds as the observed wave trains. Based on the simulation results, we discuss the possible excitation mechanism of the waves, their dynamical properties, and the use of the observations for coronal MHD seismology.

  5. Heat and freshwater exchange on the Antarctic continental1" shelf in a regional coupled climate model2"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Edwin

    Heat and freshwater exchange on the Antarctic continental1" shelf in a regional coupled climate, South Korea 120-749. Email:21" cyoo@cims.nyu.edu.22" #12;2" Abstract23" Understanding heat. This study analyzes the heat and freshwater budget using a regional25" coupled climate model, which has been

  6. On an improved sub-regional water resources management representation for integration into earth system models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voisin, Nathalie; Li, Hongyi; Ward, Duane L.; Huang, Maoyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-09-30

    Human influence on the hydrologic cycle includes regulation and storage, consumptive use and overall redistribution of water resources in space and time. Representing these processes is essential for applications of earth system models in hydrologic and climate predictions, as well as impact studies at regional to global scales. Emerging large-scale research reservoir models use generic operating rules that are flexible for coupling with earth system models. Those generic operating rules have been successful in reproducing the overall regulated flow at large basin scales. This study investigates the uncertainties of the reservoir models from different implementations of the generic operating rules using the complex multi-objective Columbia River Regulation System in northwestern United States as an example to understand their effects on not only regulated flow but also reservoir storage and fraction of the demand that is met. Numerical experiments are designed to test new generic operating rules that combine storage and releases targets for multi-purpose reservoirs and to compare the use of reservoir usage priorities, withdrawals vs. consumptive demand, as well as natural vs. regulated mean flow for calibrating operating rules. Overall the best performing implementation is the use of the combined priorities (flood control storage targets and irrigation release targets) operating rules calibrated with mean annual natural flow and mean monthly withdrawals. The challenge of not accounting for groundwater withdrawals, or on the contrary, assuming that all remaining demand is met through groundwater extractions, is discussed.

  7. 2100 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES, VOL. 59, NO. 8, AUGUST 2012 A Distributed Bulk-Oxide Trap Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    a distributed circuit model for bulk-oxide traps based on tunneling between the semiconductor surface and trap explained by the distributed bulk-oxide trap model. Index Terms--Bulk-oxide trap, III­V, MOS, tunneling. I-oxide traps or border traps, do have long time constants as they interact with the conduction band electrons

  8. A preliminary regional PBPK model of lung metabolism for improving species dependent descriptions of 1,3-butadiene and its metabolites

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Campbell, Jerry; Van Landingham, Cynthia; Crowell, Susan; Gentry, Robinan; Kaden, Debra; Fiebelkorn, Stacy; Loccisano, Anne; Clewell, Harvey

    2015-06-12

    1,3-Butadiene (BD), a volatile organic chemical (VOC), is used in synthetic rubber production and other industrial processes. It is detectable at low levels in ambient air as well as in tobacco smoke and gasoline vapors. Inhalation exposures to high concentrations of BD have been associated with lung cancer in both humans and experimental animals, although differences in species sensitivity have been observed. Metabolically active lung cells such as Pulmonary Type I and Type II epithelial cells and club cells (Clara cells)1 are potential targets of BD metabolite-induced toxicity. Metabolic capacities of these cells, their regional densities, and distributions vary throughoutmore »the respiratory tract as well as between species and cell types. Here we present a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for BD that includes a regional model of lung metabolism, based on a previous model for styrene, to provide species-dependent descriptions of BD metabolism in the mouse, rat, and human. Since there are no in vivo data on BD pharmacokinetics in the human, the rat and mouse models were parameterized to the extent possible on the basis of in vitro metabolic data. Where it was necessary to use in vivo data, extrapolation from rat to mouse was performed to evaluate the level of uncertainty in the human model. A kidney compartment and description of downstream metabolism were also included in the model to allow for eventual use of available urinary and blood biomarker data in animals and humans to calibrate the model for estimation of BD exposures and internal metabolite levels. Results from simulated inhalation exposures to BD indicate that incorporation of differential lung region metabolism is important in describing species differences in pulmonary response and that these differences may have implications for risk assessments of human exposures to BD.« less

  9. Microtomography and pore-scale modeling of two-phase Fluid Distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silin, D.; Tomutsa, L.; Benson, S.; Patzek, T.

    2010-10-19

    Synchrotron-based X-ray microtomography (micro CT) at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) line 8.3.2 at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory produces three-dimensional micron-scale-resolution digital images of the pore space of the reservoir rock along with the spacial distribution of the fluids. Pore-scale visualization of carbon dioxide flooding experiments performed at a reservoir pressure demonstrates that the injected gas fills some pores and pore clusters, and entirely bypasses the others. Using 3D digital images of the pore space as input data, the method of maximal inscribed spheres (MIS) predicts two-phase fluid distribution in capillary equilibrium. Verification against the tomography images shows a good agreement between the computed fluid distribution in the pores and the experimental data. The model-predicted capillary pressure curves and tomography-based porosimetry distributions compared favorably with the mercury injection data. Thus, micro CT in combination with modeling based on the MIS is a viable approach to study the pore-scale mechanisms of CO{sub 2} injection into an aquifer, as well as more general multi-phase flows.

  10. Modeling of Thermal Storage Systems in MILP Distributed Energy Resource Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steen, David

    2014-01-01

    and . Mehling, Review on thermal energy storage with phaseModelling of thermal energy storage in industrial energyOptimal deployment of thermal energy storage under diverse

  11. Global and regional modeling of clouds and aerosols in the marine boundary layer during VOCALS: the VOCA intercomparison

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wyant, M. C.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Wood, Robert; Carmichael, Gregory; Clarke, A. D.; Fast, Jerome D.; George, R.; Gustafson, William I.; Hannay, Cecile; Lauer, Axel; et al

    2015-01-09

    A diverse collection of models are used to simulate the marine boundary layer in the southeast Pacific region during the period of the October–November 2008 VOCALS REx (VAMOS Ocean Cloud Atmosphere Land Study Regional Experiment) field campaign. Regional models simulate the period continuously in boundary-forced free-running mode, while global forecast models and GCMs (general circulation models) are run in forecast mode. The models are compared to extensive observations along a line at 20° S extending westward from the South American coast. Most of the models simulate cloud and aerosol characteristics and gradients across the region that are recognizably similar tomore »observations, despite the complex interaction of processes involved in the problem, many of which are parameterized or poorly resolved. Some models simulate the regional low cloud cover well, though many models underestimate MBL (marine boundary layer) depth near the coast. Most models qualitatively simulate the observed offshore gradients of SO2, sulfate aerosol, CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) concentration in the MBL as well as differences in concentration between the MBL and the free troposphere. Most models also qualitatively capture the decrease in cloud droplet number away from the coast. However, there are large quantitative intermodel differences in both means and gradients of these quantities. Many models are able to represent episodic offshore increases in cloud droplet number and aerosol concentrations associated with periods of offshore flow. Most models underestimate CCN (at 0.1% supersaturation) in the MBL and free troposphere. The GCMs also have difficulty simulating coastal gradients in CCN and cloud droplet number concentration near the coast. The overall performance of the models demonstrates their potential utility in simulating aerosol–cloud interactions in the MBL, though quantitative estimation of aerosol–cloud interactions and aerosol indirect effects of MBL clouds with these models remains uncertain.« less

  12. Global and regional modeling of clouds and aerosols in the marine boundary layer during VOCALS: the VOCA intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyant, M. C.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Wood, Robert; Carmichael, Gregory; Clarke, A. D.; Fast, Jerome D.; George, R.; Gustafson, William I.; Hannay, Cecile; Lauer, Axel; Lin, Yanluan; Morcrette, J. -J.; Mulcahay, Jane; Saide, Pablo; Spak, S. N.; Yang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    A diverse collection of models are used to simulate the marine boundary layer in the southeast Pacific region during the period of the October–November 2008 VOCALS REx (VAMOS Ocean Cloud Atmosphere Land Study Regional Experiment) field campaign. Regional models simulate the period continuously in boundary-forced free-running mode, while global forecast models and GCMs (general circulation models) are run in forecast mode. The models are compared to extensive observations along a line at 20° S extending westward from the South American coast. Most of the models simulate cloud and aerosol characteristics and gradients across the region that are recognizably similar to observations, despite the complex interaction of processes involved in the problem, many of which are parameterized or poorly resolved. Some models simulate the regional low cloud cover well, though many models underestimate MBL (marine boundary layer) depth near the coast. Most models qualitatively simulate the observed offshore gradients of SO2, sulfate aerosol, CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) concentration in the MBL as well as differences in concentration between the MBL and the free troposphere. Most models also qualitatively capture the decrease in cloud droplet number away from the coast. However, there are large quantitative intermodel differences in both means and gradients of these quantities. Many models are able to represent episodic offshore increases in cloud droplet number and aerosol concentrations associated with periods of offshore flow. Most models underestimate CCN (at 0.1% supersaturation) in the MBL and free troposphere. The GCMs also have difficulty simulating coastal gradients in CCN and cloud droplet number concentration near the coast. The overall performance of the models demonstrates their potential utility in simulating aerosol–cloud interactions in the MBL, though quantitative estimation of aerosol–cloud interactions and aerosol indirect effects of MBL clouds with these models remains uncertain.

  13. Homogenization of a catalyst layer model for periodically distributed pore geometries in PEM fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmuck, Markus

    2012-01-01

    We formally derive an effective catalyst layer model comprising the reduction of oxygen for periodically distributed pore geometries. By assumption, the pores are completely filled with water and the surrounding walls consist of catalyst particles which are attached to an electron conducting microstructure. The macroscopic transport equations are established by a multi-scale approach, based on microscopic phenomena at the pore level, and serve as a first step toward future optimization of catalyst layer designs.

  14. Homogenization of a catalyst layer model for periodically distributed pore geometries in PEM fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Schmuck; Peter Berg

    2012-04-30

    We formally derive an effective catalyst layer model comprising the reduction of oxygen for periodically distributed pore geometries. By assumption, the pores are completely filled with water and the surrounding walls consist of catalyst particles which are attached to an electron conducting microstructure. The macroscopic transport equations are established by a multi-scale approach, based on microscopic phenomena at the pore level, and serve as a first step toward future optimization of catalyst layer designs.

  15. Model documentation natural gas transmission and distribution model (NGTDM) of the national energy modeling system. Volume II: Model developer`s report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-03

    To partially fulfill the requirements for {open_quotes}Model Acceptance{close_quotes} as stipulated in EIA Standard 91-01-01 (effective February 3, 1991), the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has conducted tests of the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) for the specific purpose of validating the forecasting model. This volume of the model documentation presents the results of {open_quotes}one-at-a-time{close_quotes} sensitivity tests conducted in support of this validation effort. The test results are presented in the following forms: (1) Tables of important model outputs for the years 2000 and 2010 are presented with respect to change in each input from the reference case; (2) Tables of percent changes from base case results for the years 2000 and 2010 are presented for important model outputs; (3) Tables of conditional sensitivities (percent change in output/percent change in input) for the years 2000 and 2010 are presented for important model outputs; (4) Finally, graphs presenting the percent change from base case results for each year of the forecast period are presented for selected key outputs. To conduct the sensitivity tests, two main assumptions are made in order to test the performance characteristics of the model itself and facilitate the understanding of the effects of the changes in the key input variables to the model on the selected key output variables: (1) responses to the amount demanded do not occur since there are no feedbacks of inputs from other NEMS models in the stand-alone NGTDM run. (2) All the export and import quantities from and to Canada and Mexico, and liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports and exports are held fixed (i.e., there are no changes in imports and exports between the reference case and the sensitivity cases) throughout the forecast period.

  16. Discrimination of models including doubly charged scalar bosons by using tau lepton decay distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiroaki Sugiyama; Koji Tsumura; Hiroshi Yokoya

    2012-10-05

    The doubly charged scalar boson (H^{\\pm\\pm}) is introduced in several models of the new physics beyond the standard model. The H^{\\pm\\pm} has Yukawa interactions with two left-handed charged leptons or two right-handed charged leptons depending on the models. We study kinematical properties of H^{\\pm\\pm} decay products through tau leptons in order to discriminate the chiral structures of the new Yukawa interaction. The chirality of tau leptons can be measured by the energy distributions of the tau decay products, and thus the chiral structure of the new Yukawa interaction can be traced in the invariant-mass distributions of the H^{\\pm\\pm} decay products. We perform simulation studies for the typical decay patterns of the H^{\\pm\\pm} with simple event selections and tau-tagging procedures, and show that the chiral structure of the Yukawa interactions of H^{\\pm\\pm} can be distinguished by measuring the invariant-mass distributions.

  17. Analytic model of the ion angular distribution in a collisional sheath

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vahedi, V.; Stewart, R.A.; Lieberman, M.A. (Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and the Electronics Research Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States))

    1993-07-01

    An analytic model is developed for the ion angular distribution in a collisional sheath. In a previous study, the one-dimensional (normal to the sheath) ion velocity distribution was obtained under the assumption that charge exchange is the dominant ion-neutral collision mechanism. In the present model, we assume [lambda][sub scat][ge][lambda][sub cx], where [lambda][sub scat] and [lambda][sub cx] are the mean free paths for ion-neutral elastic scattering and charge-exchange collisions, respectively. With this assumption, the angular distribution mainly arises from ions that strike the electrode after undergoing only one scattering collision following the last charge-exchange collision. Comparison of the analytic model with results obtained from a particle-in-cell simulation gives excellent agreement. Both the average angle of ions striking the electrode and the ratio of parallel to perpendicular ion flux at the electrode are shown to scale with the ratio of scattering to charge-exchange cross sections [sigma][sub scat]/[sigma][sub cx].

  18. Tracy-Widom asymptotics for a random polymer model with gamma-distributed weights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neil O'Connell; Janosch Ortmann

    2014-08-22

    We establish Tracy-Widom asymptotics for the partition function of a random polymer model with gamma-distributed weights recently introduced by Sepp\\"al\\"ainen. We show that the partition function of this random polymer can be represented within the framework of the geometric RSK correspondence and consequently its law can be expressed in terms of Whittaker functions. This leads to a representation of the law of the partition function which is amenable to asymptotic analysis. In this model, the partition function plays a role analogous to the smallest eigenvalue in the Laguerre unitary ensemble of random matrix theory.

  19. Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan, Vol. 82, No. 6, pp. 1599--1628, 2004 1599 Regional Climate Modeling: Progress, Challenges, and Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    , and development of regional earth system models. It is believed that with the demonstrated credibility of RCMs

  20. Theoretical modeling of propagation of magneto-acoustic waves in magnetic regions below sunspots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Khomenko; A. Kosovichev; M. Collados; K. Parchevsky; V. Olshevsky

    2008-12-10

    We use 2D numerical simulations and eikonal approximation, to study properties of MHD waves traveling below the solar surface through the magnetic structure of sunspots. We consider a series of magnetostatic models of sunspots of different magnetic field strengths, from 10 Mm below the photosphere to the low chromosphere. The purpose of these studies is to quantify the effect of the magnetic field on local helioseismology measurements by modeling waves excited by sub-photospheric sources. Time-distance propagation diagrams and wave travel times are calculated for models of various field strength and compared to the non-magnetic case. The results clearly indicate that the observed time-distance helioseismology signals in sunspot regions correspond to fast MHD waves. The slow MHD waves form a distinctly different pattern in the time-distance diagram, which has not been detected in observations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the solution in the short-wavelength (eikonal) approximation, providing its validation. The frequency dependence of the travel times is in a good qualitative agreement with observations.

  1. Modeling of distribution and speciation of plutonium in the Urex extraction system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulenova, A.; Tkac, P.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Krebs, J.F.

    2008-07-01

    The PUREX extraction process is used worldwide to recover uranium and plutonium from dissolved spent nuclear fuel using the tributylphosphate-nitric acid extraction system. In the recent decade, significant research progress was achieved with the aim to modify this system by addition of a salt-free agent to optimize stripping of plutonium from the tributylphosphate (TBP) extraction product (UREX). Experimental results on the extraction of Pu(IV) with and without acetohydroxamic acid in the HNO{sub 3}/TBP (30 vol %) were used for the development of a thermodynamic model of distribution and speciation of Pu(IV) in this separation process. Extraction constants for several sets of nitric acid, nitrate, and acetohydroxamic acid concentrations were used to model the obtained data. The extraction model AMUSE (Argonne Model for Universal Solvent Extraction) was employed in our calculations. (authors)

  2. Inferring distributions of chirodropid box-jellyfishes (Cnidaria: Cubozoa) in geographic and ecological space using ecological niche modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentlage, Bastian; Peterson, A. Townsend; Cartwright, Paulyn

    2009-05-29

    : insights from predictive models. Glob Ecol Bio- geogr 11:131–141 Anderson RP, Lew D, Peterson AT (2003) Evaluating predic- tive models of species’ distributions: criteria for selecting optimal models. Ecol Model 162:211–232 Bahn V, McGill BJ (2007) Can...

  3. Model Parameterization, Prior Distributions, and the General Time-Reversible Model in Bayesian Phylogenetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zwickl, Derrick J.; Holder, Mark T.

    2004-01-01

    .— Bayesian phylo^enetic methods reiiuire Ihe selection of prior probability distribulions for all parameters of the model of evolution. These distribulii>ns allow one to incorporate prior information into a liayesian analysis, but even in the absence...

  4. Application of an automatic approach to calibrate the NEMURO nutrientphytoplanktonzooplankton food web model in the Oyashio region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­phytoplankton­zooplankton food web model in the Oyashio region Shin-ichi Ito a, , Naoki Yoshie b , Takeshi Okunishi c , Tsuneo without ontogenetic vertical migration of the large zooplankton functional group. Determining or averaged state variables were used, in whether state variables were model functional groups or were

  5. Modeling the ion density distribution in collisional cooling RF multipole ion guides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Udseth, Harold R.; Smith, Richard D.

    2003-01-01

    Collisional cooling radio frequency (RF) multipoles are widely used in mass spectrometry, as ion guides and two-dimensional (2D) ion traps. Understanding the behavior of ions in these devices is important in choosing a multipole configuration. We have developed a computer model based on ion trajectory calculations in the RF multipole electric field, taking into account ion-ion and ion-neutral interactions. The two-dimensional model for idealized infinite RF multipoles gives accurate description of the ion density distribution. We consider first a basic case of a single m/z ion cloud in the 2D RF quadrupole after equilibrium is reached. Approximate theoretical relationships for the ion cloud configuration in the 2D ion trap are tested based on simulations results. Next we proceed with a case of an ion cloud consisting of several different m/z ion species. The ion relaxation dynamics and the process of establishing the stratified ion density distribution are followed. Simulations reveal a different relaxation dynamics for the axial and radial ion kinetic energy components. The kinetic energy relaxation rate is dependent on ion population and bath gas pressure. The equilibrium distribution agrees well with the ion stratification theory, as demonstrated by simulations for RF quadrupole and octupole 2D ion traps.

  6. Generalized parton distribution functions and the nucleon spin sum rules in the chiral quark soliton model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakamatsu, M.; Tsujimoto, H. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2005-04-01

    The theoretical predictions are given for the forward limit of the unpolarized spin-flip isovector generalized parton distribution function (E{sup u}-E{sup d})(x,{xi},t) within the framework of the chiral quark soliton model, with full inclusion of the polarization of Dirac sea quarks. We observe that [(H{sup u}-H{sup d})+(E{sup u}-E{sup d})](x,0,0) has a sharp peak around x=0, which we interpret as a signal of the importance of the pionic qq excitation with large spatial extension in the transverse direction. Another interesting indication given by the predicted distribution in combination with Ji's angular momentum sum rule is that the d quark carries more angular momentum than the u quark in the proton, which may have some relation with the physics of the violation of the Gottfried sum rule.

  7. Extension of thermonuclear functions through the pathway model including Maxwell-Boltzmann and Tsallis distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. J. Haubold; D. Kumar

    2007-08-16

    The Maxwell-Boltzmannian approach to nuclear reaction rate theory is extended to cover Tsallis statistics (Tsallis, 1988) and more general cases of distribution functions. An analytical study of respective thermonuclear functions is being conducted with the help of statistical techniques. The pathway model, recently introduced by Mathai (2005), is utilized for thermonuclear functions and closed-form representations are obtained in terms of H-functions and G-functions. Maxwell-Boltzmannian thermonuclear functions become particular cases of the extended thermonuclear functions. A brief review on the development of the theory of analytic representations of nuclear reaction rates is given.

  8. An Energy-Aware Simulation Model and Transaction Protocol for Dynamic Workload Distribution in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    An Energy-Aware Simulation Model and Transaction Protocol for Dynamic Workload Distribution an undesirable occurrence. Uneven distribution of energy resources and computational workloads is especially for detailed evaluation of the performance of different energy management policies in a MANET. Next it presents

  9. The use of a distributed hydrologic model to predict dynamic landslide susceptibility for a humid basin in Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamal, Sameer A. (Sameer Ahmed)

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes the use of a distributed hydrology model in conjunction with a Factor of Safety (FS) algorithm to predict dynamic landslide susceptibility for a humid basin in Puerto Rico. The Mameyes basin, located ...

  10. Improving Energy Efficiency by Developing Components for Distributed Cooling and Heating Based on Thermal Comfort Modeling[Thermoelectric (TE) HVAC

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Discusses results from TE HVAC project to add detail to a human thermal comfort model and further allow load reduction in the climate control energy through a distributed TE network

  11. Analytical Models for Flowing-Fluid Temperature Distribution in Single-Phase Oil Reservoirs Accounting for Joule-Thomson Effect 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chevarunotai, Natasha

    2014-11-13

    temperature alteration in the reservoir. In this study, we developed a robust analytical model to estimate the flowing-fluid-temperature distribution in the reservoir accounting for J-T heating or cooling effect. All significant heat-transfer mechanisms...

  12. Experimental measurements and numerical modeling of fast-ion distributions in the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bader, Aaron Craig

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis we discuss measurements and modeling of minority heated fast-ion distributions in the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. Analysis of fast-ions >100Te is important for ...

  13. An assessment of possible climate change in the Australian region based on intercomparison of general circulation modeling results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whetton, P.H.; Pittock, A.B.; Haylock, M.R. ); Rayner, P.J. )

    1994-03-01

    To assist in estimating likely future climate change in the Australian region, the authors examine the results of four different general circulation modeling experiments run to assess the equilibrium impact of doubling greenhouse gases. The results examined were the most recent available at the time of study from various research centers in North America and Europe, as well as those of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). The approach used is, first, to assess the quality of the control (1 x CO[sub 2]) simulations from each of the models of mean sea level (MSL) pressure and precipitation in the Australian region by comparing these with the corresponding observed patterns; and, second, to then analyze the 2 x CO[sub 2] results of only those model experiments with the best control simulations. Of the models examined two are chosen on the basis of their simulation of current climate in the region: the CSIRO four-level model (CSIRO4) and the United Kingdom Meteorological Office (UKMO) model. For conditions of equivalent doubling of CO[sub 2], both models show substantial increases in surface air temperature of around 4[degrees]-6[degrees] inland and 2[degrees]-4[degrees]C in coastal regions. Both models show decreased MSL pressure over the Australian continent and increases in rainfall over northern, central, and eastern Australia, particularly in the summer half of the year. The CSIRO4 model, but not the UKMO model, also shows increased pressure to the south of the continent and decreased winter rainfall in southwest and southern Australia. Generally, field significance tests show the pattern and magnitude of the changes to be significant of CSIRO4 (for which the necessary monthly simulated data were available). 42 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Exact solution of the van der Waals model in the critical region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adriano Barra; Antonio Moro

    2015-05-01

    The celebrated van der Waals model describes simple fluids in the thermodynamic limit and predicts the existence of a critical point associated to the gas-liquid phase transition. However the behaviour of critical isotherms according to the equation of state, where a gas-liquid phase transition occurs, significantly departs from experimental observations. The correct critical isotherms are heuristically re-established via the Maxwell equal areas rule. A long standing open problem in mean field theory is concerned with the analytic description of van der Waals isotherms for a finite size system that is consistent, in the thermodynamic limit, with the Maxwell prescription. Inspired by the theory of nonlinear conservation laws, we propose a novel mean field approach, based on statistical mechanics, that allows to calculate the van der Waals partition function for a system of large but finite number of particles $N$. Our partition function naturally extends to the whole space of thermodynamic variables, reproduces, in the thermodynamic limit $N\\to \\infty$, the classical results outside the critical region and automatically encodes Maxwell's prescription. We show that isothermal curves evolve in the space of thermodynamic variables like nonlinear breaking waves and the criticality is explained as the mechanism of formation of a classical hydrodynamic shock.

  15. Environment and the Lifetime of Tropical Deep Convection in a Cloud-Permitting Regional Model Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-08-01

    By applying a cloud tracking algorithm to tropical convective systems simulated by a regional high resolution model, the study documents environmental conditions before and after convective systems are initiated over ocean and land by following them during their lifetime. The comparative roles of various environmental fields in affecting the lifetime of convection are also quantified. The statistics of lifetime, maximum area, propagation speed and direction of the simulated deep convection agrees well with geostationary satellite observations. Over ocean, convective systems enhance surface fluxes through the associated wind gusts as well as cooling and drying of the boundary layer. A significant relationship is found between the mean surface fluxes during their lifetime and the longevity of the systems which in turn is related to the initial intensity of the moist updraft and to a lesser extent upper level shear. Over land, on the other hand, convective activity suppresses surface fluxes through cloud cover and the lifetime of convection is related to the upper level shear during their lifetime and strength of the heat fluxes several hours before the initiation of convection. For systems of equal lifetime, those over land are significantly more intense than those over ocean especially during early stages of their lifetime.

  16. Distributed energy resources customer adoption modeling with combined heat and power applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2003-07-01

    In this report, an economic model of customer adoption of distributed energy resources (DER) is developed. It covers progress on the DER project for the California Energy Commission (CEC) at Berkeley Lab during the period July 2001 through Dec 2002 in the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Distributed Energy Resources Integration (DERI) project. CERTS has developed a specific paradigm of distributed energy deployment, the CERTS Microgrid (as described in Lasseter et al. 2002). The primary goal of CERTS distributed generation research is to solve the technical problems required to make the CERTS Microgrid a viable technology, and Berkeley Lab's contribution is to direct the technical research proceeding at CERTS partner sites towards the most productive engineering problems. The work reported herein is somewhat more widely applicable, so it will be described within the context of a generic microgrid (mGrid). Current work focuses on the implementation of combined heat and power (CHP) capability. A mGrid as generically defined for this work is a semiautonomous grouping of generating sources and end-use electrical loads and heat sinks that share heat and power. Equipment is clustered and operated for the benefit of its owners. Although it can function independently of the traditional power system, or macrogrid, the mGrid is usually interconnected and exchanges energy and possibly ancillary services with the macrogrid. In contrast to the traditional centralized paradigm, the design, implementation, operation, and expansion of the mGrid is meant to optimize the overall energy system requirements of participating customers rather than the objectives and requirements of the macrogrid.

  17. Quantum chaos: spectral fluctuations and overlap distributions of the three level Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meredith, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    The author test the prediction that quantum systems with chaotic classical analogs have spectral fluctuations and overlap distributions equal to those of the Gaussian Orthogonal Ensemble (GOE). The subject of our study is the three level Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick model of nuclear physics. This model differs from previously investigated systems because the quantum basis and classical phase space are compact, and the classical Hamiltonian has quartic momentum dependence. We investigate the dynamics of the classical analog to identify values of coupling strength and energy ranges for which the motion is chaotic, quasi-chaotic, and quasi-integrable. We then analyze the fluctuation properties of the eigenvalues for those same energy ranges and coupling strength, and we find that the chaotic eigenvalues are in good agreement with GOE fluctuations, while the quasi-integrable and quasi-chaotic levels fluctuations are closer to the Poisson fluctuations that are predicted for integrable systems. We also study the distribution of the overlap of a chaotic eigenvector with a basis vector, and find that in some cases it is a Gaussian random variable as predicted by GOE. This result, however, is not universal.

  18. Determination of High-Frequency Current Distribution Using EMTP-Based Transmission Line Models with Resulting Radiated Electromagnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mork, B; Nelson, R; Kirkendall, B; Stenvig, N

    2009-11-30

    Application of BPL technologies to existing overhead high-voltage power lines would benefit greatly from improved simulation tools capable of predicting performance - such as the electromagnetic fields radiated from such lines. Existing EMTP-based frequency-dependent line models are attractive since their parameters are derived from physical design dimensions which are easily obtained. However, to calculate the radiated electromagnetic fields, detailed current distributions need to be determined. This paper presents a method of using EMTP line models to determine the current distribution on the lines, as well as a technique for using these current distributions to determine the radiated electromagnetic fields.

  19. Anatomy of the AGN in NGC 5548: I. A global model for the broadband spectral energy distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehdipour, M; Kriss, G A; Cappi, M; Petrucci, P -O; Steenbrugge, K C; Arav, N; Behar, E; Bianchi, S; Boissay, R; Branduardi-Raymont, G; Costantini, E; Ebrero, J; Di Gesu, L; Harrison, F A; Kaspi, S; De Marco, B; Matt, G; Paltani, S; Peterson, B M; Ponti, G; Nuñez, F Pozo; De Rosa, A; Ursini, F; de Vries, C P; Walton, D J; Whewell, M

    2015-01-01

    An extensive multi-satellite campaign on NGC 5548 has revealed this archetypal Seyfert-1 galaxy to be in an exceptional state of persistent heavy absorption. Our observations taken in 2013-2014 with XMM-Newton, Swift, NuSTAR, INTEGRAL, Chandra, HST and two ground-based observatories have together enabled us to establish that this unexpected phenomenon is caused by an outflowing stream of weakly ionised gas (called the obscurer), extending from the vicinity of the accretion disk to the broad-line region. In this work we present the details of our campaign and the data obtained by all the observatories. We determine the spectral energy distribution of NGC 5548 from near-infrared to hard X-rays by establishing the contribution of various emission and absorption processes taking place along our line of sight towards the central engine. We thus uncover the intrinsic emission and produce a broadband continuum model for both obscured (average summer 2013 data) and unobscured ($<$ 2011) epochs of NGC 5548. Our res...

  20. An integrated assessment modeling framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environmental changes. Being data-driven, the Program uses extensive Earth system and economic data and models System Model (IGSM), an integrated assessment model that couples an Earth system model of intermediate's Integrated Global System Model. Through this integrated model, the Program seeks to: discover new

  1. Distributed energy resources customer adoption modeling with combined heat and power applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2003-01-01

    Alex Farrell of the Energy and Resources Group, UniversityMicrogrid Distributed Energy Resource Potential Using DER-of Distributed Energy Resources: The CERTS MicroGrid

  2. Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport models: One-dimensional soil thaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freezing and thawing a b s t r a c t Numerous cold regions water flow and energy transport models have. Simulated and/or observed climate change impacts in cryogenic soils include permafrost degradation, active that include the dynamic freeze­thaw process have been tested against analytical solutions, such as the Neumann

  3. USING THE UTAH ENERGY BALANCE SNOW MELT MODEL TO QUANTIFY SNOW AND GLACIER MELT IN THE HIMALAYAN REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    USING THE UTAH ENERGY BALANCE SNOW MELT MODEL TO QUANTIFY SNOW AND GLACIER MELT IN THE HIMALAYAN of glacier ice as a substrate and generation of melt from the ice substrate when seasonal snow has melted for the entire domain. Therefore, regional variability in snow and glacier melting is computed. Outflow can

  4. Volumetric 3D Modeling of the X-ray Emission Region within the Planetary Nebula BD+303639

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dewey, Daniel

    a b c d N WE S N S FB E W B F Volumetric 3D Modeling of the X-ray Emission Region within://space.mit.edu/hydra/v3d.html **ISIS and APED are available via http://space.mit.edu/CXC/ISIS Approach - Volumetric 3D

  5. A MODEL FOR THE STRENGTH OF THE AS-DEPOSITED REGIONS OF LOW-ALLOY STEEL WELD METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    true average strain ~ true plastic strain in softer phase of a dual-phase steel ~I true plastic strain in harder phase of a dual-phase steel UTS true strain at ultimate tensile stress y true strain at yieldingCHAPTER 5 A MODEL FOR THE STRENGTH OF THE AS-DEPOSITED REGIONS OF LOW-ALLOY STEEL WELD METALS 5

  6. Modeling of Multiphase Flow in the Near-Wellbore Region of the Reservoir under Transient Conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, He

    2010-07-14

    .......................................................................................................... 144 APPENDIX A: GAS-WATER TWO PHASE FLOW IMPES ALGORITHMS ..... 149 APPENDIX B: BLACK OIL PVT CHARACTERIZATION .................................. 158 APPENDIX C: SOFTWARE STRUCTURE ........................................................... 175... profile in the near-wellbore region ..................... 61 Fig. 6.2 Realistic fabricated PVT data lay out the correct trends upon pressure and create appropriate fluid compressibility for pressure oscillation in the near-wellbore region...

  7. Aeroelastic Modeling of Offshore Turbines and Support Structures in Hurricane-Prone Regions (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damiani, R.

    2014-03-01

    US offshore wind turbines (OWTs) will likely have to contend with hurricanes and the associated loading conditions. Current industry standards do not account for these design load cases (DLCs), thus a new approach is required to guarantee that the OWTs achieve an appropriate level of reliability. In this study, a sequentially coupled aero-hydro-servo-elastic modeling technique was used to address two design approaches: 1.) The ABS (American Bureau of Shipping) approach; and 2.) The Hazard Curve or API (American Petroleum Institute) approach. The former employs IEC partial load factors (PSFs) and 100-yr return-period (RP) metocean events. The latter allows setting PSFs and RP to a prescribed level of system reliability. The 500-yr RP robustness check (appearing in [2] and [3] upcoming editions) is a good indicator of the target reliability for L2 structures. CAE tools such as NREL's FAST and Bentley's' SACS (offshore analysis and design software) can be efficiently coupled to simulate system loads under hurricane DLCs. For this task, we augmented the latest FAST version (v. 8) to include tower aerodynamic drag that cannot be ignored in hurricane DLCs. In this project, a 6 MW turbine was simulated on a typical 4-legged jacket for a mid-Atlantic site. FAST-calculated tower base loads were fed to SACS at the interface level (transition piece); SACS added hydrodynamic and wind loads on the exposed substructure, and calculated mudline overturning moments, and member and joint utilization. Results show that CAE tools can be effectively used to compare design approaches for the design of OWTs in hurricane regions and to achieve a well-balanced design, where reliability levels and costs are optimized.

  8. Global distribution and sources of dissolved inorganic nitrogen export to the coastal zone: Results from a spatially explicit, global model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seitzinger, Sybil

    Global distribution and sources of dissolved inorganic nitrogen export to the coastal zone: Results dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) export by rivers to coastal waters (NEWS-DIN). NEWS-DIN was developed as part of an internally consistent suite of global nutrient export models. Modeled and measured DIN

  9. A stepped leader model for lightning including charge distribution in branched channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Wei; Zhang, Li [School of Electrical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Li, Qingmin, E-mail: lqmeee@ncepu.edu.cn [Beijing Key Lab of HV and EMC, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); State Key Lab of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, Beijing 102206 (China)

    2014-09-14

    The stepped leader process in negative cloud-to-ground lightning plays a vital role in lightning protection analysis. As lightning discharge usually presents significant branched or tortuous channels, the charge distribution along the branched channels and the stochastic feature of stepped leader propagation were investigated in this paper. The charge density along the leader channel and the charge in the leader tip for each lightning branch were approximated by introducing branch correlation coefficients. In combination with geometric characteristics of natural lightning discharge, a stochastic stepped leader propagation model was presented based on the fractal theory. By comparing simulation results with the statistics of natural lightning discharges, it was found that the fractal dimension of lightning trajectory in simulation was in the range of that observed in nature and the calculation results of electric field at ground level were in good agreement with the measurements of a negative flash, which shows the validity of this proposed model. Furthermore, a new equation to estimate the lightning striking distance to flat ground was suggested based on the present model. The striking distance obtained by this new equation is smaller than the value estimated by previous equations, which indicates that the traditional equations may somewhat overestimate the attractive effect of the ground.

  10. Phase Space Distribution for Two-Gap Solution in Unitary Matrix Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta, Parikshit

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the dynamics of weakly coupled finite temperature $U(N)$ gauge theories on $S^3$ by studying a class of effective unitary matrix model. Solving Dyson-Schwinger equation at large $N$, we find that different phases of gauge theories are characterized by gaps in eigenvalue distribution over a unit circle. In particular, we obtain no-gap, one-gap and two-gap solutions at large $N$ for a class of matrix model we are considering. The same effective matrix model can equivalently be written as a sum over representations (or Young diagrams) of unitary group. We show that at large $N$, Young diagrams corresponding to different phases can be classified in terms of discontinuities in number of boxes in two consecutive rows. More precisely, the representation, where there is no discontinuity, corresponds to no-gap and one-gap solution, where as, a diagram with one discontinuity corresponds to two-gap phase, mentioned above. This observation allows us to write a one to one relation between eigenvalue distributio...

  11. Spatial and Spectral Modeling of the Gamma-ray Distribution in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foreman, Gary; Gruendl, Robert; Hughes, Annie; Fields, Brian; Ricker, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We perform spatial and spectral analyses of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) gamma-ray emission collected over 66 months by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. In our spatial analysis, we model the LMC cosmic-ray distribution and gamma-ray production using observed maps of the LMC interstellar medium, star formation history, interstellar radiation field, and synchrotron emission. We use bootstrapping of the data to quantify the robustness of spatial model performance. We model the LMC gamma-ray spectrum using fitting functions derived from the physics of $\\pi^0$ decay, bremsstrahlung, and inverse Compton scattering. We find the integrated gamma-ray flux of the LMC from 200 MeV to 20 GeV to be $1.38 \\pm 0.02 \\times 10^{-7}$ ph cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$, of which we attribute about 10% to inverse Compton scattering and 40% to bremsstrahlung. From our work, we conclude that the spectral index of the LMC cosmic-ray proton population is 2.4$\\pm$0.2, and we find that cosmic-ray energy loss through gamma-ray production is...

  12. Importance of exposure model in estimating impacts when a water distribution system is contaminated.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M. J.; Janke, R.; Environmental Science Division; USEPA

    2008-09-01

    The quantity of a contaminant ingested by individuals using tap water drawn from a water distribution system during a contamination event depends on the concentration of the contaminant in the water and the volume of water ingested. If the concentration varies with time, the actual time of exposure affects the quantity ingested. The influence of the timing of exposure and of individual variability in the volume of water ingested on estimated impacts for a contamination event has received limited attention. We examine the significance of ingestion timing and variability in the volume of water ingested by using a number of models for ingestion timing and volume. Contaminant concentrations were obtained from simulations of an actual distribution system for cases involving contaminant injections lasting from 1 to 24 h. We find that assumptions about exposure can significantly influence estimated impacts, especially when injection durations are short and impact thresholds are high. The influence of ingestion timing and volume should be considered when assessing impacts for contamination events.

  13. Model Predictive Control-based Optimal Coordination of Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Lian, Jianming; Elizondo, Marcelo A.

    2013-01-07

    Distributed energy resources, such as renewable energy resources (wind, solar), energy storage and demand response, can be used to complement conventional generators. The uncertainty and variability due to high penetration of wind makes reliable system operations and controls challenging, especially in isolated systems. In this paper, an optimal control strategy is proposed to coordinate energy storage and diesel generators to maximize wind penetration while maintaining system economics and normal operation performance. The goals of the optimization problem are to minimize fuel costs and maximize the utilization of wind while considering equipment life of generators and energy storage. Model predictive control (MPC) is used to solve a look-ahead dispatch optimization problem and the performance is compared to an open loop look-ahead dispatch problem. Simulation studies are performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the closed loop MPC in compensating for uncertainties and variability caused in the system.

  14. Model Predictive Control-based Optimal Coordination of Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Lian, Jianming; Elizondo, Marcelo A.

    2013-04-03

    Distributed energy resources, such as renewable energy resources (wind, solar), energy storage and demand response, can be used to complement conventional generators. The uncertainty and variability due to high penetration of wind makes reliable system operations and controls challenging, especially in isolated systems. In this paper, an optimal control strategy is proposed to coordinate energy storage and diesel generators to maximize wind penetration while maintaining system economics and normal operation performance. The goals of the optimization problem are to minimize fuel costs and maximize the utilization of wind while considering equipment life of generators and energy storage. Model predictive control (MPC) is used to solve a look-ahead dispatch optimization problem and the performance is compared to an open loop look-ahead dispatch problem. Simulation studies are performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the closed loop MPC in compensating for uncertainties and variability caused in the system.

  15. Modeling regional transportation demand in China and the impacts of a national carbon constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kishimoto, Paul

    2015-01-30

    Climate and energy policy in China will have important and uneven impacts on the country’s regionally heterogeneous transport system. In order to simulate these impacts, transport sector detail is added to a multi-sector, ...

  16. Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 4. Western Solar Utilization Network Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-07-01

    This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Western Solar Utilization Network Region. (WHK)

  17. Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 1. Northeast Solar Energy Center Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-07-01

    This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Northeast Solar Energy Center Region. (WHK).

  18. Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 3. Southern Solar Energy Center Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-07-01

    This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Southern Solar Energy Center Region. (WHK)

  19. Verifying the Accuracy of Land Use Models Used in Transportation and Air Quality: A Case Study in the Sacramento, California Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodier, Caroline J.

    2005-01-01

    A Case Study in the Sacramento Region (Ph.D. Dissertation,Analysis using the Sacramento MEPLAN Land Use Transportationin the MEPLAN model of Sacramento. ” Transportation Research

  20. Modeling the neutral hydrogen distribution in the post-reionization Universe: intensity mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Viel, Matteo; Datta, Kanan K.; Choudhury, T. Roy, E-mail: villaescusa@oats.inaf.it, E-mail: viel@oats.inaf.it, E-mail: kanan@ncra.tifr.res.in, E-mail: tirth@ncra.tifr.res.in

    2014-09-01

    We model the distribution of neutral hydrogen (HI) in the post-reionization era and investigate its detectability in 21 cm intensity mapping with future radio telescopes like the Square Kilometer array (SKA). We rely on high resolution hydrodynamical N-body simulations that have a state-of-the-art treatment of the low density photoionized gas in the inter-galactic medium (IGM). The HI is assigned a-posteriori to the gas particles following two different approaches: a halo-based method in which HI is assigned only to gas particles residing within dark matter halos; a particle-based method that assigns HI to all gas particles using a prescription based on the physical properties of the particles. The HI statistical properties are then compared to the observational properties of Damped Lyman-? Absorbers (DLAs) and of lower column density systems and reasonable good agreement is found for all the cases. Among the halo-based method, we further consider two different schemes that aim at reproducing the observed properties of DLAs by distributing HI inside halos: one of this results in a much higher bias for DLAs, in agreement with recent observations, which boosts the 21 cm power spectrum by a factor ? 4 with respect to the other recipe. Furthermore, we quantify the contribution of HI in the diffuse IGM to both ?{sub HI} and the HI power spectrum finding to be subdominant in both cases. We compute the 21 cm power spectrum from the simulated HI distribution and calculate the expected signal for both SKA1-mid and SKA1-low configurations at 2.4 ? z ? 4. We find that SKA will be able to detect the 21 cm power spectrum, in the non-linear regime, up to k ? 1 h/Mpc for SKA1-mid and k ? 5 h/Mpc for SKA1-low with 100 hours of observations. We also investigate the perspective of imaging the HI distribution. Our findings indicate that SKA1-low could detect the most massive HI peaks with a signal to noise ratio (SNR) higher than 5 for an observation time of about 1000 hours at z = 4, for a synthesized beam width of 2'. Detection at redshifts z?2.4 with SKA1-mid would instead require a much longer observation time to achieve a comparable SNR level.

  1. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix J: The Regional Portfolio Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ............................................................................................................ 10 Capacity and Costs Related to Capacity ............................................................................................... 15 Variable Capacity.......................................................................................................................... 28 Modeling Energy-Limited Resources

  2. Modelling the spectral energy distribution of the red giant in RS Ophiuchi: evidence for irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavlenko, Ya V; Rushton, M T; Evans, A; Woodward, C E; Helton, L A; O'Brien, T J; Jones, D; Elkin, V

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of optical and infrared spectra of the recurrent nova RS Oph obtained during between 2006 and 2009. The best fit to the optical spectrum for 2006 September 28 gives effective temperature Tef = 3900~K for log g = 2.0, while for log g = 0.0 we find Tef = 4700~K, and a comparison with template stellar spectra provides Tef $\\sim$ 4500 K. The observed spectral energy distribution (SED), and the intensities of the emission lines, vary on short ($\\sim 1$~day) time-scales, due to disc variability. We invoke a simple one-component model for the accretion disc, and a model with a hot boundary layer, with high ($\\sim 3.9 \\times 10^{-6}$ \\Mdot) and low ($\\sim 2 \\times 10^{-8}$ \\Mdot) accretion rates, respectively. Fits to the accretion disc-extracted infrared spectrum (2008 July 15) yield effective temperatures for the red giant of Tef = 3800 +/- 100~K (log g = 2.0) and Tef = 3700 +/- 100~K (log g = 0.0). Furthermore, using a more sophisticated approach, we reproduced the optical and infrared SEDs ...

  3. Implementation and evaluation of online gas-phase chemistry within a regional climate model (RegCM-CHEM4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shalaby, A. K.; Zakey, A. S.; Tawfik, A. B.; Solmon, F.; Giorgi, Filippo; Stordal, F.; Sillman, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Steiner, A. L.

    2012-05-22

    The RegCM-CHEM4 is a new online climate-chemistry model based on the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) regional climate model (RegCM4). Tropospheric gas-phase chemistry is integrated into the climate model using the condensed version of the Carbon Bond Mechanism (CBM-Z; Zaveri and Peters, 1999) with a fast solver based on radical balances. We evaluate the model over Continental Europe for two different time scales: (1) an event-based analysis of the ozone episode associated with the heat wave of August 2003 and (2) a climatological analysis of a sixyear simulation (2000-2005). For the episode analysis, model simulations show good agreement with European Monitoring and Evaluation Program (EMEP) observations of hourly ozone over different regions in Europe and capture ozone concentrations during and after the August 2003 heat wave event. For long-term climate simulations, the model captures the seasonal cycle of ozone concentrations with some over prediction of ozone concentrations in non-heat wave summers. Overall, the ozone and ozone precursor evaluation shows the feasibility of using RegCM-CHEM4 for decadal-length simulations of chemistry-climate interactions.

  4. Generalisation of Levine's prediction for the distribution of freezing temperatures of droplets: A general singular model for ice nucleation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard P. Sear

    2013-07-29

    Models without an explicit time dependence, called singular models, are widely used for fitting the distribution of temperatures at which water droplets freeze. In 1950 Levine developed the original singular model. His key assumption was that each droplet contained many nucleation sites, and that freezing occurred due to the nucleation site with the highest freezing temperature. The fact that freezing occurs due to the maximum value out of large number of nucleation temperatures, means that we can apply the results of what is called extreme-value statistics. This is the statistics of the extreme, i.e., maximum or minimum, value of a large number of random variables. Here we use the results of extreme-value statistics to show that we can generalise Levine's model to produce the most general singular model possible. We show that when a singular model is a good approximation, the distribution of freezing temperatures should always be given by what is called the generalised extreme-value distribution. In addition, we also show that the distribution of freezing temperatures for droplets of onesize, can be used to make predictions for the scaling of the median nucleation temperature with droplet size, and vice versa.

  5. Hydrologic Extremes in a changing climate: how much information can regional climate models provide?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lettenmaier, Dennis P.

    2012-08-14

    We proposed to identify a set of about 10 urban areas across the western U.S., and hourly precipitation data within each of these areas, which were extracted from the NCDC TD 3240. We also proposed to analyze the annual maximum series of precipitation extremes simulated for NARCCAP (using Reanalysis boundary forcing) for the grid cells close to station data, and to compare the distributions of annual maximum precipitation for accumulation intervals ranging from one to 28 hours. Recognizing that there may inevitably be differences between the station data and RCM grid cell values, we proposed to examine the scale dependence in the distributions of extremes.

  6. Minimizing Energy Consumption in a Water Distribution System: A Systems Modeling Approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, John

    2011-08-08

    In a water distribution system from groundwater supply, the bulk of energy consumption is expended at pump stations. These pumps pressurize the water and transport it from the aquifer to the distribution system and to elevated storage tanks. Each...

  7. A model-based approach to regulating electricity distribution under new operating conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yap, Xiang Ling

    2012-01-01

    New technologies such as distributed generation and electric vehicles are connecting to the electricity distribution grid, a regulated natural monopoly. Existing regulatory schemes were not designed for these new technologies ...

  8. Distributed energy resources in practice: A case study analysis and validation of LBNL's customer adoption model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, Owen; Creighton, Charles; Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael

    2003-02-01

    This report describes a Berkeley Lab effort to model the economics and operation of small-scale (<500 kW) on-site electricity generators based on real-world installations at several example customer sites. This work builds upon the previous development of the Distributed Energy Resource Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), a tool designed to find the optimal combination of installed equipment, and idealized operating schedule, that would minimize the site's energy bills, given performance and cost data on available DER technologies, utility tariffs, and site electrical and thermal loads over a historic test period, usually a recent year. This study offered the first opportunity to apply DER-CAM in a real-world setting and evaluate its modeling results. DER-CAM has three possible applications: first, it can be used to guide choices of equipment at specific sites, or provide general solutions for example sites and propose good choices for sites with similar circumstances; second, it can additionally provide the basis for the operations of installed on-site generation; and third, it can be used to assess the market potential of technologies by anticipating which kinds of customers might find various technologies attractive. A list of approximately 90 DER candidate sites was compiled and each site's DER characteristics and their willingness to volunteer information was assessed, producing detailed information on about 15 sites of which five sites were analyzed in depth. The five sites were not intended to provide a random sample, rather they were chosen to provide some diversity of business activity, geography, and technology. More importantly, they were chosen in the hope of finding examples of true business decisions made based on somewhat sophisticated analyses, and pilot or demonstration projects were avoided. Information on the benefits and pitfalls of implementing a DER system was also presented from an additional ten sites including agriculture, education, health care, airport, and manufacturing facilities.

  9. Impact of Agricultural Practice on Regional Climate in a Coupled Land Surface Mesoscale Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooley, H.S.; Riley, W.J.; Torn, M.S.; He, Y.

    2004-01-01

    winter wheat belt on the mesoscale environment, Monthlygeneration Penn State/NCAR mesoscale model (MM5), NCAR,in a Coupled Land Surface Mesoscale Model H.S. Cooley Energy

  10. Forest dynamics at regional scales: predictive models constrained with inventory data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lines, Emily

    2012-06-12

    by scaling from key tree-level processes, but models typically have no climate dependency. In this thesis I demonstrate how large-scale national inventories combined with improvements in computational methods mean that models that incorporate the climate...

  11. A Habitat-based Wind-Wildlife Collision Model with Application to the Upper Great Plains Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forcey, Greg, M.

    2012-08-28

    Most previous studies on collision impacts at wind facilities have taken place at the site-specific level and have only examined small-scale influences on mortality. In this study, we examine landscape-level influences using a hierarchical spatial model combined with existing datasets and life history knowledge for: Horned Lark, Red-eyed Vireo, Mallard, American Avocet, Golden Eagle, Whooping Crane, red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat. These species were modeled in the central United States within Bird Conservation Regions 11, 17, 18, and 19. For the bird species, we modeled bird abundance from existing datasets as a function of habitat variables known to be preferred by each species to develop a relative abundance prediction for each species. For bats, there are no existing abundance datasets so we identified preferred habitat in the landscape for each species and assumed that greater amounts of preferred habitat would equate to greater abundance of bats. The abundance predictions for bird and bats were modeled with additional exposure factors known to influence collisions such as visibility, wind, temperature, precipitation, topography, and behavior to form a final mapped output of predicted collision risk within the study region. We reviewed published mortality studies from wind farms in our study region and collected data on reported mortality of our focal species to compare to our modeled predictions. We performed a sensitivity analysis evaluating model performance of 6 different scenarios where habitat and exposure factors were weighted differently. We compared the model performance in each scenario by evaluating observed data vs. our model predictions using spearmans rank correlations. Horned Lark collision risk was predicted to be highest in the northwestern and west-central portions of the study region with lower risk predicted elsewhere. Red-eyed Vireo collision risk was predicted to be the highest in the eastern portions of the study region and in the forested areas of the western portion; the lowest risk was predicted in the treeless portions of the northwest portion of the study area. Mallard collision risk was predicted to be highest in the eastern central portion of the prairie potholes and in Iowa which has a high density of pothole wetlands; lower risk was predicted in the more arid portions of the study area. Predicted collision risk for American Avocet was similar to Mallard and was highest in the prairie pothole region and lower elsewhere. Golden Eagle collision risk was predicted to be highest in the mountainous areas of the western portion of the study area and lowest in the eastern portion of the prairie potholes. Whooping Crane predicted collision risk was highest within the migration corridor that the birds follow through in the central portion of the study region; predicted collision risk was much lower elsewhere. Red bat collision risk was highly driven by large tracts of forest and river corridors which made up most of the areas of higher collision risk. Silver-haired bat and hoary bat predicted collision risk were nearly identical and driven largely by forest and river corridors as well as locations with warmer temperatures, and lower average wind speeds. Horned Lark collisions were mostly influenced by abundance and predictions showed a moderate correlation between observed and predicted mortality (r = 0.55). Red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat predictions were much higher and shown a strong correlations with observed mortality with correlations of 0.85, 0.90, and 0.91 respectively. Red bat collisions were influenced primarily by habitat, while hoary bat and silver-haired bat collisions were influenced mainly by exposure variables. Stronger correlations between observed and predicted collision for bats than for Horned Larks can likely be attributed to stronger habitat associations and greater influences of weather on behavior for bats. Although the collision predictions cannot be compared among species, our model outputs provide a convenient and easy landscape-level tool to quick

  12. Investigation of global and regional BWR instabilities with a four heated-channel Reduced Order Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    and regional Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) instabilities is described. The ROM contains three sub. Introduction Over the past decades, the concept of linear analysis to study the stability of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) has become one of the most commonly-used methodologies in reactor diagnostics. Conceptually

  13. Ability of a global three-dimensional model to locate regional events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Nikolai

    is that the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), irrespec- tive of its current status, has motivated greater; revised 31 March 2003; accepted 29 April 2003; published 30 July 2003. [1] We assess the ability events using regional travel time data alone (epicentral distances Assessments are based

  14. Coronal energy input and dissipation in a solar active region 3D MHD model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourdin, Philippe-A; Peter, Hardi

    2015-01-01

    Context. We have conducted a 3D MHD simulation of the solar corona above an active region in full scale and high resolution, which shows coronal loops, and plasma flows within them, similar to observations. Aims. We want to find the connection between the photospheric energy input by field-line braiding with the coronal energy conversion by Ohmic dissipation of induced currents. Methods. To this end we compare the coronal energy input and dissipation within our simulation domain above different fields of view, e.g. for a small loops system in the active region (AR) core. We also choose an ensemble of field lines to compare, e.g., the magnetic energy input to the heating per particle along these field lines. Results. We find an enhanced Ohmic dissipation of currents in the corona above areas that also have enhanced upwards-directed Poynting flux. These regions coincide with the regions where hot coronal loops within the AR core are observed. The coronal density plays a role in estimating the coronal temperatur...

  15. Deformed shell model results for neutrinoless double beta decay of nuclei in A=60-90 region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Sahu; V. K. B. Kota

    2015-03-20

    Nuclear transition matrix elements (NTME) for the neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{70}$Zn, $^{80}$Se and $^{82}$Se nuclei are calculated within the framework of the deformed shell model based on Hartree-Fock states. For $^{70}$Zn, jj44b interaction in $^{2}p_{3/2}$, $^{1}f_{5/2}$, $^{2}p_{1/2}$ and $^{1}g_{9/2}$ space with $^{56}$Ni as the core is employed. However, for $^{80}$Se and $^{82}$Se nuclei, a modified Kuo interaction with the above core and model space are employed. Most of our calculations in this region were performed with this effective interaction. However, jj44b interaction has been found to be better for $^{70}$Zn. The above model space was used in many recent shell model and interacting boson model calculations for nuclei in this region. After ensuring that DSM gives good description of the spectroscopic properties of low-lying levels in these three nuclei considered, the NTME are calculated. The deduced half-lives with these NTME, assuming neutrino mass is 1 eV, are $1.1 \\times 10^{26}$ yr, $2.3 \\times 10^{27}$ yr and $2.2 \\times 10^{24}$ yr for $^{70}$Zn, $^{80}$Se and $^{82}$Se, respectively.

  16. Transforming the representation of the boundary layer and low clouds for high-resolution regional climate modeling: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Hsin-Yuan; Hall, Alex

    2013-07-24

    Stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds in subtropical oceanic regions (e.g., Southeast Pacific) cover thousands of square kilometers and play a key role in regulating global climate (e.g., Klein and Hartmann, 1993). Numerical modeling is an essential tool to study these clouds in regional and global systems, but the current generation of climate and weather models has difficulties in representing them in a realistic way (e.g., Siebesma et al., 2004; Stevens et al., 2007; Teixeira et al., 2011). While numerical models resolve the large-scale flow, subgrid-scale parameterizations are needed to estimate small-scale properties (e.g. boundary layer turbulence and convection, clouds, radiation), which have significant influence on the resolved scale due to the complex nonlinear nature of the atmosphere. To represent the contribution of these fine-scale processes to the resolved scale, climate models use various parameterizations, which are the main pieces in the model that contribute to the low clouds dynamics and therefore are the major sources of errors or approximations in their representation. In this project, we aim to 1) improve our understanding of the physical processes in thermal circulation and cloud formation, 2) examine the performance and sensitivity of various parameterizations in the regional weather model (Weather Research and Forecasting model; WRF), and 3) develop, implement, and evaluate the advanced boundary layer parameterization in the regional model to better represent stratocumulus, shallow cumulus, and their transition. Thus, this project includes three major corresponding studies. We find that the mean diurnal cycle is sensitive to model domain in ways that reveal the existence of different contributions originating from the Southeast Pacific land-masses. The experiments suggest that diurnal variations in circulations and thermal structures over this region are influenced by convection over the Peruvian sector of the Andes cordillera, while the mostly dry mountain-breeze circulations force an additional component that results in semi-diurnal variations near the coast. A series of numerical tests, however, reveal sensitivity of the simulations to the choice of vertical grid, limiting the possibility of solid quantitative statements on the amplitudes and phases of the diurnal and semidiurnal components across the domain. According to our experiments, the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN) boundary layer scheme and the WSM6 microphysics scheme is the combination of schemes that performs best. For that combination, mean cloud cover, liquid water path, and cloud depth are fairly wellsimulated, while mean cloud top height remains too low in comparison to observations. Both microphysics and boundary layer schemes contribute to the spread in liquid water path and cloud depth, although the microphysics contribution is slightly more prominent. Boundary layer schemes are the primary contributors to cloud top height, degree of adiabaticity, and cloud cover. Cloud top height is closely related to surface fluxes and boundary layer structure. Thus, our study infers that an appropriate tuning of cloud top height would likely improve the low-cloud representation in the model. Finally, we show that entrainment governs the degree of adiabaticity, while boundary layer decoupling is a control on cloud cover. In the intercomparison study using WRF single-column model experiments, most parameterizations show a poor agreement of the vertical boundary layer structure when compared with large-eddy simulation models. We also implement a new Total-Energy/Mass- Flux boundary layer scheme into the WRF model and evaluate its ability to simulate both stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds. Result comparisons against large-eddy simulation show that this advanced parameterization based on the new Eddy-Diffusivity/Mass-Flux approach provides a better performance than other boundary layer parameterizations.

  17. 74 MHz Discrete HII Absorption Regions Towards The Inner Galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael E. Nord; P. A. Henning; R. J. Rand; T. Joseph W. Lazio; Namir E. Kassim

    2006-03-02

    At low radio frequencies ( 1) and can be observed as discrete absorption regions against the Galactic nonthermal background emission created by Galactic cosmic ray electrons spiraling around magnetic fields. In this work we present 74 MHz observations in the region 26>l>-15, -5regions, and derive the brightness temperature of the Galactic cosmic ray electron synchrotron emission emanating from the column behind these regions. For the 42 HII regions with known distances, the average emissivity of the column behind the HII region is derived. 74 MHz emissivity values range between 0.3 and 1.0 Kelvin per parsec for a model assuming uniform distribution of emissivity. Methods for utilizing this type of data to model the 3-dimensional distribution of cosmic ray emissivity and the possibility of using this method to break the HII region kinematic distance degeneracy are discussed.

  18. A Guide for Using the Transient Ground-Water Flow Model of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joan B. Blainey; Claudia C. Faunt, and Mary C. Hill

    2006-05-16

    This report is a guide for executing numerical simulations with the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California using the U.S. Geological Survey modular finite-difference ground-water flow model, MODFLOW-2000. Model inputs, including observations of hydraulic head, discharge, and boundary flows, are summarized. Modification of the DVRFS transient ground-water model is discussed for two common uses of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model: predictive pumping scenarios that extend beyond the end of the model simulation period (1998), and model simulations with only steady-state conditions.

  19. Surface speciation of yttrium and neodymium sorbed on rutile: Interpretations using the change distribution model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridley, Mora K.; Hiemstra, T; Machesky, Michael L.; Wesolowski, David J; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H.

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption of Y3+ and Nd3+ onto rutile has been evaluated over a wide range of pH (3 11) and surface loading conditions, as well as at two ionic strengths (0.03 and 0.3 m), and temperatures (25 and 50 C). The experimental results reveal the same adsorption behavior for the two trivalent ions onto the rutile surface, with Nd3+ first adsorbing at slightly lower pH values. The adsorption of both Y3+ and Nd3+ commences at pH values below the pHznpc of rutile. The experimental results were evaluated using a charge distribution (CD) and multisite complexation (MUSIC) model, and Basic Stern layer description of the electric double layer (EDL). The coordination geometry of possible surface complexes were constrained by molecular-level information obtained from X-ray standing wave measurements and molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies. X-ray standing wave measurements showed an inner-sphere tetradentate complex for Y3+ adsorption onto the (110) rutile surface (Zhang et al., 2004b). TheMDsimulation studies suggest additional bidentate complexes may form. The CD values for all surface species were calculated based on a bond valence interpretation of the surface complexes identified by X-ray and MD. The calculated CD values were corrected for the effect of dipole orientation of interfacial water. At low pH, the tetradentate complex provided excellent fits to the Y3+ and Nd3+ experimental data. The experimental and surface complexation modeling results show a strong pH dependence, and suggest that the tetradentate surface species hydrolyze with increasing pH. Furthermore, with increased surface loading of Y3+ on rutile the tetradentate binding mode was augmented by a hydrolyzed-bidentate Y3+ surface complex. Collectively, the experimental and surface complexation modeling results demonstrate that solution chemistry and surface loading impacts Y3+ surface speciation. The approach taken of incorporating molecular-scale information into surface complexation models (SCMs) should aid in elucidating a fundamental understating of ion-adsorption reactions.

  20. Hadron Production Model Developments and Benchmarking in the 0.7 - 12 GeV Energy Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. V. Mokhov; K. K. Gudima; S. I. Striganov

    2014-08-29

    Driven by the needs of the intensity frontier projects with their Megawatt beams, e.g., ESS, FAIR and Project X, and their experiments, the event generators of the MARS15 code have been recently improved. After thorough analysis and benchmarking against data, including the newest ones by the HARP collaboration, both the exclusive and inclusive particle production models were further developed in the crucial for the above projects - but difficult from a theoretical standpoint - projectile energy region of 0.7 to 12 GeV. At these energies, modelling of prompt particle production in nucleon-nucleon and pion-nucleon inelastic reactions is now based on a combination of phase-space and isobar models. Other reactions are still modeled in the framework of the Quark-Gluon String Model. Pion, kaon and strange particle production and propagation in nuclear media are improved. For the alternative inclusive mode, experimental data on large-angle (> 20 degrees) pion production in hadron-nucleus interactions are parameterized in a broad energy range using a two-source model. It is mixed-and-matched with the native MARS model that successfully describes low-angle pion production data. Predictions of both new models are - in most cases - in a good agreement with experimental data obtained at CERN, JINR, LANL, BNL and KEK.

  1. Inclusive distributions in p-p collisions at LHC energies compared with an adjusted DPMJET-III model with chain fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Bopp; J. Ranft

    2011-10-28

    A DPMJET-III model (DPMJET-III-2011) with chain fusion adjusted to include energy.dependent parameters is used to calculate inclusive distributions in p-p collisions at LHC energies. Presented are charged hadrons rapidity distributions, transverse momentum distributions, multiplicity distributions as well as multiplicities at mid-rapidity as function of the collision energy. For hadrons with strangeness we present cms-rapidity distributions and transverse momentum distributions. With the considered merely energy-dependent adjustments the obtained agreement with the transversal \\Lambda and \\Xi distribution is not satisfactory.

  2. Modeling the resuspension of radionuclides in Ukranian regions impacted by Chernobyl fallout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nair, S.K.; Thiessen, K.M.; Hoffman, F.O. [SENES Oak Ridge Inc., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-01-01

    Following the 1986 Chernobyl event, large amounts of radioactive materials were deposited in nearby areas. Concentrations of various radionuclides were measured in air and surface soil. To study the resuspension of radioactive particulate, three different exposure situations were developed on the basis of the collected data under the auspices of the international BIOMOVS II (BIOspheric MOdel Validation Study) project. Modelers were asked to predict seasonal air concentrations and resuspension factors at several locations at different distances from Chernobyl for six successive years following the accident. Measurements of radionuclide deposition on topsoil were provided for each site along with information on soil, vegetation, land use, surface roughness, meteorology, and climate. In this paper, the three exposure situations are described, along with the initial data set provided to the modelers; two modeling approaches used to make the endpoint predictions are also presented. After the model predictions were submitted, the measured air concentrations and resuspension factors were released to the modelers. Generally, the predictions were well within an order of magnitude of the measured values. Time-dependent trends in predictions and measurements were in good agreement with one of the models, which (a) explicitly accounted for loss processes in soil and (b) used calibration to improve its predictive capabilities. Reasons for variations between predictions and measurements, suggestions for the improvement of models, and conclusions from the model validation study are presented. 12 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Modelling the Spectral Energy Distribution of Compact Luminous Infrared Galaxies: Constraints from High Frequency Radio Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. R. Prouton; A. Bressan; M. Clemens; A. Franceschini; G. L. Granato; L. Silva

    2004-03-24

    We have performed 23 GHz VLA observations of 7 compact, luminous infrared galaxies, selected to have evidence of starburst activity. New and published multi-frequency data are combined to obtain the spectral energy distributions of all 7 galaxies from the near-infrared to the radio (at 1.4 GHz). These SEDs are compared with new models, for dust enshrouded galaxies, which account for both starburst and AGN components. In all 7 galaxies the starburst provides the dominant contribution to the infrared luminosity; in 4 sources no contribution from an AGN is required. Although AGN may contribute up to 50 percent of the total far--infrared emission, the starbursts always dominate in the radio. The SEDs of most of our sources are best fit with a very high optical depth of (>=50) at 1 micron. The scatter in the far-infrared/radio correlation, found among luminous IRAS sources, is due mainly to the different evolutionary status of their starburst components. The short time-scale of the star formation process amplifies the delay between the far-infrared and radio emission. This becomes more evident at low radio frequencies (below about 1 GHz) where synchrotron radiation is the dominant process. In the far-infrared (at wavelengths shorter than 100 micron) an additional source of scatter is provided by AGN, where present. AGN may be detected in the near-infrared by the absence of the knee, typical of stellar photospheres. However, near-infrared data alone cannot constrain the level at which AGN contribute because the interpretation of their observed properties, in this wave-band, depends strongly on model parameters.

  4. Deriving star formation histories from photometry using energy balance spectral energy distribution modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Daniel J B

    2015-01-01

    Panchromatic spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting is a critical tool for determining the physical properties of distant galaxies, such as their stellar mass and star formation rate. One widely used method is the publicly available MAGPHYS code. We build on our previous analysis (Hayward & Smith 2015) by presenting some modifications which enable MAGPHYS to automatically estimate galaxy star formation histories (SFHs), including uncertainties, based on ultra-violet to far-infrared photometry. We use state-of-the art synthetic photometry derived by performing three-dimensional dust radiative transfer on hydrodynamic simulations of isolated disc and merging galaxies to test how well the modified MAGPHYS is able to recover SFHs under idealised conditions, where the true SFH is known. We find that while the SFH of the model with the best fit to the synthetic photometry is a poor representation of the true SFH (showing large variations with the line-of-sight to the galaxy and spurious bursts of star forma...

  5. Dipole strength distributions in the stable Ba isotopes {sup 134-138}Ba: A study in the mass region of a nuclear shape transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheck, M.; Garrel, H. von; Belic, D.; Kneissl, U.; Kohstall, C.; Nord, A.; Pitz, H.H.; Stedile, F.; Tsoneva, N.; Brentano, P. von; Fransen, C.; Gade, A.; Jolie, J.; Linnemann, A.; Pietralla, N.; Werner, V.; Stoyanov, C.

    2004-10-01

    The low-lying dipole strength distributions in the odd-mass isotopes {sup 135,137}Ba were studied in nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments (NRF) performed at the Stuttgart Dynamitron facility using bremsstrahlung beams with end point energies of 4.1, 3.1, and 2.5 MeV. Numerous excited states, most of them unknown so far, were observed in the excitation energy range up to 4 MeV. Detailed spectroscopic information has been obtained on excitation energies, decay widths, decay branching ratios, and transition probabilities. The results for {sup 137}Ba are compared with calculations in the framework of the Quasiparticle-Phonon Model. The new data for {sup 135,137}Ba complete the systematics of low-lying dipole excitations as observed for the even Ba isotopes {sup 134,136,138}Ba in previous NRF experiments in Stuttgart. The complete systematics within the Ba isotopic chain, exhibiting a nuclear shape transition, is discussed with respect to E1 two-phonon excitations, M1 scissors mode excitations, and in regard to the new critical point symmetries.

  6. Comparisons of box model calculations and measurements of formaldehyde from the 1997 North Atlantic Regional Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comparisons of box model calculations and measurements of formaldehyde from the 1997 North Atlantic October 2001; accepted 16 November 2001; published 18 April 2002. [1] Formaldehyde (CH2O) measurements: formaldehyde, photochemical modeling, aircraft measurements, North Atlantic troposphere 1. Introduction [2

  7. Simulation of a Polar Low Case in the North Atlantic with different regional numerical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zahn, Matthias

    by the DWD (German Weather Service) by means of their forecast model HRM (High Resolution Model) and another University Press, Cambridge. (a) CLM (b) REMO (c) HRM, DWD (d) BWK Figure 1: 1(a)- 1(c)10m wind velocity pressure from CLM and REMO simulations and HRM analysis, DWD, respectively, at 15/10/93, 6:00, 1(d) surface

  8. Integrated Canada-U.S. Power Sector Modeling with the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, A.; Eurek, K.; Mai, T.; Perry, A.

    2013-02-01

    The electric power system in North America is linked between the United States and Canada. Canada has historically been a net exporter of electricity to the United States. The extent to which this remains true will depend on the future evolution of power markets, technology deployment, and policies. To evaluate these and related questions, we modify the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model to include an explicit representation of the grid-connected power system in Canada to the continental United States. ReEDS is unique among long-term capacity expansion models for its high spatial resolution and statistical treatment of the impact of variable renewable generation on capacity planning and dispatch. These unique traits are extended to new Canadian regions. We present example scenario results using the fully integrated Canada-U.S. version of ReEDS to demonstrate model capabilities. The newly developed, integrated Canada-U.S. ReEDS model can be used to analyze the dynamics of electricity transfers and other grid services between the two countries under different scenarios.

  9. IEEE ELECTRON DEVICE LETTERS, VOL. 32, NO. 4, APRIL 2011 485 A Distributed Model for Border Traps in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    IEEE ELECTRON DEVICE LETTERS, VOL. 32, NO. 4, APRIL 2011 485 A Distributed Model for Border Traps on tunneling between the semiconductor surface and trap states in the gate dielectric film is formulated constants as they interact with the conduction band electrons via tunneling [8]. Moreover, the dispersion

  10. Optimal estimation of catch by the continuous underway fish egg sampler based on a model of the vertical distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    modelling, catchability, fish eggs, sampling, survey design, uncertainty, vertical distribution. Received 28 an absolute measure of abundance, because gear avoidance is non-existent and the reten- tion efficiency of plankton nets can be estimated precisely (Lo, 1985). However, survey design and precision represent key

  11. A controlled distributed parameter model for a fluid-flexible structure system: numerical simulations and experiment validations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baudouin, Lucie

    A controlled distributed parameter model for a fluid-flexible structure system: numerical consider the problem of active reduction of vibrations in a fluid-flexible structure system and the sloshing of the fuel inside the wing's tank. The control is performed using piezoelectric patches

  12. A model for an under floor air distribution system Y.J.P. Lina,*, P.F. Lindenb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linden, Paul F.

    ; improved thermal comfort; improved ventilation efficiency and indoor air quality; reduced energy useA model for an under floor air distribution system Y.J.P. Lina,*, P.F. Lindenb a Energy gains that occur above the occupied zone are isolated from the calculation of the required space supply

  13. New insights into the subglacial and periglacial hydrology of Vatnajo kull, Iceland, from a distributed physical model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flowers, Gwenn

    New insights into the subglacial and periglacial hydrology of Vatnajo« kull, Iceland, from, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 3, IS-107 ReykjavõÂk, Iceland E-mail: flowers@geop.ubc.ca ABSTRACT. We apply a time-dependent distributed glaciohydraulic model to Vatna- jo« kull ice cap, Iceland, aiming

  14. Mining for Statistical Models of Availability in Large-Scale Distributed Systems: An Empirical Study of SETI@home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kondo, Derrick

    Mining for Statistical Models of Availability in Large-Scale Distributed Systems: An Empirical, these systems are composed of heterogeneous hosts whose individual availability often exhibit different an effective method for discovering subsets of hosts whose availability have similar statistical properties

  15. Supplemental Material ReadMe file: A user's guide for the vitality model with initial Gaussian distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Supplemental Material ReadMe file: A user's guide for the vitality model with initial Gaussian distribution parameter fitting routine and the R functions contained in file vitality.gaussian.R. Ting Li and James J. Anderson University of Washington June 11, 2009 The supplemental R file vitality

  16. Seismic risk assessment of spatially-distributed systems using ground-motion models fitted considering spatial correlation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Jack W.

    University, CA, USA ABSTRACT: Ground-motion models are commonly used in earthquake engineering to predict) at site j during earthquake i; f(PPPij,) denotes the ground-motion prediction function with predictive the probability distribution of the ground-motion intensity at a given site due to a particular earthquake event

  17. Formation and eruption of an active region sigmoid. I. A study by nonlinear force-free field modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Chaowei; Feng, Xueshang [SIGMA Weather Group, State Key Laboratory for Space Weather, Center for Space Science and Applied Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wu, S. T.; Hu, Qiang, E-mail: cwjiang@spaceweather.ac.cn, E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn, E-mail: wus@uah.edu, E-mail: qh0001@uah.edu [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the formation and eruption of an active region (AR) sigmoid in AR 11283. To follow the quasi-static evolution of the coronal magnetic field, we reconstruct a time sequence of static fields using a recently developed nonlinear force-free field model constrained by vector magnetograms. A detailed analysis of the fields compared with observations suggests the following scenario for the evolution of the region. Initially, a new bipole emerges into the negative polarity of a preexisting bipolar AR, forming a null-point topology between the two flux systems. A weakly twisted flux rope (FR) is then built up slowly in the embedded core region, largely through flux cancellation, forming a bald patch separatrix surface (BPSS). The FR grows gradually until its axis runs into a torus instability (TI) domain, and the BPSS also develops a full S-shape. The combined effects of the TI-driven expansion of the FR and the line tying at the BP tear the FR into two parts with the upper portion freely expelled and the lower portion remaining behind the postflare arcades. This process dynamically perturbs the BPSS and results in the enhanced heating of the sigmoid and the rope. The accelerated expansion of the upper-portion rope strongly pushes its envelope flux near the null point and triggers breakout reconnection at the null, which further drives the eruption. We discuss the important implications of these results for the formation and disruption of the sigmoid region with an FR.

  18. Improving Energy Efficiency by Developing Components for Distributed Cooling and Heating Based on Thermal Comfort Modeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Develop distributed HVAC components to supplement the central HVAC system to reduce the energy required by current compressed gas air conditioners by at least one-third.

  19. Distributed energy resources customer adoption modeling with combined heat and power applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2003-01-01

    Modeling with Combined Heat and Power Applications SCE, S.Modeling with Combined Heat and Power Applications FigureModeling with Combined Heat and Power Applications Figure

  20. Deformation of layered rocks in the ramp regions of thrust faults: a study with rock models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Judith Savaso

    1985-01-01

    wall at an S/Lr of 0. 20. " . . . . . . " "" . . -" . 43 17 Diagram showing the thrust belt terminology used to refer to locations and structures in the models. . . . . . 47 18 Deformation maps of configuration A models layered with lead and a... of configuration A. 65 xi LIST OF FIGURES (continued) Figure Page 25 Plot of slip across the lowest lead or mica unit of the veneer at the apex of the anticline above the ramp (location c) versus S/Lr for models of configurations A and B. 67 26 27 Plot...

  1. Global distribution and climate forcing of marine organic aerosol: 1. Model improvements and evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meskhidze, N.; Xu, J.; Gantt, Brett; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2011-11-23

    Marine organic aerosol emissions have been implemented and evaluated within the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's 7-mode Modal Aerosol Module (MAM-7). Emissions of marine primary organic aerosols (POA), phytoplanktonproduced isoprene- and monoterpenes-derived secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and methane sulfonate (MS{sup -}) are shown to affect surface concentrations of organic aerosols in remote marine regions. Global emissions of submicron marine POA is estimated to be 7.9 and 9.4 Tg yr{sup -1}, for the Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) emission parameterizations, respectively. Marine sources of SOA and particulate MS{sup -} (containing both sulfur and carbon atoms) contribute an additional 0.2 and 5.1 Tg yr{sup -1}, respectively. Widespread areas over productive waters of the Northern Atlantic, Northern Pacific, and the Southern Ocean show marine-source submicron organic aerosol surface concentrations of 100 ngm{sup -3}, with values up to 400 ngm{sup -3} over biologically productive areas. Comparison of long-term surface observations of water insoluble organic matter (WIOM) with POA concentrations from the two emission parameterizations shows that despite revealed discrepancies (often more than a factor of 2), both Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) formulations are able to capture the magnitude of marine organic aerosol concentrations, with the Gantt et al. (2011) parameterization attaining better seasonality. Model simulations show that the mixing state of the marine POA can impact the surface number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The largest increases (up to 20 %) in CCN (at a supersaturation (S) of 0.2 %) number concentration are obtained over biologically productive ocean waters when marine organic aerosol is assumed to be externally mixed with sea-salt. Assuming marine organics are internally-mixed with sea-salt provides diverse results with increases and decreases in the concentration of CCN over different parts of the ocean. The sign of the CCN change due to the addition of marine organics to seasalt aerosol is determined by the relative significance of the increase in mean modal diameter due to addition of mass, and the decrease in particle hygroscopicity due to compositional changes in marine aerosol. Based on emerging evidence for increased CCN concentration over biologically active surface ocean areas/periods, our study suggests that treatment of sea spray in global climate models (GCMs) as an internal mixture of marine organic aerosols and sea-salt will likely lead to an underestimation in CCN number concentration.

  2. Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H.4 »ProgrammingScience (SC) Regional &

  3. From Connectivity Models to Region Labels: Identifying Foci of a Neurological Disorder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkataraman, Archana

    We propose a novel approach to identify the foci of a neurological disorder based on anatomical and functional connectivity information. Specifically, we formulate a generative model that characterizes the network of ...

  4. START: Status and Region Aware Taxi Mobility Model for Urban Vehicular Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yu

    networks [1]­[3] play a critical role in building smart cities and supporting comprehensive urban, and other important tasks of smart cities. Mobility models for mobile networks [4], [5] have been well

  5. Modeled Neutron Induced Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections for Radiochemistry in the region of Iriduim and Gold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, R D; Dietrich, F S; Kelley, K; Escher, J; Bauer, R; Mustafa, M

    2008-02-26

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron induced nuclear reaction cross sections for targets ranging from osmium (Z = 76) to gold (Z = 79). Of particular interest are the cross sections on Ir and Au including reactions on isomeric targets.

  6. Dynamical Coupled-Channel Model of Meson Production Reactions in the Nucleon Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.-S. H. Lee; A. Matsuyama; T. Sato

    2006-11-15

    A dynamical coupled-channel model is presented for investigating the nucleon resonances (N*) in the meson production reactions induced by pions and photons. Our objective is to extract the N* parameters and to investigate the meson production reaction mechanisms for mapping out the quark-gluon substructure of N* from the data. The model is based on an energy-independent Hamiltonian which is derived from a set of Lagrangians by using a unitary transformation method.

  7. Region Streams: Functional Macroprogramming for Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of computational power, communication bandwidth, and energy de- mand new approaches to programming that shield the developer from low-level details of resource management, concurrency, and in-network pro- cessing. We argue. The essential data model in Regiment is based on region streams, which represent spatially distributed, time

  8. Coupling Multi-Component Models with MPH on Distributed Memory Computer Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Yun; Ding, Chris

    2005-01-01

    Among these, NASA’s Earth System Models Framework (ESMF) [to facilitate coupling earth system model components and to

  9. Inclusive distributions at the LHC as predicted from the DPMJET-III model with chain fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Ranft; F. W. Bopp; R. Engel; S. Roesler

    2007-06-26

    DPMJET-III with chain fusion is used to calculate inclusive distributions of Pb-Pb collisions at LHC energies. We present rapidity distributions as well as scaled multiplicities at mid-rapidity as function of the collision energy and the number of participants.

  10. A comparison of neural network and processbased models for vegetation distribution under global climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    climate change Eric Chown chown@cs.orst.edu Thomas G. Dietterich tgd@cs.orst.edu Department of Computer covering current climate and vegetation distribution in the coterminous United States. Completely automated on two tasks: prediction of current vegetation distribution given current climate and prediction

  11. Distributed stability tests for large-scale systems with limited model information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulbrich, Michael

    . While the design of distributed control laws has received a lot of attention, the distributed analysis) within the Priority Program SPP 1305 "Control Theory of Digitally Networked Dynamical Systems-scale interconnected systems have attracted a lot of research recently in the field of system and control theory

  12. Comparing a spherical harmonic model of the global electric field distribution with Astrid-2 observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eriksson, Stefan

    of not measuring the global instantaneous two-dimensional potential distribution, which is important in studying in the past to provide analytical tools for the global potential distri- bution, such as those by Heppner potential distribution. The coefficients are assumed to depend on the IMF, the solar wind velocity

  13. Borders as membranes :metaphors and models for improved policy in border regions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malczynski, Leonard A.; Passell, Howard David; Forster, Craig B. (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT); Cockerill, Kristan (Cockerill Consulting, Boone, NC)

    2005-10-01

    Political borders are controversial and contested spaces. In an attempt to better understand movement along and through political borders, this project applied the metaphor of a membrane to look at how people, ideas, and things ''move'' through a border. More specifically, the research team employed this metaphor in a system dynamics framework to construct a computer model to assess legal and illegal migration on the US-Mexico border. Employing a metaphor can be helpful, as it was in this project, to gain different perspectives on a complex system. In addition to the metaphor, the multidisciplinary team utilized an array of methods to gather data including traditional literature searches, an experts workshop, a focus group, interviews, and culling expertise from the individuals on the research team. Results from the qualitative efforts revealed strong social as well as economic drivers that motivate individuals to cross the border legally. Based on the information gathered, the team concluded that legal migration dynamics were of a scope we did not want to consider hence, available demographic models sufficiently capture migration at the local level. Results from both the quantitative and qualitative data searches were used to modify a 1977 border model to demonstrate the dynamic nature of illegal migration. Model runs reveal that current US-policies based on neo-classic economic theory have proven ineffective in curbing illegal migration, and that proposed enforcement policies are also likely to be ineffective. We suggest, based on model results, that improvement in economic conditions within Mexico may have the biggest impact on illegal migration to the U.S. The modeling also supports the views expressed in the current literature suggesting that demographic and economic changes within Mexico are likely to slow illegal migration by 2060 with no special interventions made by either government.

  14. Observing and modelling f-region ionospheric dynamics using the (OII) 7320a emission. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, S.S.

    1992-01-01

    Limb-scan observations of Doppler line profiles from the (OII) lambda 7320A emission at F-Region altitudes, made with the Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) on the Dynamics Explorer-2 (DE-2) spacecraft, have been analyzed to provide measurements of the meridional component of the ion convection velocity along the instrument line-of-sight. The DE-2 results presented here demonstrate the first spaceborne use of the remote-sensing Doppler techniques for measurements of ionospheric convection. The FPI meridional ion drift measurements have been compared with nearly simultaneous in situ ion drift measurements from the Retarding Potential Analyzer (RPA) on DE 2. Once allowance is made for the temporal lag between the in situ and remote measurements, the results from the two techniques are found to be in good agreement, within specified experimental errors, giving confidence in the FPI measurements.

  15. Neutron lifetimes behavior analysis considering the two-region kinetic model in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonnelli, Eduardo; Diniz, Ricardo

    2014-11-11

    This is a complementary work about the behavior analysis of the neutron lifetimes that was developed in the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor facility. The macroscopic neutron noise technique was experimentally employed using pulse mode detectors for two stages of control rods insertion, where a total of twenty levels of subcriticality have been carried out. It was also considered that the neutron reflector density was treated as an additional group of delayed neutrons, being a sophisticated approach in the two-region kinetic theoretical model.

  16. Assessment of Uncertainties in the Response of the African Monsoon Precipitation to Land Use change simulated by a regional model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xue, Yongkang; Boone, Aaron; de Sales, Fernando; Neupane, Naresh; Huang, Maoyi; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-02-22

    Land use and land cover over Africa have changed substantially over the last sixty years and this change has been proposed to affect monsoon circulation and precipitation. This study examines the uncertainties on the effect of these changes on the African Monsoon system and Sahel precipitation using an ensemble of regional model simulations with different combinations of land surface and cumulus parameterization schemes. Although the magnitude of the response covers a broad range of values, most of the simulations show a decline in Sahel precipitation due to the expansion of pasture and croplands at the expense of trees and shrubs and an increase in surface air temperature.

  17. Photoelectron angular distributions for states of any mixed character: An experiment-friendly model for atomic, molecular, and cluster anions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khuseynov, Dmitry; Blackstone, Christopher C.; Culberson, Lori M.; Sanov, Andrei, E-mail: sanov@u.arizona.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

    2014-09-28

    We present a model for laboratory-frame photoelectron angular distributions in direct photodetachment from (in principle) any molecular orbital using linearly polarized light. A transparent mathematical approach is used to generalize the Cooper-Zare central-potential model to anionic states of any mixed character. In the limit of atomic-anion photodetachment, the model reproduces the Cooper-Zare formula. In the case of an initial orbital described as a superposition of s and p-type functions, the model yields the previously obtained s-p mixing formula. The formalism is further advanced using the Hanstorp approximation, whereas the relative scaling of the partial-wave cross-sections is assumed to follow the Wigner threshold law. The resulting model describes the energy dependence of photoelectron anisotropy for any atomic, molecular, or cluster anions, usually without requiring a direct calculation of the transition dipole matrix elements. As a benchmark case, we apply the p-d variant of the model to the experimental results for NO{sup ?} photodetachment and show that the observed anisotropy trend is described well using physically meaningful values of the model parameters. Overall, the presented formalism delivers insight into the photodetachment process and affords a new quantitative strategy for analyzing the photoelectron angular distributions and characterizing mixed-character molecular orbitals using photoelectron imaging spectroscopy of negative ions.

  18. The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS): Development for Parallel Processing Computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirne, Walfredo

    on the mesoscale (horizontal scales from 2 km to 2000 km) for purposes ranging from operational weather forecasting and simulating convective clouds, mesoscale convective systems, cirrus clouds, and precipitating weather systems models that had a great deal of overlap, the CSU cloud/mesoscale mode (Tripoli and Cotton, 1982

  19. Modeling the Dynamics of Desakota Regions: Global - Local Nexus in the Taipei Metropolitan Area 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Bing-Sheng

    2010-10-12

    in 1991, focuses on how internal domestic and local forces drive the specific rural-urban transformation in Asia. However, the McGee-Ginsburg model does not emphasize the importance of globalization on Asian urbanization. To fill the gap, this study...

  20. Realistic Shell-Model Calculations for Nuclei in the Region of Shell Closures off Stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Covello; L. Coraggio; A. Gargano

    1998-07-24

    We have performed realistic shell-model calculations for nuclei around doubly magic 100Sn and 132Sn using an effective interaction derived from the Bonn A nucleon-nucleon potential. The results are in remarkably good agreement with the experimental data showing the ability of our effective interaction to provide an accurate description of nuclear structure properties.

  1. An Evaluation of High Order Spatial Accuracy Algorithms for Modeling Fixed and Rotary Wing Tip regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 An Evaluation of High Order Spatial Accuracy Algorithms for Modeling Fixed and Rotary Wing Tip Nielsen Engineering and Research, Inc., Mountain View, CA 94043-2212 Yi Liu, Radhika Gupta, and L. N. Sankar School of Aerospace Engineering, Georgia Tech, Atlanta, GA 30332-0150 ABSTRACT Several high order

  2. An experimental validation of the PRO model for parallel and distributed computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    model was introduced by Gebremedhin et al. [2002] as a frame- work for the design and analysis. The Parallel Resource-Optimal (PRO) model, introduced in Gebremedhin et al. [2002], is similar to the BSP model discussion of the PRO model, see Gebremedhin et al. [2002]. The PRO model The key features of PRO

  3. DistFlow ODE: Modeling, analyzing and controlling long distribution feeder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Danhua

    We consider a linear feeder connecting multiple distributed loads and generators to the sub-station. Voltage is controlled directly at the sub-station, however, voltage down the line shifts up or down, in particular depending ...

  4. Extending JAGS: A tutorial on adding custom distributions to JAGS (with a diffusion model example)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wabersich, D; Wabersich, D; Vandekerckhove, J

    2014-01-01

    Optionally, reference the Rmath library AC_DEFINE(MATHLIB_1, [Define if you have standalone R math library]) case "${define this distribution are relatively easy to write without the need for calling advanced functions from extra libraries.

  5. Inferring surface heat flux distributions guided by a global seismic model: particular application to Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Nikolai

    , the procedure generates a histogram of heat-flow values determined from existing measurements obtained from are strongly non-Gaussian, but are well approximated by the log-logistic distribution which is completely

  6. Behavioural insights into the Modelling of Freight Transportation and Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    -level, companies have become increasingly customer-order- driven. Production systems such as JIT, Lean Production, or Time Based Manufacturing are now ubiquitous. More customer-order-driven production and distribution

  7. Distributed quantitative precipitation forecasts combining information from radar and numerical weather prediction model outputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganguly, Auroop Ratan

    2002-01-01

    Applications of distributed Quantitative Precipitation Forecasts (QPF) range from flood forecasting to transportation. Obtaining QPF is acknowledged to be one of the most challenging areas in hydrology and meteorology. ...

  8. MODELING SPECIES DISTRIBUTIONS: APPLICATIONS AND METHODS FOR MARINE BIOGEOGRAPHY AND CONSERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owens, Hannah Lois

    2015-05-31

    I employed multidisciplinary approaches for understanding distributions of marine fishes in the present, past, and future, and for considering more broadly the historical role of primary research in policy decisions. In chapter 1, I generated...

  9. Modeling and applications of two-phase flow distribution in manifolds under microgravity conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Cale Hollis

    1998-01-01

    associated with the flow throughout a manifold was developed. This calculational procedure was developed in order to calculate the flow distribution throughout a system, given only the inlet flow conditions and an arbitrary manifold geometry. Sample...

  10. Load Modeling and State Estimation Methods for Power Distribution Systems: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tom McDermott

    2010-05-07

    The project objective was to provide robust state estimation for distribution systems, comparable to what has been available on transmission systems for decades. This project used an algorithm called Branch Current State Estimation (BCSE), which is more effective than classical methods because it decouples the three phases of a distribution system, and uses branch current instead of node voltage as a state variable, which is a better match to current measurement.

  11. 2D versus 1D ground-motion modelling for the Friuli region, north-eastern Italy1 W. Imperatori1, *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    12 evaluate how the 2D (in the NW-SE direction) geological structure of the Friuli (NE Italy) basin13-studied regions, such as California, 3D geological structure models are often used for4 ground-motion modelling analyses, different 1D models are9 chosen for different stations to better characterize the structure

  12. Two-dimensional model of the air flow and temperature distribution in a cavity-type heat receiver of a solar stirling engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makhkamov, K.K.; Ingham, D.B.

    1999-11-01

    A theoretical study on the air flow and temperature in the heat receiver, affected by free convection, of a Stirling Engine for a Dish/Stirling Engine Power System is presented. The standard {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model for the fluid flow has been used and the boundary conditions employed were obtained using a second level mathematical model of the Stirling Engine working cycle. Physical models for the distribution of the solar insolation from the Concentrator on the bottom and side walls of the cavity-type heat receiver have been taken into account. The numerical results show that most of the heat losses in the receiver are due to re-radiation from the cavity and conduction through the walls of the cavity. It is in the region of the boundary of the input window of the heat receiver where there is a sensible reduction in the temperature in the shell of the heat exchangers and this is due to the free convection of the air. Further, the numerical results show that convective heat losses increase with decreasing tilt angle.

  13. Complex Chemistry in Star-Forming Regions: An Expanded Gas-Grain Warm-up Chemical Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robin T. Garrod; Susanna L. Widicus Weaver; Eric Herbst

    2008-03-08

    Gas-phase processes were long thought to be the key formation mechanisms for complex organic molecules in star-forming regions. However, recent experimental and theoretical evidence has cast doubt on the efficiency of such processes. Grain-surface chemistry is frequently invoked as a solution, but until now there have been no quantitative models taking into account both the high degree of chemical complexity and the evolving physical conditions of star-forming regions. Here, we introduce a new gas-grain chemical network, wherein a wide array of complex species may be formed by reactions involving radicals. The radicals we consider (H, OH, CO, HCO, CH3, CH3O, CH2OH, NH and NH2) are produced primarily by cosmic ray-induced photodissociation of the granular ices formed during the colder, earlier stages of evolution. The gradual warm-up of the hot core is crucial to the formation of complex molecules, allowing the more strongly-bound radicals to become mobile on grain surfaces. This type of chemistry is capable of reproducing the high degree of complexity seen in Sgr B2(N), and can explain the observed abundances and temperatures of a variety of previously detected complex organic molecules, including structural isomers. Many other complex species are predicted by this model, and several of these species may be detectable in hot cores. Differences in the chemistry of high- and low-mass star-formation are also addressed; greater chemical complexity is expected where evolution timescales are longer.

  14. Application of Distribution Transformer Thermal Life Models to Electrified Vehicle Charging Loads Using Monte-Carlo Method: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuss, M.; Markel, T.; Kramer, W.

    2011-01-01

    Concentrated purchasing patterns of plug-in vehicles may result in localized distribution transformer overload scenarios. Prolonged periods of transformer overloading causes service life decrements, and in worst-case scenarios, results in tripped thermal relays and residential service outages. This analysis will review distribution transformer load models developed in the IEC 60076 standard, and apply the model to a neighborhood with plug-in hybrids. Residential distribution transformers are sized such that night-time cooling provides thermal recovery from heavy load conditions during the daytime utility peak. It is expected that PHEVs will primarily be charged at night in a residential setting. If not managed properly, some distribution transformers could become overloaded, leading to a reduction in transformer life expectancy, thus increasing costs to utilities and consumers. A Monte-Carlo scheme simulated each day of the year, evaluating 100 load scenarios as it swept through the following variables: number of vehicle per transformer, transformer size, and charging rate. A general method for determining expected transformer aging rate will be developed, based on the energy needs of plug-in vehicles loading a residential transformer.

  15. SERA Scenarios of Early Market Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Introductions: Modeling Framework, Regional Markets, and Station Clustering; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.

    2015-03-23

    This presentation provides an overview of the Scenario Evaluation and Regionalization Analysis (SERA) model, describes the methodology for developing scenarios for hydrogen infrastructure development, outlines an example "Hydrogen Success" scenario, and discusses detailed scenario metrics for a particular case study region, the Northeast Corridor.

  16. An integrated assessment modeling framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change: the MIT IGSM-CAM (version 1.0)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monier, Erwan

    This paper describes a computationally efficient framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change. In this framework, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model ...

  17. First Structure Formation: I. Primordial Star Forming Regions in hierarchical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Abel; Peter Anninos; Michael L. Norman; Yu Zhang

    1997-05-17

    We investigate the possibility of very early formation of primordial star clusters from high-\\sigma perturbations in cold dark matter dominated structure formation scenarios. For this we have developed a powerful 2-level hierarchical cosmological code with a realistic and robust treatment of multi-species primordial gas chemistry, paying special attention to the formation and destruction of hydrogen molecules, non-equilibrium ionization, and cooling processes. We performed 3-D simulations at small scales and at high redshifts and find that, analogous to simulations of large scale structure, a complex system of filaments, sheets, and spherical knots at the intersections of filaments form. On the mass scales covered by our simulations (5x10^5 - 1x10^9\\Ms) that collapse at redshifts z>25, we find that only at the spherical knots can enough H2 be formed (n_{H_2}/n_H > 5x10^-4) to cool the gas appreciably. Quantities such as the time dependence of the formation of H2 molecules, the final H2 fraction, and central densities from the simulations are compared to the theoretical predictions of Abel (1995) and Tegmark et al. (1997) and found to agree remarkably well. Comparing the 3-D results to an isobaric collapse model we further discuss the possible implications of the extensive merging of small structure that is inherent in hierarchical models. Typically only 5-8% percent of the total baryonic mass in the collapsing structures is found to cool significanlty. Assuming the Padoan (1995) model for star formation our results would predict the first stellar systems to be as small as ~30\\Ms. Some implications for primordial globular cluster formation scenarios are also discussed.

  18. A solar active region loop compared with a 2D MHD model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gontikakis, C; Dara, H C; Tsinganos, K

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed a coronal loop observed with the Normal Incidence Spectrometer (NIS), which is part of the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The measured Doppler shifts and proper motions along the selected loop strongly indicate unidirectional flows. Analysing the Emission Measure Curves of the observed spectral lines, we estimated that the temperature along the loop was about 380000 K. We adapted a solution of the ideal MHD steady equations to our set of measurements. The derived energy balance along the loop, as well as the advantages/disadvantages of this MHD model for understanding the characteristics of solar coronal loops are discussed.

  19. A solar active region loop compared with a 2D MHD model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Gontikakis; G. J. D. Petrie; H. C. Dara; K. Tsinganos

    2005-03-31

    We analyzed a coronal loop observed with the Normal Incidence Spectrometer (NIS), which is part of the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The measured Doppler shifts and proper motions along the selected loop strongly indicate unidirectional flows. Analysing the Emission Measure Curves of the observed spectral lines, we estimated that the temperature along the loop was about 380000 K. We adapted a solution of the ideal MHD steady equations to our set of measurements. The derived energy balance along the loop, as well as the advantages/disadvantages of this MHD model for understanding the characteristics of solar coronal loops are discussed.

  20. Improved Indoor Tracking Based on Generalized t-Distribution Noise Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuo, Liu; Le, Yin; Khuen, Ho Weng; Voon, Ling Keck

    2015-01-01

    function. Industrial & engineering chemistry research, 42(model. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, 52(11):

  1. Improved Indoor Tracking Based on Generalized t-Distribution Noise Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuo, Liu; Le, Yin; Khuen, Ho Weng; Voon, Ling Keck

    2015-01-01

    objective function. Industrial & engineering chemistryfunction approac. Industrial & Engineering Chem- istrynoise model. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research,

  2. Model for Sustainable Urban Design With Expanded Sections on Distributed Energy Resources, February 2004

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Document describing a model design for urban development and redevelopment that will reduce urban energy consumption

  3. Economic regulation of electricity distribution utilities under high penetration of distributed energy resources : applying an incentive compatible menu of contracts, reference network model and uncertainty mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenkins, Jesse D. (Jesse David)

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing changes in the use and management of electricity distribution systems - including the proliferation of distributed energy resources, smart grid technologies (i.e., advanced power electronics and information and ...

  4. Generalized parton distributions and transverse densities in a light-front quark-diquark model for the nucleons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandan Mondal; Dipankar Chakrabarti

    2015-06-17

    We present a study of the generalized parton distributions for the quarks in a proton in both momentum and position spaces using the light-front wave functions of a quark-diquark model for the nucleon predicted by the soft-wall model of AdS/QCD. The results are compared with the soft-wall AdS/QCD model of proton GPDs for zero skewness. We also calculate the GPDs for nonzero skewness. We observe that the GPDs have a diffraction pattern in longitudinal position space, as seen before in other models. Then we present a comparitive study of the nucleon charge and anomalous magnetization densities in the transverse plane. Flavor decompositions of the form factors and transverse densities are also discussed.

  5. Hydraulic model analysis of water distribution system, Rockwell International, Rocky Flats, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perstein, J.; Castellano, J.A.

    1989-01-20

    Rockwell International requested an analysis of the existing plant site water supply distribution system at Rocky Flats, Colorado, to determine its adequacy. On September 26--29, 1988, Hughes Associates, Inc., Fire Protection Engineers, accompanied by Rocky Flats Fire Department engineers and suppression personnel, conducted water flow tests at the Rocky Flats plant site. Thirty-seven flows from various points throughout the plant site were taken on the existing domestic supply/fire main installation to assure comprehensive and thorough representation of the Rocky Flats water distribution system capability. The analysis was completed in four phases which are described, together with a summary of general conclusions and recommendations.

  6. Microscopic modeling of mass and charge distributions in the spontaneous fission of 240Pu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jhilam Sadhukhan; Witold Nazarewicz; Nicolas Schunck

    2015-10-27

    In this letter, we outline a methodology to calculate microscopically mass and charge distributions of spontaneous fission yields. We combine the multi-dimensional minimization of collective action for fission with stochastic Langevin dynamics to track the relevant fission paths from the ground-state configuration up to scission. The nuclear potential energy and collective inertia governing the tunneling motion are obtained with nuclear density functional theory in the collective space of shape deformations and pairing. We obtain a quantitative agreement with experimental data and find that both the charge and mass distributions in the spontaneous fission of 240Pu are sensitive both to the dissipation in collective motion and to adiabatic characteristics.

  7. Microscopic modeling of mass and charge distributions in the spontaneous fission of 240Pu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Schunck, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    In this letter, we outline a methodology to calculate microscopically mass and charge distributions of spontaneous fission yields. We combine the multi-dimensional minimization of collective action for fission with stochastic Langevin dynamics to track the relevant fission paths from the ground-state configuration up to scission. The nuclear potential energy and collective inertia governing the tunneling motion are obtained with nuclear density functional theory in the collective space of shape deformations and pairing. We obtain a quantitative agreement with experimental data and find that both the charge and mass distributions in the spontaneous fission of 240Pu are sensitive both to the dissipation in collective motion and to adiabatic characteristics.

  8. In-situ prediction on sensor networks using distributed multiple linear regression models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basha, Elizabeth (Elizabeth Ann)

    2010-01-01

    Within sensor networks for environmental monitoring, a class of problems exists that requires in-situ control and modeling. In this thesis, we provide a solution to these problems, enabling model-driven computation where ...

  9. Probabilistic Modelling of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Impacts on Distribution Networks in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    emission rates, especially in a low carbon intensive generation mixture such as that of British Columbia. This research aims to investigate the incremental impacts to distribution networks in British Columbia imposed in British Columbia by Liam Kelly B.A.Sc, University of Waterloo, 2005 A Thesis Submitted in Partial

  10. Continuous-Model Communication Complexity with Application in Distributed Resource Allocation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Huaiyu

    , is studied and the resource allocation is considered to be the procedure of computing a common function whose is provided based on the first order differentiation of the output function of resource allocation]. In this paper, we consider the distributed resource allocation as computing a multi-input-multi-output function

  11. Transactors: A Programming Model for Maintaining Globally Consistent Distributed State in Unreliable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bystroff, Chris

    .3.3 [Programming Languages]: Language Constructs and Features--concurrent programming structures; F.3.2 [Logics and Meanings of Programs]: Semantics of Programming Languages--operational semantics.3 [Programming Techniques]: Concurrent Programming--distributed programming General Terms Languages, Reliability

  12. An Electricity Trade Model for Multiple Power Distribution Networks in Smart Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    of the presented solutions. I. INTRODUCTION Energy efficiency optimization has drawn significant attention], [2]. Smart energy systems are thus introduced which aim at increasing the efficiency of both energy generation and distribution. The state-of-the-art smart energy systems, including resource allocation

  13. Distributed energy resources in practice: A case study analysis and validation of LBNL's customer adoption model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Owen; Creighton, Charles; Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael

    2003-01-01

    California rebate increases optimal yearly energy costs fromCalifornia. http://www.powerlight.com Distributed Energy Resources in Practice CostCalifornia. 93 Figure 33: Cumulative Energy Expense Projections from BD Biosciences Pharmingen. 96 Figure 34: Aggregated Yearly Energy Cost

  14. Distributed Response Time Analysis of GSPN Models with MapReduce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knottenbelt, William J.

    be extracted from a GSPN's underlying semi-Markov process using a method based on numerical Laplace transform power is needed and the computation must therefore be distributed. This paper describes, such as web servers, communication networks and stock market trading systems. In particular, we describe

  15. Quantification of model mismatch errors of the dynamic energy distribution in a stirred-tank reactor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimmich, Mark Raymond

    1987-01-01

    stream and the recycle stream. Both streams were modeled as plug flow. The model was developed for tanks using axial flow agitators with a large length/diameter ratio. Tracer experiments were used to validate the model. Based on difFerent tracer...

  16. Application of an online-coupled regional climate model, WRF-CAM5, over East Asia for examination of ice nucleation schemes: Part I. Comprehensive model evaluation and trend analysis for 2006 and 2011

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Ying; Zhang, Yang; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai -Yung; Zhang, Qiang; He, Kebin

    2015-08-18

    Online-coupled climate and chemistry models are necessary to realistically represent the interactions between climate variables and chemical species and accurately simulate aerosol direct and indirect effects on cloud, precipitation, and radiation. In this Part I of a two-part paper, simulations from the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with the physics package of Community Atmosphere Model (WRF-CAM5) are conducted with the default heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization over East Asia for two full years: 2006 and 2011. A comprehensive model evaluation is performed using satellite and surface observations. The model shows an overall acceptable performance for major meteorological variables at themore »surface and in the boundary layer, as well as column variables (e.g., precipitation, cloud fraction, precipitating water vapor, downward longwave and shortwave radiation). Moderate to large biases exist for cloud condensation nuclei over oceanic areas, cloud variables (e.g., cloud droplet number concentration, cloud liquid and ice water paths, cloud optical depth, longwave and shortwave cloud forcing). These biases indicate a need to improve the model treatments for cloud processes, especially cloud droplets and ice nucleation, as well as to reduce uncertainty in the satellite retrievals. The model simulates well the column abundances of chemical species except for column SO2 but relatively poor for surface concentrations of several species such as CO, NO2, SO2, PM2.5, and PM10. Several reasons could contribute to the underestimation of major chemical species in East Asia including underestimations of anthropogenic emissions and natural dust emissions, uncertainties in the spatial and vertical distributions of the anthropogenic emissions, as well as biases in meteorological, radiative, and cloud predictions. Despite moderate to large biases in the chemical predictions, the model performance is generally consistent with or even better than that reported for East Asia with only a few exceptions. The model generally reproduces the observed seasonal variations and the difference between 2006 and 2011 for most variables or chemical species. Overall, these results demonstrate promising skills of WRF-CAM5 for long-term simulations at a regional scale and suggest several areas of potential improvements.« less

  17. Reference Models and Incentive Regulation of Electricity Distribution Networks: An Evaluation of Sweden’s Network Performance Assessment Model (NPAM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamasb, Tooraj; Pollitt, Michael G.

    (Capex), quality of service, and network losses in a single model. Aggregation of these important elements into a single model has useful efficiency and incentive properties. Firms can adjust their inputs and outputs more efficiently by weighting... long-term benchmarking model, the NPAM incorporates the main inputs and outputs of regulatory concern such as operating and maintenance expenditures (Opex), capital expenditures (Capex), service quality, and network energy losses. It is generally...

  18. Moisture Flux Convergence in Regional and Global Climate Models: Implications for Droughts in the Southwestern United States Under Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yanhong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Salathe, E.; Dominguez, Francina; Nijssen, Bart; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2012-05-10

    The water cycle of the southwestern United States (SW) is dominated by winter storms that maintain a positive annual net precipitation. Analysis of the control and future climate from four pairs of regional and global climate models (RCMs and GCMs) shows that the RCMs simulate a higher fraction of transient eddy moisture fluxes because the hydrodynamic instabilities associated with flow over complex terrain are better resolved. Under global warming, this enables the RCMs to capture the response of transient eddies to increased atmospheric stability that allows more moisture to converge on the windward side of the mountains by blocking. As a result, RCMs simulate enhanced transient eddy moisture convergence in the SW compared to GCMs, although both robustly simulate drying due to enhanced moisture divergence by the divergent mean flow in a warmer climate. This enhanced convergence leads to reduced susceptibility to hydrological change in the RCMs compared to GCMs.

  19. Realistic expanding source model for invariant one-particle multiplicity distributions and two-particle correlations in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, S; Chapman, Scott; Nix, J Rayford

    1996-01-01

    We present a realistic expanding source model with nine parameters that are necessary and sufficient to describe the main physics occuring during hydrodynamical freezeout of the excited hadronic matter produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. As a first test of the model, we compare it to data from central Si + Au collisions at p_lab/A = 14.6 GeV/c measured in experiment E-802 at the AGS. An overall chi-square per degree of freedom of 1.055 is achieved for a fit to 1416 data points involving invariant pi^+, pi^-, K^+, and K^- one-particle multiplicity distributions and pi^+ and K^+ two-particle correlations. The 99-percent-confidence region of parameter space is identified, leading to one-dimensional error estimates on the nine fitted parameters and other calculated physical quantities. Three of the most important results are the freezeout temperature, longitudinal proper time, and baryon density along the symmetry axis. For these we find values of 92.9 +/- 4.4 MeV, 8.2 +/- 2.2 fm/c, and 0.0222 + 0.0097...

  20. The generalized parton distribution functions and the nucleon spin sum rules in the chiral quark soliton model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Wakamatsu; H. Tsujimoto

    2005-03-29

    The theoretical predictions are given for the forward limit of the unpolarized spin-flip isovector generalized parton distribution function $(E^u - E^d)(x, \\xi, t)$ within the framework of the chiral quark soliton model, with full inclusion of the polarization of Dirac sea quarks. We observe that $[(H^u - H^d) + (E^u - E^d)](x,0,0)$ has a sharp peak around $x=0$, which we interpret as a signal of the importance of the pionic $q \\bar{q}$ excitation with large spatial extension in the transverse direction. Another interesting indication given by the predicted distribution in combination with Ji's angular momentum sum rule is that the $\\bar{d}$-quark carries more angular momentum than the $\\bar{u}$-quark in the proton, which may have some relation with the physics of the violation of the Gottfried sum rule.

  1. Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lettenmaier, Dennis P

    2013-04-08

    Primary activities are reported in these areas: climate system component studies via one-way coupling experiments; development of the Regional Arctic Climate System Model (RACM); and physical feedback studies focusing on changes in Arctic sea ice using the fully coupled model.

  2. Improving Energy Efficiency by Developing Components for Distributed Cooling and Heating Based on Thermal Comfort Modeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Discusses comfort model enhancement/validation, climate system efficiency parameters and system trade off, and powertrain mode operation changes to further vehicle energy saving while preserving occupant comfort.

  3. Multiobjective calibration and sensitivity of a distributed land surface water and energy balance model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houser, Paul R; Gupta, Hoshin V; Shuttleworth, W. James; Famiglietti, James S

    2001-01-01

    identification and energy balance models on a tallgrassdata for surface energy balance evaluation of a semiaridWatershed. We are energy balance components over a semiarid

  4. MEG (Magnetoencephalography) multipolar modeling of distributed sources using RAP-MUSIC (Recursively Applied and Projected Multiple Signal Characterization)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosher, J. C.; Baillet, S.; Jerbi, K.; Leahy, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    We describe the use of truncated multipolar expansions for producing dynamic images of cortical neural activation from measurements of the magnetoencephalogram. We use a signal-subspace method to find the locations of a set of multipolar sources, each of which represents a region of activity in the cerebral cortex. Our method builds up an estimate of the sources in a recursive manner, i.e. we first search for point current dipoles, then magnetic dipoles, and finally first order multipoles. The dynamic behavior of these sources is then computed using a linear fit to the spatiotemporal data. The final step in the procedure is to map each of the multipolar sources into an equivalent distributed source on the cortical surface. The method is illustrated through an application to epileptic interictal MEG data.

  5. The sensitivity of modeled ozone to the temporal distribution of point, area, and mobile source emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, Russell R.

    emissions in the eastern United States Patricia Castellanos , Sheryl H. Ehrman* , Jeffrey W. Stehr , Russell pollution problems in the US. Hourly emissions fields used in air quality models (AQMs) generally show less of estimated emissions affects modeled ozone, we analyzed the effects of altering all anthropogenic emissions

  6. Heat Transfer Modeling and Use of Distributed Temperature Measurements to Predict Rate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hashmi, Gibran Mushtaq

    2014-07-08

    in the literature. The steady-state model is used where the fluid flow is essentially steady and any change in rate is followed by a sufficiently long steady schedule. The transient model is used where the well is still flowing in the initial stages or fluctuations...

  7. A habitat model predicting Cerulean Warbler (Dendroica cerulea) distribution in Central

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    during Spring migration Tiffany Beachy FWF Seminar 16 April 2008 · Nearctic Neotropical migrants · Breed · Validation of model: ­ April 2007 ­ Chiapas, Mexico, Guatemala, and Honduras #12;4 Methods: Acquire variables in Central America during spring migration · Continued monitoring needed to further validate the model

  8. Method Comparison For Estimation Of Distributed Parameters In Permittivity Models Using Reflectance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;1 Introduction There is a current interest in the integration of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) for both static matrix composites. In order to model the reflectance, one must specify a model for the complex have hypothesized that as the CMC under study (a ceramic matrix with a silicon carbide fiber

  9. Modeling Silicon Photonics in Distributed Computing Systems: from the Device to the Rack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergman, Keren

    systems involving millions of devices have to be modeled. We review key model transformation methods. Introduction Optical systems have dominated the long haul telecom market for a few decades now. Medium to long dissipation over long distances. However, as photonics expands to the datacom market and tries to get

  10. An aggregation model reduction method for one-dimensional distributed systems.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    control group for help and good company. Most important for me is to thank my family and the good people problems. In order to obtain models of lower complexity than the original models, the steady-state systems for good cooperation and company in various places in Europe. Many thanks to Lisbeth Roel for help

  11. Atmospheric test models and numerical experiments for the simulation of the global distribution of weather data transponders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grossman, A; Molenkamp, C R

    1999-08-25

    A proposal has been made to establish a high density global network of atmospheric micro transponders to record time, temperature, and wind data with time resolution of {le} 1 minute, temperature accuracy of {+-} 1 K, spatial resolution no poorer than {approx}3km horizontally and {approx}0.1km vertically, and 2-D speed accuracy of {le} 1m/s. This data will be used in conjunction with advanced numerical weather prediction models to provide increases in the reliability of long range weather forecasts. Major advances in data collection technology will be required to provide the proposed high-resolution data collection network. Systems studies must be undertaken to determine insertion requirements, spacing, and evolution of the transponder ensemble, which will be used to collect the data. Numerical models which provide realistic global weather pattern simulations must be utilized in order to perform these studies. A global circulation model with a 3{sup o} horizontal resolution has been used for initial simulations of the generation and evolution of transponder distributions. These studies indicate that reasonable global coverage of transponders can be achieved by a launch scenario consisting of the sequential launch of transponders at specified heights from a globally distributed set of launch sites.

  12. Abstract Flood frequency analysis is usually based on the fitting of an extreme value distribution to the local

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribatet, Mathieu

    Abstract Flood frequency analysis is usually based on the fitting of an extreme value distribution restrictive than the index flood model while preserving the formalism of ``homogeneous regions indicate that the regional Bayesian model outperforms the index flood model and local estimators

  13. 978-1-4244-2677-5/08/$25.00 2008 IEEE 1 of 7 ON MODELING ENERGY-SECURITY TRADE-OFFS FOR DISTRIBUTED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaffrès-Runser, Katia

    will increase the energy spent on overhead. A distributed solution is thus highly desirable. In this work, we and type of instructions in an IDS algorithm; (b) propose an energy efficient, distributed monitoring978-1-4244-2677-5/08/$25.00 ©2008 IEEE 1 of 7 ON MODELING ENERGY-SECURITY TRADE

  14. Force-free field modeling of twist and braiding-induced magnetic energy in an active-region corona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thalmann, J. K.

    2014-01-01

    The theoretical concept that braided magnetic field lines in the solar corona may dissipate a sufficient amount of energy to account for the brightening observed in the active-region (AR) corona has only recently been substantiated by high-resolution observations. From the analysis of coronal images obtained with the High Resolution Coronal Imager, first observational evidence of the braiding of magnetic field lines was reported by Cirtain et al. (hereafter CG13). We present nonlinear force-free reconstructions of the associated coronal magnetic field based on Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager vector magnetograms. We deliver estimates of the free magnetic energy associated with a braided coronal structure. Our model results suggest (?100 times) more free energy at the braiding site than analytically estimated by CG13, strengthening the possibility of the AR corona being heated by field line braiding. We were able to appropriately assess the coronal free energy by using vector field measurements and we attribute the lower energy estimate of CG13 to the underestimated (by a factor of 10) azimuthal field strength. We also quantify the increase in the overall twist of a flare-related flux rope that was noted by CG13. From our models we find that the overall twist of the flux rope increased by about half a turn within 12 minutes. Unlike another method to which we compare our results, we evaluate the winding of the flux rope's constituent field lines around each other purely based on their modeled coronal three-dimensional field line geometry. To our knowledge, this is done for the first time here.

  15. Energy performance of underfloor air distribution systems part IV: underfloor plenum testing and modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, Fred; Jin, Hui

    2007-01-01

    for implementation in EnergyPlus. A secondary goal was toCFD database for implementation into EnergyPlus Comparisonbetween EnergyPlus and CFD plenum model predictions

  16. Negative Binomial-Generalized Exponential Distribution: Generalized Linear Model and its Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vangala, Prathyusha

    2015-05-06

    Modelling crash data has been an integral part of the research done in highway safety. Different tools have been suggested by researchers to analyze crash data. One such tool, which was recently proposed, is the Negative Binomial Generalized...

  17. Distributed data processing within dense networks of wireless sensors using parallelized model updating techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    simulated annealing search method optimized for in-network execution, this algorithm efficiently assigns structure model of a six-story steel building exposed to seismic base motion. Keywords: Wireless sensors

  18. Ecosystem-scale Selenium Model for the San Francisco Bay-Delta Regional Ecosystem Restoration Implementation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presser, Theresa S.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    2013-01-01

    experimental ponds. Water, Air, and Soil Pollution 62(1–2):Pollution [SFBRWQCB] California San Francisco Bay Regional Water

  19. Scattering Studies of Hydrophobic Monomers in Liposomal Bilayers: An Expanding shell Model of Monomer Distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richter, Andrew G [ORNL; Dergunov, Sergey [ORNL; Ganus, Bill [University of Memphis; Thomas, Zachary P [ORNL; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh [ORNL; Urban, Volker S [ORNL; Liu, Yun [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Porcar, Lionel [ORNL; Pinkhassik, Eugene [University of Memphis

    2011-01-01

    Hydrophobic monomers partially phase separate from saturated lipids when loaded into lipid bilayers in amounts exceeding a 1:1 monomer/lipid molar ratio. This conclusion is based on the agreement between two independent methods of examining the structure of monomer-loaded bilayers. Complete phase separation of monomers from lipids would result in an increase in bilayer thickness and a slight increase in the diameter of liposomes. A homogeneous distribution of monomers within the bilayer would not change the bilayer thickness and would lead to an increase in the liposome diameter. The increase in bilayer thickness, measured by the combination of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), was approximately half of what was predicted for complete phase separation. The increase in liposome diameter, measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS), was intermediate between values predicted for a homogeneous distribution and complete phase separation. Combined SANS, SAXS, and DLS data suggest that at a 1.2 monomer/lipid ratio approximately half of the monomers are located in an interstitial layer sandwiched between lipid sheets. These results expand our understanding of using self-assembled bilayers as scaffolds for the directed covalent assembly of organic nanomaterials. In particular, the partial phase separation of monomers from lipids corroborates the successful creation of nanothin polymer materials with uniform imprinted nanopores. Pore-forming templates do not need to span the lipid bilayer to create a pore in the bilayer-templated films.

  20. Scattering Studies of Hydrophobic Monomers in Liposomal Bilayers: An Expanding Shell Model of Monomer Distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richter, Andrew [Valparaiso University; Dergunov, Sergey [University of Memphis; Ganus, Bill [University of Memphis; Thomas, Zachary [University of Memphis; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh [ORNL; Urban, Volker S [ORNL; Liu, Yun [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Porcar, Lionel [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL); Pinkhassik, Eugene [University of Memphis

    2011-01-01

    Hydrophobic monomers partially phase separate from saturated lipids when loaded into lipid bilayers in amounts exceeding a 1:1 monomer/lipid molar ratio. This conclusion is based on the agreement between two independent methods of examining the structure of monomer-loaded bilayers. Complete phase separation of monomers from lipids would result in an increase in bilayer thickness and a slight increase in the diameter of liposomes. A homogeneous distribution of monomers within the bilayer would not change the bilayer thickness and would lead to an increase in the liposome diameter. The increase in bilayer thickness, measured by the combination of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), was approximately half of what was predicted for complete phase separation. The increase in liposome diameter, measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS), was intermediate between values predicted for a homogeneous distribution and complete phase separation. Combined SANS, SAXS, and DLS data suggest that at a 1.2 monomer/lipid ratio approximately half of the monomers are located in an interstitial layer sandwiched between lipid sheets. These results expand our understanding of using self-assembled bilayers as scaffolds for the directed covalent assembly of organic nanomaterials. In particular, the partial phase separation of monomers from lipids corroborates the successful creation of nanothin polymer materials with uniform imprinted nanopores. Pore-forming templates do not need to span the lipid bilayer to create a pore in the bilayer-templated films.

  1. Spectral energy distribution, polarization, and synthetic radio maps of Cygnus X-1: a lepto-hadronic jet model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pepe, C; Romero, G E

    2015-01-01

    In this work we combine SEDs, radio maps and polarization observations to understand the emission mechanisms in Cygnus X-1. Our radiative model indicates that the MeV emission originates in the jet and that all the very high-energy emission is from hadronic origin. We also performed a synthetic radio map that suggests that our description of the magnetic field should be improved, since it leads to a very compact emission region. In order to choose the most suitable magnetic field geometry, we investigated the polarization in X-rays and we found that very simple geometries can explain the high levels of polarization reported by other authors.

  2. Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic Using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassano, John

    2013-06-30

    The primary research task completed for this project was the development of the Regional Arctic Climate Model (RACM). This involved coupling existing atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land models using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) coupler (CPL7). RACM is based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model, the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) ocean model, the CICE sea ice model, and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land model. A secondary research task for this project was testing and evaluation of WRF for climate-scale simulations on the large pan-Arctic model domain used in RACM. This involved identification of a preferred set of model physical parameterizations for use in our coupled RACM simulations and documenting any atmospheric biases present in RACM.

  3. A Distributed Modeling System for Short-Term to Seasonal Ensemble Streamflow Forecasting in Snowmelt Dominated Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigmosta, Mark S.; Gill, Muhammad K.; Coleman, Andre M.; Prasad, Rajiv; Vail, Lance W.

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes a distributed modeling system for short-term to seasonal water supply forecasts with the ability to utilize remotely-sensed snow cover products and real-time streamflow measurements. Spatial variability in basin characteristics and meteorology is represented using a raster-based computational grid. Canopy interception, snow accumulation and melt, and simplified soil water movement are simulated in each computational unit. The model is run at a daily time step with surface runoff and subsurface flow aggregated at the basin scale. This approach allows the model to be updated with spatial snow cover and measured streamflow using an Ensemble Kalman-based data assimilation strategy that accounts for uncertainty in weather forecasts, model parameters, and observations used for updating. Model inflow forecasts for the Dworshak Reservoir in northern Idaho are compared to observations and to April-July volumetric forecasts issued by the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) for Water Years 2000 – 2006. October 1 volumetric forecasts are superior to those issued by the NRCS, while March 1 forecasts are comparable. The ensemble spread brackets the observed April-July volumetric inflows in all years. Short-term (one and three day) forecasts also show excellent agreement with observations.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Inter-basin Groundwater Flow into Northern Yucca Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Using the Death Valley Regional Flow System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pohlmann Karl,Ye Ming

    2012-03-01

    Models of groundwater flow for the Yucca Flat area of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) are under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for corrective action investigations of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit (CAU). One important aspect of these models is the quantity of inter-basin groundwater flow from regional systems to the north. This component of flow, together with its uncertainty, must be properly accounted for in the CAU flow models to provide a defensible regional framework for calculations of radionuclide transport that will support determinations of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine contaminant boundary. Because characterizing flow boundary conditions in northern Yucca Flat requires evaluation to a higher level of detail than the scale of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU model can efficiently provide, a study more focused on this aspect of the model was required.

  5. A three-dimensional numerical model of predevelopment conditions in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Agnese, F.A.; O'Brien, G.M.; Faunt, C.C.; Belcher, W.R.; San Juan, Carma

    2002-11-22

    In the early 1990's, two numerical models of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system were developed by the U.S. Department of Energy. In general, the two models were based on the same basic hydrogeologic data set. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy requested that the U.S. Geological Survey develop and maintain a ground-water flow model of the Death Valley region in support of U.S. Department of Energy programs at the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of developing this ''second-generation'' regional model was to enhance the knowledge and understanding of the ground-water flow system as new information and tools are developed. The U.S. Geological Survey also was encouraged by the U.S. Department of Energy to cooperate to the fullest extent with other Federal, State, and local entities in the region to take advantage of the benefits of their knowledge and expertise. The short-term objective of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system project was to develop a steady-stat e representation of the predevelopment conditions of the ground-water flow system utilizing the two geologic interpretations used to develop the previous numerical models. The long-term objective of this project was to construct and calibrate a transient model that simulates the ground-water conditions of the study area over the historical record that utilizes a newly interpreted hydrogeologic conceptual model. This report describes the result of the predevelopment steady-state model construction and calibration.

  6. Model-independent calculation of $SU(3)_f$ violation in baryon octet light-cone distribution amplitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp Wein; Andreas Schäfer

    2015-01-28

    In this work we present a minimal parametrization of the light-cone distribution amplitudes of the baryon octet including higher twist contributions. Simultaneously we obtain the quark mass dependence of the amplitudes at leading one-loop accuracy by the use of three-flavor baryon chiral perturbation theory (BChPT), which automatically yields model-independent results for the leading $SU(3)$ flavor breaking effects. For that purpose we have constructed the nonlocal light-cone three-quark operators in terms of baryon octet and meson fields and have carried out a next-to-leading order BChPT calculation. We were able to find a minimal set of distribution amplitudes (DAs) that do not mix under chiral extrapolation towards the physical point and naturally embed the $\\Lambda$ baryon. Additionally they are chosen in such a way that all DAs of a certain symmetry class have a similar quark mass dependence (independent of the twist of the corresponding amplitude), which allows for a compact presentation. The results are well-suited for the extrapolation of lattice data and for model building.

  7. Fuel Cell Power Model Version 2: Startup Guide, System Designs, and Case Studies. Modeling Electricity, Heat, and Hydrogen Generation from Fuel Cell-Based Distributed Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D.; Penev, M.; Saur, G.; Becker, W.; Zuboy, J.

    2013-06-01

    This guide helps users get started with the U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model Version 2, which is a Microsoft Excel workbook that analyzes the technical and economic aspects of high-temperature fuel cell-based distributed energy systems with the aim of providing consistent, transparent, comparable results. This type of energy system would provide onsite-generated heat and electricity to large end users such as hospitals and office complexes. The hydrogen produced could be used for fueling vehicles or stored for later conversion to electricity.

  8. Avalanche: A Fine-Grained Flow Graph Model for Irregular Applications on Distributed-Memory Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newton, Ryan R.

    libraries [18, 30]. To address this need we propose a new C++ library, Avalanche, for expressing fine computations. However, most of these models either require specialized languages and compilers or are library generates active-message handlers. Avalanche is built as a C++ library on top of our previously

  9. Observations and modelling of the global distribution and long-term trend of atmospheric 14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (IWR), University of Heidelberg, INF 368, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany, now at Electrical Engineering for Australian Weather and Climate Research / CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research (CMAR), Private Bag No. 1 and sinks, using the coarse-grid carbon cycle model GRACE. Dedicated simulations of global trends and inter

  10. Development of indices for agricultural drought monitoring using a spatially distributed hydrologic model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasimhan, Balaji

    2005-11-01

    -correlated with the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index NDVI (r ~ 0.6) for agriculture and pasture land use types, indicating that the model performed well in simulating the soil water. Using historical weather data from 1901-2002, long-term weekly normal soil moisture...

  11. Resonance recombination model and quark distribution functions in the quark-gluon plasma 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravagli, L.; van Hees, H.; Rapp, Ralf.

    2009-01-01

    is adjusted to hydrodynamic simulations of semicentral Au-Au collisions at RHIC. To facilitate the applicability of the Langevin process, we focus on strange and charm quarks. Their interactions in the QGP are modeled using leading-order perturbative QCD...

  12. A Component Model for Control-Intensive Distributed Embedded Systems 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Steffen

    embedded systems, resources limitations in terms of memory, bandwidth and energy com- bined the corresponding product (car, production cell, etc.), follow- ing its physical architecture, to bring the embedded system closer to the sensed or controlled elements. In this paper, we propose a new component model

  13. Determining Greenland Ice Sheet sensitivity to regional climate change: one-way coupling of a 3-D thermo-mechanical ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, Nicole-Jeanne

    2011-01-01

    ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model By Nicole-ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model Copyrightice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model by Nicole-

  14. COMPLETE LOCALISATION IN THE PARABOLIC ANDERSON MODEL WITH PARETO-DISTRIBUTED POTENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mörters, Peter

    for the heat equation tu(t, z) = u(t, z) + (z)u(t, z) on (0, ) � Zd with random potential ((z): z Zd ). We and main results 1.1 The parabolic Anderson model and intermittency We consider the heat equation, Feynman-Kac formula. 1 #12;2 WOLFGANG K¨ONIG, PETER M¨ORTERS, AND NADIA SIDOROVA islands. This effect

  15. Megacity impacts on regional ozone formation: observations and WRF-Chem modeling for the MIRAGE-Shanghai field campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Tie, X. : Analysis of ozone and VOCs measured in Shanghai: AMegacity impacts on regional ozone formation terminations inand Tie, X. : Study of ozone “weekend effect” in Shanghai,

  16. Magnetic field distribution in the quiet Sun: a simplified model approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Berrilli; D. Del Moro; B. Viticchie

    2008-08-03

    We simulate the dynamics and the evolution of quiet Sun magnetic elements to produce a probability density function of the field strengths associated with such elements. The dynamics of the magnetic field are simulated through a numerical model in which magnetic elements are passively driven by an advection field presenting spatio-temporal correlations which mimicks the granulation and the mesogranulation scales observed on the solar surface. The field strength can increase due to an amplification process which takes place where the magnetic elements converge. Starting from a delta-like probability density function centered on B=30 G, we obtain magnetic field strengths up to 2 kG (in absolute value). To derive the statistical properties of the magnetic elements several simulation runs are performed. The model is able to produce kG magnetic fields in a time interval of the order of the granulation time scale. The mean unsigned flux density and the mean magnetic energy density of the synthetic quiet Sun reach respectively 100 G and 350 G in the stationary regime. The derived probability density function of the magnetic field strength decreases rapidly from B=30 G to B=100 G and presents a secondary maximum for B=2 kG. From this result it follows that magnetic fields >700 G dominate the unsigned flux density and magnetic energy density although the probability density function of the field strength presents a maximum for B=30 G.

  17. Modeling the Summertime Climate of Southwest Asia: The Role of Land Surface Processes in Shaping the Climate of Semiarid Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcella, Marc P.

    Presented is a study on the role of land surface processes in determining the summertime climate over the semiarid region of southwest Asia. In this region, a warm surface air temperature bias of 3.5°C is simulated in the ...

  18. A long Saharan dust event over the western Mediterranean: Lidar, Sun photometer observations, and regional dust modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    over the Mediterranean region (http://www.bsc.es/projects/earthscience/ DREAM/) considering four of dust exported annually from northern Africa (Sahara-Sahel region) are still not reliable, and range]. Once in the atmosphere, dust particles interact with solar and thermal radiation, modulating the Earth

  19. Modern Grid Initiative Distribution Taxonomy Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Kevin P.; Chen, Yousu; Chassin, David P.; Pratt, Robert G.; Engel, David W.; Thompson, Sandra E.

    2008-11-01

    This is the final report for the development of a toxonomy of prototypical electrical distribution feeders. Two of the primary goals of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Modern Grid Initiative (MGI) are 'to accelerate the modernization of our nation's electricity grid' and to 'support demonstrations of systems of key technologies that can serve as the foundation for an integrated, modern power grid'. A key component to the realization of these goals is the effective implementation of new, as well as existing, 'smart grid technologies'. Possibly the largest barrier that has been identified in the deployment of smart grid technologies is the inability to evaluate how their deployment will affect the electricity infrastructure, both locally and on a regional scale. The inability to evaluate the impacts of these technologies is primarily due to the lack of detailed electrical distribution feeder information. While detailed distribution feeder information does reside with the various distribution utilities, there is no central repository of information that can be openly accessed. The role of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in the MGI for FY08 was to collect distribution feeder models, in the SynerGEE{reg_sign} format, from electric utilities around the nation so that they could be analyzed to identify regional differences in feeder design and operation. Based on this analysis PNNL developed a taxonomy of 24 prototypical feeder models in the GridLAB-D simulations environment that contain the fundamental characteristics of non-urban core, radial distribution feeders from the various regions of the U.S. Weighting factors for these feeders are also presented so that they can be used to generate a representative sample for various regions within the United States. The final product presented in this report is a toolset that enables the evaluation of new smart grid technologies, with the ability to aggregate their effects to regional and national levels. The distribution feeder models presented in this report are based on actual utility models but do not contain any proprietary or system specific information. As a result, the models discussed in this report can be openly distributed to industry, academia, or any interested entity, in order to facilitate the ability to evaluate smart grid technologies.

  20. Gap-Size Distribution Functions of a Random Sequential Adsorption Model of Segments on the Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. A. M. Araujo; A. Cadilhe

    2006-04-24

    We performed extensive simulations accompanied by a detailed study of a two-segment size random sequential model on the line. We followed the kinetics towards the jamming state, but we paid particular attention to the characterization of the jamming state structure. In particular, we studied the effect of the size ratio on the mean-gap size, the gap-size dispersion, gap-size skewness, and gap-size kurtosis at the jamming state. We also analyzed the above quantities for the four possible segment-to-segment gap types. We ranged the values of the size ratio from one to twenty. In the limit of a size ratio of one, one recovers the classical car-parking problem. We observed that at low size ratios the jamming state is constituted by short streaks of small and large segments, while at high values of the size ratio the jamming state structure is formed by long streaks of small segments separated by a single large segment. This view of the jamming state structure as a function of the size ratio is supported by the various measured quantities. The present work can help provide insight, for example, on how to minimize the interparticle distance or minimize fluctuations around the mean particle-to-particle distance.