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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributing gas utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Gas Utility Pipeline Tax (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

All gas utilities, including any entity that owns, manages, operates, leases, or controls a pipeline for the purpose of transporting natural gas in the state for sale or compensation, as well as...

2

Natural Gas Utilities Options Analysis for the Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

> Natural Gas Utilities Options Analysis for the Hydrogen Economy Hydrogen Pipeline R&D Project > GTI focuses on energy & environmental issues ­ Specialize on natural gas & hydrogen > Our main Natural Gas Gas Hydrates Kent Perry Executive Director Exploration & Production Technology Distributed

3

Gas Utilities (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gas Utilities (Maine) Gas Utilities (Maine) Gas Utilities (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maine Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Public Utilities Commission Rules regarding the production, sale, and transfer of manufactured gas will also apply to natural gas. This section regulates natural gas utilities that serve ten or more customers, more than one customer when any portion

4

DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford January 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE , (509) 376-5365, Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering natural gas transportation and distribution requirements to support the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and evaporator operations at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. DOE awarded a task order worth up to $5 million to the local, licensed supplier of natural gas in the Hanford area, Cascade Natural Gas Corporation (Cascade). Cascade will support DOE and its Environmental

5

Liberty Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Liberty Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs Liberty Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs Liberty Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Other Construction Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Custom Projects: $100,000 (existing facilities); $250,000 (new construction) Energy Efficiency Engineering Study: $10,000 Steam Traps: $2500 Programmable Thermostats: up to five units Boiler Reset Controls: up to two units Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount

6

Safety of Gas Transmission and Distribution Systems (Maine) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Safety of Gas Transmission and Distribution Systems (Maine) Safety of Gas Transmission and Distribution Systems (Maine) Safety of Gas Transmission and Distribution Systems (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maine Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Public Utilities Commission These regulations describe requirements for the participation of natural gas utilities in the Underground Utility Damage Prevention Program,

7

Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency Rebate  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(Gas) - Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency (Gas) - Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency Rebate Program Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace: $150 - $300 Custom: Varies by project Provider Montana-Dakota Utilities Co. Montana-Dakota Utilities (MDU) offers rebates on energy efficient natural gas furnaces to its eligible commercial customers. New furnaces are eligible for a rebate incentive between $150 and $300, if the equipment meets program efficiency standards. Furnaces with AFUE between 92% of 95% are eligible for rebates if they are being installed as replacement units

8

Avista Utilities (Gas)- Prescriptive Commercial Incentive Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Avista Utilities offers Natural Gas saving incentives to commercial customers on rate schedule 420 and 424. This program provides rebates for a variety of equipment and appliances including cooking...

9

Natural Gas Utilities Options Analysis for the Hydrogen Economy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Utilities Options Analysis for the Hydrogen Economy Natural Gas Utilities Options Analysis for the Hydrogen Economy Presentation by 12-Richards to DOE Hydrogen Pipeline...

10

Natural Gas Utilities Options Analysis for the Hydrogen Economy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Utilities Options Analysis for the Hydrogen Economy Natural Gas Utilities Options Analysis for the Hydrogen Economy Objectives: Identify business opportunities and...

11

Federal Utility Partnership Working Group: Atlanta Gas Light...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Group: Atlanta Gas Light Resources Federal Utility Partnership Working Group: Atlanta Gas Light Resources Presentation-given at the April 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working...

12

Gas concentration cells for utilizing energy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method are disclosed for utilizing energy, in which the apparatus may be used for generating electricity or as a heat pump. When used as an electrical generator, two gas concentration cells are connected in a closed gas circuit. The first gas concentration cell is heated and generates electricity. The second gas concentration cell repressurizes the gas which travels between the cells. The electrical energy which is generated by the first cell drives the second cell as well as an electrical load. When used as a heat pump, two gas concentration cells are connected in a closed gas circuit. The first cell is supplied with electrical energy from a direct current source and releases heat. The second cell absorbs heat. The apparatus has no moving parts and thus approximates a heat engine. 4 figs.

Salomon, R.E.

1987-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

13

Gas concentration cells for utilizing energy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for utilizing energy, in which the apparatus may be used for generating electricity or as a heat pump. When used as an electrical generator, two gas concentration cells are connected in a closed gas circuit. The first gas concentration cell is heated and generates electricity. The second gas concentration cell repressurizes the gas which travels between the cells. The electrical energy which is generated by the first cell drives the second cell as well as an electrical load. When used as a heat pump, two gas concentration cells are connected in a closed gas circuit. The first cell is supplied with electrical energy from a direct current source and releases heat. The second cell absorbs heat. The apparatus has no moving parts and thus approximates a heat engine.

Salomon, Robert E. (Philadelphia, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utility District Natural Gas Fueling Station  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Utility District Utility District Natural Gas Fueling Station Regulation to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utility District Natural Gas Fueling Station Regulation on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utility District Natural Gas Fueling Station Regulation on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utility District Natural Gas Fueling Station Regulation on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utility District Natural Gas Fueling Station Regulation on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utility District Natural Gas Fueling Station Regulation on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utility District Natural Gas Fueling Station Regulation on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

15

Odorization system upgrades gas utility`s pipelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mountain Fuel Supply Co., a subsidiary of Questar Corp., salt Lake City, is a natural gas holding company with $1.6 billion in assets. From 1929 to 1984, Mountain Fuel Supply Co. owned and operated many natural gas wells, gathering systems, and transmission pipelines to serve its Utah and Wyoming customers. Gas is odorized at convenient points on the transmission lines and at each downstream location where unodorized gas entered the system. Since 40 to 60% of the gas delivered to the company`s customers passes through Coalville Station, it was vital that a reliable, state-of-the-art odorant station be constructed at this site. Construction began during the summer of 1994 and the system came on line Sept. 1, 1994. The station odorized 435 MMcfd with 330 lbs. of odorant during last winter`s peak day, a mild winter. Mountain Fuel is subject to Department of Transportation (DOT) codes which mandate that gas be readily detectable at one fifth the lower explosive limit (LEL), or about 1% gas in air. However, the company strives to maintain a readily detectable odor at 0.25% of gas in air as measured by odormeter tests throughout the distribution system. Experience has shown that maintaining an odorant injection rate of 0.75 lbs/MMcf provides adequate odor levels. A blend of odorant consisting of 50% tertiary butyl mercaptan (TBM) and 50% tetrahydrothiophene (THT) was used for many years by Questar Pipeline. Presently, it is used at all Mountain Fuel stations. This paper reviews the design and operation of this odorization station.

Niebergall, B. [Mountain Fuel Supply, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Pipeline Capacity and Utilization  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline Utilization & Capacity Pipeline Utilization & Capacity About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity & Utilization Overview | Utilization Rates | Integration of Storage | Varying Rates of Utilization | Measures of Utilization Overview of Pipeline Utilization Natural gas pipeline companies prefer to operate their systems as close to full capacity as possible to maximize their revenues. However, the average utilization rate (flow relative to design capacity) of a natural gas pipeline system seldom reaches 100%. Factors that contribute to outages include: Scheduled or unscheduled maintenance Temporary decreases in market demand Weather-related limitations to operations

17

Gas and Electric Utilities Regulation (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gas and Electric Utilities Regulation (South Dakota) Gas and Electric Utilities Regulation (South Dakota) Gas and Electric Utilities Regulation (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Retail Supplier Institutional Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider South Dakota Public Utilities Commission This legislation contains provisions for gas and electric utilities. As part of these regulations, electric utilities are required to file with the

18

City of Gas City, Indiana (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City, Indiana (Utility Company) City, Indiana (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Gas City Place Indiana Utility Id 6993 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png All Electric Heat for Library or School Service Commercial Commercial and General Power Service Commercial Outdoor Lighting- 1000 W Lighting Outdoor Lighting- 175 W Lighting Outdoor Lighting- 400 W Lighting Public Street Lighting and Highway Lighting- 175 W Mercury Vapor/100 W HPS Lighting Public Street Lighting and Highway Lighting-400 W Mercury Vapor/250 W HPS

19

Natural Gas Pipeline Utilities (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Gas Pipeline Utilities (Maine) Natural Gas Pipeline Utilities (Maine) Natural Gas Pipeline Utilities (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Public Utilities Commission These regulations apply to entities seeking to develop and operate natural gas pipelines and provide construction requirements for such pipelines. The regulations describe the authority of the Public Utilities Commission with

20

Natural Gas Utility Restructuring and Customer Choice Act (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations apply to natural gas utilities that have restructured in order to acquire rate-based facilities. The regulations address customer choice offerings by natural gas utilities, which...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributing gas utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Programmable Thermostat: 1 per address Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace: $150 - $300 Programmable Thermostat: $20 Natural Gas Water Heater: $50 - $100 Provider Montana-Dakota Utilities Co. Montana-Dakota Utilities (MDU) offers several residential rebates on energy efficient measures and natural gas equipment. New furnaces, water heaters and programmable thermostats are eligible for a rebate incentive if the

22

Norwich Public Utilities (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Norwich Public Utilities (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Norwich Public Utilities (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Norwich Public Utilities (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnaces: $400 Boilers: $600 Tankless Boiler/Water Heater Combined: $850 - $1050 Indirect Fired/Tankless Water Heaters: $250 - $450 Provider Norwich Public Utilities Norwich Public Utilities (NPU) provides residential natural gas customers rebates for upgrading to energy efficient equipment in eligible homes. NPU offers rebates of between $250 - $1050 for natural gas furnaces, boilers,

23

Uniform System of Accounts for Gas Utilities (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This rule establishes a uniform system of accounts and annual report filing requirements for natural gas utilities operating in Maine.

24

Distributed Hydrogen Production from Natural Gas: Independent...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Distributed Hydrogen Production from Natural Gas: Independent Review Panel Report Distributed Hydrogen Production from Natural Gas: Independent Review Panel Report Independent...

25

Agenda: Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage and Distribution ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage and Distribution Agenda: Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage and Distribution A Public Meeting on the Quadrennial Energy Review, Hosted by the...

26

BioGas Project Applications for Federal Agencies and Utilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Alternate Energy Systems, Inc. Alternate Energy Systems, Inc. Natural Gas / Air Blenders for BioGas Installations BioGas Project Applications for Federal Agencies and Utilities Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting - October 20-21, 2010 Rapid City, SD 1 BioGas Project Applications for Federal Agencies and Utilities Wolfgang H. Driftmeier Alternate Energy Systems, Inc. 210 Prospect Park - Peachtree City, GA 30269 wdriftmeier@altenergy.com www.altenergy.com 770 - 487 - 8596 Alternate Energy Systems, Inc. Natural Gas / Air Blenders for BioGas Installations BioGas Project Applications for Federal Agencies and Utilities Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting - October 20-21, 2010 Rapid City, SD 2 BioGas Project Applications for Federal Agencies and Utilities Objective

27

Utility Partnerships Webinar Series: Gas Utility Energy Efficiency Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Emerging gas technologies to enhance industrial energy efficiency, challenges of integrating into the marketplace and an overview of DTE Energy’s energy efficiency programs for natural gas customers.

28

Orange and Rockland Utilities (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Orange and Rockland Utilities (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Orange and Rockland Utilities (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program Orange and Rockland Utilities (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Construction Water Heating Program Info State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace: $140 - $420 Water Boiler: $350 or $700 Steam Boiler: $350 Boiler Reset Control: $70 Indirect Water Heater: $210 Programmable Thermostat: $18 Duct and Air Sealing: up to $420 Provider Orange and Rockland Utilities, Inc. Orange and Rockland Utilities provides rebates for residential customers

29

Cost of Gas Adjustment for Gas Utilities (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cost of Gas Adjustment for Gas Utilities (Maine) Cost of Gas Adjustment for Gas Utilities (Maine) Cost of Gas Adjustment for Gas Utilities (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maine Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Public Utilities Commission This rule, applicable to gas utilities, establishes rules for calculation of gas cost adjustments, procedures to be followed in establishing gas cost adjustments and refunds, and describes reports required to be filed with

30

Natural Gas Utility Conservation Programs (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

You are here You are here Home » Natural Gas Utility Conservation Programs (Maine) Natural Gas Utility Conservation Programs (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maine Program Type Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Provider Public Utilities Commission This Chapter describes how natural gas utilities serving more than 5,000 residential customers must implement natural gas energy conservation programs. The regulations describe

31

BioGas Project Applications for Federal Agencies and Utilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers BioGas Project Applications for Federal Agencies and Utilities and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Rapid City, South Dakota.

32

California Natural Gas % of Total Electric Utility Deliveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electric Utility Deliveries (Percent) California Natural Gas % of Total Electric Utility Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

33

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and...

34

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

31, 2012, Washington, DC Major assumption changes for AEO2013 Oil and Gas Working Group Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module DRAFT WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION DO NOT...

35

Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Residential New Construction Rebate  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Residential New Construction Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Residential New Construction Rebate Program Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Residential New Construction Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Eligible Furnace: $300 Natural Gas Water Heater: $50 - $100 Provider Montana-Dakota Utilities Co. Montana-Dakota Utilities (MDU) offers rebates to customers who install energy efficient natural gas equipment in new construction. New furnaces and water heaters are eligible for incentives through this offering. All new eligible homes with qualifying furnaces will receive a $300 rebate and

36

Natural Gas Utilities Options Analysis for the Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

> Natural Gas Utilities Options Analysis for the Hydrogen Economy Hydrogen Pipeline R&D Project of strategic options for the natural gas industry as hydrogen energy systems evolve ­ Vehicle to encourage of tradeoffs ­ NY state qualifies natural gas-run fuel cells, CA only renewable hydrogen (potential for partial

37

Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Facility Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

38

Balefill Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Balefill Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Balefill Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Balefill Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Facility Balefill Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Bergen County, New Jersey Coordinates 40.9262762°, -74.07701° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.9262762,"lon":-74.07701,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

39

Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Facility Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Hartford County, Connecticut Coordinates 41.7924343°, -72.8042797° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7924343,"lon":-72.8042797,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

40

Austin Utilities (Gas and Electric) - Commercial and Industrial Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Austin Utilities (Gas and Electric) - Commercial and Industrial Austin Utilities (Gas and Electric) - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Austin Utilities (Gas and Electric) - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Appliances & Electronics Other Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Commercial Weatherization Water Heating Maximum Rebate Electric Measures: $100,000 per customer location, per technology, per year Custom Gas Measures: $75,000 per commercial location per year, $5,000 per industrial location per year Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting Equipment: See Program Website Air Source Heat Pumps: $20-$25/ton, plus bonus rebate of $4/ton for each

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributing gas utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Florida Public Utilities (Gas)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Florida Public Utilities offers the Energy for Life Conservation Program to its residential natural gas customers to save energy in their homes. Rebates are available for existing residences and...

42

An integrated optimal design method for utility power distribution systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This dissertation presents a comprehensive and integrated design methodology to optimize both the electrical and the economic performance of a utility power distribution system. The… (more)

Fehr, Ralph E

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Albany Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilization Project Biomass Facility Utilization Project Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Albany Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Facility Albany Landfill Gas Utilization Project Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Albany County, New York Coordinates 42.5756797°, -73.9359821° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5756797,"lon":-73.9359821,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

44

Low-NOx Gas Turbine Injectors Utilizing Hydrogen-Rich Opportunity...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NOx Gas Turbine Injectors Utilizing Hydrogen-Rich Opportunity Fuels - Fact Sheet, 2011 Low-NOx Gas Turbine Injectors Utilizing Hydrogen-Rich Opportunity Fuels - Fact Sheet, 2011...

45

Evolution of the Distributed Utility Concept 1988-2003  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evolution of the Distributed Utility Concept 1988-2003 Evolution of the Distributed Utility Concept 1988-2003 Speaker(s): Joe Iannucci Date: March 27, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Kristina LaCommare Joe Iannucci of Distributed Utility Associates, a small consulting firm in Livermore specializing in distributed resources, will speak on his experiences in the evolution of the Distributed Utility Concept. Joe's background in solar analysis at Sandia National Laboratories, and as a Director of Research at PG&E led to his insights in the late 1980s that the value of power was becoming even more important than its generation cost. He will explain how this perspective shift gave rise to the Distributed Utility Concept work at PG&E's (belated) research and development department in San Ramon. Since then Joe and his former and present

46

Avista Utilities (Gas) - Oregon Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oregon Residential Energy Efficiency Oregon Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Avista Utilities (Gas) - Oregon Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Forced Air Furnaces and Boilers: $200 Programmable Thermostats: $50 Windows: $2.25/sq. ft. Insulation: 50% of cost Provider Avista Utilities Avista Utilities offers a variety of equipment rebates to Oregon residential customers. Rebates are available for boilers, furnaces, insulation measures, windows and programmable thermostats. All equipment must meet certain energy efficiency standards listed on the program web

47

Fact Sheet: DOE/National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners Natural Gas Infrastructure Modernization Partnership  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In one of a series of actions to help modernize the nation¹s natural gas transmission and distribution systems and reduce methane emissions, DOE will work with the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) to encourage investments in infrastructure modernization to enhance pipeline safety, efficiency and deliverability.

48

Gas Utilization Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilization Facility Biomass Facility Utilization Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Gas Utilization Facility Biomass Facility Facility Gas Utilization Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location San Diego County, California Coordinates 33.0933809°, -116.6081653° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.0933809,"lon":-116.6081653,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

49

Avista Utilities (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Avista Utilities (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Construction Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Construction Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Incentives should not exceed 50% of the actual measure cost Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Natural Gas Furnace/Boiler: $400 Water Heater: $30 Floor and Wall Insulation: $0.50/sq. ft. Attic and Ceiling Insulation: $0.25/sq. ft. ENERGY STAR rated homes: $650 - $900 Replacement of Electric Straight Resistance Space Heat: $750 Provider

50

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 129 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each projection year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. Natural gas flow patterns are a function of the pattern in the previous year, coupled

51

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module This  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This This page inTenTionally lefT blank 127 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through a regional interstate representative pipeline network, for both a peak (December through March) and off-peak period during each projection year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. Natural gas flow patterns are a function of the

52

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The motivation and objective of this research is to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions by: (1) applying the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM); (2) using the California Commercial End-Use Survey (CEUS) database for commercial buildings; (3) selecting buildings with electric peak loads between 100 kW and 5 MW; (4) considering fuel cells, micro-turbines, internal combustion engines, gas turbines with waste heat utilization, solar thermal, and PV; (5) testing of different policy instruments, e.g. feed-in tariff or investment subsidies.

Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Lipman, Tim; Lai, Judy; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Methane Gas Utilization Project from Landfill at Ellery (NY)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Landfill Gas to Electric Energy Generation and Transmission at Chautauqua County Landfill, Town of Ellery, New York. The goal of this project was to create a practical method with which the energy, of the landfill gas produced by the decomposing waste at the Chautauqua County Landfill, could be utilized. This goal was accomplished with the construction of a landfill gas to electric energy plant (originally 6.4MW and now 9.6MW) and the construction of an inter-connection power-line, from the power-plant to the nearest (5.5 miles) power-grid point.

Pantelis K. Panteli

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

54

Radiology utilizing a gas multiwire detector with resolution enhancement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a process and apparatus for obtaining filmless, radiological, digital images utilizing a gas multiwire detector. Resolution is enhanced through projection geometry. This invention further relates to imaging systems for X-ray examination of patients or objects, and is particularly suited for mammography.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Grafton, VA); Majewski, Lucasz A. (Grafton, VA)

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

55

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Distributed Solar Tariff | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Distributed Solar Tariff River Falls Municipal Utilities - Distributed Solar Tariff River Falls Municipal Utilities - Distributed Solar Tariff < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Amount $0.30/kWh Provider River Falls Municipal Utilities River Falls Municipal Utilities (RFMU), a member of WPPI Energy, offers a special energy purchase rate to its customers that generate electricity using solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. The special rate, $0.30/kilowatt-hour (kWh), is available to all the RFMU customers on a first-come, first-served basis for systems up to 4 kilowatts (kW). The RFMU

56

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Production and Distribution  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Production Production and Distribution to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Production and Distribution on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Production and Distribution on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Production and Distribution on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Production and Distribution on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Production and Distribution on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Production and Distribution on AddThis.com... More in this section... Natural Gas Basics Production & Distribution Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Natural Gas Production and Distribution

57

On parton distributions in a photon gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In some cases it may be useful to know parton distributions in a photon gas. This may be relevant, e.g., for the analysis of interactions of high energy cosmic ray particles with the cosmic microwave background radiation. The latter can be considered as a gas of photons with an almost perfect blackbody spectrum. An approach to finding such parton distributions is described. The survival probability of ultra-high energy neutrinos traveling through this radiation is calculated.

I. Alikhanov

2009-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

58

Utility Wind Integration Group Distributed Wind/Solar Interconnection  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Utility Wind Integration Group Distributed Wind/Solar Utility Wind Integration Group Distributed Wind/Solar Interconnection Workshop Utility Wind Integration Group Distributed Wind/Solar Interconnection Workshop May 21, 2013 8:00AM MDT to May 22, 2013 5:00PM MDT Golden, Colorado This two-day workshop will answer your questions about interconnecting wind and solar plants and other distributed generation applications to electric distribution systems while providing insight on integrating large-scale renewable generation into the transmission system. Held at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) state-of-the-art Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) on the first day and at the Western Area Power Administration's Electric Power Training Center (EPTC) on the second day, the workshop will provide an overview of wind and solar interconnection

59

127 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through a regional interstate representative pipeline network, for both a peak (December through March) and off-peak period during each projection year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. Natural gas flow patterns are a function of the pattern in the previous year, coupled with the relative prices of the supply options available to bring gas to market centers within each of the NGTDM regions (Figure 9). The major assumptions used within the NGTDM are grouped into four general categories. They relate to (1) structural components of the model, (2) capacity expansion and pricing of transmission and distribution services, (3) Arctic pipelines, and (4) imports and exports. A complete listing of NGTDM assumptions and in-depth

Key Assumptions

60

Proactive Renewables Integration for Utility Distribution Planning and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proactive Renewables Integration for Utility Distribution Planning and Proactive Renewables Integration for Utility Distribution Planning and Operations Speaker(s): Emma Stewart Date: March 5, 2013 - 12:00pm Location: 90-1099 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Sila Kiliccote The interconnection process can be a laborious and expensive process for both utilities and developers. High PV penetration levels create a number of challenges for the management and operation of the utility grid. This study presents work being completed in Hawaii to improve and innovate the interconnect process, separating perceived issues from real technical concerns. Existing interconnection methods and standards such as IEEE 1547, Hawaii Rule 14H and California Rule 21 are evaluated in emerging high penetration scenarios. These rules define a 15% DG penetration level as a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributing gas utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Utilization of Process Off-Gas as a Fuel for Improved Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of an Advanced Combined Heat and Power (CHP) System Utilizing Off-Gas from Coke Calcination ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE Utilization of Process Off-Gas as a Fuel for Improved...

62

Stimulating utilities to promote energy efficiency: Process evaluation of Madison Gas and Electric's Competition Pilot Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the process evaluation of the design and implementation of the Energy Conservation Competition Pilot (hereafter referred to as the Competition), ordered by the Public Service Commission of Wisconsin (PSCW) with a conceptual framework defined by PSCW staff for the Madison Gas and Electric (MGE) Company. This process evaluation documents the history of the Competition, describing the marketing strategies adopted by MGE and its competitors, customer service and satisfaction, administrative issues, the distribution of installed measures, free riders, and the impact of the Competition on MGE, its competitors, and other Wisconsin utilities. We also suggest recommendations for a future Competition, compare the Competition with other approaches that public utility commissions (PUCs) have used to motivate utilities to promote energy efficiency, and discuss its transferability to other utilities. 48 refs., 8 figs., 40 tabs.

Vine, E.; De Buen, O.; Goldfman, C.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Voltage Impacts of Utility-Scale Distributed Wind  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although most utility-scale wind turbines in the United States are added at the transmission level in large wind power plants, distributed wind power offers an alternative that could increase the overall wind power penetration without the need for additional transmission. This report examines the distribution feeder-level voltage issues that can arise when adding utility-scale wind turbines to the distribution system. Four of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory taxonomy feeders were examined in detail to study the voltage issues associated with adding wind turbines at different distances from the sub-station. General rules relating feeder resistance up to the point of turbine interconnection to the expected maximum voltage change levels were developed. Additional analysis examined line and transformer overvoltage conditions.

Allen, A.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Methods of natural gas liquefaction and natural gas liquefaction plants utilizing multiple and varying gas streams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of natural gas liquefaction may include cooling a gaseous NG process stream to form a liquid NG process stream. The method may further include directing the first tail gas stream out of a plant at a first pressure and directing a second tail gas stream out of the plant at a second pressure. An additional method of natural gas liquefaction may include separating CO.sub.2 from a liquid NG process stream and processing the CO.sub.2 to provide a CO.sub.2 product stream. Another method of natural gas liquefaction may include combining a marginal gaseous NG process stream with a secondary substantially pure NG stream to provide an improved gaseous NG process stream. Additionally, a NG liquefaction plant may include a first tail gas outlet, and at least a second tail gas outlet, the at least a second tail gas outlet separate from the first tail gas outlet.

Wilding, Bruce M; Turner, Terry D

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

65

Oil and Gas CDT Gas hydrate distribution on tectonically active continental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil and Gas CDT Gas hydrate distribution on tectonically active continental margins: Impact on gas. Gregory F. Moore, University of Hawaii (USA) http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/moore/ Key Words Gas Hydrates, Faults, Fluid Flow, gas prospectivity Overview Fig. 1. Research on gas hydrates is often undertaken

Henderson, Gideon

66

Slippage solution of gas pressure distribution in process of landfill gas seepage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mathematical model of landfill gas migration was established under presumption of the ... a large impact on gas pressure distribution. Landfill gas pressure and pressure gradient considering slippage effect...

Qiang Xue; Xia-ting Feng; Bing Liang

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Rescheduling Bulk Gas Production and Distribution Wasu Glankwamdee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

customer demand at minimum cost? #12;Bulk Gas Wrinkles Production Most sites operate in two modes: RegularRescheduling Bulk Gas Production and Distribution Wasu Glankwamdee Jackie Griffin Jeff Linderoth March 15, 2006 #12;Liquid Bulk Gas Production-Distribution Sites S Products P = {LOX, LNI} Customers C

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

68

Gas Distribution Modeling using Sparse Gaussian Process Mixture Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Distribution Modeling using Sparse Gaussian Process Mixture Models Cyrill Stachniss1 Christian-- In this paper, we consider the problem of learning a two dimensional spatial model of a gas distribution with a mobile robot. Building maps that can be used to accurately predict the gas concentration at query

Stachniss, Cyrill

69

Resource planning for gas utilities: Using a model to analyze pivotal issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the advent of wellhead price decontrols that began in the late 1970s and the development of open access pipelines in the 1980s and 90s, gas local distribution companies (LDCs) now have increased responsibility for their gas supplies and face an increasingly complex array of supply and capacity choices. Heretofore this responsibility had been share with the interstate pipelines that provide bundled firm gas supplies. Moreover, gas supply an deliverability (capacity) options have multiplied as the pipeline network becomes increasing interconnected and as new storage projects are developed. There is now a fully-functioning financial market for commodity price hedging instruments and, on interstate Pipelines, secondary market (called capacity release) now exists. As a result of these changes in the natural gas industry, interest in resource planning and computer modeling tools for LDCs is increasing. Although in some ways the planning time horizon has become shorter for the gas LDC, the responsibility conferred to the LDC and complexity of the planning problem has increased. We examine current gas resource planning issues in the wake of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) Order 636. Our goal is twofold: (1) to illustrate the types of resource planning methods and models used in the industry and (2) to illustrate some of the key tradeoffs among types of resources, reliability, and system costs. To assist us, we utilize a commercially-available dispatch and resource planning model and examine four types of resource planning problems: the evaluation of new storage resources, the evaluation of buyback contracts, the computation of avoided costs, and the optimal tradeoff between reliability and system costs. To make the illustration of methods meaningful yet tractable, we developed a prototype LDC and used it for the majority of our analysis.

Busch, J.F.; Comnes, G.A.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Resilience-Based Design of Natural Gas Distribution Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Case Study Resilience-Based Design of Natural Gas Distribution Networks G. P. Cimellaro, Ph.D., A response to natural disasters. In this paper, a new performance index measuring the functionality of a gas; Disaster resilience; Vulnerability; Gas networks; Damage assessment; Lifelines; Serviceability; Natural gas

Bruneau, Michel

71

Electric Utility Transmission and Distribution Line Engineering Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Economic development in the United States depends on a reliable and affordable power supply. The nation will need well educated engineers to design a modern, safe, secure, and reliable power grid for our future needs. An anticipated shortage of qualified engineers has caused considerable concern in many professional circles, and various steps are being taken nationwide to alleviate the potential shortage and ensure the North American power system's reliability, and our world-wide economic competitiveness. To help provide a well-educated and trained workforce which can sustain and modernize the nation's power grid, Gonzaga University's School of Engineering and Applied Science has established a five-course (15-credit hour) Certificate Program in Transmission and Distribution (T&D) Engineering. The program has been specifically designed to provide working utility engineering professionals with on-line access to advanced engineering courses which cover modern design practice with an industry-focused theoretical foundation. A total of twelve courses have been developed to-date and students may select any five in their area of interest for the T&D Certificate. As each course is developed and taught by a team of experienced engineers (from public and private utilities, consultants, and industry suppliers), students are provided a unique opportunity to interact directly with different industry experts over the eight weeks of each course. Course material incorporates advanced aspects of civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering disciplines that apply to power system design and are appropriate for graduate engineers. As such, target students for the certificate program include: (1) recent graduates with a Bachelor of Science Degree in an engineering field (civil, mechanical, electrical, etc.); (2) senior engineers moving from other fields to the utility industry (i.e. paper industry to utility engineering or project management positions); and (3) regular working professionals wishing to update their skills or increase their knowledge of utility engineering design practices and procedures. By providing graduate educational opportunities for the above groups, the T&D Program will help serve a strong industry need for training the next generation of engineers in the cost-effective design, construction, operation, and maintenance of modern electrical transmission and distribution systems. In addition to developing the on-line engineering courses described above, the T&D Program also focused significant efforts towards enhancing the training opportunities available to power system operators in the northwest. These efforts have included working with outside vendors to provide NERC-approved training courses in Gonzaga University's (GU) system operator training facility, support for an accurate system model which can be used in regional blackstart exercises, and the identification of a retired system operator who could provide actual regional training courses. The GU system operator training facility is also being used to recruit young workers, veterans, and various under-represented groups to the utility industry. Over the past three years students from Columbia Gorge Community College, Spokane Falls Community College, Walla Walla Community College, Central Washington University, Eastern Washington University, Gonzaga University, and various local high schools have attended short (one-day) system operator training courses free of charge. These collaboration efforts has been extremely well received by both students and industry, and meet T&D Program objectives of strengthening the power industry workforce while bridging the knowledge base across power worker categories, and recruiting new workers to replace a predominantly retirement age workforce. In the past three years the T&D Program has provided over 170 utility engineers with access to advanced engineering courses, been involved in training more than 300 power system operators, and provided well over 500 college and high school students with an experienc

Peter McKenny

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, DOE/EIA-M062(2005) (Washington, DC, 2005). 5, DOE/EIA-M062(2005) (Washington, DC, 2005). Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 101 Primary Flows Secondary Flows Pipeline Border Crossing Specific LNG Terminals Primary Flows Secondary Flows Pipeline Border Crossing Specific LNG Terminals Generic LNG Terminals Alaska Alaska MacKenzie W. Canada E. Canada Canada Offshore & LNG Pacific (9) Mountain (8) CA (12) AZ/NM (11) W. South Central (7) E. South Central (6) W. North Central (4) E. North Central (3) Mid Atlantic (2) New Engl. (1) S. Atlantic (5) FL (10) Bahamas Mexico Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model Regions Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting Report #:DOE/EIA-0554(2006) Release date: March 2006 Next release date: March 2007

73

Economics of Alaska North Slope gas utilization options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recoverable natural gas available for sale in the developed and known undeveloped fields on the Alaskan North Slope (ANS) total about 26 trillion cubic feet (TCF), including 22 TCF in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU) and 3 TCF in the undeveloped Point Thomson Unit (PTU). No significant commercial use has been made of this large natural gas resource because there are no facilities in place to transport this gas to current markets. To date the economics have not been favorable to support development of a gas transportation system. However, with the declining trend in ANS oil production, interest in development of this huge gas resource is rising, making it important for the U.S. Department of Energy, industry, and the State of Alaska to evaluate and assess the options for development of this vast gas resource. The purpose of this study was to assess whether gas-to-liquids (GTL) conversion technology would be an economic alternative for the development and sale of the large, remote, and currently unmarketable ANS natural gas resource, and to compare the long term economic impact of a GTL conversion option to that of the more frequently discussed natural gas pipeline/liquefied natural gas (LNG) option. The major components of the study are: an assessment of the ANS oil and gas resources; an analysis of conversion and transportation options; a review of natural gas, LNG, and selected oil product markets; and an economic analysis of the LNG and GTL gas sales options based on publicly available input needed for assumptions of the economic variables. Uncertainties in assumptions are evaluated by determining the sensitivity of project economics to changes in baseline economic variables.

Thomas, C.P.; Doughty, T.C.; Hackworth, J.H.; North, W.B.; Robertson, E.P.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

SUBSTITUTION OF NATURAL GAS FOR COAL: CLIMATIC EFFECTS OF UTILITY SECTOR EMISSIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUBSTITUTION OF NATURAL GAS FOR COAL: CLIMATIC EFFECTS OF UTILITY SECTOR EMISSIONS KATHARINE HAYHOE. Substitution of natural gas for coal is one means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However, natural of coal by natural gas are evaluated, and their modeled net effect on global mean-annual temperature

Jain, Atul K.

75

Sacramento Utility to Launch Concentrating Solar Power-Natural Gas Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sacramento Utility to Launch Concentrating Solar Power-Natural Gas Sacramento Utility to Launch Concentrating Solar Power-Natural Gas Project Sacramento Utility to Launch Concentrating Solar Power-Natural Gas Project October 31, 2013 - 11:30am Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON -- As part of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above strategy to deploy every available source of American energy, the Energy Department today announced a new concentrating solar power (CSP) project led by the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD). The project will integrate utility-scale CSP technology with SMUD's 500-megawatt (MW) natural gas-fired Cosumnes Power Plant. Supported by a $10 million Energy Department investment, this project will help design, build and test cost-competitive CSP-fossil fuel power generating systems in the United

76

Survey of state regulatory activities on least cost planning for gas utilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers' short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. Incorporating the concept of meeting customer energy service needs entails a recognition that customers' costs must be considered along with the utility's costs in the economic analysis of energy options. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. All state commissions were surveyed to assess the current status of gas planning and demand-side management and to identify significant regulatory issues faced by commissions during the next several years. The survey was to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least-cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: (1) status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; (2) type and scope ofnatural gas DSM programs in effect, includeing fuel substitution; (3) economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; (4) relationship between prudence reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; and (5) key regulatory issues facing gas utilities during the next five years. 34 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

Goldman, C.A. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, Washington, DC (United States)); Hopkins, M.E. (Fleming Group, Washington, DC (United States))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES Electrical or plumbing failure/Flooding/Water leak/Natural gas or  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES Electrical or plumbing failure/Flooding/Water leak/Natural gas or a generator? NOTIFY the University Police. FOLLOW evacuation procedures. NOTIFY Building Safety personnel

Fernandez, Eduardo

78

UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES Electrical or plumbing failure/Flooding/Water leak/Natural gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES Electrical or plumbing failure/Flooding/Water leak/Natural gas. . What should I do if the if the building does not have emergency lighting or a generator? NOTIFY

Fernandez, Eduardo

79

Natural Gas Utilities Options Analysis for the Hydrogen Economy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 January 2005 6 January 2005 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN Mark E. Richards Manager, Advanced Energy Systems 2 Gas Technology Institute > GTI is an independent non-profit R&D organization > GTI focuses on energy & environmental issues - Specialize on natural gas & hydrogen > Our main facility is an 18- acre campus near Chicago - Over 350,000 ft 2 GTI's Main Research Facility GTI's Energy & Environmental Technology Center 3 GTI RD&D Organization Robert Stokes Vice-President Research & Deployment Hydrogen Fuel Processing Low-Temperature Fuel Cells High-Temperature Fuel Cells Vehicle Fuel Infrastructure Gerry Runte Executive Director Hydrogen Energy Systems Gasification & Hot Gas Cleanup Process Engineering Thermal Waste Stabilization

80

Optimization of gas utilization efficiency for short-pulsed electron cyclotron resonance ion source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical analysis of {sup 6}He atoms utilizing efficiency in the ion source with powerful gyrotron heating is performed in present work using zero-dimensional balanced model of ECR discharge in a magnetic trap. Two ways of creation of ion source with high gas utilization efficiency (up to 60%-90%) are suggested.

Izotov, I. V.; Skalyga, V. A.; Zorin, V. G. [Institute of Applied Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributing gas utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Regulation and Measuring Cost-Efficiency with Panel Data Models: Application to Electricity Distribution Utilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper examines the performance of panel data models in measuring cost-efficiency of electricity distribution utilities. Different cost frontier models are applied to a sample...

Mehdi Farsi; Massimo Filippini

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells by State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells by State Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells by State Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells by State Release date: January 7, 2011 | Next Release Date: To be determined Distribution tables of oil and gas wells by production rate for all wells, including marginal wells, are now available for most states for the years 1995 to 2009. Graphs displaying historical behavior of well production rate are also available. To download data for all states and all years, including years prior to 1995, in an Excel spreadsheet XLS (4,000 KB). The quality and completeness of data is dependent on update lag times and the quality of individual state and commercial source databases. Undercounting of the number of wells occurs in states where data is sometimes not available at the well level but only at the lease level. States not listed below will be added later as data becomes available.

83

Colorado Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

(Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

84

New Hampshire Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) New Hampshire Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

85

Michigan Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

(Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

86

Utah Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2,935...

87

Ohio Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 19,453...

88

Maine Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Million Cubic Feet) Maine Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 0 0 0...

89

Vermont Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Vermont Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

90

North Carolina Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) North Carolina Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

91

Missouri Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

92

Maine Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Maine Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

93

Mississippi Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

(Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

94

New Jersey Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Million Cubic Feet) New Jersey Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

95

Virginia Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

(Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

96

California Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

97

Arkansas Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

(Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

98

Arizona Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Million Cubic Feet) Arizona Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

99

Louisiana Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

100

District of Columbia Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Million Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributing gas utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Texas Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

(Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

102

Maryland Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

103

District of Columbia Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

104

Massachusetts Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Million Cubic Feet) Massachusetts Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

105

Washington Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Million Cubic Feet) Washington Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

106

Alabama Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

107

Delaware Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Million Cubic Feet) Delaware Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 13...

108

South Dakota Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

(Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

109

Illinois Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

110

Oregon Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

111

South Carolina Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Million Cubic Feet) South Carolina Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

112

Tennessee Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

113

Idaho Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

(Million Cubic Feet) Idaho Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 5,186...

114

Nebraska Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

(Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

115

North Dakota Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

(Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

116

Kansas Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

117

Vermont Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Million Cubic Feet) Vermont Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 9 8...

118

Delaware Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Delaware Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

119

Nevada Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Nevada Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

120

Kansas Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributing gas utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Wyoming Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

(Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

122

Indiana Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

(Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

123

North Carolina Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Million Cubic Feet) North Carolina Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

124

Connecticut Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

(Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

125

Montana Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

126

New Hampshire Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

(Million Cubic Feet) New Hampshire Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

127

Alabama Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

128

Minnesota Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

(Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

129

Oklahoma Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

130

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

131

South Carolina Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) South Carolina Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

132

West Virginia Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

133

California Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

134

Florida Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Million Cubic Feet) Florida Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

135

Rhode Island Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

(Million Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

136

Iowa Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

(Million Cubic Feet) Iowa Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 11,309...

137

Oklahoma Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

138

Georgia Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

(Million Cubic Feet) Georgia Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

139

Alaska Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

140

Nevada Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Million Cubic Feet) Nevada Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 656...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributing gas utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Florida Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Florida Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

142

New York Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

(Million Cubic Feet) New York Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

143

Massachusetts Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Massachusetts Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

144

Minimization of Blast furnace Fuel Rate by Optimizing Burden and Gas Distribution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the research is to improve the competitive edge of steel mills by using the advanced CFD technology to optimize the gas and burden distributions inside a blast furnace for achieving the best gas utilization. A state-of-the-art 3-D CFD model has been developed for simulating the gas distribution inside a blast furnace at given burden conditions, burden distribution and blast parameters. The comprehensive 3-D CFD model has been validated by plant measurement data from an actual blast furnace. Validation of the sub-models is also achieved. The user friendly software package named Blast Furnace Shaft Simulator (BFSS) has been developed to simulate the blast furnace shaft process. The research has significant benefits to the steel industry with high productivity, low energy consumption, and improved environment.

Dr. Chenn Zhou

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Utilization of low-quality natural gas: A current assessment. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to evaluate the low quality natural gas (LQNG) resource base, current utilization of LQNG, and environmental issues relative to its use, to review processes for upgrading LQNG to pipeline quality, and to make recommendations of research needs to improve the potential for LQNG utilization. LQNG is gas from any reservoir which contains amounts of nonhydrocarbon gases sufficient to lower the heating value or other properties of the gas below commercial, pipeline standards. For the purposes of this study, LQNG is defined as natural gas that contains more than 2% carbon dioxide, more than 4% nitrogen, or more than 4% combined CO{sub 2} plus N{sub 2}. The other contaminant of concern is hydrogen sulfide. A minor contaminant in some natural gases is helium, but this inert gas usually presents no problems.

Acheson, W.P.; Hackworth, J.H.; Kasper, S.; McIlvried, H.G.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Effective Distribution Policies Utilizing Logistics Contracting Hyun-Soo Ahn Osman Engin Alper Philip Kaminsky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective Distribution Policies Utilizing Logistics Contracting Hyun-Soo Ahn · Osman Engin Alper@ieor.berkeley.edu · kaminsky@ieor.berkeley.edu Logistics outsourcing is becoming a more widely utilized practice across many of a production- distribution system with stochastic demand and logistics outsourcing. For our initial

Kaminsky, Philip M.

147

Solar Valuation and the Modern Utility's Expansion into Distributed Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Residential solar's diffusion across the U.S. power grid is inspiring concern in the utility industry. Of particular debate have been net energy metering policies (NEM), which engender revenue losses and lead to cross-subsidization of solar customers by non-solar customers. An emerging alternative to NEM is the value of solar tariff (VOST), which is designed to pay residential solar generation based on a more nuanced benefit-cost analysis to determine the actual value of residential solar to utility operations.

Griselda Blackburn; Clare Magee; Varun Rai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

DOE Report to Congress„Energy Efficient Electric and Natural Gas Utilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AND REGIONAL POLICIES THAT AND REGIONAL POLICIES THAT PROMOTE ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAMS CARRIED OUT BY ELECTRIC AND GAS UTILITIES A REPORT TO THE UNITED STATES CONGRESS PURSUANT TO SECTION 139 OF THE ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 2005 MARCH 2007 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Sec. 139. Energy Efficient Electric and Natural Gas Utilities Study. a) IN GENERAL.-Not later than 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary, in consultation with the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commis- sioners and the National Association of State Energy Offi- cials, shall conduct a study of State and regional policies that promote cost-effective programs to reduce energy con- sumption (including energy efficiency programs) that are carried out by- (1) utilities that are subject to State regulation; and

149

Distributed boundary layer suction utilizing wing tip effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that this is not the case. The rotational force at the tip accounts for the suction power. Since this power is utilized to suck air from the boundary, energy is dissipated, thereby weakening the vortex strength. Providing this assumption is valid, the effect would... was done. TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter Page INTRODUCTION OBJECTIVES AND SCOPE EXPERIMENTAL FACILITY AND PROCEDURES Wing Model . Wake Rake Boundary Layer Probe . . Multiple Tube Manometers Wind Tunnel and Related Equipment Procedures Computation...

Edwards, Jay Thomas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

150

FUEL CELLS – SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS | Gas Distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A uniform distribution of the reactants over the total available electrode surfaces in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) is a prerequisite for the proper operation of the fuel cell. The gas distribution plays a dominant role not only in the current density distribution but also in the temperature distribution over the cell areas and in the stack and modules. Several transport mechanisms for mass transport occurring in the SOFC are introduced and discussed. General flow configurations and structures for the gas distribution at three different levels, i.e., stack/module, cell/tube, and electrode/electrolyte, are discussed for both tubular and planar type cells and illustrated with examples of concentration and temperature profiles.

L.G.J. de Haart; M. Spiller

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Natural gas demand at the utility level: An application of dynamic elasticities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Previous studies provide strong evidence that energy demand elasticities vary across regions and states, arguing in favor of conducting energy demand studies at the smallest unit of observation for which good quality data are readily available, that is the utility level. We use monthly data from the residential sector of Xcel Energy's service territory in Colorado for the period January 1994 to September 2006. Based on a very general Autoregressive Distributed Lag model this paper uses a new approach to simulate the dynamic behavior of natural gas demand and obtain dynamic elasticities. Knowing consumers' response on a unit time basis enables one to answer a number of questions, such as, the length of time needed to reach demand stability. Responses to price and income were found to be much lower–even in the long run–than has been commonly suggested in the literature. Interestingly, we find that the long run equilibrium is reached relatively quickly, around 18 months after a change in price or income has occurred, while the literature implies a much longer period for complete adjustments to take place.

Leila Dagher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Advanced islanding detection utilized in distribution systems with DFIG  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The penetration of distributed generation (DG) in electrical power systems is rapidly increasing these days and more attention is drawn to maintain a healthy distribution system. Islanding operation of \\{DGs\\} is one of the biggest challenges to the distribution system stability. Fast and accurate islanding detection can avoid the possibility of damages to the \\{DGs\\} when they are un-intentionally reconnected to the grid and also provide useful information to the protection and automation design of the stand alone operated system. Rate of change of frequency (ROCOF) method is one of the most commonly employed anti-islanding protection techniques, it offers fast detection and easy implementation. However, it is often easily affected by the system disturbance and might not able to detect the islanding situation if the power imbalance between the DG and the load is small. This paper investigates an inter-lock method which can improve the performance of rate of change of frequency (ROCOF) by applying system impedance estimation. It was found that this new method can help in verifying the ROCOF relay islanding detection and avoiding false operations of ROCOF in a grid connected distribution system which has large load variations. The proposed method was verified using the experimental testing results derived from both an experimental testing model which includes an 8 kW Double Feed Induction Generator (DFIG) and a 9 MW DFIG simulation system.

Ke Jia; Tianshu Bi; Bohan Liu; David Thomas; Andrew Goodman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

A new airfuel WSGGM (weighted sum of gray gas model) for better utility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A new airfuel WSGGM (weighted sum of gray gas model) for better utility boiler simulation properties. · For each condition: use the validated EWBM to generate emissivity database, spanning a larger). Large emissivity database matrix: 146 discrete values for PL times 101 data points for Tg. · For each

Yin, Chungen

154

Carbon and Hydrogen Analyses of the Components of a Mixture Utilizing Separation-Combustion Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Utilizing Separation-Combustion Gas Chromatography...temperature copper oxide combustion tube which feeds...solution of brominated hydrocarbons (1% v/v) in...was passed into a combustion tube. Following...Wisconsin) was used to heat the combustion tube...indi- cated by the data of Table II. The......

Sam N. Pennington; Harry D. Brown

1968-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Rate impacts and key design elements of gas and electric utility decoupling: a comprehensive review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Opponents of decoupling worry that customers will experience frequent and significant rate increases as a result of its adoption, but a review of 28 natural gas and 17 electric utilities suggests that decoupling adjustments are both refunds to customers as well as charges and tend to be small. (author)

Lesh, Pamela G.

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

Observed oil and gas field size distributions: A consequence of the discovery process and prices of oil and gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

If observed oil and gas field size distributions are obtained ... should approximate that of the parent population of oil and gas fields. However, empirical evidence ... the observable size distributions change w...

Lawrence J. Drew; Emil D. Attanasi; John H. Schuenemeyer

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Phorgotten phenomena: Verifying electrical CP contacts on gas distribution pipelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Federal and state regulations mandate that gas companies must maintain cathodic protection (CP) throughout distribution systems to protect against corrosion. From time to time, underground contacts occur. Any contact of metal lines depletes CP potentials. Finding and clearing these contacts is time-consuming and costly. Some gas companies report that only one in 10 of these underground contacts are found. The paper describes a method that has maintained a 98% efficiency in clearing underground contacts for the past 10 years for Cascade Natural Gas.

Maxwell, J.L. [Cascade Natural Gas Corp., Seattle, WA (United States)

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10 10 Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in the Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico Submitted by: Baylor University One Bear Place, Box 97354 Waco, TX 76798 Principal Author: John A. Dunbar Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory January 15, 2011 Office of Fossil Energy 1 Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico Pr oject Quar ter 17 Repor t Report Type: Quarterly Starting October 1, 2010 Ending December 31, 2010 Author: John A. Dunbar Baylor University Department of Geology January 15, 2011 DOE Award Number: DE-FC26-06NT142959

159

Chapter 7 - General Regularities in Oil and Gas Distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary The chapter provides a detailed geological description of the South Caspian Sea area, focusing on the major characteristics and patterns found in the distribution of oil and gas producing areas of the region. The chapter has divided the South Caspian Sea into three major areas: the Azerbaijan portion, the Turkmenistan portion, and the areas adjacent to the South Caspian basin. The chapter analyzes these areas, focusing on various topics related to the geological aspect of oil and gas production such as issues relating to depositional environments, oil and gas traps, lithology and properties of reservoir rocks, composition and properties of argillaceous rocks, effects of pressure and temperature, effects of abnormally high formation pressures, distribution of oil reserves, oil composition and its properties, properties of natural gas, the formation waters related properties, oil and gas migration and accumulation, and the potential of very deep oil and gas bearing deposits. The chapter also highlights the areas worthy of future exploration to find oil and gas reserves.

Leonid A. Buryakovsky; George V. Chilingar; Fred Aminzadeh

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Trigeneration scheme for energy efficiency enhancement in a natural gas processing plant through turbine exhaust gas waste heat utilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performance of Natural Gas Processing Plants (NGPPs) can be enhanced with the integration of Combined Cooling, Heating and Power (CCHP) generation schemes. This paper analyzes the integration of a trigeneration scheme within a NGPP, that utilizes waste heat from gas turbine exhaust gases to generate process steam in a Waste Heat Recovery Steam Generator (WHRSG). Part of the steam generated is used to power double-effect water–lithium bromide (H2O–LiBr) absorption chillers that provide gas turbine compressor inlet air-cooling. Another portion of the steam is utilized to meet part furnace heating load, and supplement plant electrical power in a combined regenerative Rankine cycle. A detailed techno-economic analysis of scheme performance is presented based on thermodynamic predictions obtained using Engineering Equation Solver (EES). The results indicate that the trigeneration system could recover 79.7 MW of gas turbine waste heat, 37.1 MW of which could be utilized by three steam-fired H2O–LiBr absorption chillers to provide 45 MW of cooling at 5 °C. This could save approximately 9 MW of electric energy required by a typical compression chiller, while providing the same amount of cooling. In addition, the combined cycle generates 22.6 MW of additional electrical energy for the plant, while process heating reduces furnace oil consumption by 0.23 MSCM per annum. Overall, the trigeneration scheme would result in annual natural gas fuel savings of approximately 1879 MSCM, and annual operating cost savings of approximately US$ 20.9 million, with a payback period of 1 year. This study highlights the significant economical and environmental benefits that could be achieved through implementation of the proposed integrated cogeneration scheme in NGPPs, particularly in elevated ambient temperature and humidity conditions such as encountered in Middle East facilities.

Sahil Popli; Peter Rodgers; Valerie Eveloy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributing gas utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Low emissions combustor development for an industrial gas turbine to utilize LCV fuel gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced coal-based power generation systems such as the British Coal Topping Cycle offer the potential for high-efficiency electricity generation with minimum environmental impact. An important component of the Topping cycle program is the gas turbine, for which development of a combustion system to burn low calorific value coal derived fuel gas, at a turbine inlet temperature of 1,260 C (2,300 F), with minimum pollutant emissions, is a key R and D issue. A phased combustor development program is underway burning low calorific value fuel gas (3.6--4.1 MJ/m[sup 3]) with low emissions, particularly NO[sub x] derived from fuel-bound nitrogen. The first phase of the combustor development program has now been completed using a generic tubo-annular, prototype combustor design. Tests were carried out at combustor loading and Mach numbers considerably greater than the initial design values. Combustor performance at these conditions was encouraging. The second phase of the program is currently in progress. This will assess, initially, an improved variant of the prototype combustor operating at conditions selected to represent a particular medium sized industrial gas turbine. This combustor will also be capable of operating using natural gas as an auxiliary fuel, to suite the start-up procedure for the Topping Cycle. The paper presents the Phase 1 test program results for the prototype combustor. Design of the modified combustor for Phase 2 of the development program is discussed, together with preliminary combustor performance results.

Kelsall, G.J.; Smith, M.A. (British Coal Corp., Glos (United Kingdom). Coal Research Establishment); Cannon, M.F. (European Gas Turbines Ltd., Lincoln (United Kingdom). Aero and Technology Products)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

The feasibility of replacing or upgrading utility distribution transformers during routine maintenance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is estimated that electric utilities use about 40 million distribution transformers in supplying electricity to customers in the United States. Although utility distribution transformers collectively have a high average efficiency, they account for approximately 61 billion kWh of the 229 billion kWh of energy lost annually in the delivery of electricity. Distribution transformers are being replaced over time by new, more efficient, lower-loss units during routine utility maintenance of power distribution systems. Maintenance is typically not performed on units in service. However, units removed from service with appreciable remaining life are often refurbished and returned to stock. Distribution transformers may be removed from service for many reasons, including failure, over- or underloading, or line upgrades such as voltage changes or rerouting. When distribution transformers are removed from service, a decision must be made whether to dispose of the transformer and purchase a lower-loss replacement or to refurbish the transformer and return it to stock for future use. This report contains findings and recommendations on replacing utility distribution transformers during routine maintenance, which is required by section 124(c) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The objectives of the study are to evaluate the practicability, cost-effectiveness, and potential energy savings of replacing or upgrading existing transformers during routine utility maintenance and to develop recommendations on was to achieve the potential energy savings.

Barnes, P.R.; Van Dyke, J.W.; McConnell, B.W.; Cohn, S.M.; Purucker, S.L.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Estimating Predictive Variance for Statistical Gas Distribution Modelling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent publications in statistical gas distribution modelling have proposed algorithms that model mean and variance of a distribution. This paper argues that estimating the predictive concentration variance entails not only a gradual improvement but is rather a significant step to advance the field. This is, first, since the models much better fit the particular structure of gas distributions, which exhibit strong fluctuations with considerable spatial variations as a result of the intermittent character of gas dispersal. Second, because estimating the predictive variance allows to evaluate the model quality in terms of the data likelihood. This offers a solution to the problem of ground truth evaluation, which has always been a critical issue for gas distribution modelling. It also enables solid comparisons of different modelling approaches, and provides the means to learn meta parameters of the model, to determine when the model should be updated or re-initialised, or to suggest new measurement locations based on the current model. We also point out directions of related ongoing or potential future research work.

Lilienthal, Achim J.; Asadi, Sahar; Reggente, Matteo [AASS Research Center, Oerebro University (Sweden)

2009-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

164

Cascade utilization of chemical energy of natural gas in an improved CRGT cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper three advanced power systems: the chemically recuperated gas turbine (CRGT) cycle, the steam injected gas turbine (STIG) cycle and the combined cycle (CC), are investigated and compared by means of exergy analysis. Making use of the energy level concept, cascaded use of the chemical exergy of natural gas in a CRGT cycle is clarified, and its performance of the utilization of chemical energy is evaluated. Based on this evaluation, a new CRGT cycle is designed to convert the exergy of natural gas more efficiently into electrical power. As a result, the exergy efficiency of the new CRGT cycle is about 55%, which is 8 percentage points higher than that of the reference CRGT cycle. The analysis gave a better interpretation of the inefficiencies of the CRGT cycle and suggested improvement options. This new approach can be used to design innovative energy systems.

Wei Han; Hongguang Jin; Na Zhang; Xiaosong Zhang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is directing substantial programs in the development and encouragement of new energy technologies. Among them are renewable energy and distributed energy resource technologies. As part of its ongoing effort to document the status and potential of these technologies, DOE EERE directed the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to lead an effort to develop and publish Distributed Energy Technology Characterizations (TCs) that would provide both the department and energy community with a consistent and objective set of cost and performance data in prospective electric-power generation applications in the United States. Toward that goal, DOE/EERE - joined by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) - published the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations in December 1997.As a follow-up, DOE EERE - joined by the Gas Research Institute - is now publishing this document, Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations.

Goldstein, L.; Hedman, B.; Knowles, D.; Freedman, S. I.; Woods, R.; Schweizer, T.

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions are engaged in a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the fly ash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. During this reporting quarter, performance testing of flue gas conditioning was underway at the PacifiCorp Jim Bridger Power Plant. The product tested, ADA-43, was a combination resistivity modifier with cohesivity polymers. This represents the first long-term full-scale testing of this class of products. Modifications to the flue gas conditioning system at Jim Bridger, including development of alternate injection lances, was also undertaken to improve chemical spray distribution and to avoid spray deposition to duct interior surfaces. Also in this quarter, a firm commitment was received for another long-term test of the cohesivity additives. This plant fires a bituminous coal and has opacity and particulate emissions performance issues related to fly ash re-entrainment. Ammonia conditioning is employed here on one unit, but there is interest in liquid cohesivity additives as a safer alternative.

Kenneth E. Baldrey

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

A Sealed, UHV Compatible, Soft X-ray Detector Utilizing Gas Electron Multipliers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An advanced soft X-ray detector has been designed and fabricated for use in synchrotron experiments that utilize X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the study a wide range of materials properties. Fluorescence X-rays, in particular C{sub K} at 277eV, are converted in a low pressure gas medium, and charge multiplication occurs in two gas electron multipliers, fabricated in-house from glass reinforced laminate, to enable single photon counting. The detector satisfies a number of demanding characteristics often required in synchrotron environments, such as UHV compatibility compactness, long-term stability, and energy resolving capability.

Schaknowski, N.A.; Smith, G.

2009-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

168

Simultaneous production and distribution of industrial gas supply-chains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, we propose a multi-period mixed-integer linear programming model for optimal enterprise-level planning of industrial gas operations. The objective is to minimize the total cost of production and distribution of liquid products by coordinating production decisions at multiple plants and distribution decisions at multiple depots. Production decisions include production modes and rates that determine power consumption. Distribution decisions involve source, destination, quantity, route, and time of each truck delivery. The selection of routes is a critical factor of the distribution cost. The main goal of this contribution is to assess the benefits of optimal coordination of production and distribution. The proposed methodology has been tested on small, medium, and large size examples. The results show that significant benefits can be obtained with higher coordination among plants/depots in order to fulfill a common set of shared customer demands. The application to real industrial size test cases is also discussed.

Pablo A. Marchetti; Vijay Gupta; Ignacio E. Grossmann; Lauren Cook; Pierre-Marie Valton; Tejinder Singh; Tong Li; Jean André

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Utility-Scale Wind Power: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale wind power systems was performed to determine the causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening of approximately 240 LCAs of onshore and offshore systems yielded 72 references meeting minimum thresholds for quality, transparency, and relevance. Of those, 49 references provided 126 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. Published estimates ranged from 1.7 to 81 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), with median and interquartile range (IQR) both at 12 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh. After adjusting the published estimates to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the total range was reduced by 47% to 3.0 to 45 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh and the IQR was reduced by 14% to 10 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, while the median remained relatively constant (11 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh). Harmonization of capacity factor resulted in the largest reduction in variability in life cycle GHG emission estimates. This study concludes that the large number of previously published life cycle GHG emission estimates of wind power systems and their tight distribution suggest that new process-based LCAs of similar wind turbine technologies are unlikely to differ greatly. However, additional consequential LCAs would enhance the understanding of true life cycle GHG emissions of wind power (e.g., changes to other generators operations when wind electricity is added to the grid), although even those are unlikely to fundamentally change the comparison of wind to other electricity generation sources.

Dolan, S. L.; Heath, G. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

New Markets, Outmoded Manufacturing: The Transition from Manufactured Gas to Natural Gas by Northeastern Utilities after World War II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For more than a century, large manufactured gas plants dotted the industrial landscape of the urban Northeast. Using a variety of technologies, these factories applied heat and pressure to coke, coal, and oil to produce a gas suitable for use in space heating and cooking. Yet this well-established, vital industry literally ceased to exist in the two decades after World War II, as natural gas transported from the southwestern United States replaced manufactured gas in all of the major markets in the Northeast. This abrupt victory of a new product was a modem variant of "creative destruction " as described by Joseph Schumpeter in his classic study Capitalism, Socialism and Democracy [10]. While creating a more efficient fuel supply, the coming of natural gas also destroyed the existing system for the production and distribution of manufactured gas. Yet this mid-20th century case of creative destruction differed sharply from Schumpeter's descriptions of the same process during the era of high capitalism in the late 19th century. In that dynamic period, innovations took place in a largely unfettered

Chris Castaneda; Joseph Pratt

171

Impact of Utility-Scale Distributed Wind on Transmission-Level System Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a new renewable integration study that aims to assess the potential for adding distributed wind to the current power system with minimal or no upgrades to the distribution or transmission electricity systems. It investigates the impacts of integrating large amounts of utility-scale distributed wind power on bulk system operations by performing a case study on the power system of the Independent System Operator-New England (ISO-NE).

Brancucci Martinez-Anido, C.; Hodge, B. M.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Colorado Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.17 0.17 0.17 1970's 0.18 0.19 0.21 0.22 0.27 0.49 0.72 1.00 1.31 1.53 1980's 2.17 2.58 2.78 2.78 2.81 2.62 2.71 2.57 2.24 1.75 1990's 1.75 1.79 1.89 1.86 1.78 1.45 1.97 2.44 1.98 1.66 2000's 3.89 3.86 NA -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Colorado Natural Gas Prices Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use

173

Kentucky Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.33 0.27 0.23 1970's 0.20 0.22 0.24 0.25 0.29 0.37 0.48 0.60 0.57 1.26 1980's 1.67 2.18 2.85 3.05 2.93 2.89 2.44 1.97 1.77 2.00 1990's 2.12 2.35 2.51 2.67 1.95 1.83 2.63 2.51 2.45 2.11 2000's 3.27 3.96 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Kentucky Natural Gas Prices Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use

174

Louisiana Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.19 0.19 0.05 1970's 0.20 0.21 0.23 0.24 0.28 0.39 0.50 0.81 0.96 1.30 1980's 1.81 2.36 2.91 3.13 3.00 2.90 2.48 1.97 1.96 2.07 1990's 1.98 2.25 2.25 2.40 1.44 1.61 2.58 2.59 2.22 1.98 2000's 3.10 3.76 NA -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Louisiana Natural Gas Prices Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use

175

Montana Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.12 0.11 0.11 1970's 0.11 0.12 0.17 0.21 0.23 0.42 0.46 0.73 0.83 1.16 1980's 1.29 1.90 2.87 3.00 3.04 2.51 2.28 1.86 1.65 1.57 1990's 1.75 1.76 1.63 2.15 1.53 1.16 1.44 1.77 1.72 2.12 2000's 2.96 2.48 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Montana Natural Gas Prices Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use

176

Arizona Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Arizona Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.15 0.15 0.15 1970's 0.17 0.17 0.19 0.22 0.28 0.36 0.44 0.64 0.75 1.29 1980's 1.62 2.22 2.86 3.16 2.83 2.79 2.22 1.49 1.79 1.50 1990's 1.65 1.26 1.25 1.68 1.28 1.19 1.80 2.20 1.90 2.08 2000's 3.61 3.96 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Arizona Natural Gas Prices Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use

177

Arkansas Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.18 0.18 0.18 1970's 0.19 0.22 0.24 0.26 0.30 0.43 0.52 0.71 0.86 1.12 1980's 1.78 2.12 2.63 2.94 2.97 2.78 2.46 2.64 2.07 2.30 1990's 2.17 2.06 1.78 1.64 1.61 1.45 2.41 2.42 1.58 1.38 2000's 2.41 4.09 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Arkansas Natural Gas Prices Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use

178

Maryland Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.20 0.19 0.19 1970's 0.19 0.22 0.24 0.25 0.27 0.38 0.50 0.69 0.84 1.25 1980's 2.41 2.74 3.08 3.28 3.29 3.17 3.19 2.37 2.27 2.72 1990's 2.15 1.94 1.94 2.08 2.01 1.81 2.48 2.98 2.41 2.30 2000's 3.30 4.75 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Maryland Natural Gas Prices Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use

179

Michigan Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.27 0.27 0.27 1970's 0.27 0.28 0.29 0.35 0.46 0.56 0.71 0.98 1.67 1.60 1980's 2.98 3.73 3.63 3.86 3.95 3.54 2.95 2.64 2.39 2.03 1990's 1.86 0.50 0.57 0.26 0.20 0.54 1.04 0.95 0.69 0.78 2000's 1.32 1.76 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Michigan Natural Gas Prices Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use

180

Oregon Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.22 0.21 0.22 1970's 0.22 0.32 0.28 0.35 0.47 0.61 0.82 1.77 1.98 2.53 1980's 4.41 4.75 4.90 4.19 3.90 3.13 2.35 2.00 1.90 2.09 1990's 2.16 2.32 2.16 1.71 1.86 1.77 1.77 1.80 1.84 1.98 2000's 2.74 2.91 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Oregon Natural Gas Prices Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributing gas utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Missouri Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.20 0.20 0.20 1970's 0.21 0.23 0.25 0.26 0.29 0.39 0.48 0.80 0.87 1.20 1980's 1.71 2.12 2.81 3.04 2.92 2.86 2.61 2.41 2.78 1.94 1990's 1.77 2.05 2.31 2.01 0.91 1.19 2.34 2.43 2.02 2.14 2000's 2.48 4.86 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Missouri Natural Gas Prices Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use

182

Wyoming Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.14 0.16 0.16 1970's 0.17 0.17 0.18 0.24 0.24 0.51 0.65 0.69 1.36 1.59 1980's 2.05 2.51 2.91 3.05 2.99 2.76 2.56 2.36 2.06 1.88 1990's 1.95 1.85 2.48 1.92 1.52 1.31 1.54 1.84 1.86 1.87 2000's 3.21 3.04 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Wyoming Natural Gas Prices Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use

183

Alaska Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0.26 0.27 0.28 0.28 0.30 0.35 0.57 0.58 0.50 0.14 1980's 0.73 1.13 0.60 0.86 0.61 0.63 0.61 0.65 1.01 1.13 1990's 1.08 1.32 1.12 1.11 1.11 1.24 1.17 1.34 1.23 0.82 2000's 1.34 1.84 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Alaska Natural Gas Prices Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use

184

Georgia Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Georgia Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.19 0.19 0.19 1970's 0.20 0.22 0.23 0.25 0.28 0.32 0.36 0.67 0.90 1.35 1980's 2.10 2.78 3.11 3.22 3.26 3.23 3.32 2.50 2.41 2.69 1990's 2.19 2.08 2.08 2.24 2.14 1.93 2.62 3.09 2.48 2.18 2000's 3.30 4.57 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Georgia Natural Gas Prices Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use

185

Nebraska Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.14 0.15 0.15 1970's 0.16 0.16 0.18 0.19 0.24 0.32 0.42 0.57 0.73 1.10 1980's 1.36 1.81 2.35 2.56 2.55 2.51 2.40 2.20 1.77 1.86 1990's 1.70 1.43 1.54 1.79 1.34 1.33 2.10 2.54 2.01 1.96 2000's 2.81 3.56 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Nebraska Natural Gas Prices Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use

186

Virginia Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.20 0.20 0.20 1970's 0.20 0.22 0.27 0.28 0.31 0.38 0.53 0.81 1.49 1.40 1980's 2.09 2.81 3.33 3.59 3.49 3.35 3.37 2.68 2.59 2.63 1990's 2.05 1.86 1.93 2.27 2.14 1.83 2.60 3.22 2.59 2.20 2000's 2.66 5.05 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Virginia Natural Gas Prices Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use

187

Indiana Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.20 0.21 0.21 1970's 0.21 0.23 0.25 0.27 0.28 0.38 0.45 0.81 0.86 1.21 1980's 1.73 2.18 2.91 3.21 3.02 3.11 2.78 2.52 2.69 2.17 1990's 2.17 2.46 2.51 1.38 1.03 1.05 2.47 2.58 2.27 2.16 2000's 3.69 4.18 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Indiana Natural Gas Prices Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use

188

Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

July 1 - September 30, 2011 July 1 - September 30, 2011 Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in the Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico Submitted by: Baylor University One Bear Place, Box 97354 Waco, TX 76798 Principal Author: John A. Dunbar Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory October 14, 2011 Office of Fossil Energy 1 Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico Pr oject Quar ter 20 Repor t Report Type: Quarterly Starting July 1, 2011 Ending September 30, 2011 Author: John A. Dunbar Baylor University Department of Geology October 14, 2011 DOE Award Number: DE-FC26-06NT142959

189

Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

January 1 - March 31, 2012 January 1 - March 31, 2012 Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in the Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico Submitted by: Baylor University One Bear Place, Box 97354 Waco, TX 76798 Principal Author: John A. Dunbar Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory April 18, 2012 Office of Fossil Energy 1 Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico Pr oject Quar ter 22 Repor t Report Type: Quarterly Starting January 1, 2012 Ending March 31, 2012 Author: John A. Dunbar Baylor University Department of Geology April 18, 2012 DOE Award Number: DE-FC26-06NT142959

190

DOE Announces Webinars on the Distributed Wind Power Market, Utility Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Utility Energy Service Contracts, and More Utility Energy Service Contracts, and More DOE Announces Webinars on the Distributed Wind Power Market, Utility Energy Service Contracts, and More August 21, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis EERE offers webinars to the public on a range of subjects, from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies to training for the clean energy workforce. Webinars are free; however, advanced registration is typically required. You can also watch archived webinars and browse previously aired videos, slides, and transcripts. Upcoming Webinars August 21: Live Webinar on the 2012 Distributed Wind Market Report Webinar Sponsor: EERE's Wind and Water Power Technologies Program The Energy Department will present a live webcast titled "2012 Market Report on U.S. Wind Technologies in Distributed Applications" on Wednesday,

191

A comprehensive analysis of natural gas distribution pipeline incidents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to provide a reference database for pipeline companies and/or regulators with an investigation of safety performance of US natural gas distribution pipelines. With a total of 3,679 natural gas distribution pipeline incidents between 1985 and 2010, nine safety indicators are statistically analysed in terms of the year, pipeline length, regions, pipeline diameter, pipeline wall thickness, material, age, incident area and incident cause to identify the relationship between safety indicators and various variables. Overall average frequencies of incidents, injuries and fatalities between 1985 and 2009 are 0.0846/1,000 mile-years, 0.0407/1,000 mile-years, and 0.0094/1,000 mile-years respectively. The analysis shows that the safety performance of US natural gas distribution pipeline is improving over time, and different variables have different impact on safety performances. However, the number of annual incidents does not show a significant decline due to increasing energy demand. [Received: March 21 2012; Accepted: July 15 2012

Zhenhua Rui; Xiaoqing Wang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Fuel Flexible Combustion Systems for High-Efficiency Utilization of Opportunity Fuels in Gas Turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this program was to develop low-emissions, efficient fuel-flexible combustion technology which enables operation of a given gas turbine on a wider range of opportunity fuels that lie outside of current natural gas-centered fuel specifications. The program encompasses a selection of important, representative fuels of opportunity for gas turbines with widely varying fundamental properties of combustion. The research program covers conceptual and detailed combustor design, fabrication, and testing of retrofitable and/or novel fuel-flexible gas turbine combustor hardware, specifically advanced fuel nozzle technology, at full-scale gas turbine combustor conditions. This project was performed over the period of October 2008 through September 2011 under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-08NT05868 for the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (USDOE/NETL) entitled "Fuel Flexible Combustion Systems for High-Efficiency Utilization of Opportunity Fuels in Gas Turbines". The overall objective of this program was met with great success. GE was able to successfully demonstrate the operability of two fuel-flexible combustion nozzles over a wide range of opportunity fuels at heavy-duty gas turbine conditions while meeting emissions goals. The GE MS6000B ("6B") gas turbine engine was chosen as the target platform for new fuel-flexible premixer development. Comprehensive conceptual design and analysis of new fuel-flexible premixing nozzles were undertaken. Gas turbine cycle models and detailed flow network models of the combustor provide the premixer conditions (temperature, pressure, pressure drops, velocities, and air flow splits) and illustrate the impact of widely varying fuel flow rates on the combustor. Detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms were employed to compare some fundamental combustion characteristics of the target fuels, including flame speeds and lean blow-out behavior. Perfectly premixed combustion experiments were conducted to provide experimental combustion data of our target fuels at gas turbine conditions. Based on an initial assessment of premixer design requirements and challenges, the most promising sub-scale premixer concepts were evaluated both experimentally and computationally. After comprehensive screening tests, two best performing concepts were scaled up for further development. High pressure single nozzle tests were performed with the scaled premixer concepts at target gas turbine conditions with opportunity fuels. Single-digit NOx emissions were demonstrated for syngas fuels. Plasma-assisted pilot technology was demonstrated to enhance ignition capability and provide additional flame stability margin to a standard premixing fuel nozzle. However, the impact of plasma on NOx emissions was observed to be unacceptable given the goals of this program and difficult to avoid.

Venkatesan, Krishna

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

193

Illinois Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.21 0.20 0.20 1970's 0.21 0.22 0.23 0.27 0.29 0.54 0.58 0.83 0.98 1.11 1980's 1.78 2.12 2.56 3.07 2.88 2.97 2.73 2.68 2.53 2.17 1990's 2.06 2.29 2.44 1.97 1.88 1.66 2.63 2.68 2.27 2.48 2000's 3.12 3.94 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use

194

Washington Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Washington Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.22 0.21 0.22 1970's 0.22 0.24 0.28 0.33 0.44 0.65 0.78 1.67 1.92 2.38 1980's 3.92 4.34 4.72 3.98 3.72 3.12 2.52 2.11 1.99 2.06 1990's 2.04 1.98 1.89 1.37 1.84 1.78 1.77 1.89 1.76 2.03 2000's 3.07 2.82 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Washington Natural Gas Prices

195

Mississippi Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.19 0.20 0.19 1970's 0.20 0.21 0.23 0.24 0.28 0.36 0.46 0.73 0.88 1.28 1980's 1.75 2.34 2.91 3.06 2.94 2.92 2.44 1.99 1.87 2.09 1990's 2.11 2.33 2.34 2.37 1.98 1.82 2.63 2.62 2.33 2.19 2000's 3.37 4.28 NA -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Mississippi Natural Gas Prices

196

Minnesota Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Minnesota Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.26 0.22 0.22 1970's 0.25 0.25 0.26 0.28 0.33 0.55 0.60 1.24 1.28 2.20 1980's 1.26 4.27 4.43 4.14 3.99 3.45 2.68 2.19 1.81 1.77 1990's 1.89 0.56 0.61 0.47 0.47 0.37 0.68 0.63 0.54 0.82 2000's 1.50 1.40 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Minnesota Natural Gas Prices

197

Connecticut Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.35 0.68 0.30 1970's 0.32 0.32 0.35 0.40 0.50 0.58 0.59 1.50 2.60 2.53 1980's 2.76 2.94 3.53 3.30 3.18 3.71 2.53 2.52 2.13 2.97 1990's 3.68 3.08 2.95 3.53 2.62 2.20 3.50 1.54 3.00 0.59 2000's 4.82 4.93 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Connecticut Natural Gas Prices

198

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.25 0.24 0.24 1970's 0.25 0.29 0.31 0.32 0.40 0.54 0.60 0.92 0.94 1.42 1980's 1.89 2.34 3.02 3.20 3.09 3.06 2.63 2.38 2.36 2.35 1990's 2.57 2.41 2.41 2.83 2.47 2.00 2.71 2.72 2.08 1.97 2000's 3.59 4.76 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Pennsylvania Natural Gas Prices

199

Tennessee Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.20 0.20 0.20 1970's 0.20 0.22 0.23 0.24 0.28 0.36 0.49 0.73 0.89 1.26 1980's 1.73 2.25 2.96 3.19 2.94 3.01 2.29 1.85 1.78 1.97 1990's 1.94 2.61 2.44 2.23 1.88 1.59 2.57 2.52 2.17 2.04 2000's 3.44 4.13 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Tennessee Natural Gas Prices

200

Electric/Gas Utility-type Vehicle Page 1 of 5 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University No. 5501 Rev.: 0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-licensed gas- or electric-powered utility-type vehicles) that are operated on the main campus in Blacksburg, VAElectric/Gas Utility-type Vehicle Page 1 of 5 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University __________________________________________________________________________________ Subject: Electric/Gas Utility-type Vehicle

Beex, A. A. "Louis"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributing gas utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

NO, Reduction in a Gas Fired Utility Boiler by Combustion Modifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data on the effect of several combustion modifications on the for-math of nitrogen oxides and on boiler efficiency were acquired and analyzed for a 110 MW gas fired utility boiler. The results from the study showed that decreasing the oxygen in the flue gas from 2.2% to 0.6 % reduced the NO, formation by 33 % and also gave better boiler efficiencies. Flue gas recirculation through the bottom of the fire4mx WBS founb to be Ineffective. Staged combustion was found to reduce the NO, emlssions by as much as 55 % while decreasing the efficiency by about 5%. Adjustment of the burner air registers reduced the NO, formation by about 20 ppm. The lowest NO, emisdons of 42 ppm (at about 3 % 02) in the stack was obtained for air only to one top burner and 0.5 % oxygen in the flue gas. The reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO,) emissions from steam boilers has been under study for several years. The NO, from boilers consist almost entirely of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (N02) with NO2 usually only l or 2 % of the total. After leaving the stack, the NO eventually combines with atmospheric oxygen to form NOp. The Environmental Protection Agency has sponsored several studies1-I0 on reducing NO, emissions while maintaining thermal efficiency of boilers. Other studies have been sponsored by The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) " and Argonne National

Jerry A. Bullin; Dan Wilkerson

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Electron energy distribution function control in gas discharge plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) and electron temperature in low temperature gas discharge plasmas is analyzed in frames of local and non-local electron kinetics. It is shown, that contrary to the local case, typical for plasma in uniform electric field, there is the possibility for EEDF modification, at the condition of non-local electron kinetics in strongly non-uniform electric fields. Such conditions “naturally” occur in some self-organized steady state dc and rf discharge plasmas, and they suggest the variety of artificial methods for EEDF modification. EEDF modification and electron temperature control in non-equilibrium conditions occurring naturally and those stimulated by different kinds of plasma disturbances are illustrated with numerous experiments. The necessary conditions for EEDF modification in gas discharge plasmas are formulated.

Godyak, V. A. [Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA and RF Plasma Consulting, Brookline, Massachusetts (United States)] [Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA and RF Plasma Consulting, Brookline, Massachusetts (United States)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Gas Distribution in Unventilated Indoor Environments Inspected by a Mobile Robot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Distribution in Unventilated Indoor Environments Inspected by a Mobile Robot Michael Wandel1@tech.oru.se Abstract Gas source localisation with robots is usually per- formed in environments with a strong in different environments, and the similarities as well as differences in the analyte gas distributions

Zell, Andreas

204

Thermodynamic Cycle Selection for Distributed Natural Gas Liquefaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural gas liquefaction plants with cooling capacities of approximately 100 kW are facilitating the development of a distributed LNG infrastructure. To be economically viable liquefiers of this scale must be able to operate on a variety of feed gases while offering relatively low capital costs short delivery time and good performance. This paper opens with a discussion of a natural gas liquefier design focusing on the refrigeration system. Linde cascade mixed refrigerant and modified?Brayton cycle refrigeration systems are then discussed in context of the overall plant design. Next a detailed comparison of the modified?Brayton and mixed refrigerant cycles is made including cycle selection’s impact on main system components like the recuperative heat exchanger and compressors. In most cases a reverse?Brayton or a mixed refrigerant cycle refrigerator is the best?suited available technology for local liquefaction. The mixed refrigerant cycle liquefier offers the potential of better real performance at lower capital costs but requires more know?how in the areas of two?phase flow and refrigerant composition management heat exchanger design and process control.

M. A. Barclay; D. F. Gongaware; K. Dalton; M. P. Skrzypkowski

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for the Utilization of Low Rank Coals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air Products has developed a potentially ground-breaking technology – Sour Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) – to replace the solvent-based acid gas removal (AGR) systems currently employed to separate sulfur containing species, along with CO{sub 2} and other impurities, from gasifier syngas streams. The Sour PSA technology is based on adsorption processes that utilize pressure swing or temperature swing regeneration methods. Sour PSA technology has already been shown with higher rank coals to provide a significant reduction in the cost of CO{sub 2} capture for power generation, which should translate to a reduction in cost of electricity (COE), compared to baseline CO{sub 2} capture plant design. The objective of this project is to test the performance and capability of the adsorbents in handling tar and other impurities using a gaseous mixture generated from the gasification of lower rank, lignite coal. The results of this testing are used to generate a high-level pilot process design, and to prepare a techno-economic assessment evaluating the applicability of the technology to plants utilizing these coals.

Kloosterman, Jeff

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

Application of Hi-Tc superconducting current fault limiters to utility distribution networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new classification of superconducting current fault limiter (SCFL) is described which is a non-quenching, variable-inductance-mode VIM current limiter with characteristics matched to utility distribution line parameters. A major application of this device is for replacement of fixed-inductance air-core reactors used in impedance and short-circuit levels from sub-transmission to distribution. The secondary application of the SCFL is for protection of distribution substation transformers in the 5--40 MVA range, as a replacement for current limiting fuses and air-blast circuit breakers. The SCFL devices have the unique characteristic of producing minimal or no transient recovery voltage (TRV) as is typical of conventional interruption technologies.

Kuznetsov, S.B.; Webb, T.J. [Power Superconducting Devices Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Commercialization of a 2.5kW Utility Interactive Inverter for Distributed Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through this project, Advanced Energy Conversion (AEC) has developed, tested, refined and is preparing to commercialize a 2.5kW utility-interactive inverter system for distributed generation. The inverter technology embodies zero-voltage switching technology that will ultimately yield a system that is smaller, less expensive and more efficient than existing commercial technologies. This program has focused on commercial success through careful synthesis of technology, market-focus and business development. AEC was the primary participant. AEC is utilizing contract manufacturers in the early stages of production, allowing its technical staff to focus on quality control issues and product enhancements. The objective of this project was to bring the AEC inverter technology from its current pre-production state to a commercial product. Federal funds have been used to build and test production-intent inverters, support the implementation of the commercialization plan and bring the product to the point of UL certification.

Torrey, David A.

2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

208

Flue Gas Purification Utilizing SOx/NOx Reactions During Compressin of CO2 Derived from Oxyfuel Combustion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Flue Gas Purification Flue Gas Purification Utilizing SO X /NO X Reactions During Compression of CO 2 Derived from Oxyfuel Combustion Background Oxy-combustion in a pulverized coal-fired power station produces a raw carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) product containing contaminants such as water vapor, oxygen, nitrogen, and argon from impurities in the oxygen used and any air leakage into the system. Acid gases are also produced as combustion products, such as sulfur oxides (SO

209

U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline & Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline & Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 76,386 65,770...

210

Low-NOx Gas Turbine Injectors Utilizing Hydrogen-Rich Opportunity...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of opportunity fuels will avoid greenhouse gas emissions from the combustion of natural gas and increase the diversity of fuel sources for U.S. industry. Introduction Gas turbines...

211

The impacts of solar water heating in low-income households on the distribution utility’s active, reactive and apparent power demands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Brazilian low-income households, water-heating requirements are typically met by electrical showerheads. On average, 73.1% of all residential units in the country are equipped with these resistance-heating devices, with nominal powers ranging from 3 to 8 kW. This situation imposes a considerable burden on the electricity utility companies, since electrical showerheads typically represent the highest load but the lowest utilization (load factor) in a residential consumer unit. Furthermore, typical utilization times coincide with, and contribute to, the electrical power demand peaks in Brazil, rendering these low-cost, high-power electrical devices a high-cost consumer for the electrical system to cater for. For low-income residential consumers, electricity tariffs are subsidized, and utilities must therefore make a considerable investment in infrastructure for a limited return. In this paper we analyze the impacts of solar water heating in low-income households on the distribution utility active, reactive and apparent power demands. We have monitored a statistically representative group of low-income residences equipped with a compact domestic solar water heater in Florianopolis – Brazil for 1 year. We show that in comparison with identical residential units using electrical showerheads, with the adoption of solar water heating the reductions in the active, reactive and apparent power demands on the distribution utility were 49%, 29% and 49% respectively.

Helena F. Naspolini; Ricardo Rüther

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Improvement of LNG production technology in gas-distribution stations with an increased content of carbon dioxide in supply-line gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The possibility is considered of reducing the weight of absorbent in a carbon dioxide gas cleaning system during liquefied natural gas production in gas-distribution stations (due to use of a pressure drop ... is...

S. P. Gorbachev; S. V. Lyugai

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Hydrogen production from steam reforming of coke oven gas and its utility for indirect reduction of iron oxides in blast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of coal and coke are consumed for heating and reducing iron oxides [2,3]. As a result, BFs have becomeHydrogen production from steam reforming of coke oven gas and its utility for indirect reduction 2012 Available online 18 June 2012 Keywords: Steam reforming Hydrogen and syngas production Coke oven

Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

214

Utilizing Electric Vehicles to Assist Integration of Large Penetrations of Distributed Photovoltaic Generation Capacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Executive Summary Introduction and Motivation This analysis provides the first insights into the leveraging potential of distributed photovoltaic (PV) technologies on rooftop and electric vehicle (EV) charging. Either of the two technologies by themselves - at some high penetrations – may cause some voltage control challenges or overloading problems, respectively. But when combined, there – at least intuitively – could be synergistic effects, whereby one technology mitigates the negative impacts of the other. High penetration of EV charging may overload existing distribution system components, most prominently the secondary transformer. If PV technology is installed at residential premises or anywhere downstream of the secondary transformer, it will provide another electricity source thus, relieving the loading on the transformers. Another synergetic or mitigating effect could be envisioned when high PV penetration reverts the power flow upward in the distribution system (from the homes upstream into the distribution system). Protection schemes may then no longer work and voltage violation (exceeding the voltage upper limited of the ANSI voltage range) may occur. In this particular situation, EV charging could absorb the electricity from the PV, such that the reversal of power flow can be reduced or alleviated. Given these potential mutual synergistic behaviors of PV and EV technologies, this project attempted to quantify the benefits of combining the two technologies. Furthermore, of interest was how advanced EV control strategies may influence the outcome of the synergy between EV charging and distributed PV installations. Particularly, Californian utility companies with high penetration of the distributed PV technology, who have experienced voltage control problems, are interested how intelligent EV charging could support or affect the voltage control

Tuffner, Francis K.; Chassin, Forrest S.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Gowri, Krishnan

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

215

Emerging technologies for the management and utilization of landfill gas. Final report, August 1994-August 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report gives information on emerging technologies that are considered to be commercially available (Tier 1), currently undergoing research and development (Tier 2), or considered as potentially applicable (Tier 3), for the management of landfill gas (LFG) emissions or for the utilization of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) from LFG. The emerging technologies that are considered to be Tier 1 are: (1) phosphoric acid fuel cells, (2) processes for converting CH4 from LFG to compressed LFG for vehicle fuel or other fuel uses, and (3) use of LFG as a fuel source for leachate evaporation systems. The Tier 2 technologies covered in the report are: (1) operation of landfills as anaerobic bioreactors, (2) operation of landfills are aerobic bioreactors, (3) production of ethanol from LFG, (4) production of commercial CO2 from LFG, and (5) use of LFG to provide fuel for heat and CO2 enhancement in greenhouses. Tier 3 technologies, considered as potentially applicable for LFG. include Stirling and Organic Rankine Cycle engines.

Roe, S.; Reisman, J.; Strait, R.; Doorn, M.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

An examination of the costs and critical characteristics of electric utility distribution system capacity enhancement projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report classifies and analyzes the capital and total costs (e.g., income tax, property tax, depreciation, centralized power generation, insurance premiums, and capital financing) associated with 130 electricity distribution system capacity enhancement projects undertaken during 1995-2002 or planned in the 2003-2011 time period by three electric power utilities operating in the Pacific Northwest. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in cooperation with participating utilities, has developed a large database of over 3,000 distribution system projects. The database includes brief project descriptions, capital cost estimates, the stated need for each project, and engineering data. The database was augmented by additional technical (e.g., line loss, existing substation capacities, and forecast peak demand for power in the area served by each project), cost (e.g., operations, maintenance, and centralized power generation costs), and financial (e.g., cost of capital, insurance premiums, depreciations, and tax rates) data. Though there are roughly 3,000 projects in the database, the vast majority were not included in this analysis because they either did not clearly enhance capacity or more information was needed, and not available, to adequately conduct the cost analyses. For the 130 projects identified for this analysis, capital cost frequency distributions were constructed, and expressed in terms of dollars per kVA of additional capacity. The capital cost frequency distributions identify how the projects contained within the database are distributed across a broad cost spectrum. Furthermore, the PNNL Energy Cost Analysis Model (ECAM) was used to determine the full costs (e.g., capital, operations and maintenance, property tax, income tax, depreciation, centralized power generation costs, insurance premiums and capital financing) associated with delivering electricity to customers, once again expressed in terms of costs per kVA of additional capacity. The projects were sorted into eight categories (capacitors, load transfer, new feeder, new line, new substation, new transformer, reconductoring, and substation capacity increase) and descriptive statistics (e.g., mean, total cost, number of observations, and standard deviation) were constructed for each project type. Furthermore, statistical analysis has been performed using ordinary least squares regression analysis to identify how various project variables (e.g., project location, the primary customer served by the project, the type of project, the reason for the upgrade, size of the upgrade) impact the unit cost of the project.

Balducci, Patrick J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Brown, Daryl R.; Fathelrahman, Eihab M.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Distributed Hydrogen Production from Natural Gas: Independent Review Panel Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Independent review report on the available information concerning the technologies needed for forecourts producing 150 kg/day of hydrogen from natural gas.

218

TRUCK ROUTING PROBLEM IN DISTRIBUTION OF GASOLINE TO GAS STATIONS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis aims at finding a daily routing plan for a fleet of vehicles delivering gasoline to gas stations for an oil company, satisfying all… (more)

Janakiraman, Swagath

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Distributed Hydrogen Production from Natural Gas: Independent Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Independent review report on the available information concerning the technologies needed for forecourts producing 150 kg/day of hydrogen from natural gas.

Fletcher, J.; Callaghan, V.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Low-NOx Gas Turbine Injectors Utilizing Hydrogen-Rich Opportunity Fuels  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Gas turbines are commonly used in industry for onsite power and heating needs because of their high efficiency and clean environmental performance. Natural gas is the fuel most frequently used to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributing gas utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Utilization and Mitigation of VAM/CMM Emissions by a Catalytic Combustion Gas Turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A system configured with a catalytic combustion gas turbine generator unit is introduced. The system has ... Heavy Industries, Ltd., such as small gas turbines, recuperators and catalytic combustors, and catalyti...

K. Tanaka; Y. Yoshino; H. Kashihara; S. Kajita

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Low-NOx Gas Turbine Injectors Utilizing Hydrogen-Rich Opportunity Fuels- Fact Sheet, 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Factsheet summarizing how this project will modify a gas turbine combustion system to operate on hydrogen-rich opportunity fuels

223

The Beckett System Recovery and Utilization of Low Grade Waste Heat From Flue Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. During low demand periods, the unit is gas-fired and produces 150 psi steam at high efficiency. In the fall, the heat exchanger is converted to accept flue gas from the large original water tube boilers. The flue gas heats water, which preheats make...

Henderson, W. R.; DeBiase, J. F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Pipeline Annual Data - 1997 Gas Distribution Annuals Data (Zip) | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 Gas Distribution Annuals Data (Zip) 7 Gas Distribution Annuals Data (Zip) Energy Data Apps Maps Challenges Resources Blogs Let's Talk Energy Beta You are here Data.gov » Communities » Energy » Data Pipeline Annual Data - 1997 Gas Distribution Annuals Data (Zip) Dataset Summary Description Pipeline operators (for gas distribution, gas transmission, and hazardous liquid pipelines) are required to submit an annual report to the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration's Office of Pipeline Safety. The report includes information about the operator, a description of their system (main, services), leaks eliminated/repaired during the year, excavation damage, excess flow valves, and other information. Beginning in 2010, the form also includes information regarding integrity management programs.

225

A Simple Physical Model for the Gas Distribution in Galaxy Clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dominant baryonic component of galaxy clusters is hot gas whose distribution is commonly probed through X-ray emission arising from thermal bremsstrahlung. The density profile thus obtained has been traditionally modeled with a beta-profile, a simple function with only three parameters. However, this model is known to be insufficient for characterizing the range of cluster gas distributions, and attempts to rectify this shortcoming typically introduce additional parameters to increase the fitting flexibility. We use cosmological and physical considerations to obtain a family of profiles for the gas with fewer parameters than the beta-model but which better accounts for observed gas profiles over wide radial intervals.

Patej, Anna

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Phase distribution and intrapore salt exchange during drilling mud invasion of an oil- and gas-bearing formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As a result of drilling mud filtrate invasion of a formation saturated with oil, gas and natural water, the distribution...

N. K. Korsakova; V. I. Pen’kovskii

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) has successfully completed a research and development program granted by the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to develop a family of non-toxic flue gas conditioning agents to provide utilities and industries with a cost-effective means of complying with environmental regulations on particulate emissions and opacity. An extensive laboratory screening of potential additives was completed followed by full-scale trials at four utility power plants. The developed cohesivity additives have been demonstrated on a 175 MW utility boiler that exhibited poor collection of unburned carbon in the electrostatic precipitator. With cohesivity conditioning, opacity spiking caused by rapping reentrainment was reduced and total particulate emissions were reduced by more than 30%. Ammonia conditioning was also successful in reducing reentrainment on the same unit. Conditioned fly ash from the process is expected to be suitable for dry or wet disposal and for concrete admixture.

C. Jean Bustard

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Utilization of CO2 as cushion gas for porous media compressed air energy storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy storage for large-scale deployment of intermittent solar andsolar energy systems. The number of cycles that occur in 30 years in a natural gas storage

Oldenburg, C.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions are engaged in a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the fly ash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. During this reporting quarter, installation of a liquid flue gas conditioning system was completed at the American Electric Power Conesville Plant, Unit 3. This plant fires a bituminous coal and has opacity and particulate emissions performance issues related to fly ash re-entrainment. Two cohesivity-specific additive formulations, ADA-44C and ADA-51, will be evaluated. In addition, ammonia conditioning will also be compared.

Kenneth E. Baldrey

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Case Study of Optimal Byproduct Gas Distribution in Integrated Steel Mill Using Multi-Period Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? ? ? Case Study of Optimal Byproduct Gas Distribution in Integrated Steel Mill Using Multi-Period Optimization KIMMO M?KINEN BUSINESS MANAGER TONI KYM?L?INEN PRODUCT MANAGER JAAKKO JUNTTILA SALES MANAGER ABB OY HELSINKI FINLAND...

Makinen, K.; Kymalainen, T.; Junttila, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Numerical Investigation of Temperature Distribution on a High Pressure Gas Turbine Blade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A numerical code is developed to calculate the temperature distributions on the surface of a gas turbine blade. This code is a tool for quick prediction of the temperatures by knowing the boundary conditions and the flow conditions, and doesn...

Zirakzadeh, Hootan

2014-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

232

Reliability analysis of urban gas transmission and distribution system based on FMEA and correlation operator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to improve the safety management of urban gas transmission and distribution system, failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) was used to construct the reliability analysis ... the risk priority number (R...

Su Li; Weiguo Zhou

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

384 JOURNAL OF MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS, VOL. 19, NO. 2, APRIL 2010 Monolithically Integrated Gas Distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Distribution Chamber for Silicon MEMS Fuel Cells Antonio Luque, Senior Member, IEEE, José M polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cell. The silicon struc- ture contains the mechanical support, gas of the membrane. Experimental results of the usage of the chamber as part of a fuel cell are shown, comparing

Wilamowski, Bogdan Maciej

234

NATURAL GAS ADVISORY COMMITTEE Name Affiliation Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURAL GAS ADVISORY COMMITTEE 2011-2013 Name Affiliation Sector Dernovsek, David Bonneville Power Defenbach, Byron Intermountain Gas Distribution Dragoon, Ken NWPCC Council Friedman, Randy NW Natural Gas Distribution Gopal, Jairam Southern CA Edison Electric Utility Hamilton, Linda Shell Trading Gas & Power

235

Economic evaluation and market analysis for natural gas utilization. Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past decade, the U.S. has experienced a surplus gas supply. Future prospects are brightening because of increased estimates of the potential size of undiscovered gas reserves. At the same time, U.S. oil reserves and production have steadily declined, while oil imports have steadily increased. Reducing volume growth of crude oil imports was a key objective of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Natural gas could be an important alternative energy source to liquid products derived from crude oil to help meet market demand. The purpose of this study was to (1) analyze three energy markets to determine whether greater use could be made of natural gas or its derivatives and (2) determine whether those products could be provided on an economically competitive basis. The following three markets were targeted for possible increases in gas use: transportation fuels, power generation, and chemical feedstock. Gas-derived products that could potentially compete in these three markets were identified, and the economics of the processes for producing those products were evaluated. The processes considered covered the range from commercial to those in early stages of process development. The analysis also evaluated the use of both high-quality natural gas and lower-quality gases containing CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} levels above normal pipeline quality standards.

Hackworth, J.H.; Koch, R.W.; Rezaiyan, A.J.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

New Natural Gas Storage and Transportation Capabilities Utilizing Rapid Methane Hydrate Formation Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas (methane as the major component) is a vital fossil fuel for the United States and around the world. One of the problems with some of this natural gas is that it is in remote areas where there is little or no local use for the gas. Nearly 50 percent worldwide natural gas reserves of ~6,254.4 trillion ft3 (tcf) is considered as stranded gas, with 36 percent or ~86 tcf of the U.S natural gas reserves totaling ~239 tcf, as stranded gas [1] [2]. The worldwide total does not include the new estimates by U.S. Geological Survey of 1,669 tcf of natural gas north of the Arctic Circle, [3] and the U.S. ~200,000 tcf of natural gas or methane hydrates, most of which are stranded gas reserves. Domestically and globally there is a need for newer and more economic storage, transportation and processing capabilities to deliver the natural gas to markets. In order to bring this resource to market, one of several expensive methods must be used: 1. Construction and operation of a natural gas pipeline 2. Construction of a storage and compression facility to compress the natural gas (CNG) at 3,000 to 3,600 psi, increasing its energy density to a point where it is more economical to ship, or 3. Construction of a cryogenic liquefaction facility to produce LNG, (requiring cryogenic temperatures at <-161 °C) and construction of a cryogenic receiving port. Each of these options for the transport requires large capital investment along with elaborate safety systems. The Department of Energy's Office of Research and Development Laboratories at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is investigating new and novel approaches for rapid and continuous formation and production of synthetic NGHs. These synthetic hydrates can store up to 164 times their volume in gas while being maintained at 1 atmosphere and between -10 to -20°C for several weeks. Owing to these properties, new process for the economic storage and transportation of these synthetic hydrates could be envisioned for stranded gas reserves. The recent experiments and their results from the testing within NETL's 15-Liter Hydrate Cell Facility exhibit promising results. Introduction of water at the desired temperature and pressure through an NETL designed nozzle into a temperature controlled methane environment within the 15-Liter Hydrate Cell allowed for instantaneous formation of methane hydrates. The instantaneous and continuous hydrate formation process was repeated over several days while varying the flow rate of water, its' temperature, and the overall temperature of the methane environment. These results clearly indicated that hydrates formed immediately after the methane and water left the nozzle at temperatures above the freezing point of water throughout the range of operating conditions. [1] Oil and Gas Journal Vol. 160.48, Dec 22, 2008. [2] http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/servicerpt/natgas/chapter3.html and http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/servicerpt/natgas/pdf/tbl7.pdf [3] U.S. Geological Survey, “Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal: Estimates of Undiscovered Oil and Gas North of the Arctic Circle,” May 2008.

Brown, T.D.; Taylor, C.E.; Bernardo, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Gas Deliverability Using the Method of Distributed Volumetric Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

larger part of the well lifetime and these pseudosteady-state productivity calculations become less applicable in prediction of the reservoir?s production behavior. The Distributed Volumetric Sources (DVS) method seems able to fill this gap. Our method...

Jin, Xiaoze

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS RECEIVER UTILIZING SMALL PARTICLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Symposium on Solar Thermal Power and Energy Systems,solar to thermal conversion is accomplished by a dispersion of ultra~fine partlcles suspended in a gas to absorb radlant energy

Hunt, Arlon J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Offshore gas conservation utilizing a turbo-expander based refrigeration extraction cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas associated with the crude produced from Occidental's Piper Field is conserved by drying it and condensing out the heavier components. This renders the gas with water and hydrocarbon dew points acceptable for transfer to St. Fergus via Total's Frigg Field Pipeline. A process which includes a turbo expander/compressor is used to extract the condensate which is spiked into the crude pipeline for eventual recovery as liquid product and fuel gas at Flotta. The turbo expander can extract 30% more condensate than a simple Joule-Thompson expansion. Gas transferred to St. Fergus is 80% methane with a net calorific value of 1000 btu/scf and a water dew point of -20 F at 1700 psig.

Ross, I.; Robinson, T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Use of piston expanders in plants utilizing energy of compressed natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A comparative analysis has been performed of the suitability of using turbo-and piston (reciprocating) expanders in low-consumption units of natural gas...i...= 3–5 MPa. Two versions have been investigated: 1) mo...

A. I. Prilutskii

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributing gas utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Feasibility study: utilization of landfill gas for a vehicle fuel system, Rossman's landfill, Clackamas County, Oregon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1978, a landfill operator in Oregon became interested in the technical and economic feasibility of recovering the methane generated in the landfill for the refueling of vehicles. DOE awarded a grant for a site-specific feasibility study of this concept. This study investigated the expected methane yield and the development of a conceptual gas-gathering system; gas processing, compressing, and storage systems; and methane-fueled vehicle systems. Cost estimates were made for each area of study. The results of the study are presented. Reasoning that gasoline prices will continue to rise and that approximately 18,000 vehicles in the US have been converted to operate on methane, a project is proposed to use this landfill as a demonstration site to produce and process methane and to fuel a fleet (50 to 400) vehicles with the gas produced in order to obtain performance and economic data on the systems used from gas collection through vehicle operation. (LCL)

None

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

The future of natural gas consumption in Beijing, Guangdong and Shanghai: An assessment utilizing MARKAL  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural gas could possibly become a si0gnificant portion of the future fuel mix in China. However, there is still great uncertainty surrounding the size of this potential market and therefore its impact on the global gas trade. In order to identify some of the important factors that might drive natural gas consumption in key demand areas in China, we focus on three regions: Beijing, Guangdong, and Shanghai. Using the economic optimization model MARKAL, we initially assume that the drivers are government mandates of emissions standards, reform of the Chinese financial structure, the price and available supply of natural gas, and the rate of penetration of advanced power generating and end-use. The results from the model show that the level of natural gas consumption is most sensitive to policy scenarios, which strictly limit SO2 emissions from power plants. The model also revealed that the low cost of capital for power plants in China boosts the economic viability of capital-intensive coal-fired plants. This suggests that reform within the financial sector could be a lever for encouraging increased natural gas use.

BinBin Jiang; Chen Wenying; Yu Yuefeng; Zeng Lemin; David Victor

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Demonstration of an on-site PAFC cogeneration system with waste heat utilization by a new gas absorption chiller  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis and cost reduction of fuel cells is being promoted to achieve commercial on-site phosphoric acid fuel cells (on-site FC). However, for such cells to be effectively utilized, a cogeneration system designed to use the heat generated must be developed at low cost. Room heating and hot-water supply are the most simple and efficient uses of the waste heat of fuel cells. However, due to the short room-heating period of about 4 months in most areas in Japan, the sites having demand for waste heat of fuel cells throughout the year will be limited to hotels and hospitals Tokyo Gas has therefore been developing an on-site FC and the technology to utilize tile waste heat of fuel cells for room cooling by means of an absorption refrigerator. The paper describes the results of fuel cell cogeneration tests conducted on a double effect gas absorption chiller heater with auxiliary waste heat recovery (WGAR) that Tokyo Gas developed in its Energy Technology Research Laboratory.

Urata, Tatsuo [Tokyo Gas Company, LTD, Tokyo (Japan)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

244

Distribution of Natural Gas: The Final Step in the Transmission Process  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

June 2008 June 2008 1 Each day, close to 70 million customers in the United States depend upon the national natural gas distribution network, including natural gas distribution companies and pipelines, to deliver natural gas to their home or place of business (Figure 1). These customers currently consume approximately 20 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of natural gas per annum, accounting for about 22 percent of the total energy consumed in the United States each year. This end- use customer base is 92 percent residential units, 7 percent commercial businesses, and 1 percent large industrial and electric power generation customers. 1 However, the large- volume users, though small in number, account for more than 60 percent of the natural gas used by end users.

245

A Technique to Utilize Smart Meter Load Information for Adapting Overcurrent Protection for Radial Distribution Systems with Distributed Generations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

overcurrent protection scheme to reduce the number of customers affected by faults in RDS with DGs. Further, a technique is presented that utilizes customers loading information from smart meters in AMI to improve the sensitivity of substation OC relays...

Ituzaro, Fred Agyekum

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

246

Coking Plants, Coal-to-gas Plants, Gas Production and Distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This environmental brief covers various coal upgrading technologies, incl. coking and low-temperature carbonization as processes yielding the target products coke and gas plus tar products and diverse...

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Pipeline Annual Data - 1996 Gas Distribution Annuals Data (Zip) | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Distribution Annuals Data (Zip) Distribution Annuals Data (Zip) Energy Data Apps Maps Challenges Resources Blogs Let's Talk Energy Beta You are here Data.gov » Communities » Energy » Data Pipeline Annual Data - 1996 Gas Distribution Annuals Data (Zip) Dataset Summary Description Pipeline operators (for gas distribution, gas transmission, and hazardous liquid pipelines) are required to submit an annual report to the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration's Office of Pipeline Safety. The report includes information about the operator, a description of their system (main, services), leaks eliminated/repaired during the year, excavation damage, excess flow valves, and other information. Beginning in 2010, the form also includes information regarding integrity management programs.

248

A Quantitative Assessment of Utility Reporting Practices for Reporting Electric Power Distribution Events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consider reporting of SAIDI and SAIFI both including and notInterruption Frequency Index (SAIFI) reported by utilities.Frequency Index (SAIFI). We pay special attention to the

Hamachi La Commare, Kristina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Work distribution of an expanding gas and transverse energy production in relativistic heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The work distribution of an expanding extreme relativistic gas is shown to be a gamma distribution with a different shape parameter as compared with its non-relativistic counterpart. This implies that the shape of the transverse energy distribution in relativistic heavy ion collisions depends on the particle contents during the evolution of the hot and dense matter. Therefore, transverse energy fluctuations provide additional insights into the Quark-Gluon Plasma produced in these collisions.

Bin Zhang; Jay P. Mayfield

2014-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

250

Work distribution of an expanding gas and transverse energy production in relativistic heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The work distribution of an expanding extreme relativistic gas is shown to be a gamma distribution with a different shape parameter as compared with its non-relativistic counterpart. This implies that the shape of the transverse energy distribution in relativistic heavy ion collisions depends on the particle contents during the evolution of the hot and dense matter. Therefore, transverse energy fluctuations provide additional insights into the Quark-Gluon Plasma produced in these collisions.

Zhang, Bin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Evaluation of naturally fractured gas shale production utilizing multiwell transient tests: A field study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of multiple well transient tests were conducted in a Devonian shale gas field in Meigs County, Ohio. Production parameters were quantified and it was determined that the reservoir is highly anisotropic, which is a significant factor in calculating half-fracture length from pressure transient data. Three stimulation treatments, including conventional explosive shooting, nitrogen foam frac, and high energy gas frac (HEGF), were compared on the basis of overall effectiveness and performance. Based on the evaluation of results, the nitrogen foam frac provided the most improved productivity. The study provided new type curves and analytical solutions for the mathematical representation of naturally fractured reservoirs and confirmed that the shale reservoir in Meigs County can be modeled as a dual porosity system using pseudosteady-state gas transfer from the matrix to the fracture system.

Chen, C.C.; Alam, J.; Blanton, T.L.; Vozniak, J.P.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Public Utility Regulation (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Utility Regulation (Iowa) Utility Regulation (Iowa) Public Utility Regulation (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Utilities Board This section applies to any person, partnership, business association, or corporation that owns or operates any facilities for furnishing gas by piped distribution system, electricity, communications services, or water to the public for compensation. Regulations pertaining to these facilities can be found in this section. Some exemptions apply

253

Rapid deployment of oil-drilling tools utilizing distribution network and inventory strategies .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??DTS is an oil and gas services company that delivers drilling tools to six major customer districts in the continental U.S. After the tools are… (more)

Rahim, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. Subsequent chapters of this report provide: an overview of NGTDM; a description of the interface between the NEMS and NGTDM; an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM; the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module; the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module; the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module; the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module; and a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions are engaged in a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the fly ash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. During this reporting quarter, performance testing of flue gas conditioning was completed at the PacifiCorp Jim Bridger Power Plant. The product tested, ADA-43, was a combination resistivity modifier with cohesivity polymers. The product was effective as a flue gas conditioner. However, ongoing problems with in-duct deposition resulting from the flue gas conditioning were not entirely resolved. Primarily these problems were the result of difficulties encountered with retrofit of an existing spray humidification system. Eventually it proved necessary to replace all of the original injection lances and to manually bypass the PLC-based air/liquid feed control. This yielded substantial improvement in spray atomization and system reliability. However, the plant opted not to install a permanent system. Also in this quarter, preparations continued for a test of the cohesivity additives at the American Electric Power Conesville Plant, Unit 3. This plant fires a bituminous coal and has opacity and particulate emissions performance issues related to fly ash re-entrainment. Ammonia conditioning is employed here on one unit, but there is interest in liquid cohesivity additives as a safer alternative.

Kenneth E. Baldrey

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

U.S. Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells Dataset Summary Description Distribution tables of oil and gas wells by production rate for all wells, including marginal wells, are available from the EIA for most states for the years 1919 to 2009. Graphs displaying historical behavior of well production rate are also available. The quality and completeness of data is dependent on update lag times and the quality of individual state and commercial source databases. Undercounting of the number of wells occurs in states where data is sometimes not available at the well level but only at the lease level. States not listed below will be added later as data becomes available. Source EIA Date Released January 07th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords

257

Tissue-to-blood distribution coefficients in the rat: Utility for estimation of the volume of distribution in man  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A compilation of rat tissue-to-blood partition coefficient data obtained both in vitro and in vivo in thirteen different tissues for a total of 309 different drugs is presented. An evaluation of the relationship between several fundamental physicochemical molecular descriptors and these distribution parameters was made. In addition, the ability to predict the Human Volume of distribution by regression analysis and by a Physiologically-based approach was also tested. Results have shown different trends between the drug classes and tissues, consistent with earlier described relationships between physicochemical properties and pharmacokinetic behavior. It was also possible to conclude for the acceptable ability to predict the volume of distribution in Humans by both regression and mechanistic approaches, which suggests that this type of data represents a convenient tool to describe the drug distribution on a new drug development context. These observations and analyses, along with the large database of rat tissue distribution data, should enable future efforts aimed toward developing a full in silico quantitative structure–pharmacokinetic relationships and improving our understanding of the correlations between fundamental chemical characteristics and drug distribution.

Paulo Paixão; Natália Aniceto; Luís F. Gouveia; José A.G. Morais

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Factsheet: An Initiative to Help Modernize Natural Gas Transmission...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

construction and utility workers to meet the growing demand for employees to replace and repair existing distribution pipeline systems. The Interstate Natural Gas Association of...

259

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions are engaged in a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the fly ash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. During this reporting quarter, installation of a flue gas conditioning system was completed at PacifiCorp Jim Bridger Power Plant. Performance testing was underway. Results will be detailed in the next quarterly and subsequent technical summary reports. Also in this quarter, discussions were initiated with a prospective long-term candidate plant. This plant fires a bituminous coal and has opacity performance issues related to fly ash re-entrainment. Ammonia conditioning has been proposed here, but there is interest in liquid additives as a safer alternative.

Kenneth E. Baldrey

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions are engaged in a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the fly ash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. This quarterly report summarizes project activity for the period April-June, 2003. In this period there was limited activity and no active field trials. Results of ash analysis from the AEP Conesville demonstration were received. In addition, a site visit was made to We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant and a proposal extended for a flue gas conditioning trial with the ADA-51 cohesivity additive. It is expected that this will be the final full-scale evaluation on the project.

Kenneth E. Baldrey

2003-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributing gas utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Sedimentological control on saturation distribution in Arctic gas-hydrate-bearing sands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mechanistic model is proposed to predict/explain hydrate saturation distribution in “converted free gas” hydrate reservoirs in sub-permafrost formations in the Arctic. This 1-D model assumes that a gas column accumulates and subsequently is converted to hydrate. The processes considered are the volume change during hydrate formation and consequent fluid phase transport within the column, the descent of the base of gas hydrate stability zone through the column, and sedimentological variations with depth. Crucially, the latter enable disconnection of the gas column during hydrate formation, which leads to substantial variation in hydrate saturation distribution. One form of variation observed in Arctic hydrate reservoirs is that zones of very low hydrate saturations are interspersed abruptly between zones of large hydrate saturations. The model was applied to data from Mount Elbert well, a gas hydrate stratigraphic test well drilled in the Milne Point area of the Alaska North Slope. The model is consistent with observations from the well log and interpretations of seismic anomalies in the area. The model also predicts that a considerable amount of fluid (of order one pore volume of gaseous and/or aqueous phases) must migrate within or into the gas column during hydrate formation. This paper offers the first explanatory model of its kind that addresses “converted free gas reservoirs” from a new angle: the effect of volume change during hydrate formation combined with capillary entry pressure variation versus depth.

Javad Behseresht; Steven L. Bryant

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Pyrolysis process for producing condensed stabilized hydrocarbons utilizing a beneficially reactive gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a process for recovery of values contained in solid carbonaceous material, the solid carbonaceous material is comminuted and then subjected to pyrolysis, in the presence of a carbon containing solid particulate source of heat and a beneficially reactive transport gas in a transport flash pyrolysis reactor, to form a pyrolysis product stream. The pyrolysis product stream contains a gaseous mixture and particulate solids. The solids are separated from the gaseous mixture to form a substantially solids-free gaseous stream which comprises volatilized hydrocarbon free radicals newly formed by pyrolysis. Preferably the solid particulate source of heat is formed by oxidizing part of the separated particulate solids. The beneficially reactive transport gas inhibits the reactivity of the char product and the carbon-containing solid particulate source of heat. Condensed stabilized hydrocarbons are obtained by quenching the gaseous mixture stream with a quench fluid which contains a capping agent for stabilizing and terminating newly formed volatilized hydrocarbon free radicals. The capping agent is partially depleted of hydrogen by the stabilization and termination reaction. Hydrocarbons of four or more carbon atoms in the gaseous mixture stream are condensed. A liquid stream containing the stabilized liquid product is then treated or separated into various fractions. A liquid containing the hydrogen depleted capping agent is hydrogenated to form a regenerated capping agent. At least a portion of the regenerated capping agent is recycled to the quench zone as the quench fluid. In another embodiment capping agent is produced by the process, separated from the liquid product mixture, and recycled.

Durai-Swamy, Kandaswamy (Culver City, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Fractal distributions of dark matter and gas in the MareNostrum Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a method of multifractal analysis of N-body cosmological simulations that improves on the customary counts-in-cells method by taking special care of the effects of discreteness and large scale homogeneity. The analysis of the Mare-Nostrum simulation with our method provides strong evidence of self-similar multifractal distributions of dark matter and gas, with a halo mass function that is of Press-Schechter type but has a power-law exponent -2, as corresponds to a multifractal. Furthermore, our analysis shows that the dark matter and gas distributions are indistinguishable as multifractals. To determine if there is any gas biasing, we calculate the cross-correlation coefficient, with negative but inconclusive results. Hence, we develop an effective Bayesian analysis connected with information theory, which clearly demonstrates that the gas is biased in a long range of scales, up to the scale of homogeneity. However, entropic measures related to the Bayesian analysis show that this gas bias is small (in a precise sense) and is such that the fractal singularities of both distributions coincide and are identical. We conclude that this common multifractal cosmic web structure is determined by the dynamics and is independent of the initial conditions.

Jose Gaite

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

Fractal analysis of the dark matter and gas distributions in the Mare-Nostrum universe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We develop a method of multifractal analysis of N-body cosmological simulations that improves on the customary counts-in-cells method by taking special care of the effects of discreteness and large scale homogeneity. The analysis of the Mare-Nostrum simulation with our method provides strong evidence of self-similar multifractal distributions of dark matter and gas, with a halo mass function that is of Press-Schechter type but has a power-law exponent -2, as corresponds to a multifractal. Furthermore, our analysis shows that the dark matter and gas distributions are indistinguishable as multifractals. To determine if there is any gas biasing, we calculate the cross-correlation coefficient, with negative but inconclusive results. Hence, we develop an effective Bayesian analysis connected with information theory, which clearly demonstrates that the gas is biased in a long range of scales, up to the scale of homogeneity. However, entropic measures related to the Bayesian analysis show that this gas bias is small (in a precise sense) and is such that the fractal singularities of both distributions coincide and are identical. We conclude that this common multifractal cosmic web structure is determined by the dynamics and is independent of the initial conditions.

Gaite, José, E-mail: jose.gaite@upm.es [Instituto de Microgravedad IDR, EIAE, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Pza. Cardenal Cisneros 3, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Factsheet: An Initiative to Help Modernize Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Infrastructure  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Today, the White House and the Department of Energy are hosting a Capstone Methane Stakeholder Roundtable. In addition, DOE is announcing a series of actions, partnerships, and stakeholder commitments to help modernize the nation’s natural gas transmission and distribution systems and reduce methane emissions.

266

Calculation of the electron distribution function of a rare gas nuclear induced plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1101 Calculation of the electron distribution function of a rare gas nuclear induced plasma A. M of the energy spectrum of the seed electrons. As an example, this calculation is applied to the case of neon ionisantes rapides est calculable, dans sa partie à basse et moyenne énergie, sans la connaissance précise

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

267

CARS, GAS, AND POLLUTION POLICIES Distributional and Efficiency Impacts of Gasoline Taxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CARS, GAS, AND POLLUTION POLICIES Distributional and Efficiency Impacts of Gasoline Taxes, reduc- ing automobile-related gasoline consumption has become a major U.S. public policy issue. Recently, many analysts have called for new or more stringent policies to discourage gasoline consumption

Boyer, Edmond

268

Study of integrated metal hydrides heat pump and cascade utilization of liquefied natural gas cold energy recovery system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The traditional cold energy utilization of the liquefied natural gas system needs a higher temperature heat source to improve exergy efficiency, which barricades the application of the common low quality thermal energy. The adoption of a metal hydride heat pump system powered by low quality energy could provide the necessary high temperature heat and reduce the overall energy consumption. Thus, an LNG cold energy recovery system integrating metal hydride heat pump was proposed, and the exergy analysis method was applied to study the case. The performance of the proposed integration system was evaluated. Moreover, some key factors were also theoretically investigated about their influences on the system performance. According to the results of the analysis, some optimization directions of the integrated system were also pointed out.

Xiangyu Meng; Feifei Bai; Fusheng Yang; Zewei Bao; Zaoxiao Zhang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Rapid deployment of oil-drilling tools utilizing distribution network and inventory strategies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DTS is an oil and gas services company that delivers drilling tools to six major customer districts in the continental U.S. After the tools are used at a rig, they are transported to the closest repair and maintenance (MTC) ...

Rahim, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Question 2: Gas procurement strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article is a collection of responses from natural gas distribution company representatives to questions on how the start-up of the natural gas futures market has changed gas procurement strategies, identification of procurement problems related to pipeline capacity, deliverability, or pregranted abandonment of firm transportation, the competition of separate utility subsidiaries with brokers, marketers, and other gas suppliers who sell gas to large-volume industrial or other 'noncore' customers.

Carrigg, J.A.; Crespo, J.R.; Davis, E.B. Jr.; Farman, R.D.; Green, R.C. Jr.; Hale, R.W.; Howard, J.J.; McCormick, W.T. Jr.; Page, T.A.; Ryan, W.F.; Schrader, T.F.; Schuchart, J.A.; Smith, J.F.; Stys, R.D.; Thorpe, J.A.

1990-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

271

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions are engaged in a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the fly ash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. During this reporting quarter, further laboratory-screening tests of additive formulations were completed. For these tests, the electrostatic tensiometer method was used for determination of fly ash cohesivity. Resistivity was measured for each screening test with a multi-cell laboratory fly ash resistivity furnace constructed for this project. Also during this quarter chemical formulation testing was undertaken to identify stable and compatible resistivity/cohesivity liquid products.

Kenneth E. Baldrey

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions are engaged in a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the fly ash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. During this reporting quarter, two cohesivity-specific additive formulations, ADA-44C and ADA-51, were evaluated in a full-scale trial at the American Electric Power Conesville plant. Ammonia conditioning was also evaluated for comparison. ADA-51 and ammonia conditioning significantly reduced rapping and non-rapped particulate re-entrainment based on stack opacity monitor data. Based on the successful tests to date, ADA-51 will be evaluated in a long-term test.

Kenneth E. Baldrey

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

New York Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) New York Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.26 0.23 0.25 1970's 0.23 0.25 0.26 0.27 0.31 0.39 0.54 0.85 1.07 1.44 1980's 1.95 2.41 3.15 3.44 3.23 3.15 2.53 2.47 2.33 2.64 1990's 2.59 2.71 2.86 3.15 2.21 1.52 2.23 1.89 1.38 1.31 2000's 2.25 2.94 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use New York Natural Gas Prices Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use

274

Texas Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.16 0.17 0.17 1970's 0.17 0.18 0.19 0.20 0.28 0.37 0.51 0.68 0.73 1.19 1980's 1.56 2.24 3.09 3.11 2.98 2.80 2.18 2.01 1.98 1.81 1990's 1.74 1.62 1.66 1.82 1.64 1.64 2.40 2.36 2.02 1.99 2000's 2.99 3.13 NA -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Texas Natural Gas Prices Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use

275

Ohio Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.22 0.23 0.23 1970's 0.23 0.27 0.28 0.30 0.32 0.43 0.53 0.87 1.01 1.37 1980's 1.92 2.33 3.04 3.42 3.28 3.28 2.79 2.64 2.43 2.54 1990's 2.61 2.66 2.83 2.53 2.50 2.03 2.88 2.80 3.20 2.63 2000's 3.41 5.18 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Ohio Natural Gas Prices Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use

276

Idaho Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Idaho Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.21 0.21 0.22 1970's 0.22 0.24 0.28 0.34 0.44 0.60 0.72 1.65 1.95 2.45 1980's 3.93 3.95 4.19 3.69 3.55 3.15 2.67 2.08 2.00 2.05 1990's 2.06 1.99 1.89 1.76 1.86 1.78 1.79 1.83 1.67 2.04 2000's 3.52 3.49 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Idaho Natural Gas Prices Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use

277

Utah Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.21 0.21 0.21 1970's 0.21 0.22 0.28 0.29 0.34 0.54 0.67 1.40 1.72 1.88 1980's 2.94 3.17 2.67 2.94 2.99 3.19 2.93 2.66 2.84 2.18 1990's 2.25 2.51 2.25 1.91 1.94 1.57 1.68 2.20 2.05 1.92 2000's 3.19 2.97 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Utah Natural Gas Prices Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use

278

U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.20 0.20 0.21 1970's 0.21 0.22 0.23 0.25 0.30 0.40 0.51 0.77 0.90 1.32 1980's 1.85 2.39 2.97 3.15 3.04 2.92 2.52 2.17 2.10 2.01 1990's 1.95 1.87 2.07 1.97 1.70 1.49 2.27 2.29 2.01 1.88 2000's 2.97 3.55 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use U.S. Natural Gas Prices

279

Iowa Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Iowa Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.17 0.16 0.17 1970's 0.17 0.19 0.20 0.22 0.26 0.34 0.52 0.73 0.99 1.17 1980's 1.55 1.89 2.50 2.73 2.71 2.83 2.57 2.75 2.01 2.02 1990's 1.52 1.54 1.71 1.25 1.39 1.40 2.37 2.46 2.06 2.16 2000's 3.17 3.60 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Iowa Natural Gas Prices

280

NSLS Utilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Utilities Utilities The Utilities Group, led by project engineer Ron Beauman, is responsible for providing Utilities Engineering and Technical services to NSLS, Users, and SDL including cooling water at controlled flow rates, pressures, and temperatures, compressed air and other gases. In addition, they provide HVAC engineering, technical, and electrical services as needed. Utilities systems include cooling and process water, gas, and compressed air systems. These systems are essential to NSLS operations. Working behind the scenes, the Utilities group continuously performs preventative maintenance to ensure that the NSLS has minimal downtime. This is quite a feat, considering that the Utilities group has to maintain seven very large and independent systems that extent throughout NSLS. Part of the group's

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributing gas utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. From 1982 through 1993, the Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS) was used by the EIA for its analyses, and the Gas Analysis Modeling System (GAMS) was used within IFFS to represent natural gas markets. Prior to 1982, the Midterm Energy Forecasting System (MEFS), also referred to as the Project Independence Evaluation System (PIES), was employed. NEMS was developed to enhance and update EIA`s modeling capability by internally incorporating models of energy markets that had previously been analyzed off-line. In addition, greater structural detail in NEMS permits the analysis of a broader range of energy issues. The time horizon of NEMS is the midterm period (i.e., through 2015). In order to represent the regional differences in energy markets, the component models of NEMS function at regional levels appropriate for the markets represented, with subsequent aggregation/disaggregation to the Census Division level for reporting purposes.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Wireless Self-powered Visual and NDE Robotic Inspection System for Live Gas Distribution Mains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) under contract from Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DoE/NETL) and co-funding from the Northeast Gas Association (NGA), has completed the overall system design of the next-generation Explorer-II (X-II) live gas main NDE and visual inspection robot platform. The design is based on the Explorer-I prototype which was built and field-tested under a prior (also DoE- and NGA co-funded) program, and served as the validation that self-powered robots under wireless control could access and navigate live natural gas distribution mains. The X-II system design ({approx}8 ft. and 66 lbs.) was heavily based on the X-I design, yet was substantially expanded to allow the addition of NDE sensor systems (while retaining its visual inspection capability), making it a modular system, and expanding its ability to operate at pressures up to 750 psig (high-pressure and unpiggable steel-pipe distribution mains). A new electronics architecture and on-board software kernel were added to again improve system performance. A locating sonde system was integrated to allow for absolute position-referencing during inspection (coupled with external differential GPS) and emergency-locating. The power system was upgraded to utilize lithium-based battery-cells for an increase in mission-time. The system architecture now relies on a dual set of end camera-modules to house the 32-bit processors (Single-Board Computer or SBC) as well as the imaging and wireless (off-board) and CAN-based (on-board) communication hardware and software systems (as well as the sonde-coil and -electronics). The drive-module (2 ea.) are still responsible for bracing (and centering) to drive in push/pull fashion the robot train into and through the pipes and obstacles. The steering modules and their arrangement, still allow the robot to configure itself to perform any-angle (up to 90 deg) turns in any orientation (incl. vertical), and enable the live launching and recovery of the system using custom fittings and a (to be developed) launch-chamber/-tube. The battery modules are used to power the system, by providing power to the robot's bus. The support modules perform the functions of centration for the rest of the train as well as odometry pickups using incremental encoding schemes. The electronics architecture is based on a distributed (8-bit) microprocessor architecture (at least 1 in ea. module) communicating to a (one of two) 32-bit SBC, which manages all video-processing, posture and motion control as well as CAN and wireless communications. The operator controls the entire system from an off-board (laptop) controller, which is in constant wireless communication with the robot train in the pipe. The sensor modules collect data and forward it to the robot operator computer (via the CAN-wireless communications chain), who then transfers it to a dedicated NDE data-storage and post-processing computer for further (real-time or off-line) analysis. CMU has fully designed every module in terms of the mechanical, electrical and software elements (architecture only). Substantial effort has gone into pre-prototyping to uncover mechanical, electrical and software issues for critical elements of the design. Design requirements for sensor-providers were also detailed and finalized and provided to them for inclusion in their designs. CMU is expecting to start 2006 with a detailed design effort for both mechanical and electrical components, followed by procurement and fabrication efforts in late winter/spring 2006. The assembly and integration efforts will occupy all of the spring and summer of 2006. Software development will also be a major effort in 2006, and will result in porting and debugging of code on the module- and train-levels in late summer and Fall of 2006. Final pipe mock-up testing is expected in late fall and early winter 2006 with an acceptance demonstration of the robot train (with a sensor-module mock-up) planned to DoE/NGA towards the end of 2006.

Susan Burkett; Hagen Schempf

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

283

Flue Gas Purification Utilizing SOx/NOx Reactions During Compression of CO{sub 2} Derived from Oxyfuel Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States wishes to decrease foreign energy dependence by utilizing the country’s significant coal reserves, while stemming the effects of global warming from greenhouse gases. In response to these needs, Air Products has developed a patented process for the compression and purification of the CO{sub 2} stream from oxyfuel combustion of pulverized coal. The purpose of this project was the development and performance of a comprehensive experimental and engineering evaluation to determine the feasibility of purifying CO{sub 2} derived from the flue gas generated in a tangentially fired coal combustion unit operated in the oxy-combustion mode. Following the design and construction of a 15 bar reactor system, Air Products conducted two test campaigns using the slip stream from the tangentially fired oxy-coal combustion unit. During the first test campaign, Air Products evaluated the reactor performance based on both the liquid and gaseous reactor effluents. The data obtained from the test run has enabled Air Products to determine the reaction and mass transfer rates, as well as the effectiveness of the reactor system. During the second test campaign, Air Products evaluated reactor performance based on effluents for different reactor pressures, as well as water recycle rates. Analysis of the reaction equations indicates that both pressure and water flow rate affect the process reaction rates, as well as the overall reactor performance.

Fogash, Kevin

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

284

Flue Gas Perification Utilizing SOx/NOx Reactions During Compression of CO2 Derived from Oxyfuel Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States wishes to decrease foreign energy dependence by utilizing the country’s significant coal reserves, while stemming the effects of global warming from greenhouse gases. In response to these needs, Air Products has developed a patented process for the compression and purification of the CO2 stream from oxyfuel combustion of pulverized coal. The purpose of this project was the development and performance of a comprehensive experimental and engineering evaluation to determine the feasibility of purifying CO2 derived from the flue gas generated in a tangentially fired coal combustion unit operated in the oxy-combustion mode. Following the design and construction of a 15 bar reactor system, Air Products conducted two test campaigns using the slip stream from the tangentially fired oxy-coal combustion unit. During the first test campaign, Air Products evaluated the reactor performance based on both the liquid and gaseous reactor effluents. The data obtained from the test run has enabled Air Products to determine the reaction and mass transfer rates, as well as the effectiveness of the reactor system. During the second test campaign, Air Products evaluated reactor performance based on effluents for different reactor pressures, as well as water recycle rates. Analysis of the reaction equations indicates that both pressure and water flow rate affect the process reaction rates, as well as the overall reactor performance.

Kevin Fogash

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

285

DETERMINING ALL GAS PROPERTIES IN GALAXY CLUSTERS FROM THE DARK MATTER DISTRIBUTION ALONE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate that all properties of the hot X-ray emitting gas in galaxy clusters are completely determined by the underlying dark matter (DM) structure. Apart from the standard conditions of spherical symmetry and hydrostatic equilibrium for the gas, our proof is based on the Jeans equation for the DM and two simple relations which have recently emerged from numerical simulations: the equality of the gas and DM temperatures, and the almost linear relation between the DM velocity anisotropy profile and its density slope. For DM distributions described by the Navarro-Frenk-White or the Sersic profiles, the resulting gas density profile, the gas-to-total-mass ratio profile, and the entropy profile are all in good agreement with X-ray observations. All these profiles are derived using zero free parameters. Our result allows us to predict the X-ray luminosity profile of a cluster in terms of its DM content alone. As a consequence, a new strategy becomes available to constrain the DM morphology in galaxy clusters from X-ray observations. Our results can also be used as a practical tool for creating initial conditions for realistic cosmological structures to be used in numerical simulations.

Frederiksen, Teddy F.; Hansen, Steen H.; Host, Ole [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Roncadelli, Marco [INFN, Sezione di Pavia, Via A. Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTION POTENTIAL WITH COMBINED HEAT AND POWER WITH DISTRIBUTED GENERATION PRIME MOVERS - ASME 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pending or recently enacted greenhouse gas regulations and mandates are leading to the need for current and feasible GHG reduction solutions including combined heat and power (CHP). Distributed generation using advanced reciprocating engines, gas turbines, microturbines and fuel cells has been shown to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) compared to the U.S. electrical generation mix due to the use of natural gas and high electrical generation efficiencies of these prime movers. Many of these prime movers are also well suited for use in CHP systems which recover heat generated during combustion or energy conversion. CHP increases the total efficiency of the prime mover by recovering waste heat for generating electricity, replacing process steam, hot water for buildings or even cooling via absorption chilling. The increased efficiency of CHP systems further reduces GHG emissions compared to systems which do not recover waste thermal energy. Current GHG mandates within the U.S Federal sector and looming GHG legislation for states puts an emphasis on understanding the GHG reduction potential of such systems. This study compares the GHG savings from various state-of-the- art prime movers. GHG reductions from commercially available prime movers in the 1-5 MW class including, various industrial fuel cells, large and small gas turbines, micro turbines and reciprocating gas engines with and without CHP are compared to centralized electricity generation including the U.S. mix and the best available technology with natural gas combined cycle power plants. The findings show significant GHG saving potential with the use of CHP. Also provided is an exploration of the accounting methodology for GHG reductions with CHP and the sensitivity of such analyses to electrical generation efficiency, emissions factors and most importantly recoverable heat and thermal recovery efficiency from the CHP system.

Curran, Scott [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Bunce, Michael [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Rhode Island Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.73 0.33 0.39 1970's 0.33 0.38 0.38 0.42 0.41 0.55 0.75 1.67 2.08 2.06 1980's 2.92 4.74 4.53 4.74 4.05 4.53 3.55 2.87 2.20 4.19 1990's 3.74 3.41 2.94 3.31 2.69 2.21 3.35 3.15 3.00 2.53 2000's 4.67 5.20 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Rhode Island Natural Gas Prices

288

North Dakota Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.27 0.17 0.17 1970's 0.20 0.20 0.25 0.29 0.31 0.51 0.57 0.75 0.95 1.55 1980's 1.81 2.34 4.11 3.80 3.42 2.77 2.56 2.40 2.49 2.03 1990's 1.61 1.35 1.28 1.84 1.34 1.01 1.70 2.07 1.77 2.12 2000's 3.62 2.14 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use North Dakota Natural Gas Prices

289

South Dakota Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.24 0.22 0.20 1970's 0.20 0.20 0.30 0.33 0.31 0.50 0.55 0.63 0.78 1.20 1980's 1.71 2.20 2.91 3.31 3.32 3.46 2.69 2.17 2.05 1.91 1990's 2.13 1.42 1.22 1.80 1.36 1.03 1.75 2.13 1.68 2.12 2000's 3.76 3.28 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use South Dakota Natural Gas Prices

290

West Virginia Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.34 0.33 1970's 0.32 0.33 0.38 0.39 0.45 0.59 0.69 1.12 1.29 0.85 1980's 2.24 2.62 3.35 3.75 3.71 3.85 3.44 2.85 2.89 2.97 1990's 2.86 2.49 2.93 3.57 3.54 1.87 3.19 2.97 2.69 2.54 2000's 3.70 5.42 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use West Virginia Natural Gas Prices

291

The influence of attached bubbles on potential drop and current distribution at gas-evolving electrodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A theoretical study is presented of the effects of bubbles attached to the surface of a gas-evolving electrode, with emphasis on their influence on the local current distribution and on the potential drop at the electrode. The mathematical model accounts for the combined influence of (i) ohmic obstruction within the electrolyte, (ii) area masking on the electrode surface, which raises surface overpotential by increasing the effective current density, and (iii) decreased local supersaturation, which lowers the concentration overpotential. The electrolytic transport is described by potential theory, and the dissolved gas is assumed to obey steady-state diffusion within a concentration boundary layer. The coupled field equations are solved numerically using the boundary-element method. The model is applied to hydrogen evolution in potassium-hydroxide solution. For gas evolution in the Tafel kinetic regime, the current distribution is nearly uniform over the unmasked electrode area, and the increase in surface overpotential is the dominant voltage effect. However, outside the Tafel regime (e.g. on cathodes of greater catalytic activity) the current density is strongly enhanced near the bubble-contact zone, and the supersaturation-lowering effect is quite strong, largely offsetting the ohmic and surface-overpotential effects. Proceeding from a set of base conditions, the authors perform a systematic examination of attached-bubble effects, their relative importance, and their dependence on system variables.

Dukovic, J.; Tobias, C.W.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

New Mexico Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.16 0.15 0.15 1970's 0.17 0.17 0.18 0.22 0.30 0.39 0.41 0.68 0.79 1.36 1980's 1.78 2.25 2.80 3.10 3.24 2.86 2.31 1.66 1.70 1.63 1990's 1.67 1.36 1.31 1.79 1.61 1.13 1.59 1.94 1.89 1.03 2000's 1.80 1.74 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use New Mexico Natural Gas Prices

293

New Jersey Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) New Jersey Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.25 0.21 0.21 1970's 0.22 0.23 0.24 0.25 0.27 0.33 0.41 0.63 0.85 1.29 1980's 1.96 2.75 3.07 3.37 3.68 3.40 2.94 2.53 2.73 2.74 1990's 2.62 2.48 2.62 2.93 2.66 2.59 3.15 3.11 2.93 1.79 2000's 4.00 4.74 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use New Jersey Natural Gas Prices

294

Probability distribution functions of gas in M31 and M51  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present probability distribution functions (PDFs) of the surface densities of ionized and neutral gas in the nearby spiral galaxies M31 and M51, as well as of dust emission and extinction Av in M31. The PDFs are close to lognormal and those for HI and Av in M31 are nearly identical. However, the PDFs for H2 are wider than the HI PDFs and the M51 PDFs have larger dispersions than those for M31. We use a simple model to determine how the PDFs are changed by variations in the line-of-sight (LOS) pathlength L through the gas, telescope resolution and the volume filling factor of the gas, f_v. In each of these cases the dispersion sigma of the lognormal PDF depends on the variable with a negative power law. We also derive PDFs of mean LOS volume densities of gas components in M31 and M51. Combining these with the volume density PDFs for different components of the ISM in the Milky Way (MW), we find that sigma decreases with increasing length L with an exponent of -0.76 +/- 0.06, which is steeper than expected. ...

Berkhuijsen, Elly M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Demand Matrix for Information, Measuring, and Control System for the Diagnostics and Safety of Gazprom Gas Distribution Stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider the salient aspects of unification of the diagnostic parameters necessary for optimally managing the development of the OAO Gazprom system of gas distribution stations now functioning or being overhau...

Yu. I. Esin; V. M. Klishchevskaya; N. G. Petrov; G. A. Sarychev…

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Humidity-independent portable air-hydrogen fuel cells with slotted silicon based gas-distributing plates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have studied the characteristics of small-scale air-hydrogen fuel cells (FCs) operating in a free-breathing cathode regime. The cells are provided with a new gas-distributing element on the cathode side, wh...

E. V. Astrova; D. A. Andronikov; M. V. Gorokhov…

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Systematic Studies of the Gas Humidification Effects on Spatial PEMFC Performance Distributions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall current density that is measured in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) represents the average of the local reaction rates. The overall and local PEMFC performances are determined by several primary loss mechanisms, namely activation, ohmic, and mass transfer. Spatial performance and loss variabilities are significant and depend on the cell design and operating conditions. A segmented cell system was used to quantify different loss distributions along the gas channel to understand the effects of gas humidification. A reduction in the reactant stream humidification decreased cell performance and resulted in non-uniform distributions of overpotentials and performance along the flow field. Activation and ohmic overpotentials increased with a relative humidity decrease due to insufficient membrane and catalyst layer hydration. The relative humidity of the cathode had a strong impact on the mass transfer overpotential due to a lower oxygen permeability through the dry Nafion film covering the catalyst surface. The mass transfer loss distribution was non-uniform, and the mass transfer overpotential increased for the outlet segments due to the oxygen consumption at the inlet segments, which reduced the oxygen concentration downstream, and a progressive water accumulation from upstream segments. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and an equivalent electric circuit (EEC) facilitated the analysis and interpretation of the segmented cell data.

Reshetenko, T. V.; Bender, G.; Bethune, K.; Rocheleau, R.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

NATURAL GAS ADVISORY COMMITTEE 2013-2015 Name Affiliation Phone E-mail Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURAL GAS ADVISORY COMMITTEE 2013-2015 Name Affiliation Phone E-mail Sector Cocks, Michael BPA Natural Gas (503) 721-2475 randy.friedman@nwnatural.com Distribution Finklea Edward NW Ind. Gas Users (503@ci.tacoma.wa.us Electric Utility Defenbach, Byron Intermountain Gas (208) 377-6080 bdefen@intgas.com Distribution Dahlberg

299

Regulations For Gas Companies (Tennessee) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Regulations For Gas Companies (Tennessee) Regulations For Gas Companies (Tennessee) Regulations For Gas Companies (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Tennessee Regulatory Authority The Regulations for Gas Companies, implemented by the Tennessee Regulatory Authority (Authority) outline the standards for metering, distribution and electricity generation for utilities using gas. They follow the same equipment, metering reporting and customer relations standards as the Regulations for Electric Companies. In addition to these requirements these regulations outline purity requirements, pressure limits, piping

300

Galaxy-cluster gas-density distributions of the Representative XMM-Newton Cluster Structure Survey (REXCESS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a study of the structural and scaling properties of the gas distributions in the intracluster medium (ICM) of 31 nearby (z 3 keV scale self-similarly, with no temperature dependence of gas-density normalisation. We find some evidence of a correlation between dynamical state and outer gas density slope, and between dynamical state and both central gas normalisation and cooling time. We find no evidence of a significant bimodality in the distributions of central density, density gradient, or cooling time. Finally, we present the gas mass-temperature relation for the REXCESS sample, which is consistent with the expectation of self-similar scaling modified by the presence of an entropy excess in the inner regions of the cluster, and has a logarithmic intrinsic scatter of ~10%.

J. H. Croston; G. W. Pratt; H. Boehringer; M. Arnaud; E. Pointecouteau; T. J. Ponman; A. J. R. Sanderson; R. F. Temple; R. G. Bower; M. Donahue

2008-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributing gas utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The ATLAS 3D project - XVI. Physical parameters and spectral line energy distributions of the molecular gas in gas-rich early-type galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[Abridged] We present a detailed study of the physical properties of the molecular gas in a sample of 18 molecular gas-rich early-type galaxies (ETGs) from the ATLAS$ 3D sample. Our goal is to better understand the star formation processes occurring in those galaxies, starting here with the dense star-forming gas. We use existing integrated $^{12}$CO(1-0, 2-1), $^{13}$CO(1-0, 2-1), HCN(1-0) and HCO$^{+}$(1-0) observations and present new $^{12}$CO(3-2) single-dish data. From these, we derive for the first time the average kinetic temperature, H$_{2}$ volume density and column density of the emitting gas, this using a non-LTE theoretical model. Since the CO lines trace different physical conditions than of those the HCN and HCO$^{+}$ lines, the two sets of lines are treated separately. We also compare for the first time the predicted CO spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) and gas properties of our molecular gas-rich ETGs with those of a sample of nearby well-studied disc galaxies. The gas excitation con...

Bayet, Estelle; Davis, Timothy A; Young, Lisa M; Crocker, Alison F; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frédéric; Cappellari, Michele; Davies, Roger L; de Zeeuw, P T; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnovi?, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; McDermid, Richard M; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Development of efficiency-enhanced cogeneration system utilizing high-temperature exhaust-gas from a regenerative thermal oxidizer for waste volatile-organic-compound gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed a gas-turbine cogeneration system that makes effective use of the calorific value of the volatile organic compound (VOC) gases exhausted during production processes at a manufacturing plant. The system utilizes the high-temperature exhaust-gas from the regenerative thermal oxidizer (RTO) which is used for incinerating VOC gases. The high-temperature exhaust gas is employed to resuperheat the steam injected into the gasturbine. The steam-injection temperature raised in this way increases the heat input, resulting in the improved efficiency of the gas-turbine. Based on the actual operation of the system, we obtained the following results: • Operation with the steam-injection temperature at 300 °C (45 °C resuperheated from 255 °C) increased the efficiency of the gasturbine by 0.7%. • The system can enhance the efficiency by 1.3% when the steam-injection temperature is elevated to 340 °C (85 °C resuperheated). In this case, up to 6.6 million yen of the total energy cost and 400 tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions can be reduced annually. • A gas-turbine cogeneration and RTO system can reduce energy consumption by 23% and CO2 emission by 30.1% at the plant.

Masaaki Bannai; Akira Houkabe; Masahiko Furukawa; Takao Kashiwagi; Atsushi Akisawa; Takuya Yoshida; Hiroyuki Yamada

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Utility Energy Savings Contract Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Utility Energy Savings Utility Energy Savings Contract Project Redstone Arsenal, Alabama Presented by Doug Dixon, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory For Mark D. Smith, PE, CEM, CEA Energy Manager, Redstone Arsenal Federal Utility Partnership Working Group - Fall 2010 UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED 0 50 100 150 200 250 Klbs FY09 Total Hourly Steam FY09 Total Threshold $22.76 / MMBTU (Minimum take-or-pay base rate) (Consumer Price Index) Average FY09 Natural Gas Price $5.52 / MMBTU $16.91 / MMBTU (High capacity rate) (Petroleum Price Index) Hours UNCLASSIFIED Resolution * Manage the steam load to the minimum take-or- pay thresholds under the existing contract.  Prune the distribution system by eliminating long runs with low density and high thermal losses.  Ensure summer steam loads are utilized.

304

Non-dipole effects in photoelectron angular distributions for rare gas atoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors present a theoretical study of O(ka) and O(k{sup 2}a{sup 2}) corrections to the dipole approximation in photoionization of rare gas atoms, where k is the magnitude of the photon wave vector and a is the radius of the ionized subshell. In the dipole approximation, the photoelectron angular distribution is characterized by the single parameter {Beta}. The O(ka) corrections are characterized by two parameters {gamma} and {delta}, and the O(k{sup 2}a{sup 2}) corrections are characterized by three parameters {lambda}, {mu}, and {nu}, constrained by the relation {lambda} + {mu} + {nu} = 0 and a correction {Delta}{Beta} to the dipole parameter {Beta}. Formulas are given for the non-dipole parameters in terms of reduced matrix elements of electric and magnetic multipole operators. Tables and graphs of the seven angular distribution parameters, calculated in the relativistic independent-particle approximation (IPA), are given for electron energies ranging from 20 to 5,000 eV for all 41 subshells of the rare gas atoms He,NE,Ar,Kr, and Xe. Tables and graphs of the O(ka) parameters are also given in the energy range 2--60 eV for the n = 3 and 4 shells of Kr, and for the n = 4 and 5 shells of Xe, where interesting non-dipole effects are found. Comparisons of the IPA calculations with correlated relativistic random-phase approximation calculations are made for selected subshells of Ar and Kr, illustrating the influence of correlation on the non-dipole parameters.

Derevianko, A.; Johnson, W.R.; Cheng, K.T.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Analyzing Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Infrastructure - Optimizing Transitions from Distributed to Centralized H2 Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

50% of daily production H 2 gas storage costs (separate fromNatural gas is currently the lowest cost hydrogen productioncosts are calculated for each station. On-site natural gas steam reformers The hydrogen production

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Utilization of a fuel cell power plant for the capture and conversion of gob well gas. Final report, June--December, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary study has been made to determine if a 200 kW fuel cell power plant operating on variable quality coalbed methane can be placed and successfully operated at the Jim Walter Resources No. 4 mine located in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama. The purpose of the demonstration is to investigate the effects of variable quality (50 to 98% methane) gob gas on the output and efficiency of the power plant. To date, very little detail has been provided concerning the operation of fuel cells in this environment. The fuel cell power plant will be located adjacent to the No. 4 mine thermal drying facility rated at 152 M British thermal units per hour. The dryer burns fuel at a rate of 75,000 cubic feet per day of methane and 132 tons per day of powdered coal. The fuel cell power plant will provide 700,000 British thermal units per hour of waste heat that can be utilized directly in the dryer, offsetting coal utilization by approximately 0.66 tons per day and providing an avoided cost of approximately $20 per day. The 200 kilowatt electrical power output of the unit will provide a utility cost reduction of approximately $3,296 each month. The demonstration will be completely instrumented and monitored in terms of gas input and quality, electrical power output, and British thermal unit output. Additionally, real-time power pricing schedules will be applied to optimize cost savings. 28 refs., 35 figs., 13 tabs.

Przybylic, A.R.; Haynes, C.D.; Haskew, T.A.; Boyer, C.M. II; Lasseter, E.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Comparisons of pore size distribution: A case from the Western Australian gas shale formations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Pore structure of shale samples from Triassic Kockatea and Permian Carynginia formations in the Northern Perth Basin, Western Australia is characterized. Transport properties of a porous media are regulated by the topology and geometry of inter-connected pore spaces. Comparisons of three laboratory experiments are conducted on the same source of samples to assess such micro-, meso- and macro-porosity: Mercury Injection Capillary Pressure (MICP), low field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and nitrogen adsorption (N2). High resolution FIB/SEM image analysis is used to further support the experimental pore structure interpretations at sub-micron scale. A dominating pore throat radius is found to be around 6 nm within a mesopore range based on MICP, with a common porosity around 3%. This relatively fast experiment offers the advantage to be reliable on well chips or cuttings up the pore throat sizes >2 nm. However, nitrogen adsorption method is capable to record pore sizes below 2 nm through the determination of the total pore volume from the quantity of vapour adsorbed at relative pressure. But the macro-porosity and part of the meso-porosity is damaged or even destroyed during the sample preparation. BET specific surface area results usually show a narrow range of values from 5 to 10 m2/g. Inconsistency was found in the pore size classification between MICP and N2 measurements mostly due to their individual lower- and upper-end pore size resolution limits. The water filled pores disclosed from NMR T2 relaxation time were on average 30% larger than MICP tests. Evidence of artificial cracks generated from the water interactions with clays after re-saturation experiments could explain such porosity over-estimation. The computed pore body to pore throat ratio extracted from the Timur–Coates NMR model, calibrated against gas permeability experiments, revealed that such pore geometry directly control the permeability while the porosity and pore size distribution remain similar between different shale gas formations and/or within the same formation. The combination of pore size distribution obtained from MICP, N2 and NMR seems appropriate to fully cover the range of pore size from shale gas and overcome the individual method limits.

Adnan Al Hinai; Reza Rezaee; Lionel Esteban; Mehdi Labani

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Research results and utility experience workshop: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This workshop was sponsored by the Distributed Utility Valuation (DUV) Project-a joint effort of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Department of Energy (DOE), Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Department of Energy (DOE), and Pacific Gas & Electric Company (PG&E). The purpose of the workshop is to provide a forum for utilities, other research organizations, and regulatory agencies to share results and data on Distributed Utility (DU)-related research and applications. Up-to-date information provided insight into the various technologies available to utilities, the methods used to select the technologies, and case study results. The workshop was divided into three sessions: Planning Tools; Utility Experience; and Policy and Technology Implications. Brief summaries of the individual presentations from each session are attached as appendices.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

ENERGY COMMISSION PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Prosper, California Public Utilities Commission, 415.703.2160 GREENHOUSE GAS STRATEGIES OPINION RELEASED SACRAMENTO -- The California Energy Commission and the California Public Utilities Commission today released

310

Method for recovering power according to a cascaded rankine cycle by gasifying liquefied natural gas and utilizing the cold potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention discloses a method for recovering effective energy as power between liquefied natural gas and a high temperature source by cascading two kinds of Rankine cycles when the liquefied natural gas is re-gasified. The method is characterized in that a first medium performs a first Rankine cycle with the liquefied natural gas as a low temperature source, the first medium being mainly a mixture of hydrocarbons having 1-6 carbon atoms or a mixture of halogenated hydrocarbons of boiling points close to those of said hydrocarbons, the first medium having compositions according to which the vapor curve of gasifying the liquefied natural gas substantially corresponds to the low pressure cooling curve of the first medium, the power generated thereby is recovered by a first turbine during the first Rankine cycle, a second medium having a higher boiling point than said first medium performs a second Rankine cycle with part of said first Rankine cycle as the low temperature source, the second medium, being a single hydrocarbon component having 1-6 carbon atoms or a mixture thereof, a single halogenated hydrocarbon whose boiling point is close to that of this hydrocarbon or a mixture thereof, or ammonia, whose low pressure cooling curve substantially corresponds to the vapor curve of the high pressure first medium, said first and second Rankine cycles are cascaded, and a second turbine is disposed to recover power during the second Rankine cycle.

Matsumoto, O.; Aoki, I.

1984-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

311

What Damped Ly-alpha Systems Tell Us About the Radial Distribution of Cold Gas at High Redshift  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the properties of damped Lyman-alpha systems (DLAS) in semi-analytic models, focusing on whether the models can reproduce the kinematic properties of low-ionization metal lines described by Prochaska & Wolfe (1997b, 1998). We explore a variety of approaches for modelling the radial distribution of the cold neutral gas associated with the galaxies in our models, and find that our results are very sensitive to this ingredient. If we use an approach based on Fall & Efstathiou (1980), in which the sizes of the discs are determined by conservation of angular momentum, we find that the majority of the DLAS correspond to a single galactic disc. These models generically fail to reproduce the observed distribution of velocity widths. In alternative models in which the gas discs are considerably more extended, a significant fraction of DLAS arise from lines of sight intersecting multiple gas discs in a common halo. These models produce kinematics that fit the observational data, and also seem to agree well with the results of recent hydrodynamical simulations. Thus we conclude that Cold Dark Matter based models of galaxy formation can be reconciled with the kinematic data, but only at the expense of the standard assumption that DLAS are produced by rotationally supported gas discs whose sizes are determined by conservation of angular momentum. We suggest that the distribution of cold gas at high redshift may be dominated by another process, such as tidal streaming due to mergers.

Ariyeh H. Maller; Jason X. Prochaska; Rachel S. Somerville; Joel R. Primack

2000-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

312

Economic regulation of electricity distribution utilities under high penetration of distributed energy resources : applying an incentive compatible menu of contracts, reference network model and uncertainty mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ongoing changes in the use and management of electricity distribution systems - including the proliferation of distributed energy resources, smart grid technologies (i.e., advanced power electronics and information and ...

Jenkins, Jesse D. (Jesse David)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Utilization of Common Automotive Three-Way NO{sub x} Reduction Catalyst for Managing Off- Gas from Thermal Treatment of High-Nitrate Waste - 13094  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studsvik's Thermal Organic Reduction (THOR) steam reforming process has been tested and proven to effectively treat radioactive and hazardous wastes streams with high nitrate contents to produce dry, stable mineral products, while providing high conversion (>98%) of nitrates and nitrites directly to nitrogen gas. However, increased NO{sub x} reduction may be desired for some waste streams under certain regulatory frameworks. In order to enhance the NO{sub x} reduction performance of the THOR process, a common Three-Way catalytic NO{sub x} reduction unit was installed in the process gas piping of a recently completed Engineering Scale Technology Demonstration (ESTD). The catalytic DeNO{sub x} unit was located downstream of the main THOR process vessel, and it was designed to catalyze the reduction of residual NO{sub x} to nitrogen gas via the oxidation of the hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds that are inherent to the THOR process gas. There was no need for auxiliary injection of a reducing gas, such as ammonia. The unit consisted of four monolith type catalyst sections positioned in series with a gas mixing section located between each catalyst section. The process gas was monitored for NO{sub x} concentration upstream and downstream of the catalytic DeNO{sub x} unit. Conversion efficiencies ranged from 91% to 97% across the catalytic unit, depending on the composition of the inlet gas. Higher concentrations of hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the THOR process gas increased the NO{sub x} reduction capability of the catalytic DeNO{sub x} unit. The NO{sub x} destruction performance of THOR process in combination with the Three-Way catalytic unit resulted in overall system NO{sub x} reduction efficiencies of greater than 99.9% with an average NO{sub x} reduction efficiency of 99.94% for the entire demonstration program. This allowed the NO{sub x} concentration in the ESTD exhaust gas to be maintained at less than 40 parts per million (ppm), dry basis with an average concentration of approximately 17 ppm, dry basis. There were no signs of catalyst deactivation throughout the 6 day demonstration program, even under the high steam (>50%) content and chemically reducing conditions inherent to the THOR process. Utilization of the common Three-Way automotive catalyst may prove to be a cost effective method for improving NO{sub x} emissions from thermal treatment processes that utilize similar processing conditions. This paper will discuss the details of the implementation and performance of the Three-Way catalytic DeNO{sub x} unit at the THOR ESTD, as well as a discussion of future work to determine the long-term durability of the catalyst in the THOR process. (authors)

Foster, Adam L.; Ki Song, P.E. [Studsvik, Inc. 5605 Glenridge Drive Suite 705, Atlanta, GA 30342 (United States)] [Studsvik, Inc. 5605 Glenridge Drive Suite 705, Atlanta, GA 30342 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

DOE Launches Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D Program Enhancing Pipeline and Distribution System Operational Efficiency, Reducing Methane Emissions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Following the White House and the Department of Energy Capstone Methane Stakeholder Roundtable on July 29th, DOE announced a series of actions, partnerships, and stakeholder commitments to help modernize the nation’s natural gas transmission and distribution systems and reduce methane emissions. Through common-sense standards, smart investments, and innovative research, DOE seeks to advance the state of the art in natural gas system performance. DOE’s effort is part of the larger Administration’s Climate Action Plan Interagency Strategy to Reduce Methane Emissions.

315

Applications of radon distribution and radon flux for the determination of oceanic mixing and air-sea gas exchange  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPLICATIONS OF RADON DISTRIBUTION AND RADON FLUX FOR THE DETERS 1INATION Ol OCEANIC IvfIXING AND AIR -SEA GAS EXCHA NGE A Thesis by ROBERT I. EWIS BREWER Submitted to the Graduate College oi T e xa s A '4 I'. 1 Univ c r s i ty in partial... luiiillment of the requirement for the degree of KIASTER OF SCIENCE May 1977 Major Subject: Oceanography APPLICATIONS OF RADON DIS TBIBUTION AND RADON FLUX FOR THE DETERMINATION OF OCEANIC MIXING A ND AIR ? SEA GAS EXCIdA NGE A Thesis by ROBERT LEWIS...

Brewer, Robert Lewis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

316

The effect of initial gas content and distribution on the residual gas content of cores after waterflooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of desaturating from 100 per cent brine saturation; in the second, waterflooding took place after successive steps of increasing the brine saturation, starting at the lowest value that could be obtained by flowing gas through it. The results indicate... s Hexanes Heptanes + 93. 30 5 1. 70 $ 4. 00 $ 0. 37 $ 0. 07 $ 0. 20 $ 0. 36 $ The brine used was made up from distilled water, sodium chloride, and sodium nitrite, the latter salt added to inhibit corrosion. The brine had the following composition...

Elliott, James Kelly

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

317

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When the gas turbine generator was introduced to the power generation ... fossil-fueled power plant. Twenty years later, gas turbines were established as an important means of ... on utility systems. By the early...

Jeffrey M. Smith

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Georgia Underground Gas Storage Act of 1972 (Georgia) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Georgia Underground Gas Storage Act of 1972 (Georgia) Georgia Underground Gas Storage Act of 1972 (Georgia) Georgia Underground Gas Storage Act of 1972 (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer General Public/Consumer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Georgia Underground Gas Storage Act, which permits the building of reserves for withdrawal in periods of peak demand, was created to promote the economic development of the State of Georgia and provide for more economical distribution of gas to the domestic, commercial, and industrial consumers of the State. Any gas utility desiring to utilize or operate an

319

Natural Gas Regulation - Delaware Public Service Commission (Delaware) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Gas Regulation - Delaware Public Service Commission Natural Gas Regulation - Delaware Public Service Commission (Delaware) Natural Gas Regulation - Delaware Public Service Commission (Delaware) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Fuel Distributor Program Info State Delaware Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Delaware Public Service Commission The Delaware Public Service Commission regulates only the distribution of natural gas to Delaware consumers. The delivery and administrative costs associated with natural gas distribution are determined in base rate proceedings before the Commission. The recovery of costs associated with the natural gas used by customers is determined annually as part of fuel adjustment proceedings. As a result of this process, rates for natural gas

320

ENHANCED GROWTH RATE AND SILANE UTILIZATION IN AMORPHOUS SILICON AND NANOCRYSTALLINE-SILICON SOLAR CELL DEPOSITION VIA GAS PHASE ADDITIVES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air Products set out to investigate the impact of additives on the deposition rate of both ���µCSi and ���±Si-H films. One criterion for additives was that they could be used in conventional PECVD processing, which would require sufficient vapor pressure to deliver material to the process chamber at the required flow rates. The flow rate required would depend on the size of the substrate onto which silicon films were being deposited, potentially ranging from 200 mm diameter wafers to the 5.7 m2 glass substrates used in GEN 8.5 flat-panel display tools. In choosing higher-order silanes, both disilane and trisilane had sufficient vapor pressure to withdraw gas at the required flow rates of up to 120 sccm. This report presents results obtained from testing at Air Products�¢���� electronic technology laboratories, located in Allentown, PA, which focused on developing processes on a commercial IC reactor using silane and mixtures of silane plus additives. These processes were deployed to compare deposition rates and film properties with and without additives, with a goal of maximizing the deposition rate while maintaining or improving film properties.

Ridgeway, R.G.; Hegedus, S.S.; Podraza, N.J.

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributing gas utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Methods for Analyzing the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Photovoltaic Generation to the U.S. Electric Utility System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report outlines the methods, data, and tools that could be used at different levels of sophistication and effort to estimate the benefits and costs of DGPV. In so doing, we identify the gaps in current benefit-cost-analysis methods, which we hope will inform the ongoing research agenda in this area. The focus of this report is primarily on benefits and costs from the utility or electricity generation system perspective. It is intended to provide useful background information to utility and regulatory decision makers and their staff, who are often being asked to use or evaluate estimates of the benefits and cost of DGPV in regulatory proceedings. Understanding the technical rigor of the range of methods and how they might need to evolve as DGPV becomes a more significant contributor of energy to the electricity system will help them be better consumers of this type of information. This report is also intended to provide information to utilities, policy makers, PV technology developers, and other stakeholders, which might help them maximize the benefits and minimize the costs of integrating DGPV into a changing electricity system.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Palmintier, B.; Barrows, C.; Ibanez, E.; Bird, L.; Zuboy, J.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Explorer-II: Wireless Self-Powered Visual and NDE Robotic Inspection System for Live Gas Distribution Mains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) under contract from Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DoE/NETL) and co-funding from the Northeast Gas Association (NGA), has completed the overall system design, field-trial and Magnetic Flux Leakage (MFL) sensor evaluation program for the next-generation Explorer-II (X-II) live gas main Non-destructive Evaluation (NDE) and visual inspection robot platform. The design is based on the Explorer-I prototype which was built and field-tested under a prior (also DoE- and NGA co-funded) program, and served as the validation that self-powered robots under wireless control could access and navigate live natural gas distribution mains. The X-II system design ({approx}8 ft. and 66 lbs.) was heavily based on the X-I design, yet was substantially expanded to allow the addition of NDE sensor systems (while retaining its visual inspection capability), making it a modular system, and expanding its ability to operate at pressures up to 750 psig (high-pressure and unpiggable steel-pipe distribution mains). A new electronics architecture and on-board software kernel were added to again improve system performance. A locating sonde system was integrated to allow for absolute position-referencing during inspection (coupled with external differential GPS) and emergency-locating. The power system was upgraded to utilize lithium-based battery-cells for an increase in mission-time. The resulting robot-train system with CAD renderings of the individual modules. The system architecture now relies on a dual set of end camera-modules to house the 32-bit processors (Single-Board Computer or SBC) as well as the imaging and wireless (off-board) and CAN-based (on-board) communication hardware and software systems (as well as the sonde-coil and -electronics). The drive-module (2 ea.) are still responsible for bracing (and centering) to drive in push/pull fashion the robot train into and through the pipes and obstacles. The steering modules and their arrangement, still allow the robot to configure itself to perform any-angle (up to 90 deg) turns in any orientation (incl. vertical), and enable the live launching and recovery of the system using custom fittings and a (to be developed) launch-chamber/-tube. The battery modules are used to power the system, by providing power to the robot's bus. The support modules perform the functions of centration for the rest of the train as well as odometry pickups using incremental encoding schemes. The electronics architecture is based on a distributed (8-bit) microprocessor architecture (at least 1 in ea. module) communicating to a (one of two) 32-bit SBC, which manages all video-processing, posture and motion control as well as CAN and wireless communications. The operator controls the entire system from an off-board (laptop) controller, which is in constant wireless communication with the robot train in the pipe. The sensor modules collect data and forward it to the robot operator computer (via the CAN-wireless communications chain), who then transfers it to a dedicated NDE data-storage and post-processing computer for further (real-time or off-line) analysis. The prototype robot system was built and tested indoors and outdoors, outfitted with a Remote-Field Eddy Current (RFEC) sensor integrated as its main NDE sensor modality. An angled launcher, allowing for live launching and retrieval, was also built to suit custom angled launch-fittings from TDW. The prototype vehicle and launcher systems are shown. The complete system, including the in-pipe robot train, launcher, integrated NDE-sensor and real-time video and control console and NDE-data collection and -processing and real-time display, were demonstrated to all sponsors prior to proceeding into final field-trials--the individual components and setting for said acceptance demonstration are shown. The launcher-tube was also used to verify that the vehicle system is capable of operating in high-pressure environments, and is safely deployable using proper evacuating/purging techniques for operation in the po

Carnegie Mellon University

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

323

Gas and RRR distribution in high purity Niobium EB welded in Ultra-High Vacuum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron beam (EB) welding in UHV (ultra-high vacuum, 10-5 divide 10-8 mbar) is applied in the standard fabrication of high gradient niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities of TESLA design. The quality of EB welding is critical for cavity performance. Experimental data of gas content (H2, O2, N2) and RRR (residual resistivity ratio) measurements in niobium (Nb) welding seams are presented. EB welding in UHV conditions allow to preserve low gas content (1 divide 3 wt. ppm hydrogen and 5 divide 7 ppm oxygen and nitrogen), essential for high values of RRR - 350 divide 400 units. Gas content redistribution in the electron beam welded and heat affected region take place in the welding process. Correlation between gas solubility parameters, RRR and thermal conductivity are presented. Mechanisms of gas solubility in EB welding process are discussed.

Anakhov, S.; Singer, X.; Singer, W.; Wen, H. [RSVPU, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); IEE CAS, Beijing (China)

2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

324

Fact Sheet: DOE/National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissione...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

DOENational Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners Natural Gas Infrastructure Modernization Partnership Fact Sheet: DOENational Association of Regulatory Utility...

325

Natural gas distributed throughout the Marcellus black shale in northern Appalachia could boost proven U.S. gas reserves by trillions of cubic feet (see http://live.psu.edu/story/28116).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural gas distributed throughout the Marcellus black shale in northern Appalachia could boost is the second largest producing on-shore domestic natural gas field in the United States after the San Juan and opportunities faced by landowners navigating the legal and practical issues of leasing their land for natural

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

326

City of Memphis, Tennessee (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Memphis, Tennessee (Utility Company) Memphis, Tennessee (Utility Company) (Redirected from Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division) Jump to: navigation, search Name Memphis City of Place Memphis, Tennessee Utility Id 12293 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] SGIC[3] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Smart Grid Project was awarded $5,063,469 Recovery Act Funding with a total project value of $13,112,363. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png DRAINAGE PUMPING STATION RATE Commercial GENERAL POWER RATE - PART B Industrial

327

Evaluation of the 3D-furnace simulation code AIOLOS by comparing CFD predictions of gas compositions with in-furnace measurements in a 210MW coal-fired utility boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The furnace of a pulverised coal-fired utility boiler with a thermal output of 210MW, with dimensions of 8m x 8m x 29m and 12 burners located on three levels, is considered. Coal combustion is described by a five-step-reaction scheme. The model covers two heterogeneous reactions for pyrolysis and char combustion and three gas phase reactions for the oxidation of volatile matter. A standard k, ?-model is used for the description of turbulence. The interaction of turbulence and chemistry is modelled using the Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC). The transport equations for mass, momentum, enthalpy and species are formulated in general curvilinear co-ordinates enabling an accurate treatment of boundaries and a very good control over the distribution of the grid lines. The discretisation is based on a non-staggered finite-volume approach and the coupling of velocities and pressure is achieved by the SIMPLEC method. Numerical diffusion is minimised by the use of the higher-order discretisation scheme MLU. The accuracy of the predictions is demonstrated by comparing the computational results with in-furnace measurements of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and oxygen concentrations and of temperatures.

Hermann Knaus; Uwe Schnell; Klaus R.G. Hein

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

KRS Chapter 278: Natural Gas (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

KRS Chapter 278: Natural Gas (Kentucky) KRS Chapter 278: Natural Gas (Kentucky) KRS Chapter 278: Natural Gas (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Transportation Utility Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Kentucky Public Service Commission The Public Service Commission may, by rule or order, authorize and require the transportation of natural gas in intrastate commerce by intrastate pipelines, or by local distribution companies with unused or excess capacity not needed to meet existing obligations of the pipeline or distribution company, for any person for one (1) or more uses, as defined by the commission by rule, in the case of:(a) Natural gas sold by a producer, pipeline or other seller to such person; or(b) Natural gas

329

An evaluation of joint repair methods for cast iron natural gas distribution mains and the preliminary development of an alternative joint seal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Approximately 10 percent of the natural gas pumped into distribution systems is unaccounted for. A significant portion of this amount is leakage from joints in 50 to 100 year old cast iron main. Because of the cumulative ...

Rogers, Thomas Edward

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Metropolitan Utilities District Fuels  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Metropolitan Utilities Metropolitan Utilities District Fuels Vehicles With Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Metropolitan Utilities District Fuels Vehicles With Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Metropolitan Utilities District Fuels Vehicles With Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Metropolitan Utilities District Fuels Vehicles With Natural Gas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Metropolitan Utilities District Fuels Vehicles With Natural Gas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Metropolitan Utilities District Fuels Vehicles With Natural Gas on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Metropolitan Utilities District Fuels Vehicles With Natural Gas on

331

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wood with supplementary fuels such as coal, oil, natural gas, and coke by pulp and paper mills and wood, knots, chips, etc. with other supplementary fuels such as coal, oil, natural gas, and coke to generateCenter for By-Products Utilization DEVELOPMENT OF CLSM USING COAL ASH AND WOOD ASH, A SOURCE OF NEW

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

332

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with supplementary fuels such as coal, oil, natural gas, and coke by pulp and paper mills and wood, such as bark, twigs, knots, chips, etc. with other supplementary fuels such as coal, oil, natural gas, and cokeCenter for By-Products Utilization CLSM CONTAINING MIXTURES OF COAL ASH AND A NEW POZZOLANIC

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

333

Optimization of the distribution of compressed natural gas (CNG) refueling stations: Swiss case studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To become a mass-market product, compressed natural gas (CNG) cars will need a dense network of filling stations. The Swiss natural gas industry plans to invest in 350 additional CNG stations to supplement the existing 50 sites. Cost–benefit analysis is used to define the optimal locations for these among the existing 3470 petrol filling stations. It is found using two simulations looking at equitable location of sites and socially optimal ones, that the investment in additional CNG infrastructure is unlikely to be socially advantageous.

Martin Frick; K.W. Axhausen; Gian Carle; Alexander Wokaun

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.3 Natural Gas Production and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 Top 10 Natural Gas Producing States, 2009 and 2010 (1) Gas Production in 2009 Gas Production in 2010 Marketed Production (2) Share of Marketed Production Share of State (billion cubic feet) U.S. Production State (billion cubic feet) U.S. Production 1. Texas 6,819 30% 1. Texas 6,715 30% 2. Wyoming 2,335 10% 2. Wyoming 2,306 10% 3. Oklahoma 1,858 8% 3. Louisiana 2,210 10% 4. Louisiana 1,549 7% 4. Oklahoma 1,827 8% 5. Colorado 1,499 7% 5. Colorado 1,578 7% 6. New Mexico 1,383 6% 6. New Mexico 1,292 6% 7. Arkansas 680 3% 7. Arkansas 927 4% 8. Utah 444 2% 8. Pennsylvania (3) 573 3% 9. Alaska 397 2% 9. Utah 432 2% 10. Kansas 354 2% 10. Alaska 374 2% 77% 81% Gulf of Mexico 2,429 11% Gulf of Mexico 2,245 10% U.S Total U.S. Total Note(s): Source(s): 21,604 22,402 1) State production includes offshore production in state waters, where applicable. 2) Marketed production equals gross withdrawals less gas

335

,"South Carolina Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Carolina Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2005 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1480_ssc_3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1480_ssc_3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

336

,"North Carolina Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Carolina Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2005 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1480_snc_3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1480_snc_3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

337

,"New Hampshire Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Hampshire Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2005 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1480_snh_3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1480_snh_3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

338

,"North Dakota Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2005 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1480_snd_3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1480_snd_3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

339

,"New York Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2005 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1480_sny_3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1480_sny_3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

340

,"West Virginia Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2005 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1480_swv_3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1480_swv_3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributing gas utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2005 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1480_snm_3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1480_snm_3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

342

,"New Jersey Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Jersey Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2005 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1480_snj_3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1480_snj_3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

343

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Dakota Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2005 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1480_ssd_3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1480_ssd_3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

344

Distributional Implications of Alternative U.S. Greenhouse Gas Control Measures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the distributional and efficiency impacts of different allowance allocation schemes motivated by recently proposed U.S. climate legislation for a national cap and trade system using a new dynamic computable ...

Paltsev, Sergey

345

Airborne CO2 DIAL measurement of atmospheric tracer gas concentration distributions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An airborne differential absorption lidar system employing high-energy line-tunable CO2 lasers has been used to map cross-plume vertical distributions resulting from a...

Uthe, Edward E

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Numerical solutions of ideal quantum gas dynamical flows governed by semiclassical ellipsoidal-statistical distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to cover the high-energy tail of the distribution...mass, momentum and energy, but differs from the...2000 Fundamentals of carrier transport, 2nd edn...G . 2005 Nanoscale energy transport and conversion : a parallel treatment...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Distributional Implications of Alternative U.S. Greenhouse Gas Control Measures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the distributional and efficiency impacts of different allowance allocation schemes for a national cap and trade system using the USREP model, a new recursive dynamic computable general equilibrium model of the ...

Rausch, Sebastian

348

NATURAL GAS ADVISORY COMMITTEE 2013-2015 Name Affiliation Phone E-mail Sector June 7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURAL GAS ADVISORY COMMITTEE 2013-2015 Name Affiliation Phone E-mail Sector June 7 meeting Cocks Friedman, Randy NW Natural Gas (503) 721-2475 randy.friedman@nwnatural.com Distribution Finklea Edward NW-8553 bdickens@ci.tacoma.wa.us Electric Utility Defenbach, Byron Intermountain Gas (208) 377-6080 bdefen

349

Natural gas monthly, October 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. The data in this publication are collected on surveys conducted by the EIA to fulfill its responsibilities for gathering and reporting energy data. Some of the data are collected under the authority of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), an independent commission within the DOE, which has jurisdiction primarily in the regulation of electric utilities and the interstate natural gas industry. Geographic coverage is the 50 States and the District of Columbia. 16 figs., 33 tabs.

Not Available

1991-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

350

Simultaneous Production and Distribution of Industrial Gas Supply-Chains Pablo A. Marchetti1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of production and distribution. The proposed methodology has been tested on small, medium, and large size/depots in order to fulfill a common set of shared customer demands. The application to real industrial size test be gasified and sent to the pipeline to ensure that over-the-fence customer demands are satisfied. Moreover

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

351

DOE/EIA-0131(96) Distribution Category/UC-960 Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ID ID OR WY ND SD CA NV UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA IL IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Japan Mexico Mexico Algeria Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Algeria Canada United Arab Emirates Interstate Movements of Natural Gas in the United States, 1996 (Volumes Reported in Million Cubic Feet) Supplemental Data From Volume To From Volume To (T) AL KY (T) MA ME (T) AL LA MA NH (T) AL MO (T) MA NJ (T) AL SC MD DC CT RI RI MA DE MD VA DC MA CT (T) Trucked Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." E I A NERGY NFORMATION DMINISTRATION 906,407 355,260 243,866 220 384,311 576,420 823,799 842,114 27,271 126,012 133 602,841 266 579,598 16,837 268,138 48,442 182,511 219,242 86,897 643,401 619,703 8,157 937,806 292,711 869,951 12,316 590,493 118,256

352

Utility Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Products Industrial Institutional Multi-Sector Residential Momentum Savings Regional Efficiency Progress Report Utility Toolkit Sponsored E-Source Membership Utility Potential...

353

Advanced Power Electronic Interfaces for Distributed Energy Systems, Part 2: Modeling, Development, and Experimental Evaluation of Advanced Control Functions for Single-Phase Utility-Connected Inverter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrating renewable energy and distributed generations into the Smart Grid architecture requires power electronic (PE) for energy conversion. The key to reaching successful Smart Grid implementation is to develop interoperable, intelligent, and advanced PE technology that improves and accelerates the use of distributed energy resource systems. This report describes the simulation, design, and testing of a single-phase DC-to-AC inverter developed to operate in both islanded and utility-connected mode. It provides results on both the simulations and the experiments conducted, demonstrating the ability of the inverter to provide advanced control functions such as power flow and VAR/voltage regulation. This report also analyzes two different techniques used for digital signal processor (DSP) code generation. Initially, the DSP code was written in C programming language using Texas Instrument's Code Composer Studio. In a later stage of the research, the Simulink DSP toolbox was used to self-generate code for the DSP. The successful tests using Simulink self-generated DSP codes show promise for fast prototyping of PE controls.

Chakraborty, S.; Kroposki, B.; Kramer, W.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.3 Natural Gas Production and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Underground Base Gas Working Gas Total Storage Capacity 1980 3,642 2,655 6,297 7,434 85% 1981 3,752 2,817 6,569 7,805 84% 1982 3,808 3,071 6,879 7,915 87% 1983 3,847 2,595 6,442 7,985 81% 1984 3,830 2,876 6,706 8,043 83% 1985 3,842 2,607 6,448 8,087 80% 1986 3,819 2,749 6,567 8,145 81% 1987 3,792 2,756 6,548 8,124 81% 1988 3,800 2,850 6,650 8,124 82% 1989 3,812 2,513 6,325 8,120 78% 1990 3,868 3,068 6,936 7,794 89% 1991 3,954 2,824 6,778 7,993 85% 1992 4,044 2,597 6,641 7,932 84% 1993 4,327 2,322 6,649 7,989 83% 1994 4,360 2,606 6,966 8,043 87% 1995 4,349 2,153 6,503 7,953 82% 1996 4,341 2,173 6,513 7,980 82% 1997 4,350 2,175 6,525 8,332 78% 1998 4,326 2,730 7,056 8,179 86% 1999 4,383 2,523 6,906 8,229 84% 2000 4,352 1,719 6,071 8,241 74% 2001 4,301 2,904 7,204 8,415 86% 2002 4,340 2,375 6,715 8,207 82% 2003 4,303 2,563 6,866 8,206

355

Molten carbonate fuel cell and gas turbine hybrid systems as distributed energy resources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC)/gas turbine (GT) hybrid system has attracted a great deal of research effort due to its higher electricity efficiency. However, its technology has remained at the conceptual level due to incomplete examination of the related issues, challenges and variables. To contribute to the development of system technology, the MCFC/GT hybrid system is analyzed and discussed herein. A qualitative comparison of the two kinds of MCFC/GT hybrid system, indirect and direct, is hindered by the many variables involved. However, the indirect system may be preferred for relatively small-scale systems with the micro-GT. The direct system can be more competitive in terms of system efficiency and GT selection due to the optionality of system layouts as well as even higher GT inlet temperature. System layout is an important factor influencing the system efficiency. The other issues such as GT selection, system pressurization and part-load operation are also significant.

Jung-Ho Wee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Purchased Gas Adjustment Rules (Tennessee) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Purchased Gas Adjustment Rules (Tennessee) Purchased Gas Adjustment Rules (Tennessee) Purchased Gas Adjustment Rules (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Industry Recruitment/Support Provider Tennessee Regulatory Authority The Purchased Gas Adjustment Rules are implemented by the Tennessee Regulatory Authority (Authority). Purchased Gas Adjustment (PGA) Rules are intended to permit the company/LDC (local gas distribution company regulated by the Authority) to recover, in timely fashion, the total cost of gas purchased for delivery to its customers and to assure that the Company does not over-collect or under-collect Gas Costs from its

357

A comparative analysis of the technical and economic indicators characterizing independent small-capacity power installations for supplying power to trunk gas lines and gas distribution stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results obtained from a feasibility study of different independent sources of energy are presented, using which one can select them on a sound basis for supplying heat and power for trunk gas lines and gas distri...

G. A. Fokin

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Particle Velocity Distributions and Ionization Processes in a Gas-Puff Z Pinch  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have measured the time-dependent radial velocity distributions of singly to five times ionized ions in an imploding plasma shell by observing the spectral shapes and intensities of emission lines in various directions. An ionization wave propagating much faster than the local radial ion velocities is observed. The ionization front velocity is found to be consistent with estimates of electron heat conduction into the plasma-neutral layer. The ionization and velocity histories of the particles are experimentally determined. The mechanisms of momentum transfer to the particles are also determined and compared with existing models.

M. E. Foord; Y. Maron; G. Davara; L. Gregorian; A. Fisher

1994-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

359

Gas Storage Act (Illinois) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gas Storage Act (Illinois) Gas Storage Act (Illinois) Gas Storage Act (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Utility Program Info State Illinois Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Illinois Commerce Commission Any corporation which is engaged in or desires to engage in, the distribution, transportation or storage of natural gas or manufactured gas, which gas, in whole or in part, is intended for ultimate distribution to the public in the State of Illinois, if the said business of such corporation is regulated or subject to regulation under either the laws of the State of Illinois or the laws of the United States, shall have the right to enter upon, take or damage private property or any interest

360

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.3 Natural Gas Production and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Natural Gas Overview (Trillion Cubic Feet) Supplemental Net Storage Balancing Production Gas Import Withdrawal Item (1) Consumption (2) 1980 19.40 0.15 0.94 0.02 -0.64 19.88 1981 19.18 0.18 0.84 -0.30 -0.50 19.40 1982 17.82 0.14 0.88 -0.31 -0.54 18.00 1983 16.09 0.13 0.86 0.45 -0.70 16.83 1984 17.47 0.11 0.79 -0.20 -0.22 17.95 1985 16.45 0.13 0.89 0.23 -0.43 17.28 1986 16.06 0.11 0.69 -0.15 -0.49 16.22 1987 16.62 0.10 0.94 -0.01 -0.44 17.21 1988 17.10 0.10 1.22 0.06 -0.45 18.03 1989 17.31 0.11 1.27 0.33 0.10 19.12 1990 17.81 0.12 1.45 -0.51 0.31 19.17 1991 17.70 0.11 1.64 0.08 0.03 19.56 1992 17.84 0.12 1.92 0.17 0.18 20.23 1993 18.10 0.12 2.21 -0.04 0.40 20.79 1994 18.82 0.11 2.46 -0.29 0.14 21.25 1995 18.60 0.11 2.69 0.41 0.40 22.21 1996 18.85 0.11 2.78 0.00 0.86 22.61 1997 18.90 0.10 2.84 0.02 0.87 22.74 1998 19.02 0.10 2.99 -0.53 0.66 22.25 1999 18.83 0.10 3.42 0.17 -0.12 22.41 2000 19.18

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributing gas utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Utility Cost Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

utility bills. The r~~ulte of the modeling program and actual 1983 natural gas and electric consumption are graphed in Figures 2 and 3. The results indicate a good understanding of the heating requiremente of the facility as demonetrated by the close... fit of the two curves defining actual and modeled natural gas usage. Examination of the graph showing modeled electric coneumption verens actual 1983 data, illustrates an underetanding of electrical energy requiremente during all but peak cooling...

Horn, S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Natural Gas Pipeline Leaks Across Washington, DC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pipeline safety in the United States has increased in recent decades, but incidents involving natural gas pipelines still cause an average of 17 fatalities and $133 M in property damage annually. ... Along with reducing greenhouse gas emissions, repairing production and pipeline leaks would improve consumer health and safety and save money. ... (37) Several barriers to pipeline repair and replacement exist, however, as cost recovery for pipeline repairs by distribution companies is often capped by Public Utility Commissions (PUCs). ...

Robert B. Jackson; Adrian Down; Nathan G. Phillips; Robert C. Ackley; Charles W. Cook; Desiree L. Plata; Kaiguang Zhao

2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

363

Rural Utilities Service Electric Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Rural Utilities Service Electric Program’s loans and loan guarantees finance the construction of electric distribution, transmission, and generation facilities, including system improvements...

364

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.3 Natural Gas Production and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 Natural Gas Consumption, by Sector (Trillion Cubic Feet) Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Electric Power Total 1980 4.75 2.61 8.20 0.63 3.68 19.88 1981 4.55 2.52 8.06 0.64 3.64 19.40 1982 4.63 2.61 6.94 0.60 3.23 18.00 1983 4.38 2.43 6.62 0.49 2.91 16.83 1984 4.56 2.52 7.23 0.53 3.11 17.95 1985 4.43 2.43 6.87 0.50 3.04 17.28 1986 4.31 2.32 6.50 0.49 2.60 16.22 1987 4.31 2.43 7.10 0.52 2.84 17.21 1988 4.63 2.67 7.48 0.61 2.64 18.03 1989 4.78 2.72 7.89 0.63 3.11 19.12 1990 4.39 2.62 8.25 0.66 3.24 19.17 1991 4.56 2.73 8.36 0.60 3.32 19.56 1992 4.69 2.80 8.70 0.59 3.45 20.23 1993 4.96 2.86 8.87 0.63 3.47 20.79 1994 4.85 2.90 8.91 0.69 3.90 21.25 1995 4.85 3.03 9.38 0.70 4.24 22.21 1996 5.24 3.16 9.69 0.72 3.81 22.61 1997 4.98 3.21 9.71 0.76 4.06 22.74 1998 4.52 3.00 9.49 0.64 4.59 22.25 1999 4.73 3.04 9.16 0.66 4.82 22.41 2000 5.00 3.18 9.29 0.65 5.21 23.33 2001 4.77 3.02 8.46 0.64 5.34

365

City of Memphis, Tennessee (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Memphis, Tennessee (Utility Company) Memphis, Tennessee (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Memphis City of Place Memphis, Tennessee Utility Id 12293 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] SGIC[3] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Smart Grid Project was awarded $5,063,469 Recovery Act Funding with a total project value of $13,112,363. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png DRAINAGE PUMPING STATION RATE Commercial GENERAL POWER RATE - PART B Industrial GENERAL POWER RATE - PART C Industrial

366

City of Monroe, Georgia (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Monroe, Georgia (Utility Company) Monroe, Georgia (Utility Company) (Redirected from Monroe Water, Light & Gas Comm) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Monroe Place Georgia Utility Id 12800 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png COMMERCIAL DEMAND RATE Commercial COMMERCIAL NON DEMAND RATE Commercial Church Service Commercial City Electric Service Commercial Industrial Service Industrial RESIDENTIAL RATE Residential SECURITY LIGHT - 1000 Watt MH Lighting SECURITY LIGHT - 400 Watt HPS Lighting

367

Hutchinson Utilities Commission - Residential Energy Efficiency Program |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hutchinson Utilities Commission - Residential Energy Efficiency Hutchinson Utilities Commission - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Hutchinson Utilities Commission - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate 500 Program Info Expiration Date program offered until expiration of funding State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Natural Gas Furnaces: $150-$250, depending on efficiency Natural Gas Furnace Tune-up: $25 ECM Motor: $75 Natural Gas Boilers: $200 Central Air Conditioners: $250 Central Air Conditioner Tune-up: $25 Tankless Gas Water Heaters: $150 Storage Gas Water Heaters: $50 Air Source Heat Pumps: $75/ton

368

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs | Environmental  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Programs Energy Efficiency Programs Suggest a Listing Efficiency United The energy efficiency program for 18 Michigan Utilities including Alpena Power Company, Baraga Electric Utility, Bayfield Electric Cooperative, City of Crystal Falls Electric Department, City of Gladstone Department of Power & Light, City of South Haven Public Works, Daggett Electric Company, Hillsdale Board of Public Utilities, Indiana Michigan Power Company, L'Anse Electric Utility, Michigan Gas Utilities, Negaunee Electric Department, The City of Norway Department of Power & Light, SEMCO ENERGY Gas Company, Upper Peninsula Power Company, We Energies, Wisconsin Public Service and Xcel Energy. Energy Company Links A directory of approximately 700 oil and gas companies, utilities and oil

369

Primer on gas integrated resource planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics: gas resource planning: need for IRP; gas integrated resource planning: methods and models; supply and capacity planning for gas utilities; methods for estimating gas avoided costs; economic analysis of gas utility DSM programs: benefit-cost tests; gas DSM technologies and programs; end-use fuel substitution; and financial aspects of gas demand-side management programs.

Goldman, C.; Comnes, G.A.; Busch, J.; Wiel, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Distribution Integrity Management Plant (DIMP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the distribution integrity management plan (Plan) for the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Natural Gas Distribution System. This Plan meets the requirements of 49 CFR Part 192, Subpart P Distribution Integrity Management Programs (DIMP) for the LANL Natural Gas Distribution System. This Plan was developed by reviewing records and interviewing LANL personnel. The records consist of the design, construction, operation and maintenance for the LANL Natural Gas Distribution System. The records system for the LANL Natural Gas Distribution System is limited, so the majority of information is based on the judgment of LANL employees; the maintenance crew, the Corrosion Specialist and the Utilities and Infrastructure (UI) Civil Team Leader. The records used in this report are: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) 7100.1-1, Report of Main and Service Line Inspection, Natural Gas Leak Survey, Gas Leak Response Report, Gas Leak and Repair Report, and Pipe-to-Soil Recordings. The specific elements of knowledge of the infrastructure used to evaluate each threat and prioritize risks are listed in Sections 6 and 7, Threat Evaluation and Risk Prioritization respectively. This Plan addresses additional information needed and a method for gaining that data over time through normal activities. The processes used for the initial assessment of Threat Evaluation and Risk Prioritization are the methods found in the Simple, Handy Risk-based Integrity Management Plan (SHRIMP{trademark}) software package developed by the American Pipeline and Gas Agency (APGA) Security and Integrity Foundation (SIF). SHRIMP{trademark} uses an index model developed by the consultants and advisors of the SIF. Threat assessment is performed using questions developed by the Gas Piping Technology Company (GPTC) as modified and added to by the SHRIMP{trademark} advisors. This Plan is required to be reviewed every 5 years to be continually refined and improved. Records for all piping system installed after the effective date of this Plan will be captured and retained in the UI records documentation system. Primary Utility Asbuilts are maintained by Utilities Mapping (UMAP) and additional records are maintained on the N drive. Engineering Change Notices (ECNs) are stored on the N drive under configuration management and kept up by Utilities and Infrastructure Division Office (UI-DO). Records include, at a minimum, the location where new piping and appurtenances are installed and the material of which they are constructed.

Gonzales, Jerome F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

371

Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life-cycle modeling with GREET.

Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

372

Development of Fuel-Flexible Combustion Systems Utilizing Opportunity...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Fuel-Flexible Combustion Systems Utilizing Opportunity Fuels in Gas Turbines - Fact Sheet, May 2014 Development of Fuel-Flexible Combustion Systems Utilizing Opportunity Fuels in...

373

Utility Formation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

amounts See detailed discussion of these standards. For more information regarding tribal utility formation, contact the Power Service Line Account Executives: Eastern Power...

374

Percent Distribution  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Percent Distribution of Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers by State, 1996 Table State Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Utilities Alabama..................................... 1.08 0.92 2.27 0.08 0.23 Alaska ........................................ 0.31 0.87 0.85 - 1.16 Arizona....................................... 0.53 0.92 0.30 3.91 0.70 Arkansas.................................... 0.88 0.98 1.59 0.11 1.24 California.................................... 9.03 7.44 7.82 43.11 11.64 Colorado .................................... 2.12 2.18 0.94 0.58 0.20 Connecticut................................ 0.84 1.26 0.37 1.08 0.38 D.C............................................. 0.33 0.52 - 0.21 - Delaware.................................... 0.19 0.21 0.16 0.04 0.86 Florida........................................

375

Field evaluation of cofiring gas with coal for quantifying operational benefits and emissions trim in a utility boiler. Volume 2. Topical report, 1989-1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The volume consists of 14 appendixes to accompany volume 1 of the report, and covers the following test data: analysis of coal, fylash, and bottom ash samples; cleanliness factors; slagging observation record sheets; stack opacity measurements; stack sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides measurements; total coal flow; fuel gas flow; furnace exit gas temperature; percent oxygen at economizer outlet; percent excess air; bulk steam temperatures at secondary superheater and reheater outlets; secondary superheater and reheater tube outlet leg temperatures; unit heat rate; and models used for data interpretation.

Clark, K.J.; Torbov, T.S.; Impey, R.J.; Hara, K.G.; Burnett, T.D.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Distribution:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

JAN26 19% JAN26 19% Distribution: OR00 Attn: h.H.M.Roth DFMusser ITMM MMMann INS JCRyan FIw(2) Hsixele SRGustavson, Document rocm Formal file i+a@mmm bav@ ~@esiaw*cp Suppl. file 'Br & Div rf's s/health (lic.only) UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION SPECIAL NUCLEAB MATERIAL LICENSE pursuant to the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Chapter 1, P&t 70, "Special Nuclear Material Reg)llatiqm," a license is hereby issued a$hortztng the licensee to rekeive and possess the special nuclear material designated below; to use such special nuclear mat&ial for the purpose(s) and at the place(s) designated below; and to transfer such material to per&s authorized to receive it in accordance with the regula,tions in said Part.

377

Cyber - Protection for utilities ... | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cyber - Protection for utilities ... Hackers hoping to disrupt the power grid, water or natural gas service may be foiled by an intrusion detection system developed by researchers...

378

For Utilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Utilities and energy efficiency program administrators can incorporate Superior Energy Performance® (SEP™) into new or existing programs to help their industrial customers meet efficiency targets. The utility can provide incentives or other support to manufacturers who decide to implement SEP or pursue capital investments in energy efficiency. Accredited verification bodies have verified the substantial energy savings that are possible with SEP.

379

UTILITY INVESTMENT IN ON-SITE SOLAR: RISK AND RETURN ANALYSIS FOR CAPITALIZATION AND FINANCING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Standard and Poor's Utility Index San Diego Gas Pacificof Averaging Interval: Utilities Index. Beta Scatter as aRecord Application to Utility Equity Returns Project

Kahn, E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Optimal Design and Synthesis of Algal Biorefinery Processes for Biological Carbon Sequestration and Utilization with Zero Direct Greenhouse Gas Emissions: MINLP Model and Global Optimization Algorithm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Correspondingly, the superstructure is shown in Figure 7, and the border of continuous and discontinuous sections is redefined to cover the feed gas. ... The optimality tolerance for the branch-and-refine algorithm is set to 10–6, and optimality margins of the solving original problem (P1) and the linear relaxation problem (P2) are both zero. ... Sets ...

Jian Gong; Fengqi You

2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributing gas utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Efficient Utilization of Greenhouse Gases in a Gas-to-Liquids Process Combined with CO2/Steam-Mixed Reforming and Fe-Based Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the reforming unit, CO2 reforming and steam reforming of methane are combined together to produce syngas in flexible composition. ... In the burner-type reformer, NG is used as a heating fuel, in order to reduce the consumption of NG, the vent gas can be applied to the burner to replace some part of NG as fuel. ...

Chundong Zhang; Ki-Won Jun; Kyoung-Su Ha; Yun-Jo Lee; Seok Chang Kang

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

382

Cold End Inserts for Process Gas Waste Heat Boilers Air Products, operates hydrogen production plants, which utilize large waste heat boilers (WHB)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cold End Inserts for Process Gas Waste Heat Boilers Overview Air Products, operates hydrogen walls. Air Products tasked our team to design an insert to place in the tubes of the WHB to increase flow velocity, thereby reducing fouling of the WHB. Objectives Air Products wishes that our team

Demirel, Melik C.

383

Barrow Utils & Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

& Elec Coop, Inc & Elec Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Barrow Utils & Elec Coop, Inc Place Alaska Utility Id 1276 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Primary Metering ASNA/PHS Commercial Primary Metering USAF/DEW Site Commercial Primary Metering NSB Gas Fields Commercial Primary Metering NSBSD, C/O Annex Commercial Primary Metering UIC/NARL Commercial

384

Influence of gas flow rate on liquid distribution in trickle-beds using perforated plates as liquid distributors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" the distribution imposed at the top of the reactor. Finally, a comparison between the two measuring techniques-beds reactors, the second will directly affect its performances. Indeed, a bad liquid distribution will not only distribution when fluids distribution on top of the reactor is ensured by a perforated plate. In opposition

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

385

Seismic interpretation, distribution, and basin modelling of natural gas leakage in block 2 of the Orange Basin, offshore South Africa.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Includes abstract. The aims of this study are to: (1) characterize different natural gas leakage features present throughout the basin, and (2) understand the relationship… (more)

Boyd, Donna Louise.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Natural gas pipeline technology overview.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States relies on natural gas for one-quarter of its energy needs. In 2001 alone, the nation consumed 21.5 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. A large portion of natural gas pipeline capacity within the United States is directed from major production areas in Texas and Louisiana, Wyoming, and other states to markets in the western, eastern, and midwestern regions of the country. In the past 10 years, increasing levels of gas from Canada have also been brought into these markets (EIA 2007). The United States has several major natural gas production basins and an extensive natural gas pipeline network, with almost 95% of U.S. natural gas imports coming from Canada. At present, the gas pipeline infrastructure is more developed between Canada and the United States than between Mexico and the United States. Gas flows from Canada to the United States through several major pipelines feeding U.S. markets in the Midwest, Northeast, Pacific Northwest, and California. Some key examples are the Alliance Pipeline, the Northern Border Pipeline, the Maritimes & Northeast Pipeline, the TransCanada Pipeline System, and Westcoast Energy pipelines. Major connections join Texas and northeastern Mexico, with additional connections to Arizona and between California and Baja California, Mexico (INGAA 2007). Of the natural gas consumed in the United States, 85% is produced domestically. Figure 1.1-1 shows the complex North American natural gas network. The pipeline transmission system--the 'interstate highway' for natural gas--consists of 180,000 miles of high-strength steel pipe varying in diameter, normally between 30 and 36 inches in diameter. The primary function of the transmission pipeline company is to move huge amounts of natural gas thousands of miles from producing regions to local natural gas utility delivery points. These delivery points, called 'city gate stations', are usually owned by distribution companies, although some are owned by transmission companies. Compressor stations at required distances boost the pressure that is lost through friction as the gas moves through the steel pipes (EPA 2000). The natural gas system is generally described in terms of production, processing and purification, transmission and storage, and distribution (NaturalGas.org 2004b). Figure 1.1-2 shows a schematic of the system through transmission. This report focuses on the transmission pipeline, compressor stations, and city gates.

Folga, S. M.; Decision and Information Sciences

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Distributed Energy Fuel Cells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Fuel Cells Energy Fuel Cells DOE Hydrogen DOE Hydrogen and and Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Coordination Meeting Fuel Cell Coordination Meeting June 2-3, 2003 Electricity Users Kathi Epping Kathi Epping Objectives & Barriers Distributed Energy OBJECTIVES * Develop a distributed generation PEM fuel cell system operating on natural gas or propane that achieves 40% electrical efficiency and 40,000 hours durability at $400-750/kW by 2010. BARRIERS * Durability * Heat Utilization * Power Electronics * Start-Up Time Targets and Status Integrated Stationary PEMFC Power Systems Operating on Natural Gas or Propane Containing 6 ppm Sulfur 40,000 30,000 15,000 Hours Durability 750 1,250 2,500 $/kWe Cost 40 32 30 % Electrical Efficiency Large (50-250 kW) Systems 40,000 30,000 >6,000 Hours Durability 1,000 1,500 3,000

388

Rochester Gas & Electric Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rochester Gas & Electric Corp Rochester Gas & Electric Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name Rochester Gas & Electric Corp Place New York Utility Id 16183 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO NY Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Buying Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png SERVICE CLASSIFICATION NO. 1 - RESIDENTIAL SERVICE RSS (Non-Retail Access

389

Comments of San Diego Gas & Electric Company | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

San Diego Gas & Electric Company San Diego Gas & Electric Company Comments of San Diego Gas & Electric Company San Diego Gas & Electric Company ("SDG&E") submits these comments in response to the above-enumerated Request for Information noticed by the Department on May 11, 2010. SDG&E is a regulated electric and gas utility operating pursuant to authorities granted to it by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the State of California. SDG&E serves 3.4 million consumers in the San Diego and southern Orange County areas of California via 1.4 million electric meters and 830,000 gas meters. SDG&E's sister company, the Southern California Gas Company, is the nation's largest gas-distribution utility, serving another 20.3 million consumers in a

390

Utility Grid EV charging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Main Utility Grid EV charging PCC Batteries DC Load EV charging Flywheel Interlinking converter PV or large distance interconnected grids, to energy efficient applications in distribution system, energy storage systems and local loads as a local grid, is gaining more interests due to its potential

Chaudhary, Sanjay

391

Baltimore Gas & Electric Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Baltimore Gas and Electric Company) Baltimore Gas and Electric Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Baltimore Gas & Electric Co Place Baltimore, Maryland Service Territory Maryland Website www.bge.com/Pages/default Green Button Committed Yes Utility Id 1167 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] SGIC[3] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Baltimore Gas and Electric Company Smart Grid Project was awarded $200,000,000 Recovery Act Funding with a total project value of $451,814,234. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png

392

Electric, Street Railway, and Gas Corporations (South Dakota) | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electric, Street Railway, and Gas Corporations (South Dakota) Electric, Street Railway, and Gas Corporations (South Dakota) Electric, Street Railway, and Gas Corporations (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Line Extension Analysis Provider South Dakota Public Utilities Commission This legislation contains provisions pertaining to a corporation formed for the purpose of constructing, maintaining and operating a street railway or railways; generating, transmitting or distributing electricity to be sold to or used by the public for heat, light or power manufacturing; or producing, supplying, or transporting natural or artificial gas. The

393

Method and apparatus utilizing ionizing and microwave radiation for saturation determination of water, oil and a gas in a core sample  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is described for determining the relative permeabilities of gas, water and oil in a core sample has a microwave emitter/detector subsystem and an X-ray emitter/detector subsystem. A core holder positions the core sample between microwave absorbers which prevent diffracted microwaves from reaching a microwave detector where they would reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the microwave measurements. The microwave emitter/detector subsystem and the X-ray emitter/detector subsystem each have linear calibration characteristics, allowing one subsystem to be calibrated with respect to the other subsystem. The dynamic range of microwave measurements is extended through the use of adjustable attenuators. This also facilitates the use of core samples with wide diameters. The stratification characteristics of the fluids may be observed with a windowed cell separator at the outlet of the core sample. The condensation of heavy hydrocarbon gas and the dynamic characteristics of the fluids are observed with a sight glass at the outlet of the core sample. 11 figs.

Maerefat, N.L.; Parmeswar, R.; Brinkmeyer, A.D.; Honarpour, M.

1994-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

394

Method and apparatus utilizing ionizing and microwave radiation for saturation determination of water, oil and a gas in a core sample  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for determining the relative permeabilities of gas, water and oil in a core sample has a microwave emitter/detector subsystem and an X-ray emitter/detector subsystem. A core holder positions the core sample between microwave absorbers which prevent diffracted microwaves from reaching a microwave detector where they would reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the microwave measurements. The microwave emitter/detector subsystem and the X-ray emitter/detector subsystem each have linear calibration characteristics, allowing one subsystem to be calibrated with respect to the other subsystem. The dynamic range of microwave measurements is extended through the use of adjustable attenuators. This also facilitates the use of core samples with wide diameters. The stratification characteristics of the fluids may be observed with a windowed cell separator at the outlet of the core sample. The condensation of heavy hydrocarbon gas and the dynamic characteristics of the fluids are observed with a sight glass at the outlet of the core sample.

Maerefat, Nicida L. (Sugar Land, TX); Parmeswar, Ravi (Marlton, NJ); Brinkmeyer, Alan D. (Tulsa, OK); Honarpour, Mehdi (Bartlesville, OK)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

National Utility Rate Database: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When modeling solar energy technologies and other distributed energy systems, using high-quality expansive electricity rates is essential. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a utility rate platform for entering, storing, updating, and accessing a large collection of utility rates from around the United States. This utility rate platform lives on the Open Energy Information (OpenEI) website, OpenEI.org, allowing the data to be programmatically accessed from a web browser, using an application programming interface (API). The semantic-based utility rate platform currently has record of 1,885 utility rates and covers over 85% of the electricity consumption in the United States.

Ong, S.; McKeel, R.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Predicting the Three Dimensional Distribution of Gas Pollutants for Industrial-type Geometries in the South Pars Gas Complex Using Computational Fluid Dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present investigation, a comprehensive map of the studied region, which includes several gas refinery phases, was prepared. ... The Reynolds averaged Navier–Stokes equations for continuity and momentum are defined as follows:(24, 25, 30, 31)(2)(3)where ? and ?t are molecular viscosity and turbulent viscosity, respectively, ? is density of the main fluid, V is mean velocity vector, P is static pressure, g is the gravitational acceleration, and Sm is the mass added to the continuous phase from other sources. ... Comparison between the CFD Calculated Concentration of the Pollutants in Two Different Input Wind Velocities of 2.5 and 3.5 (m/s) ...

Hessamodin Nourbakhsh; Dariush Mowla; Feridun Esmaeilzadeh

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

397

Natural Gas Choice and Competition Act in 1999 (Pennsylvania) | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Choice and Competition Act in 1999 (Pennsylvania) Choice and Competition Act in 1999 (Pennsylvania) Natural Gas Choice and Competition Act in 1999 (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Public Utilities Commission This act aims to regulate the distribution system for natural gas by utility companies in terms of contracts, costs, tariff structures and competition. These regulations include minimum standards for the construction, testing, corrosion protection, operation, release prevention, and repair and reuse of storage tanks, periodic inspection of the leak detection systems, release prevention measures and an annual registration fee to be paid by owners of storage tanks.

398

Natural gas monthly, September 1991. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production distribution consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The data in this publication are collected on surveys conducted by the EIA to fulfill its responsibilities for gathering and reporting energy data. Some of the data are collected under the authority of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), an independent commission within the DOE, which has jurisdiction primarily in the regulation of electric utilities and the interstate natural gas industry. Geographic coverage is the 50 States and the District of Columbia.

Not Available

1991-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

399

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

400

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributing gas utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Acoustic properties of natural gas hydrates and the geophysical assessment of the subsurface distribution of hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural gas hydrates are a solid form of natural gas found in the deep water marine margins of continents and under permafrost in Arctic regions worldwide. They have been recognized as a very significant potential energy source in the future. They form under high pressure and low temperature. Hydrate saturated sediments are acoustically faster and slightly less dense than water saturated sediments but much faster and denser than gas saturated sediments. These properties allow for the identification of marine hydrate saturated sediments that are underlain by gas saturated sediments. The resulting geophysical reflector referred to as a bottom simulating reflector or BSR often mimics the seafloor in areas where geothermal gradient is laterally consistent. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Regulation and Enforcement has used three?dimensional seismic data in the Gulf of Mexico and two?dimensional seismic data in the Atlantic to (1) map the distribution of BSRs (2) drill six wells in the GOM with moderate to high hydrate saturations in sand reservoirs and (3) assess the resource potential of hydrates.

William Shedd; Matt Frye; Paul Godfriaux; Kody Kramer

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Burden distribution control for maintaining the central gas flow at No. 1 blast furnace in Pohang Works  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The causes for temperature lowering at the upper shaft center in Pohang No. 1 blast furnace were investigated. The test operation with charging notch change in the actual blast furnace and with a 1/12 scale model to Pohang No. 1 blast furnace were carried out in order to improve central gas flow in the shaft. Finally, rebuilding of the lower bunker interior was performed using the results of model experiments. It was confirmed that the main reason for the gas temperature lowering at the upper shaft center was the smaller particle size at center than the wall according to the discharging characteristics of center feed bunker with stone box. The central gas flow could be secured through modifying the stone box in the bunker.

Jung, S.K.; Lee, Y.J.; Suh, Y.K.; Ahn, T.J.; Kim, S.M. [Pohang Iron and Steel Co. Ltd. (Korea, Republic of). Technical Research Labs.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Comments of San Diego Gas & Electric Company | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

files these comments in files these comments in response to the above-enumerated Request for Information noticed by the Department on May 11, 2010. SDG&E is a regulated public electric and gas utility operating pursuant to authorities granted to it by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the State of California. SDG&E serves 3.4 million consumers in the San Diego and southern Orange County areas of California via 1.4 million electric meters and 830,000 gas meters. SDG&E's sister company, the Southern California Gas Company, is the nation's largest gas-distribution utility, serving another 20.3 million consumers in a 20,000 square-mile area via 5.7 million gas meters. Comments of San Diego Gas & Electric Company More Documents & Publications Comments of San Diego Gas & Electric Company

404

Joint Electrical Utilities (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Joint Electrical Utilities (Iowa) Joint Electrical Utilities (Iowa) Joint Electrical Utilities (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Utilities Board Cities may establish utilities to acquire existing electric generating facilities or distribution systems. Acquisition, in this statute, is defined as city involvement, and includes purchase, lease, construction, reconstruction, extension, remodeling, improvement, repair, and equipping of the facility. This chapter does not limit the powers or authority of

405

Pelican Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pelican Utility Pelican Utility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pelican Utility Place Alaska Utility Id 29297 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.4450/kWh Commercial: $0.4450/kWh Industrial: $0.3890/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Pelican_Utility&oldid=411348

406

Flora Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flora Utilities Flora Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Flora Utilities Place Indiana Utility Id 6425 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Rate Commercial Municipal Rate Commercial Power Acct. Rate Commercial Residential Rate Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0958/kWh Commercial: $0.0893/kWh Industrial: $0.0805/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Flora_Utilities&oldid=410706

407

Local Leaders: Respond to Natural Gas Disruptions | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Gas Disruptions Local Leaders: Respond to Natural Gas Disruptions Local Leaders: Respond to Natural Gas Disruptions Because natural gas is distributed through underground...

408

Chapter 9 - Natural Gas Dehydration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural, associated, or tail gas usually contains water, in liquid and/or vapor form, at source and/or as a result of sweetening with an aqueous solution. Operating experience and thorough engineering have proved that it is necessary to reduce and control the water content of gas to ensure safe processing and transmission. Pipeline drips installed near wellheads and at strategic locations along gathering and trunk lines will eliminate most of the free water lifted from the wells in the gas stream. Multistage separators can also be deployed to ensure the reduction of free water that may be present. However, the removal of the water vapor that exists in solution in natural gas requires a more complex treatment. This treatment consists of “dehydrating” the natural gas, which is accomplished by lowering the dew point temperature of the gas at which water vapor will condense from the gas. There are several methods of dehydrating natural gas. The most common of these are liquid desiccant (glycol) dehydration, solid desiccant dehydration, and cooling the gas. Any of these methods may be used to dry gas to a specific water content. Usually, the combination of the water content specification, initial water content, process character, operational nature, and economic factors determine the dehydration method to be utilized. However, the choice of dehydration method is usually between glycol and solid desiccants. These are presented in depth in subsequent portions of this chapter. Keywords: absorber, adsorption isotherm, bed loading, chemisorption, dehydration, desiccant, desiccant regeneration, equilibrium zone, flash tank, flow distribution, glycol circulation pump, glycol dehydration, inlet feed contamination, liquid carryover, mass transfer zone, molecular sieve, overcirculation, reboiler, solubility, still, surge tank, undercirculation.

Saeid Mokhatab; William A. Poe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

List of Landfill Gas Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incentives Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 377 Landfill Gas Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 377) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund Ohio Commercial Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric

410

Physical Plant Utility Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electrical distribution systems a 13.8 kV grounded wye Primary Selective system and a 2.4 kV ungrounded delta open loop system. The campus takes service at 13.8 kV from the utility via two paralleled feeds on the Westside of campus and at this time generates 10MWs at 13.8 kV with future additional generation planned

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

411

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid Under Uncertainty  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid Under Uncertainty Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid Under Uncertainty Speaker(s): Afzal Siddiqui Date: July 24, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 This study examines a California-based microgrid's decision to invest in a distributed generation (DG) unit that operates on natural gas. While the long-term natural gas generation cost is stochastc, we initially assume that the microgrid may purchase electricity at a fixed retail rate from its utility. Using the real options approach, we find natural gas generation cost thresholds that trigger DG investment. Furthermore, the consideration of operational flexibility by the microgrid accelerates DG investment, while the option to disconnect entirely from the utility is not attractive. By allowing the electricity price to be stochastic, we next determine an

412

Demonstration projects for coalbed methane and Devonian shale gas: Final report. [None  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1979, the US Department of Energy provided the American Public Gas Association (APGA) with a grant to demonstrate the feasibility of bringing unconventional gas such as methane produced from coalbeds or Devonian Shale directly into publicly owned utility system distribution lines. In conjunction with this grant, a seven-year program was initiated where a total of sixteen wells were drilled for the purpose of providing this untapped resource to communities who distribute natural gas. While coalbed degasification ahead of coal mining was already a reality in several parts of the country, the APGA demonstration program was aimed at actual consumer use of the gas. Emphasis was therefore placed on degasification of coals with high methane gas content and on utilization of conventional oil field techniques. 13 figs.

Verrips, A.M.; Gustavson, J.B.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Sandia National Laboratories: Utility Operations and Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

utility of these cost distributions (including positive skewness effects towards higher costs) to quantify variance and other risk-related benefits arising from such narrowing...

414

Estimating electricity storage power rating and discharge duration for utility transmission and distribution deferral :a study for the DOE energy storage program.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a methodology for estimating the power and energy capacities for electricity energy storage systems that can be used to defer costly upgrades to fully overloaded, or nearly overloaded, transmission and distribution (T&D) nodes. This ''sizing'' methodology may be used to estimate the amount of storage needed so that T&D upgrades may be deferred for one year. The same methodology can also be used to estimate the characteristics of storage needed for subsequent years of deferral.

Eyer, James M. (Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA); Butler, Paul Charles; Iannucci, Joseph J., Jr. (,.Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

EM Utility Contracts  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

12 12 EM UTILITY CONTRACT Site State Supplier Executed Contract Type DOE Contract # East Tennessee Technology Park TN Tennessee Valley Authority 4/27/2007 Energy supply contract (retail) DE-AC05-07OR23242 Hanford WA Bonneville Power Administration 10/1/2001 Transmission Service Agreement Hanford WA Bonneville Power Administration 10/1/2011 Power Sales Agreement (retail) Moab UT Paducah KY Electric Energy, Inc. (EEI as agent for DOE) Original Power Contract Portsmouth OH Pike Natural Gas 2/28/2007 Negotiated contract Portsmouth OH Ohio Valley Electric Corporation (OVEC) 9/10/2008 Letter Agreement DE-AC05-03OR22988 Savannah River Site SC South Carolina Electric & Gas

416

Southern Indiana Gas & Elec Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas & Elec Co Gas & Elec Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Southern Indiana Gas & Elec Co Place Indiana Utility Id 17633 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png AD - Area Development Commercial

417

Southern Indiana Gas & Elec Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas & Elec Co Gas & Elec Co (Redirected from Vectren) Jump to: navigation, search Name Southern Indiana Gas & Elec Co Place Indiana Utility Id 17633 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png AD - Area Development Commercial

418

Oklahoma Gas & Electric Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oklahoma Gas and Electric Company) Oklahoma Gas and Electric Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Oklahoma Gas & Electric Co Place Oklahoma Utility Id 14063 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] SGIC[3] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png GS-1 (General Service) Commercial GS-TOU (General Service Time-Of-Use) Commercial

419

Central Hudson Gas & Elec Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hudson Gas & Elec Corp Hudson Gas & Elec Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name Central Hudson Gas & Elec Corp Place New York Utility Id 3249 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO NY Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png DS-IN 85 Watt (acorn Decorative) Lighting DS-MH 175 Watt (acorn Decorative) Lighting

420

Public Service Elec & Gas Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Elec & Gas Co Elec & Gas Co (Redirected from PSEG) Jump to: navigation, search Name Public Service Elec & Gas Co Place New Jersey Utility Id 15477 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 100 COBRA HEAD CUT OFF TYPE III HP Lighting 100 CORA HEAD H.P. Commercial 100 DELUXE ACORN H.P Lighting 100 FRANKIN PARK TYPE IV H.P Commercial 100 NEW XFORD BLACK TYPE III H.P Commercial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributing gas utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Louisville Gas & Electric Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas & Electric Co Gas & Electric Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Louisville Gas & Electric Co Place Kentucky Utility Id 11249 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png ; CSR10-Curtailable Service Rider- Primary voltage Commercial

422

South Carolina Electric&Gas Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric&Gas Co Electric&Gas Co Jump to: navigation, search Name South Carolina Electric&Gas Co Place South Carolina Utility Id 17539 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes RTO PJM Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 16 (General Service Time-Of-Use) Commercial

423

Fitchburg Gas and Electric Light Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fitchburg Gas and Electric Light Company Fitchburg Gas and Electric Light Company Place New Hampshire Utility Id 6374 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO NE Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Fitchburg Gas and Electric Light Company (Massachusetts).

424

Albany Water Gas & Light Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Gas & Light Comm Water Gas & Light Comm Jump to: navigation, search Name Albany Water Gas & Light Comm Place Georgia Utility Id 230 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Demand Commercial Commercial Non-Demand Commercial Large Commercial Demand Commercial Residential Residential Security Lights 1000 Watt Metal Halide Metal Pole Lighting Security Lights 1000 Watt Metal Halide Wooden Pole Lighting Security Lights 150 HPSV Fixtures Metal Pole Lighting Security Lights 150 HPSV Fixtures Wooden Pole Lighting

425

Bath Electric Gas & Water Sys | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Gas & Water Sys Electric Gas & Water Sys Jump to: navigation, search Name Bath Electric Gas & Water Sys Place New York Utility Id 1343 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO NY Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial (20 KW to 75 KW demand) Commercial Industrial (Over 75 KW demand) Industrial Outdoor Lighting (175W MV-150W HPS) Lighting Outdoor Lighting (250W HPS) Lighting Outdoor Lighting (400W MV/HPS) Lighting Residential Residential Small Commercial ( Under 20 KW demand) Commercial

426

Baltimore Gas & Electric Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Baltimore Gas & Electric Co Baltimore Gas & Electric Co Place Baltimore, Maryland Service Territory Maryland Website www.bge.com/Pages/default Green Button Committed Yes Utility Id 1167 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] SGIC[3] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Baltimore Gas and Electric Company Smart Grid Project was awarded $200,000,000 Recovery Act Funding with a total project value of $451,814,234. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 100 watt Incandescent Lighting 100000 Lumen 1090 Watt MHR Lighting

427

Presque Isle Elec & Gas Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Elec & Gas Coop Elec & Gas Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name Presque Isle Elec & Gas Coop Place Michigan Utility Id 15340 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Controlled Heating Residential Customer Owned Backup Generation Commercial General Service - Single Phase Commercial General Service - Single Phase(Oil Related Accounts) Commercial General Service - Three Phase Commercial General Service - Three Phase(Oil Related Accounts) Commercial Green/Renewable Energy Rider

428

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

429

New York State Elec & Gas Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New York State Elec & Gas Corp New York State Elec & Gas Corp Place New York Utility Id 13511 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes NERC RFC Yes ISO NY Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Buying Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png GS-2 (Small General Service ESS) Industrial

430

Slinger Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Slinger Utilities Slinger Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Slinger Utilities Place Wisconsin Utility Id 17324 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service- Single-Phase Commercial General Service- Single-Phase- Time-of-Day Commercial General Service- Three-Phase Commercial General Service- Three-Phase- Time-of-Day Commercial Industrial Power- Time-of-Day Industrial Large Power- Time-of-Day Commercial Ornamental Street Lighting- 150W HPS Lighting Overhead Street Lighting- 150W HPS Lighting

431

Decatur Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Decatur Utilities Place Alabama Utility Id 4958 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial - BILL CODE 50 Commercial Commercial - Bill Code 40 Commercial Residential - Bill Code 22 Residential Security Light 100 W HPS (No Pole) Lighting Security Light 100 W HPS (With Pole) Lighting Security Light 250 W HPS (No Pole) Lighting Security Light 250 W HPS (With Pole) Lighting

432

Dalton Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dalton Utilities Dalton Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Dalton Utilities Place Georgia Utility Id 4744 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 100 - Watt Sodium Vapor Lighting 1000 - Watt Metal Halide Directional Type Lighting 150 Watt Mercury Vapor Underground Service Lighting 150 Watt Sodium Vapor Underground Service Lighting 175 - Watt Mercury Vapor Lighting 175 - Watt Sodium Vapor Lighting

433

Waupun Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waupun Utilities Waupun Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Waupun Utilities Place Wisconsin Utility Id 20213 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Single Phase Commercial Commercial Three Phase Commercial Renewable Energy Residential Residential Small Power Industrial Average Rates Residential: $0.1060/kWh Commercial: $0.0968/kWh Industrial: $0.0770/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

434

Maryville Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maryville Utilities Maryville Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Maryville Utilities Place Tennessee Utility Id 11789 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial- Schedule GSA-1 Commercial Commercial- Schedule GSA-2 Commercial Commercial- Schedule GSA-3 Commercial Outdoor Light- 100W HP Sodium Security Light Lighting Outdoor Light- 175W Mercury Vapor Lighting Outdoor Light- 250W HP Sodium Flood Light Lighting Outdoor Light- 250W HP Sodium Security Light Lighting Outdoor Light- 400W Mercury Vapor Lighting

435

Oconomowoc Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Oconomowoc Utilities Place Wisconsin Utility Id 13963 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership

436

Sheffield Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Sheffield Utilities Place Alabama Utility Id 17033 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Security Light 100 W HPS Openbottom Lighting Security Light 150 W HPS Cobrahead Lighting Security Light 150 W HPS Decorative Light Lighting Security Light 1500 W MH Floodlight Lighting Security Light 175 W MV Openbottom Lighting Security Light 250 W HPS Cobrahead Lighting Security Light 250 W HPS Decorative Light Lighting Security Light 250 W HPS Floodlight Lighting

437

Cannelton Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cannelton Utilities Cannelton Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Cannelton Utilities Place Indiana Utility Id 2964 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Outdoor Lighting: Murcury Vapor Light, 175 Watt Lighting Rate 1: Residential Residential Rate 2: Multi-Phase Commercial Rate 2: Single Phase Commercial Rate 3: Industrial Phase II Residential Rate 3: Industrial phase I Industrial Street Lighting: Decorative Metal Halide, 175 Watt Lighting Street Lighting: High Pressure Sodium, 100 Watt Lighting

438

Feasibility study for alternate fuels production: unconventional natural gas from wastewater treatment plants. Volume II, Appendix D. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data are presented from a study performed to determined the feasibility of recovering methane from sewage at a typical biological secondary wastewater treatment plant. Three tasks are involved: optimization of digester gas; digester gas scrubbing; and application to the East Bay Municipal Utility District water pollution control plant. Results indicate that excess digester gas can be used economically at the wastewater treatment plant and that distribution and scrubbing can be complex and costly. (DMC) 193 references, 93 figures, 26 tables.

Overly, P.; Tawiah, K.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Gas leakage and distribution characteristics of methyl bromide and sulfuryl fluoride during fumigations in a pilot flour mill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The half-loss time (HLT) is used as an indicator to quantify gas leakage rates during methyl bromide (MB) and sulfuryl fluoride (SF) fumigations. Comparisons of \\{HLTs\\} between three MB and three SF fumigations were quantified in the Hal Ross pilot flour mill, Department of Grain Science and Industry, Kansas State University, USA. The sealing quality or gas tightness of the mill before each fumigation was verified by a pressurization test. Fumigant concentrations during the six fumigations were monitored continuously at 30 locations among the five mill floors during the 24 h fumigation period. A weather station on the mill roof monitored barometric pressure, wind speed and direction, temperature, and relative humidity. A data logger on each mill floor recorded temperature and relative humidity. The pressurization test showed that the relationship between airflow rate and building static pressure varied among the fumigations despite the same areas being sealed by two separate fumigation service providers due to environmental conditions not being identical among the fumigations. Concentration differences of both fumigants within the mill ranged from 2 to 7 g/m3. The observed \\{HLTs\\} for the MB and SF fumigations were in the range of 3.61 to 28.64 h and 9.97 to 31.65 h, respectively, and were inversely related only to wind speeds during fumigation and not any other environmental conditions recorded. In our study, the fumigant leakage rate was found to be predominantly a function of wind speed rather than inherent gas characteristics of MB and SF.

Watcharapol Chayaprasert; Dirk E. Maier; Bhadriraju Subramanyam; Michelle Hartzer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

16 - Biomethane injection into natural gas networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: Biomethane is a flexible and easily storable fuel that can be used wherever natural gas is used without the need to change any settings on equipment designed to use natural gas. In regions where a natural gas grid already exists, there is a ready-made system for the distribution of biomethane. This chapter briefly introduces: the legal framework and technical standards of biomethane feed-in into the gas network in Germany; the different subsidy schemes and reliefs to encourage biomethane production or utilization; and the different available options for biomethane feed-in and feed-in facilities. The chapter also looks at one of the most challenging aspects of biomethane feed-in – costs and energy efficiency – and outlines several options for improvement.

Wolfgang Urban

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributing gas utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Definition: Distributed Energy Resource | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resource Resource Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Distributed Energy Resource A device that produces electricity, and is connected to the electrical system, either "behind the meter" in the customer's premise, or on the utility's primary distribution system. A Distributed Energy Resource (DER) can utilize a variety of energy inputs including, but not limited to, liquid petroleum fuels, biofuels, natural gas, solar, wind, and geothermal. Electricity storage devices can also be classified as DERs.[1] Also Known As DER Related Terms energy, biofuels, electricity storage technologies, system, electricity generation References ↑ https://www.smartgrid.gov/category/technology/distributed_energy_resource [[Categ LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

442

Natural Gas Monthly  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Highlights activities, events, and analyses associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer related activities and underground storage data are also reported.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heating Maximum Rebate $1,000 Program Info Start Date 01/01/2013 Expiration Date 04/30/2013 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount ComEd Rebates Central Air Conditioner Unit 14 SEER or above: $350 Central Air Conditioner Unit Energy Star rated: $500 Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas Furnace: $200 - $500 (varies based on gas company and unit installed) Provider ComEd Energy ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas are offering a Complete System Replacement Rebate Program to residential customers. The program is

444

San Diego Gas & Electric Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Diego Gas & Electric Co Diego Gas & Electric Co (Redirected from San Diego Gas and Electric Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name San Diego Gas & Electric Co Place San Diego, California Service Territory California Website www.sdge.com Green Button Landing Page www.sdge.com/customer-ser Green Button Reference Page www.sdge.com/green-button Green Button Implemented Yes Utility Id 16609 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO CA Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] SGIC[3]

445

Baltimore Gas & Electric Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Baltimore Gas & Electric Co Baltimore Gas & Electric Co (Redirected from BGE) Jump to: navigation, search Name Baltimore Gas & Electric Co Place Baltimore, Maryland Service Territory Maryland Website www.bge.com/Pages/default Green Button Landing Page www.bge.com/Pages/default Green Button Reference Page www.businesswire.com/news Green Button Implemented Yes Utility Id 1167 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] SGIC[3] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Baltimore Gas and Electric Company Smart Grid Project was awarded

446

Chapter 10 - The Transformation of the German Gas Supply Industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Natural gas is the second largest energy source in Germany, and its market share will continue to increase. This chapter describes the historical development of the German gas industry, discusses current issues of importance in German gas policy, and outlines the industrial organization and profiles of the major gas utilities. Today, the German gas industry can be divided into two groups: the gas supply industry and the rest of the gas industry. The gas market in Germany has developed on three levels: natural gas production and import, pipeline business and distribution, and end user supply. Germany's energy policy, as a part of economic policy, is oriented to free market principles. The future of the German gas market is very promising. The share of natural gas is growing as a part of primary energy supply, as well as in power generation, substituting coal and oil, and electricity in the heat market. With regard to the effects of liberalization, it can be said that a one-to-one transposition of international experience to the German gas industry will not be possible, due to the different historical, economical, and political factors at work.

Lutz Mez

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Combined effects of gas pressure and exciting frequency on electron energy distribution functions in hydrogen capacitively coupled plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The combined effects of the variation of hydrogen pressure (40-400 mTorr) and exciting frequency (13.56-50 MHz) on the electron energy probability function (EEPF) and other plasma parameters in capacitively coupled hydrogen H{sub 2} discharge at fixed discharge voltage were investigated using rf-compensated Langmuir probe. At a fixed exciting frequency of 13.56 MHz, the EEPF evolved from Maxwellian-like distribution to a bi-Maxwellian distribution when the H{sub 2} pressure increased, possibly due to efficient vibrational excitation. The electron density largely increased to a peak value and then decreased with the increase of H{sub 2} pressure. Meanwhile, the electron temperature and plasma potential significantly decrease and reaching a minimum at 120 mTorr beyond, which saturated or slightly increases. On the other hand, the dissipated power and electron density markedly increased with increasing the exciting frequency at fixed H{sub 2} pressure and voltage. The electron temperatures negligibly dependent on the driving frequency. The EEPFs at low pressure 60 mTorr resemble Maxwellian-like distribution and evolve into a bi-Maxwellian type as frequency increased, due to a collisonless (stochastic) sheath-heating in the very high frequency regime, while the EEPF at hydrogen pressure {>=}120 mTorr retained a bi-Maxwellian-type distribution irrespective of the driving frequency. Such evolution of the EEPFs shape with the driving frequency and hydrogen pressure has been discussed on the basis of electron diffusion processes and low threshold-energy inelastic collision processes taking place in the discharge. The ratio of stochastic power to bulk power heating ratio is dependent on the hydrogen pressure while it is independent on the driving frequency.

Abdel-Fattah, E. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Zagazig University, Zagazig 44519 (Egypt); Sugai, H. [Department of Electronics and Information Engineering, Chubu University, 1200 Matsumoto-cho, Kasugai 487-8501 (Japan)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

Common Mathematical Foundations of Expected Utility and Dual ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distributions, and their convex combinations correspond to lotteries. The dual utility theory uses convex combinations of comonotonic real random variables, ...

2012-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

449

Greg Rutherford Executive Director Global Power & Utilities Investment...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Director Global Power & Utilities Investment Banking Morgan Stanley Bankability of Electricity Transmission, Storage and Distribution Infrastructure Investment Opening...

450

Minimum Gas Service Standards (Ohio)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Natural gas companies in Ohio are required to follow the Minimum Gas Service Standards, which are set and enforced by the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio. These rules are found in chapter 4901...

451

Natural gas monthly, July 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents information pertaining to the natural gas industry. Data are included on production, consumption, distribution, and pipeline activities.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Competitive Natural Gas Providers (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Competitive providers and aggregators of natural gas must be certified by the Utilities Board. Applicants must demonstrate the managerial, technical, and financial capability to perform the...

453

Alabama Gas Corporation - Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Alabama Gas Corporation - Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program Alabama Gas Corporation - Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program Alabama Gas Corporation - Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Alabama Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace (Replacement): $200 Dryer (Replacement): $100 Natural Gas Range/Cooktop (Replacement): $100 Water Heaters (Replacement): $200 Tankless Water Heaters (Replacement): $200 Provider Alabama Gas Corporation Alabama Gas Corporation (Alagasco) offers various rebates to its residential customers who replace older furnaces, water heaters, cooktops, ranges and clothes dryers with new, efficient equipment. All equipment

454

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Vehicle Rebate  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Compressed Natural Gas Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Vehicle Rebate - Metropolitan Utilities District to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Vehicle Rebate - Metropolitan Utilities District on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Vehicle Rebate - Metropolitan Utilities District on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Vehicle Rebate - Metropolitan Utilities District on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Vehicle Rebate - Metropolitan Utilities District on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Vehicle Rebate - Metropolitan Utilities District on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed

455

Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Utility Partners  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) utility partners are eager to work closely with Federal agencies to help achieve energy management goals.

456

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Natural Gas Transmission  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by obtaining market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. In addition, natural gas flow patterns are a function of the pattern in the previous year, coupled with the relative prices of gas supply options as translated to the represented market “hubs.” The major assumptions used within the NGTDM are grouped into five general categories. They relate to (1) the classification of demand into core and noncore transportation service classes, (2) the pricing of transmission and distribution services, (3) pipeline and storage capacity expansion and utilization, (4) the implementation of recent regulatory reform, and (5) the implementation of provisions of the Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP). A complete listing of NGTDM assumptions and in-depth methodology descriptions are presented in Model Documentation Report: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-MO62/1, January 1999.

457

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Natural Gas Transmission  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. In addition, natural gas flow patterns are a function of the pattern in the previous year, coupled with the relative prices of gas supply options as translated to the represented market “hubs.” The major assumptions used within the NGTDM are grouped into five general categories. They relate to (1) the classification of demand into core and noncore transportation service classes, (2) the pricing of transmission and distribution services, (3) pipeline and storage capacity expansion and utilization, (4) the implementation of recent regulatory reform, and (5) the implementation of provisions of the Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP). A complete listing of NGTDM assumptions and in-depth methodology descriptions are presented in Model Documentation: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System, Model Documentation 2000, DOE/EIA-M062(2000), January 2000.

458

features Utility Generator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;#12;#12;#12;features function utility Training Pool Utility Generator Per-frame function content utility classes utility classes utility Tree Decision Generator Module Utility Clustering Adaptive Content Classification Loop features content VO selection & Utility Selector content features Real

Chang, Shih-Fu

459

ELECTRICITY AND NATURAL GAS DATA COLLECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION HISTORICAL ELECTRICITY AND NATURAL GAS DATA COLLECTION Formsand of Power Plants Semi-Annual Report ..................................... 44 CEC-1306D UDC Natural Gas Tolling Agreement Quarterly Report.......................... 46 i #12;Natural Gas Utilities and Retailers

460

Photovoltaics: New opportunities for utilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication presents information on photovoltaics. The following topics are discussed: Residential Photovoltaics: The New England Experience Builds Confidence in PV; Austin's 300-kW Photovoltaic Power Station: Evaluating the Breakeven Costs; Residential Photovoltaics: The Lessons Learned; Photovoltaics for Electric Utility Use; Least-Cost Planning: The Environmental Link; Photovoltaics in the Distribution System; Photovoltaic Systems for the Rural Consumer; The Issues of Utility-Intertied Photovoltaics; and Photovoltaics for Large-Scale Use: Costs Ready to Drop Again.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributing gas utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Underground Storage of Natural Gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Nebraska) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Underground Storage of Natural Gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gas Underground Storage of Natural Gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Nebraska) Underground Storage of Natural Gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Nebraska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission This statute declares underground storage of natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas to be in the public interest if it promotes the conservation

462

Colorado Public Utility Commission's Xcel Wind Decision  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In early 2001 the Colorado Public Utility Commission ordered Xcel Energy to undertake good faith negotiations for a wind plant as part of the utility's integrated resource plan. This paper summarizes the key points of the PUC decision, which addressed the wind plant's projected impact on generation cost and ancillary services. The PUC concluded that the wind plant would cost less than new gas-fired generation under reasonable gas cost projections.

Lehr, R. L. (NRUC/NWCC); Nielsen, J. (Land and Water Fund of the Rockies); Andrews, S.; Milligan, M. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

2001-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

463

Enhanced carbon monoxide utilization in methanation process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carbon monoxide - containing gas streams are passed over a catalyst to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon thereon essentially without the formation of inactive coke. The active carbon is subsequently reacted with steam or hydrogen to form methane. Surprisingly, hydrogen and water vapor present in the feed gas do not adversely affect CO utilization significantly, and such hydrogen actually results in a significant increase in CO utilization.

Elek, Louis F. (Peekskill, NY); Frost, Albert C. (Congers, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Utility Sounding Board  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reports, Publications, and Research Utility Toolkit Sponsored E-Source Membership Utility Potential Calculator EE Maximization Tool Conduit Utility Sounding Board Residential...

465

GASIFICATION FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recent emphasis in gasification technology development has been directed toward reduced-scale gasifier systems for distributed generation at remote sites. The domestic distributed power generation market over the next decade is expected to be 5-6 gigawatts per year. The global increase is expected at 20 gigawatts over the next decade. The economics of gasification for distributed power generation are significantly improved when fuel transport is minimized. Until recently, gasification technology has been synonymous with coal conversion. Presently, however, interest centers on providing clean-burning fuel to remote sites that are not necessarily near coal supplies but have sufficient alternative carbonaceous material to feed a small gasifier. Gasifiers up to 50 MW are of current interest, with emphasis on those of 5-MW generating capacity. Internal combustion engines offer a more robust system for utilizing the fuel gas, while fuel cells and microturbines offer higher electric conversion efficiencies. The initial focus of this multiyear effort was on internal combustion engines and microturbines as more realistic near-term options for distributed generation. In this project, we studied emerging gasification technologies that can provide gas from regionally available feedstock as fuel to power generators under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification, primarily coal-fed, has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries. Commercial-scale gasification activities are under way at 113 sites in 22 countries in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia, according to the Gasification Technologies Council. Gasification studies were carried out on alfalfa, black liquor (a high-sodium waste from the pulp industry), cow manure, and willow on the laboratory scale and on alfalfa, black liquor, and willow on the bench scale. Initial parametric tests evaluated through reactivity and product composition were carried out on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) equipment. These tests were evaluated and then followed by bench-scale studies at 1123 K using an integrated bench-scale fluidized-bed gasifier (IBG) which can be operated in the semicontinuous batch mode. Products from tests were solid (ash), liquid (tar), and gas. Tar was separated on an open chromatographic column. Analysis of the gas product was carried out using on-line Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). For selected tests, gas was collected periodically and analyzed using a refinery gas analyzer GC (gas chromatograph). The solid product was not extensively analyzed. This report is a part of a search into emerging gasification technologies that can provide power under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries, and it is probable that scaled-down applications for use in remote areas will become viable. The appendix to this report contains a list, description, and sources of currently available gasification technologies that could be or are being commercially applied for distributed generation. This list was gathered from current sources and provides information about the supplier, the relative size range, and the status of the technology.

Ronald C. Timpe; Michael D. Mann; Darren D. Schmidt

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Energy and exergy analyses of an externally fired gas turbine (EFGT) cycle integrated with biomass gasifier for distributed power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass based decentralized power generation using externally fired gas turbine (EFGT) can be a technically feasible option. In this work, thermal performance and sizing of such plants have been analyzed at different cycle pressure ratio (rp = 2?8), turbine inlet temperature (TIT = 1050–1350 K) and the heat exchanger cold end temperature difference (CETD = 200–300 K). It is found that the thermal efficiency of the EFGT plant reaches a maximum at an optimum pressure ratio depending upon the TIT and heat exchanger CETD. For a particular pressure ratio, thermal efficiency increases either with the increase in TIT or with the decrease in heat exchanger CETD. The specific air flow, associated with the size of the plant equipment, decreases with the increase in pressure ratio. This decrease is rapid at the lower end of the pressure ratio (rp < 4) but levels-off at higher rp values. An increase in the TIT reduces the specific air flow, while a change in the heat exchanger CETD has no influence on it. Based on this comparison, the performance of a 100 kW EFGT plant has been analyzed for three sets of operating parameters and a trade-off in the operating condition is reached.

Amitava Datta; Ranjan Ganguly; Luna Sarkar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Community Renewable Energy Deployment: Sacramento Municipal Utility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deployment: Sacramento Municipal Utility Deployment: Sacramento Municipal Utility District Projects Jump to: navigation, search Name Community Renewable Energy Deployment: Sacramento Municipal Utility District Projects Agency/Company /Organization US Department of Energy Focus Area Agriculture, Economic Development, Greenhouse Gas, Renewable Energy, Biomass - Anaerobic Digestion, Solar - Concentrating Solar Power, Solar, - Solar Pv, Biomass - Waste To Energy Phase Bring the Right People Together, Develop Finance and Implement Projects Resource Type Case studies/examples Availability Publicly available--Free Publication Date 2/2/2011 Website http://www1.eere.energy.gov/co Locality Sacramento Municipal Utility District, CA References Community Renewable Energy Deployment: Sacramento Municipal Utility District Projects[1]

468

OPENING STATEMENT FOR JOE HOLMES, COLORADO SPRINGS UTILITIES  

Energy Savers [EERE]

UTILITITES (CSU). CSU IS A MUNICIPALLY-OWNED, FOUR-SERVICE UTILITY PROVIDING ELECTRICITY, NATURAL GAS, WATER AND WASTEWATER SERVICES TO BUSINESS AND RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS IN THE...

469

Figure 3-11 South Table Mountain Utilities Map  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

FTLB AMMO LEGEND Gas Existing Buildings Electrical Figure 3-11 South Table Mountain Utilities Map Sewer Communication Water Surface Drainage Storm Water WATER TANK FACILITIES...

470

List of Other Distributed Generation Technologies Incentives | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incentives Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 123 Other Distributed Generation Technologies Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 123) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard (Pennsylvania) Renewables Portfolio Standard Pennsylvania Investor-Owned Utility Retail Supplier Building Insulation Ceiling Fan

471

Utilization Analysis Page 1 UTILIZATION ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilization Analysis Page 1 UTILIZATION ANALYSIS Section 46a-68-40 and HIRING/PROMOTION GOALS utilized in the Health Center's workforce, the numbers of protected classes in the workforce must conducted for each occupational category and position classification. The Utilization Analysis was performed

Oliver, Douglas L.

472

utility functions scaling profiles utility-fair  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bandwidth utility functions scaling profiles utility-fair I. INTRODUCTION The emerging MPEG-4 video. This can result in a significant increase in the utilization of network capacity [1]. These techniques. Bandwidth utility functions [9] can be used to characterize an application's capability to adapt over

Chang, Shih-Fu

473

University of Alaska Fairbanks Utility Development Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.1 Strategy 2 - Natural Gas Sub-Option - New Equipment STEAM SYSTEM Equipment MachineorGrouUniversity of Alaska Fairbanks Utility Development Plan October 25,2006TechnicalAppendices B UTILITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN APPENDIX B: TECHNICAL APPENDIX #12;10/25/06 SECTION 1 ­ TECHNICAL PRODUCTION

Hartman, Chris

474

Gas Pipeline Securities (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute establishes that entities engaged in the transmission of gas by pipelines are not required to obtain the consent of the Utility Regulatory Commission for issuance of stocks,...

475

Utility Contract Competition | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Competition Competition Utility Contract Competition October 7, 2013 - 2:26pm Addthis Opening utility energy service contracts to competing franchised utility companies ensures Federal agencies get the best value for their projects. Federal agencies are not legally required to compete for utility incentive services provided by the "established source" utility in the utility's franchised service territory. If services are available, the Energy Policy Act of 1992 states that there should be no restriction on Federal facilities directly benefiting from the services the same as any other customer. The exception is if there is more than one serving utility offering utility energy services (e.g., a gas company and an electric company). In this case, the Federal Acquisition Regulations and good fiscal management

476

Cogeneration - A Utility Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are discussed from a utility perspective as how they influence utility participation in future projects. The avoided cost methodology is examined, and these payments for sale of energy to the utility are compared with utility industrial rates. In addition...

Williams, M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Utility Monitor September 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utility Monitor September 2010 Why monitor utility syntax? Enforce and Maintain Company-Wide DB2 Utility Standards. Jennifer Nelson Product Specialist, Rocket Software © 2010 IBM Corporation © 2010............................................................................................................... iv 1 Why Monitor DB2 Utility Syntax

478

NET PRED UTILITY  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

002602IBMPC00 Normalized Elution Time Prediction Utility  http://omics.pnl.gov/software/NETPredictionUtility.php 

479

Utility Metering - AGL Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AGL Resources AGL Resources Mike Ellis Director, AGL Energy Services Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Spring 2013 - May 22-23 San Francisco, CA Hosted by: Pacific Gas and Electric Company  Multiple LDCs with legacy metering equipment  Several use Itron 100G technology ◦ Mobile, once-a-month data collection ◦ Meter can store interval data for >30 days ◦ Meter technology could be leverage on fixed-base network, however there are no current plans for upgrade  Technology for capturing interval data is installed on case by case basis ◦ Customers on Interruptible Rate ◦ Large users  Electronic corrector installed on the meter ◦ Pressure and Temperature compensation  Typically data is retrieved once a day ◦ Transmission frequency impacts battery life

480

Best Practices for Utility Incentive Programs - Best Offer Ever  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

March 2012 March 2012 1 Austin's Energy Leadership Best Practices for Utility Incentive Programs - Best Offer Ever Karl R. Rábago Distributed Energy Services Austin Energy February 2012 20 March 2012 2 Society Economy Environment Austin Energy's Mission Statement 20 March 2012 3 Clean Energy for Everyone, Today and Tomorrow. 20 March 2012 4 20 March 2012 5 5 20 March 2012 Best Offer Ever * Austin Energy rebates * Texas Gas Service rebates (if applicable) * Federal tax credits * 0% loan financing Average customer cost $9,000 Austin Energy rebates - $1,400 Amount financed with 0% loan $7,600 Texas Gas Service rebate - $300 Cost after all rebates $7,300 Federal tax credit - $1,500 Customer net cost $5,800 20 March 2012 6 6 20 March 2012 Best Offer Ever Raised Issues in Several

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributing gas utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Solar Valuation in Utility Planning Studies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solar Valuation in Utility Planning Studies Solar Valuation in Utility Planning Studies Title Solar Valuation in Utility Planning Studies Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication 2013 Authors Mills, Andrew D., and Ryan H. Wiser Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, renewable energy: policy Abstract This webinar was presented by the Clean Energy States Alliance and featured Andrew Mills of Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) discussing new research on solar valuation that he and his colleague, Ryan Wiser, have recently published. As renewable technologies mature, recognizing and evaluating their economic value will become increasingly important for justifying their expanded use. In their report, Mills and Wiser used a unique investment and dispatch model to evaluate the changes in the long-run value of variable renewables with increasing penetration levels, based on a case study of California. They found that the value of solar is high at low penetration levels owing to the capacity and energy value of solar, even accounting for an increased need for ancillary services and imperfect forecastability. At higher penetration levels, the marginal value of additional PV and concentrating solar power (CSP) without thermal storage declines, largely due to a decrease in capacity value. The value of CSP with thermal storage remains higher for similar penetration levels owing to the ability to continue to produce energy for hours after the sun goes down. By way of comparison, in California the value of wind at low penetrations is less than the value of solar at low penetrations, but its value is less sensitive to penetration levels. In addition to discussing these findings, Mills reviewed a recent sample of utility planning studies and procurement processes to identify how current practices reflect these drivers of solar's economic value. The LBNL report found that many of the utilities have a framework to capture and evaluate solar's value, but approaches vary widely: only a few studies appear to complement the framework with detailed analysis of key factors such as capacity credits, integration costs, and tradeoffs between distributed and utility-scale photovoltaics. In particular Mills and Wiser found that studies account for the capacity value of solar, though capacity credit estimates with increasing penetration can be improved. Similarly, few planning studies currently reflect the full range of potential benefits from adding thermal storage and/or natural gas augmentation to concentrating solar power plants.

482

Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate $450 Program Info Start Date 01/01/2013 Expiration Date 05/31/2013 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies Provider Natural Gas Savings Program The Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas Natural Gas Savings Programs are offering the following bonus rebates (in addition to the joint utilities bonus rebate). For both offers below, installation must occur from February 1 through May 31, 2013. All paperwork must be received on or before May 31,

483

Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Utilities Electric Utility Rates The Utilities Gateway houses OpenEI's free, community-editable utility rate repository. OpenEI users may browse, edit and add new electric utility rates to OpenEI's repository. EIA provides the authoritative list of utility companies in the United States, and thus OpenEI limits utility rates to companies listed by EIA. 43,031 rates have been contributed for 3,832 EIA-recognized utility companies. Browse rates by zip code Browse rates by utility name Create or edit a rate Number of Utility Companies by State Click on a state to view summaries for that state. See a list of all U.S. utility companies and aliases Utility Rate Database Description The Utility Rate Database (URDB) is a free storehouse of rate structure

484

Kerrville Public Utility Board | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kerrville Public Utility Board Kerrville Public Utility Board Jump to: navigation, search Name Kerrville Public Utility Board Place Texas Utility Id 28604 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location TRE NERC ERCOT Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution